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Sample records for endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated

  1. Insufficient sleep is associated with impaired nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Bain, Anthony R; Weil, Brian R; Diehl, Kyle J; Greiner, Jared J; Stauffer, Brian L; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2017-08-18

    Habitual short nightly sleep duration is associated with increased atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk and morbidity. Vascular endothelial dysfunction represents an important mechanism that may underlie this heightened cardiovascular risk. Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, particularly NO-mediated vasodilation, contributes to the development and progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease and acute vascular events. We tested the hypothesis that chronic insufficient sleep is associated with impaired NO-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation in middle-aged adults. Thirty adult men were studied: 15 with normal nightly sleep duration (age: 58 ± 2 y; sleep duration: 7.7 ± 0.2 h/night) and 15 with short nightly sleep duration (55 ± 2 y; 6.1 ± 0.2 h/night). Forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of the endothelial NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), as well as responses to sodium nitroprusside, were determined by strain-gauge venous occlusion plethysmography. The FBF response to acetylcholine was lower (∼20%; p<0.05) in the short sleep duration group (from 4.6 ± 0.3 to 11.7 ± 1.0 ml/100 ml tissue/min) compared with normal sleep duration group (from 4.4 ± 0.3 to 14.5 ± 0.5 ml/100 ml tissue/min). L-NMMA significantly reduced the FBF response to acetylcholine in the normal sleep duration group (∼40%), but not the short sleep duration group. There were no group differences in the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside. These data indicate that short nightly sleep duration is associated with endothelial-dependent vasodilator dysfunction due, in part, to diminished NO bioavailability. Impaired NO-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk with insufficient sleep. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic treatment with taurine ameliorates diabetes-induced dysfunction of nitric oxide-mediated neurogenic and endothelium-dependent corpus cavernosum relaxation in rats.

    PubMed

    Dalaklioglu, Selvinaz; Kuscu, Nilay; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Bayram, Zeliha; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Ozdem, Sadi Satilmis

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed to examine the effect of chronic taurine treatment on corpus cavernosum dysfunction in diabetic rats and to investigate possible underlying mechanisms. Thirty male rats were randomized to three groups of 10 each, including control, diabetic, and taurine-treated diabetic. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ, single intraperitoneal dose of 50 mg/kg body weight). Taurine was administered orally for 12 weeks (1% w/v in drinking water) from the day on which STZ was injected. At the end of the 12th week, strips of corpus cavernosum were suspended in an organ bath system for functional studies. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic corpus cavernosum relaxation were evaluated by acetylcholine (ACh, 0.1-100 μm) and electrical field stimulation (EFS, 30 V, 5 ms, 2-32 Hz), respectively. The expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) (Ser-1177), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), NADPH oxidase subunit gp91(phox) , Rho A, and Rho kinase in corpus cavernosum were semi-quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemistry. Induction of diabetes resulted in significant inhibition of NO-mediated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic corpus cavernosum relaxation. Furthermore, eNOS, p-eNOS, and nNOS expressions decreased significantly in diabetic rats compared to controls, while gp91(phox) , RhoA and Rho kinase expressions increased significantly. The diminished relaxation response to ACh and EFS as well as diabetes-related changes in expressions of these proteins in corpus cavernosum of diabetic rats was significantly improved by taurine. Taurine treatment improves NO-mediated relaxations of corpus cavernosum in diabetic rats probably by inhibiting NADPH oxidase/Rho kinase pathways.

  3. Integrins mediate mechanical compression–induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression–induced vasodilation and NOx (NO−2 and NO−3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression–induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading. PMID:26324675

  4. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading. © 2015 Lu and Kassab.

  5. Overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in arteries infused with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Du, Liang; Flynn, Rowan; Dronadula, Nagadhara; Zhang, Jingwan; Kim, Francis; Dichek, David

    2012-11-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ad) are useful tools for in vivo gene transfer into endothelial cells. However, endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired after Ad infusion, and this impairment is not prevented by use of advanced-generation "helper-dependent" (HD) Ad that lack all viral genes. We hypothesized that endothelium-dependent vasodilation could be improved in Ad-infused arteries by overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). We tested this hypothesis in hyperlipidemic, atherosclerosis-prone rabbits because HDAd will likely be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. Moreover, the consequences of eNOS overexpression might differ in normal and atherosclerosis-prone arteries and could include atherogenic effects, as reported in transgenic mice. We cloned rabbit eNOS and constructed an HDAd that expresses it. HDAdeNOS increased NO production by cultured endothelial cells and increased arterial eNOS mRNA in vivo by ∼10-fold. Compared to arteries infused with a control HDAd, HDAdeNOS-infused arteries of hyperlipidemic rabbits had significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and similar responses to phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Moreover, infusion of HDAdeNOS had local atheroprotective effects including large, significant decreases in intimal lipid accumulation and arterial tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression (p≤0.04 for both). HDAdeNOS infusion yields a durable (≥2 weeks) increase in arterial eNOS expression, improves vasomotor function, and reduces artery wall inflammation and lipid accumulation. Addition of an eNOS expression cassette improves the performance of HDAd, has no harmful effects, and may reduce atherosclerotic lesion growth.

  6. Overexpression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Improves Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation in Arteries Infused with Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Du, Liang; Flynn, Rowan; Dronadula, Nagadhara; Zhang, Jingwan; Kim, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adenoviral vectors (Ad) are useful tools for in vivo gene transfer into endothelial cells. However, endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired after Ad infusion, and this impairment is not prevented by use of advanced-generation “helper-dependent” (HD) Ad that lack all viral genes. We hypothesized that endothelium-dependent vasodilation could be improved in Ad-infused arteries by overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). We tested this hypothesis in hyperlipidemic, atherosclerosis-prone rabbits because HDAd will likely be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. Moreover, the consequences of eNOS overexpression might differ in normal and atherosclerosis-prone arteries and could include atherogenic effects, as reported in transgenic mice. We cloned rabbit eNOS and constructed an HDAd that expresses it. HDAdeNOS increased NO production by cultured endothelial cells and increased arterial eNOS mRNA in vivo by ∼10-fold. Compared to arteries infused with a control HDAd, HDAdeNOS-infused arteries of hyperlipidemic rabbits had significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and similar responses to phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Moreover, infusion of HDAdeNOS had local atheroprotective effects including large, significant decreases in intimal lipid accumulation and arterial tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression (p≤0.04 for both). HDAdeNOS infusion yields a durable (≥2 weeks) increase in arterial eNOS expression, improves vasomotor function, and reduces artery wall inflammation and lipid accumulation. Addition of an eNOS expression cassette improves the performance of HDAd, has no harmful effects, and may reduce atherosclerotic lesion growth. PMID:22906141

  7. Acute Retinal Ischemia Inhibits Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide–Mediated Dilation of Retinal Arterioles via Enhanced Superoxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yi; Potts, Luke B.; Yuan, Zhaoxu; Kuo, Enoch; Rosa, Robert H.; Kuo, Lih

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Because retinal vascular disease is associated with ischemia and increased oxidative stress, the vasodilator function of retinal arterioles was examined after retinal ischemia induced by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The role of superoxide anions in the development of vascular dysfunction was assessed. Methods. IOP was increased and maintained at 80 to 90 mm Hg for 30, 60, or 90 minutes by infusing saline into the anterior chamber of a porcine eye. The fellow eye with normal IOP (10–20 mm Hg) served as control. In some pigs, superoxide dismutase mimetic TEMPOL (1 mM) or vehicle (saline) was injected intravitreally before IOP elevation. After enucleation, retinal arterioles were isolated and pressurized without flow for functional analysis by recording diameter changes using videomicroscopic techniques. Dihydroethidium (DHE) was used to detect superoxide production in isolated retinal arterioles. Results. Isolated retinal arterioles developed stable basal tone and the vasodilations to endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated agonists bradykinin and L-lactate were significantly reduced only by 90 minutes of ischemia. However, vasodilation to endothelium-independent NO donor sodium nitroprusside was unaffected after all time periods of ischemia. DHE staining showed that 90 minutes of ischemia significantly increased superoxide levels in retinal arterioles. Intravitreal injection of membrane-permeable radical scavenger but not vehicle before ischemia prevented elevation of vascular superoxide and preserved bradykinin-induced dilation. Conclusions. Endothelium-dependent NO-mediated dilation of retinal arterioles is impaired by 90 minutes of ischemia induced by elevated IOP. The inhibitory effect appears to be mediated by the alteration of NO signaling via vascular superoxide. PMID:22110081

  8. Antihypertensive treatment and endothelium-dependent venodilation in sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Duchna, Hans-Werner; Orth, Maritta; Schultze-Werninghaus, Gerhard; Guilleminault, Christian; Stoohs, Riccardo A

