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Sample records for endothelial nos estrogen

  1. Sustained hypertension despite endothelial-specific eNOS rescue in eNOS-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Suvorava, Tatsiana; Stegbauer, Johannes; Thieme, Manuel; Pick, Stephanie; Friedrich, Sebastian; Rump, Lars C; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Kojda, Georg

    2015-03-13

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible contribution of non-endothelial eNOS to the regulation of blood pressure (BP). To accomplish this, a double transgenic strain expressing eNOS exclusively in the vascular endothelium (eNOS-Tg/KO) has been generated by endothelial-specific targeting of bovine eNOS in eNOS-deficient mice (eNOS-KO). Expression of eNOS was evaluated in aorta, myocardium, kidney, brain stem and skeletal muscle. Organ bath studies revealed a complete normalization of aortic reactivity to acetylcholine, phenylephrine and the NO-donors in eNOS-Tg/KO. Function of eNOS in resistance arteries was demonstrated by acute i.v. infusion of acetylcholine and the NOS-inhibitor L-NAME. Acetylcholine decreased mean arterial pressure in all strains but eNOS-KO responded significantly less sensitive as compared eNOS-Tg/KO and C57BL/6. Likewise, acute i.v. L-NAME application elevated mean arterial pressure in C57BL/6 and eNOS-Tg/KO, but not in eNOS-KO. In striking contrast to these findings, mean, systolic and diastolic BP in eNOS-Tg/KO remained significantly elevated and was similar to values of eNOS-KO. Chronic oral treatment with L-NAME increased BP to the level of eNOS-KO only in C57BL/6, but had no effect on hypertension in eNOS-KO and eNOS-Tg/KO. Taken together, functional reconstitution of eNOS in the vasculature of eNOS-KO not even partially lowered BP. These data suggest that the activity of eNOS expressed in non-vascular tissue might play a role in physiologic BP regulation. PMID:25680465

  2. Estrogen Stimulates Homing of Endothelial Progenitor Cells to Endometriotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Rudzitis-Auth, Jeannette; Nenicu, Anca; Nickels, Ruth M; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into microvessels contributes to the vascularization of endometriotic lesions. Herein, we analyzed whether this vasculogenic process is regulated by estrogen. Estrogen- and vehicle-treated human EPCs were analyzed for migration and tube formation. Endometriotic lesions were induced in irradiated FVB/N mice, which were reconstituted with bone marrow from FVB/N-TgN (Tie2/green fluorescent protein) 287 Sato mice. The animals were treated with 100 μg/kg β-estradiol 17-valerate or vehicle (control) over 7 and 28 days. Lesion growth, cyst formation, homing of green fluorescent protein(+)/Tie2(+) EPCs, vascularization, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by high-resolution ultrasonography, caliper measurements, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Numbers of blood circulating EPCs were assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro, estrogen-treated EPCs exhibited a higher migratory and tube-forming capacity when compared with controls. In vivo, numbers of circulating EPCs were not affected by estrogen. However, estrogen significantly increased the number of EPCs incorporated into the lesions' microvasculature, resulting in an improved early vascularization. Estrogen further stimulated the growth of lesions, which exhibited massively dilated glands with a flattened layer of stroma. This was mainly because of an increased glandular secretory activity, whereas cell proliferation and apoptosis were not markedly affected. These findings indicate that vasculogenesis in endometriotic lesions is dependent on estrogen, which adds a novel hormonally regulated mechanism to the complex pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27315780

  3. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 transmits estrogens' effects in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sukocheva, Olga; Wadham, Carol; Gamble, Jennifer; Xia, Pu

    2015-12-01

    We have previously reported that the steroid hormone estrogens stimulate activation of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in breast cancer cells. Both estrogens and S1P are potent biological modulators of endothelial function in vasculature able to activate multiple effectors, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In this study we report that treatment of endothelial cells (ECs) with 17β-estradiol (E2) resulted in a rapid, transient, and dose-dependent increase in SphK activity and increased S1P production. The effect was not reproduced by the inactive E2 analogue 17α-E2. Expression of the dominant-negative mutant SphK1(G82D) or transfection of SphK1-targeted siRNA in ECs caused not only a defect in SphK activation by E2, but also a significant inhibition of E2-induced activation of Akt/eNOS. Furthermore, E2 treatment induced internalization of plasma membrane S1P1 receptor, accompanied with an increase in the amount of cytosolic S1P1. By down-regulating S1P1 receptor expression, the S1P1-specific antisense oligonucleotides significantly inhibited E2-induced activation of Akt/eNOS in ECs. E2-induced EC migration and tube formation were also inhibited by S1P1 down-regulation. Thus, the findings indicate an important role of the SphK1/S1P1 pathway in mediating estrogen signaling and its actions in vasculature.

  4. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells.

  5. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  6. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  7. Melatonin affects the dynamic steady-state equilibrium of estrogen sulfates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by regulating the balance between estrogen sulfatase and sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin is known to reduce the growth of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with estrogen signaling pathways. Estrogens play an important role in breast cancer, but also in various types of tissues, including vascular tissue. Estrogen sulfatase (STS) converts inactive estrogen sulfates into active estrogens, whereas estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) sulfonates estrogens to estrogen sulfates. Therefore, STS and EST are considered to be involved in the regulation of local estrogen levels in hormone‑dependent tumors and in non-pathologic tissues, such as those of the vascular system. Estrogens have a major impact on the vasculature, influencing vascular function, the expression of adhesion proteins, angiogenesis and the inflammatory state. In this study, we investigated the status of STS and EST in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the modulatory effects of melatonin. Both STS and EST were highly expressed in the HUVECs. The enzymatic activity correlated with the expression levels in these cells. Our findings also demonstrated that melatonin, at physiological concentrations, modulated the synthesis and transformation of biologically active estrogens in HUVECs through the inhibition of STS activity and expression, and the stimulation of EST activity and expression. Since melatonin decreased the STS levels and increased the EST levels, it modified the dynamic steady‑state equilibrium of estrogen sulfates by increasing the inactive estrogen levels and decreasing the active estrogen levels. Therefore, melatonin may modulate the known different biological actions of estrogens in endothelial cells, as well as in estrogen-dependent tumors and non-pathologic tissues. PMID:26458420

  8. A Maillard reaction product enhances eNOS activity in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph A; Heiss, Elke H; Schachner, Daniel; Aristei, Yasmin; Severin, Theodor; Dirsch, Verena M

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Although dietary factors can modulate eNOS activity, putative effects of processed food are barely investigated. We aimed to examine whether the model Maillard reaction product 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-1-propyl-4(1H)-pyridone (HMPP), formed from maltol or starch and propylamine, affects the eNOS system. Incubation of EA.hy926 endothelial cells with 30-300 microM HMPP for 18 h enhanced endothelial NO release measured with the fluorescent probe diaminofluorescein-2 and eNOS activity determined by the [14C]L-arginine-[14C]L-citrulline conversion assay. HMPP increased NO production also in two different types of primary human endothelial cells. Protein levels of eNOS and inducible NO synthase remained unaltered by HMPP. HMPP inhibited eNOS activity within the first 2-4 h, whereas it potently increased eNOS activity after 12-24 h. Levels of eNOS phosphorylation, expression of heat-shock protein 90, caveolin-1 and various antioxidant enzymes were not affected. Intracellular reactive oxygen species remained unchanged by HMPP. This is the first study to demonstrate positive effects of a Maillard reaction product on eNOS activity and endothelial NO production, which is considered favourable for cardiovascular protection. PMID:20112298

  9. Isolation and chromosomal localization of the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.J.; Michel, T.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-01-15

    Endothelial NOS activity is a major determinant of vascular tone and blood pressure, and in several important (and sometimes hereditary) disease states, such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, the endothelial NO signaling system appears to be abnormal. To explore the relationship of the endothelial NOS activity, the authors isolated the human gene encoding the endothelial NOS. Genomic clones containing the 5[prime] end of this gene were identified in a human genomic library by applying a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach. Identification of the human gene for endothelial NOS (NOS3) was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the first coding exon, which was found to be identical to its cognate cDNA. The NOS3 gene spans at least 20 kb and appears to contain multiple introns. The transcription start site and promoter region of the NOS3 gene were identified by primer extension and ribonuclease protection assays. Sequencing of the putative promoter revealed consensus sequences for the shear stress-response element, as well as cytokine-responsive cis regulatory sequences, both possible important to the roles played by NOS3 in the normal and the diseased cardiovascular system. The authors also mapped the chromosomal location of the NOS3 gene. First, a chromosomal panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids was screened using PCR with oligonucleotide primers derived from the NOS3 genomic clone. The specificity of the amplified PCR product was confirmed by human and hamster genomic DNA controls, as well as by Southern blot analysis, using the NOS3 cDNA as probe. Definitive chromosomal assignment of the NOS3 gene to human chromosome 7 was based upon 0% discordancy; fluorescence in situ hybridization sublocalized the NOS3 gene to 7q36. The identification and characterization of the NOS3 gene may lead to further insights into heritable disease states associated with this gene product. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Improvement of endothelial dysfunction by selective estrogen receptor-alpha stimulation in ovariectomized SHR.

    PubMed

    Widder, Julian; Pelzer, Theo; von Poser-Klein, Christine; Hu, Kai; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Hegele-Hartung, Christa; Neyses, Ludwig; Bauersachs, Johann

    2003-11-01

    Both known estrogen receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta, are expressed in blood vessels. To gain further insight into the role of ERalpha in a functional setting, we investigated the effect of the novel highly selective ERalpha agonist Cpd1471 on vascular reactivity in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). After ovariectomy or sham operation, 12-week-old female SHR received either 17beta-estradiol (E2, 2 microg/kg body wt per day), the selective ERalpha agonist Cpd1471 (30 microg/kg body wt per day), or placebo. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation was significantly blunted in aortas from ovariectomized rats (Rmax, 53%+/-3% versus sham, 79%+/-2%; P<0.001). Treatment with E2 or Cpd1471 significantly augmented acetylcholine-induced relaxation in ovariectomized rats (Rmax, 70%+/-2%; resp, 73%+/-2%). Endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was not different among the four groups. The contractile response induced by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-l-arginine, an index of basal NO formation, was significantly lower in ovariectomized rats compared with sham-operated animals (53+/-2% versus 77%+/-5%; P<0.01) and was normalized by both E2 (70%+/-2%) and Cpd1471 (70%+/-3%). Aortic endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression and phosphorylation of the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, an index of NO/cGMP-signaling, was reduced in ovariectomized SHR and normalized by E2 and Cpd1471. In SHR after ovariectomy, endothelium-dependent NO-mediated vasorelaxation and eNOS expression are attenuated. The novel selective ERalpha agonist Cpd1471 prevented these pathophysiological changes to a similar extent as E2. Thus, the pharmacological principle of selective ERalpha activation mediates positive vascular effects.

  11. Central Role of eNOS in the Maintenance of Endothelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Kelm, Malte

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Disruption of endothelial function is considered a key event in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is a central regulator of cellular function that is important to maintain endothelial homeostasis. Recent Advances: Endothelial homeostasis encompasses acute responses such as adaption of flow to tissue's demand and more sustained responses to injury such as re-endothelialization and sprouting of endothelial cells (ECs) and attraction of circulating angiogenic cells (CAC), both of which support repair of damaged endothelium. The balance and the intensity of endothelial damage and repair might be reflected by changes in circulating endothelial microparticles (EMP) and CAC. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) is a generally accepted clinical read-out of NO-dependent vasodilation, whereas EMP are upcoming prognostically validated markers of endothelial injury and CAC are reflective of the regenerative capacity with both expressing a functional eNOS. These markers can be integrated in a clinical endothelial phenotype, reflecting the net result between damage from risk factors and endogenous repair capacity with NO representing a central signaling molecule. Critical Issues: Improvements of reproducibility and observer independence of FMD measurements and definitions of relevant EMP and CAC subpopulations warrant further research. Future Directions: Endothelial homeostasis may be a clinical therapeutic target for cardiovascular health maintenance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1230–1242. PMID:25330054

  12. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Kulakov, Larissa; Opländer, Christian; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria; Kröncke, Klaus-D; Suschek, Christoph V

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein) and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation.

  13. Arginase inhibition restores NOS coupling and reverses endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffness in old rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Bugaj, Lukasz J.; Oh, Young Jun; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Soucy, Kevin G.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Webb, Alanah; Camara, Andre; Sikka, Gautam; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A.; Ilies, Monica; Christianson, David W.; Champion, Hunter C.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that upregulation of arginase contributes to impaired endothelial function in aging. In this study, we demonstrate that arginase upregulation leads to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and that in vivo chronic inhibition of arginase restores nitroso-redox balance, improves endothelial function, and increases vascular compliance in old rats. Arginase activity in old rats was significantly increased compared with that shown in young rats. Old rats had significantly lower nitric oxide (NO) and higher superoxide (O2−) production than young. Acute inhibition of both NOS, with NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and arginase, with 2(S)-amino- 6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH), significantly reduced O2− production in old rats but not in young. In addition, the ratio of eNOS dimer to monomer in old rats was significantly decreased compared with that shown in young rats. These results suggest that eNOS was uncoupled in old rats. Although the expression of arginase 1 and eNOS was similar in young and old rats, inducible NOS (iNOS) was significantly upregulated. Furthermore, S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 was significantly elevated in old rats. These findings support our previously published finding that iNOS nitrosylates and activates arginase 1 (Santhanam et al., Circ Res 101: 692–702, 2007). Chronic arginase inhibition in old rats preserved eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratio and significantly reduced O2− production and enhanced endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation to ACh. In addition, ABH significantly reduced vascular stiffness in old rats. These data indicate that iNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 and the increase in arginase activity lead to eNOS uncoupling, contributing to the nitroso-redox imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular stiffness observed in vascular aging. We suggest that arginase is a viable target for therapy in age-dependent vascular stiffness. PMID:19661445

  14. ER Alpha Rapid Signaling Is Required for Estrogen Induced Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Ueda, Kazutaka; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Diomede, Olga I.; Andrade, Tiffany; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen promotes the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which likely underlies its ability to accelerate re-endothelialization and reduce adverse remodeling after vascular injury. In previous studies, we have shown that the protective effects of E2 (the active endogenous form of estrogen) in vascular injury require the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). ERα transduces the effects of estrogen via a classical DNA binding, “genomic” signaling pathway and via a more recently-described “rapid” signaling pathway that is mediated by a subset of ERα localized to the cell membrane. However, which of these pathways mediates the effects of estrogen on endothelial cells is poorly understood. Here we identify a triple point mutant version of ERα (KRR ERα) that is specifically defective in rapid signaling, but is competent to regulate transcription through the “genomic” pathway. We find that in ECs expressing wild type ERα, E2 regulates many genes involved in cell migration and proliferation, promotes EC migration and proliferation, and also blocks the adhesion of monocytes to ECs. ECs expressing KRR mutant ERα, however, lack all of these responses. These observations establish KRR ERα as a novel tool that could greatly facilitate future studies into the vascular and non-vascular functions of ERα rapid signaling. Further, they support that rapid signaling through ERα is essential for many of the transcriptional and physiological responses of ECs to E2, and that ERα rapid signaling in ECs, in vivo, may be critical for the vasculoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen. PMID:27035664

  15. Augmentation of platelet and endothelial cell eNOS activity decreases sepsis-related neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raymond; Kirschenbaum, Linda A; LaRow, Catherine; Berna, Gioiamaria; Griffin, Kelly; Astiz, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    NO is an important mediator of microvascular patency and blood flow. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of enhanced eNOS activity in attenuating sepsis-induced neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions. Microslides coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with plasma from patients with septic shock. Neutrophil and platelets from control subjects were also stimulated with plasma from patients in septic shock and perfused over stimulated endothelial cells. l-Arginine (LA) with and without NG-monomethyl l-arginine (LNMMA), a nonselective NOS inhibitor, and N-(3-(aminomethyl) benzyl acetamide) ethanimidamide dihydrochloride (1400W), a highly selective iNOS inhibitor, were added to the septic plasma. The number of neutrophils adherent to endothelial cells, neutrophil rolling velocity, and the number of neutrophil aggregates were determined. Cell activation and the formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates were assessed by flow cytometry. Separate experiments were done with isolated platelets using platelet aggregometry. l-Arginine significantly decreased sepsis-related neutrophil adhesion and aggregation and increased rolling velocity. The addition of LNMMA to LA and cell suspensions reversed the effects of LA on these parameters, whereas the addition of 1400W had no effect on LA-related changes. Platelet-neutrophil aggregation, platelet aggregation, platelet activation, and neutrophil activation induced by septic plasma were also significantly decreased by LA. Again, the addition of LNMMA reversed the effects of LA on these parameters, whereas 1400W had no effect on LA-related changes. These data suggest that enhancement of platelet and endothelial cell eNOS activity decreases sepsis-induced neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions and may play a role in maintaining microvascular patency in septic shock.

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase: From biochemistry and gene structure to clinical implications of NOS3 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-01-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important vasodilator with a well-established role in cardiovascular homeostasis. While mediator is synthesized from L-arginine by neuronal, endothelial, and inducible nitric oxide synthases (NOS1,NOS3 and NOS2 respectively), NOS3 is the most important isoform for NO formation in the cardiovascular system. NOS3 is a dimeric enzyme whose expression and activity are regulated at transcriptional, posttranscriptional,and posttranslational levels. The NOS3 gene, which encodes NOS3, exhibits a number of polymorphic sites including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs), microsatellites, and insertions/deletions. Some NOS3 polymorphisms show functional effects on NOS3 expression or activity, thereby affecting NO formation. Interestingly, many studies have evaluated the effects of functional NOS3 polymorphisms on disease susceptibility and drug responses. Moreover, some studies have investigated how NOS3 haplotypes may impact endogenous NO formation and disease susceptibility. In this article,we carried out a comprehensive review to provide a basic understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in NOS3 regulation and how genetic variations in NOS3 may translate into relevant clinical and pharmacogenetic implications. PMID:26428312

  17. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase: From biochemistry and gene structure to clinical implications of NOS3 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-01-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important vasodilator with a well-established role in cardiovascular homeostasis. While mediator is synthesized from L-arginine by neuronal, endothelial, and inducible nitric oxide synthases (NOS1,NOS3 and NOS2 respectively), NOS3 is the most important isoform for NO formation in the cardiovascular system. NOS3 is a dimeric enzyme whose expression and activity are regulated at transcriptional, posttranscriptional,and posttranslational levels. The NOS3 gene, which encodes NOS3, exhibits a number of polymorphic sites including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs), microsatellites, and insertions/deletions. Some NOS3 polymorphisms show functional effects on NOS3 expression or activity, thereby affecting NO formation. Interestingly, many studies have evaluated the effects of functional NOS3 polymorphisms on disease susceptibility and drug responses. Moreover, some studies have investigated how NOS3 haplotypes may impact endogenous NO formation and disease susceptibility. In this article,we carried out a comprehensive review to provide a basic understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in NOS3 regulation and how genetic variations in NOS3 may translate into relevant clinical and pharmacogenetic implications.

  18. Dietary soy isoflavone induced increases in antioxidant and eNOS gene expression lead to improved endothelial function and reduced blood pressure in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mahn, Katharina; Borrás, Consuelo; Knock, Greg A; Taylor, Paul; Khan, Imran Y; Sugden, David; Poston, Lucilla; Ward, Jeremy P T; Sharpe, Richard M; Viña, Jose; Aaronson, Philip I; Mann, Giovanni E

    2005-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that populations consuming large amounts of soy protein have a reduced incidence of coronary heart disease (1-5). The cardiovascular risks associated with conventional hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women (5-7) have precipitated a search for alternative estrogen receptor modulators. Here we report that long-term feeding of rats with a soy protein-rich (SP) diet during gestation and adult life results in decreased oxidative stress, improved endothelial function, and reduced blood pressure in vivo measured by radiotelemetry in aged male offspring. Improved vascular reactivity in animals fed an SP diet was paralleled by increased mitochondrial glutathione and mRNA levels for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the antioxidant enzymes manganese superoxide dismutase and cytochrome c oxidase. Reduced eNOS and antioxidant gene expression, impaired endothelial function, and elevated blood pressure in animals fed a soy-deficient diet was reversed after refeeding them an SP diet for 6 months. Our findings suggest that an SP diet increases eNOS and antioxidant gene expression in the vasculature and other tissues, resulting in reduced oxidative stress and increased NO bioavailability. The improvement in endothelial function, increased gene expression, and reduced blood pressure by soy isoflavones have implications for alternative therapy for postmenopausal women and patients at risk of coronary heart disease.

  19. C. pneumoniae disrupts eNOS trafficking and impairs NO production in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Konrad E; Wolf, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) generated NO plays a crucial physiological role in the regulation of vascular tone. eNOS is a constitutively expressed synthase whose enzymatic function is regulated by dual acylation, phosphorylation, protein-protein interaction and subcellular localization. In endothelial cells, the enzyme is primarily localized to the Golgi apparatus (GA) and the plasma membrane where it binds to caveolin-1. Upon stimulation, the enzyme is translocated from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm where it generates NO. When activation of eNOS ceases, the majority of the enzyme is recycled back to the membrane fraction. An inability of eNOS to cycle between the cytosol and the membrane leads to impaired NO production and vascular dysfunction. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that primarily infects epithelial cells of the human respiratory tract, but unlike any other chlamydial species, C. pneumoniae displays tropism toward atherosclerotic tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that C. pneumoniae inclusions colocalize with eNOS, and the microorganism interferes with trafficking of the enzyme from the GA to the plasma membrane in primary human aortic endothelial cells. This mislocation of eNOS results in significant inhibition of NO release by C. pneumoniae-infected cells. Furthermore, we show that the distribution of eNOS in C. pneumoniae-infected cells is altered due to an intimate association of the Golgi complex with chlamydial inclusions rather than by direct interaction of the enzyme with the chlamydial inclusion membrane.

  20. Prunella vulgaris L. Upregulates eNOS expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ning; Bollinger, Larissa; Steinkamp-Fenske, Katja; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2010-01-01

    The purported effects of "circulation-improving" herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) show striking similarities with the vascular actions of nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). We have previously reported that Salviae miltiorrhizae radix and Zizyphi spinosae semen upregulate eNOS expression. In the present study, we studied the effect on eNOS gene expression of 15 Chinese herbs with potential effects on the vasculature, and identified Prunella vulgaris L. (PVL) (flowering spike) as a potent eNOS-upregulating agent. In EA.hy 926 cells, a cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), an aqueous extract of PVL increased eNOS promoter activity, eNOS mRNA and protein expressions, as well as NO production in concentration- and time-dependent manners. We have previously shown that ursolic acid (a constituent of Salviae miltiorrhizae radix), betulinic acid (a compound present in Zizyphi spinosae semen), luteolin and cynaroside (ingredients of artichoke, Cynara scolymus L.) are capable of enhancing eNOS gene expression. These compounds are also present in significant quantities in PVL. Thus, PVL contains active principles that stimulate human eNOS gene expression, and such compounds may have therapeutic potential against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20503475

  1. Coronary vascular and aortic endothelial permeability during estrogen therapy: a study in DOCA-salt hypertensive ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, M; Nematbakhsh, M

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major source of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. Premenopausal and estrogen-treated postmenopausal women have a lower incidence of CVD. It has been suggested that circulating endogenous estrogens are probably responsible for this protection. This study investigated the hypothesis that the reduction of endothelial permeability is responsible for cardioprotective effects of estrogen in hypertensive animals. Fourty-four rats were ovariectomized and divided into five groups: groups 1, 2 and 4 received DOCA-salt and groups 3 and 5 received normal saline (N/S) injection for four weeks. Then, in groups 4 and 5 the blood pressure was measured. Group 1 received estradiol valerate and in groups 2 and 3 continued with DOCA-salt and N/S injection for six weeks, respectively. Endothelial permeability was measured by Evans Blue extraction method. There was no significant difference in endothelial permeability in coronary circulation in estrogen-treated group and controls (12.97+/-2.32 vs. 9.96+/-1.01, respectively). Also, aortic endothelial permeability in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats did not change significantly after estrogen treatment (28.34+/-3.65 vs. 41.60+/-5.98). This study showed that the cardioprotective effects of estrogen in DOCA-salt hypertensive animals are not mediated by a reduction of endothelial permeability.

  2. Disrupted NOS signaling in lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to chronically increased pulmonary lymph flow.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sanjeev A; Gong, Wenhui; He, Youping; Johengen, Michael; Kameny, Rebecca J; Raff, Gary W; Maltepe, Emin; Oishi, Peter E; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Associated abnormalities of the lymphatic circulation are well described in congenital heart disease. However, their mechanisms remain poorly elucidated. Using a clinically relevant ovine model of a congenital cardiac defect with chronically increased pulmonary blood flow (shunt), we previously demonstrated that exposure to chronically elevated pulmonary lymph flow is associated with: 1) decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) in pulmonary lymph; and 2) attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxation of thoracic duct rings, suggesting disrupted lymphatic endothelial NO signaling in shunt lambs. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this altered NO signaling, primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were isolated from the efferent lymphatic of the caudal mediastinal node in 4-wk-old control and shunt lambs. We found that shunt LECs (n = 3) had decreased bioavailable NO and decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and protein expression compared with control LECs (n = 3). eNOS activity was also low in shunt LECs, but, interestingly, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and activity were increased in shunt LECs, as were total cellular nitration, including eNOS-specific nitration, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pharmacological inhibition of iNOS reduced ROS in shunt LECs to levels measured in control LECs. These data support the conclusion that NOS signaling is disrupted in the lymphatic endothelium of lambs exposed to chronically increased pulmonary blood and lymph flow and may contribute to decreased pulmonary lymphatic bioavailable NO.

  3. Induction of endothelial iNOS by 4-hydroxyhexenal through NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Je, J H; Jung, K J; Yu, B P; Chung, H Y

    2004-08-15

    Lipid peroxidation and its end-product, 4-hydroxyhexenal (HHE), are known to affect redox balance during aging, which causes various degenerative processes including vascular alterations from endothelial cell deterioration. To better understand the molecular action of HHE in the development of vascular abnormalities during the aging process, we investigated whether the upregulation of inducible endothelial nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by HHE is mediated through nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Results indicate that HHE stimulates iNOS by the transcriptional regulation of NF-kappaB activation through cytosolic kappaB degradation inhibitors (IkappaB). Pretreatment with NF-kappaB inhibitors Bay 11-7082 and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) suppressed the upregulation of iNOS by blunting IkappaB degradation and NF-kappaB binding activity. Because inflammatory stimuli induce iNOS to generate large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), intracellular NO levels in the presence of Bay 11-7082, NAC, and caffeic acid methyl ester were estimated. These inhibitors significantly suppressed the HHE-induced NO levels to a basal level. These findings strongly suggest that in endothelial cells, HHE induces iNOS gene expression through NF-kappaB activation, which can lead to vascular dysfunction by the activation of various proinflammatory genes.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of the human iNOS gene by IL-1beta in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kolyada, A. Y.; Madias, N. E.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelium participates in the control of vascular tone and function via the release of nitric oxide (NO) by the endothelial-type NO synthase (eNOS). Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in endothelial cells occurs in many clinical conditions following induction by lipopolysaccharide or cytokines and generates large quantities of NO that result in endothelial cell activation and dysfunction. No information exists on the transcriptional regulation of the human iNOS gene (or that of other species) in endothelial cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the transcriptional regulation of the human iNOS gene by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PVEC) by transient cotransfections of different iNOS-promoter constructs and cDNA of different transcription factors and regulatory proteins. RESULTS: The -1034/+88 bp iNOS promoter was strongly induced by IL-1beta, the regulatory elements for such induction being localized downstream of -205 bp. Cotransfection experiments with NF-kappaB isoforms, IkappaB isoforms, and IKK mutants suggested that the NF-kappaB site at -115/-106 bp is important, but not sufficient, for induction of iNOS promoter and that the role of NF-kappaB is partially independent of its binding site. C/EBP sites within the -205/+88 bp region were shown to be responsible, along with NF-kappaB site, for induction of iNOS promoter by IL-1beta. Overexpression of C/EBPalpha, C/EBPdelta, and liver-enriched activator protein (LAP) activated the promoter, whereas overexpression of liver-enriched inhibitory protein (LIP) strongly suppressed it. C/EBPbeta (LAP and LIP isoforms) was constitutively present in PVEC and was induced (approximately 2-fold) by IL-1beta, whereas C/EBPdelta was not constitutively expressed but was strongly induced by IL-1beta. Both C/EBPbeta and C/EBPdelta participated in DNA-protein complex formation. CONCLUSION: Both NF-kappaB and C/EBP pathways are important for the

  5. Estradiol induces endothelial cell migration and proliferation through estrogen receptor-enhanced RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Pilar J; Sobrino, Agua; Laguna-Fernandez, Andrés; Novella, Susana; Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel-Angel; Sanchís, Juan; Cano, Antonio; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2011-03-30

    Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are involved in re-endothelialization and angiogenesis, two important cardiovascular processes that are increased in response to estrogens. RhoA, a small GTPase which controls multiple cellular processes, is involved in the control of cell migration and proliferation. Our aim was to study the role of RhoA on estradiol-induced migration and proliferation and its dependence on estrogen receptors activity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with estradiol, in the presence or absence of ICI 182780 (estrogen receptors antagonist) and Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor). Estradiol increased Rho GEF-1 gene expression and RhoA (gene and protein expression and activity) in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. Cell migration, stress fiber formation and cell proliferation were increased in response to estradiol and were also dependent on the estrogen receptors and RhoA activation. Estradiol decreased p27 levels, and significantly raised the expression of cyclins and CDK. These effects were counteracted by the use of either ICI 182780 or Y-27632. In conclusion, estradiol enhances the RhoA/ROCK pathway and increases cell cycle-related protein expression by acting through estrogen receptors. This results in an enhanced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells.

  6. Role of PECAM-1 in the shear-stress-induced activation of Akt and the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Fisslthaler, Beate; Dixit, Madhulika; Busse, Rudi

    2005-09-15

    The application of fluid shear stress to endothelial cells elicits the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and phosphorylation of the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Shear stress also elicits the enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of endothelial proteins, especially of those situated in the vicinity of cell-cell contacts. Since a major constituent of these endothelial cell-cell contacts is the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) we assessed the role of PECAM-1 in the activation of eNOS. In human endothelial cells, shear stress induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and enhanced the association of PECAM-1 with eNOS. Endothelial cell stimulation with shear stress elicited the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS as well as of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). While the shear-stress-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 as well as the serine phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were abolished by the pre-treatment of cells with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP1 the phosphorylation of AMPK was unaffected. Down-regulation of PECAM-1 using a siRNA approach attenuated the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS, as well as the shear-stress-induced accumulation of cyclic GMP levels while the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of AMPK remained intact. A comparable attenuation of Akt and eNOS (but not AMPK) phosphorylation and NO production was also observed in endothelial cells generated from PECAM-1-deficient mice. These data indicate that the shear-stress-induced activation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells is modulated by the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 whereas the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of AMPK is controlled by an alternative signaling pathway. PMID:16118242

  7. Tetrahydrobiopterin improves endothelial function and decreases arterial stiffness in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Meditz, Amie; Deane, Kevin D.; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms mediating arterial stiffening with aging and menopause are not completely understood. We determined whether administration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a critical cofactor for endothelial nitric oxide synthase to produce nitric oxide, would increase vascular endothelial-dependent vasodilatory tone and decrease arterial stiffness in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women. Additionally, we examined whether the beneficial effects of estrogen on vascular function were possibly related to BH4. Arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance) and endothelial-dependent vasodilation [brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] were measured in postmenopausal (n = 24; 57 ± 1 yr, mean ± SE) and eumenorrheic premenopausal (n = 9; 33 ± 2 yr) women before and 3 h after the oral administration of BH4. Subsequently, in postmenopausal women, vascular testing (before and after BH4) was repeated following randomization to either 2 days of transdermal estradiol or placebo. Baseline carotid artery compliance and brachial artery FMD were lower in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women (P < 0.0001). BH4 administration increased carotid artery compliance (0.61 ± 0.05 to 0.73 ± 0.04 mm2·mmHg−1·10−1 vs. baseline, P < 0.0001) and brachial artery FMD (P < 0.001) in postmenopausal women but had no effect in premenopausal women (P = 0.62). Carotid artery compliance (0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.78 ± 0.06 mm2·mmHg−1·10−1, P < 0.001) and FMD increased in postmenopausal women in response to estradiol (P = 0.02) but were not further improved with the coadministration of BH4, possibly because estrogen increased BH4 bioavailability. Carotid artery compliance and FMD increased with BH4 in the placebo group (P = 0.02). Although speculative, these results suggest that reduced vascular BH4 may be an important contributor to arterial stiffening in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women, related in part to reduced endothelial-dependent vasodilatory tone. PMID:22245769

  8. Polymorphisms in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) predict sunitinib-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eechoute, K; van der Veldt, A A M; Oosting, S; Kappers, M H W; Wessels, J A M; Gelderblom, H; Guchelaar, H-J; Reyners, A K L; van Herpen, C M L; Haanen, J B; Mathijssen, R H J; Boven, E

    2012-10-01

    Hypertension is an important side effect of sunitinib treatment. In a retrospective study in 255 patients, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, endothelin-1 (ET-1), and endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were multivariately tested against hypertension grades and changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean arterial BP (MAP). Next, the association between hypertension and survival in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) was studied. Greater elevations in SBP and MAP were associated with the presence of a haplotype in VEGFA (P = 0.014 and P = 0.036, respectively). The tendency to develop grade 3 hypertension was associated with this haplotype and also with a SNP in eNOS (P = 0.031 and P = 0.045, respectively). In mRCC patients, sunitinib-induced hypertension was found to confer a survival benefit, with the mean overall survival being prolonged by 7.2 months (P = 0.035 and P = 0.026 for SBP and DBP elevations, respectively). Genetic polymorphisms in VEGFA and eNOS independently predict rise in BP and/or development of severe hypertension in sunitinib-treated patients. Grade 3 hypertension was found to be an independent factor for overall survival in patients with mRCC. PMID:22948895

  9. (−)-Epicatechin activation of endothelial cell eNOS, NO and related signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Maya, Lisandro; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that (−)-epicatechin can exert cardioprotective actions, which may involve eNOS-mediated nitric oxide production in endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which (−)-epicatechin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we proposed to identify the intracellular pathways involved in (−)-epicatechin-induced effects on eNOS, utilizing human coronary artery endothelial cells in culture. Treatment of cells with (−)-epicatechin leads to time- and dose-dependent effects, which peaked at 10 min at 1 μmol/L. (−)-Epicatechin treatment activates eNOS via serine-633 and serine-1177 phosphorylation and threonine-495 dephosphorylation. Using specific inhibitors, we have established the participation of the PI3K pathway in eNOS activation. (−)-Epicatechin induces eNOS uncoupling from caveolin-1 and its association with calmodulin-1, suggesting the involvement of intracellular calcium. These results allowed us to propose that (−) epicatechin effects may be dependent on actions exerted at the cell membrane level. To test this hypothesis, cells were treated with the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, which blocked (−)-epicatechin-induced eNOS activation. We also demonstrated inositol phosphate accumulation in (−)-epicatechin-treated cells. The inhibitory effects of the pre-incubation of cells with the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 indicate that (−)-epicatechin-induced eNOS activation is at least partially mediated via the Ca2+/CaMKII pathway. The (−)-epicatechin stereoisomer catechin was only able to partially stimulate nitric oxide production in cells. Altogether, these results strongly suggest the presence of a cell surface acceptor-effector for the cacao flavanol (−)-epicatechin, which may mediate its cardiovascular effects. PMID:20404222

  10. Endothelial Function and Insulin Resistance in Early Postmenopausal Women with Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Importance of ESR1 and NOS3 Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Clapauch, Ruth; Mourão, André Felipe; Mecenas, Anete S.; Maranhão, Priscila A.; Rossini, Ana; Bouskela, Eliete

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular benefits from estradiol activation of nitric oxide endothelial production may depend on vascular wall and on estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) polymorphisms. We have evaluated the microcirculation in vivo through nailfold videocapillaroscopy, before and after acute nasal estradiol administration at baseline and after increased sheer stress (postocclusive reactive hyperemia response) in 100 postmenopausal women, being 70 controls (healthy) and 30 simultaneously hypertensive and diabetic (HD), correlating their responses to PvuII and XbaI ESR1 polymorphisms and to VNTR, T-786C and G894T NOS3 variants. In HD women, C variant allele of ESR1 Pvull was associated to higher vasodilatation after estradiol (1.72 vs 1.64 mm/s, p = 0.01 compared to TT homozygotes) while G894T and T-786C NOS3 polymorphisms were connected to lower increment after shear stress (15% among wild type and 10% among variant alleles, p = 0.02 and 0.04). The G variant allele of ESR1 XbaI polymorphism was associated to higher HOMA-IR (3.54 vs. 1.64, p = 0.01) in HD and higher glucose levels in healthy women (91.8 vs. 87.1 mg/dl, p = 0.01), in which increased waist and HOMA-IR were also related to the G allele in NOS3 G894T (waist 93.5 vs 88.2 cm, p = 0.02; HOMA-IR 2.89 vs 1.48, p = 0.05). ESR1 Pvull, NOS3 G894T and T-786C polymorphism analysis may be considered in HD postmenopausal women for endothelial response prediction following estrogen therapy but were not discriminatory for endothelial response in healthy women. ESR1 XbaI and G894T NOS3 polymorphisms may be useful in accessing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes risks in all women, even before menopause and occurrence of metabolic disease. PMID:25077953

  11. (−)-Epicatechin induces calcium and translocation independent eNOS activation in arterial endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Maya, Lisandro; Ceballos, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    The consumption of cacao-derived (i.e., cocoa) products provides beneficial cardiovascular effects in healthy subjects as well as individuals with endothelial dysfunction such as smokers, diabetics, and postmenopausal women. The vascular actions of cocoa are related to enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production. These actions can be reproduced by the administration of the cacao flavanol (−)-epicatechin (EPI). To further understand the mechanisms behind the vascular action of EPI, we investigated the effects of Ca2+ depletion on endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) activation/phosphorylation and translocation. Human coronary artery endothelial cells were treated with EPI or with bradykinin (BK), a well-known Ca2+-dependent eNOS activator. Results demonstrate that both EPI and BK induce increases in intracellular calcium and NO levels. However, under Ca2+-free conditions, EPI (but not BK) is still capable of inducing NO production through eNOS phosphorylation at serine 615, 633, and 1177. Interestingly, EPI-induced translocation of eNOS from the plasmalemma was abolished upon Ca2+ depletion. Thus, under Ca2+-free conditions, EPI can stimulate NO synthesis independent of calmodulin binding to eNOS and of its translocation into the cytoplasm. We also examined the effect of EPI on the NO/cGMP/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) pathway activation in isolated Ca2+-deprived canine mesenteric arteries. Results demonstrate that under these conditions, EPI induces the activation of this vasorelaxation-related pathway and that this effect is inhibited by pretreatment with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, suggesting a functional relevance for this phenomenon. PMID:21209365

  12. Ginsenoside Rg3 increases nitric oxide production via increases in phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: Essential roles of estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Thi; Kim, Nak Doo; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Oh, Seok Jeong; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-08-01

    We previously showed that ginsenosides increase nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular endothelium and that ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) is the most active one among ginseng saponins. However, the mechanism for Rg3-mediated nitric oxide production is still uncertain. In this study, we determined whether Rg3 affects phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECV 304 human endothelial cells. Rg3 increased both the phosphorylation and the expression of eNOS in a concentration-dependent manner and a maximal effect was found at 10 {mu}g/ml of Rg3. The enzyme activities of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase were enhanced as were estrogen receptor (ER)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent reporter gene transcriptions in Rg3-treated endothelial cells. Rg3-induced eNOS phosphorylation required the ER-mediated PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Moreover, Rg3 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through up-regulation of CaM kinase II and Rg3-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was reversed by AMPK inhibition. The present results provide a mechanism for Rg3-stimulated endothelial NO production.

  13. Different expression of NOS isoforms in early endothelial progenitor cells derived from peripheral and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Muscari, Claudio; Gamberini, Chiara; Carboni, Marco; Basile, Ilaria; Farruggia, Giovanna; Bonafè, Francesca; Giordano, Emanuele; Caldarera, Claudio Marcello; Guarnieri, Carlo

    2007-11-01

    Cord blood and peripheral-adult blood were compared as different sources of early endothelial precursor cells (eEPCs). Total mononuclear cells (MNCs) were obtained from both blood types and committed to eEPCs by exposure to fibronectin, VEGF, IGF-I, and bFGF. Under this condition, MNCs seeded at the density of 3 x 10(5) cells/cm(2) assumed a spindle shape, which was indicative of developing eEPCs, and expanded in a similar manner irrespective to the blood sources. Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-1) and acetylated low density lipoprotein (acLDL) double staining was present in 90% in both peripheral- and cord-blood eEPCs after 2-week expansion. Also, the ability of eEPCs to form tubule-like structures in Matrigel was independent of their blood source, but dependent on the presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). eNOS and nNOS were not detectable by Western blotting in both peripheral and cord-blood eEPCs upon 3 weeks and their mRNA levels were lower than 2% relative to those present in HUVECs. On the contrary, iNOS protein was detectable in peripheral-blood eEPCs, but not in cord-blood eEPCs and HUVECs, as well as iNOS mRNA was more concentrated in peripheral-blood eEPCs than in cord-blood eEPCs and HUVECs. These data suggest that: (a) peripheral and cord blood can be considered comparable sources of eEPCs when they are expanded and differentiated in a short-term period; (b) the extremely low expression of constitutive NOS isoforms in the eEPCs of both blood types should markedly reduce their ability to regulate NO-dependent vasorelaxation; (c) the presence of iNOS in peripheral-blood eEPCs could improve the process of vasculogenesis.

  14. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  15. Ambient ultrafine particles reduce endothelial nitric oxide production via S-glutathionylation of eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunfeng; Navab, Mohamad; Shen, Melody; Hill, James; Pakbin, Payam; Sioutas, Constantinos; Hsiai, Tzung; Li, Rongsong

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate pollutants is intimately linked to vascular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses with clinical relevance to atherosclerosis. Particulate matter (PM) has been reported to induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we tested whether ambient ultrafine particles (UFP, diameter < 200 nm) modulate eNOS activity in terms of nitric oxide (NO) production via protein S-glutathionylation. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) with UFP significantly reduced NO production. UFP-mediated reduction in NO production was restored in the presence of JNK inhibitor (SP600125), NADPH oxidase inhibitor (Apocynin), anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine), and superoxide dismutase mimetics (Tempol and MnTMPyP). UFP exposure increased the GSSG/GSH ratio and eNOS S-glutathionylation, whereas over-expression of Glutaredoxin-1 (to inhibit S-glutathionylation) restored UFP-mediated reduction in NO production by nearly 80%. Thus, our findings suggest that eNOS S-glutathionylation is a potential mechanism underlying ambient UFP-induced reduction of NO production. PMID:23751346

  16. Glutathionylation Mediates Angiotensin II–Induced eNOS Uncoupling, Amplifying NADPH Oxidase‐Dependent Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia‐Chi; Gentile, Carmine; Kok, Cindy; Nunez, Andrea; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A. S.; Davies, Michael J.; Hawkins, Clare L.; Rasmussen, Helge H.; Figtree, Gemma A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathionylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) “uncouples” the enzyme, switching its function from nitric oxide (NO) to O2•− generation. We examined whether this reversible redox modification plays a role in angiotensin II (Ang II)‐induced endothelial dysfunction. Methods and Results Ang II increased eNOS glutathionylation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), rabbit aorta, and human arteries in vitro. This was associated with decreased NO bioavailability and eNOS activity as well as increased O2•− generation. Ang II‐induced decrease in eNOS activity was mediated by glutathionylation, as shown by restoration of function by glutaredoxin‐1. Moreover, Ang II‐induced increase in O2•− and decrease in NO were abolished in HUVECs transiently transfected, with mutant eNOS rendered resistant to glutathionylation. Ang II effects were nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase dependent because preincubation with gp 91ds‐tat, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, abolished the increase in eNOS glutathionylation and loss of eNOS activity. Functional significance of glutathionylation in intact vessels was supported by Ang II‐induced impairment of endothelium‐dependent vasorelaxation that was abolished by the disulfide reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Furthermore, attenuation of Ang II signaling in vivo by administration of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor reduced eNOS glutathionylation, increased NO, diminished O2•−, improved endothelium‐dependent vasorelaxation and reduced blood pressure. Conclusions Uncoupling of eNOS by glutathionylation is a key mediator of Ang II‐induced endothelial dysfunction, and its reversal is a mechanism for cardiovascular protection by ACE inhibition. We suggest that Ang II‐induced O2•− generation in endothelial cells, although dependent on NADPH oxidase, is amplified by glutathionylation‐dependent eNOS uncoupling. PMID:24755153

  17. Protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial dysfunction in resistance and conduit vasculature of iNOS knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, S D; Seggara, G; Vo, P A; Macallister, R J; Hobbs, A J; Ahluwalia, A

    2003-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic of, and may be pathogenic in, inflammatory cardiovascular diseases, including sepsis. The mechanism underlying inflammation-induced endothelial dysfunction may be related to the expression and activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). This possibility was investigated in isolated resistance (mesenteric) and conduit (aorta) arteries taken from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated (12.5 mg/kg i.v.) or saline-treated iNOS knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. LPS pretreatment (for 15 h, but not 4 h) profoundly suppressed responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and significantly reduced sensitivity to the NO donor spermine-NONOate (SPER-NO) in aorta and mesenteric arteries of WT mice. This effect was temporally associated with iNOS protein expression in both conduit and resistance arteries and with a 10-fold increase in plasma NOx levels. In contrast, no elevation of plasma NOx was observed in LPS-treated iNOS KO animals, and arteries dissected from these animals did not express iNOS or display hyporeactivity to ACh or SPER-NO. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon may be suppression of eNOS expression, as observed in arteries of WT animals, that was absent in arteries of iNOS KO animals. These results clearly demonstrate that iNOS induction plays an integral role in mediation of the endothelial dysfunction associated with sepsis in both resistance and conduit arteries.

  18. Reversal of SIN-1-induced eNOS dysfunction by the spin trap, DMPO, in bovine aortic endothelial cells via eNOS phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amlan; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Druhan, Lawrence J; Wang, Tse-Yao; De Pascali, Francesco; Rockenbauer, Antal; Racoma, Ira; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Zweier, Jay L; Cardounel, Arturo J; Villamena, Frederick A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nitric oxide (NO) derived from eNOS is mostly responsible for the maintenance of vascular homeostasis and its decreased bioavailability is characteristic of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED). Because 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), a commonly used spin trap, can control intracellular nitroso-redox balance by scavenging ROS and donating NO, it was employed as a cardioprotective agent against ED but the mechanism of its protection is still not clear. This study elucidated the mechanism of protection by DMPO against SIN-1-induced oxidative injury to bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Experimental Approach BAEC were treated with SIN-1, as a source of peroxynitrite anion (ONOO−), and then incubated with DMPO. Cytotoxicity following SIN-1 alone and cytoprotection by adding DMPO was assessed by MTT assay. Levels of ROS and NO generation from HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type and mutant eNOS cDNAs, tetrahydrobiopterin bioavailability, eNOS activity, eNOS and Akt kinase phosphorylation were measured. Key Results Post-treatment of cells with DMPO attenuated SIN-1-mediated cytotoxicity and ROS generation, restoration of NO levels via increased in eNOS activity and phospho-eNOS levels. Treatment with DMPO alone significantly increased NO levels and induced phosphorylation of eNOS Ser1179 via Akt kinase. Transfection studies with wild-type and mutant human eNOS confirmed the dual role of eNOS as a producer of superoxide anion (O2−) with SIN-1 treatment, and a producer of NO in the presence of DMPO. Conclusion and Implications Post-treatment with DMPO of oxidatively challenged cells reversed eNOS dysfunction and could have pharmacological implications in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24405159

  19. Resveratrol Prevented Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Rat Thoracic Aorta Through Increased eNOS Expression

    PubMed Central

    Uğurel, Seda Sultan; Kuşçu, Nilay; Özenci, Çiler Çelik; Dalaklıoğlu, Selvinaz; Taşatargil, Arda

    2016-01-01

    Background: The cardiovascular benefits of Resveratrol (RVT) have been well established by previous experimental and clinical studies. Aims: The goal of this study was to test the effectiveness of RVT administration on the impaired endothelial function induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and to elucidate the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) pathway. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Endotoxemia was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg LPS, and the thoracic aorta was isolated six hours later. RVT was injected intraperitoneally 15 minutes before LPS administration. Six hours after LPS injection, potassium chloride (KCl), phenylephrine (Phe), acetylcholine (ACh), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were used to examine to vascular reactivity and endothelial function. eNOS, phospho-eNOS (p-eNOS) (Ser 1177), and SIRT1 expressions in thoracic aorta were evaluated by Western blot. Results: LPS administration significantly inhibited the relaxation response induced by ACh, while the relaxation to SNP was not significantly altered. Phe- and KCl-induced contractile responses in the thoracic aorta significantly decreased in LPS-injected group. eNOS and p-eNOS expression decreased significantly in arteries obtained from LPS group rats. The impaired vasoreactivity as well as decreased expressions of eNOS, p-eNOS, and SIRT1 in vessels from LPS-injected rats were improved by RVT treatment. Conclusion: The endothelium-dependent vasodilatation of the thoracic aorta was significantly inhibited by LPS administration, and RVT treatment may improve vascular endothelial function. The protective effect of RVT might be associated with increased eNOS expression and activity. PMID:27403381

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphism in early term chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Mir, S; Berdeli, A

    2009-12-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a complex phenomenon caused by underlying kidney disease with superimposed enviromental and genetic factors. CAN development begins with progressive renal microvascular injury. Endothelial cells play key roles in the regulation of vascular tone, permeability, and remodeling. A reduction in basal nitric oxide (NO) release as a result of genetic variation in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) function may predispose to hypertension, thrombosis, vasospasm, and atherosclerosis, all contributing to the development of CAN. We analyzed the G894T mutation at exon 7 of the eNOS gene in relationship to CAN among 81 children with renal transplantations. The 20 patients who developed CAN underwent renal biopsies for histological confirmation. Proteinuria and hypertension were observed in CAN. We selected 173 healthy reference subjects. The G894T polymorphism of the eNOS gene was determined by PCR-restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis. The group included 33 male and 48 female subjects who received 32 living-related grafts and 49 from deceased donors (DD) donors. Donor age (y) was 32.7 +/- 13.7 and the HLA A,B,DR mismatch number of the cadaveric cases was 3.5 +/- 0.79. The distribution of the genotypes were ENOS GG/GT/TT 48%, 33%, 19%, respectively. G-alleles frequency was 64.8%; T-allele frequency was 35.2%. ENOS G894T gene polymorphism did not seem to influence long-term renal allograft outcome. Recipient ENOS G894T gene polymorphism did not alter the risk of chronic allograft failure. Even if NO synthesis and bioactivity are influenced by this polymorphism, many vasoactive factors may have roles to suppress the advantageous effects of NO. PMID:20005399

  1. The effects of (-)-epicatechin on endothelial cells involve the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Mendez-Luna, David; Beltran-Partida, Ernesto; Castillo, Carmen; Guevara, Gustavo; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Correa-Basurto, José; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    We have provided evidence that the stimulatory effects of (-)-epicatechin ((-)-EPI) on endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production may involve the participation of a cell-surface receptor. Thus far, such entity(ies) has not been fully elucidated. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a cell-surface receptor that has been linked to protective effects on the cardiovascular system and activation of intracellular signaling pathways (including NO production) similar to those reported with (-)-EPI. In bovine coronary artery endothelial cells (BCAEC) by the use of confocal imaging, we evidence the presence of GPER at the cell-surface and on F-actin filaments. Using in silico studies we document the favorable binding mode between (-)-EPI and GPER. Such binding is comparable to that of the GPER agonist, G1. By the use of selective blockers, we demonstrate that the activation of ERK 1/2 and CaMKII by (-)-EPI is dependent on the GPER/c-SRC/EGFR axis mimicking those effects noted with G1. We also evidence by the use of siRNA the role that GPER has on mediating ERK1/2 activation by (-)-EPI. GPER appears to be coupled to a non Gαi/o or Gαs, protein subtype. To extrapolate our findings to an ex vivo model, we employed phenylephrine pre-contracted aortic rings evidencing that (-)-EPI can mediate vasodilation through GPER activation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that suggests the GPER as a potential mediator of (-)-EPI effects and highlights the important role that GPER may have on cardiovascular system protection.

  2. The effects of (-)-epicatechin on endothelial cells involve the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Mendez-Luna, David; Beltran-Partida, Ernesto; Castillo, Carmen; Guevara, Gustavo; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Correa-Basurto, José; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    We have provided evidence that the stimulatory effects of (-)-epicatechin ((-)-EPI) on endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production may involve the participation of a cell-surface receptor. Thus far, such entity(ies) has not been fully elucidated. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a cell-surface receptor that has been linked to protective effects on the cardiovascular system and activation of intracellular signaling pathways (including NO production) similar to those reported with (-)-EPI. In bovine coronary artery endothelial cells (BCAEC) by the use of confocal imaging, we evidence the presence of GPER at the cell-surface and on F-actin filaments. Using in silico studies we document the favorable binding mode between (-)-EPI and GPER. Such binding is comparable to that of the GPER agonist, G1. By the use of selective blockers, we demonstrate that the activation of ERK 1/2 and CaMKII by (-)-EPI is dependent on the GPER/c-SRC/EGFR axis mimicking those effects noted with G1. We also evidence by the use of siRNA the role that GPER has on mediating ERK1/2 activation by (-)-EPI. GPER appears to be coupled to a non Gαi/o or Gαs, protein subtype. To extrapolate our findings to an ex vivo model, we employed phenylephrine pre-contracted aortic rings evidencing that (-)-EPI can mediate vasodilation through GPER activation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that suggests the GPER as a potential mediator of (-)-EPI effects and highlights the important role that GPER may have on cardiovascular system protection. PMID:26303816

  3. Estrogen Receptor-β and Fetoplacental Endothelial Prostanoid Biosynthesis: A Link to Clinically Demonstrated Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Linda; Abdallah, Nadine; Chatterton, Robert; Xin, Hong; Monsivais, Diana; Coon, John; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Fetal growth restriction (FGR) due to placental dysfunction impacts short- and long-term neonatal outcomes. Abnormal umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry indicating elevated fetoplacental vascular resistance has been associated with fetal morbidity and mortality. Estrogen receptors are regulators of vasomotor tone, and fetoplacental endothelium expresses estrogen receptor-β (ESR2) as its sole estrogen receptor. Objective: Our objective was to elucidate the mechanism whereby ESR2 regulates placental villous endothelial cell prostanoid biosynthesis. Design and Participants: We conducted immunohistochemical analysis of human placental specimens and studies of primary fetoplacental endothelial cells isolated from subjects with uncomplicated pregnancies. Main Outcome Measures: We evaluated in vivo levels of ESR2 and cyclooxygenase-2 (PTGS2) in villous endothelial cells from fetuses with or without FGR and/or abnormal umbilical artery Doppler indices and in vitro effects of ESR2 on prostanoid biosynthetic gene expression. Results: ESR2 and PTGS2 expression were significantly higher within subjects with FGR with abnormal umbilical artery Doppler indices in comparison with controls (P < 0.01). ESR2 knockdown led to decreased cyclooxygenase-1 (PTGS1), PTGS2, prostaglandin F synthase (AKR1C3), and increased prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS), with opposing results found after ESR2 overexpression (P < 0.05). ESR2 mediates prostaglandin H2 substrate availability and, in the setting of differential regulation of AKR1C3 and PTGIS, altered the balance between vasodilatory and vasoconstricting prostanoid production. Conclusions: Higher ESR2 expression in the placental vasculature of FGR subjects with abnormal blood flow is associated with an endothelial cell phenotype that preferentially produces vasoconstrictive prostanoids. Endothelial ESR2 appears to be a master regulator of prostanoid biosynthesis and contributes to high-resistance fetoplacental blood flow, thereby

  4. Development of confocal immunofluorescence FRET microscopy to Investigate eNOS and GSNOR localization and interaction in pulmonary endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Shagufta; Brown-Steinke, Kathleen; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2015-03-01

    Confocal FRET microscopy is a widely used technique for studying protein-protein interactions in live or fixed cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) are enzymes involved in regulating the bioavailability of S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) in the pulmonary endothelium and have roles in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Labeling of endogenous proteins to better understand a disease process can be challenging. We have used immunofluorescence to detect endogenous eNOS and GSNOR in primary pulmonary endothelial cells to co-localize these proteins as well as to study their interaction by FRET. The challenge has been in selecting the right immunofluorescence labeling condition, right antibody, the right blocking reagent, the right FRET pair and eliminating cross-reactivity of secondary antibodies. We have used Alexa488 and Alexa568 as a FRET pair. After a series of optimizations, the data from Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) demonstrate co-localization of eNOS and GSNOR in the perinuclear region of the pulmonary endothelial cell primarily within the cis-Golgi with lower levels of co-localization seen within the trans-Golgi. FRET studies demonstrate, for the first time, interaction between eNOS and GSNOR in both murine and bovine pulmonary endothelial cells. Further characterization of eNOSGSNOR interaction and the subcellular location of this interaction will provide mechanistic insight into the importance of S-nitrosothiol signaling in pulmonary biology, physiology and pathology.

  5. Endothelial NOS-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)- terminal kinase by oxidized low-density lipoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Levonen, A. L.; Moellering, D.; Ramachandran, A.; Patel, R. P.; Jo, H.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to activate a number of signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. Among these are the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), also known as stress-activated protein kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinase) determine cell survival in response to environmental stress. Interestingly, JNK signaling involves redox-sensitive mechanisms and is activated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species derived from both NADPH oxidases, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), peroxides, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The role of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the activation of JNK in response to oxLDL has not been examined. Herein, we show that on exposure of endothelial cells to oxLDL, both ERK and JNK are activated through independent signal transduction pathways. A key role of eNOS activation through a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent mechanism leading to phosphorylation of eNOS is demonstrated for oxLDL-dependent activation of JNK. Moreover, we show that activation of ERK by oxLDL is critical in protection against the cytotoxicity of oxLDL.

  6. Retinal hypoxia induces vascular endothelial growth factor through induction of estrogen-related receptor γ

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Ji Yeon; Choi, Young Keun; Kook, Hyun; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Dong Ho

    2015-05-01

    Ischemic retinopathies causing overexpression of pro-angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), are the most common cause of blindness. Thus, understanding the pathophysiology of targetable pathways that regulate retinal VEGF is of great interest. A conserved binding site for estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) has been identified in the promoter of the Vegfa gene. ERRγ is a constitutively active orphan nuclear receptor and its expression is increased by hypoxic stimuli in metabolically active tissues. This study evaluated the role of ERRγ in the ischemic retina and the anti-VEGF potential of GSK5182, a selective inverse agonist of ERRγ. In an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model, immunohistochemistry showed significantly increased ERRγ expression in the ganglion cell layer at postnatal day (P) 17. In a ganglion cell line (RGC-5), mRNA and protein levels of ERRγ were increased by desferrioxamine treatment and hypoxic conditions (1% O{sub 2}). Transient transfection of RGC-5 cells revealed that ERRγ regulated Vegfa expression and this was inhibited by GSK5182. Intravitreal injection of GSK5182 into the OIR model at P14 inhibited retinal Vegfa mRNA expression at P17. GSK5182 suppresses hypoxia-induced VEGF expression via ERRγ; therefore, ERRγ could be a treatment target for ischemic retinopathies. - Highlights: • OIR mice exhibited increased ERRγ expression in the ganglion cell layer. • Hypoxia-induced ERRγ expression was observed in retinal ganglion cells. • ERRγ overexpression increased VEGFA expression in retinal ganglion cells. • An ERRγ inverse agonist suppressed VEGFA expression in retinal ganglion cells. • Intravitreal injection of an ERRγ inverse agonist suppressed VEGFA in OIR mice.