    2006-09-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with nitric oxide-mediated endothelial dysfunction and increased risk and prevalence of cardiovascular disease, namely, arterial hypertension. A substantial number of patients do not comply with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment. These individuals have a persisting increased cardiovascular risk. Antihypertensive drugs have shown to improve nitric oxide-mediated endothelial dysfunction. We therefore designed a study to test the hypothesis that antihypertensive drug treatment in hypertensive patients with SDB can have beneficial effects on nitric oxide-mediated endothelial function in the absence of treatment with nCPAP. Six patients with SDB and treated arterial hypertension, six normotensive patients with SDB, and six healthy controls received sleep studies and an assessment of venodilation using the dorsal hand vein technique. Polygraphic measures using standard overnight sleep studies and dose-response curves to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator bradykinin were obtained. Maximum nitric-oxide-mediated dilation to bradykinin was significantly higher in patients with SDB who had received antihypertensive drug treatment compared to normotensive SDB patients. Nitric oxide-mediated dilation in hypertensive patients with SDB was similar to nitric oxide-mediated dilation in healthy controls. After treatment of normotensive patients with SDB using nCPAP, nitric oxide-mediated dilation in normotensive SDB patients was comparable to nitric oxide-mediated dilation in SDB patients with antihypertensive drug treatment and normal controls. Hypertensive patients with SDB present a normal nitric oxide-mediated endothelial function under antihypertensive treatment.

  9. Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations via nitric oxide production and activation of IKCa channels

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Harry Z.E.; Shi, Jian; Jahan, Kazi S.; Martinucci, Matthew C.; Gilbert, Steven J.; Vanessa Ho, W.-S.; Albert, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of vascular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) is reported to induce both constrictions and relaxations. However, cellular mechanisms involved in these responses remain unclear. The present study investigates the effect of stimulating CaSRs on vascular contractility and focuses on the role of the endothelium, nitric oxide (NO) and K+ channels in these responses. In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca2 +]o from 1 mM to 6 mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine pre-contracted rabbit mesenteric arteries. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were dependent on a functional endothelium, and were inhibited by the negative allosteric CaSR modulator Calhex-231. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were reduced by inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase, guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G. CaSR activation also induced NO production in freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs) in experiments using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of large (BKCa) and intermediate (IKCa) Ca2 +-activated K+ channels (iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin), and Kv7 channels (linopirdine) also reduced [Ca2 +]o-induced vasorelaxations. Increasing [Ca2 +]o also activated IKCa currents in perforated-patch recordings of isolated mesenteric artery ECs. These findings indicate that stimulation of CaSRs induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations which are mediated by two separate pathways involving production of NO and activation of IKCa channels. NO stimulates PKG leading to BKCa activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas IKCa activity contributes to endothelium-derived hyperpolarisations. PMID:26772767

  10. Asymmetrical dimethylarginine plasma concentrations are related to basal nitric oxide release but not endothelium-dependent vasodilation of resistance arteries in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, Friedrich; Schaller, Georg; Pleiner, Johannes; Vychytil, Andreas; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere; Hörl, Walter H; Wolzt, Michael

    2005-06-01

    Vascular dysfunction in chronic renal failure may be linked to reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity and increased circulating concentrations of the endogenous NO synthase inhibitor asymmetrical dimethyl L-arginine (ADMA). The association between ADMA and basal endothelial NO release and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in resistance arteries of chronic renal failure patients is unknown. Forearm blood flow responses to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine, the endothelium-independent vasodilator nitroglycerine, and the endothelium-dependent vasoconstrictor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) were assessed in 37 peritoneal dialysis patients. L-arginine and ADMA plasma concentrations were measured by HPLC. ADMA (mean +/- SEM: 0.68 +/- 0.02 micromol/L) was associated with basal forearm blood flow (r = -0.33; P < 0.05) and L-NMMA induced vasoconstriction (r = -0.55; P < 0.0005), but not with dilator effects of acetylcholine or nitroglycerine. L-arginine (68 +/- 3 micromol/L) tended to correlate with acetylcholine-induced vasodilation (r = 0.32; P = 0.05) but was not associated with other parameters. ADMA is related to basal but not to acetylcholine-stimulated NO bioactivity in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation found in chronic renal failure is not explained by elevated circulating NO synthase inhibitors in renal failure.

  11. Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide and Hyperpolarization-Mediated Venous Relaxation Pathways in Rat Inferior Vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Raffetto, Joseph D.; Yu, Peng; Reslan, Ossama M.; Xia, Yin; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    -NAME and indomethacin suggesting that any Ach-induced EDHF is blocked in the presence of high KCl depolarizing solution, which does not favor outward movement of K+ ion and membrane hyperpolarization. Cromakalim, activator of KATP, caused significant IVC relaxation when applied alone or on top of maximal Ach-induced relaxation, suggesting that the Ach response may not involve KATP. Ach-induced relaxation was not inhibited by glibenclamide, 4-AP or apamin, suggesting little role of KATP, Kv or SKCa, respectively. In contrast, iberiotoxin significantly inhibited Ach-induced relaxation, suggesting a role of BKCa. Conclusions Thus endothelium-dependent venous relaxation plays a major role in the control of venous function. In addition to NO, an EDHF pathway involving BKCa may play a role in endothelium-dependent venous relaxation. PMID:22209615

  12. Effect of chronic lithium administration on endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum: the role of nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathways.

    PubMed

    Sadeghipour, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Nobakht, Maliheh; Ebrahimi, Farzad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2007-01-01

    To verify the effect of chronic lithium administration on the endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum, as lithium is a major drug for treating bipolar disorder and some studies showed that lithium might cause erectile dysfunction in such patients, by a mechanism as yet unknown. LiCl (600 mg/L) was dissolved in drinking water and Sprague-Dawley rats received the solution for 30 days; control rats received tap water. After 30 days corporeal strips were prepared from both groups, mounted under tension in oxygenated organ baths, and pre-contracted with phenylephrine (7.5 microm). After equilibration, the strips were relaxed by acetylcholine (10 nm to 1 mm) in the presence or absence of indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; 20 microm). Furthermore, the relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside (1 nm to 1 mm), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, were investigated in both groups. NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry was used to identify NO synthase within cavernosal tissue strips of both groups. The acetylcholine-dependent relaxation was significantly lower in lithium-treated rats than in controls. Although indomethacin decreased significantly the relaxant responses to acetylcholine in controls, it increased the relaxant responses in lithium-treated rats. NADPH-diaphorase staining was greater in the chronic lithium-treated than in control preparations. Sodium nitroprusside produced similar relaxation in both groups. Chronic lithium administration can impair the endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum; NO availability might decrease after lithium administration and the cyclooxygenase pathways might have a role in this effect.

  13. Repetition of ischemic preconditioning augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans: role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide and endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masashi; Ueda, Keiko; Goto, Chikara; Jitsuiki, Daisuke; Nishioka, Kenji; Umemura, Takashi; Noma, Kensuke; Yoshizumi, Masao; Chayama, Kazuaki; Higashi, Yukihito

    2007-06-01

    Several studies have shown that both early and late effects of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protect against myocardial injury after ischemic reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the late effects of IPC on endothelial function in humans. Late phase of IPC was induced by upper limb ischemia (cuff inflation of over 200 mm Hg for 5 minutes) 6 times a day for 1 month. We evaluated forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) before and after IPC stimulus in 30 young healthy men. FBF was measured using a strain-gauge plethysmograph. The IPC stimulus significantly increased plasma concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), circulating level of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and FBF responses to ACh, but these did not change in the control group. The FBF responses to SNP were similar before and after the IPC stimulus. Infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, completely eliminated the IPC stimulus-induced augmentation of FBF responses to ACh. In the contralateral arms of subjects that received the IPC stimulus, FBF responses to ACh did not change, but levels of VEGF and circulating EPCs increased. These findings suggest that repetition of late IPC stimulus augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans through increases in nitric oxide production and number of EPCs under a local condition. Repetition of IPC stimulus may be a simple, safe, and feasible therapeutic technique for endothelial protection of peripheral vessels.