  7. Pretreatment with β-Boswellic Acid Improves Blood Stasis Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Role of eNOS Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Chen, Minchun; Ding, Yi; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhang, Yikai; Wei, Peifeng; Wang, Jingwen; Qiao, Yi; Li, Liang; Li, Yuwen; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells play an important role in modulating anti-thrombus and maintaining the natural function of vascular by secreting many active substances. β-boswellic acid (β-BA) is an active triterpenoid compound from the extract of boswellia serrate. In this study, it is demonstrated that β-BA ameliorates plasma coagulation parameters, protects endothelium from blood stasis induced injury and prevents blood stasis induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, it is found that β-BA significantly increases nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in carotid aortas of blood stasis rats. To stimulate blood stasis-like conditions in vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Treatment of β-BA significantly increased intracellular NO level. Western blot and immunofluorescence as well as immunohistochemistry reveal that β-BA increases phosphorylation of enzyme nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1177. In addition, β-BA mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation can be markedly blocked by eNOS inhibitor L-NAME in blood stasis rats. In OGD treated HUEVCs, the protective effect of β-BA is attenuated by knockdown of eNOS. In conclusion, the above findings provide convincing evidence for the protective effects of β-BA on blood stasis induced endothelial dysfunction by eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:26482008

  8. Pretreatment with β-Boswellic Acid Improves Blood Stasis Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Role of eNOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingming; Chen, Minchun; Ding, Yi; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhang, Yikai; Wei, Peifeng; Wang, Jingwen; Qiao, Yi; Li, Liang; Li, Yuwen; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells play an important role in modulating anti-thrombus and maintaining the natural function of vascular by secreting many active substances. β-boswellic acid (β-BA) is an active triterpenoid compound from the extract of boswellia serrate. In this study, it is demonstrated that β-BA ameliorates plasma coagulation parameters, protects endothelium from blood stasis induced injury and prevents blood stasis induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, it is found that β-BA significantly increases nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in carotid aortas of blood stasis rats. To stimulate blood stasis-like conditions in vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Treatment of β-BA significantly increased intracellular NO level. Western blot and immunofluorescence as well as immunohistochemistry reveal that β-BA increases phosphorylation of enzyme nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1177. In addition, β-BA mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation can be markedly blocked by eNOS inhibitor L-NAME in blood stasis rats. In OGD treated HUEVCs, the protective effect of β-BA is attenuated by knockdown of eNOS. In conclusion, the above findings provide convincing evidence for the protective effects of β-BA on blood stasis induced endothelial dysfunction by eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:26482008

  9. ET-1 Stimulates Superoxide Production by eNOS Following Exposure of Vascular Endothelial Cells to Endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, Deepak; Pennington, Samantha; Karaa, Amel; Clemens, Mark G

    2016-07-01

    It has been shown that microcirculation is hypersensitized to endothelin1 (ET-1) following endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) treatment leading to an increased vasopressor response. This may be related in part to decreased activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by ET-1. eNOS can also be uncoupled to produce superoxide (O2). This aberrant eNOS activity could further contribute to the hyperconstriction and injury caused by ET-1 following LPS. We therefore tested whether LPS affects ROS production by vascular endothelial cells and whether and how this effect is altered by ET-1. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) were subjected to a 6-h treatment with LPS (250 ng/mL) or LPS and sepiapterin (100 μM) followed by a 30-min treatment with 100 μM L-Iminoethyl Ornithine (L-NIO) an irreversible eNOS inhibitor and 30-min treatment with ET-1 (10 nM). Conversion of [H]L-arginine to [H]L-citrulline was used to measure eNOS activity. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitable reduction of Cytochrome-C, dihydro carboxy fluorescein (DCF), and Mitosox was used to estimate ROS. LT-SDS PAGE was used to assess the degree of monomerization of the eNOS homodimer. Stimulation of HUVECs with ET-1 significantly increased NO synthesis by 1.4-fold (P < 0.05). ET-1 stimulation of LPS-treated HUVECs failed to increase NO production. Western blot for eNOS protein showed no change in eNOS protein levels. LPS alone resulted in an insignificant increase in ROS production as measured by cytochrome C that was increased 4.6-fold by ET-1 stimulation (P < 0.05). L-NIO significantly decreased ET-1-induced ROS production (P < 0.05). Sepiapterin significantly decreased ROS production in both; unstimulated and ET-1-stimulated LPS-treated groups, but did not restore NO production. DCF experiments confirmed intracellular ROS while Mitosox suggested a non-mitochondrial source. ET-1 treatment following a chronic LPS stress

  10. Endothelial Estrogen Receptor-α Does Not Protect Against Vascular Stiffness Induced by Western Diet in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Camila; Lastra, Guido; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I; Haertling, Dominic; DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Jia, Guanghong; Chen, Dongqing; Barron, Brady J; Garro, Mona; Padilla, Jaume; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Sowers, James R

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of a diet high in fat and refined carbohydrates (Western diet [WD]) is associated with obesity and insulin resistance, both major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In women, obesity and insulin resistance abrogate the protection against CVD likely afforded by estrogen signaling through estrogen receptor (ER)α. Indeed, WD in females results in increased vascular stiffness, which is independently associated with CVD. We tested the hypothesis that loss of ERα signaling in the endothelium exacerbates WD-induced vascular stiffening in female mice. We used a novel model of endothelial cell (EC)-specific ERα knockout (EC-ERαKO), obtained after sequential crossing of the ERα double floxed mice and VE-Cadherin Cre-recombinase mice. Ten-week-old females, EC-ERαKO and aged-matched genopairs were fed either a regular chow diet (control diet) or WD for 8 weeks. Vascular stiffness was measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity and ex vivo in aortic explants by atomic force microscopy. In addition, vascular reactivity was assessed in isolated aortic rings. Initial characterization of the model fed a control diet did not reveal changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity, aortic vasoreactivity, or vascular stiffness in the EC-ERαKO mice. Interestingly, ablation of ERα in ECs reduced WD-induced vascular stiffness and improved endothelial-dependent dilation. In the setting of a WD, endothelial ERα signaling contributes to vascular stiffening in females. The precise mechanisms underlying the detrimental effects of endothelial ERα in the setting of a WD remain to be elucidated. PMID:26872089

  11. Endothelial Estrogen Receptor-α Does Not Protect Against Vascular Stiffness Induced by Western Diet in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Camila; Lastra, Guido; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I; Haertling, Dominic; DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Jia, Guanghong; Chen, Dongqing; Barron, Brady J; Garro, Mona; Padilla, Jaume; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Sowers, James R

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of a diet high in fat and refined carbohydrates (Western diet [WD]) is associated with obesity and insulin resistance, both major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In women, obesity and insulin resistance abrogate the protection against CVD likely afforded by estrogen signaling through estrogen receptor (ER)α. Indeed, WD in females results in increased vascular stiffness, which is independently associated with CVD. We tested the hypothesis that loss of ERα signaling in the endothelium exacerbates WD-induced vascular stiffening in female mice. We used a novel model of endothelial cell (EC)-specific ERα knockout (EC-ERαKO), obtained after sequential crossing of the ERα double floxed mice and VE-Cadherin Cre-recombinase mice. Ten-week-old females, EC-ERαKO and aged-matched genopairs were fed either a regular chow diet (control diet) or WD for 8 weeks. Vascular stiffness was measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity and ex vivo in aortic explants by atomic force microscopy. In addition, vascular reactivity was assessed in isolated aortic rings. Initial characterization of the model fed a control diet did not reveal changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity, aortic vasoreactivity, or vascular stiffness in the EC-ERαKO mice. Interestingly, ablation of ERα in ECs reduced WD-induced vascular stiffness and improved endothelial-dependent dilation. In the setting of a WD, endothelial ERα signaling contributes to vascular stiffening in females. The precise mechanisms underlying the detrimental effects of endothelial ERα in the setting of a WD remain to be elucidated.

  12. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  13. Purinergic glio-endothelial coupling during neuronal activity: role of P2Y1 receptors and eNOS in functional hyperemia in the mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Davila, Antonio; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Varamini, Behzad; Ballabh, Praveen; Sonntag, William E; Baur, Joseph A; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-12-01

    Impairment of moment-to-moment adjustment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) via neurovascular coupling is thought to play a critical role in the genesis of cognitive impairment associated with aging and pathological conditions associated with accelerated cerebromicrovascular aging (e.g., hypertension, obesity). Although previous studies demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in neurovascular uncoupling in these conditions, the role of endothelial NO mediation in neurovascular coupling responses is not well understood. To establish the link between endothelial function and functional hyperemia, neurovascular coupling responses were studied in mutant mice overexpressing or deficient in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), and the role of P2Y1 receptors in purinergic glioendothelial coupling was assessed. We found that genetic depletion of eNOS (eNOS(-/-)) and pharmacological inhibition of NO synthesis significantly decreased the CBF responses in the somatosensory cortex evoked by whisker stimulation and by administration of ATP. Overexpression of eNOS enhanced NO mediation of functional hyperemia. In control mice, the selective and potent P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2179 attenuated both whisker stimulation-induced and ATP-mediated CBF responses, whereas, in eNOS(-/-) mice, the inhibitory effects of MRS2179 were blunted. Collectively, our findings provide additional evidence for purinergic glio-endothelial coupling during neuronal activity, highlighting the role of ATP-mediated activation of eNOS via P2Y1 receptors in functional hyperemia. PMID:26453330

  14. [ENDOTHELIAL MONOCYTEACTIVATING FACTOR II CANCELS OXIDATIVE STRESS, CONSTITUTIVE NOS UNCOUPLING AND INDUCED VIOLATIONS OF CARDIAC HEMODYNAMICS IN HYPERTENSION (PART II)].

    PubMed

    Dorofeyeva, N A; Kotsuruba, A V; Mogilnitskaya, L A; Malyna, A E; Kornelyuk, A I; Sagach, V F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of EMAP II on free radical state of the heart and blood vessels, to restore cNOS coupling and cardiac hemodynamics in spontaneously hypertensive rats. It was found that, due to the combined inhibition of oxidative and nitrosative stress, EMAP I quickly restores impaired in hypertension constitutive de novo synthesis of NO by restoring cNOS coupling. Restoration by EMAP II of constitutive de novo synthesis NO abolished cardiac and endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In hypertension, the introduction of EMAP II helped to improve the performance of the pumping function of the heart (stroke volume increased by 18.2 %, cardiac output -22 %), an arterial stiffness decreased by 23.2 %, process of relaxation of the left ventricle improved, due to decreased in 4,7 times myocardial end-diastolic stiffness. PMID:26495731

  15. Triterpenoic Acids from Apple Pomace Enhance the Activity of the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS).

    PubMed

    Waldbauer, Katharina; Seiringer, Günter; Nguyen, Dieu Linh; Winkler, Johannes; Blaschke, Michael; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Urban, Ernst; Ladurner, Angela; Dirsch, Verena M; Zehl, Martin; Kopp, Brigitte

    2016-01-13

    Pomace is an easy-accessible raw material for the isolation of fruit-derived compounds. Fruit consumption is associated with health-promoting effects, such as the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Increased vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, for example, due to an enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, could be one molecular mechanism mediating this effect. To identify compounds from apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) pomace that have the potential to amplify NO bioavailability via eNOS activation, a bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol/water (70:30) extract has been performed using the (14)C-L-arginine to (14)C-L-citrulline conversion assay (ACCA) in the human endothelium-derived cell line EA.hy926. Phytochemical characterization of the active fractions was performed using the spectrophotometric assessment of the total phenolic content, as well as TLC, HPLC-DAD-ELSD, and HPLC-MS analyses. Eleven triterpenoic acids, of which one is a newly discovered compound, were identified as the main constituents in the most active fraction, accompanied by only minor contents of phenolic compounds. When tested individually, none of the tested compounds exhibited significant eNOS activation. Nevertheless, cell stimulation with the reconstituted compound mixture restored eNOS activation, validating the potential of apple pomace as a source of bioactive components.

  16. Estetrol Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Russo, Eleonora; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout aging in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2, and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use. PMID:26257704

  17. Estetrol Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Russo, Eleonora; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout aging in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2, and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use. PMID:26257704

  18. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombosis in mice by antagonizing eNOS via β2GPI and apoER2.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sangeetha; Morrell, Craig N; Tarango, Cristina; Thomas, Gail D; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Girardi, Guillermina; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Philip G; Thorpe, Philip E; Salmon, Jane E; Shaul, Philip W; Mineo, Chieko

    2011-01-01

    In antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) binding to β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) induce endothelial cell-leukocyte adhesion and thrombus formation via unknown mechanisms. Here we show that in mice both of these processes are caused by the inhibition of eNOS. In studies of cultured human, bovine, and mouse endothelial cells, the promotion of monocyte adhesion by aPL entailed decreased bioavailable NO, and aPL fully antagonized eNOS activation by diverse agonists. Similarly, NO-dependent, acetylcholine-induced increases in carotid vascular conductance were impaired in aPL-treated mice. The inhibition of eNOS was caused by antibody recognition of domain I of β2GPI and β2GPI dimerization, and it was due to attenuated eNOS S1179 phosphorylation mediated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Furthermore, LDL receptor family member antagonism with receptor-associated protein (RAP) prevented aPL inhibition of eNOS in cell culture, and ApoER2-/- mice were protected from aPL inhibition of eNOS in vivo. Moreover, both aPL-induced increases in leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombus formation were absent in eNOS-/- and in ApoER2-/- mice. Thus, aPL-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombosis are caused by eNOS antagonism, which is due to impaired S1179 phosphorylation mediated by β2GPI, apoER2, and PP2A. Our results suggest that novel therapies for APS can now be developed targeting these mechanisms. PMID:21123944

  19. Hypercholesterolemia-induced erectile dysfunction: endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the mouse penis by NAD(P)H oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Strong, Travis D.; Sezen, Sena F.; Johnson, Justin M.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hypercholesterolemia induces erectile dysfunction (ED) mostly by increasing oxidative stress and impairing endothelial function in the penis, but the mechanisms regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are not understood. AIMS We evaluated whether hypercholesterolemia activates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase in the penis, providing an initial source of ROS to induce endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and endothelial dysfunction resulting in ED. METHODS Low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)–null mice were fed Western diet for 4 weeks to induce early-stage hyperlipidemia. Wild type (WT) mice fed regular chow served as controls. Mice received NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Markers of endothelial function (phospho [P]-vasodilator-stimulated-protein [VASP]-Ser-239), oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NAD[P]H oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox), P-eNOS-Ser-1177, and eNOS were measured by Western blot in penes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Molecular mechanisms of ROS generation and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemia-induced ED. RESULTS Erectile response was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in hypercholesterolemic LDLR-null mice compared to WT mice. Relative to WT mice, hypercholesterolemia increased (P<0.05) protein expressions of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox and gp91phox, eNOS uncoupling, and 4-HNE-modified proteins, and reduced (P<0.05) P-VASP-Ser-239 expression in the penis. Apocynin treatment of LDLR-null mice preserved (P<0.05) maximal intracavernosal pressure, and reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of gp67phox and gp47phox, 4-HNE, P-VASP-Ser-239, and eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of WT mice did not affect any of these parameters

  20. Chronic aerobic exercise associated to dietary modification improve endothelial function and eNOS expression in high fat fed hamsters.

    PubMed

    Boa, Beatriz C S; Souza, Maria das Graças C; Leite, Richard D; da Silva, Simone V; Barja-Fidalgo, Thereza Christina; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme; Bouskela, Eliete

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is epidemic in the western world and central adipose tissue deposition points to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, independently of any association between obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors. Physical exercise has been used as non-pharmacological treatment to significantly reverse/attenuate obesity comorbidities. In this study we have investigated effects of exercise and/or dietary modification on microcirculatory function, body composition, serum glucose, iNOS and eNOS expression on 120 male hamsters treated for 12 weeks with high fat chow (HF, n = 30) starting on the 21st day of birth. From week 12 to 20, animals were randomly separated in HF (no treatment change), return to standard chow (HFSC, n = 30), high fat chow associated to an aerobic exercise training program (AET) (HFEX, n = 30) and return to standard chow+AET (HFSCEX, n = 30). Microvascular reactivity in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside and macromolecular permeability increase induced by 30 minutes ischemia followed by reperfusion were assessed on the cheek pouch preparation. Total body fat and aorta eNOS and iNOS expression by immunoblotting assay were evaluated on the experimental day. Compared to HFSC and HFSCEX groups, HF and HFEX ones presented increased visceral fat [(mean±SEM) (HF)4.9±1.5 g and (HFEX)4.7±0.9 g vs. (HFSC)*3.0±0.7 g and (HFSCEX)*1.9±0.4 g/100 g BW]; impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation [Ach 10(-8) M (HF)87.9±2.7%; (HFSC)*116.7±5.9%; (HFEX)*109.1±4.6%; (HFSCEX)*105±2.8%; Ach10(-6) M (HF)95.3±3.1%; (HFSC)*126±6.2%; (HFEX)*122.5±2.8%; (HFSCEX)*118.1±4.3% and Ach10(-4) M (HF)109.5±4.8%; (HFSC)*149.6±6.6%; (HFEX)*143.5±5.4% and (HFSCEX)*139.4±5.2%], macromolecular permeability increase after ischemia/reperfusion [(HF)40.5±4.2; (HFSC)*19.0±1.6; (HFEX)*18.6±2.1 and (HFSCEX)* 21.5±3.7 leaks/cm2), decreased eNOS expression, increased leptin and glycaemic levels. Endothelial

  1. Sodium nitrite exerts an antihypertensive effect and improves endothelial function through activation of eNOS in the SHR.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Lau, Yeh Siang; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) induces relaxation in isolated arteries partly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving NO-eNOS-sGC-cGMP pathway. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic NaNO2 administration on arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function in hypertensive rats. NaNO2 (150 mg L-1) was given in drinking water for four weeks to spontaneously (SHR) and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) treated hypertensive SD rats. Arterial SBP and vascular function in isolated aortae were studied. Total plasma nitrate/nitrite and vascular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured using commercially available assay kits. Vascular nitric oxide (NO) levels were evaluated by DAF-FM fluorescence while the proteins involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was determined by Western blotting. NaNO2 treatment reduced SBP, improved the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased plasma total nitrate/nitrite level and vascular tissue NO and cGMP levels in SHR. Furthermore, increased presence of phosphorylated eNOS and Hsp-90 was observed in NaNO2-treated SHR. The beneficial effect of nitrite treatment was not observed in L-NAME treated hypertensive SD rats. The present study provides evidence that chronic treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with NaNO2 improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in addition to its antihypertensive effect, partly through mechanisms involving activation of eNOS. PMID:27616322

  2. eNOS Glu298Asp Polymorphism and Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with and without End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Nevin; Ateş, Kadir; İlhan, Necip; Kaman, Dilara; Çeliker, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney diseases are known to influence nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), though the exact mechanism is still poorly understood. Aims: The purpose of the present study was to examine eNOS Glu298Asp gene polymorphism, plasma NOx and ADMA concentration in subjects with and without End-stage Renal Disease. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: In this study, genotype distributions of Glu-298Asp in exon 7 of the eNOS gene polymorphisms in 130 hemodialysis and 64 peritoneal dialysis patients were compared with 92 controls. NOx was measured by using the Griess reaction while arginine, ADMA and SDMA measurements were performed by HPLC. Genotyping for eNOS Glu298Asp polymorphism was detected with the polymerase chain reaction and/or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Results: When the genotype frequencies of TT and GT genes were compared between both groups, there was no detected statistically important difference, even-though a TT genotype frequency was 27 (20.8%) versus 17 (26.6%), GT heterozygote genotype frequency was 52 (40%) versus 22 (34.4%), and GG homozygote genotype frequency was 51 (39.2%) versus 25 (39.1%), respectively (p>0.05). NOx, SDMA and ADMA concentrations were significantly elevated in subjects with hemodialysis patients as compared to their corresponding controls. Whereas nitrite was found to be significantly decreased in the patient with peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion: Not observed any connection between the Glu298Asp polymorphism in the eNOS gene and end-stage Renal Diseases in our study population under different dialysis treatments. However, higher ADMA and SDMA concentrations in subjects with ESRD support the existing hypothesis that NOx overproduction affects endothelial dysfunction. Thus, the reduction of ADMA and SDMA concentrations might play a protective role in ESRD patients. PMID:27403380

  3. Sodium nitrite exerts an antihypertensive effect and improves endothelial function through activation of eNOS in the SHR

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Lau, Yeh Siang; Vanhoutte, Paul M.; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) induces relaxation in isolated arteries partly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving NO-eNOS-sGC-cGMP pathway. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic NaNO2 administration on arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function in hypertensive rats. NaNO2 (150 mg L−1) was given in drinking water for four weeks to spontaneously (SHR) and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) treated hypertensive SD rats. Arterial SBP and vascular function in isolated aortae were studied. Total plasma nitrate/nitrite and vascular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured using commercially available assay kits. Vascular nitric oxide (NO) levels were evaluated by DAF-FM fluorescence while the proteins involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was determined by Western blotting. NaNO2 treatment reduced SBP, improved the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased plasma total nitrate/nitrite level and vascular tissue NO and cGMP levels in SHR. Furthermore, increased presence of phosphorylated eNOS and Hsp-90 was observed in NaNO2-treated SHR. The beneficial effect of nitrite treatment was not observed in L-NAME treated hypertensive SD rats. The present study provides evidence that chronic treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with NaNO2 improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in addition to its antihypertensive effect, partly through mechanisms involving activation of eNOS. PMID:27616322

  4. Placental villous vascular endothelial growth factor expression and vascularization after estrogen suppression during the last two-thirds of baboon pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Victoria A.; Pepe, Gerald J.; Albrecht, Eugene D.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that placental cytotrophoblast vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and vessel density were increased by elevating estrogen and decreased by suppressing estrogen in early baboon pregnancy. The present study determined whether the elevation in estrogen which occurs in the last two-thirds of baboon pregnancy also has a role in the regulation of placental villous VEGF expression and angiogenesis. Placentas were obtained on day 170 of gestation (term, 184 days) from baboons untreated or treated with the aromatase inhibitor CGS 20267 or CGS 20267 plus estradiol daily on days 30–169. Serum estradiol levels in CGS 20267-treated baboons were decreased (P < 0.001) by 95%, however, placental cytotrophoblast VEGF mRNA levels (means ± SE, attomoles/μg RNA) were similar in untreated (25,807 ± 5,873), CGS 20267-treated (23,900 ± 1,940) and CGS 20267 plus estradiol-treated (26,885 ± 2,569) baboons. VEGF mRNA levels in the syncytiotrophoblast (2,008 ± 405) and inner villous stromal cell (1,724 ± 287) fractions of untreated baboons also were not altered by CGS 20267. However, whole villous VEGF mRNA levels in CGS 20267-treated baboons (18,590 ± 2,315) were 4-fold greater (P < 0.001) than in untreated animals and restored to normal by estradiol. Percent vascularized area (15.88 ± 0.88%) and vessel density (1,375 ± 71/mm2) of the villous placenta in untreated animals were not altered by estrogen deprivation. We propose that villous cytotrophoblasts lose their responsivity to estrogen and that placental villous cytotrophoblast VEGF expression and angiogenesis are regulated by estrogen in a cell- and gestational age-specific manner, and that factors other than estrogen maintain VEGF expression in the last two-thirds of pregnancy. PMID:17906373

  5. A selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibits TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis by activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Eto, Masato; Akishita, Masahiro; Okabe, Tetsuro; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi

    2009-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) is a pleiotropic cytokine exerting both inflammatory and cell death activity and is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The present study was designed to examine whether the raloxifene analogue, LY117018 could inhibit TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells and to clarify the involved mechanisms. Apoptosis of endothelial cells was determined by DNA fragmentation assay and the activation of caspase-3. LY117018 significantly inhibited TNF-alpha-induced caspase-3 activation and cell DNA fragmentation levels in bovine carotid artery endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of LY117018 was abolished by an estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. p38 MAPK, JNK, ERK1/2 and Akt have been shown to act as apoptotic or anti-apoptotic signals. TNF-alpha stimulated the phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK, JNK, ERK1/2 and Akt in vascular endothelial cells. TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis was significantly decreased by SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor or SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, but was enhanced by an ERK1/2 pathway inhibitor, PD98059 or a PI3-kinase/Akt pathway inhibitor, wortmannin. The anti-apoptotic effect of LY117018 was abrogated only by PD98059 but was not affected by the inhibitors for p38 MAPK, JNK, or Akt. LY117018 stimulated the further increase in phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in TNF-alpha treated endothelial cells but it did not affect phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK, JNK or Akt. These results suggest that LY 110718 prevents caspase-3 dependent apoptosis induced by TNF-alpha in vascular endothelial cells through activation of the estrogen receptors and the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. PMID:19275968

  6. Insulin resistance reduces arterial prostacyclin synthase and eNOS activities by increasing endothelial fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xueliang; Edelstein, Diane; Obici, Silvana; Higham, Ninon; Zou, Ming-Hui; Brownlee, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance markedly increases cardiovascular disease risk in people with normal glucose tolerance, even after adjustment for known risk factors such as LDL, triglycerides, HDL, and systolic blood pressure. In this report, we show that increased oxidation of FFAs in aortic endothelial cells without added insulin causes increased production of superoxide by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. FFA-induced overproduction of superoxide activated a variety of proinflammatory signals previously implicated in hyperglycemia-induced vascular damage and inactivated 2 important antiatherogenic enzymes, prostacyclin synthase and eNOS. In 2 nondiabetic rodent models — insulin-resistant, obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats and high-fat diet–induced insulin-resistant mice — inactivation of prostacyclin synthase and eNOS was prevented by inhibition of FFA release from adipose tissue; by inhibition of the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I; and by reduction of superoxide levels. These studies identify what we believe to be a novel mechanism contributing to the accelerated atherogenesis and increased cardiovascular disease risk occurring in people with insulin resistance. PMID:16528409

  7. Ellagic acid protects endothelial cells from oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis by modulating the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Hsiu-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, Shin-Da; Huang, Chih-Yang; Chiu, Tsan-Hung; Tsai, Kun-Ling; Hsu, Wen-Cheng; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2010-10-15

    Endothelial apoptosis is a driving force in atherosclerosis development. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes inflammatory and thrombotic processes and is highly atherogenic, as it stimulates macrophage cholesterol accumulation and foam cell formation. Previous studies have shown that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide (PI3K/Akt/eNOS/NO) pathway is involved in oxLDL-induced endothelial apoptosis. Ellagic acid, a natural polyphenol found in berries and nuts, has in recent years been the subject of intense research within the fields of cancer and inflammation. However, its protective effects against oxLDL-induced injury in vascular endothelial cells have not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effect of ellagic acid in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to oxLDL and explored the possible mechanisms. Our results showed that pretreatment with ellagic acid (5-20 {mu}M) significantly attenuated oxLDL-induced cytotoxicity, apoptotic features, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the anti-apoptotic effect of ellagic acid was partially inhibited by a PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) and a specific eNOS inhibitor (cavtratin) but not by an ERK inhibitor (PD98059). In exploring the underlying mechanisms of ellagic acid action, we found that oxLDL decreased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation, which in turn activated NF-{kappa}B and downstream pro-apoptotic signaling events including calcium accumulation, destabilization of mitochondrial permeability, and disruption of the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Those alterations induced by oxLDL, however, were attenuated by pretreatment with ellagic acid. The inhibition of oxLDL-induced endothelial apoptosis by ellagic acid is due at least in part to its anti-oxidant activity and its ability to modulate the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway.

  8. Exenatide exerts direct protective effects on endothelial cells through the AMPK/Akt/eNOS pathway in a GLP-1 receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rui; Ma, Shifeng; Wang, Chen; Ke, Jing; Yang, Jin; Li, Weihong; Liu, Ye; Hou, Wenfang; Feng, Xinheng; Wang, Guang; Hong, Tianpei

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) may have direct favorable effects on cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the GLP-1 analog exenatide on improving coronary endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled and given either lifestyle intervention or lifestyle intervention plus exenatide treatment. After 12-wk treatment, coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR), an important indicator of coronary endothelial function, was improved significantly, and serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were remarkably decreased in the exenatide treatment group compared with the baseline and the control group. Notably, CFVR was correlated inversely with hemoglobin A1c (Hb A1c) and positively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, exendin-4 (a form of exenatide) significantly increased NO production, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation, and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1) level in a dose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist exendin (9-39) or GLP-1R siRNA, adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, AMPK inhibitor compound C, and PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 abolished the effects of exendin-4. Furthermore, exendin-4 reversed homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction by decreasing sICAM-1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and upregulating NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. Likewise, exendin (9-39) diminished the protective effects of exendin-4 on the homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction. In conclusion, exenatide significantly improves coronary endothelial function in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. The effect may be mediated through activation of AMPK/PI3K-Akt/eNOS pathway via a GLP-1R/cAMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:27072494

  9. Vasoinhibins Prevent Bradykinin-Stimulated Endothelial Cell Proliferation by Inactivating eNOS via Reduction of both Intracellular Ca2+ Levels and eNOS Phosphorylation at Ser1179

    PubMed Central

    Thebault, Stéphanie; González, Carmen; García, Celina; Zamarripa, David Arredondo; Nava, Gabriel; Vaca, Luis; López-Casillas, Fernando; de la Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez; Clapp, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Vasoinhibins, a family of antiangiogenic peptides derived from prolactin proteolysis, inhibit the vascular effects of several proangiogenic factors, including bradykinin (BK). Here, we report that vasoinhibins block the BK-induced proliferation of bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells. This effect is mediated by the inactivation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as the NO donor DETA-NONOate reverted vasoinhibin action. It is an experimentally proven fact that the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i) upon BK stimulation activates eNOS, and vasoinhibins blocked the BK-mediated activation of phospholipase C and the formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate leading to a reduced release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. The [Ca2+]i rise evoked by BK also involves the influx of extracellular Ca2+ via canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. Vasoinhibins likely interfere with TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry since La3+, which is an enhancer of TRPC4 and TRPC5 channel activity, prevented vasoinhibins from blocking the stimulation by BK of endothelial cell NO production and proliferation, and vasoinhibins reduced the BK-induced increase of TRPC5 mRNA expression. Finally, vasoinhibins prevented the BK-induced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179, a post-translational modification that facilitates Ca2+-calmodulin activation of eNOS. Together, our data show that vasoinhibins, by lowering NO production through the inhibition of both [Ca2+]i mobilization and eNOS phosphorylation, prevent the BK-induced stimulation of endothelial cell proliferation. Thus, vasoinhibins help to regulate BK effects on angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis.

  10. The role of eNOS in the migration and proliferation of bone-marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells and in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aizhen; Wang, Libo; Qian, Liling

    2015-04-01

    The role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the activities of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) including migration, proliferation, and tube formation in vitro was investigated. EPCs were obtained from rat bone mononuclear cells by culturing for 7-10 days in EGM-2MV and identified by their capacity for FITC-UEA-1 binding and acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Dil-ac-LDL) intake using fluorescence microscopy. Migration, proliferation and tube formation activities were assessed in the presence or absence of N(ω)-nitro-L-argininemethylester (L-NAME), an eNOS inhibitor. mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4, CXCR7, VEGFR2, and eNOS were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting in the presence or absence of L-NAME. Nitric oxide production was detected by nitrate reductase in the presence or absence of L-NAME. Typical spindle-shaped cells appeared on the 7(th)-10(th) day and confluence reached about 80%. The percentage of FITC-UEA-1 and Dil-ac-LDL double-stained cells was about 85%. Cell migration, proliferation, and tube formation were significantly weakened after eNOS was inhibited (P < 0.05), and the expressions of CXCR4 and eNOS were significantly reduced (P < 0.05, respectively), but there was little change in CXCR7 and VEGFR2. NO production was dramatically decreased after eNOS was inhibited (P < 0.05). In summary, L-NAME significantly reduced the expression of eNOS and NO production by EPCs and inhibited migration, proliferation and tube formation by these cells, suggesting that eNOS affects EPC activities; CXCR4 may be implicated in the action of eNOS.

  11. Omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS through suppressing pulmonary inflammation and promoting endothelial barrier via an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Di; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Wang, Daoxin; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu; Zhou, Guoqi; Xia, Jing; Zhong, Xi; Pu, Shenglan

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary inflammation and endothelial barrier permeability. Omentin has been shown to benefit obesity-related systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS are unknown. In the present study, the level of circulating omentin in patients with ARDS was assessed to appraise its clinical significance in ARDS. Mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing omentin (Ad-omentin) and one-shot treatment of recombinant human omentin (rh-omentin) to examine omentin's effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS. Pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) were treated with rh-omentin to further investigate its underlying mechanism. We found that a decreased level of circulating omentin negatively correlated with white blood cells and procalcitonin in patients with ARDS. Ad-omentin protected against LPS-induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and endothelial barrier injury in mice, accompanied by Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Treatment of pulmonary ECs with rh-omentin attenuated inflammatory response and restored adherens junctions (AJs), and cytoskeleton organization promoted endothelial barrier after LPS insult. Moreover, the omentin-mediated enhancement of EC survival and differentiation was blocked by the Akt/eNOS pathway inactivation. Therapeutic rh-omentin treatment also effectively protected against LPS-induced ARDS via the Akt/eNOS pathway. Collectively, these data indicated that omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS by suppressing inflammation and promoting the pulmonary endothelial barrier, at least partially, through an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism. Therapeutic strategies aiming to restore omentin levels may be valuable for the prevention or treatment of ARDS. PMID:27607575

  12. Omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS through suppressing pulmonary inflammation and promoting endothelial barrier via an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qi, Di; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Wang, Daoxin; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu; Zhou, Guoqi; Xia, Jing; Zhong, Xi; Pu, Shenglan

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary inflammation and endothelial barrier permeability. Omentin has been shown to benefit obesity-related systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS are unknown. In the present study, the level of circulating omentin in patients with ARDS was assessed to appraise its clinical significance in ARDS. Mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing omentin (Ad-omentin) and one-shot treatment of recombinant human omentin (rh-omentin) to examine omentin's effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS. Pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) were treated with rh-omentin to further investigate its underlying mechanism. We found that a decreased level of circulating omentin negatively correlated with white blood cells and procalcitonin in patients with ARDS. Ad-omentin protected against LPS-induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and endothelial barrier injury in mice, accompanied by Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Treatment of pulmonary ECs with rh-omentin attenuated inflammatory response and restored adherens junctions (AJs), and cytoskeleton organization promoted endothelial barrier after LPS insult. Moreover, the omentin-mediated enhancement of EC survival and differentiation was blocked by the Akt/eNOS pathway inactivation. Therapeutic rh-omentin treatment also effectively protected against LPS-induced ARDS via the Akt/eNOS pathway. Collectively, these data indicated that omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS by suppressing inflammation and promoting the pulmonary endothelial barrier, at least partially, through an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism. Therapeutic strategies aiming to restore omentin levels may be valuable for the prevention or treatment of ARDS. PMID:27607575

  13. MiR-21 is induced in endothelial cells by shear stress and modulates apoptosis and eNOS activity

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Martina; Baker, Meredith B.; Moore, Jeffrey P.; Searles, Charles D.

    2010-03-19

    Mechanical forces associated with blood flow play an important role in regulating vascular signaling and gene expression in endothelial cells (ECs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse cell functions, including differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. miRNAs are known to have an important role in modulating EC biology, but their expression and functions in cells subjected to shear stress conditions are unknown. We sought to determine the miRNA expression profile in human ECs subjected to unidirectional shear stress and define the role of miR-21 in shear stress-induced changes in EC function. TLDA array and qRT-PCR analysis performed on HUVECs exposed to prolonged unidirectional shear stress (USS, 24 h, 15 dynes/cm{sup 2}) identified 13 miRNAs whose expression was significantly upregulated (p < 0.05). The miRNA with the greatest change was miR-21; it was increased 5.2-fold (p = 0.002) in USS-treated versus control cells. Western analysis demonstrated that PTEN, a known target of miR-21, was downregulated in HUVECs exposed to USS or transfected with pre-miR-21. Importantly, HUVECs overexpressing miR-21 had decreased apoptosis and increased eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO{sup {center_dot}}) production. These data demonstrate that shear stress forces regulate the expression of miRNAs in ECs, and that miR-21 influences endothelial biology by decreasing apoptosis and activating the NO{sup {center_dot}} pathway. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which shear stress forces modulate vascular homeostasis.

  14. Role of reactive oxygen species in the signalling cascade of cyclosporine A-mediated up-regulation of eNOS in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Ongil, S; Hernández-Perera, O; Navarro-Antolín, J; Pérez de Lema, G; Rodríguez-Puyol, M; Lamas, S; Rodríguez-Puyol, D

    1998-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) increases eNOS mRNA expression in bovine cultured aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). As some effects of CsA may be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), present experiments were devoted to test the hypothesis that the CsA-induced eNOS up-regulation could be dependent on an increased synthesis of ROS.CsA induced a dose-dependent increase of ROS synthesis, with the two fluorescent probes used, DHR123 (CsA 1 μM: 305±7% over control) and H2DCFDA (CsA 1 μM: 178±6% over control).Two ROS generating systems, xanthine plus xanthine oxidase (XXO) and glucose oxidase (GO), increased the expression of eNOS mRNA in BAEC, an effect which was maximal after 8 h of incubation (XXO: 168±21% of control values. GO: 208±18% of control values). The ROS-dependent increased eNOS mRNA expression was followed by an increase in eNOS activity.The effect of CsA on eNOS mRNA expression was abrogated by catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD). In contrast, the antioxidant PDTC augmented eNOS mRNA expression, both in basal conditions and in the presence of CsA.The potential participation of the transcription factor AP-1 was explored. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were consistent with an increase in AP-1 DNA-binding activity in BAEC treated with CsA or glucose oxidase.The present results support a role for ROS, particularly superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, as mediators of the CsA-induced eNOS mRNA up-regulation. Furthermore, they situate ROS as potential regulators of gene expression in endothelial cells, both in physiological and pathophysiological situations. PMID:9647467

  15. Possible involvement of PPARγ-associated eNOS signaling activation in rosuvastatin-mediated prevention of nicotine-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Sonam; Mahadevan, Nanjaian; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2013-02-01

    Nicotine exposure via cigarette smoking and tobacco chewing is associated with vascular complications. The present study investigated the effect of rosuvastatin in nicotine (2 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, scanning electron microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining of thoracic aorta were performed to assess the vascular endothelial integrity. Moreover, oxidative stress was assessed by estimating aortic superoxide anion generation and serum thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. The nicotine administration produced VED by markedly reducing acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, increasing oxidative stress, and inducing lipid alteration. However, treatment with rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks) markedly attenuated nicotine-induced vascular endothelial abnormalities, oxidative stress, and lipid alteration. Interestingly, the co-administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) antagonist, GW9662 (1 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) submaximally, significantly prevented rosuvastatin-induced improvement in vascular endothelial integrity, endothelium-dependent relaxation, and nitrite/nitrate concentration in rats administered nicotine. However, GW9662 co-administration did not affect rosuvastatin-associated vascular anti-oxidant and lipid-lowering effects. The incubation of aortic ring, isolated from rosuvastatin-treated nicotine-administered rats, with L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), significantly attenuated rosuvastatin-induced improvement in acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation. Rosuvastatin prevents nicotine-induced vascular endothelial abnormalities by activating

  16. Impact of Rosuvastatin Treatment on HDL-Induced PKC-βII and eNOS Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells and Its Relation to Flow-Mediated Dilatation in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Ephraim B; Gaida, Pauline; Höllriegel, Robert; Fischer, Tina; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker; Erbs, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial function is impaired in chronic heart failure (CHF). Statins upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and improve endothelial function. Recent studies demonstrated that HDL stimulates NO production due to eNOS phosphorylation at Ser(1177), dephosphorylation at Thr(495), and diminished phosphorylation of PKC-βII at Ser(660). The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of rosuvastatin on HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation and its relation to endothelial function. Methods. 18 CHF patients were randomized to 12 weeks of rosuvastatin or placebo. At baseline, 12 weeks, and 4 weeks after treatment cessation we determined lipid levels and isolated HDL. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were incubated with isolated HDL and phosphorylation of eNOS and PKC-βII was evaluated. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was measured at the radial artery. Results. Rosuvastatin improved FMD significantly. This effect was blunted after treatment cessation. LDL plasma levels were reduced after rosuvastatin treatment whereas drug withdrawal resulted in significant increase. HDL levels remained unaffected. Incubation of HAEC with HDL had no impact on phosphorylation of eNOS or PKC-βII. Conclusion. HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation levels in endothelial cells do not change with rosuvastatin in CHF patients and do not mediate the marked improvement in endothelial function. PMID:27563480

  17. Impact of Rosuvastatin Treatment on HDL-Induced PKC-βII and eNOS Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells and Its Relation to Flow-Mediated Dilatation in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gaida, Pauline; Höllriegel, Robert; Fischer, Tina; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker; Erbs, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial function is impaired in chronic heart failure (CHF). Statins upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and improve endothelial function. Recent studies demonstrated that HDL stimulates NO production due to eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177, dephosphorylation at Thr495, and diminished phosphorylation of PKC-βII at Ser660. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of rosuvastatin on HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation and its relation to endothelial function. Methods. 18 CHF patients were randomized to 12 weeks of rosuvastatin or placebo. At baseline, 12 weeks, and 4 weeks after treatment cessation we determined lipid levels and isolated HDL. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were incubated with isolated HDL and phosphorylation of eNOS and PKC-βII was evaluated. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was measured at the radial artery. Results. Rosuvastatin improved FMD significantly. This effect was blunted after treatment cessation. LDL plasma levels were reduced after rosuvastatin treatment whereas drug withdrawal resulted in significant increase. HDL levels remained unaffected. Incubation of HAEC with HDL had no impact on phosphorylation of eNOS or PKC-βII. Conclusion. HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation levels in endothelial cells do not change with rosuvastatin in CHF patients and do not mediate the marked improvement in endothelial function. PMID:27563480

  18. NFKB1 promoter variation implicates shear-induced NOS3 gene expression and endothelial function in prehypertensives and stage I hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon-Young; Farrance, Iain K G; Fenty, Nicola M; Hagberg, James M; Roth, Stephen M; Mosser, David M; Wang, Min Qi; Jo, Hanjoong; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Brant, Steven R; Brown, Michael D

    2007-10-01

    In endothelial cells, NF-kappaB is an important intracellular signaling molecule by which changes in wall shear stress are transduced into the nucleus to initiate downstream endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene expression. We investigated whether NF-kappa light-chain gene enhancer in B cells 1 (NFKB1) promoter polymorphism ((-94)NFKB1 I/D, where I is the insertion allele and D is the deletion allele) was associated with 1) NOS3 gene expression in endothelial cells under physiological levels of unidirectional laminar shear stress (LSS) and 2) endothelial function in prehypertensive and stage I hypertensive individuals before and after a 6-mo supervised endurance exercise intervention. Competitive EMSAs revealed that proteins present in the nuclei of endothelial cells preferentially bound to the I allele NFKB1 promoter compared with the D allele. Reporter gene assays showed that the I allele promoter had significantly higher activity than the D allele. In agreement with these observations, homozygous II genotype cells had higher p50 expression levels than homozygous DD genotype cells. Cells with the homozygous II genotype showed a greater increase in NOS3 protein expression than did homozygous DD genotype cells under LSS. Functional experiments on volunteers confirmed higher baseline reactive hyperemic forearm blood flow, and, furthermore, the subgroup analysis revealed that DD homozygotes were significantly less prevalent in the exercise responder group compared with II and ID genotypes. We conclude that the (-94)NFKB1 I/D promoter variation contributes to the modulation of vascular function and adaptability to exercise-induced flow shear stress, most likely due to differences in NFKB1 gene transactivity. PMID:17644577

  19. Mild caloric restriction reduces blood pressure and activates endothelial AMPK-PI3K-Akt-eNOS pathway in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, C F; Pulido-Olmo, H; Ruiz-Hurtado, G; Gil-Ortega, M; Aranguez, I; Rubio, M A; Ruiz-Gayo, M; Somoza, B; Fernández-Alfonso, M S

    2015-01-01

    Genetic obesity models exhibit endothelial dysfunction associated to adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) dysregulation. This study aims to assess if mild short-term caloric restriction (CR) restores endothelial AMPK activity leading to an improvement in endothelial function. Twelve-week old Zucker lean and obese (fa/fa) male rats had access to standard chow either ad libitum (AL, n=8) or 80% of AL (CR, n=8) for two weeks. Systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in fa/fa AL rats versus lean AL animals, but was normalized by CR. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-9) to 10(-4) M) was reduced in fa/fa AL compared to control lean AL rats (p<0.001), and restored by CR. The AMPK activator AICAR (10(-5) to 8·10(-3) M) elicited a lower relaxation in fa/fa AL rings that was normalized by CR (p<0.001). Inhibition of PI3K (wortmannin, 10(-7) M), Akt (triciribine, 10(-5) M), or eNOS (L-NAME, 10(-4) M) markedly reduced AICAR-induced relaxation in lean AL, but not in fa/fa AL rats. These inhibitions were restored by CR in Zucker fa/fa rings. These data show that mild short-term CR improves endothelial function and lowers blood pressure in obesity due to the activation of the AMPK-PI3K-Akt-eNOS pathway. PMID:25530153

  20. Extract from Ribes nigrum leaves in vitro activates nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and increases CD39 expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luzak, Boguslawa; Boncler, Magdalena; Rywaniak, Joanna; Dudzinska, Dominika; Rozalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Balcerczak, Ewa; Podsedek, Anna; Redzynia, Malgorzata; Watala, Cezary

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether blackcurrant leaf extract (BLE) modulates endothelium antithrombotic function, namely increases the expression/activity of ADPase (CD39) and augments the production of nitric oxide in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). It was found that BLE with proanthocyanidins (60 % of the total polyphenol content) increased the CD39-positive endothelial cell fraction (up to 10 % for 2.5 μg/ml, and up to 33 % for 15 μg/ml, p < 0.05 or less) in a concentration-dependent manner, and enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (T495 phosphorylation decreased by 31 ± 6 % for 2.5 μg/ml and 48 ± 6 % for 15 μg/ml; S1177 phosphorylation increased by 13 ± 3 % for 2.5 μg/ml and 18 ± 7 % for 15 μg/ml, compared to untreated cells, p < 0.05 or less). Additionally, incubation for 24 or 48 h with BLE at a lower range of polyphenol concentrations, significantly increased cell viability with a maximal effect at 2.5 μg/ml (viability increased by 24.8 ± 1.0 % for 24 h and by 32.5 ± 2.7 % for 48-h time incubation, p < 0.0001). The increased CD39 expression and the increased eNOS activation in HUVEC can be regarded as the beneficial markers of the improvement of antiplatelet action of endothelial cells. Unexpectedly, these assumptions were not confirmed in the experimental model of platelet-endothelial cell interactions. These observations lead to the conclusion that BLE may improve endothelial cell viability at low physiological concentrations without affecting the antiplatelet action of endothelium. PMID:25407137

  1. A variant of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) associated with AMS susceptibility is less common in the Quechua, a high altitude Native population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Ha, Alice Y N; Kidd, Kenneth K; Koehle, Michael S; Rupert, Jim L

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is a vascular enzyme that produces nitric oxide, a transient signaling molecule that by vasodilatation regulates blood flow and pressure. Nitric oxide is believed to play roles in both short-term acclimatization and long-term evolutionary adaptation to environmental hypoxia. Several laboratories, including ours, have shown that variants in NOS3 (the gene encoding eNOS) are overrepresented in individuals with altitude-related illnesses such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS), suggesting that NOS3 genotypes contribute to altitude tolerance. To further test our hypothesis that the G allele at the G894T polymorphism in NOS3 (dbSNP number: rs1799983; protein polymorphism Glu298Asp) is beneficial in hypoxic environments, we compared frequencies of this allele in an altitude-adapted Amerindian population, Quechua of the Andean altiplano, with those in a lowland Amerindian population, Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula. While common in both populations, the G allele was significantly more frequent in the highlanders. Taken together, our data suggest that this variant in NOS3, which has been previously associated with higher levels of nitric oxide, contributes to both acclimatization and adaptation to altitude. PMID:20367485

  2. Differential Activation of Multiple Signaling Pathways Dictates eNOS Upregulation by FGF2 but not VEGF in Placental Artery Endothelial Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Greenwood, Eugenia; Liao, Wu-Xiang; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Dong-Bao

    2008-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), upregulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression, at least in part, via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2/1 (ERK2/1) in ovine fetoplacental artery endothelial (oFPAE) cells. Herein we further investigated the temporal effects of FGF2 and VEGF on other signaling pathways including members (Jun N-terminal kinase JNK1/2 and p38MAPK) of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (PI3K/AKT1), and the tyrosine kinase c-SRC, and examined if either one or more of these pathways play a role in the differential regulation of eNOS by FGF2 and VEGF. We first confirmed that in oFPAE cells, FGF2, but not VEGF, increased eNOS protein. FGF2 stimulated eNOS protein in a time and concentration dependent manner, which also depended on cell density. FGF2 provoked sustained (5 min to 12 h) whereas VEGF only stimulated transient (5 min) ERK2/1 phosphorylation. FGF2 was 1.7-fold more potent in stimulating ERK2/1 phosphorylation than VEGF. FGF2 and VEGF only transiently activated JNK1/2 and AKT1 within 5 min; however, FGF2 was a stronger stimulus than VEGF. FGF2 and VEGF did not significantly activate p38MAPK at 5 min; however, VEGF stimulated p38MAPK phosphorylation at 60 min. VEGF but not FGF2 significantly stimulated c-SRC phosphorylation. Inhibitors of MEK-ERK2/1 (PD98059), JNK1/2 (SP600125) and PI3K (wortmannin), but not p38MAPK (SB203580) and SRC (PP2), decreased the FGF2-increased eNOS protein expression. Thus, the FGF2-induced eNOS protein expression requires activation of multiple signaling pathways including ERK2/1, JNK1/2 and PI3K/AKT1. Differences in intensity and temporal patterns of activation of these pathways by FGF2 and VEGF may account for their differential effects on eNOS expression in OFPAE cells. PMID:18571718

  3. Rumex acetosa L. induces vasorelaxation in rat aorta via activation of PI3-kinase/Akt- AND Ca(2+)-eNOS-NO signaling in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y Y; Su, X H; Jin, J Y; Zhou, Z Q; Sun, S S; Wen, J F; Kang, D G; Lee, H S; Cho, K W; Jin, S N

    2015-12-01

    Rumex acetosa L. (RA) (Polygonaceae) is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) commonly used in clinic for a long history in China and the aerial parts of RA has a wide variety of pharmacological actions such as diuretic, anti-hypertensive, anti-oxidative, and anti-cancer effects. However, the mechanisms involved are to be defined. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect and define the mechanism of action of the ethanol extract of Rumex acetosa L. (ERA) in rat aorta. ERA was examined for its vascular relaxant effect in isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat thoracic aorta and its acute effects on arterial blood pressure. In addition, the roles of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-nitric oxide (NO) signaling in the ERA-induced effects were tested in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The phosphorylation levels of Akt and eNOS were assessed by Western blot analysis in the cultured HUVECs. ERA induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The ERA-induced vasorelaxation was abolished by L-NAME (an NOS inhibitor) or ODQ (a sGC inhibitor), but not by indomethacin. Inhibition of PI3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway markedly reduced the ERA-induced vasorelaxation. In HUVECs, ERA increased NO formation in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited by L-NAME and by removing extracellular Ca(2+). In addition, ERA promoted phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS, which was prevented by wortmannin and LY294002, indicating that ERA induces eNOS phosphorylation through the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Further, in anesthetized rats, intravenously administered ERA decreased arterial blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner through an activation of the NOS-NO system. In summary, the ERA- induced vasorelaxation was dependent on endothelial integrity and NO production, and was mediated by activation of both the endothelial PI3-kinase/Akt- and Ca(2+)-eNOS-NO signaling and muscular NO-sGC-cGMP signaling. PMID:26769840

  4. Rumex acetosa L. induces vasorelaxation in rat aorta via activation of PI3-kinase/Akt- AND Ca(2+)-eNOS-NO signaling in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y Y; Su, X H; Jin, J Y; Zhou, Z Q; Sun, S S; Wen, J F; Kang, D G; Lee, H S; Cho, K W; Jin, S N

    2015-12-01

    Rumex acetosa L. (RA) (Polygonaceae) is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) commonly used in clinic for a long history in China and the aerial parts of RA has a wide variety of pharmacological actions such as diuretic, anti-hypertensive, anti-oxidative, and anti-cancer effects. However, the mechanisms involved are to be defined. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect and define the mechanism of action of the ethanol extract of Rumex acetosa L. (ERA) in rat aorta. ERA was examined for its vascular relaxant effect in isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat thoracic aorta and its acute effects on arterial blood pressure. In addition, the roles of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-nitric oxide (NO) signaling in the ERA-induced effects were tested in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The phosphorylation levels of Akt and eNOS were assessed by Western blot analysis in the cultured HUVECs. ERA induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The ERA-induced vasorelaxation was abolished by L-NAME (an NOS inhibitor) or ODQ (a sGC inhibitor), but not by indomethacin. Inhibition of PI3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway markedly reduced the ERA-induced vasorelaxation. In HUVECs, ERA increased NO formation in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited by L-NAME and by removing extracellular Ca(2+). In addition, ERA promoted phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS, which was prevented by wortmannin and LY294002, indicating that ERA induces eNOS phosphorylation through the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Further, in anesthetized rats, intravenously administered ERA decreased arterial blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner through an activation of the NOS-NO system. In summary, the ERA- induced vasorelaxation was dependent on endothelial integrity and NO production, and was mediated by activation of both the endothelial PI3-kinase/Akt- and Ca(2+)-eNOS-NO signaling and muscular NO-sGC-cGMP signaling.

  5. Overexpression of osteopontin induces angiogenesis of endothelial progenitor cells via the avβ3/PI3K/AKT/eNOS/NO signaling pathway in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingyi; Yan, Wei; Lu, Xiaoming; Qian, Chunfa; Zhang, Junxia; Li, Ping; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Peng; Fu, Zhen; Pu, Peiyu; Kang, Chunshen; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Ning; You, Yongping

    2011-08-01

    Angiogenesis, a hallmark of tumor growth, is regulated by various angiogenic factors. Recent studies have shown that osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted, integrin-binding protein that contributes to glioma progression. However, its effect on the angiogenesis of gliomas is not fully understood. To elucidate the role of OPN in the process of glioma angiogenesis, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were treated with conditioned media of human glioma SHG44 cells overexpressing OPN. Here, we identified that OPN secreted by glioma cells accelerated EPCs angiogenesis in vitro, including proliferation, migration, and tube formation. OPN also induced the activation of AKT and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and increased NO production without affecting the expression of VEGF, VEGFR-1, or VEGFR-2. Moreover, the avβ3 antibody, the PI3-K inhibitor LY294002 and the eNOS inhibitor NMA suppressed the OPN-mediated increase in NO production and angiogenesis in EPCs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that OPN directly stimulates angiogenesis via the avβ3/PI3-K/AKT/eNOS/NO signaling pathway and may play an important role in tumorigenesis by enhancing angiogenesis in gliomas.

  6. Chronic Cigarette Smoking Impairs Erectile Function through Increased Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis, Decreased nNOS, Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Contents in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan. W.; Ho, Dong-Ru; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette use is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). While the association between chronic smoking and ED is well established, the fundamental mechanism(s) of cigarette-related ED are incompletely understood, partly due to no reliable animal model of smoking-induced ED. The present study was designed to validate an in vivo rat model of chronic cigarette-induced ED. Forty 12-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Ten rats served as control group and were exposed only to room air. The remaining 30 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks (n = 10), 12 weeks (n = 10), and 24 weeks (n = 10). At the 24-week time point all rats were assessed with intracavernous pressure (ICP) during cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Blood and urine were collected to measure serum testosterone and oxidative stress, respectively. Corporal tissue was assessed by Western blot for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Penile tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry for endothelial, smooth muscle, and apoptotic content. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in 24-week cigarette exposed animals compared to the control animals. Mean ICP/MAP ratio and cavernosal smooth muscle/endothelial contents were significantly lower in the 12- and 24-week rats compared to control animals. Oxidative stress was significantly higher in the 24-week cigarette exposed group compared to control animals. Mean nNOS expression was significantly lower, and apoptotic index significantly higher, in CS-exposed animals compared to control animals. These findings indicate that the rat model exposure to CS increases apoptosis and oxidative stress and decreases nNOS, endothelial and smooth muscle contents, and ICP in a dose dependent fashion. The rat model is a useful tool for further study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of CS-related ED. PMID:26491965

  7. Chronic Cigarette Smoking Impairs Erectile Function through Increased Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis, Decreased nNOS, Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Contents in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan W; Ho, Dong-Ru; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette use is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). While the association between chronic smoking and ED is well established, the fundamental mechanism(s) of cigarette-related ED are incompletely understood, partly due to no reliable animal model of smoking-induced ED. The present study was designed to validate an in vivo rat model of chronic cigarette-induced ED. Forty 12-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Ten rats served as control group and were exposed only to room air. The remaining 30 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks (n = 10), 12 weeks (n = 10), and 24 weeks (n = 10). At the 24-week time point all rats were assessed with intracavernous pressure (ICP) during cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Blood and urine were collected to measure serum testosterone and oxidative stress, respectively. Corporal tissue was assessed by Western blot for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Penile tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry for endothelial, smooth muscle, and apoptotic content. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in 24-week cigarette exposed animals compared to the control animals. Mean ICP/MAP ratio and cavernosal smooth muscle/endothelial contents were significantly lower in the 12- and 24-week rats compared to control animals. Oxidative stress was significantly higher in the 24-week cigarette exposed group compared to control animals. Mean nNOS expression was significantly lower, and apoptotic index significantly higher, in CS-exposed animals compared to control animals. These findings indicate that the rat model exposure to CS increases apoptosis and oxidative stress and decreases nNOS, endothelial and smooth muscle contents, and ICP in a dose dependent fashion. The rat model is a useful tool for further study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of CS-related ED.

  8. Kallistatin inhibits TGF-β-induced endothelial-mesenchymal transition by differential regulation of microRNA-21 and eNOS expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Youming; Li, Pengfei; Bledsoe, Grant; Yang, Zhi-Rong; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2015-09-10

    Kallistatin, an endogenous protein, consists of two structural elements: active site and heparin-binding domain. Kallistatin exerts beneficial effects on fibrosis by suppressing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β synthesis in animal models. TGF-β is the most potent inducer of endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), which contributes to fibrosis and cancer. MicroRNA (miR)-21 is an important player in organ fibrosis and tumor invasion. Here we investigated the potential role of kallistatin in EndMT via modulation of miR-21 in endothelial cells. Human kallistatin treatment blocked TGF-β-induced EndMT, as evidenced by morphological changes as well as increased endothelial and reduced mesenchymal marker expression. Kallistatin also inhibited TGF-β-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and NADPH oxidase expression and activity. Moreover, kallistatin antagonized TGF-β-induced miR-21 and Snail1 synthesis, Akt phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) synthesis and activation. Kallistatin via its heparin-binding site blocked TGF-β-induced miR-21, Snail1 expression, and ROS formation, as wild-type kallistatin, but not heparin-binding site mutant kallistatin, exerted the effect. Conversely, kallistatin through its active site stimulated the synthesis of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and forkhead box O1 (FoxO1); however, these effects were blocked by genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This is the first study to demonstrate that kallistatin's heparin-binding site is crucial for preventing TGF-β-induced miR-21 and oxidative stress, while its active site is key for stimulating the expression of antioxidant genes via interaction with an endothelial surface tyrosine kinase. These findings reveal novel mechanisms of kallistatin in protection against fibrosis and cancer by suppressing EndMT.

  9. Pterostilbene, an Active Constituent of Blueberries, Stimulates Nitric Oxide Production via Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Hoon; Jeong, Sun-Oh; Chung, Hun-Teag; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, a key process in development of cardiovascular diseases, is largely due to reduced nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Resveratrol has been reported to stimulate NO production via estrogen receptor α (ERα) activation in endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether two natural methylated analogs of resveratrol, pterostilbene (Pts) and trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene (TMS), similarly to resveratrol, could influence endothelial NO release in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In HUVECs exposed to Pts or TMS, NO production and phosphorylation of eNOS, protein kinase B (Akt), and ERα were measured by using a fluorimetric NO assay kit and Western blot analysis, respectively. Dimethylated Pts, but not trimethylated TMS, stimulated dose-dependent NO production via eNOS phosphorylation. Pts also stimulated dose-dependent phosphorylation of Akt, but not of ERα. NO production and eNOS phosphorylation in response to Pts were significantly abolished by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt inhibitor LY294002, but not by the ERα antagonist ICI182780. Our results suggest that Pts, but not TMS, is capable of inducing eNOS phosphorylation and the subsequent NO release, presumably, by activating PI3K/Akt pathway. The potential efficacy of Pts, an active constituent of blueberries, may aid in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases characterized by endothelial dysfunction.

  10. Role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in diabetic nephropathy: lessons from diabetic eNOS knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takamune; Harris, Raymond C

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in many countries. The animal models that recapitulate human DN undoubtedly facilitate our understanding of this disease and promote the development of new diagnostic markers and therapeutic interventions. Based on the clinical evidence showing the association of eNOS dysfunction with advanced DN, we and others have created diabetic mice that lack eNOS expression and shown that eNOS-deficient diabetic mice exhibit advanced nephropathic changes with distinct features of progressive DN, including pronounced albuminuria, nodular glomerulosclerosis, mesangiolysis, and arteriolar hyalinosis. These studies clearly defined a critical role of eNOS in DN and developed a robust animal model of this disease, which enables us to study the pathogenic mechanisms of progressive DN. Further, recent studies with this animal model have explored the novel mechanisms by which eNOS deficiency causes advanced DN and provided many new insights into the pathogenesis of DN. Therefore, here we summarize the findings obtained with this animal model and discuss the roles of eNOS in DN, unresolved issues, and future investigations of this animal model study. PMID:25371905

  11. Oxidized LDL at low concentration promotes in-vitro angiogenesis and activates nitric oxide synthase through PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shan; Wong, Siu Ling; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Low-concentration oxidized LDL enhances angiogenesis through nitric oxide (NO). {yields} Oxidized LDL increases intracellular NO levels via eNOS phosphorylation. {yields} Akt/PI3K signaling mediates oxidized LDL-induced eNOS phosphorylation. -- Abstract: It has long been considered that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) causes endothelial dysfunction and is remarkably related to the development of atherosclerosis. However, the effect of oxLDL at very low concentration (<10 {mu}g/ml) on the endothelial cells remains speculative. Nitric oxide (NO) has a crucial role in the endothelial cell function. In this study, we investigated the effect of oxLDL at low concentration on NO production and proliferation, migration, tube formation of the human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Results showed that oxLDL at 5 {mu}g/ml enhanced HCAEC proliferation, migration and tube formation. These phenomena were accompanied by an increased intracellular NO production. L-NAME (a NOS inhibitor), LY294002 and wortmannin (PI3K inhibitors) could abolish oxLDL-induced angiogenic effects and prevent NO production in the HCAEC. The phosphorylation of Akt, PI3K and eNOS were up-regulated by oxLDL, which was attenuated by LY294002. Our results suggested that oxLDL at low concentration could promote in-vitro angiogenesis and activate nitric oxide synthesis through PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in HCAEC.

  12. Adenosine A2B receptor stimulates angiogenesis by inducing VEGF and eNOS in human microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaolong; Ou, Xuehai; Song, Tao; Zhang, Wentao; Cong, Fei; Zhang, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is critical to wound repair due to its role in providing oxygen and nutrients that are required to support the growth and function of reparative cells in damaged tissues. Adenosine receptors are claimed to be of paramount importance in driving wound angiogenesis by inducing VEGF. However, the underlying mechanisms for the regulation of adenosine receptors in VEGF as well as eNOS remain poorly understood. In the present study, we found that adenosine and the non-selective adenosine receptor agonists (NECA) induced tube formation in HMEC-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Adenosine or NECA (10 µmol/L) significantly augmented the number and length of the segments in comparison with the control. Simultaneously, VEGF and eNOS were significantly upregulated following the administration of 10 µmol/L NECA, while they were suppressed after A2B AR genetic silencing and pharmacological inhibition by MRS1754. In addition, VEGF expression and eNOS bioavailability elimination significantly reduced the formation of capillary-like structures. Furthermore, the activation of A2B AR by NECA significantly increased the intracellular cAMP levels and concomitant CREB phosphorylation, eventually leading to the production of VEGF in HMEC-1. However, the activated PKA-CREB pathway seemed to be invalidated in the induction of eNOS. Moreover, we found that the elicited PI3K/AKT signaling in response to the induction of NECA assisted in regulating eNOS but failed to impact on VEGF generation. In conclusion, the A2B AR activation-driven angiogenesis via cAMP-PKA-CREB mediated VEGF production and PI3K/AKT-dependent upregulation of eNOS in HMEC-1. PMID:25966978

  13. Association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene G894T polymorphism with hypertension risk and complications.

    PubMed

    ALrefai, Abeer A; Habib, Mona Salah El-Din; Yaseen, Rehab I; Gabr, Mahmoud K; Habeeb, Rabab M

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the association of NOS3 polymorphisms with hypertension risk and complications. eNOS (G894T) SNP was performed by RT-PCR on 70 hypertensive patients (25 were hypertensive, 25 were hypertensive with CAD, and 20 were diabetic with hypertension) and 30 age- and gender-matched individuals. Lipid and glucose profile were assessed by standard colorimetric assay. Our results revealed that combination of (GT + TT) genotype and T allele significantly increases the risk of hypertension (OR = 3.86 and 4.33), respectively. Subgroup analysis showed significant association between CAD with eNOS (G894T) mutant genotype (P = 0.002) and allele frequency (P < 0.001). Moreover, the mutant homozygous and heterozygous eNOS genotype together were significantly associated with higher TC, LDLc, (P < 0.001), and TG (P = 0.001). Thus, hypercholesterolemia (P < 0.001 and OR = 12.48) increases the risk of hypertension among T carrier. These results indicated that the T carriers significantly increase hypertension risk and complication (CAD), mainly with hypercholesterolemia and in elderly. PMID:27557897

  14. Genistein activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase in broiler pulmonary arterial endothelial cells by an Akt-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Nie, Wei; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhang, Bingkun; Wang, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Deregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the development of multiple cardiovascular diseases. Our recent study demonstrated that genistein supplementation attenuates pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers by restoration of endothelial function. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by using broiler pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs). Our results showed that genistein stimulated a rapid phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179 which was associated with activation of eNOS/NO axis. Further study indicated that the activation of eNOS was not mediated through estrogen receptors or tyrosine kinase inhibition, but via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-dependent signaling pathway, as the eNOS activity and related NO release were largely abolished by pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K or Akt. Thus, our findings revealed a critical function of Akt in mediating genistein-stimulated eNOS activity in PAECs, partially accounting for the beneficial effects of genistein on the development of cardiovascular diseases observed in animal models. PMID:20926919

  15. Estrogen-related receptor alpha induces the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Rebecca A.; Gaillard, Stéphanie; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. In addition to its function as a metabolic regulator, ERRα has been implicated in the growth and progression of several malignancies. In the setting of breast cancer, not only is ERRα a putative negative prognostic factor, but we have recently found that knockdown of its expression retards tumor growth in a xenograft model of this disease. The specific aspects of ERRα function that are responsible for its actions in breast cancer, however, remain unclear. Using the coactivator PGC-1α as a protein ligand to regulate ERRα activity, we analyzed the effects of this receptor on gene expression in the ERα-positive MCF-7 cell line. This analysis led to the identification of a large number of potential ERRα target genes, many of which were subsequently validated in other breast cancer cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate in this study that activation of ERRα in several different breast cancer cell lines leads to a significant increase in VEGF mRNA expression, an activity that translates into an increase in VEGF protein secretion. The induction of VEGF results from the interaction of ERRα with specific ERR-responsive elements within the VEGF promoter. These findings suggest that ERRα-dependent induction of VEGF may contribute to the overall negative phenotype observed in tumors in which ERRα is expressed and provide validation for its use as a therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:19429439

  16. Redox-Sensitive Up-Regulation of eNOS by Purple Grape Juice in Endothelial Cells: Role of PI3-Kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, JNK, FoxO1 and FoxO3a

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Sherzad; Kim, Jong Hun; Frota Madeira, Socorro Vanesca; Bronner, Christian; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B.

    2013-01-01

    The vascular protective effect of grape-derived polyphenols has been attributable, in part, to their direct action on blood vessels by stimulating the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to determine whether Concord grape juice (CGJ), which contains high levels of polyphenols, stimulates the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cells and, if so, to determine the signaling pathway involved. CGJ dose- and time-dependently increased eNOS mRNA and protein levels and this effect is associated with an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ on eNOS mRNA is not associated with an increased eNOS mRNA stability and inhibited by antioxidants such as MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase, and by wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3-kinase), SB 203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK), and SP 600125 (an inhibitor of JNK). Moreover, CGJ induced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells and this effect is inhibited by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase. The CGJ-induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK kinases is abolished by MnTMPyP. CGJ induced phosphorylation of transcription factors FoxO1 and FoxO3a, which regulate negatively eNOS expression, and this effect is prevented by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, wortmannin, SB203580 and SP600125. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the FoxO3a protein is associated with the eNOS promoter in control cells and that CGJ induced its dissociation. Thus, the present study indicates that CGJ up-regulates the expression of eNOS mRNA and protein leading to an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ is a redox-sensitive event involving PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK and JNK pathways, and the inactivation of the FoxO transcription factors, FoxO1 and FoxO3a, thereby preventing their repression of the eNOS gene. PMID:23533577

  17. Target sequencing, cell experiments, and a population study establish endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene as hypertension susceptibility gene.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Erika; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Thijs, Lutgarde; Lupoli, Sara; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; D'Avila, Francesca; Tikhonoff, Valerie; De Astis, Silvia; Barcella, Matteo; Seidlerová, Jitka; Benaglio, Paola; Malyutina, Sofia; Frau, Francesca; Velayutham, Dinesh; Benfante, Roberta; Zagato, Laura; Title, Alexandra; Braga, Daniele; Marek, Diana; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Casiglia, Edoardo; Filipovsky, Jan; Nikitin, Yuri; Rivolta, Carlo; Manunta, Paolo; Beckmann, Jacques S; Barlassina, Cristina; Cusi, Daniele; Staessen, Jan A

    2013-11-01

    A case-control study revealed association between hypertension and rs3918226 in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene promoter (minor/major allele, T/C allele). We aimed at substantiating these preliminary findings by target sequencing, cell experiments, and a population study. We sequenced the 140-kb genomic area encompassing the eNOS gene. In HeLa and HEK293T cells transfected with the eNOS promoter carrying either the T or the C allele, we quantified transcription by luciferase assay. In 2722 randomly recruited Europeans (53.0% women; mean age 40.1 years), we studied blood pressure change and incidence of hypertension in relation to rs3918226, using multivariable-adjusted models. Sequencing confirmed rs3918226, a binding site of E-twenty six transcription factors, as the single nucleotide polymorphism most closely associated with hypertension. In T compared with C transfected cells, eNOS promoter activity was from 20% to 40% (P<0.01) lower. In the population, systolic/diastolic blood pressure increased over 7.6 years (median) by 9.7/6.8 mm Hg in 28 TT homozygotes and by 3.8/1.9 mm Hg in 2694 C allele carriers (P≤0.0004). The blood pressure rise was 5.9 mm Hg systolic (confidence interval [CI], 0.6-11.1; P=0.028) and 4.8 mm Hg diastolic (CI, 1.5-8.2; P=0.0046) greater in TT homozygotes, with no differences between the CT and CC genotypes (P≥0.90). Among 2013 participants normotensive at baseline, 692 (34.4%) developed hypertension. The hazard ratio and attributable risk associated with TT homozygosity were 2.04 (CI, 1.24-3.37; P=0.0054) and 51.0%, respectively. In conclusion, rs3918226 in the eNOS promoter tags a hypertension susceptibility locus, TT homozygosity being associated with lesser transcription and higher risk of hypertension.

  18. Target sequencing, cell experiments, and a population study establish endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene as hypertension susceptibility gene.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Erika; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Thijs, Lutgarde; Lupoli, Sara; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; D'Avila, Francesca; Tikhonoff, Valerie; De Astis, Silvia; Barcella, Matteo; Seidlerová, Jitka; Benaglio, Paola; Malyutina, Sofia; Frau, Francesca; Velayutham, Dinesh; Benfante, Roberta; Zagato, Laura; Title, Alexandra; Braga, Daniele; Marek, Diana; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Casiglia, Edoardo; Filipovsky, Jan; Nikitin, Yuri; Rivolta, Carlo; Manunta, Paolo; Beckmann, Jacques S; Barlassina, Cristina; Cusi, Daniele; Staessen, Jan A

    2013-11-01

    A case-control study revealed association between hypertension and rs3918226 in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene promoter (minor/major allele, T/C allele). We aimed at substantiating these preliminary findings by target sequencing, cell experiments, and a population study. We sequenced the 140-kb genomic area encompassing the eNOS gene. In HeLa and HEK293T cells transfected with the eNOS promoter carrying either the T or the C allele, we quantified transcription by luciferase assay. In 2722 randomly recruited Europeans (53.0% women; mean age 40.1 years), we studied blood pressure change and incidence of hypertension in relation to rs3918226, using multivariable-adjusted models. Sequencing confirmed rs3918226, a binding site of E-twenty six transcription factors, as the single nucleotide polymorphism most closely associated with hypertension. In T compared with C transfected cells, eNOS promoter activity was from 20% to 40% (P<0.01) lower. In the population, systolic/diastolic blood pressure increased over 7.6 years (median) by 9.7/6.8 mm Hg in 28 TT homozygotes and by 3.8/1.9 mm Hg in 2694 C allele carriers (P≤0.0004). The blood pressure rise was 5.9 mm Hg systolic (confidence interval [CI], 0.6-11.1; P=0.028) and 4.8 mm Hg diastolic (CI, 1.5-8.2; P=0.0046) greater in TT homozygotes, with no differences between the CT and CC genotypes (P≥0.90). Among 2013 participants normotensive at baseline, 692 (34.4%) developed hypertension. The hazard ratio and attributable risk associated with TT homozygosity were 2.04 (CI, 1.24-3.37; P=0.0054) and 51.0%, respectively. In conclusion, rs3918226 in the eNOS promoter tags a hypertension susceptibility locus, TT homozygosity being associated with lesser transcription and higher risk of hypertension. PMID:24019403

  19. Association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphism (Glu 298 Asp) with coronary artery disease in subjects from Multan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Taqddus, Asia; Saad, Abu-Bakar Ali; Pasha, Burhan; Latif, Muhammad; Safdar, Sohail; Shaikh, Rehan Sadiq; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2014-03-01

    Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) is the most common disease and cause of mortality in both genders across the world and certain risk factors i.e. age, gender, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, drugs usage, weight etc are known to be associated with the disease. The aim of this study was to find if there is any correlation exists between ACS and hereditary genetic defect in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) gene as eNOS generates Nitric oxide in blood vessels and regulates the vascular tone hence directly affecting the cardiovascular function. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (Glu 298 Asp) in ecNOS was determined in 280 subjects, from Southern Punjab (in Pakistan) population, including (160 ACS patients and 120 healthy controls) by PCR-RFLP method and genotype was correlated with various risk factors as well as with serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Our results indicated that the genotype Glu 298 Asp was not associated with ACS but when various studied parameters were compared among patients suffering from various forms of ACS and their healthy controls, it was observed that age (45-55 years) (P = 0.05), gender (male) (P < 0.001), education (P<0.001), family history (P=0.03), hypertension (P<0.001), diabetes (P<0.01) and smoking habit (P = 0.03) were the significantly different parameters among them and may be associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Cholesterol (161.5±79 mg/dL) level was found to be higher in patients (P = 0.04) than controls while triglyceride remained unaffected (P = 0.87) in both groups. PMID:24577926

  20. The estrogen-dependent baroreflex dysfunction caused by nicotine in female rats is mediated via NOS/HO inhibition: Role of sGC/PI3K/MAPKERK.

    PubMed

    Fouda, Mohamed A; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; El-Gowilly, Sahar M; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2015-12-15

    We have previously reported that estrogen (E2) exacerbates the depressant effect of chronic nicotine on arterial baroreceptor activity in female rats. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this nicotine effect is modulated by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and/or heme oxygenase (HO) and their downstream soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling. We investigated the effects of (i) inhibition or facilitation of NOS or HO on the interaction of nicotine (2mg/kg/day i.p., 2 weeks) with reflex bradycardic responses to phenylephrine in ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated with E2 or vehicle, and (ii) central pharmacologic inhibition of sGC, PI3K, or MAPKs on the interaction. The data showed that the attenuation by nicotine of reflex bradycardia in OVXE2 rats was abolished after treatment with hemin (HO inducer) or l-arginine (NOS substrate). The hemin or l-arginine effect disappeared after inhibition of NOS (Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, L-NAME) and HO (zinc protoporphyrin IX, ZnPP), respectively, denoting the interaction between the two enzymatic pathways. E2-receptor blockade (ICI 182,780) reduced baroreflexes in OVXE2 rats but had no effect on baroreflex improvement induced by hemin or l-arginine. Moreover, baroreflex enhancement by hemin was eliminated following intracisternal (i.c.) administration of wortmannin, ODQ, or PD98059 (inhibitors of PI3K, sGC, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases, MAPKERK, respectively). In contrast, the hemin effect was preserved after inhibition of MAPKp38 (SB203580) or MAPKJNK (SP600125). Overall, NOS/HO interruption underlies baroreflex dysfunction caused by nicotine in female rats and the facilitation of NOS/HO-coupled sGC/PI3K/MAPKERK signaling might rectify the nicotine effect.

  1. Estrogen receptors and endothelium.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Fontaine, Coralie; Billon-Galés, Audrey; Favre, Julie; Laurell, Henrik; Lenfant, Françoise; Gourdy, Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Estrogens, and in particular 17beta-estradiol (E2), play a pivotal role in sexual development and reproduction and are also implicated in a large number of physiological processes, including the cardiovascular system. Both acetylcholine-induced and flow-dependent vasodilation are preserved or potentiated by estrogen treatment in both animal models and humans. Indeed, E2 increases the endothelial production of nitric oxide and prostacyclin and prevents early atheroma through endothelial-mediated mechanisms. Furthermore, whereas it prevents endothelial activation, E2 potentiates the ability of several subpopulations of the circulating or resident immune cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The balance between these 2 actions could determine the final effect in a given pathophysiological process. E2 also promotes endothelial healing, as well as angiogenesis. Estrogen actions are essentially mediated by 2 molecular targets: estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and ERbeta. The analysis of mouse models targeted for ERalpha or ERbeta demonstrated a prominent role of ERalpha in vascular biology. ERalpha directly modulates transcription of target genes through 2 activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2. Interestingly, an AF-1-deficient ERalpha isoform can be physiologically expressed in the endothelium and appears sufficient to mediate most of the vasculoprotective actions of E2. In contrast, AF-1 is necessary for the E2 actions in reproductive targets. Thus, it appears conceivable to uncouple the vasculoprotective and sexual actions with appropriate selective ER modulators. PMID:20631350

  2. PI3K/AKT signaling pathway plays a role in enhancement of eNOS activity by recombinant human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Han, Zhen-Hua; Li, Yong-Qin; Xue, Jia-Hong; Gao, Deng-Feng; Wu, Xiao-San; Wang, Cong-Xia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the activity of recombinant human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (rhACE2) promoted the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured in vitro. Then treated with Ang II (1×10-6 mol/L) for 24 h. The rhACE2 (100 μmol/L) was added and incubated for 5, 10, 15, 30, 60 min respectively which was based on Ang II intervention. The effect of rhACE2 on phosphorylation eNOS level was also observed in the presence of LY294002 (10 μmol/L) (PI3K/AKT inhibitors). Griess reagent method was applied to measure NO contents in cell culture supernatant, RT-PCR to detect the expression of eNOSmRNA in HUVEC, and Western blot to detect the expression of eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS. In Ang II intervention group, NO contents were significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05). Through rhACE2 treatment, the NO contents in cell culture medium and the expression level of phosphorylated eNOS were significantly higher than in Ang II intervention group (P < 0.05), but eNOSmRNA and non-phosphorylated eNOS protein expression level showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). After HUVEC was intervened by PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitor LY294002, the expression level of phosphorylated eNOS was significantly lower than that in the rhACE2 30 min treatment group (P < 0.05). rhACE2 may reduce the activity of Ang II inhibited endothelial cell eNOS, which can be blocked by PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitor LY294002, suggesting PI3K/AKT signaling pathway plays an important role in rhACE2’s promotion of the activity of endothelial cell eNOS. PMID:25550859

  3. T11TS impedes glioma angiogenesis by inhibiting VEGF signaling and pro-survival PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway with concomitant upregulation of PTEN in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Acharya, Sagar; Basu, Anjan Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2013-05-01

    The crucial role of angiogenesis in malignant glioma progression makes it a potential target of therapeutic intervention in glioma. Previous studies from our lab showed that sheep erythrocyte membrane glycopeptide T11-target structure (T11TS) has potent anti-neoplastic and immune stimulatory effects in rodent glioma model. In the present study we investigated the anti-angiogenic potential of T11TS and deciphered the underlying molecular mechanism of its anti-angiogenic action in malignant glioma. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is crucial for initiating tumor angiogenic responses. The present preclinical study was designed to evaluate the effect of T11TS therapy on VEGF and VEGFR-2 expression in glioma associated brain endothelial cells and to determine the effects of in vivo T11TS administration on expression of PTEN and downstream pro-survival PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway proteins in glioma associated brain endothelial cells. T11TS therapy in rodent glioma model significantly downregulated expression of VEGF along with its receptor VEGFR-2 and inhibited the expression of pro-survival PI3K/Akt/eNOS proteins in glioma associated brain endothelial cells. Furthermore, T11TS therapy in glioma induced rats significantly upregulated brain endothelial cell PTEN expression, inhibited eNOS phosphorylation and production of nitric oxide in glioma associated brain endothelial cells. Taken together our findings suggest that T11TS can be introduced as an effective angiogenesis inhibitor in human glioma as T11TS targets multiple levels of angiogenic signaling cascade impeding glioma neovascularisation.

  4. Estrogen overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002584.htm Estrogen overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Estrogen is a female hormone. Estrogen overdose occurs when ...

  5. XJP-1 protects endothelial cells from oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis by inhibiting NADPH oxidase subunit expression and modulating the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Wang, Qiujuan; Guo, Qinglong; Xu, Jinyi; Wu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial apoptosis triggered by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) can accelerate the progression of endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis. (±)7,8-Dihydroxy-3-methyl-isochromanone-4 (XJP-1) is a natural phenolic compound derived from banana peel. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effect of XJP-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to ox-LDL and explored underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that in the presence of ox-LDL, XJP-1 significantly attenuated ox-LDL-mediated cytotoxicity, apoptosis, caspase-3 activation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and NADPH oxidase subunit (p22phox and p47phox) expression in HUVECs. In addition, the anticytotoxic and anti-apoptotic effect of XJP-1 was partially inhibited by a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002), an Akt inhibitor (SH-6), a specific eNOS inhibitor (l-NAME) and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor (DPI). In exploring the underlying mechanisms of XJP-1 action, we found that XJP-1 eliminated ox-LDL-induced dephosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in a dose-dependent manner. However, XJP-1 alone upregulation of Akt and eNOS phosphorylation were blocked by LY294002 and SH-6. Moreover, XJP-1 increased NO production, but this effect was abolished by LY294002, SH-6 and l-NAME. The inhibition of ox-LDL-induced endothelial dysfunction by XJP-1 is due at least in part to its anti-oxidant activity and its ability to modulate the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway.

  6. Tetramethylpyrazine attenuates TNF-α-induced iNOS expression in human endothelial cells: Involvement of Syk-mediated activation of PI3K-IKK-IκB signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhen; Li, Zhiliang; Chen, Song; Pan, Jieyi; Ma, Xiaochun

    2013-08-15

    Endothelial cells produce nitric oxide (NO) by activation of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and transcription of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We explored the effect of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a compound derived from chuanxiong, on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced iNOS in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and explored the signal pathways involved by using RT-PCR and Western blot. TMP suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of iNOS by inhibiting IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation, IκB degradation and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation, which were required for NO gene transcription. Exposure to wortmannin abrogated IKK/IκB/NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression, suggesting activation of such a signal pathway might be phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) dependent. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) inhibitor piceatannol significantly inhibited NO production. Furthermore, piceatannol obviously suppressed TNF-α-induced IκB phosphorylation and the downstream NF-κB activation, suggesting that Syk is an upstream key regulator in the activation of PI3K/IKK/IκB-mediated signaling. TMP significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of Syk and PI3K. Our data indicate that TMP might repress iNOS expression, at least in part, through its inhibitory effect of Syk-mediated PI3K phosphorylation in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. -- Highlights: •TMP suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of iNOS by inhibiting IKK/IκB/NF-κB pathway. •PI3K inhibitor wortmannin abrogated IKK/IκB/NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression. •Syk inhibitor piceatannol repressed PI3K/IKK/IκB mediated NO production. •Syk is an upstream regulator in the activation of PI3K/IKK/IκB-mediated signaling. •TMP might repress iNOS expression through Syk-mediated PI3K pathway.

  7. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) gene G894T and VNTR polymorphisms are closely associated with the risk of ischemic stroke development for Asians: meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaolong

    2014-01-01

    Although the relationships between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphisms (including G894T, VNTR and T786C) and risk of ischemic stroke (IS) have been extensively studied, controversial results have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the relationships between them by using a meta-analysis. Literatures were retrieved through the following databases: Medline, Embase and Wangfang (updated to January 1st, 2013). Fixed- or random-effects model was used to calculate pooled odds ratio and 95 % confidence interval (OR and 95 % CI). A total of 31 case-control studies including 8,547 patients and 9,117 controls were included in this meta-analysis eventually. For eNOS G894T polymorphism, the results indicated that TT genotype was significantly associated with increased risk of IS incidence compared to G allele (OR and 95 % CI 1.25 (1.09-1.42) for TT vs. GT+GG, P < 0.001). When subgroup analysis was conducted according to ethnicities, T allele was significantly associated with risk of IS for Asians rather than for Caucasians. For eNOS VNTR polymorphism, 4aa genotype was significantly associated with risk of IS incidence compared to 4bb genotype (OR (95 % CI) 2.22 (1.66-2.97) for aa vs. bb, P < 0.001). Similarly, when subgroup analyses were conducted, 4aa was closely associated with increased risk of IS for Asians rather than for Caucasians. For eNOS T786C polymorphism, it was not associated with risk of IS incidence. In conclusion, this study indicated that eNOS 894T and VNTR 4a allele was significantly associated with risk of IS incidence for Asians. However, eNOS T786C polymorphism was not a likely risk factor for IS incidence.

  9. Association of endothelial microparticle with NO, eNOS, ET-1, and fractional flow reserve in patients with coronary intermediate lesions.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Chou, Yuan I Scarlet; Kong, Jinge; Li, Jizhao; Pan, Bing; Cui, Ming; Zhou, Enchen; Zhang, Yongzhen; Zheng, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticle (EMP) is a biomarker for endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study is to investigate the utility of EMP in evaluating coronary intermediate lesions. Participants included 49 patients with coronary intermediate lesions and 24 subjects with normal coronary arteries. Among these subjects, 28 patients accepted fractional flow reserve (FFR). Results showed that level of EMP was significantly higher in the intermediate lesion group. No correlation was found between EMP and FFR value, suggesting that circulating EMP is a systemic marker rather than a focal one. PMID:26554436

  10. GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zilin; Cheng, Liang; Liang, Hongliang; Duan, Weixun; Hu, Jing; Zhi, Weiwei; Yang, Jinbao; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhao, Minggao; Liu, Jincheng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of estrogen receptors on diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction is critical, but ambiguous. Individuals with diabetic vascular disease may require estrogen receptor-specific targeted therapy in the future. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has beneficial effects on vascular function. However, its fundamental mechanisms are unclear. The RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway contributes to diabetic vascular complications, whereas estrogen can suppress Rho-kinase function. Thus, we assumed that GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular dysfunction. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in this process. Vascular endothelial cells and ex vivo cultured ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6 mouse aortae were treated with high glucose (HG) alone or in combination with GPER agonist (G1). G1 treatment was also administered to OVX db/db mice for 8 weeks. An ex-vivo isovolumic myograph was used to analyze the endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent contraction of mouse aortae. Apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation were attenuated in G1-pretreated vascular endothelial cells. G1 significantly decreased the phosphorylation of inhibitory endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase residue threonine 495 (eNOS Thr495), inhibited RhoA expression, and increased NO production. Additionally, G1 rescued the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and inhibited RhoA activation in the thoracic aorta of OVX db/db mice and ex-vivo cultured OVX C57BL/6 mouse aortae treated with HG. Estrogens acting via GPER could protect vascular endothelium, and GPER activation might elicit ERα-independent effect to inhibit RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway. Additionally, GPER activation might reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting RhoA activation. Thus, the results of the present study suggest a new therapeutic paradigm for end-stage vascular dysfunction by inhibiting RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway via GPER activation. PMID:26785611

  11. [T(-786) --> C-polymorphism of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase promoter gene (eNOS) and exercise performance in sport].

    PubMed

    Drozdovs'ka, S B; Lysenko, O M; Dosenko, V Ie; Il'ïn, V M; Moĭbenko, O O

    2013-01-01

    Given the significant impact of the T(-786) --> C-polymorphism of the eNOS gene in the process of adaptation to physical stress, we aimed to investigate the effect of this polymorphism on physical performance in sportsmen and establish the possibility of its use as a marker of predisposition to the sport. DNA of 516 people, of which 195 qualified athletes and 321 people who had no experience of regular exercise was investigated. The frequency of genotypes and alleles of the T(-786) --> C-polymorphism of the eNOS gene in groups of athletes of different sports, the distribution of genotypes and alleles among athletes and those who are not involved in sports were studied. T allele frequency in a group of athletes on 6.4% (r(chi)2 = 0.03) than in control group. The association of the T allele of the T(-786) --> C-polymorphism of the eNOS gene with a predisposition for speed and power was established. In the group of athletes in speed and power sports, the T-allele frequency was higher than that in the control group by 12% (r(chi)2 = 0.002) and than in group endurance sports by 10% (r(chi)2 = 0.004). We found that the T(-786) --> C-polymorphism of the eNOS gene influence the power and efficiency ofthe functioning of the cardiorespiratory system of athletes during exercise.

  12. The 27-bp repeat polymorphism in intron 4 (27 bp-VNTR) of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene is associated with albumin to creatinine ratio in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Nath, Subrata D; He, Xin; Voruganti, V Saroja; Blangero, John; MacCluer, Jean W; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Arar, Nedal H; Abboud, Hanna E; Thameem, Farook

    2009-11-01

    The T-786C, Glu298Asp, and 27 bp variable number of tandem repeats (27 bp-VNTR-a/b) polymorphsims of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene are thought to alter nitric oxide production and contribute to the development of vascular and renal disease risk. The objective of this study is to investigate whether these three polymorphisms examined previously by others are associated with cardiovascular and renal disease risk in Mexican Americans. Study participants (N = 848; 21 families) were genotyped for T-786C, Glu298Asp, and 27 bp-VNTR-a/b polymorphisms by PCR followed by restriction digestion. Association analyses were performed by a measured genotype approach implemented in the program SOLAR. Of the phenotypes (type 2 diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, waist circumference, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR), and estimated glomerular filtration rate) examined for association, the 27 bp-VNTR-a/b variant exhibited statistically significant association with ACR (P = 0.047) after accounting for the trait specific covariate effects. In addition, the promoter variant (T-786C) showed a significant association with triglycerides (P = 0.034) after accounting for covariate influences. In conclusion, the present study adds evidence to the role of eNOS candidate gene polymorphisms in modulating the risk factors related to cardiovascular-renal disease in Mexican Americans although the magnitude of the genetic effect is small. PMID:19468830

  13. Dopamine D2-Receptor-Mediated Increase in Vascular and Endothelial NOS Activity Ameliorates Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Caudell, Danielle N.; Cooper, Matthew; Clark, Joseph F.; Shutter, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious complication resulting in delayed neurological deficit, increased morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stays, and rehabilitation time. It afflicts approximately 35 per 100,000 Americans per year, and there is currently no effective therapy. We present in vitro data suggesting that increasing intrinsic nitric oxide relaxation pathways in vascular smooth muscle via dopaminergic agonism ameliorates cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Methods Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with cerebral vasospasm after SAH (CSFV) was used to induce vasospasm in porcine carotid artery in vitro. Dopamine was added to test its ability to reverse spasm, and specific dopamine receptor antagonists were used to determine which receptor mediated the protection. Immunohistochemical techniques confirmed the presence of dopamine receptor subtypes and the involvement of NOS in the mechanism of dopamine protection. Results Dopamine receptor 1, 2, and 3 subtypes are all present in porcine carotid artery. Dopamine significantly reversed spasm in vitro (67% relaxation), and this relaxation was prevented by Haloperidol, a D2R antagonist (10% relaxation, P < 0.05), but not by D1 or D3-receptor antagonism. Both eNOS and iNOS expression were increased significantly in response to CSFV alone, and this was significantly enhanced by addition of dopamine, and blocked by Haloperidol. Conclusion Cerebral vasospasm is significantly reversed in a functional measure of vasospasm in vitro by dopamine, via a D2R-mediated pathway. The increase in NOS protein seen in both the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle in response to CSFV is enhanced by dopamine, also in a D2R-dependent mechanism. PMID:18807216

  14. The role of NOS2A -954G/C and vascular endothelial growth factor +936C/T polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nonproliferative retinopathy risk management.

    PubMed

    Porojan, Mihai Dumitru; Cătană, Andreea; Popp, Radu A; Dumitrascu, Dan L; Bala, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains one of the major health problems in Europe. Retinopathy is one of the major causes of morbidity in T2DM, strongly influencing the evolution and prognosis of these patients. In the last 2 decades, several studies have been conducted to identify the possible genetic susceptibility factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. However, there is little data related to the involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene polymorphisms in the T2DM Caucasian population. The objective of this study was to identify a possible connection between NOS2A -954G/C (rs2297518) and VEGF +936C/T (rs3025039) polymorphisms and the risk of developing T2DM and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy in a Caucasian population group. We investigated 200 patients diagnosed with T2DM and 208 controls. Genotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Statistical and comparative analyses (Fisher's exact test) for dominant and recessive models of NOS2A -954G/C and VEGF +936C/T polymorphisms revealed an increased risk of T2DM (χ (2)=8.14, phi =0.141, P=0.004, odds ratio [OR] =2.795, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.347-5.801; χ (2)=18.814, phi =0.215, P<0.001, OR =2.59, 95% CI =1.675-4.006, respectively). Also, comparative analysis for the recessive model (using Pearson's chi-square test [χ (2)] and the phi coefficient [phi]) reveals that the variant CC genotype of NOS2A gene is more frequently associated with T2DM without retinopathy (χ (2)=3.835, phi =-0.138, P=0.05, OR =0.447, 95% CI =0.197-1.015). In conclusion, the results of the study place VEGF +936C/T polymorphisms among the genetic risk factor for T2DM, whereas NOS2A -954G/C polymorphisms act like a protective individual factor for nonproliferative retinopathy. PMID:26664124

  15. Endothelial Caveolar Subcellular Domain Regulation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ramadoss, Jayanth; Pastore, Mayra B.; Magness, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Complex regulatory processes alter the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) leading to nitric oxide (NO) production by endothelial cells under various physiological states. These complex processes require specific sub-cellular eNOS partitioning between plasma membrane caveolar domains and non-caveolar compartments.eNOS translocation from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments is important for eNOS activation and subsequent NO biosynthesis. We present data reviewing and interpreting information: 1) the coupling of endothelial plasma membrane receptor systems in the caveolar structure relative to eNOS trafficking; 2) how eNOS trafficking relates to specific protein-protein interaction for inactivation and activation of eNOS; and 3) how these complex mechanisms confer specific subcellular location relative to eNOS multi-site phosphorylation and signaling.Dysfunction in regulation of eNOS activation may contribute to several disease states; in particular gestational endothelial abnormalities (preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, etc) that have life-long deleterious health consequences that predispose the offspring to develop hypertensive disease, type II diabetes and adiposity.1 PMID:23745825

  16. Influence of eNOS gene 4a/b VNTR polymorphism on development of endothelial dysfunction and respiratory system disorders in children - residents of radioactively contaminated areas.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Ye I; Kolpakov, Ye; Zyhalo, V M; Lytvynets, O M; Kondrashova, V H; Vdovenko, V Yu; Skvarska, O O; Leonovych, O S

    2015-12-01

    Meta roboty – doslidyty rol' polimorfizmu geniv eNOS u rozvytku endotelial'noI dysfunktsiI ta funktsional' nykh rozladiv systemy dykhannia u ditey – meshkantsiv radioaktyvno zabrudnenykh terytoriy.Materialy i metody doslidzhennia. Dlia vyznachennia mozhlyvykh asotsiatyvnykh zv’iazkiv polimorfizmu u 4 mu introni gena eNOS z pokaznykamy, shcho kharakteryzuiut' funktsional'nyy stan endoteliiu ta bronkholegenevoI sys temy, provedeno obstezhennia 184 ditey. Z nykh osnovnu grupu sklaly 135 ditey – meshkantsiv radioaktyvno zabrud nenykh terytoriy, kontrol'nu – 49 ditey, iaki prozhyvaly v „chystykh ” shchodo radioaktyvnogo zabrudnennia regionakh i ne nalezhaly do postrazhdalykh vnaslidok Chornobyl's'koI avariI kontyngentiv. Provodyly molekuliarno gene tychne doslidzhennia z vyznachenniam polimorfizmu v 4 mu introni gena eNOS. Doslidzhennia ventyliatsiynoI spro mozhnosti legeniv otsiniuvaly za dopomogoiu metodu pnevmotakhografiI. Dlia reiestratsiI endoteliyzalezhnoI reaktsiI sudynnogo rusla na zminy umov krovopostachannia vykorystovuvaly termografichnyy sposib. Vyznachennia rivniv azotystykh spoluk NO2 ta NO3 provodyly za standartnoiu metodykoiu z vykorystanniam reaktyvu Grissa. Riven' inkorporovanogo 137Cs v organizmi vyznachaly za dopomogoiu lichyl'nyka vyprominiuvannia liudyny Skrynner 3M vyrobnytstva Instytutu ekologiI liudyny.Rezul'taty. Dity osnovnoI grupy za chastotoiu polimorfnykh 4a/b genotypiv ta aleliv 4a i 4b gena eNOS ne vidriznia lysia vid kontroliu ta danykh literatury. U ditey osnovnoI grupy z genotypom 4a/4b u porivnianni z dit'my, iaki ma ly genotyp 4b/4b, vidmichalosia zbil'shennia tryvalosti vidnovlennia krovoobigu do vykhidnogo rivnia pislia ok liuziynoI proby; sposterigalosia znyzhennia vmistu nitrytu v syrovattsi krovi; zmenshennia integral'nykh pokaznykiv elastychnosti i roztiazhnosti legenevoI tkanyny, prokhidnosti dykhal'nykh shliakhiv; u 1,5 raza chastishe reiestruvalysia oznaky bronkhospazmu. Tsi nespryiatlyvi efekty buly

  17. Estrogen, nitric oxide, and hypertension differentially modulate agonist-induced contractile responses in female transgenic (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Brosnihan, K Bridget; Li, Ping; Figueroa, Jorge P; Ganten, Detlev; Ferrario, Carlos M

    2008-05-01

    Clinical trials revealed that estrogen may result in cardiovascular risk in patients with coronary heart disease, despite earlier studies demonstrating that estrogen provided cardiovascular protection. It is possible that the preexisting condition of hypertension and the ability of estrogen to activate the renin-angiotensin system could confound its beneficial effects. Our hypothesis is that the attenuation of estrogen to agonist-induced vasoconstrictor responses through the activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is impaired by hypertension. We investigated the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) replacement in normotensive Sprague-Dawley (SD) and (mRen2)27 hypertensive transgenic (TG) rats on contractile responses to three vasoconstrictors, angiotensin II (ANG II), serotonin (5-HT), and phenylephrine (PE), and on the modulatory role of vascular NO to these responses. The aorta was isolated from ovariectomized SD and TG rats treated chronically with 5 mg E(2) or placebo (P). The isometric tension of the aortic rings was measured in organ chambers, and endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the rat aorta was detected using Western blot analysis. E(2) treatment increased eNOS expression in the SD and TG aorta and reduced ANG II- and 5-HT- but not PE-induced contractions in SD and TG rats. The inhibition of NOS with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester enhanced ANG II-, 5-HT-, and PE-induced contractions in P-treated and ANG II and PE responses in E(2)-treated SD and TG rats. Only the responses to 5-HT were augmented in hypertensive rats. In conclusion, this study shows that the preexisting condition of hypertension augmented the vascular responsiveness of 5-HT, whereas the attenuation of estrogen by ANG II and 5-HT vascular responses was not impaired by hypertension. The adrenergic agonist was unresponsive to estrogen treatment. The contribution of NO as a factor contributing to the relative refractoriness of the vascular responses is dependent on the nature of the

  18. A multilevel prediction of physiological response to challenge: Interactions among child maltreatment, neighborhood crime, endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (eNOS), and GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha-6 gene (GABRA6).

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Manly, Jody Todd; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-11-01

    Physiological response to stress has been linked to a variety of healthy and pathological conditions. The current study conducted a multilevel examination of interactions among environmental toxins (i.e., neighborhood crime and child maltreatment) and specific genetic polymorphisms of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (eNOS) and GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha-6 gene (GABRA6). One hundred eighty-six children were recruited at age 4. The presence or absence of child maltreatment as well as the amount of crime that occurred in their neighborhood during the previous year were determined at that time. At age 9, the children were brought to the lab, where their physiological response to a cognitive challenge (i.e., change in the amplitude of the respiratory sinus arrhythmia) was assessed and DNA samples were collected for subsequent genotyping. The results confirmed that complex Gene × Gene, Environment × Environment, and Gene × Environment interactions were associated with different patterns of respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity. The implications for future research and evidence-based intervention are discussed. PMID:26535938

  19. A multilevel prediction of physiological response to challenge: Interactions among child maltreatment, neighborhood crime, endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (eNOS), and GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha-6 gene (GABRA6).

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Manly, Jody Todd; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-11-01

    Physiological response to stress has been linked to a variety of healthy and pathological conditions. The current study conducted a multilevel examination of interactions among environmental toxins (i.e., neighborhood crime and child maltreatment) and specific genetic polymorphisms of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (eNOS) and GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha-6 gene (GABRA6). One hundred eighty-six children were recruited at age 4. The presence or absence of child maltreatment as well as the amount of crime that occurred in their neighborhood during the previous year were determined at that time. At age 9, the children were brought to the lab, where their physiological response to a cognitive challenge (i.e., change in the amplitude of the respiratory sinus arrhythmia) was assessed and DNA samples were collected for subsequent genotyping. The results confirmed that complex Gene × Gene, Environment × Environment, and Gene × Environment interactions were associated with different patterns of respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity. The implications for future research and evidence-based intervention are discussed.

  20. Vascular Aging in Women: is Estrogen the Fountain of Youth?

    PubMed

    Novella, Susana; Dantas, Ana Paula; Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with structural and functional changes in the vasculature, including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and remodeling, impaired angiogenesis, and defective vascular repair, and with increased prevalence of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular risk is similar for older men and women, but lower in women during their fertile years. This age- and sex-related difference points to estrogen as a protective factor because menopause is marked by the loss of endogenous estrogen production. Experimental and some clinical studies have attributed most of the protective effects of estrogen to its modulatory action on vascular endothelium. Estrogen promotes endothelial-derived NO production through increased expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and modulates prostacyclin and thromboxane A(2) release. The thromboxane A(2) pathway is key to regulating vascular tone in females. Despite all the experimental evidence, some clinical trials have reported no cardiovascular benefit from estrogen replacement therapy in older postmenopausal women. The "Timing Hypothesis," which states that estrogen-mediated vascular benefits occur only before the detrimental effects of aging are established in the vasculature, offers a possible explanation for these discrepancies. Nevertheless, a gap remains in current knowledge of cardiovascular aging mechanisms in women. This review comprises clinical and experimental data on the effects of aging, estrogens, and hormone replacement therapy on vascular function of females. We aim to clarify how menopause and aging contribute jointly to vascular aging and how estrogen modulates vascular response at different ages. PMID:22685434

  1. Vascular Aging in Women: is Estrogen the Fountain of Youth?

    PubMed Central

    Novella, Susana; Dantas, Ana Paula; Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with structural and functional changes in the vasculature, including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and remodeling, impaired angiogenesis, and defective vascular repair, and with increased prevalence of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular risk is similar for older men and women, but lower in women during their fertile years. This age- and sex-related difference points to estrogen as a protective factor because menopause is marked by the loss of endogenous estrogen production. Experimental and some clinical studies have attributed most of the protective effects of estrogen to its modulatory action on vascular endothelium. Estrogen promotes endothelial-derived NO production through increased expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and modulates prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 release. The thromboxane A2 pathway is key to regulating vascular tone in females. Despite all the experimental evidence, some clinical trials have reported no cardiovascular benefit from estrogen replacement therapy in older postmenopausal women. The “Timing Hypothesis,” which states that estrogen-mediated vascular benefits occur only before the detrimental effects of aging are established in the vasculature, offers a possible explanation for these discrepancies. Nevertheless, a gap remains in current knowledge of cardiovascular aging mechanisms in women. This review comprises clinical and experimental data on the effects of aging, estrogens, and hormone replacement therapy on vascular function of females. We aim to clarify how menopause and aging contribute jointly to vascular aging and how estrogen modulates vascular response at different ages. PMID:22685434

  2. Mechanisms and Consequences of eNOS Dysfunction in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Yon, Ji-Youn; Cai, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability contributes to endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. The endothelial isoform of NO synthase (eNOS) is responsible for the production of NO within endothelium. Loss of eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin to initial increase in oxidative stress leads to uncoupling of eNOS, in which the enzyme produces superoxide anion rather than NO, further substantiating oxidative stress to induce vascular pathogenesis. The current review focuses on recent advances on the molecular mechanisms and consequences of eNOS dysfunction in hypertension, and potential novel therapeutic strategies restoring eNOS function to treat hypertension. PMID:25882860

  3. Modulation of some estrogen-responsive genes in the vena cava of ovariectomised Wistar rats by griffonianone C, an isoflavone derived from Millettia griffoniana Baill. (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Ketcha Wanda, Germain Jean Magloire; Kretzschmar, Georg; Njamen, Dieudonné; Tagatsing Fotsing, Maurice; Yankep, Emmanuel; Vollmer, Günter

    2010-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether griffonianone C (Griff C), extracted from root bark of Millettia griffoniana, changes the expression of several estrogen-responsive genes in the vena cava of ovariectomised rats. For this purpose, we subcutaneously administered Griff C (2, 10, or 20mg/kg/d BW), 17β-estradiol (E2: 10μg/kg/d BW) as positive control, and a vehicle control respectively for three days. Relative expression levels of estrogen receptor α (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR), cyclooxygenase2 (Cox-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF-receptor 2, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki67 mRNA extracted from the vena cava of these rats were quantified by real-time PCR. Results showed that Griff C up-regulated the expression of PR, ACE, ERα, VEGF, VEGFR2 and Ki67. However, the results of Cox-2, PCNA, and eNOS expression did not reach significance in the E2 and Griff C treated samples. These results show that griffonianone C regulated a few of the analysed genes in a similar fashion than estradiol; however, others showed a different pattern. This suggests that some of the biological effects attributed to M. griffoniana are mediated via ER pathway others may be mediated via other pathways. PMID:20732395

  4. Bee Venom Accelerates Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice by Suppressing Activating Transcription Factor-3 (ATF-3) and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS)-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Recruiting Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Hozzein, Wael N; Badr, Badr M; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad; Saad Eldien, Heba M; Garraud, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to impaired diabetic wound healing including impaired neovascularization and deficient endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) recruitment. Bee venom (BV) has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of several diseases. Nevertheless, the effect of BV on the healing of diabetic wounds has not been studied. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the impact of BV on diabetic wound closure in a type I diabetic mouse model. Three experimental groups were used: group 1, non-diabetic control mice; group 2, diabetic mice; and group 3, diabetic mice treated with BV. We found that the diabetic mice exhibited delayed wound closure characterized by a significant decrease in collagen production and prolonged elevation of inflammatory cytokines levels in wounded tissue compared to control non-diabetic mice. Additionally, wounded tissue in diabetic mice revealed aberrantly up-regulated expression of ATF-3 and iNOS followed by a marked elevation in free radical levels. Impaired diabetic wound healing was also characterized by a significant elevation in caspase-3, -8, and -9 activity and a marked reduction in the expression of TGF-β and VEGF, which led to decreased neovascularization and angiogenesis of the injured tissue by impairing EPC mobilization. Interestingly, BV treatment significantly enhanced wound closure in diabetic mice by increasing collagen production and restoring the levels of inflammatory cytokines, free radical, TGF-β, and VEGF. Most importantly, BV-treated diabetic mice exhibited mobilized long-lived EPCs by inhibiting caspase activity in the wounded tissue. Our findings reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying improved diabetic wound healing and closure following BV treatment. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2159-2171, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26825453

  5. Estrogen Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Aft, Rebecca L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to estrogens correlates with increased risk for breast cancer. One explanation is that estrogen metabolites cause mutations by reacting with DNA, leading to depurination. We describe an extraction procedure and a liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) assay to detect estrone-metabolite-modified adenine (Ade) in 100-200 mg samples of human breast tissue. To insure reliable analyses, we used a synthetic estrone-metabolite-modified, U-15N labeled Ade as an internal standard (IS). Appropriate high pressure liquid chromatography gives sharp (∼ 5 s at half height) with identical retention times for the analyte and the IS. In breast tissue from women with and without cancer, we found a co-eluting material with similar MS/MS fragmentation as the IS, providing high specificity in the identification of the modified Ade; the recovery was approximately 50%. For women with and without breast cancer, the levels of the modified Ade are in the range of 20-70 fmol/g of breast tissue from five women and not detectable in tissue from another women. The sample size and detection limits are not yet sufficient to permit distinctions between cancer and noncancer patients. PMID:18672910

  6. ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE (NO) AND ITS PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, A.; Catravas, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous lipophilic free radical generated by three distinct isoforms of nitric oxide synthases (NOS), type 1 or neuronal (nNOS), type 2 or inducible (iNOS) and type 3 or endothelial NOS (eNOS). Expression of eNOS is altered in many types of cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes and hypertension. The ubiquitous chaperone heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) associates with NOS and is important for its proper folding and function. Current studies point toward a therapeutic potential by modulating hsp90-NOS association in various vascular diseases. Here we review the transcriptional regulation of endothelial NOS and factors affecting eNOS activity and function, as well as the important vascular pathologies associated with altered NOS function, focusing on the regulatory role of hsp90 and other factors in NO-associated pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:18692595

  7. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  8. ADP Signaling in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Connie Ng; Kou, Ruqin; Johnson, Rosalyn P.; Li, Gordon K.; Michel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    ADP responses underlie therapeutic approaches to many cardiovascular diseases, and ADP receptor antagonists are in widespread clinical use. The role of ADP in platelet biology has been extensively studied, yet ADP signaling pathways in endothelial cells remain incompletely understood. We found that ADP promoted phosphorylation of the endothelial isoform of nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1179 and Ser635 and dephosphorylation at Ser116 in cultured endothelial cells. Although eNOS activity was stimulated by both ADP and ATP, only ADP signaling was significantly inhibited by the P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS 2179 or by knockdown of P2Y1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA). ADP activated the small GTPase Rac1 and promoted endothelial cell migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rac1 blocked ADP-dependent eNOS Ser1179 and Ser635 phosphorylation, as well as eNOS activation. We analyzed pathways known to regulate eNOS, including phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, ERK1/2, Src, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ) using the inhibitors wortmannin, PD98059, PP2, and STO-609, respectively. None of these inhibitors altered ADP-modulated eNOS phosphorylation. In contrast, siRNA-mediated knockdown of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibited ADP-dependent eNOS Ser635 phosphorylation and eNOS activity but did not affect eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation. Importantly, the AMPK enzyme inhibitor compound C had no effect on ADP-stimulated eNOS activity, despite completely blocking AMPK activity. CaMKKβ knockdown suppressed ADP-stimulated eNOS activity, yet inhibition of CaMKKβ kinase activity using STO-609 failed to affect eNOS activation by ADP. These data suggest that the expression, but not the kinase activity, of AMPK and CaMKKβ is necessary for ADP signaling to eNOS. PMID:19783664

  9. Wine polyphenols improve endothelial function in large vessels of female spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    López-Sepúlveda, Rocío; Jiménez, Rosario; Romero, Miguel; Zarzuelo, Maria José; Sánchez, Manuel; Gómez-Guzmán, Manuel; Vargas, Félix; O'Valle, Francisco; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan

    2008-04-01

    Red wine polyphenols (RWPs) have been reported to prevent hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Several individual RWPs exert estrogenic effects. We analyzed the possible in vivo protective effects on blood pressure and endothelial function of RWPs in female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and its relationship with ovarian function. RWPs (40 mg/kg by gavage) were orally administered for 5 weeks. Ovariectomized rats showed both increased isoprostaglandin F(2alpha) excretion and aortic superoxide production and reduced relaxant response to acetylcholine and contraction to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor l-NAME measured in the aorta but similar blood pressure, as compared with sham-operated rats. Moreover, in ovariectomized rats aortic eNOS expression was unchanged, whereas caveolin-1, angiotensin II receptor (AT)-1, and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits p22(phox) and p47(phox) expression was increased compared with sham-operated rats. In both ovariectomized and sham-operated SHR, RWPs reduced systolic blood pressure, urinary isoprostaglandin F(2alpha) excretion, and aortic O(2)(-) production, improving the endothelium-dependent relaxant response to acetylcholine in SHR. These changes were associated with unchanged aortic eNOS expression, whereas caveolin-1 was increased and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits p22(phox) and p47(phox) expression was reduced. RWPs had no effect on the AT-1 overexpression found in ovariectomized animals. All these results suggest that a chronic treatment with RWPs reduces hypertension and vascular dysfunction through reduction in vascular oxidative stress in female SHR in a manner independent of the ovarian function.

  10. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  11. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis. PMID:27610040

  12. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis. PMID:27610040

  13. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis.

  14. NOS3 polymorphisms, cigarette smoking, and cardiovascular disease risk: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) activity and cigarette smoking significantly influence endothelial function. We sought to determine whether cigarette smoking modified the association between NOS3 polymorphisms and risk of coronary heart disease or stroke. All 1085 incident coronary heart di...

  15. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    PubMed

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation--both peripherally and in the brain--and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures.

  16. Melatonin modulates aromatase activity and expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-García, Virginia; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Melatonin is known to suppress the development of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with the estrogen signaling pathways. Paracrine interactions between malignant epithelial cells and proximal stromal cells are responsible for local estrogen biosynthesis. In human breast cancer cells and peritumoral adipose tissue, melatonin downregulates aromatase, which transforms androgens into estrogens. The presence of aromatase on endothelial cells indicates that endothelial cells may contribute to tumor growth by producing estrogens. Since human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) express both aromatase and melatonin receptors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of melatonin to regulate the activity and expression of aromatase on endothelial cells, thus, modulating local estrogen biosynthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that melatonin inhibits the growth of HUVECs and reduces the local biosynthesis of estrogens through the downregulation of aromatase. These results are supported by three lines of evidence. Firstly, 1 mM of melatonin counteracted the testosterone-induced cell proliferation of HUVECs, which is dependent on the local biosynthesis of estrogens from testosterone by the aromatase activity of the cells. Secondly, we found that 1 mM of melatonin reduced the aromatase activity of HUVECs. Finally, by real‑time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that melatonin significantly downregulated the expression of aromatase as well as its endothelial-specific aromatase promoter region I.7. We conclude that melatonin inhibits aromatase activity and expression in HUVECs by regulating gene expression of specific aromatase promoter regions, thereby reducing the local production of estrogens. PMID:23450505

  17. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) T-786C, 4a4b, and G894T polymorphisms and male infertility: study for idiopathic asthenozoospermia and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Pingping; Zou, Shasha; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Jianhua; Wang, Yanan; Yang, Juanjuan; Song, Zhijian; Jiang, Huayu; Shi, Huijuan; Huang, Yiran; Li, Zheng; Shi, Yongyong; Hu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies on the eNOS gene and male infertility show that expression of eNOS regulates normal spermatogenesis in the testis, and the eNOS gene variants (T-786C, 4a4b, and G894T) are potentially involved in impairment of spermatogenesis and sperm function. Thus, we conducted this association and meta-analysis study to further validate whether variants of those three loci affected the risk of idiopathic asthenozoospermia (AZS) and male infertility. Approximately 340 Chinese idiopathic AZS patients and 342 healthy men were included for this case-control study, genotyped by gel electrophoresis analysis or direct sequencing of PCR products. The eNOS mRNA isolated from the semen of patients was further examined by quantitative real-time PCR. Also, a meta-analysis of association between eNOS gene polymorphisms and male infertility was performed. A significant association was identified on allelic level between 4a4b variant and AZS in our study (chi-squared = 7.53, corrected P = 0.018, odds ratio (OR) = 1.808), while there were no significant difference of T-786C and G894T for asthenozoospermia in both genotype and allele distributions. In addition, expression of eNOS was up-regulated in patients compared with controls (about 2.4-fold, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the results of the meta-analysis support the conclusion that the T-786C and 4a4b loci were associated with male infertility in both Asian and Caucasian populations. Our study provides genetic evidence for the eNOS gene being a risk factor for idiopathic AZS and male infertility. Considering genetic differences among populations and complex pathogenesis of male infertility, more validating studies using independent samples are suggested in the future.

  18. Renal Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huifang; Harris, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been posited to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Due to the heterogeneity of endothelial cells (ECs), it is difficult to generalize about endothelial responses to diabetic stimuli. At present, there are limited techniques fordirectly measuring EC function in vivo, so diagnosis of endothelial disorders still largely depends on indirect assessment of mediators arising from EC injury. In the kidney microcirculation, both afferent and efferent arteries, arterioles and glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) have all been implicated as targets of diabetic injury. Both hyperglycemia per se, as well as the metabolic consequences of glucose dysregulation, are thought to lead to endothelial cell dysfunction. In this regard, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a central role in EC dysfunction. Impaired eNOS activity can occur at numerous levels, including enzyme uncoupling, post-translational modifications, internalization and decreased expression. Reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability exacerbates oxidative stress, further promoting endothelial dysfunction and injury. The injured ECs may then function as active signal transducers of metabolic, hemodynamic and inflammatory factors that modify the function and morphology of the vessel wall and interact with adjacent cells, which may activate a cascade of inflammatory and proliferative and profibrotic responses in progressive DN. Both pharmacological approaches and potential regenerative therapies hold promise for restoration of impaired endothelial cells in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24720460

  19. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed

    Dewundara, Samantha S; Wiggs, Janey L; Sullivan, David A; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a gene receptive to estrogen regulation, are associated with glaucoma. The study concluded that increasing evidence suggests that lifetime exposure to estrogen may alter the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Estrogen exposure may have a neuroprotective effect on the progression of POAG but further studies need to confirm this finding. The role of sex-specific preventive and therapeutic treatment may be on the horizon. PMID:26959139

  20. Brassinosteroids inhibit in vitro angiogenesis in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rárová, Lucie; Zahler, Stefan; Liebl, Johanna; Kryštof, Vladimír; Sedlák, David; Bartůněk, Petr; Kohout, Ladislav; Strnad, Miroslav

    2012-11-01

    Antiangiogenic activity of the brassinosteroid plant hormones (BRs) and their derivative cholestanon was investigated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). 24-Epibrassinolide and 28-homocastasterone from group of 21 tested natural BRs inhibited migration of HUVEC cells. Seven tested BRs decreased the number of tubes significantly. Synthetic analogue cholestanon inhibited angiogenesis in vitro more effectively than natural BRs. Because of the similarity of BRs to human steroids, we have also studied interactions of BRs with human steroid receptors. Synthetic BRs cholestanon showed agonistic effects on estrogen-receptor-α, estrogen-receptor-β and androgen receptor. Of the natural BRs, 24-epibrassinolide was found to be a weak antagonist of estrogen-receptor-α (ERα). Our results provide the first evidence that large group of BRs can inhibit in vitro angiogenesis of primary endothelial cells. BRs constitute a novel group of human steroid receptor activators or inhibitors with capacity to inhibit angiogenesis.

  1. Growth Hormone Effects in Immune Stress: AKT/eNOS Signaling Module in the Cellular Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activation of the constitutive endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) and expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) with subsequent nitric oxide production are among the early cellular responses that follow in a systemic exposure of animals to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Growth hormone (GH) has been sh...

  2. iNOS-dependent sweating and eNOS-dependent cutaneous vasodilation are evident in younger adults, but are diminished in older adults exercising in the heat.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; Alexander, Lacy M; Akbari, Pegah; Foudil-Bey, Imane; Louie, Jeffrey C; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) contributes to sweating and cutaneous vasodilation during exercise in younger adults. We hypothesized that endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) mediate NOS-dependent sweating, whereas eNOS induces NOS-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in younger adults exercising in the heat. Further, aging may upregulate inducible NOS (iNOS), which may attenuate sweating and cutaneous vasodilator responses. We hypothesized that iNOS inhibition would augment sweating and cutaneous vasodilation in exercising older adults. Physically active younger (n = 12, 23 ± 4 yr) and older (n = 12, 60 ± 6 yr) adults performed two 30-min bouts of cycling at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). Sweat rate and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) were evaluated at four intradermal microdialysis sites with: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) nNOS inhibitor (nNOS-I, NPLA), 3) iNOS inhibitor (iNOS-I, 1400W), or 4) eNOS inhibitor (eNOS-I, LNAA). In younger adults during both exercise bouts, all inhibitors decreased sweating relative to control, albeit a lower sweat rate was observed at iNOS-I compared with eNOS-I and nNOS-I sites (all P < 0.05). CVC at the eNOS-I site was lower than control in younger adults throughout the intermittent exercise protocol (all P < 0.05). In older adults, there were no differences between control and iNOS-I sites for sweating and CVC during both exercise bouts (all P > 0.05). We show that iNOS and eNOS are the main contributors to NOS-dependent sweating and cutaneous vasodilation, respectively, in physically active younger adults exercising in the heat, and that iNOS inhibition does not alter sweating or cutaneous vasodilation in exercising physically active older adults.

  3. Estrogen and Bazedoxifene

    MedlinePlus

    ... menstrual periods become less frequent and stop and women may experience other symptoms and body changes). Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are also used to prevent osteoporosis (condition in which the bones ... and break easily) in women who have undergone menopause. Estrogen is in a ...

  4. Polymorphic variations in manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) genes contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Li, J Y; Tao, F; Wu, X X; Tan, Y Z; He, L; Lu, H

    2015-01-01

    Impaired antioxidant defense increases the oxidative stress and contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MnSOD and eNOS are important antioxidant enzymes. This aim of this study was to verify the association of MnSOD and eNOS tagSNPs with T2DM in a Chinese Han population. Four tagSNPs of MnSOD and eight tagSNPs of eNOS were detected using TaqMan technology in 1272 healthy controls and 1234 T2DM patients. All study participants were unrelated members of the Han ethnic group in China. In this study, the frequency of the rs4880 MnSOD single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotype differed significantly between T2DM patients and controls [allele: P = 0.03, genotype: P = 0.04, odd's ratio (OR) = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-1.49]. The A-T haplotype and G-T haplotype remained significant in T2DM after Bonferroni correction (P = 1.58 x 10(-6) and 8.00 x 10(-4), respectively) with a global p-value of 7.25 x 10(-8). The rs1799983 and rs891512 SNPs of eNOS differed significantly between T2DM patients and controls [rs1799983: corrected allele: P = 2.10 x 10(-3), corrected genotype: P = 6.30 x 10(-3), OR = 1.43 (95%CI = 1.18-1.73); rs891512, corrected allele: P = 3.50 x 10(-3), corrected genotype: P = 9.10 x 10(-3), OR = 1.70 (95%CI = 1.26-2.30)]. Following Bonferroni correction, none of the haplotypes of eNOS were significant in T2DM. These results indicate that common variants in MnSOD and eNOS increased the risk of T2DM in the Chinese Han population. PMID:26505452

  5. Polymorphic variations in manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) genes contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Li, J Y; Tao, F; Wu, X X; Tan, Y Z; He, L; Lu, H

    2015-10-21

    Impaired antioxidant defense increases the oxidative stress and contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MnSOD and eNOS are important antioxidant enzymes. This aim of this study was to verify the association of MnSOD and eNOS tagSNPs with T2DM in a Chinese Han population. Four tagSNPs of MnSOD and eight tagSNPs of eNOS were detected using TaqMan technology in 1272 healthy controls and 1234 T2DM patients. All study participants were unrelated members of the Han ethnic group in China. In this study, the frequency of the rs4880 MnSOD single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotype differed significantly between T2DM patients and controls [allele: P = 0.03, genotype: P = 0.04, odd's ratio (OR) = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-1.49]. The A-T haplotype and G-T haplotype remained significant in T2DM after Bonferroni correction (P = 1.58 x 10(-6) and 8.00 x 10(-4), respectively) with a global p-value of 7.25 x 10(-8). The rs1799983 and rs891512 SNPs of eNOS differed significantly between T2DM patients and controls [rs1799983: corrected allele: P = 2.10 x 10(-3), corrected genotype: P = 6.30 x 10(-3), OR = 1.43 (95%CI = 1.18-1.73); rs891512, corrected allele: P = 3.50 x 10(-3), corrected genotype: P = 9.10 x 10(-3), OR = 1.70 (95%CI = 1.26-2.30)]. Following Bonferroni correction, none of the haplotypes of eNOS were significant in T2DM. These results indicate that common variants in MnSOD and eNOS increased the risk of T2DM in the Chinese Han population.