  14. Resveratrol induces acute endothelium-dependent renal vasodilation mediated through nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Gordish, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is suggested to have beneficial cardiovascular and renoprotective effects. Resveratrol increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We hypothesized resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, mediated through increased NO production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In anesthetized rats, we found 5.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) of resveratrol increased renal blood flow (RBF) by 8% [from 6.98 ± 0.42 to 7.54 ± 0.17 ml·min−1·gram of kidney weight−1 (gkw); n = 8; P < 0.002] and decreased renal vascular resistance (RVR) by 18% from 15.00 ± 1.65 to 12.32 ± 1.20 arbitrary resistance units (ARU; P < 0.002). To test the participation of NO, we administered 5.0 mg/kg bw resveratrol before and after 10 mg/kg bw of the NOS inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). l-NAME reduced the increase in RBF to resveratrol by 54% (from 0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.27 ± 0.06 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 10; P < 0.001). To test the participation of ROS, we gave 5.0 mg/kg bw resveratrol before and after 1 mg/kg bw tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. Resveratrol increased RBF 7.6% (from 5.91 ± 0.32 to 6.36 ± 0.12 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P < 0.001) and decreased RVR 19% (from 18.83 ± 1.37 to 15.27 ± 1.37 ARU). Tempol blocked resveratrol-induced increase in RBF (from 0.45 ± 0.12 to 0.10 ± 0.05 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P < 0.03) and the decrease in RVR posttempol was 44% of the control response (3.56 ± 0.34 vs. 1.57 ± 0.21 ARU; n = 7; P < 0.006). We also tested the role of endothelium-derived prostanoids. Two days of 10 mg/kg bw indomethacin pretreatment did not alter basal blood pressure or RBF. Resveratrol-induced vasodilation remained unaffected. We conclude intravenous resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, partially mediated by increased NO production/NO bioavailability and superoxide scavenging but not by inducing vasodilatory cyclooxygenase products. PMID:24431202

  15. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation effects of Panax notoginseng and its main components are mediated by nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Ren, Yu; Xing, Leilei; Dai, Xiangdong; Liu, Sheng; Yu, Bin; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Panax notoginseng, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The main bioactive components of this species are Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS). The present study aimed to investigate the effects of PNS and five of its main components (ginsenosides Rg1, Re, Rb1 and Rd, and notoginsenoside R1) on rat aorta rings pre-contracted with norepinephrine (NE) and to determine the underlying mechanism of action. Isolated aorta rings (with or without intact endothelium) from adult male Wistar rats were stimulated with NE to induce vasoconstriction, and subsequently treated with different concentrations of PNS and its five main components (Rg1, Re, Rb1, R1 and Rd) separately. This procedure was repeated after pre-incubation with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin (INDO), in order to elucidate the mechanism of action of PNS and its components. The results demonstrated that PNS and the components Rg1, Re, Rb1 and R1, but not Rd, induced vessel relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner when the endothelium lining was intact. NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME and guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ attenuated the diastolic effects of PNS, Rg1, Re, Rb1 and R1 in aortic rings with intact endothelium. By contrast, INDO, a known COX inhibitor weakened the vasodilation effects of PNS, Re and Rb1 but demonstrated no effect on Rg1 and R1. In conclusion, PNS and two of its main components (Re and Rb1) exert vasodilating effects through the NO and COX pathways. PMID:28101178

  16. Resveratrol Ameliorates Clonidine-Induced Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Involving Akt and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Regulation in Type 2 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Hida, Mari; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic vascular complication is one of the manifestations of endothelial dysfunction. Resveratrol (RV) is considered to be beneficial in protecting endothelial function. However, the exact protective effect and mechanisms involved have not been fully clarified. In this study, we investigated the relationship between Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and RV in diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction. Aortas were dissected and placed in organ chambers, and nitric oxide (NO) production in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and RV was measured. ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was markedly increased in controls by RV pretreatment. Furthermore, RV caused NO-dependent relaxation via the Akt signaling pathway, which was weaker in the aortas of diabetic mice than age-matched controls. To further examine the underlying mechanisms, we measured the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS by Western blotting. RV caused the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in aortas, which was decreased in diabetic mice. However, RV augmented the impaired clonidine-induced relaxation in diabetic mice. Interestingly, the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS was increased under stimulation with RV and clonidine only in diabetic mice. Thus, either RV or clonidine causes Akt-dependent NO-mediated relaxation, which is weaker in diabetic mice than controls. However, additional exposure to RV and clonidine has an augmenting effect on the Akt/eNOS signaling pathway under diabetic conditions. RV-induced Akt/eNOS activity may be a common link involved in the clonidine-induced Akt/eNOS activity, so RV and clonidine may have a synergistic effect.

  17. Leptin-Induced Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxation of Peripheral Arteries in Lean and Obese Rats: Role of Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Gertler, Arieh; Solomon, Gili; Wood, Mark E.; Whiteman, Matthew; Bełtowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue hormone leptin induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation mediated by nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF). Previously it has been demonstrated that in short-term obesity the NO-dependent and the EDHF-dependent components of vascular effect of leptin are impaired and up-regulated, respectively. Herein we examined the mechanism of the EDHF-dependent vasodilatory effect of leptin and tested the hypothesis that alterations of acute vascular effects of leptin in obesity are accounted for by chronic hyperleptinemia. The study was performed in 5 groups of rats: (1) control, (2) treated with exogenous leptin for 1 week to induce hyperleptinemia, (3) obese, fed highly-palatable diet for 4 weeks, (4) obese treated with pegylated superactive rat leptin receptor antagonist (PEG-SRLA) for 1 week, (5) fed standard chow and treated with PEG-SRLA. Acute effect of leptin on isometric tension of mesenteric artery segments was measured ex vivo. Leptin relaxed phenylephrine-preconstricted vascular segments in NO- and EDHF-dependent manner. The NO-dependent component was impaired and the EDHF-dependent component was increased in the leptin-treated and obese groups and in the latter group both these effects were abolished by PEG-SRLA. The EDHF-dependent vasodilatory effect of leptin was blocked by either the inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase, propargylglycine, or a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) scavenger, bismuth (III) subsalicylate. The results indicate that NO deficiency is compensated by the up-regulation of EDHF in obese rats and both effects are accounted for by chronic hyperleptinemia. The EDHF-dependent component of leptin-induced vasorelaxation is mediated, at least partially, by H2S. PMID:24475175

  18. Leptin-induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of peripheral arteries in lean and obese rats: role of nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Gertler, Arieh; Solomon, Gili; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Bełtowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue hormone leptin induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation mediated by nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF). Previously it has been demonstrated that in short-term obesity the NO-dependent and the EDHF-dependent components of vascular effect of leptin are impaired and up-regulated, respectively. Herein we examined the mechanism of the EDHF-dependent vasodilatory effect of leptin and tested the hypothesis that alterations of acute vascular effects of leptin in obesity are accounted for by chronic hyperleptinemia. The study was performed in 5 groups of rats: (1) control, (2) treated with exogenous leptin for 1 week to induce hyperleptinemia, (3) obese, fed highly-palatable diet for 4 weeks, (4) obese treated with pegylated superactive rat leptin receptor antagonist (PEG-SRLA) for 1 week, (5) fed standard chow and treated with PEG-SRLA. Acute effect of leptin on isometric tension of mesenteric artery segments was measured ex vivo. Leptin relaxed phenylephrine-preconstricted vascular segments in NO- and EDHF-dependent manner. The NO-dependent component was impaired and the EDHF-dependent component was increased in the leptin-treated and obese groups and in the latter group both these effects were abolished by PEG-SRLA. The EDHF-dependent vasodilatory effect of leptin was blocked by either the inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase, propargylglycine, or a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) scavenger, bismuth (III) subsalicylate. The results indicate that NO deficiency is compensated by the up-regulation of EDHF in obese rats and both effects are accounted for by chronic hyperleptinemia. The EDHF-dependent component of leptin-induced vasorelaxation is mediated, at least partially, by H2S.

  19. (-)epicatechin induces and modulates endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated rat mesenteric artery rings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Yu; Yao, Xiao-Qiang; Chan, Franky Leung; Lau, Chi-Wai; Huang, Yu

    2002-12-01

    The present study was aimed to examine the role of endothelial nitric oxide in the relaxant response to green tea (-)epicatechin and its modulation of endothelium-mediated relaxation in the isolated rat mesenteric artery rings. Changes in the isometric tension were measured with Grass force-displacement transducers. The (-)epicatechin-induced relaxation was largely dependent on the presence of intact endothelium and was reversed by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester 10 micromol/L or methylene blue 10 micromol/L, the inhibitors of nitric oxide-mediated relaxation. L-Arginine at 1 mmol/L antagonized the effect of L-NAME or methylene blue. Pretreatment of endothelium-intact rings with (-)epicatechin 10 micromol/L enhanced the relaxation induced by endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine, while this concentration did not influence the endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside in the endothelium-denuded artery rings. The results indicate that the endothelium-dependent vasodilation by (-)epicatechin is mainly mediated through nitric oxide and low concentration of (-)epicatechin augments endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in the rat mesenteric arteries.

  20. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine in bovine oviductal arteries: mediation by nitric oxide and changes in apamin-sensitive K+ conductance.

    PubMed Central

    García-Pascual, A.; Labadía, A.; Jimenez, E.; Costa, G.