  6. Endothelial Lessons.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    This essay focuses on nine important lessons learned during more than thirty years of endothelial research. They include: the danger of hiding behind a word, the confusion generated by abbreviations, the need to define the physiological role of the response studied, the local role of endothelium- dependent responses, the strength of pharmacological analyses, endothelial dysfunction as consequence and cause of disease, the importance of rigorous protocols, the primacy of in vivo studies and the importance of serendipity. PMID:26638800

  7. The use of a whole animal biophotonic model as a screen for the angiogenic potential of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for normal vascular growth and development during wound repair. VEGF is estrogen responsive and capable of regulating its own receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Several agricultural pesticides (e.g., methoxychlor)...

  8. Ablation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter, Abca2 modifies response to estrogen-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Mack, Jody T; Brown, Carol B; Garrett, Tracy E; Uys, Joachim D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Tew, Kenneth D

    2012-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter 2 (ABCA2) is an endolysosomal protein expressed in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, prostate, ovary and macrophages. In cell cultures, ABCA2 over-expression has been linked with resistance to the anticancer agent, estramustine phosphate (EMP; a nor-nitrogen mustard conjugate of estradiol). The present study shows that Abca2 knockout (KO) mice have greater sensitivity to a variety of side effects induced by EMP treatment. Chronic EMP (12×100 mg/kg body weight) produced mortality in 36% of KO mice, but only 7% of age-matched wild type (WT). Side effects of the drug were also more prevalent in the KO mouse. For example, during the first week of EMP treatments, 67% of KO males (compared to 6% of WT males) responded with episodic erectile events. In WT mice, ABCA2 protein localized within pene corpuscles, (which rely on modified Schwann cells for amplification of tactile signals) suggesting that the transporter may function in the erectile process. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS; a source of nitric oxide during erectile response) levels were similar in WT and KO male penile tissue. Treatment with 100 mg/kg EMP (once daily for four days) elevated serum estradiol and estrone in both WT and KO. However, the circulating levels of these estrogens were higher in KO mice implying a reduced plasma clearance of estrogens as a consequence of ABCA2 ablation. Consistent with the pro-convulsant effects of estrogens, KO mice also displayed an increased incidence of seizures following EMP (14% vs. 0%). Taken together, these data indicate that ABCA2 deficiency renders mice more sensitive to EMP treatment-induced effects implying that the transporter has a role in regulating EMP transport and/or metabolism.

  9. Soy Isoflavone Protects Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Increasing Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Decreasing Oxidative Stress in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Li, Shuangyue; Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Jinbiao; Meng, Guoliang; Xie, Liping; Yu, Ying; Ji, Yong; Han, Yi

    2016-01-01

    There is a special role for estrogens in preventing and curing cardiovascular disease in women. Soy isoflavone (SI), a soy-derived phytoestrogen, has similar chemical structure to endogenous estrogen-estradiol. We investigate to elucidate the protective mechanism of SI on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Female SD rats underwent bilateral ovariectomy. One week later, rats were randomly divided into several groups, sham ovariectomy (control group), ovariectomy with MI/R, or ovariectomy with sham MI/R. Other ovariectomy rats were given different doses of SI or 17β-estradiol (E2). Four weeks later, they were exposed to 30 minutes of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 6 or 24 hours of reperfusion. SI administration significantly reduced myocardial infarct size and improved left ventricle function and restored endothelium-dependent relaxation function of thoracic aortas after MI/R in ovariectomized rats. SI also decreased serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activity, reduced plasma malonaldehyde, and attenuated oxidative stress in the myocardium. Meanwhile, SI increased phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signal pathway. SI failed to decrease infarct size of hearts with I/R in ovariectomized rats if PI3K was inhibited. Overall, these results indicated that SI protects myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in ovariectomized rats through increasing PI3K/Akt/eNOS signal pathway and decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:27057277

  10. Differential permeability of uterine and liver vascular beds to estrogens and estrogen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Verheugen, C; Pardridge, W M; Judd, H L; Chaudhuri, G

    1984-12-01

    The role of capillary membrane permeability and the effect of plasma protein binding on the influx of unconjugated and conjugated estrogens into a target organ, the uterus, and a metabolic organ, the liver, were studied in anesthetized rats. In the absence of plasma proteins, estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) were freely diffusible through the uterine capillaries, but influx was significantly reduced for estriol (E3) and estetrol. In the uterus, the influx of the conjugated estrogens was markedly restricted and approximated the influx of dextran, a vascular space marker. The polarity of the compound (based on the number of hydrogen bond-forming functional groups and the presence of charged groups) appeared to predict uterine endothelial membrane permeability better than the octanol/Ringer's partition coefficient. In contrast to the selective permeability properties of the uterine endothelial barrier, the limiting membrane lining the hepatic microcirculation, the hepatocyte cell membrane, was highly permeable to all unconjugated and conjugated estrogens. The addition of 4% albumin to the injection solution led to a significant inhibition of uterine influx of E2, but not E1 or E3. In the liver, only the influx of E1 sulfate was slightly diminished by 4% albumin. In all cases, the influx of estrogens greatly exceeded the rate that would be expected if only the fraction that was free (dialyzable) in vitro was diffusible in vivo. Human sera containing sex hormone-binding globulin and albumin caused inhibition of influx of E1 and E2 through the uterine capillary barriers, whereas in the liver, the influx of E2 sulfate, and E3 glucuronide were diminished. The results are compatible with a difference in permeability of the microvasculature of the two organs and a differential availability of protein-bound estrogen for influx into liver and uterus. With the exception of E1, which is nearly completely diffusible into both organs, the influx of estrogens and estrogen conjugates

  11. Chronic vagus nerve stimulation attenuates vascular endothelial impairments and reduces the inflammatory profile via inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Liu, Huaipu; Sun, Peng; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chen; Wang, Ling; Wang, Tinghuai

    2016-02-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), a method for activating cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways, could suppress endothelial activation and minimize tissue injury during inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic VNS on endothelial impairments and the inflammatory profile in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Sprague-Dawley rats (7-8 months old) were randomly assigned to the following four groups: sham-OVX, OVX, OVX+sham-VNS, and OVX+VNS. Throughout the experimental period, the OVX+VNS group received VNS for 3h (20.0 Hz, 1.0 mA, and 10.00 ms pulse width) at the same time every other day. After 12 weeks of VNS, blood samples and thoracic aortas were collected for further analyses. Light microscopy and electron microscopy analyses showed that chronic VNS prevented endothelial swelling, desquamation and even necrosis in the OVX rats. In addition, it obviously improved endothelial function in the OVX rats by restoring the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (e-NOS) and serum endothelin-1 level. Increased expression of cell adhesion molecules (VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin) in the thoracic aortas and increases in the levels of circulating cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, MCP-1, and CINC/KC) were also observed in the OVX rats. Chronic VNS significantly restored these detrimental changes partly by increasing the ACh concentrations in vascular walls and blocking NF-κB pathway activity. The results of this in vivo study have shown that the administration of chronic VNS during, in the early stage of estrogen deficiency, protects OVX rats from endothelial impairments and the inflammatory profile. These findings indicate that activation of the vagus nerve could be a promising supplemental therapy for reducing the risks of suffering from further CVDs in postmenopausal women. PMID:26692419

  12. Stromal cell-derived factor 2 is critical for Hsp90-dependent eNOS activation.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Mauro; Fröhlich, Florian; Park, Eon Joo; Schleicher, Michael; Walther, Tobias C; Sessa, William C

    2015-08-18

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) catalyzes the conversion of l-arginine and molecular oxygen into l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous second messenger that influences cardiovascular physiology and disease. Several mechanisms regulate eNOS activity and function, including phosphorylation at Ser and Thr residues and protein-protein interactions. Combining a tandem affinity purification approach and mass spectrometry, we identified stromal cell-derived factor 2 (SDF2) as a component of the eNOS macromolecular complex in endothelial cells. SDF2 knockdown impaired agonist-stimulated NO synthesis and decreased the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(1177), a key event required for maximal activation of eNOS. Conversely, SDF2 overexpression dose-dependently increased NO synthesis through a mechanism involving Akt and calcium (induced with ionomycin), which increased the phosphorylation of Ser(1177) in eNOS. NO synthesis by iNOS (inducible NOS) and nNOS (neuronal NOS) was also enhanced upon SDF2 overexpression. We found that SDF2 was a client protein of the chaperone protein Hsp90, interacting preferentially with the M domain of Hsp90, which is the same domain that binds to eNOS. In endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), SDF2 was required for the binding of Hsp90 and calmodulin to eNOS, resulting in eNOS phosphorylation and activation. Thus, our data describe a function for SDF2 as a component of the Hsp90-eNOS complex that is critical for signal transduction in endothelial cells. PMID:26286023

  13. Stromal cell–derived factor 2 is critical for Hsp90-dependent eNOS activation

    PubMed Central

    Siragusa, Mauro; Fröhlich, Florian; Park, Eon Joo; Schleicher, Michael; Walther, Tobias C.; Sessa, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) catalyzes the conversion of l-arginine and molecular oxygen into l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous second messenger that influences cardiovascular physiology and disease. Several mechanisms regulate eNOS activity and function, including phosphorylation at Ser and Thr residues and protein-protein interactions. Combining a tandem affinity purification approach and mass spectrometry, we identified stromal cell–derived factor 2 (SDF2) as a component of the eNOS macromolecular complex in endothelial cells. SDF2 knockdown impaired agonist-stimulated NO synthesis and decreased the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177, a key event required for maximal activation of eNOS. Conversely, SDF2 overexpression dose-dependently increased NO synthesis through a mechanism involving Akt and calcium (induced with ionomycin), which increased the phosphorylation of Ser1177 in eNOS. NO synthesis by iNOS (inducible NOS) and nNOS (neuronal NOS) was also enhanced upon SDF2 overexpression. We found that SDF2 was a client protein of the chaperone protein Hsp90, interacting preferentially with the M domain of Hsp90, which is the same domain that binds to eNOS. In endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), SDF2 was required for the binding of Hsp90 and calmodulin to eNOS, resulting in eNOS phosphorylation and activation. Thus, our data describe a function for SDF2 as a component of the Hsp90-eNOS complex that is critical for signal transduction in endothelial cells. PMID:26286023

  14. Inhibition of angiogenesis by selective estrogen receptor modulators through blockade of cholesterol trafficking rather than estrogen receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong Sup; Li, Ruo-Jing; Lv, Junfang; Head, Sarah A; Yang, Eun Ju; Liu, Jun O

    2015-06-28

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) including tamoxifen are known to inhibit angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism, which is independent of their action on the estrogen receptor (ER), has remained largely unknown. In the present study, we found that tamoxifen and other SERM inhibited cholesterol trafficking in endothelial cells, causing a hyper-accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes. Inhibition of cholesterol trafficking by tamoxifen was accompanied by abnormal subcellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and inhibition of the terminal glycosylation of the receptor. Tamoxifen also caused perinuclear positioning of lysosomes, which in turn trapped the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the perinuclear region of endothelial cells. Abnormal distribution of VEGFR2 and mTOR and inhibition of VEGFR2 and mTOR activities by tamoxifen were significantly reversed by addition of cholesterol-cyclodextrin complex to the culture media of endothelial cells. Moreover, high concentrations of tamoxifen inhibited endothelial and breast cancer cell proliferation in a cholesterol-dependent, but ER-independent, manner. Together, these results unraveled a previously unrecognized mechanism of angiogenesis inhibition by tamoxifen and other SERM, implicating cholesterol trafficking as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  15. Removal of estrogens and estrogenicity through drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Kathleen; Rosenblum, Laura; Wiese, Thomas E; Wymer, Larry; Dugan, Nicholas; Williams, Daniel; Mash, Heath; Merriman, Betty; Speth, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drinking waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conventional drinking water treatment using a natural water. Bench-scale studies utilizing chlorine, alum coagulation, ferric chloride coagulation, and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were conducted using Ohio River water spiked with three estrogens, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, and estriol. Treatment of the estrogens with chlorine, either alone or with coagulant, resulted in approximately 98% reductions in the concentrations of the parent estrogens, accompanied by formation of by-products. The MVLN reporter gene and MCF-7 cell proliferation assays were used to characterize the estrogenic activity of the water before and after treatment. The observed estrogenic activities of the chlorinated samples showed that estrogenicity of the water was reduced commensurate with removal of the parent estrogen. Therefore, the estrogen chlorination by-products did not contribute appreciably to the estrogenic activity of the water. Coagulation alone did not result in significant removals of the estrogens. However, addition of PAC, at a typical drinking water plant dose, resulted in removals ranging from approximately 20 to 80%. PMID:22361701

  16. Gender-specific alteration of adrenergic responses in small femoral arteries from estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Luksha, Leonid; Poston, Lucilla; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Aghajanova, Lusine; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2005-11-01

    Estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice become hypertensive as they age, and males have a higher blood pressure than females. We hypothesized that the absence of estrogen receptor-beta may contribute to development of cardiovascular dysfunction by modification of adrenergic responsiveness in the peripheral vasculature. Small femoral arteries (internal diameter <200 microm) were isolated from estrogen receptor-beta knockout and wild-type mice and mounted on a wire myograph. Concentration-response curves to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were compared and the contribution of adrenoceptor subtypes established using specific agonists and antagonists. The involvement of endothelial factors in the modulation of resting tone was also investigated and immunohistochemical analysis used to confirm the presence or absence of estrogen receptor expression. Compared with wild type, arteries from estrogen receptor-beta knockout male, but not female, mice demonstrated gender-specific enhancement of the response to phenylephrine (alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist), which was accompanied by elevated basal tension attributable to endothelial factors. Contractile responses to the mixed adrenoceptor agonist norepinephrine did not differ significantly between estrogen receptor-beta knockout and wild type; however, beta-adrenoceptor inhibition unmasked an enhanced underlying alpha1-adrenoceptor responsiveness in estrogen receptor-beta knockout males. beta-adrenoceptor-mediated dilatation was also enhanced in estrogen receptor-beta knockout versus wild-type males. We suggest that estrogen receptor-beta modifies the adrenergic control of small artery tone in males but not in females.

  17. Protein kinase D activity controls endothelial nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sánchez-Ruiloba, Lucía; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; Zaragoza, Carlos; Iglesias, Teresa; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates key functions of the endothelium, such as angiogenesis or vessel repair in processes involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. One of the effector kinases that become activated in endothelial cells upon VEGF treatment is protein kinase D (PKD). Here, we show that PKD phosphorylates eNOS, leading to its activation and a concomitant increase in NO synthesis. Using mass spectrometry, we show that the purified active kinase specifically phosphorylates recombinant eNOS on Ser1179. Treatment of endothelial cells with VEGF or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activates PKD and increases eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PKD and gene silencing of both PKD1 and PKD2 abrogate VEGF signaling, resulting in a clear diminished migration of endothelial cells in a wound healing assay. Finally, inhibition of PKD in mice results in an almost complete disappearance of the VEGF-induced vasodilatation, as monitored through determination of the diameter of the carotid artery. Hence, our data indicate that PKD is a new regulatory kinase of eNOS in endothelial cells whose activity orchestrates mammalian vascular tone. PMID:24928905

  18. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  19. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J M; Bivalacqua, T J; Lagoda, G A; Burnett, A L; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 'young' (4-month-old) and 'aged' (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH(4) precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  20. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JM; Bivalacqua, TJ; Lagoda, GA; Burnett, AL; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 ‘young’ (4-month-old) and ‘aged’ (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH4 precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  1. Removal of Estrogens and Estrogenicity through Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drining waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conven...

  2. Impact of Hemorheological and Endothelial Factors on Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, Vera; Boschi, Letizia; Donati, Giovanni; Trabalzini, Luca; Forconi, Sandro

    Previous studies showed that endothelial alterations caused by physical stress worsened the hemorheological parameters mainly in patients affected by ischemic vascular diseases: major vascular alterations have been found in patients with very high endothelial dysfunction indexes: these indexes are given by the various substances produced by the endothelium, but it is very difficult to have a value which clearly identifies the real state of the endothelial alteration. The function of the NO, an endogenous vasodilator whose synthesis is catalyzed by NOs, can be determined by the Citrulline/Arginine ratio, which represents the level of activity of the enzyme. A very good index of the endothelial dysfunction is asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a powerful endogenous inhibitor of NOs; in fact several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between ischemic vascular disease and high levels of plasmatic ADMA. Our recent studies on heart failure and on ischemic cerebrovascular diseases evaluate endothelial dysfunctions and hemorheological parameters.

  3. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor inhibits vascular prostanoid production and activity.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Matthias R; Fredette, Natalie C; Barton, Matthias; Prossnitz, Eric R

    2015-10-01

    Complications of atherosclerotic vascular disease, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are the most common causes of death in postmenopausal women. Endogenous estrogens inhibit vascular inflammation-driven atherogenesis, a process that involves cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids such as thromboxane A2. Here, we studied whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) mediates estrogen-dependent inhibitory effects on prostanoid production and activity under pro-inflammatory conditions. Effects of estrogen on production of thromboxane A(2) were determined in human endothelial cells stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Moreover, Gper-deficient (Gper(-/-)) and WT mice were fed a pro-inflammatory diet and underwent ovariectomy or sham surgery to unmask the role of endogenous estrogens. Thereafter, contractions to acetylcholine-stimulated endothelial vasoconstrictor prostanoids and the thromboxane-prostanoid receptor agonist U46619 were recorded in isolated carotid arteries. In endothelial cells, TNF-α-stimulated thromboxane A2 production was inhibited by estrogen, an effect blocked by the GPER-selective antagonist G36. In ovary-intact mice, deletion of Gper increased prostanoid-dependent contractions by twofold. Ovariectomy also augmented prostanoid-dependent contractions by twofold in WT mice but had no additional effect in Gper(-/-) mice. These contractions were blocked by the COX inhibitor meclofenamate and unaffected by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester. Vasoconstrictor responses to U46619 did not differ between groups, indicating intact signaling downstream of thromboxane-prostanoid receptor activation. In summary, under pro-inflammatory conditions, estrogen inhibits vasoconstrictor prostanoid production in endothelial cells and activity in intact arteries through GPER. Selective activation of GPER may therefore be considered as a novel strategy to

  4. Endothelial nitric oxide: protector of a healthy mind.

    PubMed

    Katusic, Zvonimir S; Austin, Susan A

    2014-04-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is generated by constitutively active endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an essential enzyme responsible for cardiovascular homeostasis. Historically, endothelial NO was first recognized as a major vasodilator involved in control of vasomotor function and local blood flow. In this review, our attention is focused on the emerging role of endothelial NO in linking cerebrovascular function with cognition. We will discuss the recognized ability of endothelial NO to modulate processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), influence functional status of microglia, and affect cognitive function. Existing evidence suggests that the loss of NO in cultured human cerebrovascular endothelium causes increased expression of APP and β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) thereby resulting in increased secretion of amyloid β peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42). Furthermore, increased expression of APP and BACE1 as well as increased production of Aβ peptides was detected in the cerebral microvasculature and brain tissue of eNOS-deficient mice. Since Aβ peptides are considered major cytotoxic molecules responsible for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, these observations support the concept that a loss of endothelial NO might significantly contribute to the initiation and progression of cognitive decline. In addition, genetic inactivation of eNOS causes activation of microglia and promotes a pro-inflammatory phenotype in the brain. Behavioural analysis revealed that eNOS-deficient mice exhibit impaired cognitive performance thereby indicating that selective loss of endothelial NO has a detrimental effect on the function of neuronal cells. Together with findings from prior studies demonstrating the ability of endothelial NO to affect synaptic plasticity, mitochondrial biogenesis, and function of neuronal progenitor cells, it is becoming apparent that the role of endothelial NO in the control of central nervous system function is very complex. We

  5. Metformin improves endothelial function in aortic tissue and microvascular endothelial cells subjected to diabetic hyperglycaemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Suparna; Lakshmanan, Arun P; Hwang, Mu Ji; Kubba, Haidar; Mushannen, Ahmed; Triggle, Chris R; Ding, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms whereby metformin, the first line drug for type 2 diabetes (T2DM), mediates its antidiabetic effects remain elusive, particularly as to whether metformin has a direct protective action on the vasculature. This study was designed to determine if a brief 3-h exposure to metformin protects endothelial function against the effects of hyperglycaemia. We investigated the protective effects of metformin on endothelial-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) in thoracic aortae from T2DM db/db mice and on high glucose (HG, 40 mM) induced changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling in mouse microvascular endothelial cells (MMECs) in culture. Exposure of aortae from db+/? non-diabetic control mice to high glucose (HG, 40 mM) containing Krebs for 3-h significantly (P<0.05) reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-induced EDV compared to ACh-induced EDV in aortae maintained in normal glucose (NG, 11 mM) Krebs. The reduction of EDV was partially reversed following a 3-h exposure to 50 μM metformin; metformin also improved ACh-induced EDV in aortae from diabetic db/db mice. Immunoblot analysis of MMECs cultured in HG versus NG revealed a significant reduction of the ratio of phosphorylated (p-eNOS)/eNOS and p-Akt/Akt, but not the expression of total eNOS or Akt. The 3-h exposure of MMECs to metformin significantly (P<0.05) reversed the HG-induced reduction in phosphorylation of both eNOS and Akt; however, no changes were detected for phosphorylation of AMPK or the expression of SIRT1. Our data indicate that a 3-h exposure to metformin can reverse/reduce the impact of HG on endothelial function, via mechanisms linked to increased phosphorylation of eNOS and Akt.

  6. Inhibitor-κB kinase attenuates Hsp90-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase function in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Konopinski, Ryszard; Krishnan, Manickam; Roman, Linda; Bera, Alakesh; Hongying, Zheng; Habib, Samy L.; Mohan, Sumathy

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) is the predominant isoform that generates NO in the blood vessels. Many different regulators, including heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), govern eNOS function. Hsp90-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS is a critical event that determines eNOS activity. In our earlier study we demonstrated an inhibitor-κB kinase-β (IKKβ)-Hsp90 interaction in a high-glucose environment. In the present study we further define the putative binding domain of IKKβ on Hsp90. Interestingly, IKKβ binds to the middle domain of Hsp90, which has been shown to interact with eNOS to stimulate its activity. This new finding suggests a tighter regulation of eNOS activity than was previously assumed. Furthermore, addition of purified recombinant IKKβ to the eNOS-Hsp90 complex reduces the eNOS-Hsp90 interaction and eNOS activity, indicating a competition for Hsp90 between eNOS and IKKβ. The pathophysiological relevance of the IKKβ-Hsp90 interaction has also been demonstrated using in vitro vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling and an Ins2Akita in vivo model. Our study further defines the preferential involvement of α- vs. β-isoforms of Hsp90 in the IKKβ-eNOS-Hsp90 interaction, even though both Hsp90α and Hsp90β stimulate NO production. These studies not only reinforce the significance of maintaining a homeostatic balance of eNOS and IKKβ within the cell system that regulates NO production, but they also confirm that the IKKβ-Hsp90 interaction is favored in a high-glucose environment, leading to impairment of the eNOS-Hsp90 interaction, which contributes to endothelial dysfunction and vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:25652452

  7. Soluble endoglin, hypercholesterolemia and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rathouska, Jana; Jezkova, Katerina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr

    2015-12-01

    A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) is known to be an extracellular domain of the full-length membrane endoglin, which is elevated during various pathological conditions related to vascular endothelium. In the current review, we tried to summarize a possible role of soluble endoglin in cardiovascular pathologies, focusing on its relation to endothelial dysfunction and cholesterol levels. We discussed sEng as a proposed biomarker of cardiovascular disease progression, cardiovascular disease treatment and endothelial dysfunction. We also addressed a potential interaction of sEng with TGF-β/eNOS or BMP-9 signaling. We suggest soluble endoglin levels to be monitored, because they reflect the progression/treatment efficacy of cardiovascular diseases related to endothelial dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia. A possible role of soluble endoglin as an inducer of endothelial dysfunction however remains to be elucidated. PMID:26520890

  8. The dual role of iNOS in cancer.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Kashfi, Khosrow; Nath, Niharika

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the 10 smallest molecules found in nature. It is a simple gaseous free radical whose predominant functions is that of a messenger through cGMP. In mammals, NO is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) of which there are three isoforms. Neuronal (nNOS, NOS1) and endothelial (eNOS, NOS3) are constitutive calcium-dependent forms of the enzyme that regulate neural and vascular function respectively. The third isoform (iNOS, NOS2), is calcium-independent and is inducible. In many tumors, iNOS expression is high, however, the role of iNOS during tumor development is very complex and quite perplexing, with both promoting and inhibiting actions having been described. This review will aim to summarize the dual actions of iNOS-derived NO showing that the microenvironment of the tumor is a contributing factor to these observations and ultimately to cellular outcomes. PMID:26335399

  9. The dual role of iNOS in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Frederica; Kashfi, Khosrow; Nath, Niharika

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the 10 smallest molecules found in nature. It is a simple gaseous free radical whose predominant functions is that of a messenger through cGMP. In mammals, NO is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) of which there are three isoforms. Neuronal (nNOS, NOS1) and endothelial (eNOS, NOS3) are constitutive calcium-dependent forms of the enzyme that regulate neural and vascular function respectively. The third isoform (iNOS, NOS2), is calcium-independent and is inducible. In many tumors, iNOS expression is high, however, the role of iNOS during tumor development is very complex and quite perplexing, with both promoting and inhibiting actions having been described. This review will aim to summarize the dual actions of iNOS-derived NO showing that the microenvironment of the tumor is a contributing factor to these observations and ultimately to cellular outcomes. PMID:26335399

  10. Estrogen-Induced Apoptosis of Breast Epithelial Cells Is Blocked by NO/cGMP and Mediated by Extranuclear Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kastrati, Irida; Edirisinghe, Praneeth D.; Wijewickrama, Gihani T.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen action, via both nuclear and extranuclear estrogen receptors (ERs), induces a variety of cellular signals that are prosurvival or proliferative, whereas nitric oxide (NO) can inhibit apoptosis via caspase S-nitrosylation and via activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase to produce cGMP. The action of 17β-estradiol (E2) at ER is known to elicit NO signaling via activation of NO synthase (NOS) in many tissues. The MCF-10A nontumorigenic, mammary epithelial cell line is genetically stable and insensitive to estrogenic proliferation. In this cell line, estrogens or NOS inhibitors alone had no significant effect, whereas in combination, apoptosis was induced rapidly in the absence of serum; the presence of inducible NOS was confirmed by proteomic analysis. The application of pharmacological agents determined that apoptosis was dependent upon NO/cGMP signaling via cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase and could be replicated by inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/serine-threonine kinase pathway prior to addition of E2. Apoptosis was confirmed by nuclear staining and increased caspase-3 activity in E2 + NOS inhibitor-treated cells. Apoptosis was partially inhibited by a pure ER antagonist and replicated by agonists selective for extranuclear ER. Cells were rescued from E2-induced apoptosis after NOS blockade, by NO-donors and cGMP pathway agonists; preincubation with NO donors was required. The NOS and ER status of breast cancer tissues is significant in etiology, prognosis, and therapy. In this study, apoptosis of preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells was triggered by estrogens via a rapid, extranuclear ER-mediated response, after removal of an antiapoptotic NO/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase signal. PMID:20943808

  11. Expression analysis of NOS family and HSP genes during thermal stress in goat ( Capra hircus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vijay Pratap; Dangi, Satyaveer Singh; Chouhan, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Mahesh; Dangi, Saroj K.; Singh, Gyanendra; Maurya, Vijay Prakash; Kumar, Puneet; Sarkar, Mihir

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 50 genes other than heat shock protein (HSP) expression changes during thermal stress. These genes like nitric oxide synthase (NOS) need proper attention and investigation to find out their possible role in the adaptation to thermal stress in animals. So, the present study was undertaken to demonstrate the expressions of inducible form type II NOS (iNOS), endothelial type III NOS (eNOS), constitutively expressed enzyme NOS (cNOS), HSP70, and HSP90 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during different seasons in Barbari goats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunocytochemistry were applied to investigate messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, protein expression, and immunolocalization of examined factors. The mRNA and protein expressions of iNOS, eNOS, cNOS, HSP70, and HSP90 were significantly higher ( P < 0.05) during peak summer, and iNOS and eNOS expressions were also observed to be significantly higher ( P < 0.05) during peak winter season as compared with moderate season. The iNOS, eNOS, cNOS, HSP70, and HSP90 were mainly localized in plasma membrane and cytoplasm of PBMCs. To conclude, data generated in the present study indicate the possible involvement of the NOS family genes in amelioration of thermal stress so as to maintain cellular integrity and homeostasis in goats.

  12. Antidepressant effects of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Price, W A; Giannini, A J

    1985-11-01

    The authors present a case report that provides support for a relationship between estrogen and the menstrual cycle on the 1 hand and affective disorders on the other. The patient in this case, a 35-year old woman, suffered from a rapid cycling affective disorder that was severely affected by her menstrual cycle and responded positively to oral contraceptives (OCs). The patient had a 24-year history of numerous manic and depressive episodes, the 1st of which coincided with menarche. She had noted that, 4 days before menses, she would experience symptoms of premenstrual tension syndrome (PMS) and often the onset of an affective episode. Treatment with a series of psychotropic agents had not been effective in controlling the number of episodes. However, the patient reported that there had been an 8-9-month period in the past when she had taken OCs and had fewer symptoms. Thus, the patient was placed on Ortho-Novum as well as imipramine. At the 9-month follow-up, she reported there had been no further episodes of depression or mania. The exact mechanism behind estrogen's psychotropic effect is unclear, although it increases the central availability of norepinephrine and induces changes in dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic receptors. Beta-endorphin levels covary with estrogen levels, and estrogen seems to affect every major neurotransmitter system. The fact that estrogen has not consistently been shown to be effective in this regard may only signify the existence of a distinct subclass of affective disorders closely linked to the menstrual cycle. This subclass may have some type of dysfunction within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that contributes to mood swings.

  13. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  14. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling.

  15. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca2+-dependent using the Ca2+ chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  16. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  17. Effect of metformin on insulin-resistant endothelial cell function

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HAIYAN; LI, JIE; YANG, OU; KONG, JIAN; LIN, GUANGZHU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of metformin on the function of insulin-resistant (IR) endothelial cells. A model of IR endothelial cells was established by incubating cells with 30 mM glucose, 1 μM dexamethasone and various concentrations of insulin. The nitric oxide (NO) content of the endothelial cells was determined by measuring the rate of nitroreductase production; the endothelin (ET) concentration was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; and the expression levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were detected using western blotting. The optimal conditions for inducing insulin resistance in endothelial cells were a combination treatment of 10−4 mmol/l insulin, 30 mM glucose and 1 μM dexamethasone for 48 h. Notably, metformin administration significantly increased the NO content and reduced the ET-1 concentration in the IR cells compared with the non-treated control cells (P<0.05); furthermore, metformin significantly increased the intracellular eNOS protein expression in IR endothelial cells compared with the non-treated control cells (P<0.05), with an optimal metformin concentration of 10−3 mmol/l. Thus, the present study identified that metformin improves the function of IR endothelial cells, possibly through promoting eNOS protein expression and increasing the NO content. PMID:25663871

  18. Sildenafil Reduces Insulin-Resistance in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mammi, Caterina; Pastore, Donatella; Lombardo, Marco F.; Ferrelli, Francesca; Caprio, Massimiliano; Consoli, Claudia; Tesauro, Manfredi; Gatta, Lucia; Fini, Massimo; Federici, Massimo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Donadel, Giulia; Bellia, Alfonso; Rosano, Giuseppe M.; Fabbri, Andrea; Lauro, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficacy of Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors to re-establish endothelial function is reduced in diabetic patients. Recent evidences suggest that therapy with PDE5 inhibitors, i.e. sildenafil, may increase the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins in the heart and cardiomyocytes. In this study we analyzed the effect of sildenafil on endothelial cells in insulin resistance conditions in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with insulin in presence of glucose 30 mM (HG) and glucosamine 10 mM (Gluc-N) with or without sildenafil. Insulin increased the expression of PDE5 and eNOS mRNA assayed by Real time-PCR. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that sildenafil significantly increased NO production in basal condition. This effect was partially inhibited by the PI3K inhibitor LY 294002 and completely inhibited by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME. Akt-1 and eNOS activation was reduced in conditions mimicking insulin resistance and completely restored by sildenafil treatment. Conversely sildenafil treatment can counteract this noxious effect by increasing NO production through eNOS activation and reducing oxidative stress induced by hyperglycaemia and glucosamine. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that sildenafil might improve NOS activity of endothelial cells in insulin resistance conditions and suggest the potential therapeutic use of sildenafil for improving vascular function in diabetic patients. PMID:21297971

  19. Estrogens and development of pulmonary hypertension - Interaction of estradiol metabolism and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Tofovic, Stevan P.

    2010-01-01

    Severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by clustered proliferation of endothelial cells in the lumina of small size pulmonary arteries resulting in concentric obliteration of the lumina and formation of complex vascular structures known as plexiform lesions. This debilitating disease occurs more frequently in women, yet both animal studies in classical models of PAH and limited clinical data suggest protective effects of estrogens: the estrogen paradox in pulmonary hypertension. Little is known about the role of estrogens in PAH, but one line of evidence strongly suggests that the vascular protective effects of 17β-estradiol (estradiol; E2) are mediated largely by its downstream metabolites. Estradiol is metabolized to 2-hydroxyestradiol (2HE) by CYP1A1/CYP1B1, and 2HE is converted to 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) by catechol-O-methyl transferase. 2ME is extensively metabolized to 2-methoxyestrone, a metabolite that lacks biologic activity but which may be converted back to 2ME. 2ME has no estrogenic activity and its effects are mediated by estrogen receptors-independent mechanism(s). Notably, in systemic and pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts 2ME exerts stronger anti-mitotic effects than E2 itself. E2 and 2ME, despite having similar effects on other cardiovascular cells, have opposing effects on endothelial cells; that is, in endothelial cells, E2 is pro-mitogenic, pro-angiogenic and anti- apoptotic, whereas 2ME is antimitogenic, anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic. This may have significant ramifications in severe PAH that involves uncontrolled proliferation of monoclonal, apoptosis resistant endothelial cells. Based on its cellular effects, 2ME should be expected to attenuate the progression of disease and provide protection in severe PAH. In contrast, E2, due to its mitogenic, angiogenic, and anti-apoptotic effects (otherwise desirable in normal, quiescent endothelial cells), may even adversely affect

  20. Phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor-induced penile erection.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A; Crone, Julie K; Burnett, Arthur L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced penile erection is mediated by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through its phosphorylation. We assessed the role of constitutively activated eNOS in VEGF-induced penile erection using wild-type (WT) and eNOS-knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice with and without vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. Adult WT and eNOS(-/-) mice were subjected to sham operation or bilateral castration to induce vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. At the time of surgery, animals were injected intracavernosally with a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing human VEGF145 (10(9) particle units) or with empty virus (Ad.Null). After 7 days, erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Total and phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) as well as total and phosphorylated eNOS were quantitatively assessed in mice penes using Western immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In intact WT mice, VEGF145 significantly increased erectile responses, and in WT mice after castration, it completely recovered penile erection. However, VEGF145 failed to increase erectile responses in intact eNOS(-/-) mice and only partially recovered erectile function in castrated eNOS(-/-) mice. In addition, VEGF145 significantly increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine 1177 by approximately 2-fold in penes of both intact and castrated WT mice. The data provide a molecular explanation for VEGF stimulatory effect on penile erection, which involves phosphorylated eNOS (Serine 1177) mediation. PMID:14522830

  1. Phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor-induced penile erection.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A; Crone, Julie K; Burnett, Arthur L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced penile erection is mediated by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through its phosphorylation. We assessed the role of constitutively activated eNOS in VEGF-induced penile erection using wild-type (WT) and eNOS-knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice with and without vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. Adult WT and eNOS(-/-) mice were subjected to sham operation or bilateral castration to induce vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. At the time of surgery, animals were injected intracavernosally with a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing human VEGF145 (10(9) particle units) or with empty virus (Ad.Null). After 7 days, erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Total and phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) as well as total and phosphorylated eNOS were quantitatively assessed in mice penes using Western immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In intact WT mice, VEGF145 significantly increased erectile responses, and in WT mice after castration, it completely recovered penile erection. However, VEGF145 failed to increase erectile responses in intact eNOS(-/-) mice and only partially recovered erectile function in castrated eNOS(-/-) mice. In addition, VEGF145 significantly increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine 1177 by approximately 2-fold in penes of both intact and castrated WT mice. The data provide a molecular explanation for VEGF stimulatory effect on penile erection, which involves phosphorylated eNOS (Serine 1177) mediation.

  2. Endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' untranslated region of endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA: regulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, J; Sánchez de Miguel, L; Montón, M; Casado, S; López-Farré, A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression may be involved in the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation dysfunction associated with several vascular diseases. In the present work, we demonstrate that eNOS mRNA contains a previously undescribed cis element in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). A U+C-rich segment in the 3' UTR is critical in complex formation with bovine aortic endothelial cell cytosolic proteins. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), which destabilizes eNOS mRNA, increased the binding activity of the cytosolic proteins in a time-dependent manner. These data suggest that endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' UTR of eNOS mRNA. These proteins may play a role in TNF-alpha-induced eNOS mRNA destabilization. PMID:9315630

  3. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor inhibits vascular prostanoid production and activity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Matthias R.; Fredette, Natalie C.; Barton, Matthias; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Complications of atherosclerotic vascular disease, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are the most common cause of death in postmenopausal women. Endogenous estrogens inhibit vascular inflammation-driven atherogenesis, a process that involves cyclooxygenase-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids such as thromboxane A2. Here, we studied whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) mediates estrogen-dependent inhibitory effects on prostanoid production and activity under pro-inflammatory conditions. Effects of estrogen on production of thromboxane A2 were determined in human endothelial cells stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. Moreover, Gper-deficient (Gper−/−) and wild-type mice were fed a pro-inflammatory diet and underwent ovariectomy or sham surgery to unmask the role of endogenous estrogens. Thereafter, endothelium-dependent contractions to acetylcholine-stimulated vasoconstrictor prostanoids and the thromboxane-prostanoid receptor agonist U46619 were recorded in isolated carotid arteries. In endothelial cells, TNF-α-stimulated thromboxane A2 production was inhibited by estrogen, an effect blocked by the GPER-selective antagonist G36. In ovary-intact mice, deletion of Gper increased prostanoid-dependent contractions by 2-fold. Ovariectomy also augmented prostanoid-dependent contractions by 2-fold in wild-type mice, but had no additional effect in Gper−/− mice. These contractions were blocked by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor meclofenamate and unaffected by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME. Vasoconstrictor responses to U46619 did not differ between groups, indicating intact signaling downstream of thromboxane-prostanoid receptor activation. In summary, under pro-inflammatory conditions, estrogen inhibits vasoconstrictor prostanoid production in endothelial cells and activity in intact arteries through GPER. Selective activation of GPER may therefore be considered as a novel strategy to treat increased prostanoid

  4. Propofol ameliorates endothelial inflammation induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Role of phosphatase A2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minmin; Ding, Juan; Jiang, Hui; Kong, Lingchao; Sun, Zhirong; Chen, Jiawei; Miao, Changhong

    2015-10-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) induces endothelial inflammation with augmentation of endothelial adhesion molecules over-expression. Propofol was reported to attenuate endothelial adhesion molecule expression in some situations. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism for how propofol restored H/R-mediated up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Compared with the control group, H/R up-regulated expression of Pin-1 and PP2A, increased p66(Shc)-Ser(36) phosphorylation, induced p66(Shc) mitochondrial translocation, O2(-) accumulation and NF-κB activation, and decreased eNOS-Ser(1177) phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) production, thus up-regulating expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and increasing mononuclear-endothelial interaction. More importantly, except that propofol had no effect on H/R-induced p66(Shc)-Ser(36) phosphorylation, most of H/R-mediated changes were alleviated by propofol, resulting in the reduction of endothelial adhesion molecules expression and mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. Moreover, we demonstrated the protective effect of propofol on H/R-induced endothelial inflammation was similar to that of calyculin A, an inhibitor of PP2A. In contrast, FTY720, an activator of PP2A, antagonized the effect of propofol. Our data indicated that propofol down-regulated PP2A expression, leading to reduced dephosphorylation of p66(Shc)-Ser(36) and eNOS-Ser(1177), which is associated with ROS accumulation and NO reduction, resulting in inhibition of endothelial adhesion molecule expression and mononuclear-endothelial interaction.

  5. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  6. Mechanisms of transcriptional activation of the mouse claudin-5 promoter by estrogen receptor alpha and beta.

    PubMed

    Burek, Malgorzata; Steinberg, Katrin; Förster, Carola Y

    2014-07-01

    Claudin-5 is an integral membrane protein and a critical component of endothelial tight junctions that control paracellular permeability. Claudin-5 is expressed at high levels in the brain vascular endothelium. Estrogens have multiple effects on vascular physiology and function. The biological actions of estrogens are mediated by two different estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ER alpha and ER beta. Estrogens have beneficial effects in several vascular disorders. Recently we have cloned and characterized a murine claudin-5 promoter and demonstrated 17beta-estradiol (E2)-mediated regulation of claudin-5 in brain and heart microvascular endothelium on promoter, mRNA and protein level. Sequence analysis revealed a putative estrogen response element (ERE) and a putative Sp1 transcription factor binding site in the claudin-5 promoter. The aim of the present study was to further characterize the estrogen-responsive elements of claudin-5 promoter. First, we introduced point mutations in ERE or Sp1 site in -500/+111 or in Sp1 site of -268/+111 claudin-5 promoter construct, respectively. Basal and E2-mediated transcriptional activation of mutated constructs was abrogated in the luciferase reporter gene assay. Next, we examined whether estrogen receptor subtypes bind to the claudin-5 promoter region. For this purpose we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-estrogen receptor antibodies and cellular lysates of E2-treated endothelial cells followed by quantitative PCR analysis. We show enrichment of claudin-5 promoter fragments containing the ERE- and Sp1-binding site in immunoprecipitates after E2 treatment. Finally, in a gel mobility shift assay, we demonstrated DNA-protein interaction of both ER subtypes at ERE. In summary, this study provides evidence that both a non-consensus ERE and a Sp1 site in the claudin-5 promoter are functional and necessary for the basal and E2-mediated activation of the promoter.

  7. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase negatively regulates hydrogen peroxide-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Benjamin Y; Sartoretto, Juliano L; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Michel, Thomas

    2009-10-13

    Hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species are intimately involved in endothelial cell signaling. In many cell types, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been implicated in the control of metabolic responses, but the role of endothelial cell redox signaling in the modulation of AMPK remains to be completely defined. We used RNA interference and pharmacological methods to establish that H(2)O(2) is a critical activator of AMPK in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). H(2)O(2) treatment of BAECs rapidly and significantly increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. The EC(50) for H(2)O(2)-promoted phosphorylation of AMPK is 65 + or - 15 microM, within the physiological range of cellular H(2)O(2) concentrations. The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKbeta) inhibitor STO-609 abolishes H(2)O(2)-dependent AMPK activation, whereas eNOS inhibitors enhance AMPK activation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKKbeta abrogates AMPK activation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS leads to a striking increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Cellular imaging studies using the H(2)O(2) biosensor HyPer show that siRNA-mediated eNOS knockdown leads to a marked increase in intracellular H(2)O(2) generation, which is blocked by PEG-catalase. eNOS(-/-) mice show a marked increase in AMPK phosphorylation in liver and lung compared to wild-type mice. Lung endothelial cells from eNOS(-/-) mice also show a significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results establish that CaMKKbeta is critically involved in mediating the phosphorylation of AMPK promoted by H(2)O(2) in endothelial cells, and document that eNOS is an important negative regulator of AMPK phosphorylation and intracellular H(2)O(2) generation in endothelial cells. PMID:19805165

  8. NJK14013, a novel synthetic estrogen receptor-α agonist, exhibits estrogen receptor-independent, tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-In; Kim, Taelim; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jun; Heo, Jinyuk; Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    Estrogens act through interactions with estrogen receptors (ERs) to play diverse roles in various pathophysiological conditions. A number of synthetic selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, have been developed and used to treat ER-related diseases, including breast cancer and osteoporosis. Here, we identified a novel compound, bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)methanone-O-isopentyl oxime, designated NJK14013, as an ER agonist. NJK14013 activated ER-dependent transcription in a concentration-dependent manner, while suppressing androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activity. It induced the activation-related phosphorylation of ER and enhanced the transcription of growth regulation by estrogen in breast cancer 1 (GREB1), further supporting its ER-stimulating activity. NJK14013 exerted anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cell lines, including an ER-negative breast cancer cell line, suggesting that it is capable of suppressing the growth of cancer cells independent of its ER-modulating activity. In addition, NJK14013 treatment resulted in significant apoptotic death of MCF7 and Ishikawa cancer cells, but did not induce apoptosis in non-cancer human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that NJK14013 is a novel SERM that can activate ER-mediated transcription in MCF7 cells and suppress the proliferation of various cancer cells, including breast cancer cells and endometrial cancer cells. These results suggest that NJK14013 has potential as a novel SERM for anticancer or hormone-replacement therapy with reduced risk of carcinogenesis.

  9. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increases Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Transcription In Huvec Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koai, Esther; Rios, Tibisay Rincon; Edwards, John

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that VEGF increases eNOS protein, the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. To determine if VEGF alters eNOS transcription, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were transfected with reporters under the control of the eNOS promoter and stimulated with VEGF165. VEGF significantly increased eNOS-mRNA after 2 hours exposure. VEGF significantly increased eNOS reporter activity as early as one hour (268±32%), but this increase returned to baseline after 6 hours. Using deletion constructs, the VEGF response region was initially localized to within the −722/−494 region. GMSA indicated that VEGF increased DNA binding to both a cAMP-like and AP1-like response elements. Site-specific mutations and heterologous constructs indicated that the site centered at AP1-like site was both necessary and sufficient to meditate VEGF transcriptional activation. These results indicate that VEGF rapidly activates eNOS transcription prior to a rise eNOS-mRNA, an effect mediated by a cis-trans interaction localized to an AP1-like site within the eNOS promoter.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate Atherosclerotic Lesions via Restoring Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yuan-Tong

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is beneficial in myocardial infarction and hind limb ischemia, but its ability to ameliorate atherosclerosis remains unknown. Here, the effects of MSCs on inhibiting endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis were investigated in human/mouse endothelial cells treated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with oxLDL inactivated the Akt/endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway, induced eNOS degradation, and inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Coculture with human MSCs reversed the effects of oxLDL on endothelial cells and restored Akt/eNOS activity, eNOS level, and NO production. Reduction of endothelium-dependent relaxation and subsequent plaque formation were developed in apoE−/− mice fed a high-fat diet. Systemic infusion with mouse MSCs ameliorated endothelial dysfunction and plaque formation in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. Interestingly, treatment with interleukin-8 (IL8)/macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) alone induced the similar effects of human/mouse MSCs on oxLDL-treated human/mouse endothelial cells. Neutralization antibodies (Abs) against IL8/MIP-2 also blocked the effects of human/mouse MSCs on oxLDL-treated human/mouse endothelial cells. Consistently, MIP-2 injection alone induced the similar effect of MSCs on the endothelial function in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. The improvement in endothelial dysfunction by mouse MSCs was also blocked when pretreating MSCs with anti-MIP-2 Abs. In conclusion, MSC transplantation improved endothelial function and plaque formation in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. Activation of the Akt/eNOS pathway in endothelium by IL8/MIP-2 is involved in the protective effect of MSCs. The study helps support the use and clarify the mechanism of MSCs for ameliorating atherosclerosis. PMID:25504897

  11. Uric acid attenuates nitric oxide production by decreasing the interaction between endothelial nitric oxide synthase and calmodulin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: a mechanism for uric acid-induced cardiovascular disease development.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Jin, Yoon Mi; Hwang, Soojin; Cho, Du-Hyong; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-08-01

    The elevated level of uric acid in the body is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, which is mediated by endothelial dysfunction. However, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood, although dysregulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production is likely to be involved. Using human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), we explored the molecular mechanism of uric acid on endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. Although high dose of uric acid (12mg/dl for 24h treatment) significantly decreased eNOS activity and NO production, it did not alter eNOS expression and phosphorylations at eNOS-Ser(1177), eNOS-Thr(495) and eNOS-Ser(114). Under this condition, we also found no alterations in the dimerization and acetylation of eNOS, compared with the control. Furthermore, uric acid did not change the activity of arginase II, an enzyme degrading l-arginine, a substrate of eNOS, and intracellular level of calcium, a cofactor for eNOS activation. We also found that uric acid did not alter xanthine oxidase activity, suggesting no involvement of xanthine oxidase-derived O2(-) production in the observed inhibitory effects. In vitro and in cell coimmunoprecipitation studies, however, revealed that uric acid significantly decreased the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM), an eNOS activator, although it did not change the intracellular CaM level. Like in HUVEC, uric acid also decreased eNOS-CaM interaction in bovine aortic EC. Finally, uric acid attenuated ionomycin-induced increase in the interaction between eNOS and CaM. This study suggests firstly that uric acid decreased eNOS activity and NO production through reducing the binding between eNOS and CaM in EC. Our result may provide molecular mechanism by which uric acid induces endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Estradiol pretreatment attenuated nicotine-induced endothelial cell apoptosis via estradiol functional membrane receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-li; Zhao, Jian-li; Lau, Wayne-Bond; Zhang, Yan-qing; Qiao, Zhong-dong; Wang, Ya-jing

    2011-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is highly associated with increased cardiovascular disease complications. The female population, however, manifests reduced cardiovascular morbidity. We define nicotine's effect upon human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), determine whether estradiol might ameliorate endothelial dysfunction via its membrane estrogen receptor (mER), and attempt to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Endothelial cells were pretreated with estradiol-BSA and measured resultant ion flux across the cells via the patch clamp technique to assess mER is functionality. Estradiol-BSA administration was associated with 30% decreased nicotine-induced apoptosis and also attenuated nicotine-activated phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. Pretreatment of estradiol-BSA triggered a low calcium influx, suggesting ahead low influx calcium played a critical role in the underlying protective mechanisms of estradiol. Furthermore, this estradiol-BSA protection against apoptosis remained effective in the presence of tamoxifen, an intracellular estrogen receptor (iER) inhibitor. Additionally, tamoxifen did not abolish estradiol-BSA's inhibitory effect upon p38 and ERK's activation, giving evidence to the obligatory role of p38 and ERK signaling in the estradiol-BSA's anti-apoptotic action via mER. Our study provides evidence that nicotine enhances endothelial cell apoptosis, but estrogen exerts anti-apoptotic effect through its functional membrane estrogen receptor. Clinically, the nicotine in cigarettes might contribute to endothelial dysfunction, whereas ambient estradiol may provide cellular protection against nicotine-induced injury through its functional membrane receptor via MAPK pathway downregulation.

  13. Vascular expression of E-selectin is increased in estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer: a role for tumor-cell-secreted interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, M.; Corless, C. L.; Kräling, B. M.; Tran, C.; Atha, T.; Bischoff, J.; Barsky, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in breast cancer growth and metastasis. Multiple adhesion molecules have been shown to perform critical functions in the process of angiogenesis. In this study, we analyzed 15 benign and 22 malignant estrogen-receptor-negative and estrogen-receptor-positive breast specimens for the presence of the endothelial cell adhesion molecules E-selectin and P-selectin. We found that E-selectin's expression was increased in the malignant breast tumors compared with their benign counterparts (23.86% of blood vessels versus 2.47%; P = 0.0005). Furthermore, E-selectin staining was found to be significantly increased in the estrogen-receptor-negative carcinomas compared with the estrogen-receptor-positive ones (P = 0.005). In vitro findings strongly correlated with the in vivo findings and showed a higher degree of E-selectin induction in endothelial cells exposed to conditioned media from estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer cell lines than from estrogen-receptor-positive ones. The degree of E-selectin induction correlated with the amount of interleukin-1 alpha in the tumor-conditioned media. Neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-1 alpha significantly inhibited the E-selectin expression in endothelial cells exposed to tumor-conditioned media. The results indicate that the endothelial E-selectin expression during angiogenesis is related to breast carcinoma progression in vivo and that this component of angiogenesis may be due directly to tumor-cell-secreted interleukin-1 alpha. Images Figure 1 PMID:9094987

  14. Role of estrogen receptor β selective agonist in ameliorating portal hypertension in rats with CCl4-induced liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Zhang, Bin; Deng, Wen-Sheng; Duan, Ming; Chen, Wei; Wu, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of diarylpropionitrile (DPN), a selective agonist of estrogen receptor β (ERβ), in liver cirrhosis with portal hypertension (PHT) and isolated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). METHODS: Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX), and liver cirrhosis with PHT was induced by CCl4 injection. DPN and PHTPP, the selective ERβ agonist and antagonist, were used as drug interventions. Liver fibrosis was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and Masson’s trichrome staining and by analyzing smooth muscle actin expression. Hemodynamic parameters were determined in vivo using colored microspheres technique. Protein expression and phosphorylation were determined by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis. Messenger RNA levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Collagen gel contraction assay was performed using gel lattices containing HSCs treated with DPN, PHTPP, or Y-27632 prior to ET-1 addition. RESULTS: Treatment with DPN in vivo greatly lowered portal pressure and improved hemodynamic parameters without affecting mean arterial pressure, which was associated with the attenuation of liver fibrosis and intrahepatic vascular resistance (IHVR). In CCl4-treated rat livers, DPN significantly decreased the expression of RhoA and ROCK II, and even suppressed ROCK II activity. Moreover, DPN remarkedly increased the levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS, and promoted the activities of protein kinase G (PKG), which is an NO effector in the liver. Furthermore, DPN reduced the contractility of activated HSCs in the 3-dimensional stress-relaxed collagen lattices, and decreased the ROCK II activity in activated HSCs. Finally, in vivo/in vitro experiments demonstrated that MLC activity was inhibited by DPN. CONCLUSION: For OVX rats with liver cirrhosis, DPN suppressed liver RhoA/ROCK signal, facilitated NO/PKG pathways, and decreased IHVR, giving rise to

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase localized to hippocampal pyramidal cells: implications for synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Dinerman, J L; Dawson, T M; Schell, M J; Snowman, A; Snyder, S H

    1994-01-01

    Using antibodies that react selectively with peptide sequences unique to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), we demonstrate localizations to neuronal populations in the brain. In some brain regions, such as the cerebellum and olfactory bulb, eNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS) occur in the same cell populations, though in differing proportions. In the hippocampus, localizations of the two enzymes are strikingly different, with eNOS more concentrated in hippocampal pyramidal cells than in any other brain area, whereas nNOS is restricted to occasional interneurons. In many brain regions NADPH diaphorase staining reflects NOS catalytic activity. Hippocampal pyramidal cells do not stain for diaphorase with conventional paraformaldehyde fixation but stain robustly with glutaraldehyde fixatives, presumably reflecting eNOS catalytic activity. eNOS in hippocampal pyramidal cells may generate the NO that has been postulated as a retrograde messenger of long-term potentiation. Images PMID:7514300

  16. Caveolin-1 mediates endotoxin inhibition of endothelin-1-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Willson; Lee, Sang Ho; Culberson, Cathy; Korneszczuk, Katarzyna; Clemens, Mark G

    2009-11-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays a key role in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). In the presence of endotoxin, an increase in caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression impairs ET-1/eNOS signaling; however, the molecular mechanism is unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of Cav-1 in the regulation of LPS suppression of ET-1-mediated eNOS activation in LSECs by examining the effect of caveolae disruption using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CD) and filipin. Treatment with 5 mM CD for 30 min increased eNOS activity (+255%, P < 0.05). A dose (0.25 microg/ml) of filipin for 30 min produced a similar effect (+111%, P < 0.05). CD induced the perinuclear localization of Cav-1 and eNOS and stimulated NO production in the same region. Readdition of 0.5 mM cholesterol to saturate CD reversed these effects. Both the combined treatment with CD and ET-1 (CD + ET-1) and with filipin and ET-1 stimulated eNOS activity; however, pretreatment with endotoxin (LPS) abrogated these effects. Following LPS pretreatment, CD + ET-1 failed to stimulate eNOS activity (+51%, P > 0.05), which contributed to the reduced levels of eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and eNOS-Thr495 dephosphorylation, the LPS/CD-induced overexpression and translocation of Cav-1 in the perinuclear region, and the increased perinuclear colocalization of eNOS with Cav-1. These results supported the hypothesis that Cav-1 mediates the action of endotoxin in suppressing ET-1-mediated eNOS activation and demonstrated that the manipulation of caveolae produces significant effects on ET-1-mediated eNOS activity in LSECs.

  17. Melatonin modulation of crosstalk among malignant epithelial, endothelial and adipose cells in breast cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Cos, Samuel; Alvarez-García, Virginia; González, Alicia; Alonso-González, Carolina; Martínez-Campa, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Melatonin, the main secretory product of the pineal gland, is an oncostatic agent that reduces the growth and development of various types of tumors, particularly mammary tumors whose growth is dependent on estrogens. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies point to the hypothesis that melatonin interplays with estrogen signaling pathways at three different levels: i) an indirect mechanism, by interfering with the hypothalamic-pituitary-reproductive axis in such way that the level of plasma estrogens synthesized by the gonadal glands are downregulated; ii) a direct mechanism of the pineal gland at the cell cancer level, disrupting the activation of estradiol receptors, therefore behaving as a selective estrogen receptor modulator; and iii) by regulating the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of estrogens in other tissues, thus behaving as a selective estrogen enzyme modulator. The intratumoral metabolism and synthesis of estrogens, as a result of the interactions of various enzymes, is more important than blood uptake to maintain mammary gland estrogen levels in menopausal females. Additionally, estrogens are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of hormone-dependent breast carcinoma. Paracrine interactions among malignant epithelial cells and proximal adipose and endothelial cells, through cytokines and growth factors produced by breast tumor cells, modulate estrogen production at the mammary tumor level and, as a consequence, the genesis and development of mammary tumors. The aim of the present review is to summarize the recent findings describing the mechanisms by which melatonin is able to modulate the crosstalk among malignant epithelial, endothelial and adipose cells in breast cancer.

  18. Melatonin modulation of crosstalk among malignant epithelial, endothelial and adipose cells in breast cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Cos, Samuel; Alvarez-García, Virginia; González, Alicia; Alonso-González, Carolina; Martínez-Campa, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Melatonin, the main secretory product of the pineal gland, is an oncostatic agent that reduces the growth and development of various types of tumors, particularly mammary tumors whose growth is dependent on estrogens. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies point to the hypothesis that melatonin interplays with estrogen signaling pathways at three different levels: i) an indirect mechanism, by interfering with the hypothalamic-pituitary-reproductive axis in such way that the level of plasma estrogens synthesized by the gonadal glands are downregulated; ii) a direct mechanism of the pineal gland at the cell cancer level, disrupting the activation of estradiol receptors, therefore behaving as a selective estrogen receptor modulator; and iii) by regulating the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of estrogens in other tissues, thus behaving as a selective estrogen enzyme modulator. The intratumoral metabolism and synthesis of estrogens, as a result of the interactions of various enzymes, is more important than blood uptake to maintain mammary gland estrogen levels in menopausal females. Additionally, estrogens are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of hormone-dependent breast carcinoma. Paracrine interactions among malignant epithelial cells and proximal adipose and endothelial cells, through cytokines and growth factors produced by breast tumor cells, modulate estrogen production at the mammary tumor level and, as a consequence, the genesis and development of mammary tumors. The aim of the present review is to summarize the recent findings describing the mechanisms by which melatonin is able to modulate the crosstalk among malignant epithelial, endothelial and adipose cells in breast cancer. PMID:25009641

  19. A connecting hinge represses the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Panda, Koustubh; Tejero, Jesús; Aulak, Kulwant S; Fadlalla, Mohammed Adam; Mustovich, Anthony T; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2007-05-29

    In mammals, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has the weakest activity, being one-tenth and one-sixth as active as the inducible NOS (iNOS) and the neuronal NOS (nNOS), respectively. The basis for this weak activity is unclear. We hypothesized that a hinge element that connects the FMN module in the reductase domain but is shorter and of unique composition in eNOS may be involved. To test this hypothesis, we generated an eNOS chimera that contained the nNOS hinge and two mutants that either eliminated (P728IeNOS) or incorporated (I958PnNOS) a proline residue unique to the eNOS hinge. Incorporating the nNOS hinge into eNOS increased NO synthesis activity 4-fold, to an activity two-thirds that of nNOS. It also decreased uncoupled NADPH oxidation, increased the apparent K(m)O(2) for NO synthesis, and caused a faster heme reduction. Eliminating the hinge proline had similar, but lesser, effects. Our findings reveal that the hinge is an important regulator and show that differences in its composition restrict the activity of eNOS relative to other NOS enzymes.