    1995-01-01

    1. Mechanisms underlying the relaxant response to acetylcholine (ACh) were examined in bovine oviductal arteries (o.d. 300-500 microns and i.d. 150-300 microns) in vitro. Vascular rings were treated with indomethacin (10 microM) to prevent the effects of prostaglandins. 2. ACh elicited a concentration-related relaxation in ring segments precontracted with noradrenaline (NA), which was abolished by endothelium denudation. 3. The ACh-induced relaxation was attenuated but not abolished by NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 1 microM-1 mM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) formation. The inhibition caused by L-NOARG (10 microM) was reversed by addition of excess of L-arginine but not D-arginine (1 mM). 4. In high K+ (40-60 mM)-contracted rings, ACh was a much less effective vasodilator and its relaxant response was completely abolished by L-NOARG (100 microM). 5. In NA (10 microM)-contracted rings, ACh induced sustained and concentration-dependent increases in cyclic GMP, which were reduced below basal values by L-NOARG (100 microM), while potent relaxation persisted. Similar increases in cyclic GMP were evoked by ACh in high K+ (50 mM)-treated arteries and under these conditions, both cyclic GMP accumulation and relaxation were L-NOARG-sensitive. 6. S-nitroso-L-cysteine (NC), a proposed endogenous precursor of endothelial NO, also induced cyclic GMP accumulation in NA-contracted oviductal arteries. 7. Methylene blue (MB, 10 microM), a proposed inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, inhibited both endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh and endothelium-independent response to exogenous NO, whereas relaxation to NC remained unaffected. 8. The L-NOARG-resistant response to ACh was not affected by either ouabain (0.5 mM), glibenclamide (3 microM), tetraethylammonium (TEA, 1 mM) or charybdotoxin (50 nM), but was selectively blocked by apamin (0.1-1 microM). However, apamin did not inhibit either relaxation to ACh in high K(+)-contracted rings or endothelium

  1. Aronia melanocarpa juice, a rich source of polyphenols, induces endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary arteries via the redox-sensitive activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Auger, Cyril; Kurita, Ikuko; Anselm, Eric; Rivoarilala, Lalainasoa Odile; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2013-11-30

    This study examined the ability of Aronia melanocarpa (chokeberry) juice, a rich source of polyphenols, to cause NO-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated coronary arteries and, if so, to determine the underlying mechanism and the active polyphenols. A. melanocarpa juice caused potent endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary artery rings. Relaxations to A. melanocarpa juice were minimally affected by inhibition of the formation of vasoactive prostanoids and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses, and markedly reduced by N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine (endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) inhibitor), membrane permeant analogs of superoxide dismutase and catalase, PP2 (Src kinase inhibitor), and wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor). In cultured endothelial cells, A. melanocarpa juice increased the formation of NO as assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using the spin trap iron(II)diethyldithiocarbamate, and reactive oxygen species using dihydroethidium. These responses were associated with the redox-sensitive phosphorylation of Src, Akt and eNOS. A. melanocarpa juice-derived fractions containing conjugated cyanidins and chlorogenic acids induced the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. The present findings indicate that A. melanocarpa juice is a potent stimulator of the endothelial formation of NO in coronary arteries; this effect involves the phosphorylation of eNOS via the redox-sensitive activation of the Src/PI3-kinase/Akt pathway mostly by conjugated cyanidins and chlorogenic acids. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  3. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of the murine locomotor network.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joshua D; Dunford, Catherine; Sillar, Keith T; Miles, Gareth B

    2014-02-01

    Spinal motor control networks are regulated by neuromodulatory systems to allow adaptability of movements. The present study aimed to elucidate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the modulation of mammalian spinal locomotor networks. This was investigated with isolated spinal cord preparations from neonatal mice in which rhythmic locomotor-related activity was induced pharmacologically. Bath application of the NO donor diethylamine NONOate (DEA/NO) decreased the frequency and modulated the amplitude of locomotor-related activity recorded from ventral roots. Removal of endogenous NO with coapplication of a NO scavenger (PTIO) and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocker [nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of locomotor-related activity. This demonstrates that endogenously derived NO can modulate both the timing and intensity of locomotor-related activity. The effects of DEA/NO were mimicked by the cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP. In addition, the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ blocked the effects of DEA/NO on burst amplitude and frequency, although the frequency effect was only blocked at low concentrations of DEA/NO. This suggests that NO-mediated modulation involves cGMP-dependent pathways. Sources of NO were studied within the lumbar spinal cord during postnatal development (postnatal days 1-12) with NADPH-diaphorase staining. NOS-positive cells in the ventral horn exhibited a rostrocaudal gradient, with more cells in rostral segments. The number of NOS-positive cells was also found to increase during postnatal development. In summary, we have shown that NO, derived from sources within the mammalian spinal cord, modulates the output of spinal motor networks and is therefore likely to contribute to the fine-tuning of locomotor behavior.

  4. Impaired nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in transgenic sickle mouse.

    PubMed

    Kaul, D K; Liu, X D; Fabry, M E; Nagel, R L

    2000-06-01

    Transgenic sickle mice expressing human beta(S)- and beta(S-Antilles)-globins show intravascular sickling, red blood cell adhesion, and attenuated arteriolar constriction in response to oxygen. We hypothesize that these abnormalities and the likely endothelial damage, also reported in sickle cell anemia, alter nitric oxide (NO)-mediated microvascular responses and hemodynamics in this mouse model. Transgenic mice showed a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared with control groups (90 +/- 7 vs. 113 +/- 8 mmHg, P < 0.00001), accompanied by increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nonselective inhibitor of NOS, caused an approximately 30% increase in MAP and approximately 40% decrease in the diameters of cremaster muscle arterioles (branching orders: A2 and A3) in both control and transgenic mice, confirming NOS activity; these changes were reversible after L-arginine administration. Aminoguanidine, an inhibitor of inducible NOS, had no effect. Transgenic mice showed a decreased (P < 0.02-0.01) arteriolar dilation in response to NO-mediated vasodilators, i.e., ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Indomethacin did not alter the responses to ACh and SNP. Forskolin, a cAMP-activating agent, caused a comparable dilation of A2 and A3 vessels ( approximately 44 and 70%) in both groups of mice. Thus in transgenic mice, an increased eNOS/NO activity results in lower blood pressure and diminished arteriolar responses to NO-mediated vasodilators. Although the increased NOS/NO activity may compensate for flow abnormalities, it may also cause pathophysiological alterations in vascular tone.

  5. Nitric oxide-mediated immunosuppression following murine Echinococcus multilocularis infection

    PubMed Central

    DAI, W J; GOTTSTEIN, B

    1999-01-01

    In some parasitic infections immunosuppression is a prominent characteristic of the host–parasite interplay. We have used a murine alveolar echinococcosis (AE) model in susceptible C57BL/6 mice to document a suppressed splenocyte proliferative response to concanavalin A (Con A) at the early (1-month) stage and to Echinococcus multilocularis-crude antigen (Emc-antigen) at the late (4–6-month) stage of chronic infection. Despite proliferative suppression, splenic cytokine production [interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)] in response to Con A or Emc-antigen stimulation was not suppressed at 1 month postinfection (p.i.). Infection resulted in a strong Mac-1+ cell infiltration of the peritoneal cavity and spleen. Peritoneal cells (PEC) from mice infected at the 1-month stage were rich in macrophages and expressed significantly higher levels of transcripts for the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and for tumour necrosis factor-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), when compared with PEC from non-infected control mice. Conversely, the IL-10 transcript level remained low and did not change during infection. Spleen cells supplemented with PEC from infected mice induced a marked increase in the levels of nitrite in response to Con A and Emc-antigen stimulation, and also a complete suppression of splenic proliferation. The spleen cells from late-stage infected mice expressed only background levels of IL-10 but greatly increased levels of iNOS, when compared with normal spleen cells. This observation correlated with the immunosuppression demonstrated at the late stage of murine AE. Furthermore, the suppressed splenic proliferative responses observed at the early and late stage were reversed to a large extent by the addition of NG-monomethyl-l-arginine and partially by anti-IFN-γ. Thus, our results demonstrated that the immunosuppression observed in chronic AE was not primarily dependent on IL-10 but rather on nitric oxide production by macrophages