  20. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    An, Ki-Chan

    2016-08-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  1. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  2. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  3. Estrogen receptor signaling during vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Bondesson, Maria; Hao, Ruixin; Lin, Chin-Yo; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are expressed and their cognate ligands produced in all vertebrates, indicative of important and conserved functions. Through evolution estrogen has been involved in controlling reproduction, affecting both the development of reproductive organs and reproductive behavior. This review broadly describes the synthesis of estrogens and the expression patterns of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, in relation to estrogen functions in the developing fetus and child. We focus on the role of estrogens for development of reproductive tissues, as well as non-reproductive effects on the developing brain. We collate data from human, rodent, bird and fish studies and highlight common and species-specific effects of estrogen signaling on fetal development. Morphological malformations originating from perturbed estrogen signaling in estrogen receptor and aromatase knockout mice are discussed, as well as the clinical manifestations of rare estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase gene mutations in humans. PMID:24954179

  4. β3-Adrenoreceptor stimulation protects against myocardial infarction injury via eNOS and nNOS activation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaolin; Zhao, Lianyou; Li, Xue; Xue, Yusheng; Wang, Bin; Lv, Zongqiang; Chen, Jianghong; Sun, Dongdong; Zheng, Qiangsun

    2014-01-01

    β3-adrenergic receptor (AR) and the downstream signaling, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms, have been emerged as novel modulators of heart function and even potential therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. However, it is not known whether β3-AR plays cardioprotective effects against myocardial infarction (MI) injury. Therefore, the present study was designed to determine the effects of β3-AR on MI injury and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. MI model was constructed by left anterior descending (LAD) artery ligation. Animals were administrated with β3-AR agonist BRL37344 (BRL) or β3-AR inhibitor SR59230A (SR) respectively at 0.1 mg/kg/hour one day after MI operation. The scar area, cardiac function and the apoptosis of myocardial were assessed by Masson's trichrome stain, echocardiography and TUNEL assay respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to elucidate the expressions of target proteins. β3-AR activation with BRL administration significantly attenuated fibrosis and decreased scar area after MI. Moreover, BRL also preserved heart function, and reduced the apoptosis of cardiomyocyte induced by MI. Furthermore, BRL treatment altered the phosphorylation status of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and increased the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS). These results suggested that β3-AR stimulation has a substantial effect on recovery of heart function. In addition, the activations of both eNOS and nNOS may be associated with the cardiac protective effects of β3-AR.

  5. Endothelial cell expression of haemoglobin α regulates nitric oxide signalling.

    PubMed

    Straub, Adam C; Lohman, Alexander W; Billaud, Marie; Johnstone, Scott R; Dwyer, Scott T; Lee, Monica Y; Bortz, Pamela Schoppee; Best, Angela K; Columbus, Linda; Gaston, Benjamin; Isakson, Brant E

    2012-11-15

    Models of unregulated nitric oxide (NO) diffusion do not consistently account for the biochemistry of NO synthase (NOS)-dependent signalling in many cell systems. For example, endothelial NOS controls blood pressure, blood flow and oxygen delivery through its effect on vascular smooth muscle tone, but the regulation of these processes is not adequately explained by simple NO diffusion from endothelium to smooth muscle. Here we report a new model for the regulation of NO signalling by demonstrating that haemoglobin (Hb) α (encoded by the HBA1 and HBA2 genes in humans) is expressed in human and mouse arterial endothelial cells and enriched at the myoendothelial junction, where it regulates the effects of NO on vascular reactivity. Notably, this function is unique to Hb α and is abrogated by its genetic depletion. Mechanistically, endothelial Hb α haem iron in the Fe(3+) state permits NO signalling, and this signalling is shut off when Hb α is reduced to the Fe(2+) state by endothelial cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3, also known as diaphorase 1). Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CYB5R3 increases NO bioactivity in small arteries. These data reveal a new mechanism by which the regulation of the intracellular Hb α oxidation state controls NOS signalling in non-erythroid cells. This model may be relevant to haem-containing globins in a broad range of NOS-containing somatic cells. PMID:23123858

  6. Expression, localization, and regulation of NOS in human mast cell lines: effects on leukotriene production.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Mark; McCauley, Scott D; Befus, A Dean

    2004-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent radical produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and has pleiotrophic activities in health and disease. As mast cells (MCs) play a central role in both homeostasis and pathology, we investigated NOS expression and NO production in human MC populations. Endothelial NOS (eNOS) was ubiquitously expressed in both human MC lines and skin-derived MCs, while neuronal NOS (nNOS) was variably expressed in the MC populations studied. The inducible (iNOS) isoform was not detected in human MCs. Both growth factor-independent (HMC-1) and -dependent (LAD 2) MC lines showed predominant nuclear eNOS protein localization, with weaker cytoplasmic expression. nNOS showed exclusive cytoplasmic localization in HMC-1. Activation with Ca(2+) ionophore (A23187) or IgE-anti-IgE induced eNOS phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus and nuclear and cytoplasmic NO formation. eNOS colocalizes with the leukotriene (LT)-initiating enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) in the MC nucleus. The NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (SNOG), inhibited, whereas the NOS inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), potentiated LT release in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, human MC lines produce NO in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, and endogenously produced NO can regulate LT production by MCs. PMID:15044250

  7. The Expanding Complexity of Estrogen Receptor Signaling in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Menazza, Sara; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2016-03-18

    Estrogen has important effects on cardiovascular function including regulation of vascular function, blood pressure, endothelial relaxation, and the development of hypertrophy and cardioprotection. However, the mechanisms by which estrogen mediates these effects are still poorly understood. As detailed in this review, estrogen can regulate transcription by binding to 2 nuclear receptors, ERα and ERβ, which differentially regulate gene transcription. ERα and ERβ regulation of gene transcription is further modulated by tissue-specific coactivators and corepressors. Estrogen can bind to ERα and ERβ localized at the plasma membrane as well as G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor to initiate membrane delimited signaling, which enhances kinase signaling pathways that can have acute and long-term effects. The kinase signaling pathways can also mediate transcriptional changes and can synergize with the ER to regulate cell function. This review will summarize the beneficial effects of estrogen in protecting the cardiovascular system through ER-dependent mechanisms with an emphasis on the role of the recently described ER membrane signaling mechanisms.

  8. Heme oxygenase 2: endothelial and neuronal localization and role in endothelium-dependent relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Zakhary, R; Gaine, S P; Dinerman, J L; Ruat, M; Flavahan, N A; Snyder, S H

    1996-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2), which synthesizes carbon monoxide (CO), has been localized by immunohistochemistry to endothelial cells and adventitial nerves of blood vessels. HO-2 is also localized to neurons in autonomic ganglia, including the petrosal, superior cervical, and nodose ganglia, as well as ganglia in the myenteric plexus of the intestine. Enzyme studies demonstrated that tin protoporphyrin-9 is a selective inhibitor of HO with approximately 10-fold selectivity for HO over endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase. Inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin 9 reverses the component of endothelial-derived relaxation of porcine distal pulmonary arteries not reversed by an inhibitor of NOS. Thus, CO, like NO, may have endothelial-derived relaxing activity. The similarity of NOS and HO-2 localizations and functions in blood vessels and the autonomic nervous system implies complementary and possibly coordinated physiologic roles for these two mediators. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8570637

  9. Mechanical perturbations trigger endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Shunmugan; Raj, Rajendran Kadarkarai; Saravanakumar, Venkatesan; Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Rajendran, Vinoth Kumar; Shathya, Yogarajan; Ali, B. Mohammed Jaffar; Sumantran, Venil; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a vascular signaling molecule, is primarily produced by endothelial NO synthase. Recently, a functional endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was described in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC-eNOS contributes to the intravascular NO pool and regulates physiological functions. However the regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications of RBC-eNOS are unknown. The present study investigated regulation and functions of RBC-eNOS under mechanical stimulation. This study shows that mechanical stimuli perturb RBC membrane, which triggers a signaling cascade to activate the eNOS. Extracellular NO level, estimated by the 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2′, 7′-Difluorofluorescein Diacetate probe, was significantly increased under mechanical stimuli. Immunostaining and western blot studies confirmed that the mechanical stimuli phosphorylate the serine 1177 moiety of RBC-eNOS, and activates the enzyme. The NO produced by activation of RBC-eNOS in vortexed RBCs promoted important endothelial functions such as migration and vascular sprouting. We also show that mechanical perturbation facilitates nitrosylation of RBC proteins via eNOS activation. The results of the study confirm that mechanical perturbations sensitize RBC-eNOS to produce NO, which ultimately defines physiological boundaries of RBC structure and functions. Therefore, we propose that mild physical perturbations before, after, or during storage can improve viability of RBCs in blood banks. PMID:27345770

  10. Resveratrol Ameliorates High Glucose and High-Fat/Sucrose Diet-Induced Vascular Hyperpermeability Involving Cav-1/eNOS Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao lin; Qu, Wei; Wang, Lin zhi; Huang, Bin qing; Ying, Chen jiang; Sun, Xiu fa; Hao, Li ping

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial hyperpermeability is one of the manifestations of endothelial dysfunction. Resveratrol (Res) is considered to be beneficial in protecting endothelial function. However, currently, the exact protective effect and involved mechanisms of Res on endothelial dysfunction-hyperpermeability have not been completely clarified. The aim of present study is to investigate the effects of Res on amelioration of endothelial hyperpermeability and the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with a normal or high-fat/sucrose diet (HFS) with or without Res for 13 weeks. HFS and in vitro treatment with high glucose increased hyperpermeability in rat aorta, heart, liver and kidney and cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), respectively, which was attenuated by Res treatment. Application of Res reversed the changes in eNOS and Cav-1 expressions in aorta and heart of rats fed HFS and in BAECs incubated with high glucose. Res stimulated the formation of NO inhibited by high glucose in BAECs. Beta-Cyclodextrin (β-CD), caveolae inhibitor, showed the better beneficial effect than Res alone to up-regulate eNOS phosphorylative levels, while NG-Nitro-77 L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), eNOS inhibitor, had no effect on Cav-1 expression. Our studies suggested that HFS and in vitro treatment with high glucose caused endothelial hyperpermeability, which were ameliorated by Res at least involving Cav-1/eNOS regulation. PMID:25419974

  11. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  12. Diverse Functions of Endothelial NO Synthases System: NO and EDH

    PubMed Central

    Godo, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Endothelium-dependent relaxations are predominantly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) in large conduit arteries and by endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) in small resistance vessels. Although the nature of EDH factors varies depending on species and vascular beds, we have previously demonstrated that endothelial NO synthases (eNOS)-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an EDH factor in animals and humans. This vessel size-dependent contribution of NO and EDH is, at least in part, attributable to the diverse roles of endothelial NOSs system; in large conduit arteries, eNOS mainly serves as a NO-generating system to elicit soluble guanylate cyclase–cyclic guanosine monophosphate-mediated relaxations, whereas in small resistance vessels, it serves as a superoxide-generating system to cause EDH/H2O2-mediated relaxations. Endothelial caveolin-1 may play an important role for the diverse roles of NOSs. Although reactive oxygen species are generally regarded harmful, the physiological roles of H2O2 have attracted much attention as accumulating evidence has shown that endothelium-derived H2O2 contributes to cardiovascular homeostasis. The diverse functions of endothelial NOSs system with NO and EDH/H2O2 could account for a compensatory mechanism in the setting of endothelial dysfunction. In this review, we will briefly summarize the current knowledge on the diverse functions of endothelial NOSs system: NO and EDH/H2O2. PMID:26647119

  13. The NOS Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Cassie; Buck, Gayle; Akerson, Valarie

    2011-01-01

    "The picture of a scientist is me!" exclaims first grader Kendra during a nature of science (NOS) lesson. She drew a picture of a scientist and explained that she was going to be a scientist when she grew up because she "loved to observe like a scientist." Kendra's experience was a part of a 30-day unit designed specifically for first graders.…

  14. The Estrogen Receptor-β Expression in De Quervain's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Po-Chuan; Wang, Ping-Hui; Wu, Po-Ting; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist (a.k.a. de Quervain's disease) is common but how estrogen is involved is still unknown. We previously reported that inflammation was involved in the pathogenesis of this ailment. In the present study, we extended our investigation of estrogen receptor (ER)-β expression to determine whether estrogen is involved in the pathogenesis of de Quervain's. Intraoperative retinaculum samples were collected from 16 patients with the ailment. Specimens were histologically graded by collagen structure and immunohistochemically evaluated by quantifying the expression of ER-β, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 (inflammatory cytokines), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (an inflammatory enzyme), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Von Willebrand's factor (vWF). De Quervain's occurs primarily in women. The female:male ratio in our study was 7:1. We found that ER-β expression in the retinaculum was positively correlated with disease grade and patient age. Additionally, disease severity was associated with inflammatory factors--IL-1β and IL-6, COX-2, and VEGF and vWF in tenosynovial tissue. The greater the levels of ER-β expression, tissue inflammation, and angiogenesis are, the more severe de Quervain's disease is. ER-β might be a useful target for novel de Quervain's disease therapy. PMID:26556342

  15. S-glutathionylation uncouples eNOS and regulates its cellular and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-An; Wang, Tse-Yao; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Reyes, Levy A.; Hemann, Craig; Hassan Talukder, M. A.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is critical in the regulation of vascular function, and can generate both nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2•−), which are key mediators of cellular signalling. In the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, eNOS produces NO, endothelial-derived relaxing factor, from L-arginine (L-Arg) by means of electron transfer from NADPH through a flavin containing reductase domain to oxygen bound at the haem of an oxygenase domain, which also contains binding sites for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-Arg1–3. In the absence of BH4, NO synthesis is abrogated and instead O2•− is generated4–7. While NOS dysfunction occurs in diseases with redox stress, BH4 repletion only partly restores NOS activity and NOS-dependent vasodilation7. This suggests that there is an as yet unidentified redox-regulated mechanism controlling NOS function. Protein thiols can undergo S-glutathionylation, a reversible protein modification involved in cellular signalling and adaptation8,9. Under oxidative stress, S-glutathionylation occurs through thiol–disulphide exchange with oxidized glutathione or reaction of oxidant-induced protein thiyl radicals with reduced glutathione10,11. Cysteine residues are critical for the maintenance of eNOS function12,13; we therefore speculated that oxidative stress could alter eNOS activity through S-glutathionylation. Here we show that S-glutathionylation of eNOS reversibly decreases NOS activity with an increase in O2•− generation primarily from the reductase, in which two highly conserved cysteine residues are identified as sites of S-glutathionylation and found to be critical for redox-regulation of eNOS function. We show that eNOS S-glutathionylation in endothelial cells, with loss of NO and gain of O2•− generation, is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In hypertensive vessels, eNOS S-glutathionylation is increased with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation that is restored by thiol

  16. Sepiapterin improves angiogenesis of pulmonary artery endothelial cells with in utero pulmonary hypertension by recoupling endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ru-Jeng; Du, Jianhai; Xu, Hao; Bakhutashvili, Ivane; Eis, Annie; Shi, Yang; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Konduri, Girija G

    2011-09-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is associated with decreased blood vessel density that contributes to increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Previous studies showed that uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) activity and increased NADPH oxidase activity resulted in marked decreases in NO bioavailability and impaired angiogenesis in PPHN. In the present study, we hypothesize that loss of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a critical cofactor for eNOS, induces uncoupled eNOS activity and impairs angiogenesis in PPHN. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) isolated from fetal lambs with PPHN (HTFL-PAEC) or control lambs (NFL-PAEC) were used to investigate the cellular mechanisms impairing angiogenesis in PPHN. Cellular mechanisms were examined with respect to BH4 levels, GTP-cyclohydrolase-1 (GCH-1) expression, eNOS dimer formation, and eNOS-heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) interactions under basal conditions and after sepiapterin (Sep) supplementation. Cellular levels of BH4, GCH-1 expression, and eNOS dimer formation were decreased in HTFL-PAEC compared with NFL-PAEC. Sep supplementation decreased apoptosis and increased in vitro angiogenesis in HTFL-PAEC and ex vivo pulmonary artery sprouting angiogenesis. Sep also increased cellular BH4 content, NO production, eNOS dimer formation, and eNOS-hsp90 association and decreased the superoxide formation in HTFL-PAEC. These data demonstrate that Sep improves NO production and angiogenic potential of HTFL-PAEC by recoupling eNOS activity. Increasing BH4 levels via Sep supplementation may be an important therapy for improving eNOS function and restoring angiogenesis in PPHN.

  17. Sepiapterin improves angiogenesis of pulmonary artery endothelial cells with in utero pulmonary hypertension by recoupling endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Xu, Hao; Bakhutashvili, Ivane; Eis, Annie; Shi, Yang; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Konduri, Girija G.

    2011-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is associated with decreased blood vessel density that contributes to increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Previous studies showed that uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) activity and increased NADPH oxidase activity resulted in marked decreases in NO bioavailability and impaired angiogenesis in PPHN. In the present study, we hypothesize that loss of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a critical cofactor for eNOS, induces uncoupled eNOS activity and impairs angiogenesis in PPHN. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) isolated from fetal lambs with PPHN (HTFL-PAEC) or control lambs (NFL-PAEC) were used to investigate the cellular mechanisms impairing angiogenesis in PPHN. Cellular mechanisms were examined with respect to BH4 levels, GTP-cyclohydrolase-1 (GCH-1) expression, eNOS dimer formation, and eNOS-heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) interactions under basal conditions and after sepiapterin (Sep) supplementation. Cellular levels of BH4, GCH-1 expression, and eNOS dimer formation were decreased in HTFL-PAEC compared with NFL-PAEC. Sep supplementation decreased apoptosis and increased in vitro angiogenesis in HTFL-PAEC and ex vivo pulmonary artery sprouting angiogenesis. Sep also increased cellular BH4 content, NO production, eNOS dimer formation, and eNOS-hsp90 association and decreased the superoxide formation in HTFL-PAEC. These data demonstrate that Sep improves NO production and angiogenic potential of HTFL-PAEC by recoupling eNOS activity. Increasing BH4 levels via Sep supplementation may be an important therapy for improving eNOS function and restoring angiogenesis in PPHN. PMID:21622842

  18. [Progress of non-genomic action of estrogen and its impact on female reproduction].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Lin; Yuan, Dong-Zhi; Zhang, Shi-Mao; Yue, Li-Min

    2016-08-25

    Estrogen is one of the steroid hormones. Besides the genomic action mediated by its intracellular receptor on target cells, there is now increasing body of evidence indicating that estrogen also has non-genomic action. For the non-genomic action, estrogen binds to its receptor on cell membrane, subsequently rapidly activates various intracellular signaling pathways, such as PLC/Ca(2+), ERK/MAPK, cAMP-PKA, PI3K-AKT-NOS, and finally induces biological effects. The non-genomic effects of estrogen on physiologic and pathologic processes have been found in many tissues within the reproductive, nervous and cardiovascular systems and bone etc. In reproductive system, it has been demonstrated that estrogen plays important roles in follicle development, fertilization and embryo implantation, and it is involved in the genesis and development of genital tract tumors and breast cancer. In this review, we focus on the general characteristics of non-genomic action of estrogen, its main nonnuclear signaling pathways and physiological and pathological significance, especially its influences in female reproductive functions. PMID:27546514

  19. Glucocorticoids and estrogens modulate the NF-κB pathway differently in the micro- and macrovasculature.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Abarca-Rojano; Judith, Pacheco-Yépez; Elisa, Drago-Serrano Maria; Rafael, Campos-Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Estrogens and glucocorticoids have synergistic effects in the micro and macrovasculature of endothelial cells (ECs), having pro-inflammatory effects in the former and inhibiting the expression of adhesion molecules in the latter. The molecular basis of these effects in the endothelium has not yet been clarified. We postulate that the ECs of the micro- and macrovasculature have different non-genomic mechanisms that regulate levels of preexisting complexes of glucocorticoids and estrogens with their respective receptors. Since these receptors are regulated by NF-κB, their expression could be critical to the activation of a pro- or anti-inflammatory response. In the macrovasculature the synergistic effects of estrogens and glucocorticoids on ECs may be through the inhibition of NF-κB, leading to the inhibition of the expression of inflammatory molecules. It seems likely that glucocorticoid-receptor and estrogen-receptor complexes directly bind to NF-κB proteins in the macrovasculature, resulting in the inhibition of an excessive proinflammatory response. Further insights into these processes may help clarify the role of the endothelial cells of different vascular beds during the inflammatory response and chronic inflammation, and thus contribute to the design of more effective therapeutic strategies for the prevention of diseases related to inflammation, including atherosclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Arginase Inhibition Restores Peroxynitrite-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction via L-Arginine-Dependent Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Cong; Park, Jong Taek; Jeon, Yeong Gwan; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Hoe, Kwang Lae; Kim, Young Myeong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peroxynitrite plays a critical role in vascular pathophysiology by increasing arginase activity and decreasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate whether arginase inhibition and L-arginine supplement could restore peroxynitrite-induced endothelial dysfunction and determine the involved mechanism. Materials and Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with SIN-1, a peroxynitrite generator, and arginase activity, nitrite/nitrate production, and expression levels of proteins were measured. eNOS activation was evaluated via Western blot and dimer blot analysis. We also tested nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and performed a vascular tension assay. Results SIN-1 treatment increased arginase activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner and reciprocally decreased nitrite/nitrate production that was prevented by peroxynitrite scavenger in HUVECs. Furthermore, SIN-1 induced an increase in the expression level of arginase I and II, though not in eNOS protein. The decreased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and the increased at Thr495 by SIN-1 were restored with arginase inhibitor and L-arginine. The changed eNOS phosphorylation was consistent in the stability of eNOS dimers. SIN-1 decreased NO production and increased ROS generation in the aortic endothelium, all of which was reversed by arginase inhibitor or L-arginine. NG-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) prevented SIN-1-induced ROS generation. In the vascular tension assay, SIN-1 enhanced vasoconstrictor responses to U46619 and attenuated vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine that were reversed by arginase inhibition. Conclusion These findings may explain the beneficial effect of arginase inhibition and L-arginine supplement on endothelial dysfunction under redox imbalance-dependent pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27593859

  1. Fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Hisashi; Murakami, Ryuichiro . E-mail: ryuichi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kambe, Fukushi; Cao, Xia; Takahashi, Ryotaro; Asai, Toru; Hirai, Toshihisa; Numaguchi, Yasushi; Okumura, Kenji; Seo, Hisao; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2006-03-24

    Fenofibrate improves endothelial function by lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects. Additionally, fenofibrate has been demonstrated to upregulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been reported to phosphorylate eNOS at Ser-1177 and stimulate vascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) production. We report here that fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of HUVEC with fenofibrate increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Fenofibrate simultaneously increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Inhibitors of protein kinase A and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase failed to suppress the fenofibrate-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Neither bezafibrate nor WY-14643 activated AMPK in HUVEC. Furthermore, fenofibrate activated AMPK without requiring any transcriptional activities. These results indicate that fenofibrate stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production through AMPK activation, which is suggested to be a novel characteristic of this agonist and unrelated to its effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}.

  2. Delta- and gamma-tocotrienol isomers are potent in inhibiting inflammation and endothelial activation in stimulated human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Muid, Suhaila; Froemming, Gabriele R. Anisah; Rahman, Thuhairah; Ali, A. Manaf; Nawawi, Hapizah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tocotrienols (TCTs) are more potent antioxidants than α-tocopherol (TOC). However, the effectiveness and mechanism of the action of TCT isomers as anti-atherosclerotic agents in stimulated human endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions are not well established. Aims 1) To compare the effects of different TCT isomers on inflammation, endothelial activation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). 2) To identify the two most potent TCT isomers in stimulated human endothelial cells. 3) To investigate the effects of TCT isomers on NFκB activation, and protein and gene expression levels in stimulated human endothelial cells. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with various concentrations of TCT isomers or α-TOC (0.3–10 µM), together with lipopolysaccharides for 16 h. Supernatant cells were collected and measured for protein and gene expression of cytokines (interleukin-6, or IL-6; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or TNF-α), adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, or ICAM-1; vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, or VCAM-1; and e-selectin), eNOS, and NFκB. Results δ-TCT is the most potent TCT isomer in the inhibition of IL-6, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and NFκB, and it is the second potent in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS. γ-TCT isomer is the most potent isomer in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS, and it is the second most potent in inhibiting is IL-6, VCAM-1, and NFκB. For ICAM-1 protein expression, the most potent is δ-TCT followed by α-TCT. α- and β-TCT inhibit IL-6 at the highest concentration (10 µM) but enhance IL-6 at lower concentrations. γ-TCT markedly increases eNOS expression by 8–11-fold at higher concentrations (5–10 µM) but exhibits neutral effects at lower concentrations. Conclusion δ- and γ-TCT are the two most potent TCT isomers in terms of the inhibition of inflammation and endothelial activation whilst enhancing eNOS, possibly mediated via the NFκB pathway. Hence, there is a

  3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Prevents Heparanase Induction and the Development of Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Garsen, Marjolein; Rops, Angelique L.; Li, Jinhua; van Beneden, Katrien; van den Branden, Christiane; Berden, Jo HM; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) deficiency exacerbates proteinuria and renal injury in several glomerular diseases, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We recently showed that heparanase is essential for the development of experimental diabetic nephropathy and glomerulonephritis, and hypothesize that heparanase expression is regulated by eNOS. Here, we demonstrate that induction of adriamycin nephropathy (AN) in C57BL/6 eNOS-deficient mice leads to an increased glomerular heparanase expression accompanied with overt proteinuria, which was not observed in the AN-resistant wild type counterpart. In vitro, the eNOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) induced heparanase expression in cultured mouse glomerular endothelial cells. Moreover, ADMA enhanced transendothelial albumin passage in a heparanase-dependent manner. We conclude that eNOS prevents heparanase induction and the development of proteinuria. PMID:27505185

  4. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  5. Marijuana: interaction with the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Sauer, M A; Rifka, S M; Hawks, R L; Cutler, G B; Loriaux, D L

    1983-02-01

    Crude marijuana extract competed with estradiol for binding to the estrogen receptor of rat uterine cytosol. Condensed marijuana smoke also competed with estradiol for its receptor. Pure delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, however, did not interact with the estrogen receptor. Ten delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolites also failed to compete with estradiol for its receptor. Of several other common cannabinoids tested, only cannabidiol showed any estrogen receptor binding. This was evident only at very high concentrations of cannabidiol. Apigenin, the aglycone of a flavinoid phytoestrogen found in cannabis, displayed high affinity for the estrogen receptor. To assess the biological significance of these receptor data, estrogen activity was measured in vivo with the uterine growth bioassay, using immature rats. Cannabis extract in large doses exhibited neither estrogenic nor antiestrogenic effects. Thus, although estrogen receptor binding activity was observed in crude marijuana extract, marijuana smoke condensate and several known components of cannabis, direct estrogenic activity of cannabis extract could not be demonstrated in vivo.

  6. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  7. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Estrogen-alone hormone therapy does not increase the risk of ...

  8. eNOS uncoupling in the cerebellum after BBB disruption by exposure to Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom.

    PubMed

    Soares, Edilene Siqueira; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2015-09-15

    Numerous studies have shown that the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer (PNV) armed-spider causes excitotoxic signals and blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb) in rats. Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule which has a role in endothelium homeostasis and vascular health. The present study investigated the relevance of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) uncoupling to clinical neurotoxic evolution induced by PNV. eNOS immunoblotting of cerebellum lysates processed through low-temperature SDS-PAGE revealed significant increased monomerization of the enzyme at critical periods of severe envenoming (1-2 h), whereas eNOS dimerization reversal paralleled to amelioration of animals condition (5-72 h). Moreover, eNOS uncoupling was accompanied by increased expression in calcium-sensing calmodulin protein and calcium-binding calbindin-D28 protein in cerebellar neurons. It is known that greater eNOS monomers than dimers implies the inability of eNOS to produce NO leading to superoxide production and endothelial/vascular barrier dysfunction. We suggest that transient eNOS deactivation and disturbances in calcium handling reduce NO production and enhance production of free radicals thus contributing to endothelial dysfunction in the cerebellum of envenomed rats. In addition, eNOS uncoupling compromises the enzyme capacity to respond to shear stress contributing to perivascular edema and it is one of the mechanisms involved in the BBBb promoted by PNV.

  9. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingzi; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-10-01

    As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP)] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:26499181

  10. Attenuation of signaling and nitric oxide production following prolonged leptin exposure in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blanquicett, Carmelo; Graves, Anitra; Kleinhenz, Dean J; Hart, C Michael

    2007-11-01

    Acute leptin exposure stimulates endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production in vitro. In contrast, chronic elevations in circulating leptin levels in patients with obesity are associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired endothelial NO production. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to examine the direct effects of acute and more sustained leptin stimulation on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and NO production in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). HAECs were treated with vehicle or with leptin (5 or 60 ng/mL) acutely (30-60 minutes) or for 72 hours. HAEC NO release into culture media was measured with a chemiluminescence technique, and superoxide (O(2)(-.)) production was measured with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. HAEC eNOS activity was measured as the conversion of (3)H-arginine to (3)H-citrulline, and protein levels of eNOS, phospho-eNOS (serine 1177), Erk, phospho-Erk, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS3), xanthine oxidase (XO), and the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase components p22phox, p67phox, Nox-4, and gp91phox were examined by Western blotting or immunoprecipitation. Acute leptin exposure increased eNOS serine 1177 phosphorylation and caused Erk activation. In contrast, prolonged leptin stimulation was not cytotoxic and failed to alter eNOS expression, phosphorylation, or HAEC NO release. Furthermore, prolonged leptin stimulation did not alter O(2)(-.) production or NADPH oxidase or XO expression but increased SOCS3 expression. In contrast to acute stimulation, prolonged (72 hours) stimulation does not alter endothelial cell NO or O(2)(-.) production. We postulate that chronic leptin stimulation, through increased SOCS3 expression, may attenuate the effects of leptin on vascular endothelial function. PMID:18062898

  11. Estrogen actions in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, M E

    2009-01-01

    This brief review summarizes the current state of the field for estrogen receptor actions in the cardiovascular system and the cardiovascular effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). It is organized into three parts: a short Introduction and overview of the current view of how estrogen works on blood vessels; a summary of the current status of clinical information regarding HRT and cardiovascular effects; and an update on state-of-the-art mouse models of estrogen action using estrogen receptor knockout mice.

  12. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  13. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  14. Discovery of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor development candidate KD7332, part 1: Identification of a novel, potent, and selective series of quinolinone iNOS dimerization inhibitors that are orally active in rodent pain models.

    PubMed

    Bonnefous, Céline; Payne, Joseph E; Roppe, Jeffrey; Zhuang, Hui; Chen, Xiaohong; Symons, Kent T; Nguyen, Phan M; Sablad, Marciano; Rozenkrants, Natasha; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Li; Severance, Daniel; Walsh, John P; Yazdani, Nahid; Shiau, Andrew K; Noble, Stewart A; Rix, Peter; Rao, Tadimeti S; Hassig, Christian A; Smith, Nicholas D

    2009-05-14

    There are three isoforms of dimeric nitric oxide synthases (NOS) that convert arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide. Inducible NOS is implicated in numerous inflammatory diseases and, more recently, in neuropathic pain states. The majority of existing NOS inhibitors are either based on the structure of arginine or are substrate competitive. We describe the identification from an ultra high-throughput screen of a novel series of quinolinone small molecule, nonarginine iNOS dimerization inhibitors. SAR studies on the screening hit, coupled with an in vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge assay measuring plasma nitrates and drug levels, rapidly led to the identification of compounds 12 and 42--potent inhibitors of the human and mouse iNOS enzyme that were highly selective over endothelial NOS (eNOS). Following oral dosing, compounds 12 and 42 gave a statistical reduction in pain behaviors in the mouse formalin model, while 12 also statistically reduced neuropathic pain behaviors in the chronic constriction injury (Bennett) model.

  15. Molecular beacons can assess changes in expression and 3'-polyadenylation of human eNOS mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel; Baker, Meredith B; Weber, Martina; Harrison, David G; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D

    2009-03-01

    The endothelium plays an essential role in maintaining vascular homeostasis, and it fulfills this role by modulating intracellular signaling and gene expression in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli. Assessing changes in endothelial gene expression is essential to understanding how physiological and pathophysiological processes modulate vascular homeostasis. Here we describe the use of molecular beacons to rapidly and quantitatively assess expression and 3'-polyadenylation of a gene that is important for vascular homeostasis, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Single- and dual-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) molecular beacon hybridization assays were developed to measure changes in mRNA levels and 3'-polyadenylation, respectively, in primary human endothelial cell cultures subjected to laminar shear stress or statin treatment. Optimized beacon hybridization assays took approximately 15 min to perform, and eNOS mRNA levels were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Competitive inhibition assays and posttranscriptional silencing of eNOS expression were used to verify the specificity of molecular beacon fluorescence. Finally, the dual-FRET method was used to assess eNOS polyadenylation in tissues isolated from mice subjected to exercise training. These data demonstrate that molecular beacons can be used to rapidly and efficiently measure endothelial gene expression and 3'-polyadenylation. This approach could easily be adapted for studies of other endothelial genes and has promise for applications in live endothelial cells.

  16. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2016-07-12

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell. The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins, and G protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphorylation of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an endothelial cell subjected to a step increase of wall shear stress from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1-5 min) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases. PMID:27410748

  17. Role of SIRT1 and FOXO factors in eNOS transcriptional activation by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ning; Strand, Susanne; Schlufter, Frank; Siuda, Daniel; Reifenberg, Gisela; Kleinert, Hartmut; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2013-08-01

    Many of the cardiovascular protective effects of resveratrol are attributable to an enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Resveratrol has been shown to enhance eNOS gene expression as well as eNOS enzymatic activity. The aim of the present study was to analyze the molecular mechanisms of eNOS transcriptional activation by resveratrol. Treatment of human EA.hy 926 endothelial cells with resveratrol led to a concentration-dependent upregulation of eNOS expression. In luciferase reporter gene assay, resveratrol enhanced the activity of human eNOS promoter fragments (3500, 1600, 633 and 263bp in length, respectively), indicating that the proximal promoter region is required for resveratrol-induced eNOS transcriptional activation. Knockdown of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) by siRNA prevented the upregulation of eNOS mRNA and protein by resveratrol. Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are established downstream targets of SIRT1. siRNA-mediated knockdown of FOXO1 and FOXO3a abolished the effect of resveratrol on eNOS expression, indicating the involvement of these factors. Resveratrol treatment enhanced the expression of FOXO1 and FOXO3a in EA.hy 926 cells. Reporter gene assay using promoter containing forkhead response elements showed increased FOXO factor activity by resveratrol. In electrophoretic mobility shift assay, the enhanced binding of nuclear proteins to the eNOS promoter regions by resveratrol could be blocked by antibodies against FOXO1 and FOXO3a. In conclusion, resveratrol enhances the expression and activity of FOXO transcription factors. The SIRT1/FOXO factor axis is involved in resveratrol-induced eNOS transcriptional activation.

  18. [Role of estrogen in male reproduction].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi-Qing; Xu, Chen

    2005-11-01

    Estrogen plays an essential role in male reproduction. In human and other mammalians, a number of tissues express aromatase and hence synthesize estrogen. ERs and aromatase are present at all developmental stages of the male reproductive organs in many mammalian species. Estrogen is important in different aspects in male reproductive physiology, including its effects on germ cells, Sertoli cells, Leydig cells and epididymal functions.

  19. Enhanced noscapine delivery using estrogen-receptor-targeted nanoparticles for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Madan, Jitender; Gundala, Sushma R; Kasetti, Yoganjaneyulu; Bharatam, Prasad V; Aneja, Ritu; Katyal, Anju; Jain, Upendra K

    2014-07-01

    Noscapine (Nos), an orally available plant-derived antitussive alkaloid, is in phase II clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. It has extensively been shown to inhibit tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of hematopoietic, breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostate origin. However, high tumor-suppressive Nos dosages encumber the development of oral controlled-release formulations because of a short biological half-life (<2 h), poor absorption, low aqueous solubility, and extensive first-pass metabolism. Here, we present the design, fabrication, optimization, characterization, and biological evaluation of estrone-conjugated noscapine-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (Nos-ES-GN) for targeting estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Gelatin nanoparticles (GN) were a uniformly compact size, stable at physiological pH, and showed a drug entrapment efficiency of 66.1±5.9 and 65.2±5.6% for Nos-GN and Nos-ES-GN, respectively. The secondary structure of gelatin nanocoacervates was predicted using circular dichroism and in-silico molecular modeling. Our data suggest that ethanol-fabricated GN retained the α-helical content of gelatin, whereas acetone favored the formation of random coils. The conjugation of estrone to Nos-GN did not affect the release rate of the drug, and both formulations followed first-order release kinetics with an initial burst, followed by a slow release. The IC50 value of Nos-ES-GN was 21.2 μmol/l, which was ∼50% lower than the free drug (43.3 μmol/l), suggesting targeted drug delivery. Our cell uptake study carried out in an estrogen-receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines showed greater accumulation of Nos-ES-GN in MCF-7 cells instead of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our data indicated that estrone-conjugated nanoparticles may potentially be used for targeting breast cancer cells.

  20. Chronic estrogen treatment in female transgenic (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats augments endothelium-derived nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Ferrario, C M; Ganten, D; Brosnihan, K B

    1997-06-01

    (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (LMMNA), was used to evaluate indirectly the basal contribution of NO in vascular rings. The response to LMMNA was attenuated in untreated Tg(+) as compared to Tg(-) rats. E2 treatment augmented the contraction response to NOS inhibition in both Tg(+) and Tg(-) rats, resulting in a response in Tg(+) rats that was no different from Tg(-) rats. These results indicate that untreated, surgically ovariectomized hypertensive rats show deficiencies in endothelial function, which can be improved by estrogen replacement.

  1. Not lost in translation: Emerging clinical importance of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    It has been 20years that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) was cloned as the orphan receptor GPR30 from multiple cellular sources, including vascular endothelial cells. Here, I will provide an overview of estrogen biology and the historical background leading to the discovery of rapid vascular estrogen signaling. I will also review the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying GPER function, its role in physiology and disease, some of the currently available GPER-targeting drugs approved for clinical use such as SERMs (selective estrogen receptor modulators) and SERDs (selective estrogen receptor downregulators). Many of currently used drugs such as tamoxifen, raloxifene, or faslodex™/fulvestrant were discovered targeting GPER many years after they had been introduced to the clinics for entirely different purposes. This has important implications for the clinical use of these drugs and their modes of action, which I have termed 'reverse translational medicine'. In addition, environmental pollutants known as 'endocrine disruptors' have been found to bind to GPER. This article also discusses recent evidence in these areas as well as opportunities in translational clinical medicine and GPER research, including medical genetics, personalized medicine, prevention, and its theranostic use. PMID:26921679

  2. Design of pathway preferential estrogens that provide beneficial metabolic and vascular effects without stimulating reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Kim, Sung Hoon; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Yiru C; Zhang, Hui; Chambliss, Ken L; Carlson, Kathryn E; Mayne, Christopher G; Shaul, Philip W; Korach, Kenneth S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2016-01-01

    There is great medical need for estrogens with favorable pharmacological profiles that support desirable activities for menopausal women, such as metabolic and vascular protection, but that lack stimulatory activities on the breast and uterus. We report the development of structurally novel estrogens that preferentially activate a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) signaling pathways and result in favorable target tissue-selective activity. Through a process of structural alteration of estrogenic ligands that was designed to preserve their essential chemical and physical features but greatly reduced their binding affinity for ERs, we obtained "pathway preferential estrogens" (PaPEs), which interacted with ERs to activate the extranuclear-initiated signaling pathway preferentially over the nuclear-initiated pathway. PaPEs elicited a pattern of gene regulation and cellular and biological processes that did not stimulate reproductive and mammary tissues or breast cancer cells. However, in ovariectomized mice, PaPEs triggered beneficial responses both in metabolic tissues (adipose tissue and liver) that reduced body weight gain and fat accumulation and in the vasculature that accelerated repair of endothelial damage. This process of designed ligand structure alteration represents a novel approach to develop ligands that shift the balance in ER-mediated extranuclear and nuclear pathways to obtain tissue-selective, non-nuclear PaPEs, which may be beneficial for postmenopausal hormone replacement. The approach may also have broad applicability for other members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PMID:27221711

  3. Influence of coronary artery diameter on eNOS protein content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. H.; Turk, J. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Woodman, C. R.; Price, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the content of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein (eNOS protein/g total artery protein) increases with decreasing artery diameter in the coronary arterial tree. Content of eNOS protein was determined in porcine coronary arteries with immunoblot analysis. Arteries were isolated in six size categories from each heart: large arteries [301- to 2,500-microm internal diameter (ID)], small arteries (201- to 300-microm ID), resistance arteries (151- to 200-microm ID), large arterioles (101- to 150-microm ID), intermediate arterioles (51- to 100-microm ID), and small arterioles(<50-microm ID). To obtain sufficient protein for analysis from small- and intermediate-sized arterioles, five to seven arterioles 1-2 mm in length were pooled into one sample for each animal. Results establish that the number of smooth muscle cells per endothelial cell decreases from a number of 10 to 15 in large coronary arteries to 1 in the smallest arterioles. Immunohistochemistry revealed that eNOS is located only in endothelial cells in all sizes of coronary artery and in coronary capillaries. Contrary to our hypothesis, eNOS protein content did not increase with decreasing size of coronary artery. Indeed, the smallest coronary arterioles had less eNOS protein per gram of total protein than the large coronary arteries. These results indicate that eNOS protein content is greater in the endothelial cells of conduit arteries, resistance arteries, and large arterioles than in small coronary arterioles.

  4. Endostatin induces acute endothelial nitric oxide and prostacyclin release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chunying; Harris, M. Brennan; Venema, Virginia J.; Venema, Richard C. . E-mail: rvenema@mcg.edu

    2005-04-15

    Chronic exposure to endostatin (ES) blocks endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, and migration and induces EC apoptosis thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}), in contrast, play important roles in promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the acute effects of ES on endothelial NO and PGI{sub 2} production. Unexpectedly, a cGMP reporter cell assay showed that ES-induced acute endothelial NO release in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Enzyme immunoassay showed that ES also induced an acute increase in PGI{sub 2} production in BAECs. These results were confirmed by ex vivo vascular ring studies that showed vascular relaxation in response to ES. Immunoblot analysis showed that ES stimulated acute phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser116, Ser617, Ser635, and Ser1179, and dephosphorylation at Thr497 in BAECs, events associated with eNOS activation. Short-term exposure of EC to ES, therefore, unlike long-term exposure which is anti-angiogenic, may be pro-angiogenic.

  5. Regulation of Placental Villous Angiopoietin-1 and -2 Expression by Estrogen During Baboon Pregnancy1

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Eugene D.; Babischkin, Jeffery S.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    We recently showed an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), decrease in angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and unaltered Ang-2 expression by the villous placenta with advancing baboon pregnancy. Moreover, placental VEGF expression was increased by estrogen in early pregnancy. In the present study, we determined whether placental Ang-1 and Ang-2 are regulated by estrogen. Ang-1 and Ang-2 mRNA and protein were determined by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in the placenta of baboons on day 60 of gestation (term is 184 days) after administration of estrogen precursor androstenedione on days 25-59 or on day 54 after acute estradiol administration. Chronic androstenedione treatment increased serum estradiol levels 3-fold (P<0.001) and decreased (P<0.05) villous cytotrophoblast Ang-1 mRNA to a level (0.36 ± 0.08 relative to 18S rRNA) that was one-third of that in untreated animals (0.98 ± 0.26). Within 2 h of estradiol administration, cytotrophoblast Ang-1 mRNA was decreased to a level (0.24 ± 0.05) one-fifth (P<0.05) of that in untreated animals (1.14 ± 0.23). However, Ang-2 mRNA levels were unaltered. Ang-1, Ang-2 and estrogen receptors α and β protein were localized within villous cytotrophoblasts providing a mechanism for estrogen action at this site. In summary, estrogen increased VEGF, decreased Ang-1, and had no effect on Ang-2 expression within placental cytotrophoblasts during early baboon pregnancy. We propose that the estrogen-dependent differential regulation of these angioregulatory factors underpins the unique pattern of neovascularization established within the villous placenta during primate pregnancy. PMID:18022824

  6. Association of NOS2 and NOS3 gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Li, Yu-Mei; Yang, Lin-Qing; Zhong, Cai-Gao; Zhuang, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene play important roles in the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study aims to detect the potential association of NOS2 and NOS3 gene polymorphisms with the susceptibility toT2DM and diabetic nephropathy (DN) in the Chinese Han population. Four hundred and ninety T2DM patients and 485 healthy controls were enrolled in this case-control study. The genotypes of NOS2 and NOS3 gene polymorphisms were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ligase detection reaction (LDR) method. Our data demonstrated that the NOS2 rs2779248 and NOS2 rs1137933 genetic polymorphisms were significantly associated with the increased susceptibility to T2DM in the heterozygote comparison, dominant model, and allele contrast; and NOS3 rs3918188 genetic polymorphism was significantly associated with the increased susceptibility to T2DM in the homozygote comparison and recessive model. The allele-C and genotype-TC of NOS2 rs2779248, allele-A and genotype-GA of NOS2 rs1137933 and genotype-AA of NOS3 rs3918188 genetic polymorphisms might be the risk factors for increasing the susceptibility to T2DM. And a significant haplotype effect of NOS2 rs10459953/C- rs1137933/G- rs2779248/T was found between T2DM cases and controls. Moreover, NOS3 rs1800783 polymorphism was significantly associated with the increased susceptibility to DN in the heterozygote comparison, recessive model and allele contrast. At last, a positive correlation of family history of diabetes with NOS3 rs11771443 polymorphism was found in DN. These preliminary findings indicate that the NOS2 rs2779248, NOS2 rs1137933, and NOS3 rs3918188 genetic polymorphisms are potentially related to the susceptibility to T2DM, and the rs1800783 polymorphism might be considered as genetic risk factors for diabetic nephropathy, and family history of diabetes was closely associated with rs11771443 polymorphism in DN, and the

  7. Cellular and molecular biology of aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Morgan, R Garrett; Walker, Ashley E; Lesniewski, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage has been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway and result in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current state

  8. Exercise does not activate the β3 adrenergic receptor-eNOS pathway, but reduces inducible NOS expression to protect the heart of obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Adrien; Battault, Sylvain; Belaidi, Elise; Tanguy, Stephane; Rosselin, Marie; Boulghobra, Doria; Meyer, Gregory; Gayrard, Sandrine; Walther, Guillaume; Geny, Bernard; Durand, Gregory; Cazorla, Olivier; Reboul, Cyril

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with higher cardiac vulnerability to ischemia-reperfusion (IR). The cardioprotective effect of regular exercise has been attributed to β3-adrenergic receptor (β3AR) stimulation and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. Here, we evaluated the role of the β3AR-eNOS pathway and NOS isoforms in exercise-induced cardioprotection of C57Bl6 mice fed with high fat and sucrose diet (HFS) for 12 weeks and subjected or not to exercise training during the last 4 weeks (HFS-Ex). HFS animals were more sensitive to in vivo and ex vivo IR injuries than control (normal diet) and HFS-Ex mice. Cardioprotection in HFS-Ex mice was not associated with increased myocardial eNOS activation and NO metabolites storage, possibly due to the β3AR-eNOS pathway functional loss in their heart. Indeed, a selective β3AR agonist (BRL37344) increased eNOS activation and had a protective effect against IR in control, but not in HFS hearts. Moreover, iNOS expression, nitro-oxidative stress (protein s-nitrosylation and nitrotyrosination) and ROS production during early reperfusion were increased in HFS, but not in control mice. Exercise normalized iNOS level and reduced protein s-nitrosylation, nitrotyrosination and ROS production in HFS-Ex hearts during early reperfusion. The iNOS inhibitor 1400 W reduced in vivo infarct size in HFS mice to control levels, supporting the potential role of iNOS normalization in the cardioprotective effects of exercise training in HFS-Ex mice. Although the β3AR-eNOS pathway is defective in the heart of HFS mice, regular exercise can protect their heart against IR by reducing iNOS expression and nitro-oxidative stress. PMID:27164904

  9. Diminished Neurogenic Femoral Artery Vasoconstrictor Response in a Zucker Obese Rat Model: Differential Regulation of NOS and COX Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Ana Cristina; Hernández, Medardo; Novella, Susana; Martínez, María Pilar; Pagán, Rosa María; Hermenegildo, Carlos; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Benedito, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Objective Peripheral arterial disease is one of the macrovascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study addresses femoral artery regulation in a prediabetic model of obese Zucker rats (OZR) by examining cross-talk between endothelial and neural factors. Methods and Results Arterial preparations from lean (LZR) and OZR were subjected to electrical field stimulation (EFS) on basal tone. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) isoform expression patterns were determined by immunohistochemical labelling and Western blotting. Results indicate significantly reduced noradrenergic contractions in preparations from OZR compared with those of LZR. Functional inhibition of endothelial NOS (eNOS) indicated a predominant role of this isoform in LZR and its modified activity in OZR. Neural (nNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) were activated and their expression was higher in femoral arteries from OZR. Neurotransmission modulated by large-conductance Ca2+-activated (BKCa) or voltage-dependent (KV) K+ channels did not seem compromised in the obese animals. Endothelial COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed in LZR and an additional adventitial location of COX-2 was also observed in OZR, explaining the higher COX-2 protein levels detected in this group. Prostanoids derived from both isoforms helped maintain vasoconstriction in LZR while in OZR only COX-2 was active. Superoxide anion inhibition reduced contractions in endothelium-intact arteries from OZR. Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction led to reduced neurogenic vasoconstriction in femoral arteries from OZR. In a setting of obesity, NO-dependent nNOS and iNOS dilation activity could be an alternative mechanism to offset COX-2- and reactive oxygen species-mediated vasoconstriction, along with impaired endothelial NO relaxation. PMID:25216050

  10. eNOS Genetic Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueren; Wang, Jie; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Mingxi; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) polymorphisms (intron 4a/b, -786T>C and 894G>T) and cancer risk remains elusive. In addition, no studies focused on their associations with the risk of breast cancer in Chinese Han population. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between eNOS polymorphisms and cancer risk, and then a case–control study in Chinese Han population was performed to assess their associations with breast cancer susceptibility. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of association. The pooled analysis indicated that eNOS intron 4a/b and -786T>C polymorphisms were significantly associated with an increased risk of overall cancer. In subgroup analyses based on cancer type, the significant association was found between eNOS intron 4a/b polymorphism and prostate cancer risk, eNOS -786T>C polymorphism and risk of prostate, bladder and breast cancers, and eNOS 894G>T polymorphism and breast cancer risk. In subgroup analyses based on ethnicity, eNOS intron 4a/b and -786T>C polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of cancer in Caucasians. In consistent with our meta-analysis results, a case–control study in Chinese Han population showed significant associations of eNOS -786T>C and 894G>T polymorphisms with the increased risk of breast cancer. In addition, stratified analyses based on pathological type showed that eNOS 894G>T polymorphism was only associated with the risk of infiltrative ductal carcinoma. Stratified analyses by tumor stage showed that eNOS -786T>C polymorphism was only associated with the risk of tumor stage III and IV. In conclusion, our meta-analysis and case–control study suggest that eNOS -786T>C and 894G>T polymorphisms are associated with the increased risk of breast cancer. PMID:26131841

  11. [Research Progress of NOS3 Participation in Regulatory Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Diseases].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Chi, Qingjia; Wang, Guixue

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease has been a major threat to human's health and lives for many years. It is of great importance to explore the mechanisms and develop strategies to prevent the pathogenesis. Generally, cardiovascular disease is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is closely related to the nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilatation. The release of NO is regulated by NOS3 gene in mammals' vascular system. A great deal of evidences have shown that the polymorphism and epigenetic of NOS3 gene play vital roles in the pathological process of cardiovascular disease. To gain insights into the role of NOS3 in the cardiovascular diseases, we reviewed the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cardiovascular diseases in this paper, including the uncoupling of NOS3 protein, epigenetic and polymorphism of NOS3 gene. The review can also offer possible strategies to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27382763

  12. Screening of NOS activity and selectivity of newly synthesized acetamidines using RP-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Maccallini, Cristina; Di Matteo, Mauro; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Bruno, Isabella; De Filippis, Barbara; Giampietro, Letizia; Mollica, Adriano; Amoroso, Rosa

    2016-02-20

    Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) inhibitors could play a powerful role in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, novel acetamidine derivatives of NOS were synthesized and the inhibitor activity was evalued. To screen the activity and selectivity, the l-citrulline residue, after the enzymatic NOS assay, was derivatized with o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) and then evaluated by RP-HPLC method with fluorescence detection. All compounds did not affect the activity of endothelial and neuronal isoforms, while nine of them possessed a percentage of iNOS activity at 10μM lower than 50%, and were selected for IC50 evaluation. Among them, a compound emerged as a very potent (IC50 of 53nM) and selective iNOS inhibitor. PMID:26689740

  13. Exercise improves the dilatation function of mesenteric arteries in postmyocardial infarction rats via a PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youhua; Wang, Shengpeng; Wier, W Gil; Zhang, Quanjiang; Jiang, Hongke; Li, Qiuxia; Chen, Shengfeng; Tian, Zhenjun; Li, Youyou; Yu, Xiaojiang; Zhao, Ming; Liu, Jinjun; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Zang, Weijin

    2010-12-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) has been shown to induce endothelial dysfunction in peripheral resistance arteries and thus increase peripheral resistance. This study was designed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of post-MI-related dysfunctional dilatation of peripheral resistance arteries and, furthermore, to examine whether exercise may restore dysfunctional dilatation of peripheral resistance arteries. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated, MI, and MI + exercise. Ultrastructure and relaxation function of the mesenteric arteries, as well as phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Akt kinases (Akt), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, and phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and eNOS by ACh were determined. Post-MI rats exhibited pronounced ultrastructural changes in mesenteric artery endothelial cells and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, the activities of PI3K, Akt, and eNOS, and their phosphorylation by ACh were significantly attenuated in mesenteric arteries (P < 0.05-0.01). After 8 wk of exercise, not only did endothelial cells appeared more normal in structure, but also ameliorated post-MI-associated mesenteric arterial dysfunction, which were accompanied by elevated activities of PI3K, Akt, and eNOS, and their phosphorylation by ACh (P < 0.05-0.01). Importantly, inhibition of either PI3K or eNOS attenuated exercise-induced restoration of the dilatation function and blocked PI3K, Akt, and eNOS phosphorylation by ACh in the mesenteric arteries. These data demonstrate that MI induces dysfunctional dilation of peripheral resistance arteries by degradation of endothelial structural integrity and attenuating PI3K-Akt-eNOS signaling. Exercise may restore dilatation function of peripheral resistance arteries by protecting endothelial structural integrity and increasing PI3K-Akt-eNOS signaling cascades.

  14. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  15. Preserved Microvascular Endothelial Function in Young, Obese Adults with Functional Loss of Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Evans, Trent D.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Schrage, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) may be preserved in the skeletal muscle microcirculation of young, obese adults. Preserved EDD might be mediated by compensatory mechanisms, impeding insight into preclinical vascular dysfunction. We aimed to determine the functional roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) toward EDD in younger obese adults. We first hypothesized EDD would be preserved in young, obese adults. Further, we hypothesized a reduced contribution of NOS in young, obese adults would be replaced by increased COX signaling. Microvascular EDD was assessed with Doppler ultrasound and brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) in younger (27 ± 1 year) obese (n = 29) and lean (n = 46) humans. Individual and combined contributions of NOS and COX were examined with intra-arterial infusions of l-NMMA and ketorolac, respectively. Vasodilation was quantified as an increase in forearm vascular conductance (ΔFVC). Arterial endothelial cell biopsies were analyzed for protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). ΔFVC to ACh was similar between groups. After l-NMMA, ΔFVC to ACh was greater in obese adults (p < 0.05). There were no group differences in ΔFVC to ACh with ketorolac. With combined NOS-COX inhibition, ΔFVC was greater in obese adults at the intermediate dose of ACh. Surprisingly, arterial endothelial cell eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS were similar between groups. Younger obese adults exhibit preserved EDD and eNOS expression despite functional dissociation of NOS-mediated vasodilation and similar COX signaling. Compensatory NOS- and COX-independent vasodilatory mechanisms conceal reduced NOS contributions in otherwise healthy obese adults early in life, which may contribute to vascular dysfunction. PMID:26733880

  16. Preserved Microvascular Endothelial Function in Young, Obese Adults with Functional Loss of Nitric Oxide Signaling.

    PubMed

    Harrell, John W; Johansson, Rebecca E; Evans, Trent D; Sebranek, Joshua J; Walker, Benjamin J; Eldridge, Marlowe W; Serlin, Ronald C; Schrage, William G

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) may be preserved in the skeletal muscle microcirculation of young, obese adults. Preserved EDD might be mediated by compensatory mechanisms, impeding insight into preclinical vascular dysfunction. We aimed to determine the functional roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) toward EDD in younger obese adults. We first hypothesized EDD would be preserved in young, obese adults. Further, we hypothesized a reduced contribution of NOS in young, obese adults would be replaced by increased COX signaling. Microvascular EDD was assessed with Doppler ultrasound and brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) in younger (27 ± 1 year) obese (n = 29) and lean (n = 46) humans. Individual and combined contributions of NOS and COX were examined with intra-arterial infusions of l-NMMA and ketorolac, respectively. Vasodilation was quantified as an increase in forearm vascular conductance (ΔFVC). Arterial endothelial cell biopsies were analyzed for protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). ΔFVC to ACh was similar between groups. After l-NMMA, ΔFVC to ACh was greater in obese adults (p < 0.05). There were no group differences in ΔFVC to ACh with ketorolac. With combined NOS-COX inhibition, ΔFVC was greater in obese adults at the intermediate dose of ACh. Surprisingly, arterial endothelial cell eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS were similar between groups. Younger obese adults exhibit preserved EDD and eNOS expression despite functional dissociation of NOS-mediated vasodilation and similar COX signaling. Compensatory NOS- and COX-independent vasodilatory mechanisms conceal reduced NOS contributions in otherwise healthy obese adults early in life, which may contribute to vascular dysfunction. PMID:26733880

  17. Unbalanced Estrogen Metabolism in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Muhammad; Goldner, Whitney; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Rogan, Eleanor G.; Cavalieri, Ercole L.

    2013-01-01

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer most frequently occurs in premenopausal women. Greater exposure to estrogens may be a risk factor for thyroid cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in thyroid cancer, a spot urine sample was obtained from 40 women with thyroid cancer and 40 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates significantly differed between cases and controls (p<0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in thyroid cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts might play a role in the initiation of thyroid cancer. PMID:23686454

  18. Estrogen mediation of hormone responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert R; Francois, Michelle; Castracane, V Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The roles of estrogens extend from the regulation of reproduction to other functions involved in control of metabolism, fluid balance, as well as gastrointestinal, lung, and brain function, with a strong effect on other hormones that subsequently alter the physiology of multiple tissues. As such, alteration of endogenous estrogens across the menstrual cycle, or from oral contraception and estrogen replacement therapy, can affect these tissues. Due to the important effects that estrogens have on different tissues, there are many investigations concerning the effects of a human estrogenic environment on endocrine responses to exercise. The following review will describe the consequences of varying estrogen levels on pituitary, adrenal, gonadal, and endocrine function, followed by discussion of the outcomes of different estrogen levels on endocrine tissues in response to exercise, problems encountered for interpretation of findings, and recommended direction for future research. PMID:22512823

  19. Pharmacological profile of estrogens in oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Bitzer, J

    2011-06-01

    The synthetic estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE)given by mouth is stable and yields satisfactory results in terms of ovulation inhibition and effects on the endometrium. It increases however the risk especially for venous thrombotic events and to a lesser degree also arterial thrombosis. Therefore research focused on diminuition of the EE dosage and the development of a different estrogen component in oral contraceptives, specifically an estrogen occurring during physiological processes in the female body. Two estrogens emerge: 17ß Estradiol is the most potent natural estrogen and it is the major estrogen secreted by the ovaries. Estetrol is a human sex steroid (15 alpha hydroxyestriol) which is only produced during pregnancy by the fetal liver. The pharmacolokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these estrogens are compared to those of EE (absorption, metabolization, bioavailability etc.) and the clinical profile is described as far it is known from a limited number of studies. PMID:21654614

  20. Hypotension and reduced nitric oxide-elicited vasorelaxation in transgenic mice overexpressing endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Y; Kawashima, S; Hirata, K i; Yamashita, T; Ishida, T; Inoue, N; Sakoda, T; Kurihara, H; Yazaki, Y; Yokoyama, M

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), constitutively produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), plays a major role in the regulation of blood pressure and vascular tone. We generated transgenic mice overexpressing bovine eNOS in the vascular wall using murine preproendothelin-1 promoter. In transgenic lineages with three to eight transgene copies, bovine eNOS-specific mRNA, protein expression in the particulate fractions, and calcium-dependent NOS activity were confirmed by RNase protection assay, immunoblotting, and L-arginine/citrulline conversion. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that eNOS protein was predominantly localized in the endothelial cells of aorta, heart, and lung. Blood pressure was significantly lower in eNOS-overexpressing mice than in control littermates. In the transgenic aorta, basal NO release (estimated by Nomega-nitro-L-arginine-induced facilitation of the contraction by prostaglandin F2alpha) and basal cGMP levels (measured by enzyme immunoassay) were significantly increased. In contrast, relaxations of transgenic aorta in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were significantly attenuated, and the reduced vascular reactivity was associated with reduced response of cGMP elevation to these agents as compared with control aortas. Thus, our novel mouse model of chronic eNOS overexpression demonstrates that, in addition to the essential role of eNOS in blood pressure regulation, tonic NO release by eNOS in the endothelium induces the reduced vascular reactivity to NO-mediated vasodilators, providing several insights into the pathogenesis of nitrate tolerance. PMID:9854041

  1. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption.