  6. Transnitrosylation: A Factor in Nitric Oxide-Mediated Penile Erection.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Lagoda, Gwen; Goetz, Tabitha; La Favor, Justin D; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling can be mediated not only through classic 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate but also through S-nitrosylation. However, the impact of S-nitrosylation on erectile function and in NO regulation and oxidative stress in the penis remains poorly understood. To characterize the role of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), a major regulator of S-nitrosylation homeostasis, on erection physiology and on endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) function and oxidative-nitrosative stress in the penis. Adult GSNOR-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice were used. Erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Total NO in penile homogenates was measured by Griess reaction. Protein S-nitrosylation, eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177 (positive regulatory site), eNOS uncoupling, and markers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, malondialdehyde, and nitrotyrosine) in the penis were measured by western blot. Erectile function, eNOS function, and oxidative stress in the penis of GSNOR-deficient mice. Erectile function was intact in GSNOR-deficient mice. Total S-nitrosylated proteins were increased (P < .05) in the GSNOR(-/-) compared with WT mouse penis. Although eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177 did not differ between the GSNOR(-/-) and WT mouse penises at baseline, electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve increased (P < .05) phosphorylated eNOS in the WT mouse penis but failed to increase phosphorylated eNOS in the GSNOR(-/-) mouse penis. Total NO production was decreased (P < .05), whereas eNOS uncoupling, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, malondialdehyde, and nitrotyrosine were increased (P < .05) in the GSNOR-deficient mouse penis compared with the WT mouse penis. Transnitrosylation mechanisms play an important role in regulating NO bioactivity in the penis. Deficiency of GSNOR leads to eNOS dysfunction and increased oxidative damage, suggesting that homeostatic eNOS function in the penis is governed by transnitrosylation

  7. Nitric Oxide Mediates Glutamate-Linked Enhancement of cGMP Levels in the Cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredt, David S.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. We show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  8. Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-linked enhancement of cGMP levels in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Bredt, D S; Snyder, S H

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. We show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine--citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  9. Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-linked enhancement of cGMP levels in the cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. The authors show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  10. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  11. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Stress Response Induced by Diatom Aldehydes in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms. PMID:22022485

  12. The induction of nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human isolated pulmonary arteries by PACAP

    PubMed Central

    Cardell, Lars Olaf; Hjert, Ola; Uddman, Rolf

    1997-01-01

    The effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were analysed in human isolated circular segments of pulmonary arteries. Guinea-pig pulmonary arteries were used for comparison. The responses obtained were analysed in relation to the vascular endothelium and the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA).PACAP and VIP induced concentration-dependent relaxations of precontracted pulmonary arteries. The maximal dilator response (Imax,%) and the potency (pEC50 value) were the same for both peptides, and there were no differences in the effects obtained on human and guinea-pig segments. PACAP and VIP were both more potent that acetylcholine (ACh).Removal of the vascular endothelium abolished the PACAP induced dilator response in pulmonary arteries from both species. The VIP induced dilatation was unaffected, whereas the response to ACh was abolished. L-NMMA given before PACAP inhibited the dilatation. Furthermore, L-NMMA also reversed the dilatation already induced by PACAP and excess concentrations of L-arginine restored the dilator response of the L-NMMA treated arteries.PACAP is a potent dilator of human pulmonary arteries. Although the dilator effect seems to be similar in amplitude to the one induced by VIP, the present results suggest differences in the underlying mechanisms of action (endothelium-dependency) between the two peptides. PMID:9134222

  13. Nitric oxide and Kir6.1 potassium channel mediate isoquercitrin-induced endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilation in the mesenteric arterial bed of rats.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto Junior, Arquimedes; Dos Reis Piornedo, Renê; Assreuy, Jamil; Da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo

    2016-10-05

    The vascular effect of flavonoid isoquercitrin was investigated in the perfused mesenteric vascular bed of rats. In preparations with functional endothelium isoquercitrin (100, 300 and 1000nmol) dose-dependently reduced the perfusion pressure by 13±2.2, 33±3.9, and 58±3.7mm Hg, respectively. Endothelium removal or inhibition of the nitric oxide synthase enzymes by l-NAME did not change the effects of 100 and 300 nmol isoquercitrin, but reduced by 30-40% the vasodilation induced by 1000 nmol isoquercitrin. Perfusion with nutritive solution containing 40mM KCl abolished the vasodilatory effect of all isoquercitrin doses. Treatment with glibenclamide, a Kir6.1 (ATP-sensitive) potassium channel blocker, inhibited vasodilation induced by 100 and 300 nmol isoquercitrin, but only partially reduced the effect of 1000 nmol isoquercitrin. The non-selective KCa (calcium-activated) potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium, but not the selective KCa1.1 channel blocker iberiotoxin, reduced by around 60% vasodilation induced by all isoquercitrin doses. In addition, association of tetraethylammonium and glibenclamide, or l-NAME and glibenclamide, fully inhibited isoquercitrin-induced vasodilation. Our study shows that isoquercitrin induces vasodilation in resistance arteries, an effect mediated by K(+) channel opening and endothelial nitric oxide production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Abnormal endothelium-dependent responses in early radiation nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Juncos, L I; Cornejo, J C; Gomes, J; Baigorria, S; Juncos, L A

    1997-09-01

    While arterial hypertension and renal dysfunction are well recognized complications of renal irradiation, the mechanisms that trigger the development of these complications are unknown. Recently, it was reported that the endothelium is a major target in radiation injury. Because dysfunction of the endothelial cells may lead or contribute to the development of hypertension and renal dysfunction in radiation nephropathy, we tested the hypothesis that endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired in radiated kidneys prior to the onset of hypertension. To test this hypothesis, we used Long-Evans rats that had undergone left nephrectomy (3 weeks earlier) and irradiation (3000 r's) to the right kidney 8 days earlier (mean blood pressures in the irradiated rats were not different than in the controls). We then measured the changes in renal blood flow (RBF) induced by endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine and bradykinin) and -independent (nitroprusside, norepinephrine, and angiotensin II) vasoactive agents. We found that the increases in RBF induced by the endothelium-dependent but not independent vasodilators were markedly impaired in the irradiated kidneys. Blocking nitric oxide synthesis with nitro L-arginine methyl ester in sham rats mimicked the blunted responsiveness of the irradiated rats, whereas indomethacin (an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis) had no effect on either sham or irradiated rats. Finally, the RBF responses to the endothelium-independent vasoconstrictors, norepinephrine and angiotensin II, were not altered in the irradiated kidneys. These results suggest that renal irradiation causes endothelial dysfunction (prior to the onset of hypertension) but spares the vascular smooth muscle cells.

  15. Reduced nitric oxide-mediated relaxation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the tail arteries of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Siti Safiah; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan Wai Sum; Suppian, Rapeah; Yusof, Mohd Imran; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2016-02-15

    Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. The present study aimed to examine the role of nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH), in the relaxation of ventral tail arteries of rats under diabetic conditions. Relaxations of tail arteries of control and diabetic rats were studied in wire myograph. Western blotting and immunostaining were used to determine the presence of proteins. Acetylcholine-induced relaxations were significantly smaller in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 70.81 ± 2.48% versus 85.05 ± 3.15%). Incubation with the combination of non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin and potassium channel blockers, TRAM 34 and UCL 1684, demonstrated that NO-mediated relaxation was attenuated significantly in diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 48.47 ± 5.84% versus 68.39 ± 6.34%). EDH-type (in the presence of indomethacin and NO synthase inhibitor, LNAME) and prostacyclin-mediated (in the presence of LNAME plus TRAM 34 and UCL 1684) relaxations were not significantly reduced in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats [Rmax: (EDH; 17.81 ± 6.74% versus 34.16 ± 4.59%) (prostacyclin; 15.85 ± 3.27% versus 17.23 ± 3.75%)]. Endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside, salbutamol and prostacyclin were comparable in the two types of preparations. Western blotting and immunostaining indicated that diabetes diminished the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), while increasing those of COX-1 and COX-2. Thus, since acetylcholine-induced NO-mediated relaxation was impaired in diabetes because of reduced eNOS protein expression, pharmacological intervention improving NO bioavailability could be useful in the management of diabetic endothelial dysfunction.

  16. Interleukin-12 is critical for induction of nitric oxide-mediated immunosuppression following vaccination of mice with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Schwacha, M G; Eisenstein, T K

    1997-12-01

    Studies from our laboratory have shown that infection of mice with an attenuated strain of Salmonella typhimurium causes a marked suppression in the capacity of splenocytes to generate an in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) response to sheep erythrocytes. The suppression has been shown to be mediated by mature, adherent macrophages (Mphis) and nonadherent, precursor Mphis. Nitric oxide has been identified as the suppressor factor. The present study investigated the role of interleukin-12 (IL-12) in the generation of nitric oxide-mediated immunosuppression in this model. Salmonella inoculation resulted in marked suppression of PFC responses and high levels of nitrite production. When mice were treated with anti-IL-12 prior to inoculation, nitrite levels in splenocyte cultures were reduced by 75% and the suppression of PFC responses was prevented. The nonadherent splenocyte fraction from Salmonella-inoculated mice, which contains precursor Mphis and is weakly immunosuppressive, was treated with IL-12 in vitro. IL-12 augmented the capacity of this fraction to suppress PFC responses by normal splenocytes in a coculture system. Additionally, IL-12 induced nitrite and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with anti-IFN-gamma blocked nitrite production and suppression, indicating that IFN-gamma is an important intermediary in the pathway of IL-12-induced immunosuppression. These results indicate that IL-12 is critical for the induction of nitric oxide-mediated immunosuppression following S. typhimurium inoculation and, through its ability to stimulate IFN-gamma production, can induce nitric oxide-producing suppressor Mphis.

  17. Increased Nitric Oxide-Mediated Vasodilation of Bone Resistance Arteries Is Associated With Increased Trabecular Bone Volume After Endurance Training In Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, James M.; Prisby, Rhonda D.; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Allen, Matthew R.; Delp, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Old age-associated osteoporosis is related to diminished bone blood flow and impaired nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation of the bone vasculature. Endurance exercise training restores the age-associated reduction of vasodilation in numerous vascular beds, as well as improving bone properties. The purpose of this study was to determine whether functional improvements in the bone vasculature are associated with increased bone properties after an endurance training intervention. Young adult (4–6mo) and old (24–26 mo) male Fischer-344 rats remained sedentary or were trained (15 m/min walking, 15° incline, 5 days/wk, 10–12 wk). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the femoral principal nutrient artery (PNA) was assessed in vitro using acetylcholine (ACh) and inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX). PNA endothelium-dependent vasodilation was greater after training by 16% in young and by 24% in old animals. The NOS-mediated contribution to endothelium-dependent vasodilation was enhanced by 77% after training in old rats. Distal femur trabecular bone volume (BV/TV, %) was lower with old age in sedentary animals (young: 27±2%, old: 23±1%; P<0.05). Exercise-induced elevations in bone and marrow blood flow and the NOS signaling pathway were associated with greater BV/TV (young trained: 34±2%, old trained: 26±1%; P<0.05) relative to sedentary groups. These data demonstrate that training-induced increases in bone properties are associated with enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through a NOS signaling pathway in the bone vasculature. PMID:19892040

  18. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Dilation of blood vessels in response to a large number of agents has been shown to be dependent on an intact vascular endothelium. The present studies examine some aspects of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in blood vessels of the rabbit and rat. Using the rabbit ear artery and the subtype-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine, muscarinic receptors of the endothelium and smooth muscle cells were shown to be of the low affinity M/sub 2/ subtype. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to determine affinity for the smooth muscle receptors while antagonism of methacholine induced vasodilation yielded the endothelial cell receptor affinity. The effect of increasing age (1-27 months) on endothelium-dependent relaxation was studied in aortic rings, perfused tail artery and perfused mesenteric bed of the Fisher 344 rat. The influence of endothelium on contractile responses was examined using the perfused caudal artery.

  19. Nitric oxide mediates insect cellular immunity via phospholipase A2 activation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    After infection or invasion is recognized, biochemical mediators act in signaling insect immune functions. These include biogenic amines, insect cytokines, eicosanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Treating insects or isolated hemocyte populations with different mediators often leads to similar results. Se...

  20. Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation does not initiate the development of sunitinib-associated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Anna M J; van Herpen, Carla M L; Verweij, Vivienne; Pertijs, Jeanne; van den Broek, Petra H H; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Rongen, Gerard A

    2015-10-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting angiogenesis have become an important part of the treatment of patients with several types of cancer. One of the most reported side effects of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-targeted therapies is hypertension. In this study, we hypothesized that the development of hypertension in patients treated with sunitinib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is preceded by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Moreover, we hypothesized that this endothelial dysfunction is a result of impaired nitric oxide release. In a placebo-controlled experiment, we determined vascular responses in isolated mesenteric arteries of rats (n = 26) after 7 days of sunitinib treatment. Sunitinib reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but not endothelium-independent vasodilation. Moreover, we observed that the difference in endothelium-dependent vasodilation between controls and sunitinib-treated animals disappeared in the presence of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide antagonist. In patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, before and 1 week after start of sunitinib, the endothelium-dependent vasodilator response to intra-arterial acetycholine and the endothelium-independent vasodilator response to intra-arterial sodium nitroprusside was assessed with venous occlusion plethysmography. No changes in forearm blood flow ratios were observed. Mean arterial pressure did significantly increase from 101.9 ± 3.8 to 106.1 ± 2.6 mmHg after 1 week and further to 115.8 (±4.9) mmHg after 2 weeks of treatment. In animals, this study confirms that exposure to high concentrations of sunitinib reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilation by reducing endothelial release of nitric oxide. In humans, however, reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation does not precede the development of hypertension in patients treated with sunitinib.

  1. Infrared Imaging of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Blood Flow in Human Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Alexander M.; Ackerman, Hans C.; Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph M.; Littel, Patricia L.; Seamon, Catherine; Footman, Eleni; Chi, Amy; Zorca, Suzana; Krajewski, Megan L.; Cuttica, Michael J.; Machado, Roberto F.; Cannon, Richard O.; Kato, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important pathophysiologic manifestation of sickle cell disease (SCD), a condition that increases risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) imaging would detect changes in cutaneous blood flow reflective of vascular function. We performed IR imaging and conventional strain gauge plethysmography in twenty-five adults with SCD at baseline and during intra-arterial infusions of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and a NOS inhibitor L-NMMA. Skin temperature measured by IR imaging increased in a dose-dependent manner to graded infusions of ACh (+1.1° C, p < 0.0001) and SNP (+0.9° C, p < 0.0001), and correlated with dose-dependent increases in forearm blood flow (ACh: +19.9 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; rs = 0.57, p = 0.003; SNP: +8.6 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; r = 0.70, p = 0.0002). Although IR measurement of skin temperature accurately reflected agonist-induced increases in blood flow, it was less sensitive to decreases in blood flow caused by NOS inhibition. Baseline forearm skin temperature measured by IR imaging correlated significantly with baseline forearm blood flow (31.8±0.2° C, 6.0±0.4 mL/min/100mL; r = 0.58, p = 0.003), and appeared to represent a novel biomarker of vascular function. It predicted a blunted blood flow response to SNP (r = −0.61, p = 0.002), and was independently associated with a marker of pulmonary artery pressure, as well as hemoglobin level, diastolic blood pressure, homocysteine, and cholesterol (R2 = 0.84, p < 0.0001 for the model). IR imaging of agonist-stimulated cutaneous blood flow represents a less cumbersome alternative to plethysmography methodology. Measurement of baseline skin temperature by IR imaging may be a useful new marker of vascular risk in adults with SCD. PMID:22784510

  2. Gamma interferon-induced, nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N; Buller, R M; Karupiah, G

    1995-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production in the murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were previously shown to inhibit the replication of the poxviruses vaccinia virus (VV) and ectromelia virus and herpes simplex virus type 1. In the current study, we performed biochemical analyses to determine the stage in the viral life cycle blocked by IFN-gamma-induced NO. Antibodies specific for temporally expressed viral proteins, a VV-specific DNA probe, and transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the cytokine-induced NO inhibited late protein synthesis, DNA replication, and virus particle formation but not expression of the early proteins analyzed. Essentially similar results were obtained with hydroxyurea and cytosine arabinoside, inhibitors of DNA replication. Enzymatically active iNOS was detected in the lysates of IFN-gamma-treated but not in untreated RAW 264.7 cells. The IFN-gamma-treated RAW 264.7 cells which express iNOS not only were resistant to productive infection but also efficiently blocked the replication of VV in infected bystander cells of epithelial origin. This inhibition was arginine dependent, correlated with nitric production in cultures, and was reversible by the NOS inhibitor N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine. PMID:7529336

  3. Nitric oxide-mediated intracellular growth restriction of pathogenic Rhodococcus equi can be prevented by iron.

    PubMed

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages.

  4. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

    PubMed Central

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  5. Asymmetric dimethylarginine blocks nitric oxide-mediated alcohol-stimulated cilia beating.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, T A; Wells, S M; Alsaidi, Z A; DeVasure, J M; Klein, E B; Bailey, K L; Sisson, J H

    2013-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to alcohol during drinking through direct exhalation of volatized ethanol from the bronchial circulation. Alcohol exposure leads to a rapid increase in the cilia beat frequency (CBF) of bronchial epithelial cells followed by a chronic desensitization of cilia stimulatory responses. This effect is governed in part by the nitric oxide regulation of cyclic guanosine and adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinases (PKG and PKA) and is not fully understood. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, is implicated in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary disorders. We hypothesized that the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by ADMA blocks alcohol-stimulated increases in CBF. To test this hypothesis, ciliated primary bovine bronchial epithelial cells (BBEC) were preincubated with ADMA (100  µM) and stimulated with 100 mM ethanol. CBF was measured and PKA assayed. By 1 hr, ethanol activated PKA, resulting in elevated CBF. Both alcohol-induced PKA activation and CBF were inhibited in the presence of ADMA. ADMA alone had no effect on PKA activity or CBF. Using a mouse model overexpressing the ADMA-degrading enzyme, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), we examined PKA and CBF in precision-cut mouse lung slices. Alcohol-stimulated increases in lung slice PKA and CBF were temporally enhanced in the DDAH mice versus control mice.