  2. Urinary tract infection in iNOS-deficient mice with focus on bacterial sensitivity to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Poljakovic, Mirjana; Persson, Katarina

    2003-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-deficient mice were used to examine the role of iNOS in Escherichia coli-induced urinary tract infection (UTI). The toxicity of nitric oxide (NO)/peroxynitrite to bacteria and host was also investigated. The nitrite levels in urine of iNOS+/+ but not iNOS/ mice increased after infection. No differences in bacterial clearance or persistence were noted between the genotypes. In vitro, the uropathogenic E. coli 1177 was sensitive to 3-morpholinosydnonimine, whereas the avirulent E. coli HB101 was sensitive to both NO and 3-morpholinosydnonimine. E. coli HB101 was statistically (P < 0.05) more sensitive to peroxynitrite than E. coli 1177. Nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity was observed in infected bladders of both genotypes and in infected kidneys of iNOS+/+ mice. Myeloperoxidase, neuronal (n)NOS, and endothelial (e)NOS immunoreactivity was observed in inflammatory cells of both genotypes. Our results indicate that iNOS/ and iNOS+/+ mice are equally susceptible to E. coli-induced UTI and that the toxicity of NO to E. coli depends on bacterial virulence. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase and nNOS/eNOS may contribute to nitrotyrosine formation in the absence of iNOS.

  3. Red wine extract decreases pro-inflammatory markers, nuclear factor-κB and inducible NOS, in experimental metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janega, Pavol; Klimentová, Jana; Barta, Andrej; Kovácsová, Mária; Vranková, Stanislava; Cebová, Martina; Čierna, Zuzana; Matúsková, Zuzana; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Pechánová, Olga

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to analyse the effects of alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE) on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and pro-inflammatory markers such as nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) and inducible NOS (iNOS) protein expression in experimental metabolic syndrome. Young 6 week-old male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and obese, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR/N-cp) were divided into control groups and groups treated with AWE (24.2 mg per kg per day) for 3 weeks (n = 6 in each group). Total NOS activity and endothelial NOS (eNOS), iNOS and NFκB (p65) protein expressions were determined in the heart left ventricle and aorta by Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. All parameters investigated significantly increased in the aorta of SHR/N-cp rats. Pro-inflammatory markers such as NFκB and iNOS were increased in the left ventricle as well. AWE treatment did not affect total NOS activity and eNOS expression in the aorta; however, it was able to decrease NFκB and iNOS protein expression in both the left ventricle and aorta. In conclusion, in the cardiovascular system, Alibernet red wine extract decreased NFκB and iNOS protein expressions elevated as a consequence of developed metabolic syndrome. This effect may represent one of the protective, anti-inflammatory properties of Alibernet red wine polyphenols on cardiovascular risk factors related to metabolic syndrome.

  4. Non-viral eNOS gene delivery and transfection with stents for the treatment of restenosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In this study, we have examined local non-viral gene delivery, transfection, and therapeutic efficacy of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) encoding plasmid DNA administered using coated stents in a rabbit iliac artery restenosis model. Methods Lipopolyplexes (LPPs) with eNOS expressing plasmid DNA were immobilized on stainless steel stents using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and type B gelatin coatings. The gene-eluting stents were implanted bilaterally in the denuded iliac arteries and eNOS transfection and therapeutic efficacy were examined 14 days after implantation. Results The results show that non-viral lipopolyplex-coated stents can efficiently tranfect eNOS locally in the arterial lumen assessed by PCR and ELISA. Human eNOS ELISA levels were significantly raised 24 hours after transfection compared to controls (125 pg eNOS compared to <50 pg for all controls including naked DNA). Local eNOS production suppressed smooth muscle cell proliferation and promoted re-endothelialization of the artery showing a significant reduction in restenosis of 1.75 neointima/media ratio for stents with lipoplexes encoding eNOS compared with 2.3 neointima/media ratio for stents with lipoplexes encosing an empty vector. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that a potent non-viral gene vector encoding for eNOS coated onto a stent can inhibit restenosis through inhibition of smooth muscle cell growth and promotion of a healthy endothelium. PMID:20875110

  5. ACTIVATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE AND HEME OXYGENASE-1 EXPRESSION BY ELECTROPHILIC NITRO-FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Rudolph, Volker; Cole, Marsha P.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Batthyany, Carlos; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species mediate a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction, with secondary oxidized and nitrated byproducts of these reactions contributing to the pathogenesis of numerous vascular diseases. While oxidized lipids and lipoproteins exacerbate inflammatory reactions in the vasculature, in stark contrast the nitration of polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex lipids yield electrophilic products that exhibit pluripotent anti-inflammatory signaling capabilities acting via both cGMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Herein we report that nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) treatment increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in the vasculature, thus transducing vascular protective effects associated with enhanced NO production. Administration of OA-NO2 via osmotic pump results in a significant increase in eNOS and HO-1 mRNA in mouse aortas. Moreover, HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that NO2-FAs are rapidly metabolized in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and treatment with NO2-FAs stimulated the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179. These post-translational modifications of eNOS, in concert with elevated eNOS gene expression, contributed to an increase in endothelial NO production. In aggregate, OA-NO2-induced eNOS and HO-1 expression by vascular cells can induce beneficial effects on endothelial function and provide a new strategy for treating various vascular inflammatory and hypertensive disorders. PMID:19857569

  6. Characterization of cationic amino acid transporters and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human placental microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dye, J F; Vause, S; Johnston, T; Clark, P; Firth, J A; D'Souza, S W; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the expression and activity of arginine transporters and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human placental microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). Using RT-PCR amplification products for eNOS, CAT1, CAT2A, CAT2B, CAT4, 4F2hc (CD98), rBAT and the light chains y+LAT1, y+LAT2, and b0+T1 were detected in HPMEC, but not B0+. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed the presence of 4F2hc and CAT1 protein in HPMEC. 4F2hc-light chain dimers were indicated by a shift in molecular mass detected under nonreducing conditions. L-Arginine transport into HPMEC was independent of Na+ or Cl- and was inhibited by the neutral amino acid glutamine, but not by cystine. The Ki for glutamine inhibition was greater in the absence of Na+. Kinetic analysis supported a two-transporter model attributed to system y+L and system y+. Expression of eNOS in HPMEC was detectable by immunohistochemistry and ELISA but not by Western blotting. Activity of eNOS in HPMEC, measured over 48 h, either as the basal production of nitric oxide (NO) or as the accumulation of intracellular cGMP was not detectable. We conclude that HPMEC transport cationic amino acids by systems y+ and y+L and that basal eNOS expression and activity in these cells is low. PMID:14597568

  7. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitor Improves Endothelial Dysfunction in Spontaneous Hypertensive Rats Via Down-regulation of Caveolin-1 and Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung-Won; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Hyo-soo; Oh, Buyng-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Caveolin-1 regulates nitric oxide (NO) signaling by modulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The purpose of this study was to examine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor improves impaired endothelial function of the aorta in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to determine the underlying mechanisms involved. Eight-week-old male SHR were assigned to either a control group (CON, n=11) or a rosuvastatin group (ROS, n=12), rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) administered for eight weeks. Abdominal aortic rings were prepared and responses to acetylcholine (10-9-10-4 M) were determined in vitro. To evaluate the potential role of NO and caveolin-1, we examined the plasma activity of NOx, eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and expression of caveolin-1. The relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced in ROS compared to CON. Expression of eNOS RNA was unchanged, whereas NOx level and phosphorylated-eNOS at serine-1177 was increased accompanied with depressed level of caveolin-1 in ROS. We conclude that 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor can improve impaired endothelial dysfunction in SHR, and its underlying mechanisms are associated with increased NO production. Furthermore, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor can activate the eNOS by phosphorylation related to decreased caveolin-1 abundance. These results imply the therapeutic strategies for the high blood pressure-associated endothelial dysfunction through modifying caveolin status. PMID:20052342

  8. Estrogen and estrogen receptors in cardiovascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Muehlfelder, Melanie; Pelzer, Theo

    2013-05-01

    The cardiovascular system of a premenopausal woman is prepared to adapt to the challenges of increased cardiac output and work load that accompany pregnancy. Thus, it is tempting to speculate whether enhanced adaptability of the female cardiovascular system might be advantageous under conditions that promote cardiovascular disease. In support of this concept, 17β-estradiol as the major female sex hormone has been shown to confer protective cardiovascular effects in experimental studies. Mechanistically, these have been partially linked to the prevention and protection against oxidative stress. Current evidence indicates that estrogens attenuate oxidative stress at two levels: first, by preventing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and, second, by scavenging ROS in the myocardium and in the vasculature. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on current concepts on conditions and mechanisms by which estrogens protect the cardiovascular system against ROS-mediated cellular injury.

  9. Estrogen receptors in the wobbler mouse.

    PubMed

    Siegel, L I; Fox, T O

    1985-12-01

    Recent research has raised the interesting possibility that the neurological mutant mouse, wobbler (wr/wr), possesses an estrogen receptor deficit analogous to the androgen receptor deficiency found in androgen-resistant mice with testicular feminization. In the present report we examined estrogen-binding activity in cytosolic extracts of kidney, liver, and brain from wobbler mice, littermate control animals, and C57BL/6J mice, using DNA-cellulose chromatography. Estrogen binding components exhibiting properties of estrogen receptors were present in all tissues examined. Estrogen receptors adhered to DNA, displayed characteristic elution profiles from DNA-cellulose, and showed high affinity and limited capacity for estradiol, in contrast to non-receptor entities which bind estradiol. The qualitative elution patterns for estrogen receptors did not differ among groups within each tissue studied, and were similar to those reported previously in mouse kidney and brain. While estrogen receptors have been shown in mouse liver by other techniques, this is the first demonstration of putative estrogen receptors in mouse liver by DNA-cellulose chromatography. No consistent deficits in estrogen receptor concentration were found in wobblers compared to littermates. Thus, the data do not support the hypothesis that the wobbler mouse is an estrogen receptor-deficient mutant.

  10. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  11. HDL and endothelial protection

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Dinh, A; Diallo, D; Delbosc, S; Varela-Perez, L Maria; Dang, QB; Lapergue, B; Burillo, E; Michel, JB; Levoye, A; Martin-Ventura, JL; Meilhac, O

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) represent a family of particles characterized by the presence of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and by their ability to transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues back to the liver. In addition to this function, HDLs display pleiotropic effects including antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic or anti-proteolytic properties that account for their protective action on endothelial cells. Vasodilatation via production of nitric oxide is also a hallmark of HDL action on endothelial cells. Endothelial cells express receptors for apoA-I and HDLs that mediate intracellular signalling and potentially participate in the internalization of these particles. In this review, we will detail the different effects of HDLs on the endothelium in normal and pathological conditions with a particular focus on the potential use of HDL therapy to restore endothelial function and integrity. PMID:23488589

  12. Endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Davel, A P; Wenceslau, C F; Akamine, E H; Xavier, F E; Couto, G K; Oliveira, H T; Rossoni, L V

    2011-09-01

    The endothelium plays a vital role in maintaining circulatory homeostasis by the release of relaxing and contracting factors. Any change in this balance may result in a process known as endothelial dysfunction that leads to impaired control of vascular tone and contributes to the pathogenesis of some cardiovascular and endocrine/metabolic diseases. Reduced endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and increased production of thromboxane A2, prostaglandin H2 and superoxide anion in conductance and resistance arteries are commonly associated with endothelial dysfunction in hypertensive, diabetic and obese animals, resulting in reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and in increased vasoconstrictor responses. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated the role of enhanced overactivation of β-adrenergic receptors inducing vascular cytokine production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) uncoupling that seem to be the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction in hypertension, heart failure and in endocrine-metabolic disorders. However, some adaptive mechanisms can occur in the initial stages of hypertension, such as increased NO production by eNOS. The present review focuses on the role of NO bioavailability, eNOS uncoupling, cyclooxygenase-derived products and pro-inflammatory factors on the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in hypertension, sympathetic hyperactivity, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. These are cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases of high incidence and mortality around the world, especially in developing countries and endothelial dysfunction contributes to triggering, maintenance and worsening of these pathological situations.

  13. The Estrogen Hypothesis of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, James P.; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The explanation of obesity as a simple result of positive energy balance fails to account for the scope of variable responses to diets and lifestyles. It is postulated that individual physiological and anatomical variation may be responsible for developing obesity. Girls in poor families develop greater adiposity than their male siblings, a trend not present in richer environments. This indicates strong influence of estrogen on fat accumulation irrespective of poor socioeconomic conditions. Obesity rates in males and females of developed nations are similar, while in poorer nations obesity is much more prevalent in females. Female to male ratio of obesity correlates inversely with gross domestic product. Therefore, the parity of male and female obesity in developed countries may result from male exposure to environmental estrogen-like substances associated with affluence. These hormonally driven mechanisms may be equally active within both sexes in more developed areas, thereby increasing overall obesity. PMID:24915457

  14. Estrogen turns down "the AIRE".

    PubMed

    Bakhru, Pearl; Su, Maureen A

    2016-04-01

    Genetic alterations are known drivers of autoimmune disease; however, there is a much higher incidence of autoimmunity in women, implicating sex-specific factors in disease development. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene contributes to the maintenance of central tolerance, and complete loss of AIRE function results in the development of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1. In this issue of the JCI, Dragin and colleagues demonstrate that AIRE expression is downregulated in females as the result of estrogen-mediated alterations at the AIRE promoter. The association between estrogen and reduction of AIRE may at least partially account for the elevated incidence of autoimmune disease in women and has potential implications for sex hormone therapy.

  15. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  16. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids)which ar...

  17. Nongenomic Signaling Pathways of Estrogen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Kochukov, Mikhail Y.

    2010-01-01

    Xenoestrogens can affect the healthy functioning of a variety of tissues by acting as potent estrogens via nongenomic signaling pathways or by interfering with those actions of multiple physiological estrogens. Collectively, our and other studies have compared a wide range of estrogenic compounds, including some closely structurally related subgroups. The estrogens that have been studied include environmental contaminants of different subclasses, dietary estrogens, and several prominent physiological metabolites. By comparing the nongenomic signaling and functional responses to these compounds, we have begun to address the structural requirements for their actions through membrane estrogen receptors in the pituitary, in comparison to other tissues, and to gain insights into their typical non-monotonic dose-response behavior. Their multiple inputs into cellular signaling begin processes that eventually integrate at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase activities to coordinately regulate broad cellular destinies, such as proliferation, apoptosis, or differentiation. PMID:19955490

  18. Endothelial dysfunction in cirrhosis: Role of inflammation and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Vairappan, Balasubramaniyan

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the recent developments in the pathobiology of endothelial dysfunction (ED) in the context of cirrhosis with portal hypertension and defines novel strategies and potential targets for therapy. ED has prognostic implications by predicting unfavourable early hepatic events and mortality in patients with portal hypertension and advanced liver diseases. ED characterised by an impaired bioactivity of nitric oxide (NO) within the hepatic circulation and is mainly due to decreased bioavailability of NO and accelerated degradation of NO with reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, elevated inflammatory markers also inhibit NO synthesis and causes ED in cirrhotic liver. Therefore, improvement of NO availability in the hepatic circulation can be beneficial for the improvement of endothelial dysfunction and associated portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. Furthermore, therapeutic agents that are identified in increasing NO bioavailability through improvement of hepatic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and reduction in hepatic asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous modulator of eNOS and a key mediator of elevated intrahepatic vascular tone in cirrhosis would be interesting therapeutic approaches in patients with endothelial dysfunction and portal hypertension in advanced liver diseases. PMID:25848469

  19. Serine 1179 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase caused by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene through PI3K/Akt signaling in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yang; Sumi, Daigo; Kumagai, Yoshito . E-mail: yk-em-tu@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    Although 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been found to uncouple nitric oxide synthase (NOS), thereby leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS), cellular response against TNT still remains unclear. Exposure of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) to TNT (100 {mu}M) resulted in serine 1179 phosphorylation of endothelial NOS (eNOS). With specific inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002), we found that PI3K/Akt signaling participated in the eNOS phosphorylation caused by TNT, whereas the ERK pathway did not. ROS were generated following exposure of BAECs to TNT. However, TNT-mediated phosphorylation of either eNOS or Akt was drastically blocked by NAC and PEG-CAT. Interestingly, pretreatment with apocynin, a specific inhibitor for NADPH oxidase, diminished the phosphorylation of eNOS and Akt. These results suggest that TNT affects NADPH oxidase, thereby generating hydrogen peroxide, which is capable of activating PI3K/Akt signaling associated with eNOS Ser 1179 phosphorylation.

  20. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  1. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  2. Ventilation and oxygenation induce endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the lungs of fetal lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Black, S M; Johengen, M J; Ma, Z D; Bristow, J; Soifer, S J

    1997-01-01

    At birth, ventilation and oxygenation immediately decrease pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and increase pulmonary blood flow (PBF); more gradual changes occur over the next several hours. Nitric oxide, produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), mediates these gradual changes. To determine how ventilation and oxygenation affect eNOS gene expression, 12 fetal lambs were ventilated for 8 h without changing fetal descending aortic blood gases or pH (rhythmic distension) or with 100% oxygen (O2 ventilation). Vascular pressures and PBF were measured. Total RNA, protein, and tissue sections were prepared from lung tissue for RNase protection assays, Western blotting, and in situ hybridization. O2 ventilation increased PBF and decreased PVR more than rhythmic distension (P < 0.05). Rhythmic distension increased eNOS mRNA expression; O2 ventilation increased eNOS mRNA expression more and increased eNOS protein expression (P < 0.05). To define the mechanisms responsible for these changes, ovine fetal pulmonary arterial endothelial cells were exposed to 1, 21, or 95% O2 or to shear stress. 95% O2 increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). Shear stress increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). Increased oxygenation but more importantly increased PBF with increased shear stress induce eNOS gene expression and contribute to pulmonary vasodilation after birth. PMID:9294110

  3. Fo Shou San, an Ancient Chinese Herbal Decoction, Protects Endothelial Function through Increasing Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Cathy W. C.; Xu, Li; Tian, Xiao Yu; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Ken Y. Z.; Lau, Chi Wai; Lau, David T. W.; Choi, Roy C. Y.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Huang, Yu; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2012-01-01

    Fo Shou San (FSS) is an ancient herbal decoction comprised of Chuanxiong Rhizoma (CR; Chuanxiong) and Angelicae Sinensis Radix (ASR; Danggui) in a ratio of 2∶3. Previous studies indicate that FSS promotes blood circulation and dissipates blood stasis, thus which is being used widely to treat vascular diseases. Here, we aim to determine the cellular mechanism for the vascular benefit of FSS. The treatment of FSS reversed homocysteine-induced impairment of acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in aortic rings, isolated from rats. Like radical oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol, FSS attenuated homocysteine-stimulated ROS generation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and it also stimulated the production of nitric oxide (NO) as measured by fluorescence dye and biochemical assay. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of both Akt kinase and endothelial NO synthases (eNOS) were markedly increased by FSS treatment, which was abolished by an Akt inhibitor triciribine. Likewise, triciribine reversed FSS-induced NO production in HUVECs. Finally, FSS elevated intracellular Ca2+ levels in HUVECs, and the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM inhibited the FSS-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation. The present results show that this ancient herbal decoction benefits endothelial function through increased activity of Akt kinase and eNOS; this effect is causally via a rise of intracellular Ca2+ and a reduction of ROS. PMID:23284736

  4. Two functionally distinct pools of eNOS in endothelium are facilitated by myoendothelial junction lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Biwer, Lauren A; Taddeo, Evan P; Kenwood, Brandon M; Hoehn, Kyle L; Straub, Adam C; Isakson, Brant E

    2016-07-01

    In resistance arteries, endothelial cells (EC) make contact with smooth muscle cells (SMC), forming myoendothelial junctions (MEJ). Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is present in the luminal side of the EC (apical EC) and the basal side of the EC (MEJ). To test if these eNOS pools acted in sync or separately, we co-cultured ECs and SMCs, then stimulated SMCs with phenylephrine (PE). Adrenergic activation causes inositol [1,4,5] triphosphate (IP3) to move from SMC to EC through gap junctions at the MEJ. PE increases MEJ eNOS phosphorylation (eNOS-P) at S1177, but not in EC. Conversely, we used bradykinin (BK) to increase EC calcium; this increased EC eNOS-P but did not affect MEJ eNOS-P. Inhibiting gap junctions abrogated the MEJ eNOS-P after PE, but had no effect on BK eNOS-P. Differential lipid composition between apical EC and MEJ may account for the compartmentalized eNOS-P response. Indeed, DAG and phosphatidylserine are both enriched in MEJ. These lipids are cofactors for PKC activity, which was significantly increased at the MEJ after PE. Because PKC activity also relies on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium release, we used thapsigargin and xestospongin C, BAPTA, and PKC inhibitors, which caused significant decreases in MEJ eNOS-P after PE. Functionally, BK inhibited leukocyte adhesion and PE caused an increase in SMC cGMP. We hypothesize that local lipid composition of the MEJ primes PKC and eNOS-P for stimulation by PE, allowing for compartmentalized function of eNOS in the blood vessel wall. PMID:27106139

  5. Unbalanced Estrogen Metabolism in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Muhammad; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Hall, James B.; LeVan, Tricia; Cavalieri, Ercole L.; Rogan, Eleanor G.

    2013-01-01

    Greater exposure to estrogens is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in ovarian cancer, a spot urine sample and a saliva sample were obtained from 33 women with ovarian cancer and 34 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed in the urine samples by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p<0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. DNA was purified from the saliva samples and analyzed for genetic polymorphisms in the genes for two estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Women with two low-activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase plus one or two high-activity alleles of cytochrome P450 1B1 had higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts and were more likely to have ovarian cancer. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in ovarian cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts plays a critical role in the initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:24170413

  6. Functional interplay between endothelial nitric oxide synthase and membrane type 1–matrix metalloproteinase in migrating endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Genís, Laura; Gonzalo, Pilar; Tutor, Antonio S.; Gálvez, Beatriz G.; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Zaragoza, Carlos; Lamas, Santiago; Tryggvason, Karl; Apte, Suneel S.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is essential for vascular homeostasis and is also a critical modulator of angiogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms of NO action during angiogenesis remain elusive. We have investigated the potential relationship between NO and membrane type 1–matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) during endothelial migration and capillary tube formation. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) colocalizes with MT1-MMP at motility-associated structures in migratory human endothelial cells (ECs); moreover, NO is produced at these structures and is released into the medium during EC migration. We have therefore addressed 2 questions: (1) the putative regulation of MT1-MMP by NO in migratory ECs; and (2) the requirement for MT1-MMP in NO-induced EC migration and tube formation. NO upregulates MT1-MMP membrane clustering on migratory human ECs, and this is accompanied by increased degradation of type I collagen substrate. MT1-MMP membrane expression and localization are impaired in lung ECs from eNOS-deficient mice, and these cells also show impaired migration and tube formation in vitro. Inhibition of MT1-MMP with a neutralizing antibody impairs NOinduced tube formation by human ECs, and NO-induced endothelial migration and tube formation are impaired in lung ECs from mice deficient in MT1-MMP. MT1-MMP thus appears to be a key molecular effector of NO during the EC migration and angiogenic processes, and is a potential therapeutic target for NO-associated vascular disorders. PMID:17606763

  7. Selective estrogen modulators in menopause.

    PubMed

    Gambacciani, M

    2013-12-01

    Hypoestrogenism is the primary etiologic factor for osteoporosis and related fractures, as well as for a number of clinical symptoms that can reduce the quality of life in postmenopausal women. Alternative to classical hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are needed for women that cannot or don't want to be treated with hormones. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are compounds that lack the steroid structure of estrogens, but interact with estrogen receptors (ERs) as agonists or antagonists depending on the target tissue. Tamoxifen, the first generation of SERMs, has been used for decades in the primary prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Tamoxifen exerts positive estrogenic effect on bone protecting bone mineral density (BMD). However, tamoxifen acts as agonist also on the endometrium, leading to an increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. In addition, tamoxifen administration is associated with significantly increased risks of stroke, venous thromboembolism, including both deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli. Thus, these actions, in addition to the increased risk of and hot flushes, prevent the use of tamoxifen for the prevention of osteoporosis. Further generations of SERM, Raloxifene and bazedoxifene were developed for the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and are now licensed for this indication. In addition. Raloxifene is as effective as tamoxifen in reducing the risk of invasive breast cancer. On the other hand, the available data indicate that Bazedoxifene exerts a greater anti-fracture activity than Raloxifene. At variance of tamoxifen, both raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. However, they are associated with a significant increase the risks of venous thromboembolic events. Although raloxifene and Bazedoxifene prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis, they have not been associated with reductions in climacteric symptoms, particularly hot flushes. In order

  8. A novel role for an endothelial adrenergic receptor system in mediating catecholestradiol-induced proliferation of uterine artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Sheikh O; Fling, Sean N; Ramadoss, Jayanth; Magness, Ronald R

    2011-11-01

    Sequential conversion of estradiol-17β to its biologically active catecholestradiols, 2-hydroxyestradiol (OHE(2)) and 4-OHE(2), contributes importantly to its angiogenic effects on uterine artery endothelial cells (UAECs) derived from pregnant, but not nonpregnant ewes via an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism. Because catecholestradiols and catecholamines exhibit structural similarities and have high affinity for α- and β-adrenergic receptors (ARs), we investigated whether the endothelial α- or β-ARs mediate catecholestradiol-induced proliferation of P-UAECs and whether catecholamines alter these responses. Western analyses revealed expression of specific AR subtypes in nonpregnant UAECs and P-UAECs, including α(2)-, β(2)-, and β(3)-ARs but not α(1)- and β(1)-ARs. Levels of β(2)-ARs and β(3)-ARs were unaltered by pregnancy, whereas α(2)-ARs were decreased. Norepinephrine and epinephrine increased P-UAEC, but not nonpregnant UAEC proliferation, and these effects were suppressed by propranolol (β-AR blocker) but not phentolamine (α-AR blocker). Catecholamines combinations with 2-OHE(2) or 4-OHE(2) enhanced P-UAEC mitogenesis. Catecholestradiol-induced P-UAEC proliferation was also inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine. β(2)-AR and β(3)-AR antagonists (ICI 118 551and SR 59230A, respectively) abrogated the mitogenic effects of both 2-OHE(2) and 4-OHE(2). Stimulation of β(2)-ARs and β(3)-ARs using formoterol and BRL 37344 dose-dependently stimulated P-UAEC proliferation, which was abrogated by ICI 118 551 and SR 59230A, respectively. Proliferation effects of both catecholamines and catecholestradiols were only observed in P-UAECs (not nonpregnant UAECs) and were mediated via β(2)-ARs and β(3)-ARs. We demonstrate for the first time convergence of the endothelial AR and estrogenic systems in regulating endothelial proliferation, thus providing a distinct evolutionary advantage for modulating uterine perfusion during stressful pregnancies.

  9. P2Y₂ and Gq/G₁₁ control blood pressure by mediating endothelial mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShengPeng; Iring, András; Strilic, Boris; Albarrán Juárez, Julián; Kaur, Harmandeep; Troidl, Kerstin; Tonack, Sarah; Burbiel, Joachim C; Müller, Christa E; Fleming, Ingrid; Lundberg, Jon O; Wettschureck, Nina; Offermanns, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Elevated blood pressure is a key risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases. Blood pressure is largely determined by vasodilatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), that are released from the endothelium in response to fluid shear stress exerted by the flowing blood. Previous work has identified several mechanotransduction signaling processes that are involved in fluid shear stress-induced endothelial effects, but how fluid shear stress initiates the response is poorly understood. Here, we evaluated human and bovine endothelial cells and found that the purinergic receptor P2Y2 and the G proteins Gq/G11 mediate fluid shear stress-induced endothelial responses, including [Ca2+]i transients, activation of the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and VEGFR-2, as well as activation of SRC and AKT. In response to fluid shear stress, endothelial cells released ATP, which activates the purinergic P2Y2 receptor. Mice with induced endothelium-specific P2Y2 or Gq/G11 deficiency lacked flow-induced vasodilation and developed hypertension that was accompanied by reduced eNOS activation. Together, our data identify P2Y2 and Gq/G11 as a critical endothelial mechanosignaling pathway that is upstream of previously described mechanotransduction processes and demonstrate that P2Y2 and Gq/G11 are required for basal endothelial NO formation, vascular tone, and blood pressure. PMID:26168216

  10. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G.; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2016-07-01

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress (WSS)-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell (EC). The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins and G-protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphoryaltion of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an EC subjected to a step increase of WSS from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1 to 5 minutes) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases.

  11. Nafamostat mesilate promotes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation via the Akt-eNOS dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujeong; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Song, Hee-Jung; Choi, Si Wan; Nagar, Harsha; Piao, Shuyu; Jung, Saet-Byel; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Cuk-Seong

    2016-09-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (NM), a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. The intracellular mediator and external anti-inflammatory external signal in the vascular wall have been reported to protect endothelial cells, in part due to nitric oxide (NO) production. This study was designed to examine whether NM exhibit endothelium dependent vascular relaxation through Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and generation of NO. NM enhanced Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aorta tissues obtained from rats treated with various concentrations of NM. NM concomitantly decreased arginase activity, which could increase the available arginine substrate for NO production. Moreover, we investigated whether NM increased NO bioavailability and decreased aortic relaxation response to an eNOS inhibitor in the aorta. These results suggest that NM increases NO generation via the Akt/eNOS signaling pathway, leading to endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation. Therefore, the vasorelaxing action of NM may contribute to the regulation of cardiovascular function. PMID:27610041

  12. Nafamostat mesilate promotes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation via the Akt-eNOS dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sujeong; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Song, Hee-Jung; Choi, Si Wan; Nagar, Harsha; Piao, Shuyu; Jung, Saet-byel; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (NM), a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. The intracellular mediator and external anti-inflammatory external signal in the vascular wall have been reported to protect endothelial cells, in part due to nitric oxide (NO) production. This study was designed to examine whether NM exhibit endothelium dependent vascular relaxation through Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and generation of NO. NM enhanced Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aorta tissues obtained from rats treated with various concentrations of NM. NM concomitantly decreased arginase activity, which could increase the available arginine substrate for NO production. Moreover, we investigated whether NM increased NO bioavailability and decreased aortic relaxation response to an eNOS inhibitor in the aorta. These results suggest that NM increases NO generation via the Akt/eNOS signaling pathway, leading to endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation. Therefore, the vasorelaxing action of NM may contribute to the regulation of cardiovascular function. PMID:27610041

  13. Nafamostat mesilate promotes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation via the Akt-eNOS dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sujeong; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Song, Hee-Jung; Choi, Si Wan; Nagar, Harsha; Piao, Shuyu; Jung, Saet-byel; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (NM), a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. The intracellular mediator and external anti-inflammatory external signal in the vascular wall have been reported to protect endothelial cells, in part due to nitric oxide (NO) production. This study was designed to examine whether NM exhibit endothelium dependent vascular relaxation through Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and generation of NO. NM enhanced Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aorta tissues obtained from rats treated with various concentrations of NM. NM concomitantly decreased arginase activity, which could increase the available arginine substrate for NO production. Moreover, we investigated whether NM increased NO bioavailability and decreased aortic relaxation response to an eNOS inhibitor in the aorta. These results suggest that NM increases NO generation via the Akt/eNOS signaling pathway, leading to endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation. Therefore, the vasorelaxing action of NM may contribute to the regulation of cardiovascular function.

  14. Flavonoids from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) up-regulate endothelial-type nitric-oxide synthase gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huige; Xia, Ning; Brausch, Isolde; Yao, Ying; Förstermann, Ulrich

    2004-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) represents an antithrombotic and anti-atherosclerotic principle in the vasculature. Hence, an enhanced expression of eNOS in response to pharmacological interventions could provide protection against cardiovascular diseases. In EA.hy 926 cells, a cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), an artichoke leaf extract (ALE) increased the activity of the human eNOS promoter (determined by luciferase reporter gene assay). An organic subfraction from ALE was more potent in this respect than the crude extract, whereas an aqueous subfraction of ALE was without effect. ALE and the organic subfraction thereof also increased eNOS mRNA expression (measured by an RNase protection assay) and eNOS protein expression (determined by Western blot) both in EA.hy 926 cells and in native HUVECs. NO production (measured by NO-ozone chemiluminescence) was increased by both extracts. In organ chamber experiments, ex vivo incubation (18 h) of rat aortic rings with the organic subfraction of ALE enhanced the NO-mediated vasodilator response to acetylcholine, indicating that the up-regulated eNOS remained functional. Caffeoylquinic acids and flavonoids are two major groups of constituents of ALE. Interestingly, the flavonoids luteolin and cynaroside increased eNOS promoter activity and eNOS mRNA expression, whereas the caffeoylquinic acids cynarin and chlorogenic acid were without effect. Thus, in addition to the lipid-lowering and antioxidant properties of artichoke, an increase in eNOS gene transcription may also contribute to its beneficial cardiovascular profile. Artichoke flavonoids are likely to represent the active ingredients mediating eNOS up-regulation.

  15. Analysis of lagoon samples from different concentrated animal feeding operations for estrogens and estrogen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Stephen R; White, Mark V; Hudson, Felisa M; Fine, Dennis D

    2007-02-01

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids) which are used for land application. Lagoons associated with swine, poultry, and cattle operations were sampled at three locations each for direct analysis for estrogens by GC/ MS/MS and estrogen conjugates by LC/MS/MS. Estrogen conjugates were also analyzed indirectly by first subjecting the same samples to enzyme hydrolysis. Solids from centrifuged samples were extracted for free estrogens to estimate total estrogen load. Total free estrogen levels (estrone, 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estriol) were generally higher in swine primary (1000-21000 ng/L), followed by poultry primary (1800-4000 ng/L), dairy secondary (370-550 ng/L), and beef secondary (22-24 ng/L) whole lagoon samples. Swine and poultry lagoons contained levels of 17(alpha-estradiol comparable to those of 17beta-estradiol. Confirmed estrogen conjugates included estrone-3-sulfate (2-91 ng/L), 17beta-estradiol-3-sulfate (8-44 ng/L), 17alpha-estradiol-3-sulfate (141-182 ng/L), and 17beta-estradiol-17-sulfate (72-84 ng/L) in some lagoons. Enzymatic hydrolysis indicated the presence of additional unidentified estrogen conjugates not detected bythe LC/MS/MS method. In most cases estrogen conjugates accounted for at least a third of the total estrogen equivalents. Collectively, these methods can be used to better determine estrogen loads from CAFO operations, and this research shows that estrogen conjugates contribute significantly to the overall estrogen load, even in different types of CAFO lagoons. PMID:17328177

  16. Evolution of endothelial keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Price, Francis W; Price, Marianne O

    2013-11-01

    Endothelial keratoplasty has evolved into a popular alternative to penetrating keratoplasty (PK) for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction. Although the earliest iterations were challenging and were not widely adopted, the iteration known as Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) has gained widespread acceptance. DSEK combines a simplified technique for stripping dysfunctional endothelium from the host cornea and microkeratome dissection of the donor tissue, a step now commonly completed in advance by eye bank technicians. Studies show that a newer endothelial keratoplasty iteration, known as Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK), provides an even faster and better visual recovery than DSEK does. In addition, DMEK significantly reduces the risk of immunologic graft rejection episodes compared with that in DSEK or in PK. Although the DMEK donor tissue, consisting of the bare endothelium and Descemet membrane without any stroma, is more challenging to prepare and position in the recipient eye, recent improvements in instrumentation and surgical techniques are increasing the ease and the reliability of the procedure. DSEK successfully mitigates 2 of the main liabilities of PK: ocular surface complications and structural problems (including induced astigmatism and perpetually weak wounds), whereas DMEK further mitigates the 2 principal remaining liabilities of PK: immunologic graft reactions and secondary glaucoma from prolonged topical corticosteroid use.

  17. Functional role of NF-κB in expression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Joohwan; Kwak, Su-Nam; Lee, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Dong-Keon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Won, Moo-Ho; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong

    2014-05-23

    The transcription factor NF-κB has an essential role in inflammation in endothelial cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO) prevents vascular inflammation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying NF-κB-mediated regulation of eNOS expression has not been clearly elucidated. We here found that NF-κB-activating stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β, suppressed eNOS mRNA and protein levels by decreasing mRNA stability, without affecting promoter activity. TNF-α-mediated suppression of eNOS expression, mRNA stability, and 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) activity were inhibited by NF-κB inhibitors and Dicer knockdown, but not by p38 MAPK and MEK inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of NF-κB-responsive miRNAs in eNOS expression. Moreover, TNF-α increased MIR155HG expression and promoter activity as well as miR-155 biogenesis, and these increases were blocked by NF-κB inhibitors. Transfection with antagomiR-155 blocked TNF-α-mediated suppression of eNOS 3'UTR activity, eNOS mRNA and protein levels, and NO and cGMP production. These data provide evidence that NF-κB is a negative regulator of eNOS expression via upregulation of miR-155 under inflammatory conditions. These results suggest that NF-κB is a potential therapeutic target for preventing vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction induced by suppression of miR-155-mediated eNOS expression. PMID:24769202

  18. The smoking-associated oxidant hypothiocyanous acid induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Kwan, Jair; Suryo Rahmanto, Aldwin; Witting, Paul K; Davies, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Considerable evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid) formation. We hypothesized that this thiol-specific oxidant may target the Zn(2+)-thiol cluster of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), resulting in enzyme dysfunction and reduced formation of the critical signalling molecule NO•. Decreased NO• bioavailability is an early and critical event in atherogenesis, and HOSCN-mediated damage to eNOS may contribute to smoking-associated disease. In the present study it is shown that exposure of isolated eNOS to HOSCN or MPO/H2O2/SCN(-) decreased active dimeric eNOS levels, and increased inactive monomer and Zn(2+) release, compared with controls, HOCl (hypochlorous acid)- or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-treated samples. eNOS activity was increasingly compromised by MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-) concentrations. Exposure of HCAEC (human coronary artery endothelial cell) lysates to pre-formed HOSCN, or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-), increased eNOS monomerization and Zn(2+) release, and decreased activity. Intact HCAECs exposed to HOCl and HOSCN had decreased eNOS activity and NO2(-)/NO3(-) formation (products of NO• decomposition), and increased free Zn(2+). Exposure of isolated rat aortic rings to HOSCN resulted in thiol loss, and decreased eNOS activity and cGMP levels. Overall these data indicate that high SCN(-) levels, as seen in smokers, can increase HOSCN formation and enhance eNOS dysfunction in human endothelial cells, with this potentially contributing to increased atherogenesis in smokers. PMID:24112082

  19. Functional role of NF-κB in expression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Joohwan; Kwak, Su-Nam; Lee, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Dong-Keon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Won, Moo-Ho; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong

    2014-05-23

    The transcription factor NF-κB has an essential role in inflammation in endothelial cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO) prevents vascular inflammation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying NF-κB-mediated regulation of eNOS expression has not been clearly elucidated. We here found that NF-κB-activating stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β, suppressed eNOS mRNA and protein levels by decreasing mRNA stability, without affecting promoter activity. TNF-α-mediated suppression of eNOS expression, mRNA stability, and 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) activity were inhibited by NF-κB inhibitors and Dicer knockdown, but not by p38 MAPK and MEK inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of NF-κB-responsive miRNAs in eNOS expression. Moreover, TNF-α increased MIR155HG expression and promoter activity as well as miR-155 biogenesis, and these increases were blocked by NF-κB inhibitors. Transfection with antagomiR-155 blocked TNF-α-mediated suppression of eNOS 3'UTR activity, eNOS mRNA and protein levels, and NO and cGMP production. These data provide evidence that NF-κB is a negative regulator of eNOS expression via upregulation of miR-155 under inflammatory conditions. These results suggest that NF-κB is a potential therapeutic target for preventing vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction induced by suppression of miR-155-mediated eNOS expression.

  20. Role of estrogen in avian osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Beck, M M; Hansen, K K

    2004-02-01

    One of the difficulties associated with commercial layer production is the development of osteoporosis in hens late in the production cycle. In light of this fact and because of hens' unique requirements for Ca, many studies have focused on the regulation of Ca and the role of estrogen in this process. The time course of estrogen synthesis over the productive life of hens has been well documented; increased circulating estrogen accompanies the onset of sexual maturity while decreases signal a decline in egg production prior to a molt. Numbers of estrogen receptors decrease with age in numerous tissues. The parallel changes in calcium-regulating proteins, primarily Calbindin D28K, and in the ability of duodenal cells to transport Ca, are thought to occur as a result of the changes in estrogen, and are also reversible by the molt process. In addition to the traditional model of estrogen action, evidence now exists for a possible nongenomic action of estrogen via membrane-bound receptors, demonstrated by extremely rapid surges of ionized Ca in chicken granulosa cells in response to 17beta-estradiol. Estrogen receptors have also been discovered in duodenal tissue, and tamoxifen, which binds to the estrogen receptor, has been shown to cause a rapid increase in Ca transport in the duodenum. In addition, recent evidence also suggests that mineralization of bone per se may not explain entirely the etiology of osteoporosis in the hen but that changes in the collagen matrix may contribute through decreases in bone elasticity. Taken together, these studies suggest that changes in estrogen synthesis and estrogen receptor populations may underlie the age-related changes in avian bone. As with postmenopausal women, dietary Ca and vitamin D are of limited benefit as remedies for osteoporosis in the hen. PMID:14979570

  1. Estrogen receptor variant ER-α36 is involved in estrogen neuroprotection against oxidative toxicity.

    PubMed

    Han, S; Zhao, B; Pan, X; Song, Z; Liu, J; Gong, Y; Wang, M

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that estrogen exerts neuroprotective effect against various neuronal damages. However, the estrogen receptor (ER) that mediates estrogen neuroprotection has not been well established. In this study, we investigated the potential receptor that mediates estrogen neuroprotection and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was chosen as an agent in our study to mimic free radicals that are often involved in the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases. We found that in human SY5Y and IMR-32 cells, the estrogen neuroprotection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by knockdown of a variant of estrogen receptor-α, ER-α36. We also studied the rapid estrogen signaling mediated by ER-α36 in neuroprotective effect and found the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling mediated by ER-α36 is involved in estrogen neuroprotection. We also found that GPER, an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, is not involved in ER-α36-mediated rapid estrogen response. Our study thus demonstrates that ER-α36-mediated rapid estrogen signaling is involved in the neuroprotection activity of estrogen against oxidative toxicity. PMID:26383254

  2. Parabens inhibit human skin estrogen sulfotransferase activity: possible link to paraben estrogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J; Harville, Heather M; Zhang, Yanhua; Ackermann, Chrisita; Voorman, Richard L

    2007-04-11

    Parabens (p-hydroxybenzoate esters) are a group of widely used preservatives in topically applied cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Parabens display weak associations with the estrogen receptors in vitro or in cell based models, but do exhibit estrogenic effects in animal models. It is our hypothesis that parabens exert their estrogenic effects, in part, by elevating levels of estrogens through inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferases (SULTs) in skin. We report here the results of a structure-activity-relationship of parabens as inhibitors of estrogen sulfation in human skin cytosolic fractions and normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Similar to reports of paraben estrogenicity and estrogen receptor affinity, the potency of SULT inhibition increased as the paraben ester chain length increased. Butylparaben was found to be the most potent of the parabens in skin cytosol, yielding an IC(50) value of 37+/-5 microM. Butylparaben blocked the skin cytosol sulfation of estradiol and estrone, but not the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone. The parabens were also tested as inhibitors of SULT activity in a cellular system, with normal human epidermal keratinocytes. The potency of butylparaben increased three-fold in these cells relative to the IC(50) value from skin cytosol. Overall, these results suggest chronic topical application of parabens may lead to prolonged estrogenic effects in skin as a result of inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferase activity. Accordingly, the skin anti-aging benefits of many topical cosmetics and pharmaceuticals could be derived, in part, from the estrogenicity of parabens.

  3. Identification of estrogenic/anti-estrogenic compounds in diesel exhaust particulate extract.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Keiko; Toriba, Akira; Chung, Sang Woon; Kizu, Ryoichi; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2007-11-01

    Diesel exhaust particulate extract (DEPE) was obtained from diesel exhaust particulates with Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane. After separating DEPE into 11 fractions by liquid-liquid extraction, the neutral fraction (N) showed anti-estrogenic activity and the weak acid (phenol) fraction (WA(P)) showed estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activities by a yeast two-hybrid assay system expressing human estrogen receptor alpha. Both fractions were thoroughly fractionated by silica gel column chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. In the WA(P) fraction, 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol and 2,6-dimethyl-4-nitrophenol were identified by LC-MS/MS as estrogenic compounds. This is the first study to identify 2,6-dimethyl-4-nitrophenol in DEPE and the first study to show that it is an estrogenic compound. In the N fraction, 1-hydroxypyrene was also identified by LC-MS/MS as an anti-estrogenic compound.

  4. Evaluation of the Effects of Different Energy Drinks and Coffee on Endothelial Function.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Janos; Somberg, John C

    2015-11-01

    Endothelial function plays an important role in circulatory physiology. There has been differing reports on the effect of energy drink on endothelial function. We set out to evaluate the effect of 3 energy drinks and coffee on endothelial function. Endothelial function was evaluated in healthy volunteers using a device that uses digital peripheral arterial tonometry measuring endothelial function as the reactive hyperemia index (RHI). Six volunteers (25 ± 7 years) received energy drink in a random order at least 2 days apart. Drinks studied were 250 ml "Red Bull" containing 80 mg caffeine, 57 ml "5-hour Energy" containing 230 mg caffeine, and a can of 355 ml "NOS" energy drink containing 120 mg caffeine. Sixteen volunteers (25 ± 5 years) received a cup of 473 ml coffee containing 240 mg caffeine. Studies were performed before drink (baseline) at 1.5 and 4 hours after drink. Two of the energy drinks (Red Bull and 5-hour Energy) significantly improved endothelial function at 4 hours after drink, whereas 1 energy drink (NOS) and coffee did not change endothelial function significantly. RHI increased by 82 ± 129% (p = 0.028) and 63 ± 37% (p = 0.027) after 5-hour Energy and Red Bull, respectively. The RHI changed after NOS by 2 ± 30% (p = 1.000) and by 7 ± 30% (p = 1.000) after coffee. In conclusion, some energy drinks appear to significantly improve endothelial function. Caffeine does not appear to be the component responsible for these differences.

  5. Estrogenic activity of naturally occurring anthocyanidins.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, E; Stopper, H

    2001-01-01

    Anthocyanins, which are natural plant pigments from the flavonoid family, represent substantial constituents of the human diet. Because some other bioflavonoids are known to have estrogenic activity, the aim of this study was to determine the estrogenic activity of the anthocyanine aglycones. Binding affinity to the estrogen receptor-alpha was 10,000- to 20,000-fold lower than that of the endogenous estrogen estradiol. In the estrogen receptor-positive cell line MCF-7, the anthocyanidins induced expression of a reporter gene. The tested anthocyanidins showed estrogen-inducible cell proliferation in two cell lines (MCF-7 and BG-1), but not in the receptor-negative human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The phytoestrogen-induced cell proliferation could be blocked by addition of the receptor antagonist 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Combination treatments with the endogenous estrogen estradiol resulted in a reduction of estradiol-induced cell proliferation. Overall, the tested anthocyanidins exert estrogenic activity, which might play a role in altering the development of hormone-dependent adverse effects.

  6. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  7. Estrogen Receptors are Present in Neocortical Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Erik B.; O'Keefe, Joan A.; Handa, Robert J.; Castro, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    Fetal neocortical tissue was grafted into neocortical lesion cavities made in newborn rats. After two weeks survival, in vitro binding of [3H]- estradiol to cytosolic preparations provided evidence of estrogen receptors within the transplants. The observed high levels correspond to previous work demonstrating elevated estrogen receptor levels during the first postnatal week in the rat cerebral cortex. PMID:1515481

  8. The effects of estrogen in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Koellhoffer, Edward C; McCullough, Louise D

    2013-08-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and the most common cause of long-term disability in the USA. Women have a lower incidence of stroke compared with men throughout most of the lifespan which has been ascribed to protective effects of gonadal steroids, most notably estrogen. Due to the lower stroke incidence observed in pre-menopausal women and robust preclinical evidence of neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of estrogen, researchers have focused on the potential benefits of hormones to reduce ischemic brain injury. However, as women age, they are disproportionately affected by stroke, coincident with the loss of estrogen with menopause. The risk of stroke in elderly women exceeds that of men and it is clear that in some settings estrogen can have pro-inflammatory effects. This review will focus on estrogen and inflammation and its interaction with aging.

  9. Design of pathway-preferential estrogens that provide beneficial metabolic and vascular effects without stimulating reproductive tissues

    PubMed Central

    Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Yiru C.; Zhang, Hui; Chambliss, Ken L.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Mayne, Christopher G.; Shaul, Philip W.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2016-01-01

    There is great medical need for estrogens with favorable pharmacological profiles, that support desirable activities for menopausal women such as metabolic and vascular protection but that lack stimulatory activities on the breast and uterus. Here, we report the development of structurally novel estrogens that preferentially activate a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) signaling pathways and result in favorable target tissue-selective activity. Through a process of structural alteration of estrogenic ligands that was designed to preserve their essential chemical and physical features but greatly reduced their binding affinity for ERs, we obtained “Pathway Preferential Estrogens” (PaPEs) which interacted with ERs to activate the extranuclear-initiated signaling pathway preferentially over the nuclear-initiated pathway. PaPEs elicited a pattern of gene regulation and cellular and biological processes that did not stimulate reproductive and mammary tissues or breast cancer cells. However, in ovariectomized mice, PaPEs triggered beneficial responses both in metabolic tissues (adipose tissue and liver) that reduced body weight gain and fat accumulation and in the vasculature that accelerated repair of endothelial damage. This process of designed ligand structure alteration represents a novel approach to develop ligands that shift the balance in ER-mediated extranuclear and nuclear pathways to obtain tissue-selective, non-nuclear pathway-preferential estrogens, which may be beneficial for postmenopausal hormone replacement. The approach may also have broad applicability for other members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PMID:27221711

  10. Role of muscular eNOS in skeletal arteries: Endothelium-independent hypoxic vasoconstriction of the femoral artery is impaired in eNOS-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Yoo, Hae Young; Lin, Hai Yue; Oh, Goo Taeg; Zhang, Yin Hua; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-09-01

    We previously reported that hypoxia augments α-adrenergic contraction (hypoxic vasoconstriction, HVC) of skeletal arteries in rats. The underlying mechanism may involve hypoxic inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expressed in skeletal arterial myocytes (16). To further explore the novel role of muscular eNOS in the skeletal artery, we compared HVC in femoral arteries (FAs) from eNOS knockout (KO) mice with that from wild-type (WT) and heterozygous (HZ) mice. Immunohistochemical assays revealed that, in addition to endothelia, eNOS is also expressed in the medial layer of FAs, albeit at a much lower level. However, the medial eNOS signal was not evident in HZ FAs, despite strong expression in the endothelium; similar observations were made in WT carotid arteries (CAs). The amplitude of contraction induced by 1 μM phenylephrine (PhE) was greater in HZ than in WT FAs. Hypoxia (3% Po2) significantly augmented PhE-induced contraction in WT FAs but not in HZ or KO FAs. No HVC was observed in PhE-pretreated WT CAs. The NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (0.1 mM) also augmented PhE contraction in endothelium-denuded WT FAs but not in WT CAs. Inhibitors specific to neuronal NOS and inducible NOS did not augment PhE-induced contraction of WT FAs. NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) inhibitor (GKT137831, 5 μM), but not NOX2 inhibitor (apocynin, 100 μM), suppressed HVC. Consistent with the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), HVC was also inhibited by pretreatment with tiron or polyethylene glycol-catalase. Taken together, these data suggest that the eNOS expressed in smooth muscle cells in FAs attenuates α-adrenergic vasoconstriction; this suppression is alleviated under hypoxia, which potentiates vasoconstriction in a NOX4/ROS-dependent mechanism. PMID:27486092

  11. Epicatechin and catechin modulate endothelial activation induced by platelets of patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, R; Loffredo, L; Nocella, C; Bartimoccia, S; Bucci, T; De Falco, E; Peruzzi, M; Chimenti, I; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Pignatelli, P; Violi, F; Frati, G

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets.

  12. Epicatechin and Catechin Modulate Endothelial Activation Induced by Platelets of Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, R.; Loffredo, L.; Nocella, C.; Bartimoccia, S.; Bucci, T.; De Falco, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Chimenti, I.; Biondi-Zoccai, G.; Pignatelli, P.; Violi, F.; Frati, G.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. PMID:25180068

  13. Epicatechin and catechin modulate endothelial activation induced by platelets of patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, R; Loffredo, L; Nocella, C; Bartimoccia, S; Bucci, T; De Falco, E; Peruzzi, M; Chimenti, I; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Pignatelli, P; Violi, F; Frati, G

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. PMID:25180068

  14. Role for Tetrahydrobiopterin in the Fetoplacental Endothelial Dysfunction in Maternal Supraphysiological Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Leiva, Andrea; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Toledo, Fernando; Salomón, Carlos; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Sanhueza, Carlos; Pardo, Fabián

    2016-01-01

    Maternal physiological hypercholesterolemia occurs during pregnancy, ensuring normal fetal development. In some cases, the maternal plasma cholesterol level increases to above this physiological range, leading to maternal supraphysiological hypercholesterolemia (MSPH). This condition results in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in the fetal and placental vasculature. The fetal and placental endothelial dysfunction is related to alterations in the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the arginase/urea pathway and results in reduced NO production. The level of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), is reduced in nonpregnant women who have hypercholesterolemia, which favors the generation of the superoxide anion rather than NO (from eNOS), causing endothelial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether MSPH is associated with changes in the level or metabolism of BH4; as a result, eNOS function is not well understood. This review summarizes the available information on the potential link between MSPH and BH4 in causing human fetoplacental vascular endothelial dysfunction, which may be crucial for understanding the deleterious effects of MSPH on fetal growth and development. PMID:26697136

  15. Endothelial retention and phenotype on carbonized cardiovascular implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Frendl, Chris; Tucker, Scott; Khan, Nadeem; Esch, Mandy; Kanduru, Shrinidhi; Cao, Thong M.; García, Andrés J.; King, Michael R.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is an increasing clinical burden for which there is no effective treatment outside of prosthetic replacement. Over the last 20 years, clinicians have increasingly preferred the use of biological prosthetics to mechanical valves despite their superior durability because of the lifelong anticoagulation therapy that is required. Mechanical valve surface engineering has largely focused on being as non-thrombogenic as possible, but despite decades of iteration has had insufficient impact on the anticoagulation burden. In this study, we systematically evaluate the potential for endothelialization of the pyrolytic carbon surface used in mechanical valves. We compared adsorbed adhesion ligand type (collagen I, fibronectin, laminin, and purified adhesion domain fragments GFOGER and FN7-10) and concentration on endothelial adhesion rates and adhesion strength on Medtronic-Hall prosthetic valve surfaces. Regardless of ligand type or concentration, endothelial adhesion strengthening was insufficient for their intended ultra-high shear stress environment. We then hypothesized that microfabricated trenches would reduce shear stress to tolerable levels while maintaining endothelial access to the flow stream, thereby promoting a confluent and anticoagulant endothelial monolayer. Computational fluid dynamics simulations predicted an empirical relationship of channel width, depth, and spacing that would maintain interior surface shear stress within tolerable levels. Endothelial cells seeded to confluence in these channels retained a confluent monolayer when exposed to 600 dynes/cm2 shear stress for 48 hours regardless of applied adhesive ligand. Furthermore, sheared EC expressed a mature anti-coagulant profile, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), VE-cadherin, and significantly downregulated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). As a final test, channeled pyrolytic carbon surfaces with confluent EC reduced human platelet adhesion 1000-fold

  16. Melatonin as a selective estrogen enzyme modulator.

    PubMed

    Cos, S; González, A; Martínez-Campa, C; Mediavilla, M D; Alonso-González, C; Sánchez-Barceló, E J

    2008-12-01

    Melatonin exerts oncostatic effects on different kinds of tumors, especially on hormone-dependent breast cancer. The general conclusion is that melatonin, in vivo, reduces the incidence and growth of chemically-induced mammary tumors in rodents, and, in vitro, inhibits the proliferation and invasiveness of human breast cancer cells. Both studies support the hypothesis that melatonin inhibits the growth of breast cancer by interacting with estrogen-signaling pathways through three different mechanisms: (a) the indirect neuroendocrine mechanism which includes the melatonin down-regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-reproductive axis and the consequent reduction of circulating levels of gonadal estrogens, (b) direct melatonin actions at tumor cell level by interacting with the activation of the estrogen receptor, thus behaving as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), and (c) the regulation of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of estrogens in peripheral tissues, thus behaving as a selective estrogen enzyme modulator (SEEM). As melatonin reduces the activity and expression of aromatase, sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and increases the activity and expression of estrogen sulfotransferase, it may protect mammary tissue from excessive estrogenic effects. Thus, a single molecule has both SERM and SEEM properties, one of the main objectives desired for the breast antitumoral drugs. Since the inhibition of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of estrogens is currently one of the first therapeutic strategies used against the growth of breast cancer, melatonin modulation of different enzymes involved in the synthesis of steroid hormones makes, collectively, this indolamine an interesting anticancer drug in the prevention and treatment of estrogen-dependent mammary tumors.

  17. Activation of protease calpain by oxidized and glycated LDL increases the degradation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Yong; Wu, Mingyuan; Wang, Shuangxi; Zhang, Junhua; Xie, Zhonglin; Xu, Jian; Song, Ping; Wilson, Kenneth; Zhao, Zhengxing; Lyons, Timothy; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Oxidation and glycation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) promote vascular injury in diabetes; however, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly defined. The present study was conducted to determine the effects of ‘heavily oxidized’ glycated LDL (HOG-LDL) on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Exposure of bovine aortic endothelial cells with HOG-LDL reduced eNOS protein levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, without altering eNOS mRNA levels. Reduced eNOS protein levels were accompanied by an increase in intracellular Ca2+, augmented production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of Ca2+-dependent calpain activity. Neither eNOS reduction nor any of these other effects were observed in cells exposed to native LDL. Reduction of intracellular Ca2+ levels abolished eNOS reduction by HOG-LDL, as did pharmacological or genetic through calcium channel blockers or calcium chelator BAPTA or inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase (with apocynin) or inhibition of calpain (calpain 1-specific siRNA). Consistent with these results, HOG-LDL impaired acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of isolated mouse aortas, and pharmacological inhibition of calpain prevented this effect. HOG-LDL may impair endothelial function by inducing calpain-mediated eNOS degradation in a ROS- and Ca2+-dependent manner. PMID:18624772

  18. Nitrative Stress Participates in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Injury in Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu; Sun, Qi; Liu, Teng; Wang, Huanyuan; Jiao, Kun; Xu, Jiahui; Liu, Xin; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of nitrative stress in vascular endothelial injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), thirty healthy adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperhomocysteinemia model, and hyperhomocysteinemia with FeTMPyP (peroxynitrite scavenger) treatment. The endothelium-dependent dilatation of thoracic aorta in vitro was determined by response to acetylcholine (ACh). The histological changes in endothelium were assessed by HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) in thoracic aorta was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was quantified by flow cytometry. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused significant endothelial injury and dysfunction including vasodilative and histologic changes, associated with higher expression of NT in thoracic aorta. FeTMPyP treatment reversed these injuries significantly. Further, the effect of nitrative stress on cultured EPCs in vitro was investigated by administering peroxynitrite donor (3-morpholino-sydnonimine, SIN-1) and peroxynitrite scavenger (FeTMPyP). The roles of nitrative stress on cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Also, the phospho-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel of cultured EPCs was detected. Our data showed that the survival of EPCs was much lower in SIN-1 group than in vehicle group, both the apoptosis and necrosis of EPCs were much more severe, and the p-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel were obviously declined. Subsequent pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed these changes. Further, pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed homocysteine-induced EPC injury. In conclusion, this study indicates that

  19. Nitrative Stress Participates in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Injury in Hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Sun, Qi; Liu, Teng; Wang, Huanyuan; Jiao, Kun; Xu, Jiahui; Liu, Xin; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of nitrative stress in vascular endothelial injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), thirty healthy adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperhomocysteinemia model, and hyperhomocysteinemia with FeTMPyP (peroxynitrite scavenger) treatment. The endothelium-dependent dilatation of thoracic aorta in vitro was determined by response to acetylcholine (ACh). The histological changes in endothelium were assessed by HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) in thoracic aorta was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was quantified by flow cytometry. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused significant endothelial injury and dysfunction including vasodilative and histologic changes, associated with higher expression of NT in thoracic aorta. FeTMPyP treatment reversed these injuries significantly. Further, the effect of nitrative stress on cultured EPCs in vitro was investigated by administering peroxynitrite donor (3-morpholino-sydnonimine, SIN-1) and peroxynitrite scavenger (FeTMPyP). The roles of nitrative stress on cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Also, the phospho-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel of cultured EPCs was detected. Our data showed that the survival of EPCs was much lower in SIN-1 group than in vehicle group, both the apoptosis and necrosis of EPCs were much more severe, and the p-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel were obviously declined. Subsequent pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed these changes. Further, pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed homocysteine-induced EPC injury. In conclusion, this study indicates that

  20. Synergism of matrix stiffness and vascular endothelial growth factor on mesenchymal stem cells for vascular endothelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wingate, Kathryn; Floren, Michael; Tan, Yan; Tseng, Pi Ou Nancy; Tan, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for vascular tissue regeneration. Research has demonstrated that individual factors in the cell microenvironment such as matrix elasticity and growth factors regulate MSC differentiation to vascular lineage. However, it is not well understood how matrix elasticity and growth factors combine to direct the MSC fate. This study examines the combined effects of matrix elasticity and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on both MSC differentiation into endothelial lineage and MSC paracrine signaling. MSCs were seeded in soft nanofibrous matrices with or without VEGF, and in Petri dishes with or without VEGF. Only MSCs seeded in three-dimensional soft matrices with VEGF showed significant increases in the expression of endothelial markers (vWF, eNOS, Flt-1, and Flk-1), while eliminating the expression of smooth muscle marker (SM-α-actin). MSCs cultured in VEGF alone on two-dimensional dishes showed increased expression of both early-stage endothelial and smooth muscle markers, indicating immature vascular differentiation. Furthermore, MSCs cultured in soft matrices with VEGF showed faster upregulation of endothelial markers compared with MSCs cultured in VEGF alone. Paracrine signaling studies found that endothelial cells cultured in the conditioned media from MSCs differentiated in the soft matrix and VEGF condition exhibited increased migration and formation of capillary-like structures. These results demonstrate that VEGF and soft matrix elasticity act synergistically to guide MSC differentiation into mature endothelial phenotype while enhancing paracrine signaling. Therefore, it is critical to control both mechanical and biochemical factors to safely regenerate vascular tissues with MSCs.