  6. Nitric oxide mediates low magnesium inhibition of osteoblast-like cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Leidi, Marzia; Dellera, Federica; Mariotti, Massimo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Crapanzano, Calogero; Albisetti, Walter; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2012-10-01

    An adequate intake of magnesium (Mg) is important for bone cell activity and contributes to the prevention of osteoporosis. Because (a) Mg is mitogenic for osteoblasts and (b) reduction of osteoblast proliferation is detected in osteoporosis, we investigated the influence of different concentrations of extracellular Mg on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cell behavior. We found that low Mg inhibited SaOS-2 cell proliferation by increasing the release of nitric oxide through the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Indeed, both pharmacological inhibition with the iNOS inhibitor l-N(6)-(iminoethyl)-lysine-HCl and genetic silencing of iNOS by small interfering RNA restored the normal proliferation rate of the cells. Because a moderate induction of nitric oxide is sufficient to potentiate bone resorption and a relative deficiency in osteoblast proliferation can result in their inadequate activity, we conclude that maintaining Mg homeostasis is relevant to ensure osteoblast function and, therefore, to prevent osteoporosis.

  7. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B.

    PubMed

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-05-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. Bacterial nitric oxide (NO) signaling via heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) proteins regulates biofilm formation, playing an important role in protecting bacteria from oxidative stress and other environmental stresses. Biofilms are also an important part of symbiosis, allowing the organism to remain in a

  8. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. PMID:25944856

  9. Nitric oxide mediates the anticonvulsant effects of thalidomide on pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Payandemehr, Borna; Rahimian, Reza; Gooshe, Maziar; Bahremand, Arash; Gholizadeh, Ramtin; Berijani, Sina; Ahmadi-Dastgerdi, Mohammad; Aminizade, Mehdi; Sarreshte-Dari, Ali; Dianati, Vahid; Amanlou, Massoud; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-05-01

    Thalidomide is an old glutamic acid derivative which was initially used as a sedative medication but withdrawn from the market due to the high incidence of teratogenicity. Recently, it has reemerged because of its potential for counteracting number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Other than the antiemetic and hypnotic aspects, thalidomide exerts some anticonvulsant properties in experimental settings. However, the underlying mechanisms of thalidomide actions are not fully realized yet. Some investigations revealed that thalidomide could elicit immunomodulatory or neuromodulatory properties by affecting different targets, including cytokines (such as TNF α), neurotransmitters, and nitric oxide (NO). In this regard, we used a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male NMRI mice to investigate whether the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide is affected through modulation of the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway or not. Injection of a single effective dose of thalidomide (10 mg/kg, i.p. or higher) significantly increased the seizure threshold (P<0.05). On the one hand, pretreatment with low and per se noneffective dose of l-arginine [NO precursor] (10, 30 and 60 mg/kg) prevented the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide. On the other hand, NOS inhibitors [l-NAME and 7-NI] augmented the anticonvulsant effect of a subeffective dose of thalidomide (1 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) at relatively low doses. Meanwhile, several doses of aminoguanidine [an inducible NOS inhibitor] (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg) failed to alter the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide significantly. In summary, our findings demonstrated that the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway can be involved in the anticonvulsant properties of thalidomide, and the role of constitutive nNOS is prominent in the reported neuroprotective feature.

  10. Intracellular Nitric Oxide Mediates Neuroproliferative Effect of Neuropeptide Y on Postnatal Hippocampal Precursor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Angela; Newland, Philip L.; Zaben, Malik; Attard, George S.; Gray, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is widely expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is proliferative for a range of cells types in vitro. NPY plays a key role in regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo under both basal and pathological conditions, although the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) on the neurogenic effects of NPY. Using postnatal rat hippocampal cultures, we show that the proliferative effect of NPY on nestin+ precursor cells is NO-dependent. As well as the involvement of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, the proliferative effect is mediated via an NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 signaling pathway. We show that NPY-mediated intracellular NO signaling results in an increase in neuroproliferation. By contrast, extracellular NO had an opposite, inhibitory effect on proliferation. The importance of the NO-cGMP-PKG signaling pathway in ERK1/2 activation was confirmed using Western blotting. This work unites two significant modulators of hippocampal neurogenesis within a common signaling framework and provides a mechanism for the independent extra- and intracellular regulation of postnatal neural precursors by NO. PMID:22474320

  11. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Glutamate-dependent Pathway for Neurotransmission in Sepia officinalis Chromatophore Organs

    PubMed Central

    Mattiello, Teresa; Fiore, Gabriella; Brown, Euan R.; d'Ischia, Marco; Palumbo, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Chromatophore organs are complex and unique structures responsible for the variety of body coloration patterns used by cephalopods to communicate and camouflage. They are formed by a pigment-containing cytoelastic sacculus, surrounded by muscle fibers directly innervated from the brain. Muscle contraction and relaxation are responsible for expansion and retraction of the pigment-containing cell. Their functioning depends on glutamate and Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2-related peptides, which induce fast and slow cell expansion, respectively, and 5-hydroxytryptamine, which induces retraction. Apart from these three substances and acetylcholine, which acts presynaptically, no other neuroactive compounds have so far been found to be involved in the neuroregulation of chromatophore physiology, and the detailed signaling mechanisms are still little understood. Herein, we disclose the role of nitric oxide (NO) as mediator in one of the signaling pathways by which glutamate activates body patterning. NO and nitric-oxide synthase have been detected in pigment and muscle fibers of embryo, juvenile, and adult chromatophore organs from Sepia officinalis. NO-mediated Sepia chromatophore expansion operates at slower rate than glutamate and involves cGMP, cyclic ADP-ribose, and ryanodine receptor activation. These results demonstrate for the first time that NO is an important messenger in the long term maintenance of the body coloration patterns in Sepia. PMID:20516065

  12. Cigarette smoking impairs nitric oxide-mediated cerebral blood flow increase: Implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Okamura, Tomio

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral blood flow is mainly regulated by nitrergic (parasympathetic, postganglionic) nerves and nitric oxide (NO) liberated from endothelial cells in response to shear stress and stretch of vasculature, whereas sympathetic vasoconstrictor control is quite weak. On the other hand, peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow are mainly controlled by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves; endothelium-derived NO and nitrergic nerves play some roles as vasodilator factors. Cigarette smoking impairs NO synthesis in cerebral vascular endothelial cells and nitrergic nerves leading to interference with cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in the brain. Smoking-induced cerebral hypoperfusion is induced by impairment of synthesis and actions of NO via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibition and by increased production of oxygen radicals, resulting in decreased actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle. Nicotine acutely and chronically impairs the action of endothelial NO and also inhibits nitrergic nerve function in chronic use. Impaired cerebral blood supply promotes the synthesis of amyloid β that accelerates blood flow decrease. This vicious cycle is thought to be one of the important factors involving in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Quitting smoking is undoubtedly one of the important ways to prevent and delay the genesis or slow the progress of impaired cognitive function and AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve-induced responses of opossum esophageal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.; Du, C.; Conklin, J.L.; Ledlow, A.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    Nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) nerves of the opossum esophagus mediate relaxation of circular muscle from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the off contraction of circular esophageal muscle. The latencies between the end of the stimulus and the off contraction describe a gradient such that the latency is longest in muscle from the caudad esophagus. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of these nerve-induced responses. Both electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic esophageal nerves and exogenous NO relaxed LES muscle. Only EFS-induced relaxation was inhibited by L-NNA. L-arginine, the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the inhibitory effect of L-NNA. Exogenous NO neither relaxed nor contracted circular esophageal muscle. Both the amplitude and the latency of the off contraction were diminished by L-NNA. L-arginine antagonized the action of L-NNA. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine also attenuated the gradient in the latency of the off response by shortening latencies in muscle form the caudad esophagus. It had no effect on cholinergic nerve-induced contraction of longitudinal esophageal muscle. These data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophagus and LES.