  1. Synergism of Matrix Stiffness and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor on Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Vascular Endothelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, Kathryn; Floren, Michael; Tan, Yan; Tseng, Pi Ou Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for vascular tissue regeneration. Research has demonstrated that individual factors in the cell microenvironment such as matrix elasticity and growth factors regulate MSC differentiation to vascular lineage. However, it is not well understood how matrix elasticity and growth factors combine to direct the MSC fate. This study examines the combined effects of matrix elasticity and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on both MSC differentiation into endothelial lineage and MSC paracrine signaling. MSCs were seeded in soft nanofibrous matrices with or without VEGF, and in Petri dishes with or without VEGF. Only MSCs seeded in three-dimensional soft matrices with VEGF showed significant increases in the expression of endothelial markers (vWF, eNOS, Flt-1, and Flk-1), while eliminating the expression of smooth muscle marker (SM-α-actin). MSCs cultured in VEGF alone on two-dimensional dishes showed increased expression of both early-stage endothelial and smooth muscle markers, indicating immature vascular differentiation. Furthermore, MSCs cultured in soft matrices with VEGF showed faster upregulation of endothelial markers compared with MSCs cultured in VEGF alone. Paracrine signaling studies found that endothelial cells cultured in the conditioned media from MSCs differentiated in the soft matrix and VEGF condition exhibited increased migration and formation of capillary-like structures. These results demonstrate that VEGF and soft matrix elasticity act synergistically to guide MSC differentiation into mature endothelial phenotype while enhancing paracrine signaling. Therefore, it is critical to control both mechanical and biochemical factors to safely regenerate vascular tissues with MSCs. PMID:24702044

  2. Estrogen or estrogen receptor agonist inhibits lipopolysaccharide induced microglial activation and death.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua A; Das, Arabinda; Butler, Jonathan T; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2011-09-01

    Inflammation is an important pathogenic mechanism in many neurodegenerative disorders. Activated microglia play a pivotal role in releasing pro-inflammatory factors including interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for inducing inflammation. While microglia mediated inflammation is essential in maintaining CNS homeostasis, chronic inflammation results in activation of proteases for cell death. Here, we examined the effect of PPT (estrogen receptor α agonist), DPN (estrogen receptor β agonist), and estrogen on rat primary microglia following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of microglia to LPS (200 ng/ml) for 24 h induced cell death. After LPS toxicity for 15 min, microglia were treated with 25 nM PPT, 25 nM DPN, or 100 nM estrogen that prevented cell death by attenuating the release of IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2. Treatment of cells with 100 nM fulvestrant (estrogen receptor antagonist) prior to addition of PPT, DPN, or estrogen significantly decreased their ability to prevent cell death, indicating involvement of estrogen receptor (ER) in providing PPT, DPN, or estrogen mediated cytoprotection. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses showed alterations in mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2, calpain, and calpastatin during apoptosis. We also examined mRNA expression of ERβ and ERα following exposure of microglia to LPS and subsequent treatment with PPT, DPN, or estrogen. We found that estrogen or estrogen receptor agonists upregulated expression of ERs. Overall, results indicate that estrogen receptor agonist or estrogen uses a receptor mediated pathway to protect microglia from LPS toxicity.

  3. Interaction between bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 and estrogenic compounds in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Joshua P; Chen, Xinping; Frump, Andrea; Gladson, Santhi; Blackwell, Tom; Kang, Christie; Johnson, Jennifer; Loyd, James E; Hemnes, Anna; Austin, Eric; West, James

    2013-09-01

    Abstract The majority of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) cases are associated with mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2). BMPR2 mutation carries about a 20% lifetime risk of PAH development, but penetrance is approximately three times higher in females. Previous studies have shown a correlation between estrogen metabolism and penetrance, with increased levels of the estrogen metabolite 16α-hydroxyestrone (16αOHE) and reduced levels of the metabolite 2-methoxyestrogen (2ME) associated with increased risk of disease. The goal of this study was to determine whether 16αOHE increased and 2ME decreased penetrance of disease in Bmpr2 mutant mice and, if so, by what mechanism. We found that 16αOHE∶2ME ratio was high in male human HPAH patients. Bmpr2 mutant male mice receiving chronic 16αOHE had doubled disease penetrance, associated with reduced cardiac output. 2ME did not have a significant protective effect, either alone or in combination with 16αOHE. In control mice but not in Bmpr2 mutant mice, 16αOHE suppressed bone morphogenetic protein signaling, probably directly through suppression of Bmpr2 protein. Bmpr2 mutant pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were insensitive to estrogen signaling through canonical pathways, associated with aberrant intracellular localization of estrogen receptor α. In both control and Bmpr2 mutant mice, 16αOHE was associated with suppression of cytokine expression but with increased alternate markers of injury, including alterations in genes related to thrombotic function, angiogenesis, planar polarity, and metabolism. These data support a causal relationship between increased 16αOHE and increased PAH penetrance, with the likely molecular mechanisms including suppression of BMPR2, alterations in estrogen receptor translocation, and induction of vascular injury and insulin resistance-related pathways.

  4. Estrogen protects the blood-brain barrier from inflammation-induced disruption and increased lymphocyte trafficking.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, E; McArthur, S; Mauro, C; Kieswich, J; Kusters, D H M; Reutelingsperger, C P M; Yaqoob, M; Solito, E

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences have been widely reported in neuroinflammatory disorders, focusing on the contributory role of estrogen. The microvascular endothelium of the brain is a critical component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and it is recognized as a major interface for communication between the periphery and the brain. As such, the cerebral capillary endothelium represents an important target for the peripheral estrogen neuroprotective functions, leading us to hypothesize that estrogen can limit BBB breakdown following the onset of peripheral inflammation. Comparison of male and female murine responses to peripheral LPS challenge revealed a short-term inflammation-induced deficit in BBB integrity in males that was not apparent in young females, but was notable in older, reproductively senescent females. Importantly, ovariectomy and hence estrogen loss recapitulated an aged phenotype in young females, which was reversible upon estradiol replacement. Using a well-established model of human cerebrovascular endothelial cells we investigated the effects of estradiol upon key barrier features, namely paracellular permeability, transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction integrity and lymphocyte transmigration under basal and inflammatory conditions, modeled by treatment with TNFα and IFNγ. In all cases estradiol prevented inflammation-induced defects in barrier function, action mediated in large part through up-regulation of the central coordinator of tight junction integrity, annexin A1. The key role of this protein was then further confirmed in studies of human or murine annexin A1 genetic ablation models. Together, our data provide novel mechanisms for the protective effects of estrogen, and enhance our understanding of the beneficial role it plays in neurovascular/neuroimmune disease. PMID:26321046

  5. Estrogen protects the blood-brain barrier from inflammation-induced disruption and increased lymphocyte trafficking.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, E; McArthur, S; Mauro, C; Kieswich, J; Kusters, D H M; Reutelingsperger, C P M; Yaqoob, M; Solito, E

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences have been widely reported in neuroinflammatory disorders, focusing on the contributory role of estrogen. The microvascular endothelium of the brain is a critical component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and it is recognized as a major interface for communication between the periphery and the brain. As such, the cerebral capillary endothelium represents an important target for the peripheral estrogen neuroprotective functions, leading us to hypothesize that estrogen can limit BBB breakdown following the onset of peripheral inflammation. Comparison of male and female murine responses to peripheral LPS challenge revealed a short-term inflammation-induced deficit in BBB integrity in males that was not apparent in young females, but was notable in older, reproductively senescent females. Importantly, ovariectomy and hence estrogen loss recapitulated an aged phenotype in young females, which was reversible upon estradiol replacement. Using a well-established model of human cerebrovascular endothelial cells we investigated the effects of estradiol upon key barrier features, namely paracellular permeability, transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction integrity and lymphocyte transmigration under basal and inflammatory conditions, modeled by treatment with TNFα and IFNγ. In all cases estradiol prevented inflammation-induced defects in barrier function, action mediated in large part through up-regulation of the central coordinator of tight junction integrity, annexin A1. The key role of this protein was then further confirmed in studies of human or murine annexin A1 genetic ablation models. Together, our data provide novel mechanisms for the protective effects of estrogen, and enhance our understanding of the beneficial role it plays in neurovascular/neuroimmune disease.

  6. Estrogen replacement increases beta-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, M; Meyer, M; Osol, G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether estrogen replacement in ovariectomized rats could modulate arterial diameter responses to beta-adrenoceptor activation. Under relaxed conditions (0.1 mM papaverine) there were no differences in the lumen diameter of isolated, pressurized (50 mm Hg) mesenteric arteries from nontreated (191.7 +/- 13.8 microns; n = 19) versus those from estrogen-treated (190.1 +/- 11 microns; n = 14) ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats. In arteries precontracted with noradrenaline (0.3-1 microM), isoprenaline (0.01-10 microM)-induced relaxation was significantly increased in arteries from ovariectomized estrogen-treated rats (52.4 +/- 2% of the maximal relaxation induced by 0.1 mM papaverine, vs. 33.3 +/- 6.5%; p < 0.01). The half-maximal concentration value was 0.04 +/- 0.05 microM in estrogen-treated rats and 0.4 +/- 0.1 microM in nontreated rats (p < 0.01). This response was inhibited by propranolol (1 microM) in both groups to a comparable extent (61.5%), and was unaffected by endothelial removal. Forskolin (0.01-10 microM) induced similar concentration-dependent vasodilation in arteries of both groups of rats with no differences in sensitivity or maximal response. These results suggest that isoprenaline acts through beta-adrenoceptors present on vascular smooth muscle and that estrogen replacement enhances the relaxant responses induced by beta-adrenoceptor activation by an endothelium-independent mechanism.

  7. Chloroquine stimulates nitric oxide synthesis in murine, porcine, and human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghigo, D; Aldieri, E; Todde, R; Costamagna, C; Garbarino, G; Pescarmona, G; Bosia, A

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical involved in the regulation of many cell functions and in the expression of several diseases. We have found that the antimalarial and antiinflammatory drug, chloroquine, is able to stimulate NO synthase (NOS) activity in murine, porcine, and human endothelial cells in vitro: the increase of enzyme activity is dependent on a de novo synthesis of some regulatory protein, as it is inhibited by cycloheximide but is not accompanied by an increased expression of inducible or constitutive NOS isoforms. Increased NO synthesis is, at least partly, responsible for chloroquine-induced inhibition of cell proliferation: indeed, NOS inhibitors revert the drug-evoked blockage of mitogenesis and ornithine decarboxylase activity in murine and porcine endothelial cells. The NOS-activating effect of chloroquine is dependent on its weak base properties, as it is exerted also by ammonium chloride, another lysosomotropic agent. Both compounds activate NOS by limiting the availability of iron: their stimulating effects on NO synthesis and inhibiting action on cell proliferation are reverted by iron supplementation with ferric nitrilotriacetate, and are mimicked by incubation with desferrioxamine. Our results suggest that NO synthesis can be stimulated in endothelial cells by chloroquine via an impairment of iron metabolism. PMID:9691096

  8. Shear stress stimulates phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635) by a protein kinase A-dependent mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Hwang, Jinah; Sykes, Michelle; Michell, Belinda J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Lum, Hazel; Jo, Hanjoong

    2002-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) production by phosphorylating endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) at Ser(1179) in a phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner. The eNOS has additional potential phosphorylation sites, including Ser(116), Thr(497), and Ser(635). Here, we studied these potential phosphorylation sites in response to shear, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and 8-bromocAMP (8-BRcAMP) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). All three stimuli induced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635), which was consistently slower than that at Ser(1179). Thr(497) was rapidly dephosphorylated by 8-BRcAMP but not by shear and VEGF. None of the stimuli phosphorylated Ser(116). Whereas shear-stimulated Ser(635) phosphorylation was not affected by phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002, it was blocked by either treating the cells with a PKA inhibitor H89 or infecting them with a recombinant adenovirus-expressing PKA inhibitor. These results suggest that shear stress stimulates eNOS by two different mechanisms: 1) PKA- and PI3K-dependent and 2) PKA-dependent but PI3K-independent pathways. Phosphorylation of Ser(635) may play an important role in chronic regulation of eNOS in response to mechanical and humoral stimuli.

  9. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

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  10. Phenylephrine activates eNOS Ser 1177 phosphorylation and nitric oxide signaling in renal hypertensive rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno R; Pernomian, Laena; Grando, Marcella D; Bendhack, Lusiane M

    2014-09-01

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the control of the vascular tone. This work aimed to evaluate the role of an α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (PE) on eNOS activity and downstream signaling pathway activation in normotensive (2K) and renal hypertensive (2K-1C) intact-endothelium rat aortas. Concentration-effect curves were performed for PE in intact-endothelium aortas from 2K and 2K-1C rats, in the absence of or in the presence of NOS or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor. Intact endothelium aortas were stimulated with PE in organ chambers and eNOS Ser(1177)/Thr(495) phosphorylation expression was evaluated by western blot. Nitric Oxide (NO) production was evaluated in isolated endothelial cells from 2K and 2K-1C rat aortas by flow-cytometry using NO selective fluorescent probe, DAF-2DA. The sGC activity/expression was also evaluated. PE-induced contractile response is lower in 2K-1C than in 2K intact-endothelium rat aorta. This is due to higher eNOS Ser(1177) phosphorylation in 2K-1C, which induces the eNOS overactivation. It was abolished by NOS or sGC inhibition. Phenylephrine reduces NO production in 2K as compared to the basal level, but it is not modified in 2K-1C. In PE-stimulated endothelial cells, the NO production is higher in 2K-1C than in 2K. Phenylephrine induces higher cGMP production in 2K-1C than in 2K, despite the lower expression of sGC in 2K-1C. Our results suggest that alpha1-adrenoceptor activation contributes to the increased activity of the enzyme eNOS by Ser(1177) phosphorylation in 2K-1C intact-endothelium aorta, which consequently decreases PE-induced contractile response.

  11. Regulation of TREM expression in hepatic macrophages and endothelial cells during acute endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li C; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Gordon, Marion K; Laskin, Debra L

    2008-04-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) regulates inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In these studies, we analyzed the expression of TREM in hepatic macrophages and endothelial cells which play a central role in LPS clearance. LPS administration to C3H/HeOuJ mice resulted in a rapid induction of TREM-1 and TREM-3, but a decrease in TREM-2 in liver macrophages and endothelial cells. The observation that TREM family members are detectable in endothelial cells is novel and demonstrates that their expression is not limited to myeloid cells. LPS-induced alterations in TREM expression were not evident in cells from C3H/HeJ TLR-4 mutant mice, indicating that the response is dependent on TLR-4. IL-1beta and TNFalpha upregulated TREM-1 and TREM-3 expression and suppressed TREM-2 expression in macrophages and endothelial cells. This activity involved PI3-kinase and p38 MAP kinase signaling. Interestingly, no significant differences were noted in TREM expression between wild-type and TNFR1-/- mice treated with LPS. Treatment of macrophages and endothelial cells with LPS upregulated expression of nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2). This was blocked by TREM-1 Fc/fusion protein, indicating that TREM-1 mediates LPS-induced NOS-2 expression. These results suggest that TREM proteins are important in the inflammatory response of hepatic macrophages and endothelial cells to acute endotoxemia. PMID:18222421

  12. Estrogens from sewage in coastal marine environments.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Shannon; Atkinson, Marlin J; Tarrant, Ann M

    2003-01-01

    Estrogens are ancient molecules that act as hormones in vertebrates and are biologically active in diverse animal phyla. Sewage contains natural and synthetic estrogens that are detectable in streams, rivers, and lakes. There are no studies reporting the distribution of steroidal estrogens in marine environments. We measured estrogens in sewage, injection-well water, and coastal tropical and offshore tropical water in the Pacific Ocean, western Atlantic Ocean, and Caribbean Sea. Concentrations of unconjugated estrone ranged from undetectable (< 40 pg/L) in the open ocean to nearly 2,000 pg/L in Key West, Florida, and Rehoboth Bay, Delaware (USA); estrone concentrations were highest near sources of sewage. Enzymatic hydrolysis of steroid conjugates in seawater samples indicated that polar conjugates comprise one-half to two-thirds of "total estrone" (unconjugated plus conjugated) in Hawaiian coastal samples. Adsorption to basalt gravel and carbonate sand was less than 20% per week and indicates that estrogens can easily leach into the marine environment from septic fields and high-estrogen groundwater. Of 20 sites (n = 129 samples), the mean values from 12 sites were above the threshold concentration for uptake into coral, indicating that there is a net uptake of anthropogenic steroidal estrogen into these environments, with unknown impacts. PMID:12676611

  13. Estrogen Receptors, the Hippocampus, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Linda A.; Ianov, Lara; Foster, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol effects on memory depend on hormone levels and the interaction of different estrogen receptors within neural circuits. Estradiol induces gene transcription and rapid membrane signaling mediated by estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), estrogen receptor-beta (ERβ), and a recently characterized G-protein coupled estrogen receptor, each with distinct distributions and ability to influence estradiol-dependent signaling. Investigations using receptor specific agonists suggest that all three receptors rapidly activate kinase-signaling and have complex dose-dependent influences on memory. Research employing receptor knockout mice demonstrate that ERα maintains transcription and memory as estradiol levels decline. This work indicates a regulatory role of ERβ in transcription and cognition, which depends on estradiol levels and the function of ERα. The regulatory role of ERβ is due in part to ERβ acting as a negative regulator of ERα-mediated transcription. Vector-mediated expression of estrogen receptors in the hippocampus provides an innovative research approach and suggests that memory depends on the relative expression of ERα and ERβ interacting with estradiol levels. Notably, the ability of estradiol to improve cognition declines with advanced age along with decreased expression of estrogen receptors. Thus, it will be important for future research to determine the mechanisms that regulate estrogen receptor expression during aging. PMID:24510074

  14. Estrogens from sewage in coastal marine environments.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Shannon; Atkinson, Marlin J; Tarrant, Ann M

    2003-04-01

    Estrogens are ancient molecules that act as hormones in vertebrates and are biologically active in diverse animal phyla. Sewage contains natural and synthetic estrogens that are detectable in streams, rivers, and lakes. There are no studies reporting the distribution of steroidal estrogens in marine environments. We measured estrogens in sewage, injection-well water, and coastal tropical and offshore tropical water in the Pacific Ocean, western Atlantic Ocean, and Caribbean Sea. Concentrations of unconjugated estrone ranged from undetectable (< 40 pg/L) in the open ocean to nearly 2,000 pg/L in Key West, Florida, and Rehoboth Bay, Delaware (USA); estrone concentrations were highest near sources of sewage. Enzymatic hydrolysis of steroid conjugates in seawater samples indicated that polar conjugates comprise one-half to two-thirds of "total estrone" (unconjugated plus conjugated) in Hawaiian coastal samples. Adsorption to basalt gravel and carbonate sand was less than 20% per week and indicates that estrogens can easily leach into the marine environment from septic fields and high-estrogen groundwater. Of 20 sites (n = 129 samples), the mean values from 12 sites were above the threshold concentration for uptake into coral, indicating that there is a net uptake of anthropogenic steroidal estrogen into these environments, with unknown impacts. PMID:12676611

  15. PTEN overexpression attenuates angiogenic processes of endothelial cells by blockade of endothelin-1/endothelin B receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Chun-Yao; Lam, Hing-Chung; Lin, Pey-Ru; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Tseng, Jui-Cheng; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Hsu, Te-Fa; Wu, Chia-Ching; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2012-04-01

    Arteriovenous (AV) graft is frequently used as vascular access in hemodialysis patients. However, clotting or thrombosis of AV grafts often occurs and requires surgical removal. At present, the molecular pathogenesis underlying thrombosis of AV graft is not clear. The PTEN/Akt signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. In this study, elevated PTEN expression and concomitant Akt inactivation was observed in endothelium of atherosclerotic brachial arteries from hemodialysis patients. To investigate whether PTEN upregulation affects endothelial function, adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) overexpression was performed in aorta rings and cultured endothelial cells. It was found that PTEN overexpression potently inhibited the microvessel sprouting in aorta rings and the angiogenic activities of endothelial cells including migration and tube formation. On the contrary, PTEN knockdown by RNA interference promoted the endothelial migration and reversed the Ad-PTEN-induced inhibition of endothelial migration. Expression analysis showed that PTEN overexpression attenuated the expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelin B receptor (ETBR) in endothelial cells at transcriptional levels. However, exogenous ET-1 supply only partially reversed the PTEN-induced inhibition of migration and tube formation. This was delineated due to that PTEN overexpression also perturbed endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. In summary, PTEN upregulation induces endothelial dysfunction by attenuating the availability and signaling of multiple angiogenic pathways in endothelial cells, thereby may contribute to thrombosis of AV graft.

  16. Cardioprotective role of vitamin D receptor in circulating endothelial cells of ApoE-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Liao, Wang; Yi, Zhuwen; Xiang, Wei; He, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the key course of coronary heart disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of vitamin D receptor on serum 1,25-(OH)2D levels, lipid profiles, nitric oxide expression, apoptosis-related gene Bcl-2, fas protein levels, in ApoE-deficient mice. The proliferation activity of VDR-RNAi transfected endothelial cells was decreased, the ability of apoptosis was increased, nitric oxide concentration was decreased and eNOS protein level was significantly reduced. VDR-RNAi induced lipid metabolism abnormality, reduced eNOS and ApoE levels, promoted lipid peroxidation, damaged the endothelial function and accelerated the process of atheroscleros. Together, our data presented a novel role for VDR in the pathogenesis process of atheroscleros by up regulating eNOS protein expression which could lay a solid foundation of VDR-specific activator treatment for coronary artery disease. PMID:26131079

  17. Extract of Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus induces angiogenesis in vitro and activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Wei, Jianteng; Wang, Hui; Ding, Lili; Zhang, Yuyan; Lin, Xiukun

    2012-09-01

    Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus has long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in oriental medicine. The angiogentic activity of the extract of M. meretrix was investigated in this study, using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Extract of M. meretrix Linnaeus (AFG-25) was prepared with acetone and ethanol precipitation, and further separated by Sephadex G-25 column. The results show that AFG-25 promoted proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation in HUVECs, and in the presence of eNOS inhibitor NMA, the tube formation induced by AFG-25 is inhibited significantly. Moreover, AFG-25 could also promote the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the resultant elevation of nitric oxide (NO) production. The results suggested that M. meretrix contains active ingredients with angiogentic activity and eNOS/NO signal pathway is in part involved in the proangiogenesis effect induced by AFG-25.

  18. Inhibition of spinal constitutive NOS-2 by 1400W attenuates tissue injury and inflammation-induced hyperalgesia and spinal p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qingbo; Svensson, Camilla I; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Webb, Michael; Yaksh, Tony L; Hua, Xiao-Ying

    2007-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its synthesizing enzymes, including NO synthase-2 (NOS-2, also called inducible NOS, iNOS), have been implicated in spinal nociception. 1400W is a highly selective NOS-2 inhibitor, as compared with either NOS-1 (neuronal NOS, nNOS) or NOS-3 (endothelial NOS). Here we examined the anti-nociceptive effects of intrathecal (IT) administration of 1400W in two experimental models of hyperalgesia (formalin and carrageenan models), in addition to the effect of 1400W on stimulation-induced activation of spinal p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38). IT treatment of rats with 1400W produced a dose-dependent inhibition of paw formalin-induced phase II flinches, and attenuated carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia. In contrast, IT injection of a selective inhibitor of NOS-1, nNOS inhibitor-I, had no effect in either model. Furthermore, 1400W at a dose that suppressed formalin-induced flinching behavior also blocked formalin-evoked p38 phosphorylation (activation) in the spinal cord, while nNOS inhibitor-I displayed no activity. The prompt effects of IT 1400W suggest involvement of constitutively expressed NOS-2 in spinal nociception. The NOS-2 protein in rat spinal cords was undetectable by Western blotting. However, when the protein was immunoprecipitated prior to Western blotting, NOS-2-immunoreactive bands were detected in the tissues, including naïve spinal cords. The presence of constitutive spinal NOS-2 was further confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, the present studies suggest that constitutively expressed spinal NOS-2 mediates tissue injury and inflammation-induced hyperalgesia, and that activation of p38 is one of the downstream factors in NO-mediated signaling in the initial processing of spinal nociception.

  19. The protective role of endogenous estrogens in carrageenan-induced lung injury in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cuzzocrea, S.; Mazzon, E.; Sautebin, L.; Serraino, I.; Dugo, L.; Calabró, G.; Caputi, A. P.; Maggi, A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have recently demonstrated that 17beta-estradiol (E2) inhibits the increase of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) activity in selected model systems such as macrophages, microglia, smooth muscle cells, and proposed that this effect might be associated with an anti-inflammatory activity of this hormone. Here we investigate the effects of endogenous estrogens in rats subjected to carrageenan-induced pleurisy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adult female rats were ovariectomized 3 weeks before the experiments to deplete circulating estrogens. Selected inflammatory markers, landmarks of the delayed phase of carrageenan-induced pleurisy, were measured in intact (N-OVX), and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. In addition, the effect of hormone replacement was evaluated in ovariectomized rats with intraperitoneal injection of 17beta-estradiol (E2; 50 microg/kg) 1 hr before carrageenan treatment (OVX + E2). RESULTS: Ovariectomy enhanced the carrageenan-induced degree of pleural exudation and polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration in rats subjected to carrageenan-induced pleurisy. Lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and lipid peroxidation were significantly increased in estrogens-deprived rats. The iNOS in lung samples was significantly increased by the surgery. The increase of iNOS activity was correlated with a marked enhancement in the production of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical analysis for P-selectin and ICAM-I, as well as nitrotyrosine and poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) revealed a positive staining in lungs from carrageenan-treated rats, which was markedly enhanced in ovariectomized rats when compared to cycling rats, particularly in the estrous phase of the cycle. Estrogen replacement counteracted the effect of surgery on all of the above indicators of lung inflammation, suggesting that in the cycling rat this hormone plays a key role in the increased sensitivity to inflammatory injury observed in the OVX rat. CONCLUSION: This study

  20. Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Endothelin-1 in Skin Tissue from Amputated Limbs of Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, J. George; Antonissen, Claudia Heijmans; Huygen, Frank J. P. M.; Zijlstra, Freek J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Impaired microcirculation during the chronic stage of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Endothelial dysfunction is suggested to be the main cause of diminished blood flow. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and endothelin-1(ET-1) relative to vascular density represented by the endothelial marker CD31-immunoreactivity in the skin tissue of patients with chronic CRPS. Methods. We performed immunohistochemical staining on sections of skin specimens obtained from the amputated limbs (one arm and one leg) of two patients with CRPS. Results. In comparison to proximal specimens we found an increased number of migrated endothelial cells as well as an increase of eNOS activity in distal dermis specimens. Conclusions. We found indications that endothelial dysfunction plays a role in chronic CRPS. PMID:18663383

  1. Depletion of NADP(H) due to CD38 activation triggers endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Levy A; Boslett, James; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; De Pascali, Francesco; Hemann, Craig; Druhan, Lawrence J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; El-Mahdy, Mohamed; Zweier, Jay L

    2015-09-15

    In the postischemic heart, coronary vasodilation is impaired due to loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Although the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is depleted, its repletion only partially restores eNOS-mediated coronary vasodilation, indicating that other critical factors trigger endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, studies were performed to characterize the unidentified factor(s) that trigger endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart. We observed that depletion of the eNOS substrate NADPH occurs in the postischemic heart with near total depletion from the endothelium, triggering impaired eNOS function and limiting BH4 rescue through NADPH-dependent salvage pathways. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30 min of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), depletion of the NADP(H) pool occurred and was most marked in the endothelium, with >85% depletion. Repletion of NADPH after I/R increased NOS-dependent coronary flow well above that with BH4 alone. With combined NADPH and BH4 repletion, full restoration of NOS-dependent coronary flow occurred. Profound endothelial NADPH depletion was identified to be due to marked activation of the NAD(P)ase-activity of CD38 and could be prevented by inhibition or specific knockdown of this protein. Depletion of the NADPH precursor, NADP(+), coincided with formation of 2'-phospho-ADP ribose, a CD38-derived signaling molecule. Inhibition of CD38 prevented NADP(H) depletion and preserved endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO generation with increased recovery of contractile function and decreased infarction in the postischemic heart. Thus, CD38 activation is an important cause of postischemic endothelial dysfunction and presents a novel therapeutic target for prevention of this dysfunction in unstable coronary syndromes.

  2. Fennel and anise as estrogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Albert-Puleo, M

    1980-12-01

    Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare, and anise, Pimpinella anisum, are plants which have been used as estrogenic agents for millennia. Specifically, they have been reputed to increase milk secretion, promote menstruation, facilitate birth, alleviate the symptoms of the male climacteric, and increase libido. In the 1930s, some interest was shown in these plants in the development of synthetic estrogens. The main constituent of the essential oils of fennel and anise, anethole, has been considered to be the active estrogenic agent. However, further research suggests that the actual pharmacologically active agents are polymers of anethole, such as dianethole and photoanethole. PMID:6999244

  3. [Study of estrogenic effects of promestriene].

    PubMed

    Gaudefroy, M; Pigache, J P

    1977-01-01

    Promestriene (3 propyl-ether-17 beta-methyl-ether of estradiol) a new estrogen molecule, conceived for local application has been formulated for gynecological use in a water soluble cream or lotion. The study of 27 women in advanced menopause lasted 20 weeks. In women with severe estrogen deficiencies the local application of promestriene induced a slight maturation of the trigonal or vaginal malpighian epithelium. It limited itself to a small growth of intermediary cells. There was a negligible action on the superficial cells. Linear regression analysis of different indices and maturation values according to Meisels and Hustin shows that even for prolonged treatments, there is little possibility of detrimental estrogenic action.

  4. Paradoxical effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on endothelial dysfunction in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Mei-Fang; Shen, Wei-Li; Wang, Jian; Yang, Jie; Yuan, Wen-Jun; He, Jin; Wu, Ping-Ping; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Lan; Higashino, Hideaki; Chen, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although both diabetes and hypertension are risk factors for cardiovascular disease, the role of hyperglycaemia per se in endothelial dysfunction is controversial. This study was designed to examine whether hyperglycaemia, or streptozotocin-induced diabetes, could aggravate endothelial dysfunction in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Hyperglycaemia was induced by streptozotocin in 2-month-old SHRSP and age-matched normotensive Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rats. The aorta was isolated 8 weeks after induction of hyperglycaemia to record its function and to examine its morphology with transmission electron microscopy. Endothelial/inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/iNOS) and inducible/constitutive haem oxygenase (HO-1/HO-2) levels were determined with Western blotting. Aortic endothelial function and production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were assayed after incubation in vitro in hyperglycaemic, hyperosmolar solution. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes of 8 weeks duration did not result in endothelial dysfunction in normotensive WKY rats. In contrast, hyperglycaemic WKY rats showed significantly enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, which was abrogated by simultaneous blocking of NOS and HO. The enhanced vasodilatation was associated with elevation of vascular eNOS and HO-1. Significant endothelial dysfunction and massive macrophage–monocyte infiltration were found in SHRSP aorta (the ratio of the number of macrophages to endothelial cells in the intima, expressed as a percentage, was 20.9 ± 2.8% in SHRSP versus 1.9 ± 0.5% in WKY rats, P < 0.01), which was attenuated significantly in hyperglycaemic SHRSP (11.3 ± 1.6%, P < 0.01 versus SHRSP). Acute hyperglycaemia (10 min) aggravated endothelial dysfunction in SHRSP, with a marked increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species and NO production. Sustained in vitro incubation in hyperglycaemic/hyperosmolar conditions (addition of an extra 50 mmol L−1 of glucose or

  5. Salt intake, endothelial cell signaling, and progression of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Paul W

    2004-02-01

    It has been known for decades that increased dietary intake of salt (NaCl) shortens the life span of rats in a dose-dependent fashion. This review focuses specifically on the recently described biological effect and consequences of increased salt ingestion on the endothelium through a mechanism that is independent of blood pressure. Changes in salt intake are recognized by endothelial cells in the vascular tree and glomeruli through a physical process that promotes a series of signaling events involved in transcriptional regulation of genes that include transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (NOS3). A balance is struck between TGF-beta1 and NOS3 as salt intake varies and creates a negative feedback loop, because TGF-beta1 increased expression of NOS3 and NO inhibited production of TGF-beta1 in healthy rats. Changes in this feedback system have been observed in salt-sensitive hypertension and appear to impact end-organ damage, particularly the kidney. The data support an important benefit to reduction of salt intake in the setting of chronic kidney disease.

  6. Estrogen-related Receptor β Reduces the Subnuclear Mobility of Estrogen Receptor α and Suppresses Estrogen-dependent Cellular Function*

    PubMed Central

    Tanida, Takashi; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Yamada, Shunji; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that has strong homology with estrogen receptor (ER) α. ERR has three subtypes (α, β, and γ) expressed in estrogen-sensitive organs, including ovary, breast, and brain. No endogenous ligands of ERRs have been identified, but these receptors share a common DNA element with ERα and control estrogen-mediated gene transcription. Recent evidence suggests a role of ERRs in estrogen-related pathophysiology, but the detailed mechanisms of ERR functions in estrogen-related tissues are unclear. Using live-cell imaging with fluorescent protein labeling, we found that only ERRβ among the ERRs exhibits a punctate intranuclear pattern overlapping with ERα following 17β-estradiol (E2)-stimulation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed significant reduction of the mobility of ligand-activated ERα with co-expression of ERRβ. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer revealed that ERRβ directly interacts with ERα. The N-terminal domain of ERRβ was identified as the region that interacts with ERα. We also found a correlation between punctate cluster formation of ERα and interaction between the receptors. Expression of ERRβ significantly repressed ERα-mediated transactivity, whereas that of other ERR subtypes had no effect on the transactivity of ERα. Consistent with this finding, E2-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells and bcl-2 expression was significantly inhibited by expression of ERRβ. These results provide strong evidence for a suppressive effect of ERRβ on estrogen signaling through reduction of the intranuclear mobility of ERα. The findings further suggest a unique inhibitory role for ERRβ in estrogen-dependent cellular function such as cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25805499

  7. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  8. Overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in arteries infused with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Du, Liang; Flynn, Rowan; Dronadula, Nagadhara; Zhang, Jingwan; Kim, Francis; Dichek, David

    2012-11-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ad) are useful tools for in vivo gene transfer into endothelial cells. However, endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired after Ad infusion, and this impairment is not prevented by use of advanced-generation "helper-dependent" (HD) Ad that lack all viral genes. We hypothesized that endothelium-dependent vasodilation could be improved in Ad-infused arteries by overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). We tested this hypothesis in hyperlipidemic, atherosclerosis-prone rabbits because HDAd will likely be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. Moreover, the consequences of eNOS overexpression might differ in normal and atherosclerosis-prone arteries and could include atherogenic effects, as reported in transgenic mice. We cloned rabbit eNOS and constructed an HDAd that expresses it. HDAdeNOS increased NO production by cultured endothelial cells and increased arterial eNOS mRNA in vivo by ∼10-fold. Compared to arteries infused with a control HDAd, HDAdeNOS-infused arteries of hyperlipidemic rabbits had significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and similar responses to phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Moreover, infusion of HDAdeNOS had local atheroprotective effects including large, significant decreases in intimal lipid accumulation and arterial tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression (p≤0.04 for both). HDAdeNOS infusion yields a durable (≥2 weeks) increase in arterial eNOS expression, improves vasomotor function, and reduces artery wall inflammation and lipid accumulation. Addition of an eNOS expression cassette improves the performance of HDAd, has no harmful effects, and may reduce atherosclerotic lesion growth.

  9. The expression of estrogen receptor and estrogen effect in MBA-15 marrow stromal osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Knopov, V; Benayahu, D

    1996-06-01

    MBA-15, a marrow stromal-derived cell line, was shown to express an estrogen receptor. This finding was confirmed by in situ hybridization and receptor binding assay. An exposure to estrogen (10(-12)-10(-6) M) in a dose response manner resulted in a decrease of cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. Cell function was measured by enzymatic activities of two osteoblastic markers, CD10/NEP and alkaline phosphatase. These enzymatic activities were elevated following the estrogen treatment. This model enabled direct evaluation of the estrogen effect on stromal osteoblast cells. PMID:8858824

  10. Concentration of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Increasing evidence also supports their involvement in the development of certain lung, colon and prostate cancers. Methods In this study we systemically surveyed endogenous estrogen and estrogen metabolite levels in each of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, which include human breast, central nerve system, colon, ovarian, prostate, kidney and non-small cell lung cancers, as well as melanomas and leukemia. The absolute abundances of these metabolites were measured using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method that has been previously utilized for biological fluids such as serum and urine. Results Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites were found in all NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and some were substantially elevated and exceeded the levels found in well known estrogen-dependent and estrogen receptor-positive tumor cells such as MCF-7 and T-47D. While estrogens were expected to be present at high levels in cell lines representing the female reproductive system (that is, breast and ovarian), other cell lines, such as leukemia and colon, also contained very high levels of these steroid hormones. The leukemia cell line RMPI-8226 contained the highest levels of estrone (182.06 pg/106 cells) and 17β-estradiol (753.45 pg/106 cells). In comparison, the ovarian cancer cell line with the highest levels of these estrogens contained only 19.79 and 139.32 pg/106 cells of estrone and 17β-estradiol, respectively. The highest levels of estrone and 17β-estradiol in breast cancer cell lines were only 8.45 and 87.37 pg/106 cells in BT-549 and T-47D cells, respectively. Conclusions The data provided evidence for the presence of significant amounts of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in cell lines not commonly associated with these steroid hormones. This broad discovery of

  11. Obesity, Inflammation, and Exercise Training: Relative Contribution of iNOS and eNOS in the Modulation of Vascular Function in the Mouse Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Josiane F.; Correa, Izabella C.; Diniz, Thiago F.; Lima, Paulo M.; Santos, Roger L.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The understanding of obsesity-related vascular dysfunction remains controversial mainly because of the diseases associated with vascular injury. Exercise training is known to prevent vascular dysfunction. Using an obesity model without comorbidities, we aimed at investigating the underlying mechanism of vascular dysfunction and how exercise interferes with this process. Methods: High-sugar diet was used to induce obesity in mice. Exercise training was performed 5 days/week. Body weight, energy intake, and adipose tissues were assessed; blood metabolic and hormonal parameters were determined; and serum TNFα was measured. Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed by plethysmography. Changes in aortic isometric tension were recorded on myograph. Western blot was used to analyze protein expression. Nitric oxide (NO) was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were used for inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) knockdown. Results: Body weight, fat mass, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, insulin, and leptin were higher in the sedentary obese group (SD) than in the sedentary control animals (SS). Exercise training prevented these changes. No difference in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, and heart rate was found. Decreased vascular relaxation and reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) functioning in the SD group were prevented by exercise. Contractile response to phenylephrine was decreased in the aortas of the wild SD mice, compared with that of the SS group; however, no alteration was noted in the SD iNOS−/− animals. The decreased contractility was endothelium-dependent, and was reverted by iNOS inhibition or iNOS silencing. The aortas from the SD group showed increased basal NO production, serum TNFα, TNF receptor-1, and phospho-IκB. Exercise training attenuated iNOS-dependent reduction in contractile response in high-sugar diet–fed animals

  12. Obesity, Inflammation, and Exercise Training: Relative Contribution of iNOS and eNOS in the Modulation of Vascular Function in the Mouse Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Josiane F.; Correa, Izabella C.; Diniz, Thiago F.; Lima, Paulo M.; Santos, Roger L.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The understanding of obsesity-related vascular dysfunction remains controversial mainly because of the diseases associated with vascular injury. Exercise training is known to prevent vascular dysfunction. Using an obesity model without comorbidities, we aimed at investigating the underlying mechanism of vascular dysfunction and how exercise interferes with this process. Methods: High-sugar diet was used to induce obesity in mice. Exercise training was performed 5 days/week. Body weight, energy intake, and adipose tissues were assessed; blood metabolic and hormonal parameters were determined; and serum TNFα was measured. Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed by plethysmography. Changes in aortic isometric tension were recorded on myograph. Western blot was used to analyze protein expression. Nitric oxide (NO) was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were used for inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) knockdown. Results: Body weight, fat mass, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, insulin, and leptin were higher in the sedentary obese group (SD) than in the sedentary control animals (SS). Exercise training prevented these changes. No difference in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, and heart rate was found. Decreased vascular relaxation and reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) functioning in the SD group were prevented by exercise. Contractile response to phenylephrine was decreased in the aortas of the wild SD mice, compared with that of the SS group; however, no alteration was noted in the SD iNOS−/− animals. The decreased contractility was endothelium-dependent, and was reverted by iNOS inhibition or iNOS silencing. The aortas from the SD group showed increased basal NO production, serum TNFα, TNF receptor-1, and phospho-IκB. Exercise training attenuated iNOS-dependent reduction in contractile response in high-sugar diet–fed animals

  13. The Subcellular Compartmentalization of Arginine Metabolizing Enzymes and Their Role in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Lucas, Rudolf; Fulton, David

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through the conversion of its substrate, l-arginine to l-citrulline. Reduced access to l-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2) metabolize l-arginine to generate l-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of l-arginine. Indeed, supplemental l-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, this simple relationship is complicated by observations that l-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis. Accordingly, the subcellular compartmentalization of intracellular l-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of pools or pockets of l-arginine. In agreement with this, there is considerable evidence supporting the importance of the subcellular localization of l-arginine metabolizing enzymes. In endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localization inside the cell. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, arginosuccinate lyase, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. Herein, we

  14. Role of Heat Shock Protein 90 and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase during Early Anesthetic and Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Amour, Julien; Brzezinska, Anna K.; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Billstrom, Amie R.; Zielonka, Jacek; Krolikowski, John G.; Bienengraeber, Martin W.; Warltier, David C.; Pratt, Philip F.; Kersten, Judy R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide is known to be essential for early anesthetic (APC) and ischemic (IPC) preconditioning of myocardium. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Hsp90-eNOS interactions modulate APC and IPC. Methods Myocardial infarct size was measured in rabbits after coronary occlusion and reperfusion in the absence or presence of preconditioning with 30 min of isoflurane (APC) or 5 min of coronary artery occlusion (IPC), and with or without pre-treatment with geldanamycin or radicicol, two chemically distinct Hsp90 inhibitors, or NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester, a non-specific NOS inhibitor. Isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production was measured (ozone chemiluminescence) in human coronary artery endothelial cells or mouse cardiomyocytes, in the absence or presence of Hsp90 inhibitors or NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester. Interactions between Hsp90 and eNOS, and eNOS activation were assessed with immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy. Results APC and IPC decreased infarct size (50% and 59%, respectively) and this action was abolished by Hsp90 inhibitors. NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester blocked APC but not IPC. Isoflurane increased nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells, concomitantly with an increase in Hsp90-eNOS interaction (immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry). Pretreatment with Hsp90 inhibitors abolished isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production and decreased Hsp90-eNOS interactions. Isoflurane did not increase nitric oxide production in mouse cardiomyocytes and eNOS was below the level of detection. Conclusion The results indicate that Hsp90 plays a critical role in mediating APC and IPC through protein-protein interactions, and suggest that endothelial cells are important contributors to nitric oxide-mediated signalling during APC. PMID:19194158

  15. Bioinformatics Analysis of Estrogen-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Handel, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that plays critical roles in a myriad of intracellular pathways. The expression of many genes is regulated through the steroid hormone receptors ESR1 and ESR2. These bind to DNA and modulate the expression of target genes. Identification of estrogen target genes is greatly facilitated by the use of transcriptomic methods, such as RNA-seq and expression microarrays, and chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). Combining transcriptomic and ChIP-seq data enables a distinction to be drawn between direct and indirect estrogen target genes. This chapter discusses some methods of identifying estrogen target genes that do not require any expertise in programming languages or complex bioinformatics. PMID:26585125

  16. The return of the Scarlet Pimpernel: cobalamin in inflammation II - cobalamins can both selectively promote all three nitric oxide synthases (NOS), particularly iNOS and eNOS, and, as needed, selectively inhibit iNOS and nNOS.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-09-01

    The up-regulation of transcobalamins [hitherto posited as indicating a central need for cobalamin (Cbl) in inflammation], whose expression, like inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is Sp1- and interferondependent, together with increased intracellular formation of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl), methylcobalamin (MeCbl), may be essential for the timely promotion and later selective inhibition of iNOS and concordant regulation of endothelial and neuronal NOS (eNOS/nNOS.) Cbl may ensure controlled high output of nitric oxide (NO) and its safe deployment, because: (1) Cbl is ultimately responsible for the synthesis or availability of the NOS substrates and cofactors heme, arginine, BH(4) flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavin mononucleotide (FAD/FMN) and NADPH, via the far-reaching effects of the two Cbl coenzymes, methionine synthase (MS) and methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MCoAM) in, or on, the folate, glutathione, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and urea cycles, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. Deficiency of any of theNOS substrates and cofactors results in 'uncoupled' NOS reactions, decreasedNO production and increased or excessive O(2) (-), H(2)O(2), ONOO(-) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitric oxide species (RNIS) leading to pathology. (2) Cbl is also the overlooked ultimate determinant of positive glutathione status, which favours the formation of more benign NO species, s-nitrosothiols, the predominant form in which NO is safely deployed. Cbl status may consequently act as a 'back-up disc' that ensures the active status of antioxidant systems, as well as reversing and modulating the effects of nitrosylation in cell signal transduction.New evidence shows that GSCbl can significantly promote iNOS/ eNOS NO synthesis in the early stages of inflammation, thus lowering high levels of tumour necrosis factor-a that normally result in pathology, while existing evidence shows that in extreme

  17. The return of the Scarlet Pimpernel: cobalamin in inflammation II — cobalamins can both selectively promote all three nitric oxide synthases (NOS), particularly iNOS and eNOS, and, as needed, selectively inhibit iNOS and nNOS

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The up-regulation of transcobalamins [hitherto posited as indicating a central need for cobalamin (Cbl) in inflammation], whose expression, like inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is Sp1- and interferondependent, together with increased intracellular formation of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl), methylcobalamin (MeCbl), may be essential for the timely promotion and later selective inhibition of iNOS and concordant regulation of endothelial and neuronal NOS (eNOS/nNOS.) Cbl may ensure controlled high output of nitric oxide (NO) and its safe deployment, because: (1) Cbl is ultimately responsible for the synthesis or availability of the NOS substrates and cofactors heme, arginine, BH4 flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavin mononucleotide (FAD/FMN) and NADPH, via the far-reaching effects of the two Cbl coenzymes, methionine synthase (MS) and methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MCoAM) in, or on, the folate, glutathione, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and urea cycles, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. Deficiency of any of theNOS substrates and cofactors results in ‘uncoupled’ NOS reactions, decreasedNO production and increased or excessive O2−, H2O2, ONOO− and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitric oxide species (RNIS) leading to pathology. (2) Cbl is also the overlooked ultimate determinant of positive glutathione status, which favours the formation of more benign NO species, s-nitrosothiols, the predominant form in which NO is safely deployed. Cbl status may consequently act as a ‘back-up disc’ that ensures the active status of antioxidant systems, as well as reversing and modulating the effects of nitrosylation in cell signal transduction.New evidence shows that GSCbl can significantly promote iNOS/ eNOS NO synthesis in the early stages of inflammation, thus lowering high levels of tumour necrosis factor-a that normally result in pathology, while existing evidence shows that in extreme

  18. Pyrolysis of wastewater biosolids significantly reduces estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T C; Zitomer, D H; McNamara, P J

    2016-11-01

    Most wastewater treatment processes are not specifically designed to remove micropollutants. Many micropollutants are hydrophobic so they remain in the biosolids and are discharged to the environment through land-application of biosolids. Micropollutants encompass a broad range of organic chemicals, including estrogenic compounds (natural and synthetic) that reside in the environment, a.k.a. environmental estrogens. Public concern over land application of biosolids stemming from the occurrence of micropollutants hampers the value of biosolids which are important to wastewater treatment plants as a valuable by-product. This research evaluated pyrolysis, the partial decomposition of organic material in an oxygen-deprived system under high temperatures, as a biosolids treatment process that could remove estrogenic compounds from solids while producing a less hormonally active biochar for soil amendment. The estrogenicity, measured in estradiol equivalents (EEQ) by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, of pyrolyzed biosolids was compared to primary and anaerobically digested biosolids. The estrogenic responses from primary solids and anaerobically digested solids were not statistically significantly different, but pyrolysis of anaerobically digested solids resulted in a significant reduction in EEQ; increasing pyrolysis temperature from 100°C to 500°C increased the removal of EEQ with greater than 95% removal occurring at or above 400°C. This research demonstrates that biosolids treatment with pyrolysis would substantially decrease (removal>95%) the estrogens associated with this biosolids product. Thus, pyrolysis of biosolids can be used to produce a valuable soil amendment product, biochar, that minimizes discharge of estrogens to the environment. PMID:27344259

  19. Estrogenic activity in Finnish municipal wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Välitalo, Pia; Perkola, Noora; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Sillanpää, Markus; Kuckelkorn, Jochen; Mikola, Anna; Hollert, Henner; Schultz, Eija

    2016-01-01

    Effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a major source of estrogenic compounds to the aquatic environment. In the present work, estrogenic activities of effluents from eight municipal WWTPs in Finland were studied. The main objectives of the study were to quantify the concentrations of selected estrogenic compounds, to evaluate their contribution to estrogenic potency and to test the feasibility of the commercial bioassays for wastewater analysis. The effluent samples were analyzed by two in vitro tests, i.e. ERα-CALUX(®) and ELISA-E2, and by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for six estrogenic compounds: estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17α-estradiol and bisphenol A (BPA). Estrogenic effects were found in all of the effluent samples with both of the bioassays. The concentrations measured with ELISA-E2 (8.6-61.6 ng/L) were clearly higher but exhibited a similar pattern than those with chemical analysis (E2 estrogenic potency was possible only for E1 and BPA, which contributed less than 10% to the observed effects, except in one sample with a high BPA contribution (17%). The contribution of E2 was significant in two samples where it was detected (28% and 67%). The results demonstrated that more comprehensive information on potential estrogenic activity of wastewater effluents can be achieved by using in vitro biotests in addition to chemical analysis and their use would be beneficial in monitoring and screening purposes. PMID:26584345

  20. Effect of cigarette smoke extract on nitric oxide synthase in pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Y; Han, W; Giraldo, C; De Li, Y; Block, E R

    1998-11-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation and reduced nitric oxide (NO) in the exhaled air of smokers. To explore the mechanism for the impairment of NO-mediated vasodilation, we studied the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on NO synthase (eNOS) activity and content in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC). Incubation of PAEC with CSE resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in eNOS activity. The inhibitory effect of CSE on eNOS activity was not reversible. Both gas-phase and particulate-phase extracts of CSE contributed to the inhibition of eNOS activity. The protein kinase c (PKC) inhibitors staurosporine and chelerythrine did not affect the CSE-induced inhibition of eNOS activity. Catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), vitamin C, vitamin E, glutathione, and dithiothreitol (DTT) also did not prevent the CSE-induced inhibition of eNOS activity, and incubation of PAEC with 3 mM nicotine did not change the activity of eNOS. Treatment of PAEC with CSE also caused a nonreversible, time-dependent decrease in eNOS protein content detected by Western blot analysis, and in eNOS messenger RNA (mRNA) detected by Northern blot analysis. Treatment of PAEC with CSE had no effect on cell protein or glutathione contents or on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. These results indicate that exposure to CSE causes an irreversible inhibition of eNOS activity in PAEC, and suggest that the decreased activity is secondary to reduced eNOS protein mass and mRNA. The decrease in eNOS activity may contribute to the high risk of pulmonary and cardiovascular disease in cigarette smokers. PMID:9806747

  1. Noncholinergic penile erection in mice lacking the gene for endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Arthur L; Chang, Alex G; Crone, Julie K; Huang, Paul L; Sezen, Sena E

    2002-01-01

    With the current understanding that nitric oxide (NO) mediates penile erection, the endothelial isoform of NO synthase (eNOS) has been implicated in this function. We undertook this study applying transgenic mice with targeted deletion of the eNOS gene (eNOS-/- mice) as an experimental approach to evaluate the importance of eNOS in cholinergically stimulated erectile function in vivo. Combined pharmacostimulation with intracavernosal carbachol (3 ng) administration and submaximal cavernous nerve (CN) electrical stimulation (16 Hz, 5 millisecond, 1 V) simultaneous with intracavernosal pressure (ICP) monitoring, and both biochemical assay of NO synthase activity and Western blot analysis of eNOS protein content in penile tissue, were performed on eNOS-/- mice and wild-type controls. Combined intracavernosal carbachol administration and submaximal CN electrical stimulation raised the recorded ICP, elicited by CN electrical stimulation alone in wild-type mice (from 35.7 +/- 2.7 to 48.1 +/- 5.5 mm Hg, P < .05) but not in eNOS-/ - mice (from 54.9 +/- 6.3 to 51.0 +/- 9.5 mm Hg, not significant [NS]). Pretreatment with the nonselective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 mg intracavernosally) blocked electrically stimulated ICP responses in eNOS-/- mice to baseline levels (37.8 +/- 4.4 vs 12.7 +/- 4.0 mm Hg, P < .05). In penes of eNOS-/- mice, approximately 60% NO synthase activity of wild-type penis levels was retained (NS), and eNOS protein was absent. We concluded that eNOS-/- mice preserve erectile function on the basis of a noncholinergic but NO-dependent mechanism and that eNOS physiologically mediates penile erection under cholinergic stimulation. PMID:11780929

  2. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by agmatine after transient global cerebral ischemia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mun, Chin Hee; Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2010-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a protective role in cerebral ischemia by maintaining vascular permeability, whereas NO derived from neuronal and inducible NOS is neurotoxic and can participate in neuronal damage occurring in ischemia. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are up-regulated by ischemic injury and degrade the basement membrane if brain vessels to promote cell death and tissue injury. We previously reported that agmatine, synthesized from L-arginine by arginine decarboxylase (ADC) which is expressed in endothelial cells, has shown a direct increased eNOS expression and decreased MMPs expression in bEnd3 cells. But, there are few reports about the regulation of eNOS by agmatine in ischemic animal model. In the present study, we examined the expression of eNOS and MMPs by agmatine treatment after transient global ischemia in vivo. Global ischemia was induced with four vessel occlusion (4-VO) and agmatine (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at the onset of reperfusion. The animals were euthanized at 6 and 24 hours after global ischemia and prepared for other analysis. Global ischemia led severe neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but agmatine treatment protected neurons from ischemic injury. Moreover, the level and expression of eNOS was increased by agmatine treatment, whereas inducible NOS (iNOS) and MMP-9 protein expressions were decreased in the brain. These results suggest that agmatine protects microvessels in the brain by activation eNOS as well as reduces extracellular matrix degradation during the early phase of ischemic insult.

  3. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by agmatine after transient global cerebral ischemia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mun, Chin Hee; Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2010-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a protective role in cerebral ischemia by maintaining vascular permeability, whereas NO derived from neuronal and inducible NOS is neurotoxic and can participate in neuronal damage occurring in ischemia. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are up-regulated by ischemic injury and degrade the basement membrane if brain vessels to promote cell death and tissue injury. We previously reported that agmatine, synthesized from L-arginine by arginine decarboxylase (ADC) which is expressed in endothelial cells, has shown a direct increased eNOS expression and decreased MMPs expression in bEnd3 cells. But, there are few reports about the regulation of eNOS by agmatine in ischemic animal model. In the present study, we examined the expression of eNOS and MMPs by agmatine treatment after transient global ischemia in vivo. Global ischemia was induced with four vessel occlusion (4-VO) and agmatine (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at the onset of reperfusion. The animals were euthanized at 6 and 24 hours after global ischemia and prepared for other analysis. Global ischemia led severe neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but agmatine treatment protected neurons from ischemic injury. Moreover, the level and expression of eNOS was increased by agmatine treatment, whereas inducible NOS (iNOS) and MMP-9 protein expressions were decreased in the brain. These results suggest that agmatine protects microvessels in the brain by activation eNOS as well as reduces extracellular matrix degradation during the early phase of ischemic insult. PMID:21212863

  4. Human red blood cells at work: identification and visualization of erythrocytic eNOS activity in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Sansone, Roberto; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Thasian-Sivarajah, Sivatharsini; Krenz, Thomas; Horn, Patrick; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk; Heiß, Christian; Kröncke, Klaus-Dietrich; Hogg, Neil; Feelisch, Martin; Kelm, Malte

    2012-11-15

    A nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like activity has been demonstrated in human red blood cells (RBCs), but doubts about its functional significance, isoform identity and disease relevance remain. Using flow cytometry in combination with the nitric oxide (NO)-imaging probe DAF-FM we find that all blood cells form NO intracellularly, with a rank order of monocytes > neutrophils > lymphocytes > RBCs > platelets. The observation of a NO-related fluorescence within RBCs was unexpected given the abundance of the NO-scavenger oxyhemoglobin. Constitutive normoxic NO formation was abolished by NOS inhibition and intracellular NO scavenging, confirmed by laser-scanning microscopy and unequivocally validated by detection of the DAF-FM reaction product with NO using HPLC and LC-MS/MS. Using immunoprecipitation, ESI-MS/MS-based peptide sequencing and enzymatic assay we further demonstrate that human RBCs contain an endothelial NOS (eNOS) that converts L-(3)H-arginine to L-(3)H-citrulline in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent fashion. Moreover, in patients with coronary artery disease, red cell eNOS expression and activity are both lower than in age-matched healthy individuals and correlate with the degree of endothelial dysfunction. Thus, human RBCs constitutively produce NO under normoxic conditions via an active eNOS isoform, the activity of which is compromised in patients with coronary artery disease.

  5. Estrogen effects in allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Rana S.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Asthma prevalence and severity are greater in women than in men, and mounting evidence suggests this is in part related to female steroid sex hormones. Of these, estrogen has been the subject of much study. This review highlights recent research exploring the effects of estrogen in allergic disease. Recent findings Estrogen receptors are found on numerous immunoregulatory cells and estrogen’s actions skew immune responses toward allergy. It may act directly to create deleterious effects in asthma, or indirectly via modulation of various pathways including secretory leukoprotease inhibitor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel and nitric oxide production to exert effects on lung mechanics and inflammation. Not only do endogenous estrogens appear to play a role, but environmental estrogens have also been implicated. Environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens) including bisphenol A and phthalates enhance allergic sensitization in animal models and may enhance development of atopic disorders like asthma in humans. Summary Estrogen’s role in allergic disease remains complex. As allergic diseases continue to increase in prevalence and affect women disproportionately, gaining a fuller understanding of its effects in these disorders will be essential. Of particular importance may be effects of xenoestrogens on allergic disease. PMID:23090385

  6. Estrogen Biosynthesis and Action in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mungenast, Felicitas; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is still the deadliest of all gynecologic malignancies in women worldwide. This is attributed to two main features of these tumors, namely, (i) a diagnosis at an advanced tumor stage, and, (ii) the rapid onset of resistance to standard chemotherapy after an initial successful therapy with platin- and taxol-derivatives. Therefore, novel targets for an early diagnosis and better treatment options for these tumors are urgently needed. Epidemiological data show that induction and biology of ovarian cancer is related to life-time estrogen exposure. Also experimental data reveal that ovarian cancer cells share a number of estrogen regulated pathways with other hormone-dependent cancers, e.g., breast and endometrial cancer. However, ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and the subtypes are quite different with respect to mutations, origins, behaviors, markers, and prognosis and respond differently to standard chemotherapy. Therefore, a characterization of ovarian cancer subtypes may lead to better treatment options for the various subtypes and in particular for the most frequently observed high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. For this intention, further studies on estrogen-related pathways and estrogen formation in ovarian cancer cells are warranted. The review gives an overview on ovarian cancer subtypes and explains the role of estrogen in ovarian cancer. Furthermore, enzymes active to synthesize and metabolize estrogens are described and strategies to target these pathways are discussed. PMID:25429284

  7. The molecular, cellular and clinical consequences of targeting the estrogen receptor following estrogen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ping; Maximov, Philipp Y; Curpan, Ramona F; Abderrahman, Balkees; Jordan, V Craig

    2015-12-15

    During the past 20 years our understanding of the control of breast tumor development, growth and survival has changed dramatically. The once long forgotten application of high dose synthetic estrogen therapy as the first chemical therapy to treat any cancer has been resurrected, refined and reinvented as the new biology of estrogen-induced apoptosis. High dose estrogen therapy was cast aside once tamoxifen, from its origins as a failed "morning after pill", was reinvented as the first targeted therapy to treat any cancer. The current understanding of the mechanism of estrogen-induced apoptosis is described as a consequence of acquired resistance to long term antihormone therapy in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. The ER signal transduction pathway remains a target for therapy in breast cancer despite "antiestrogen" resistance, but becomes a regulator of resistance. Multiple mechanisms of resistance come into play: Selective ER modulator (SERM) stimulated growth, growth factor/ER crosstalk, estrogen-induced apoptosis and mutations of ER. But it is with the science of estrogen-induced apoptosis that the next innovation in women's health will be developed. Recent evidence suggests that the glucocorticoid properties of medroxyprogesterone acetate blunt estrogen-induced apoptosis in estrogen deprived breast cancer cell populations. As a result breast cancer develops during long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A new synthetic progestin with estrogen-like properties, such as the 19 nortestosterone derivatives used in oral contraceptives, will continue to protect the uterus from unopposed estrogen stimulation but at the same time, reinforce apoptosis in vulnerable populations of nascent breast cancer cells.

  8. Mixed estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activities of yuehchukene--a bis-indole alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Ng, P C; Ho, D D; Ng, K H; Kong, Y C; Cheng, K F; Stone, G

    1994-10-13

    Anti-estrogenic effects of yuehchukene were observed in rat uterotrophic, mice vaginal smear and MCF-7 cell growth assays. Whereas yuehchukene per se was estrogenic in these bioassay models, the co-administration of yuehchukene and an optimal dose of 3,17 beta-estradiol (estradiol) could attenuate the maximum estrogenic response due to estradiol alone. The anti-estrogenic effect of yuehchukene in rat uterine hypertrophy was corroborated by a parallel attenuation of ornithine decarboxylase activity in these tissues. Yuehchukene binds to rat, mice and MCF-7 cell estrogen receptors with a relative binding affinity of 1/150 to 1/300. This binding affinity was positively related to estrogenicity as determined by uterotrophic assay and MCF-7 cell growth. However, this estrogenic effect did not correlate with the degree of competitive receptor binding by a weaker agonist. Indole-3-carbinol and methylbutadienylindole could induce ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and estradiol-2-hydroxylase in rat liver and MCF-7 cells. It is postulated that the 'free' indole moiety of yuehchukene could possess similar induction activity. Thus yuehchukene may have a dual pharmacological function. While the intact molecule is a weak estrogen, the 'free' indole moiety in yuehchukene may induce an enhancement of estradiol-2-hydroxylase, thus terminating the biological activity of the endogenous estrogen pool. There is obvious benefit in attenuating the estrogen level in post-menopausal breast cancer patients without going directly to the use of tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor. Yuehchukene may serve this purpose. In this context, the pharmacological evaluation of a hydroxylated yuehchukene analogue and the anti-estrogenic effect of methylbutadienylindole acid-condensation products are now being studied in earnest.

  9. Estrogenic activity assessment of environmental chemicals using in vitro assays: identification of two new estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Lascombe, I; Beffa, D; Rüegg, U; Tarradellas, J; Wahli, W

    2000-01-01

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activities have been suggested to be associated with deleterious effects in animals and humans. To characterize estrogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action, we established in vitro and cell culture assays that detect human estrogen receptor [alpha] (hER[alpha])-mediated estrogenicity. First, we assayed chemicals to determine their ability to modulate direct interaction between the hER[alpha] and the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and in a competition binding assay to displace 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). Second, we tested the chemicals for estrogen-associated transcriptional activity in the yeast estrogen screen and in the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The chemicals investigated in this study were o,p'-DDT (racemic mixture and enantiomers), nonylphenol mixture (NPm), and two poorly analyzed compounds in the environment, namely, tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methane (Tris-H) and tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methanol (Tris-OH). In both yeast and MCF-7 cells, we determined estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor (ER) for o,p'-DDT, NPm, and for the very first time, Tris-H and Tris-OH. However, unlike estrogens, none of these xenobiotics seemed to be able to induce ER/SRC-1 interactions, most likely because the conformation of the activated receptor would not allow direct contacts with this coactivator. However, these compounds were able to inhibit [(3)H]-E(2) binding to hER, which reveals a direct interaction with the receptor. In conclusion, the test compounds are estrogen mimics, but their molecular mechanism of action appears to be different from that of the natural hormone as revealed by the receptor/coactivator interaction analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10903615

  10. The Estrogen Receptor-β Expression in De Quervain’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Po-Chuan; Wang, Ping-Hui; Wu, Po-Ting; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist (a.k.a. de Quervain’s disease) is common but how estrogen is involved is still unknown. We previously reported that inflammation was involved in the pathogenesis of this ailment. In the present study, we extended our investigation of estrogen receptor (ER)-β expression to determine whether estrogen is involved in the pathogenesis of de Quervain’s. Intraoperative retinaculum samples were collected from 16 patients with the ailment. Specimens were histologically graded by collagen structure and immunohistochemically evaluated by quantifying the expression of ER-β, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 (inflammatory cytokines), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (an inflammatory enzyme), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Von Willebrand’s factor (vWF). De Quervain’s occurs primarily in women. The female:male ratio in our study was 7:1. We found that ER-β expression in the retinaculum was positively correlated with disease grade and patient age. Additionally, disease severity was associated with inflammatory factors—IL-1β and IL-6, COX-2, and VEGF and vWF in tenosynovial tissue. The greater the levels of ER-β expression, tissue inflammation, and angiogenesis are, the more severe de Quervain’s disease is. ER-β might be a useful target for novel de Quervain’s disease therapy. PMID:26556342

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene intron 4 variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in β-thalassemia major: relation to cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Ismail, Eman A; Aly, Shereen H

    2015-06-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an enzyme that generates nitric oxide, is a major determinant of endothelial function. Several eNOS gene polymorphisms have been reported as 'susceptibility genes' in various human diseases states, including cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal diseases. We studied the 27-base pair tandem repeat polymorphism in intron 4 of eNOS gene in 60 β-thalassemia major (β-TM) patients compared with 60 healthy controls and assessed its role in subclinical atherosclerosis and vascular complications. Patients were evaluated stressing on transfusion history, splenectomy, thrombotic events, echocardiography and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Analysis of eNOS intron 4 gene polymorphism was performed by PCR. No significant difference was found between β-TM patients and controls with regard to the distribution of eNOS4 alleles or genotypes. The frequency of eNOS4a allele (aa and ab genotypes) was significantly higher in β-TM patients with pulmonary hypertension or cardiomyopathy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that eNOS4a allele was an independent risk factor for pulmonary hypertension in β-TM patients [odds ratio (OR) 2.2, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.19-5.6; P < 0.001]. We suggest that eNOS intron 4 gene polymorphism is related to endothelial dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis and could be a possible genetic marker for prediction of increased susceptibility to cardiovascular complications.

  12. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene intron 4 variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in β-thalassemia major: relation to cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Ismail, Eman A; Aly, Shereen H

    2015-06-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an enzyme that generates nitric oxide, is a major determinant of endothelial function. Several eNOS gene polymorphisms have been reported as 'susceptibility genes' in various human diseases states, including cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal diseases. We studied the 27-base pair tandem repeat polymorphism in intron 4 of eNOS gene in 60 β-thalassemia major (β-TM) patients compared with 60 healthy controls and assessed its role in subclinical atherosclerosis and vascular complications. Patients were evaluated stressing on transfusion history, splenectomy, thrombotic events, echocardiography and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Analysis of eNOS intron 4 gene polymorphism was performed by PCR. No significant difference was found between β-TM patients and controls with regard to the distribution of eNOS4 alleles or genotypes. The frequency of eNOS4a allele (aa and ab genotypes) was significantly higher in β-TM patients with pulmonary hypertension or cardiomyopathy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that eNOS4a allele was an independent risk factor for pulmonary hypertension in β-TM patients [odds ratio (OR) 2.2, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.19-5.6; P < 0.001]. We suggest that eNOS intron 4 gene polymorphism is related to endothelial dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis and could be a possible genetic marker for prediction of increased susceptibility to cardiovascular complications. PMID:25699607

  13. Are Temporal Differences in GDNF and NOS Isoform Induction Contributors to Neurodegeneration? A Fluorescence Microscopy-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Liang, Yangyan; Schiess, Mya C.; Padilla, Angelica; Poindexter, Brian J.; Hickson-Bick, Diane L. M.; Bick, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Specific factors in Parkinson’s disease have become targets as to their protective and degenerative effects. We have demonstrated that cytokines and PD-CSF detrimentally affect microglia and astrocyte growth. While glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been recognized as a possible neuron-rescue agent, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been implicated in neurodegenerative processes. Objective: To demonstrate that glial cell activation, cytokine production, and NOS induction, play an intimate role in the loss of dopaminergic signaling, via mechanisms that are a result of inflammation and inflammatory stimuli. Methods: Study animals were sacrificed following endotoxin treatment and tissue sections were harvested and probed for GDNF and NOS isomers by fluorescence deconvolution microscopy. Fluorescence was mapped and quantified for each probe Results: An immune cell influx into ‘vulnerable’ areas of the brain was seen, and three NOS isomers, inducible (iNOS), neuronal (nNOS) and endothelial (eNOS), were synthesized in the brains, a finding which suggests that each isomer has a role in neurodegeneration. eNOS was found associated with blood vessels, while iNOS was associated with glial and matrix cells and nNOS was located with both glia and neurons. Following endotoxin treatment, serum levels of nitric oxide were higher at 6-8 hours, while tissue levels of NOS were elevated for much longer. Thus, induction of NOS occurred earlier than the induction of GDNF. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the protective abilities of GDNF to combat neural destruction are not available rapidly enough, and do not remain at sufficiently high levels long enough to assert its protective effects. (250).

  14. Are Temporal Differences in GDNF and NOS Isoform Induction Contributors to Neurodegeneration? A Fluorescence Microscopy-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Liang, Yangyan; Schiess, Mya C.; Padilla, Angelica; Poindexter, Brian J.; Hickson-Bick, Diane L. M.; Bick, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Specific factors in Parkinson’s disease have become targets as to their protective and degenerative effects. We have demonstrated that cytokines and PD-CSF detrimentally affect microglia and astrocyte growth. While glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been recognized as a possible neuron-rescue agent, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been implicated in neurodegenerative processes. Objective: To demonstrate that glial cell activation, cytokine production, and NOS induction, play an intimate role in the loss of dopaminergic signaling, via mechanisms that are a result of inflammation and inflammatory stimuli. Methods: Study animals were sacrificed following endotoxin treatment and tissue sections were harvested and probed for GDNF and NOS isomers by fluorescence deconvolution microscopy. Fluorescence was mapped and quantified for each probe Results: An immune cell influx into ‘vulnerable’ areas of the brain was seen, and three NOS isomers, inducible (iNOS), neuronal (nNOS) and endothelial (eNOS), were synthesized in the brains, a finding which suggests that each isomer has a role in neurodegeneration. eNOS was found associated with blood vessels, while iNOS was associated with glial and matrix cells and nNOS was located with both glia and neurons. Following endotoxin treatment, serum levels of nitric oxide were higher at 6-8 hours, while tissue levels of NOS were elevated for much longer. Thus, induction of NOS occurred earlier than the induction of GDNF. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the protective abilities of GDNF to combat neural destruction are not available rapidly enough, and do not remain at sufficiently high levels long enough to assert its protective effects. (250). PMID:27651844

  15. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  16. [Physical activity and endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients: the role of nitric oxide and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Christian; Schwinger, Robert H G; Brixius, Klara

    2011-06-01

    Type 2 diabetic patients have an increased level of systemic free radicals, which severely restrict the bioavailability of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) and thus contribute to the development of an endothelial dysfunction. This review analyses the influence of physical training on molecular development mechanisms of the endothelial dysfunction and determines the significance of regular physical exercise for the endothelial function in type 2 diabetic patients. Systematic training reinforces the endogenic antioxidative capacity and results in a reduction in oxidative stress. Training - also combined with a change in diet - furthermore reduces hyperglycaemic blood sugar levels, thus curbing a major source of free radicals in diabetes. Moreover, physical exercise enhances vascular NO synthesis through an increased availability/activity of endothelial NO synthases (eNOS). Endurance, as well as resistance training with submaximal intensity or a combination of both forms of training is suitable to effectively improve the endothelial function in type 2 diabetic patients in the long term. PMID:21360292

  17. Development of novel arginase inhibitors for therapy of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Jochen; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2013-09-17

    Endothelial dysfunction and resulting vascular pathology have been identified as an early hallmark of multiple diseases, including diabetes mellitus. One of the major contributors to endothelial dysfunction is a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, impaired NO signaling, and an increase in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the endothelium NO is produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), for which l-arginine is a substrate. Arginase, an enzyme critical in the urea cycle also metabolizes l-arginine, thereby directly competing with eNOS for their common substrate and constraining its bioavailability for eNOS, thereby compromising NO production. Arginase expression and activity is upregulated in many cardiovascular diseases including ischemia reperfusion injury, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. More importantly, since the 1990s, specific arginase inhibitors such as N-hydroxy-guanidinium or N-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine, and boronic acid derivatives, such as, 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid, and S-(2-boronoethyl)-l-cysteine, that can bridge the binuclear manganese cluster of arginase have been developed. These highly potent and specific inhibitors can now be used to probe arginase function and thereby modulate the redox milieu of the cell by changing the balance between NO and ROS. Inspired by this success, drug discovery programs have recently led to the identification of α-α-disubstituted amino acid based arginase inhibitors [such as (R)-2-amino-6-borono-2-(2-(piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)hexanoic acid], that are currently under early investigation as therapeutics. Finally, some investigators concentrate on identification of plant derived compounds with arginase inhibitory capability, such as piceatannol-3'-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (PG). All of these synthesized or naturally derived small molecules may represent novel therapeutics for vascular disease particularly that associated with diabetes.

  18. Development of Novel Arginase Inhibitors for Therapy of Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and resulting vascular pathology have been identified as an early hallmark of multiple diseases, including diabetes mellitus. One of the major contributors to endothelial dysfunction is a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, impaired NO signaling, and an increase in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the endothelium NO is produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), for which l-arginine is a substrate. Arginase, an enzyme critical in the urea cycle also metabolizes l-arginine, thereby directly competing with eNOS for their common substrate and constraining its bioavailability for eNOS, thereby compromising NO production. Arginase expression and activity is upregulated in many cardiovascular diseases including ischemia reperfusion injury, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. More importantly, since the 1990s, specific arginase inhibitors such as N-hydroxy-guanidinium or N-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine, and boronic acid derivatives, such as, 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid, and S-(2-boronoethyl)-l-cysteine, that can bridge the binuclear manganese cluster of arginase have been developed. These highly potent and specific inhibitors can now be used to probe arginase function and thereby modulate the redox milieu of the cell by changing the balance between NO and ROS. Inspired by this success, drug discovery programs have recently led to the identification of α–α-disubstituted amino acid based arginase inhibitors [such as (R)-2-amino-6-borono-2-(2-(piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)hexanoic acid], that are currently under early investigation as therapeutics. Finally, some investigators concentrate on identification of plant derived compounds with arginase inhibitory capability, such as piceatannol-3′-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (PG). All of these synthesized or naturally derived small molecules may represent novel therapeutics for vascular disease particularly that associated with diabetes. PMID:24062745

  19. Tert-butylhydroquinone lowers blood pressure in AngII-induced hypertension in mice via proteasome-PTEN-Akt-eNOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing-Can; Long, Hui-Bao; Luo, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), as an antioxidant, has been widely used for many years to prevent oxidization of food products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether tBHQ activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) to prevent endothelial dysfunction and lower blood pressure. The role of Akt in tBHQ-induced eNOS phosphorylation was examined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or in mice. tBHQ treatment of HUVEC increased both Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, accompanied with increased eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and NO release. Mechanically, pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of Akt abolished tBHQ-enhanced NO release and eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC. Gain-function of PTEN or inhibition of 26S proteasome abolished tBHQ-enhanced Akt phosphorylation in HUVEC. Ex vivo analysis indicated that tBHQ improved Ach-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in LPC-treated mice aortic arteries, which were abolished by inhibition of Akt or eNOS. In animal study, administration of tBHQ significantly increased eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation, and lowered AngII-induced hypertension in wildtype mice, but not in mice deficient of Akt or eNOS. In conclusion, tBHQ via proteasome-dependent degradation of PTEN increases Akt phosphorylation, resulting in upregulation of eNOS-derived NO production and consequent improvement of endothelial function in vivo. In this way, tBHQ lowers blood pressure in hypertensive mice. PMID:27435826

  20. Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 coordinates dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase/PPAR-γ/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathways that enhance nitric oxide generation in human glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zaiming; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) degrades asymmetric dimethylarginine, which inhibits nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS). Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional factor that binds to antioxidant response elements and transcribes many antioxidant genes. Because the promoters of the human DDAH-1 and DDAH-2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and PPAR-γ genes contain 2 to 3 putative antioxidant response elements, we hypothesized that they were regulated by Nrf2/antioxidant response element. Incubation of human renal glomerular endothelial cells with the Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone (20 μmol·L(-1)) significantly (P<0.05) increased NO and activities of NOS and DDAH and decreased asymmetric dimethylarginine. It upregulated genes for hemoxygenase-1, eNOS, DDAH-1, DDAH-2, and PPAR-γ and partitioned Nrf2 into the nucleus. Knockdown of Nrf2 abolished these effects. Nrf2 bound to one antioxidant response element on DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 and PPAR-γ promoters but not to the eNOS promoter. An increased eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (P-eNOSser-1177) expression with tert-butylhydroquinone was prevented by knockdown of PPAR-γ. Expression of Nrf2 was reduced by knockdown of PPAR-γ, whereas PPAR-γ was reduced by knockdown of Nrf2, thereby demonstrating 2-way positive interactions. Thus, Nrf2 transcribes HO-1 and other genes to reduce reactive oxygen species, and DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 to reduce asymmetric dimethylarginine and PPAR-γ to increase eNOS and its phosphorylation and activity thereby coordinating 3 pathways that enhance endothelial NO generation. PMID:25691623

  1. Xiaokening stimulates endothelial nitric oxide release in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Liu, Lei; Wei, Qunli; Cui, Jie; Yan, Changdong; Wang, Xin; Wu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus induces microangiopathic changes that lead to endothelial dysfunction. This study investigated the effect of Xiaokening, a type of Chinese compound medicine, on the mesenteric arteriolar endothelial cell function of diabetic rats and its underlying mechanism. METHODS Diabetes mellitus was induced in rat models via intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin and observed over three weeks. Mesenteric arterioles, which were isolated in a cannulated and pressurised state, were incubated with intravascular injections of 1, 3 or 5 g/L Xiaokening for 24, 48 or 72 hours. The effects of Xiaokening on the release of nitric oxide (NO) on the mesenteric arterioles were detected under shear stress of 1, 10 and 20 dyn/cm2. Biochemical methods were used to determine the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The expressions of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), SOD and XO in the mesenteric arterioles were assessed using Western blot. RESULTS Compared to normal rat arterioles, less NO was released in the mesenteric arterioles of diabetic rats. Xiaokening was found to have a concentration- and time-dependent effect on NO release; when the shear stress was increased, there was a gradual increase in the release of NO. Compared to normal arterioles, the expression of eNOS in the mesenteric arterioles of diabetic rats was lower. Incubation with Xiaokening increased SOD activity and expression, and decreased XO activity and expression in the mesenteric arterioles of the diabetic rats. CONCLUSION Xiaokening was able to significantly increase NO release and improve the endothelial function of mesenteric arterioles through antioxidative mechanisms. PMID:26243977

  2. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  3. Binding of Estrogenic Compounds to Recombinant Estrogen Receptor-α: Application to Environmental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Arnaud; Boussioux, Anne-Marie; Escande, Aurélie; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Gomez, Elena; Fenet, Hélène; Ruff, Marc; Moras, Dino; Vignon, Françoise; Duchesne, Marie-Josèphe; Casellas, Claude; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Balaguer, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Estrogenic activity in environmental samples could be mediated through a wide variety of compounds and by various mechanisms. High-affinity compounds for estrogen receptors (ERs), such as natural or synthetic estrogens, as well as low-affinity compounds such as alkylphenols, phthalates, and polychlorinated biphenyls are present in water and sediment samples. Furthermore, compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which do not bind ERs, modulate estrogen activity by means of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In order to characterize compounds that mediate estrogenic activity in river water and sediment samples, we developed a tool based on the ER-αligand-binding domain, which permitted us to estimate contaminating estrogenic compound affinities. We designed a simple transactivation assay in which compounds of high affinity were captured by limited amounts of recombinant ER-αand whose capture led to a selective inhibition of transactivation. This approach allowed us to bring to light that water samples contain estrogenic compounds that display a high affinity for ERs but are present at low concentrations. In sediment samples, on the contrary, we showed that estrogenic compounds possess a low affinity and are present at high concentration. Finally, we used immobilized recombinant ER-αto separate ligands for ER and AhR that are present in river sediments. Immobilized ER-α, which does not retain dioxin-like compounds, enabled us to isolate and concentrate ER ligands to facilitate their further analysis. PMID:15743715

  4. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Son, O. van; Piersma, A.H.; Jong, P.C. de; Berg, M. van den

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E{sub 2}) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  5. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    van Meeuwen, J A; van Son, O; Piersma, A H; de Jong, P C; van den Berg, M

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E(2)) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  6. Functional significance of the rapid regulation of brain estrogens: Where do the estrogens come from?

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, Charlotte A.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens exert a wide variety of actions on reproductive and non-reproductive functions. These effects are mediated by slow and long lasting genomic as well as rapid and transient non-genomic mechanisms. Besides the host of studies demonstrating the role of genomic actions at the physiological and behavioral level, mounting evidence highlights the functional significance of non-genomic effects. However, the source of the rapid changes in estrogen availability that are necessary to sustain their fast actions is rarely questioned. For example, the rise of plasma estrogens at pro-estrus that represents one of the fastest documented changes in plasma estrogen concentration appears too slow to explain these actions. Alternatively, estrogen can be synthesized in the brain by the enzyme aromatase providing a source of locally high concentrations of the steroid. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrate that brain aromatase can be rapidly modulated by afferent inputs, including glutamatergic afferents. A role for rapid changes in estrogen production in the central nervous system is supported by experiments showing that acute aromatase inhibition affects nociception as well as male sexual behavior and that preoptic aromatase activity is rapidly (within min) modulated following mating. Such mechanisms thus fulfill the gap existing between the fast actions of estrogen and their mode of production and open new avenues for the understanding of estrogenic effects on the brain. PMID:16978590

  7. Fucoidan from Undaria pinnatifida prevents vascular dysfunction through PI3K/Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanisms in the l-NAME-induced hypertensive rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Li, Jian; Li, Zhike; Sang, Ying; Niu, Yunhui; Zhang, Qianying; Ding, Hong; Yin, Shanye

    2016-05-18

    Despite major scientific advances in its prevention, treatment and care, hypertension remains a serious condition that might lead to long-term complications such as heart disease and stroke. The great majority of forms of hypertension eventually result from an increased vasomotor tone activity that is regulated by endothelial NOS (eNOS) in vascular endothelium. Here, we examined the effect of fucoidan on eNOS activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We also examined the effects of functional components of Undaria pinnatifida fucoidan on blood pressure and vascular function in eNOS inhibition-induced hypertensive rats in vivo. Our results suggest that fucoidan increased nitric oxide production by activating eNOS and Akt phosphorylation, which could be impaired by Akt or eNOS inhibitors. In the hypertensive rat model, treatment of fucoidan resulted in potent and persistent reduction of high blood pressure (BP) even after drug withdrawal. Our results showed that the mechanisms might involve protection against vascular structure damage, enhanced endothelium-independent vascular function and inhibition of abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle cells, which are mediated by the Akt-eNOS signaling pathway. Moreover, fucoidan treatment reduced the vascular inflammation and oxidative stress control caused by iNOS expression. Together, these results support a putative role of fucoidan in hypertension prevention and treatment.

  8. Relation between Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Genotypes and Oxidative Stress Markers in Larynx Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yanar, K; Çakatay, U; Aydın, S; Verim, A; Atukeren, P; Özkan, N E; Karatoprak, K; Cebe, T; Turan, S; Ozkök, E; Korkmaz, G; Cacına, C; Küçükhüseyin, O; Yaylım, İ

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) is responsible for the endothelial synthesis of nitric oxide (NO(•)). G894T polymorphism leads to the amino acid substitution from Glu298Asp that causes lower NOS3 activity and basal NO(•) production in NOS3 894T (298Asp) allele carriers compared with the GG homozygotes. NO(•) acts as an antioxidant protecting against Fenton's reaction which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Allelic variation of NOS3 may influence an individual's risk of laryngeal cancer (LC). In the current study we have examined the possible relationship between NOS3 G894T genotypes and various systemic oxidative damage markers such as protein carbonyl, advanced oxidation protein products, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, thiol group fractions, and lipid hydroperoxides in LC patients. Genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP. In LC patients with TT genotype, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase activities and nonprotein thiol levels were significantly higher than the controls. In patients with GT and GG genotype, high levels of lipid hydroperoxides showed statistical significance when compared to controls. Our results indicate a potential relationship among G894T polymorphism of NOS3, and impaired redox homeostasis. Further studies are required to determine the role of NOS3 gene polymorphism and impaired plasma redox homeostasis. PMID:26682008

  9. Relation between Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Genotypes and Oxidative Stress Markers in Larynx Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yanar, K.; Çakatay, U.; Aydın, S.; Verim, A.; Atukeren, P.; Özkan, N. E.; Karatoprak, K.; Cebe, T.; Turan, S.; Ozkök, E.; Korkmaz, G.; Cacına, C.; Küçükhüseyin, O.; Yaylım, İ.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) is responsible for the endothelial synthesis of nitric oxide (NO•). G894T polymorphism leads to the amino acid substitution from Glu298Asp that causes lower NOS3 activity and basal NO• production in NOS3 894T (298Asp) allele carriers compared with the GG homozygotes. NO• acts as an antioxidant protecting against Fenton's reaction which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Allelic variation of NOS3 may influence an individual's risk of laryngeal cancer (LC). In the current study we have examined the possible relationship between NOS3 G894T genotypes and various systemic oxidative damage markers such as protein carbonyl, advanced oxidation protein products, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, thiol group fractions, and lipid hydroperoxides in LC patients. Genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP. In LC patients with TT genotype, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase activities and nonprotein thiol levels were significantly higher than the controls. In patients with GT and GG genotype, high levels of lipid hydroperoxides showed statistical significance when compared to controls. Our results indicate a potential relationship among G894T polymorphism of NOS3, and impaired redox homeostasis. Further studies are required to determine the role of NOS3 gene polymorphism and impaired plasma redox homeostasis. PMID:26682008

  10. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase haplotypes associated with hypertension do not predispose to cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Vivian; Lacchini, Riccardo; Jacob-Ferreira, Anna L B; Sales, Maria L; Ferreira-Sae, Maria C; Schreiber, Roberto; Nadruz, Wilson; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2010-04-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a complication that may result from chronic hypertension. While nitric oxide (NO) deficiency has been associated with LVH, inconsistent results have been reported with regards to the association of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) polymorphisms and LVH in hypertensive patients. This study aims to assess whether eNOS haplotypes are associated with LVH in hypertensive patients. This study included 101 healthy controls and 173 hypertensive patients submitted to echocardiography examination. Genotypes for three eNOS polymorphisms were determined: a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region (T-786C) and in exon 7 (Glu298Asp), and variable number of tandem repeats in intron 4. We found no significant association between eNOS genotypes and hypertension or with LVH (all p > 0.05). However, while we found two eNOS haplotypes associated with variable risk of hypertension (all p < 0.05), we found no significant associations between eNOS haplotypes and LVH (all p > 0.05), even after adjustment in multiple linear regression analysis. These findings suggest that eNOS haplotypes that have been associated with variable susceptibility to hypertension were not associated with LVH in hypertensive patients. Further studies are necessary to examine whether other genes downstream may interact with eNOS polymorphisms and predispose to LVH in hypertensive patients. PMID:20070154

  11. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhupesh Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in

  12. Aberrant production of extracellular matrix proteins and dysfunction in kidney endothelial cells with a short duration of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Grutzmacher, Cathy; Park, SunYoung; Zhao, Yun; Morrison, Margaret E; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the United States, microvascular complications during diabetic nephropathy contribute to high morbidity and mortality rates. However, the cell-autonomous impact of diabetes on kidney endothelial cell function requires further investigation. Male Akita/+ [autosomal dominant mutation in the insulin II gene (Ins2)] mice reproducibly develop diabetes by 4 wk of age. Here, we examined the impact a short duration of diabetes had on kidney endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells were prepared from nondiabetic and diabetic mice (4 wk of diabetes) to delineate the early changes in endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice following 4 wk of diabetes demonstrated aberrant expression of extracellular matrix proteins including decreased osteopontin and increased fibronectin expression which correlated with increased α5-integrin expression. These changes were associated with the attenuation of migration and capillary morphogenesis. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice had decreased VEGF levels but increased levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) and NO, suggesting uncoupling of VEGF-mediated NO production. Knocking down eNOS expression in Akita/+ kidney endothelial cells increased VEGF expression, endothelial cell migration, and capillary morphogenesis. Furthermore, attenuation of sprouting angiogenesis of aortas from Akita/+ mice with 8 wk of diabetes was restored in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate that aberrant endothelial cell function with a short duration of diabetes may set the stage for vascular dysfunction and rarefaction at later stages of diabetes.

  13. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Zhuang, Yugang; Harbeck, Mark C; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity. PMID:26560496

  14. Oxidative stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction in mouse models of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Jerkic, Mirjana; Sotov, Valentin; Letarte, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a vascular dysplasia caused by mutations in endoglin (ENG; HHT1) or activin receptor-like kinase (ALK1; HHT2) genes, coding for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily receptors. We demonstrated previously that endoglin and ALK1 interact with endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and affect its activation. Endothelial cells deficient in endoglin or ALK1 proteins show eNOS uncoupling, reduced NO, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In this study, we measured NO and H(2)O(2) levels in several organs of adult Eng and Alk1 heterozygous mice, to ascertain whether decreased NO and increased ROS production is a generalized manifestation of HHT. A significant reduction in NO and increase in ROS production were found in several organs, known to be affected in patients. ROS overproduction in mutant mice was attributed to eNOS, as it was L-NAME inhibitable. Mitochondrial ROS contribution, blocked by antimycin, was highest in liver while NADPH oxidase, inhibited by apocynin, was a major source of ROS in the other tissues. However, there was no difference in antimycin- and apocynin-inhibitable ROS production between mutant and control mice. Our results indicate that eNOS-derived ROS contributes to endothelial dysfunction and likely predisposes to disease manifestations in several organs of HHT patients. PMID:23320130

  15. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  16. Nitric oxide up-regulates endothelial expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Medini, Sawsan; Bisha, Marion; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Bas, Murat; Kojda, Georg

    2016-07-15

    Increasing vascular NO levels following up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered beneficial in cardiovascular disease. Whether such beneficial effects exerted by increased NO-levels include the vascular renin-angiotensin system remains elucidated. Exposure of endothelial cells originated from porcine aorta, mouse brain and human umbilical veins to different NO-donors showed that expression of the angiotensin-II-type-2-receptor (AT2) mRNA and protein is up-regulated by activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase without changing AT2 mRNA stability. In mice, endothelial-specific overexpression of eNOS stimulated, while chronic treatment with the NOS-blocker l-nitroarginine inhibited AT2 expression. The NO-induced AT2 up-regulation was associated with a profound inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-activity. In endothelial cells this reduction of ACE-activity was reversed by either the AT2 antagonist PD 123119 or by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D. Furthermore, in C57Bl/6 mice an acute i.v. bolus of l-nitroarginine did not change AT2-expression and ACE-activity suggesting that inhibition of ACE-activity by endogenous NO is crucially dependent on AT2 protein level. Likewise, three weeks of either voluntary or forced exercise training increased AT2 expression and reduced ACE-activity in C57Bl/6 but not in mice lacking eNOS suggesting significance of this signaling interaction for vascular physiology. Finally, aortic AT2 expression is about 5 times greater in female as compared to male C57Bl/6 and at the same time aortic ACE activity is reduced in females by more than 50%. Together these findings imply that endothelial NO regulates AT2 expression and that AT2 may regulate ACE-activity. PMID:27235748

  17. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Ken; Hiruma, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Shingo; Sato, Yoji; Tanaka, Masaru; Sawada, Rumi; Niimi, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs) can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials. PMID:27348615

  18. Effect of vaginal estrogen on pessary use

    PubMed Central

    Dessie, Sybil G.; Armstrong, Katherine; Modest, Anna M.; Hacker, Michele R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Many providers recommend concurrent estrogen therapy with pessary use to limit complications; however, limited data exist to support this practice. We hypothesized that vaginal estrogen supplementation decreases incidence of pessary-related complications and discontinuation. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent a pessary fitting from 1 January 2007 through 1 September 2013 at one institution; participants were identified by billing code and were eligible if they were post-menopausal and had at least 3 months of pessary use and 6 months of follow-up. All tests were two sided, and P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Data from 199 women were included; 134 used vaginal estrogen and 65 did not. Women who used vaginal estrogen had a longer median follow-up time (29.5 months) compared with women who did not (15.4 months) and were more likely to have at least one pessary check (98.5 % vs 86.2 %, P < 0.001). Those in the estrogen group were less likely to discontinue using their pessary (30.6 % vs 58.5 %, P < 0.001) and less likely to develop increased vaginal discharge than women who did not [hazard ratio (HR) 0.31, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.17–0.58]. Vaginal estrogen was not protective against erosions (HR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.54–1.6) or vaginal bleeding (HR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.36–1.7). Conclusions Women who used vaginal estrogen exhibited a higher incidence of continued pessary use and lower incidence of increased vaginal discharge than women who did not. PMID:26992727

  19. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of

  20. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 Is Involved in the Effects of Atorvastatin on Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    Statins exert pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells in addition to lowering cholesterol. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 (ALOX15) has been implicated in vascular inflammation and disease. The relationship between atorvastatin and ALOX15 was investigated using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining showed that ALOX15 overexpression increased the thickness of the intima-media (IMT). Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that atorvastatin increased the expression of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) but decreased the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS); these effects of atorvastatin were blocked by ALOX15 overexpression. In human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs), silencing of ALOX15 enhanced the effects of atorvastatin on endothelial function. Expression levels of CAMs and Akt/eNOS/NO under oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) stimulation were modulated by ALOX15 inhibitor and ALOX15 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Atorvastatin abolished the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) induced by ox-LDL. Exposure to ox-LDL induced upregulation of ALOX15 in HUVECs, but this effect was partially abolished by atorvastatin or the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). These results demonstrate that regulation of ALOX15 expression might be involved in the effects of atorvastatin on endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27594770

  1. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 Is Involved in the Effects of Atorvastatin on Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Xin; Hu, Chunxiao; Yu, Hui; Dong, Qian; Chang, Guanglei; Qin, Shu; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Dongying

    2016-01-01

    Statins exert pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells in addition to lowering cholesterol. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 (ALOX15) has been implicated in vascular inflammation and disease. The relationship between atorvastatin and ALOX15 was investigated using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining showed that ALOX15 overexpression increased the thickness of the intima-media (IMT). Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that atorvastatin increased the expression of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) but decreased the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS); these effects of atorvastatin were blocked by ALOX15 overexpression. In human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs), silencing of ALOX15 enhanced the effects of atorvastatin on endothelial function. Expression levels of CAMs and Akt/eNOS/NO under oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) stimulation were modulated by ALOX15 inhibitor and ALOX15 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Atorvastatin abolished the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) induced by ox-LDL. Exposure to ox-LDL induced upregulation of ALOX15 in HUVECs, but this effect was partially abolished by atorvastatin or the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). These results demonstrate that regulation of ALOX15 expression might be involved in the effects of atorvastatin on endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27594770

  2. Side-Specific Endothelial-Dependent Regulation of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jennifer; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Chen, Si; Sarang, Zubair; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Chester, Adrian H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial endothelial cells maintain vascular homeostasis and vessel tone in part through the secretion of nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we determined how aortic valve endothelial cells (VEC) regulate aortic valve interstitial cell (VIC) phenotype and matrix calcification through NO. Using an anchored in vitro collagen hydrogel culture system, we demonstrate that three-dimensionally cultured porcine VIC do not calcify in osteogenic medium unless under mechanical stress. Co-culture with porcine VEC, however, significantly attenuated VIC calcification through inhibition of myofibroblastic activation, osteogenic differentiation, and calcium deposition. Incubation with the NO donor DETA-NO inhibited VIC osteogenic differentiation and matrix calcification, whereas incubation with the NO blocker l-NAME augmented calcification even in 3D VIC–VEC co-culture. Aortic VEC, but not VIC, expressed endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in both porcine and human valves, which was reduced in osteogenic medium. eNOS expression was reduced in calcified human aortic valves in a side-specific manner. Porcine leaflets exposed to the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ increased osteocalcin and α-smooth muscle actin expression. Finally, side-specific shear stress applied to porcine aortic valve leaflet endothelial surfaces increased cGMP production in VEC. Valve endothelial-derived NO is a natural inhibitor of the early phases of valve calcification and therefore may be an important regulator of valve homeostasis and pathology. PMID:23499458

  3. High fat diet exacerbates vascular endothelial dysfunction in rats exposed to continuous hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Tang, Feng; Ga, Qin; Wuren, Tana; Wang, Ya-Ping; Rondina, Matthew T; Ge, Ri-Li

    2015-02-13

    Independently, a high fat diet and hypoxia are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and often occur concurrently in patients. Nevertheless, the effects of a high fat diet on vascular endothelial function combined with hypoxia, a situation occurring with increasing frequency in many parts of the world, remain largely unknown. We investigated the effects of a high fat diet on vascular endothelial function in rats exposed to continuous hypoxia for 4 weeks. Seventy two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: a hypoxia group fed regular chow, a combined hypoxia and high fat diet (HFD) group, and for comparison, rats maintained in normoxia, regular chow conditions were set as baseline (BL) group. The experimental data of BL group were obtained at beginning of hypoxia given in the other groups. Continuous hypoxia was induced in a hypobaric chamber maintained at an altitude of 5000 m. Compared to hypoxic conditions alone, hypoxia plus a HFD prevented adaptive changes in plasma nitric oxide (NOx) levels and caused earlier and more severe changes in aortic endothelial structures. Functionally, hypoxia plus a HFD resulted in impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation responses to acetylcholine and altered the bioavailability of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) substrate L-Arginine. At the molecular level, hypoxia plus a HFD blunted increases in endothelial NOS (eNOS) mRNA and protein in aortic endothelial tissue. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that in the setting of hypoxia, a high fat diet leads to earlier and more severe VED than hypoxia alone. These data have important implications for populations residing at high-altitude, as dietary patterns shift towards increased fat intake. PMID:25603049

  4. Memantine Attenuates Delayed Vasospasm after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage via Modulating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Liang-Chao; Shan, Yan-Shen; Pan, Chia-Hsin; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-06-23

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm is an important pathological feature of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The cause of vasospasm is multifactorial. Impairs nitric oxide availability and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction has been reported to underlie vasospasm. Memantine, a low-affinity uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) blocker has been proven to reduce early brain injury after SAH. This study investigated the effect of memantine on attenuation of vasospasm and restoring eNOS functionality. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-450 g were randomly divided into three weight-matched groups, sham surgery, SAH + vehicle, and SAH + memantine groups. The effects of memantine on SAH were evaluated by assessing the severity of vasospasm and the expression of eNOS. Memantine effectively ameliorated cerebral vasospasm by restoring eNOS functionality. Memantine can prevent vasospasm in experimental SAH. Treatment strategies may help combat SAH-induced vasospasm in the future.

  5. Ultrafast dynamics of ligand and substrate interaction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase under Soret excitation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Chang; Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Chen, Pei-Feng; Liang, Keng S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of endothelial NOS oxygenase domain (eNOS-oxy) was performed to study dynamics of ligand or substrate interaction under Soret band excitation. Photo-excitation dissociates imidazole ligand in <300fs, then followed by vibrational cooling and recombination within 2ps. Such impulsive bond breaking and late rebinding generate proteinquakes, which relaxes in several tens of picoseconds. The photo excited dynamics of eNOS-oxy with L-arginine substrate mainly occurs at the local site of heme, including ultrafast internal conversion within 400fs, vibrational cooling, charge transfer, and complete ground-state recovery within 1.4ps. The eNOS-oxy without additive is partially bound with water molecule, thus its photoexcited dynamics also shows ligand dissociation in <800fs. Then it followed by vibrational cooling coupled with charge transfer in 4.8ps, and recombination of ligand to distal side of heme in 12ps.

  6. Angiogenesis in Breast Cancer and its Correlation with Estrogen, Progesterone Receptors and other Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Poonam; Kamal, Vinay; Agarwal, Prem Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of study is to evaluate angiogenesis using CD34, in estrogen, progesterone positive and negative breastcancer and to correlate the microvessel density with known histological prognostic factors, morphological type of breast carcinoma and lymph node metastasis. Materials and Methods: Twenty eight untreated cases of breast cancer were included in the study and paraffin embedded sections were obtained from representative mastectomy specimen of breast cancer patient. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and immunohistochemistry was performed using CD34, estrogen, progesterone, cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen antibody. Angiogenesis was analysed using CD 34 antibody. For statistical analysis, cases were grouped into estrogen, progesterone positive and negative receptors. Results: Mean microvessel density in ER-/PR-, ER-/ PR+, ER+/PR-, ER+/PR+ was 15.45, 14.83, 11, 10.89 respectively. A significant correlation was found between ER receptors and mean vascular density with p-value (< 0.05). A significant difference was observed in mean vascular density between the four groups comprising (p-value < 0.05). Infiltrating duct carcinoma (NOS) grade III has got the highest mean microvessel density (14.17) followed by grade II (12.93) and grade I (12.33). Conclusion: Information about prognostic factors in breast cancer patients may lead to better ways to identify those patients at high risk who might benefit from adjuvant therapies. PMID:25737993

  7. Progesterone and estrogen receptor expression and activity in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marquez-Garban, Diana C.; Mah, Vei; Alavi, Mohammad; Maresh, Erin L.; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Bagryanova, Lora; Horvath, Steve; Chia, David; Garon, Edward; Goodglick, Lee; Pietras, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in male and female patients in the US. Although it is clear that tobacco smoking is a major cause of lung cancer, about half of all women with lung cancer worldwide are never-smokers. Despite a declining smoking population, the incidence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the predominant form of lung cancer, has reached epidemic proportions particularly in women. Emerging data suggest that factors other than tobacco, namely endogenous and exogenous female sex hormones, have a role in stimulating NSCLC progression. Aromatase, a key enzyme for estrogen biosynthesis, is expressed in NSCLC. Clinical data show that women with high levels of tumor aromatase (and high intratumoral estrogen) have worse survival than those with low aromatase. The present and previous studies also reveal significant expression and activity of estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ) in both extranuclear and nuclear sites in most NSCLC. We now report further on the expression of progesterone receptor (PR) transcripts and protein in NSCLC. PR transcripts were significantly lower in cancerous as compared to non-malignant tissue. Using immunohistochemistry, expression of PR was observed in the nucleus and/or extranuclear compartments in the majority of human tumor specimens examined. Combinations of estrogen and progestins administered in vitro cooperate in promoting tumor secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and, consequently, support tumor-associated angiogenesis. Further, dual treatment with estradiol and progestin increased the numbers of putative tumor stem/progenitor cells. Thus, ER- and/or PR-targeted therapies may offer new approaches to manage NSCLC. PMID:21600232

  8. κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation Improves Endothelial Function via Akt-stimulated NO Production in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Zheng, Xu-Yang; Li, Juan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Feng, Na; Guo, Hai-Tao; Jia, Min; Wang, Yue-Min; Fan, Rong; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of U50,488H (a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist) on endothelial function impaired by hyperlipidemia and to determine the role of Akt-stimulated NO production in it. Hyperlipidemic model was established by feeding rats with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. U50,488H and nor-BNI (a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist) were administered intraperitoneally. In vitro, the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in the effect of U50,488H was studied using cultured endothelial cells subjected to artificial hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations dramatically increased after high-fat diet feeding. Administration of U50,488H significantly alleviated endothelial ultrastructural destruction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impairment caused by hyperlipidemia. U50,488H also increased Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and serum/medium NO level both in vivo and in vitro. U50,488H increased eNOS activity and suppressed iNOS activity in vivo. The effects of U50,488H were abolished in vitro by siRNAs targeting κ-opioid receptor and Akt or PI3K/Akt/eNOS inhibitors. All effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. These results demonstrate that κ-opioid receptor stimulation normalizes endothelial ultrastructure and function under hyperlipidemic condition. Its mechanism is related to the preservation of eNOS phosphorylation through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and downregulation of iNOS expression/activity. PMID:27226238

  9. In vivo evidence for antioxidant potential of estrogen in microvessels of female spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Ana Paula V; Tostes, Rita C A; Fortes, Zuleica B; Costa, Sonia G; Nigro, Dorothy; Carvalho, Maria Helena C

    2002-02-01

    female SHR with losartan caused similar decreases in oxyradicals in both OE and OVX, whereas diclofenac and verapamil had no effects. Together these data suggest that estrogen reduces superoxide anion bioavailability in vivo. The antioxidant effect of estrogen, which can contribute to a less pronounced endothelial dysfunction in female SHR, may be dependent on a direct modulatory action of estrogen on NADPH activity.

  10. Effects of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, atorvastatin and simvastatin, on the expression of endothelin-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Perera, O; Pérez-Sala, D; Navarro-Antolín, J; Sánchez-Pascuala, R; Hernández, G; Díaz, C; Lamas, S

    1998-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis has been attributed to alterations in the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway or to an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1). The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to ameliorate endothelial function. However, the physiological basis of this observation is largely unknown. We investigated the effects of Atorvastatin and Simvastatin on the pre-proET-1 mRNA expression and ET-1 synthesis and on the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) transcript and protein levels in bovine aortic endothelial cells. These agents inhibited pre-proET-1 mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion (60-70% maximum inhibition) and reduced immunoreactive ET-1 levels (25-50%). This inhibitory effect was maintained in the presence of oxidized LDL (1-50 microg/ml). No significant modification of pre-proET-1 mRNA half-life was observed. In addition, mevalonate, but not cholesterol, reversed the statin-mediated decrease of pre-proET-1 mRNA levels. eNOS mRNA expression was reduced by oxidized LDL in a dose-dependent fashion (up to 57% inhibition), whereas native LDL had no effect. Statins were able to prevent the inhibitory action exerted by oxidized LDL on eNOS mRNA and protein levels. Hence, these drugs might influence vascular tone by modulating the expression of endothelial vasoactive factors. PMID:9637705

  11. [Medical significance of endothelial glycocalyx].

    PubMed

    Frati-Munari, Alberto C

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx is a layer composed by glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to the vascular endothelial luminal surface. It has several physiological roles: shear stress mechanotransduction to the endothelial cells, regulation of fluids and macromolecules vascular permeability, of coagulation cascade activation and fibrinolysis, and protects the endothelium from platelets and leukocytes adhesion. In general, glycocalyx protects vascular wall against pathogenic insults. The glycocalyx may be damaged by abnormal shear stress, reactive oxygen species, hypernatremia, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammatory molecules, resulting in endothelial dysfunction, enhanced vascular permeability, lipoproteins leakage to subendothelial space, activation of plasma coagulation, and increased adherence of platelets and leukocytes to the endothelial cells. Shredding of glycocalyx appears as an important initial step in the pathophysiology of vascular diseases.

  12. Using a customized DNA microarray for expression profiling of the estrogen-responsive genes to evaluate estrogen activity among natural estrogens and industrial chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, Shunichi; Aita, Yukie; Inoue, Akio; Hayashi, Shinichi; Nishigaki, Michiko; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Hiroki; Wada-Kiyama, Yuko; Sakuma, Yasuo; Akaba, Shuichi; Tanaka, Junko; Sone, Hideko; Yonemoto, Junzo; Tanji, Masao; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2004-01-01

    We developed a DNA microarray to evaluate the estrogen activity of natural estrogens and industrial chemicals. Using MCF-7 cells, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of estrogen-responsive genes among approximately 20,000 human genes. On the basis of reproducible and reliable responses of the genes to estrogen, we selected 172 genes to be used for developing a customized DNA microarray. Using this DNA microarray, we examined estrogen activity among natural estrogens (17beta-estradiol, estriol, estrone, genistein), industrial chemicals (diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, methoxychlor), and dioxin. We obtained results identical to those for other bioassays that are used for detecting estrogen activity. On the basis of statistical correlations analysis, these bioassays have shown more sensitivity for dioxin and methoxychlor. PMID:15159206

  13. Estrogenicity of glabridin in Ishikawa cells.

    PubMed

    Su Wei Poh, Melissa; Voon Chen Yong, Phelim; Viseswaran, Navaratnam; Chia, Yoke Yin

    2015-01-01

    Glabridin is an isoflavan from licorice root, which is a common component of herbal remedies used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. Past studies have shown that glabridin resulted in favorable outcome similar to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), suggesting a possible role as an estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). This study aims to evaluate the estrogenic effect of glabridin in an in-vitro endometrial cell line -Ishikawa cells via alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator assay. Its effect on cell proliferation was also evaluated using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that glabridin activated the ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator complex and displayed a dose-dependent increase in estrogenic activity supporting its use as an ERT. However, glabridin also induced an increase in cell proliferation. When glabridin was treated together with 17β-E2, synergistic estrogenic effect was observed with a slight decrease in cell proliferation as compared to treatment by 17β-E2 alone. This suggest that the combination might be better suited for providing high estrogenic effects with lower incidences of endometrial cancer that is associated with 17β-E2. PMID:25816349

  14. Estrogen receptors and human disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    A myriad of physiological processes in mammals are influenced by estrogens and the estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ. As we reviewed previously, given the widespread role for estrogen in normal human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen is implicated in the development or progression of a number of diseases. In this review, we are giving a 5-year update of the literature regarding the influence of estrogens on a number of human cancers (breast, ovarian, colorectal, prostate, and endometrial), endometriosis, fibroids, and cardiovascular disease. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into human disease, but for this review, the literature citations were limited to articles published after our previous review (Deroo and Korach in J Clin Invest 116(3):561–570, 2006) and will focus in most cases on human data and clinical trials. We will describe the influence in which estrogen’s action, through one of or both of the ERs, mediates the aforementioned human disease states. PMID:22648069

  15. Estrogen sulfotransferase ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaojuan; Guo, Yan; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Deng, Meihong; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Xu, Meishu; Lu, Peipei; Yan, Jiong; Fu, Haiyan; Liu, Youhua; Yu, Lushan; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Here we report an essential role for the estrogen sulfotransferase (EST or SULT1E1), a conjugating enzyme that sulfonates and deactivates estrogens, in sepsis response. Both the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysacharide (LPS) models of sepsis induce the expression of EST and compromise the activity of estrogen, an anti-inflammatory hormone. Surprisingly, EST ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis-induced death. Mechanistically, EST ablation attenuates sepsis-induced inflammatory responses due to compromised estrogen deactivation, leading to increased sepsis lethality. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of EST promotes estrogen deactivation and sensitizes mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response. The induction of EST by sepsis is NF-κB dependent and EST is a NF-κB target gene. The reciprocal regulation of inflammation and EST may represent a yet to be explored mechanism of endocrine regulation of inflammation, which has an impact on the clinical outcome of sepsis. PMID:26259151

  16. Genetic engineering with endothelial nitric oxide synthase improves functional properties of endothelial progenitor cells from patients with coronary artery disease: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Savneet; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Uruno, Akira; Sugawara, Akira; Jayakumar, Karunakaran; Kartha, Chandrasekharan Cheranellore

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies have reported a marked impairment in the number and functions of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In view of an important role of eNOS in angiogenesis, in the present study, we evaluated the effects of eNOS gene transfer in ex vivo expanded EPCs isolated from patients with CAD. The expanded EPCs were transfected with mammalian expression vector pcDNA3.1-eNOS containing the full-length human eNOS gene using lipofectamine. About 35-40% of the eNOS-EPCs had higher expression of eNOS as compared to untransfected EPCs. EPCs transfected with pcDNA3.0-EGFP, the plasmid vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used as control. The untransfected, GFP-transfected and eNOS-transfected EPCs were compared in terms of important functional attributes of angiogenesis such as proliferation, migration, differentiation and adhesion/integration into tube-like structures in vitro. Functional studies revealed that in the presence of defined growth conditions, compared to the untransfected and GFP-transfected cells, eNOS-EPCs from patients with CAD have a significant increase in [3H] thymidine-labeled DNA (P < 0.01), migration (14.6 +/- 1.8 and 16.5 +/- 1.9 vs. 23.5 +/- 3.4 cells/field, P < 0.01), ability to differentiate into endothelial-like spindle-shaped cells (46 +/- 4.5 and 56.5 +/- 2.1 vs. 93.2 +/- 6.6 cells/field, P < 0.001) and also incorporation into tube-like structures on the matrigel (GFP-EPCs: 21.25 +/- 2.9 vs. GFP-eNOS-EPCs: 34.5 +/- 5.5 cells/field, P < 0.05). We conclude that eNOS gene transfection is a valuable approach to augment angiogenic properties of ex vivo expanded EPCs and eNOS-modified EPCs may offer significant advantages than EPCs alone in terms of their clinical use in patients with myocardial ischemia.

  17. Role of nitric oxide signaling in endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ngan F; Fleissner, Felix; Sun, John; Cooke, John P

    2010-10-01

    Signaling pathways that govern embryonic stem cell (ESCs) differentiation are not well characterized. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent vasodilator that modulates other signaling pathways in part by activating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Because of its importance in endothelial cell (EC) growth in the adult, we hypothesized that NO may play a critical role in EC development. Accordingly, we assessed the role of NO in ESC differentiation into ECs. Murine ESCs differentiated in the presence of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) for up to 11 days were not significantly different from vehicle-treated cells in EC markers. However, by 14 days, L-NAME-treated cells manifested modest reduction in EC markers CD144, FLK1, and endothelial NOS. ESC-derived ECs generated in the presence of L-NAME exhibited reduced tube-like formation in Matrigel. To understand the discrepancy between early and late effects of L-NAME, we assessed the NOS machinery and observed low mRNA expression of NOS and sGC subunits in ESCs, compared to differentiating cells after 14 days. In response to NO donors or activation of NOS or sGC, cellular cGMP levels were undetectable in undifferentiated ESCs, at low levels on day 7, and robustly increased in day 14 cells. Production of cGMP upon NOS activation at day 14 was inhibited by L-NAME, confirming endogenous NO dependence. Our data suggest that NOS elements are present in ESCs but inactive until later stages of differentiation, during which period NOS inhibition reduces expression of EC markers and impairs angiogenic function.

  18. Diesel exhaust exposure enhances venoconstriction via uncoupling of eNOS

    SciTech Connect

    Knuckles, Travis L.; Lund, Amie K.; Lucas, Selita N.; Campen, Matthew J.

    2008-08-01

    Environmental air pollution is associated with adverse cardiovascular events, including increased hospital admissions due to heart failure and myocardial infarction. The exact mechanism(s) by which air pollution affects the heart and vasculature is currently unknown. Recent studies have found that exposure to air pollution enhances arterial vasoconstriction in humans and animal models. Work in our laboratory has shown that diesel emissions (DE) enhance vasoconstriction of mouse coronary arteries. Thus, we hypothesized that DE could enhance vasoconstriction in arteries and veins through uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). To test this hypothesis, we first bubbled DE through a physiological saline solution and exposed isolated mesenteric veins. Second, we exposed animals, whole body, to DE at 350 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for 4 h, after which mesenteric arteries and veins were isolated. Results from these experiments show that saline bubbled with DE as well as inhaled DE enhances vasoconstriction in veins but not arteries. Exposure to several representative volatile organic compounds found in the DE-exposed saline did not enhance arterial constriction. L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), an eNOS inhibitor, normalized the control vessels to the DE-exposed vessels implicating an uncoupling of eNOS as a mechanism for enhanced vasoconstriction. The principal conclusions of this research are 1) veins exhibit endothelial dysfunction following in vivo and ex vivo exposures to DE, 2) veins appear to be more sensitive to DE effects than arteries, and 3) DE components most likely induce endothelial dysfunction through the uncoupling of eNOS.

  19. Carotid Endothelial VCAM-1 Is an Early Marker of Carotid Atherosclerosis and Predicts Coronary Artery Disease in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Masseau, I.; Bowles, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim was to determine if endothelial VCAM-1 (eVCAM-1) expression in the common carotid artery (CCA) would correlate with predictive markers of atherosclerotic disease, would precede reduction of markers of endothelial cell function and would predict coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and results Carotid arterial segments (bifurcation, proximal and distal CCA) were harvested from 14 and 24 month-old male castrated familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine, a model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Quantification of local expression of eVCAM-1, intimal macrophage accumulation, oxidative stress, intima-media (I/M) ratio, intima-media thickness (IMT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) in selected regions of the carotids revealed a relationship between local inflammation and atheroscle-rotic plaque progression. Importantly, inflammation was not uniform throughout the CCA. Endo-thelial VCAM-1 expression was the greatest at the bifurcation and increased with age. Finally, eV-CAM-1 best estimated the severity of CAD compared to blood levels of glucose, hypercholestero-lemia, carotid IMT, and p-eNOS. Conclusion Our data suggested that eVCAM-1 was closely associated with atherosclerotic plaque progression and preceded impairment of EDD. Thus, this study supported the use of carotid VCAM-1 targeting agents to estimate the severity of CAD. PMID:26702331

  20. Synergistic activation of estrogen receptor with combinations of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.F.; Klotz, D.M.; Collins, B.M.

    1996-06-07

    Certain chemicals in the environment are estrogenic. The low potencies of the compounds, when studied singly, suggest that they may have little effect on biological systems. The estrogenic potencies of combinations of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen potencies of combination of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen systems (YES) containing human estrogen receptor (hER). Combinations of two weak environmental estrogens, such as dieldrin, endosulfan, or toxaphene, were 100 times as potent in hER-mediated transactivation as any chemical alone. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls shown previously to synergistically alter sexual development in turtles also synergized in the YES. The synergistic interaction of chemical mixtures with the estrogen receptor may have profound environmental implications. These results may represent a previously uncharacterized level of regulation of estrogen-associated responses. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  2. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  3. Nitrones reverse hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Headley, Colwyn A; DiSilvestro, David; Bryant, Kelsey E; Hemann, Craig; Chen, Chun-An; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A

    2016-03-15

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)​ levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC with nitrones for 24h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased (BH4) levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted.

  4. Nitrones reverse hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Headley, Colwyn A; DiSilvestro, David; Bryant, Kelsey E; Hemann, Craig; Chen, Chun-An; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A

    2016-03-15

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)​ levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC with nitrones for 24h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased (BH4) levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted. PMID:26774452

  5. Erythropoietin and a nonerythropoietic peptide analog promote aortic endothelial cell repair under hypoxic conditions: role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Heikal, Lamia; Ghezzi, Pietro; Mengozzi, Manuela; Stelmaszczuk, Blanka; Feelisch, Martin; Ferns, Gordon AA

    2016-01-01

    The cytoprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) and an EPO-related nonerythropoietic analog, pyroglutamate helix B surface peptide (pHBSP), were investigated in an in vitro model of bovine aortic endothelial cell injury under normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. The potential molecular mechanisms of these effects were also explored. Using a model of endothelial injury (the scratch assay), we found that, under hypoxic conditions, EPO and pHBSP enhanced scratch closure by promoting cell migration and proliferation, but did not show any effect under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, EPO protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. The priming effect of hypoxia was associated with stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, EPO receptor upregulation, and decreased Ser-1177 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS); the effect of hypoxia on the latter was rescued by EPO. Hypoxia was associated with a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) production as assessed by its oxidation products, nitrite and nitrate, consistent with the oxygen requirement for endogenous production of NO by endothelial NOS. However, while EPO did not affect NO formation in normoxia, it markedly increased NO production, in a manner sensitive to NOS inhibition, under hypoxic conditions. These data are consistent with the notion that the tissue-protective actions of EPO-related cytokines in pathophysiological settings associated with poor oxygenation are mediated by NO. These findings may be particularly relevant to atherogenesis and postangioplasty restenosis. PMID:27800514

  6. [Association of estrogens and selective estrogens receptors modulators: towards a renewal of the hormonal treatment?].

    PubMed

    Valéra, Marie-Cécile; Chantalat, Elodie; Vinel, Alexia; Benoit, Thibaut; Guillaume, Maeva; Game, Xavier; Gourdy, Pierre; Trémollières, Florence; Payrastre, Bernard; Arnal, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The life expectancy of women has risen in the past century from 48years to more than 80. The decline of endogenous estrogen production (in particular, the principal circulating physiological hormone, 17β-estradiol) at menopause (which occurs at an average of 51years) is often accompanied by a series of functional disorders that affect quality of life (QoL). This estrogen deficiency affects different tissues and results in an increase in the prevalence of various disorders, including but not limited to osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Hormone therapy for menopause is a relatively recent biomedical challenge, which underwent a downturn after the Women Health Initiative study of older postmenopausal women. We will summarize the WHI findings in the first part of this article. At Inserm unit 1048, we are working on understanding the protective effects of estrogen against the development of atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes in murine models. We have also focused in recent years on modeling the impact of estrogen in thrombosis models, to attempt to clarify the complex relation between estrogen and thrombotic risk. In part II of this article, we will describe a new strategy of hormone therapy for menopause, combining estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM). We review the scientific underpinnings of this strategy, which may enable the renewal of hormone therapy for menopause.

  7. The adverse effects of estrogen and selective estrogen receptor modulators on hemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Artero, Arturo; Tarín, Juan J; Cano, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Agonists of the estrogen receptor include estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Both types of compounds increase the risk for thrombosis in the arterial and the venous tree. The magnitude of the effect is influenced by potency, which depends on the type of compound and the dose. The particulars of the process change in each territory. Atherosclerosis, which creates local inflammatory conditions, may favor thrombogenesis in arteries. A direct effect of estrogen agonists is also well endorsed at both arteries, as suggested from data with high-estrogenic contraceptives, and veins. Dose reduction has been proved to be an effective strategy, but there is debate on whether additional benefit may be attained beyond a certain threshold. Hormone therapy and SERMs exhibit a lower potency estrogenic profile, but are mainly used by older women, who have a baseline increased thrombogenic risk. When used as sole agents, estrogens substantially reduce the increased risk (venous thrombosis) or may even be neutral (coronary disease). SERMs exhibit a neutral profile for coronary disease and possibly for stroke but not for venous thrombosis.

  8. [Low dose estrogens and synthetic