  14. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic hyperpolarization of opossum esophageal circular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.; Murray, J.; Conklin, J.L.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    The electromyogram recorded from circular smooth muscle (SM) of opossum esophagus, either during peristalsis or when the intrinsic esophageal nerves are stimulated by an electrical field (EFS), consists of a hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. This membrane response results from the interaction of a nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter with its receptors on SM membrane. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide (NO) were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of this NANC nerve-induced response. The transmembrane potential difference of circular SM cells of opossum esophagus was recorded with glass microelectrode. The nerve-mediated membrane response was evoked by EFS. L-NNA (50uM) abolished the initial hyperpolarization and reduced the amplitude of and the time to maximal depolarization. L-arginine (1mM), the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the effect of L-NNA. Neither L-NNA nor L-arginine altered the resting membrane potential. Exogenous NO produced hyperpolarization of SM membrane potential and attenuated the amplitude of EFS-induced hyperpolarization and depolarization. Nitrosocysteine, a NO-containing compound, also hyperpolarized the membrane potential. Effect of NO was neither blocked by L-NNA nor by TTX. The data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophageal SM membrane.

  15. The Endogenous Nitric Oxide Mediates Selenium-Induced Phytotoxicity by Promoting ROS Generation in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang-Bin; Li, You-Qin; Chen, Jian; Yang, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is suggested as an emerging pollutant in agricultural environment because of the increasing anthropogenic release of Se, which in turn results in phytotoxicity. The most common consequence of Se-induced toxicity in plants is oxidative injury, but how Se induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst remains unclear. In this work, histofluorescent staining was applied to monitor the dynamics of ROS and nitric oxide (NO) in the root of Brassica rapa under Se(IV) stress. Se(IV)-induced faster accumulation of NO than ROS. Both NO and ROS accumulation were positively correlated with Se(IV)-induced inhibition of root growth. The NO accumulation was nitrate reductase (NR)- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent while ROS accumulation was NADPH oxidase-dependent. The removal of NO by NR inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, and NO scavenger could alleviate Se(IV)-induced expression of Br_Rbohs coding for NADPH oxidase and the following ROS accumulation in roots, which further resulted in the amelioration of Se(IV)-induced oxidative injury and growth inhibition. Thus, we proposed that the endogenous NO played a toxic role in B. rapa under Se(IV) stress by triggering ROS burst. Such findings can be used to evaluate the toxic effects of Se contamination on crop plants. PMID:25333984

  16. Factors Associated with Nitric Oxide-mediated β2 Integrin Inhibition of Neutrophils*

    PubMed Central

    Bhopale, Veena M.; Yang, Ming; Yu, Kevin; Thom, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation explored the mechanism for inhibition of β2 integrin adhesion molecules when neutrophils are exposed to nitric oxide (•NO). Roles for specific proteins were elucidated using chemical inhibitors, depletion with small inhibitory RNA, and cells from knock-out mice. Optimal inhibition occurs with exposures to a •NO flux of ∼28 nmol/min for 2 min or more, which sets up an autocatalytic cascade triggered by activating type 2 nitric-oxide synthase (NOS-2) and NADPH oxidase (NOX). Integrin inhibition does not occur with neutrophils exposed to a NOX inhibitor (Nox2ds), a NOS-2 inhibitor (1400W), or with cells from mice lacking NOS-2 or the gp91phox component of NOX. Reactive species cause S-nitrosylation of cytosolic actin that enhances actin polymerization. Protein cross-linking and actin filament formation assays indicate that increased polymerization occurs because of associations involving vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, focal adhesion kinase, and protein-disulfide isomerase in proximity to actin filaments. These effects were inhibited in cells exposed to ultraviolet light which photo-reverses S-nitrosylated cysteine residues and by co-incubations with cytochalasin D. The autocatalytic cycle can be arrested by protein kinase G activated with 8-bromo-cyclic GMP and by a high •NO flux (∼112 nmol/min) that inactivates NOX. PMID:26032418

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide- and Nitric Oxide-mediated Disease Control of Bacterial Wilt in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Kang, Su Ran; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Dong June; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Sung, Chang Hyun; Kang, Han Sol; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Seong Hwan; Kim, Young Shik

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in tomato plants by Ralstonia solanacearum infection and the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide in tomato bacterial wilt control were demonstrated. During disease development of tomato bacterial wilt, accumulation of superoxide anion (O2−) and H2O2 was observed and lipid peroxidation also occurred in the tomato leaf tissues. High doses of H2O2and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) nitric oxide donor showed phytotoxicity to detached tomato leaves 1 day after petiole feeding showing reduced fresh weight. Both H2O2and SNP have in vitro antibacterial activities against R. solanacearum in a dose-dependent manner, as well as plant protection in detached tomato leaves against bacterial wilt by 106 and 107 cfu/ml of R. solanacearum. H2O2- and SNP-mediated protection was also evaluated in pots using soil-drench treatment with the bacterial inoculation, and relative ‘area under the disease progressive curve (AUDPC)’ was calculated to compare disease protection by H2O2 and/or SNP with untreated control. Neither H2O2 nor SNP protect the tomato seedlings from the bacterial wilt, but H2O2+ SNP mixture significantly decreased disease severity with reduced relative AUDPC. These results suggest that H2O2 and SNP could be used together to control bacterial wilt in tomato plants as bactericidal agents. PMID:25288967

  18. Nitric oxide mediates Fos expression in the spinal cord induced by mechanical noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Wilcox, G L; Beitz, A J

    1992-10-01

    Immunocytochemical localization of Fos protein was used to analyze the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the expression of Fos in the spinal cord, induced by mechanical noxious stimulation (NS). Mechanical NS was applied to the left hindpaw 30 minutes after intrathecal administration of the NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and the resulting Fos expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn was compared with that obtained in rats exposed only to the mechanical NS. Pretreatment with L-NAME but not its stereoisomer N omega-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (D-NAME), produced a dose-dependent suppression of Fos expression induced by mechanical noxious stimulation. These results indicate that NO modulates the expression of Fos in the dorsal horn induced by mechanical noxious stimulation and further support the hypothesis that NO is involved in nociceptive events occurring in the spinal cord in response to a peripheral noxious stimulus.

  19. Human astrocytes inhibit Cryptococcus neoformans growth by a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungus that causes life- threatening meningoencephalitis in 5-10% of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is characterized by a lymphohistiocytic infiltrate, accumulation of encapsulated forms of C. neoformans, and varying degrees of glial reaction. Little is known about the contribution of endogenous central nervous system cells to the pathogenesis of cryptococcal infections. In this study, we investigated the role of astrocytes as potential effector cells against C. neoformans. Primary cultures of human fetal astrocytes, activated with interleukin 1 beta plus interferon gamma inhibited the growth of C. neoformans. The inhibition of C. neoformans growth was paralleled by production of nitrite, and reversed by the inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO.) synthase, NG-methyl-mono-arginine and NG-nitro-arginine methyl ester. The results suggest a novel function for human astrocytes in host defence and provide a precedent for the use of NO. as an antimicrobial effector molecule by human cells. PMID:8006595

  20. Elevated level of nitric oxide mediates the anti-depressant effect of rubidium chloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Mehdi; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-09-05

    Rubidium has been used to treat psychiatric conditions including depression. We examined the antidepressant activity of rubidium chloride (RbCl) in male mice and the possible interference of nitric oxide (NO) in this effect. Mouse forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) were used to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of RbCl. These drugs were used in this study: N(G)-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-Nitroindazole and aminoguanidine, selective neuronal and inducible NOS inhibitors, respectively, and l-arginine, an NO precursor. We studied the changes of serum and hippocampus nitrite level after different treatments. RbCl (30mg/kg), when administered 60min before the tests, significantly reduced the immobility time. Non-effective doses of l-NAME (10mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (50mg/kg), co-administered with the effective dose of RbCl (30mg/kg), reversed the anti-immobility effect of RbCl, while 7-NI (25mg/kg) could not prevent the diminishing effect of RbCl on immobility time. Moreover, co-administration of non-effective doses of l-arginine (750mg/kg) and RbCl (10mg/kg) decreased the immobility time. None of the mentioned treatments altered the locomotor activity of mice in open-field test. Nitrite level was significantly increased in serum and hippocampus of animals after RbCl (30mg/kg) administration and this nitrite level elevation was reversed by non-effective dose of l-NAME and aminoguanidine, but not 7-NI. Our data for the first time reveal the role of NO pathway in the antidepressant-like activity of RbCl, concluding that this effect results from elevation of NO through involvement of iNOS in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  2. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L.; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W.; Bukiya, Anna N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from “energy drinks”) continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40–70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS−/−) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  3. Expression of the nos gene and firefly flashing: a test of the nitric-oxide-mediated flash control model.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-04-19

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence.

  4. Expression of the nos gene and Firefly Flashing: A Test of the Nitric-Oxide-Mediated Flash Control Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-01-01

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence. PMID:25373203

  5. Endothelium dependency of contractile activity differs in infant and adult vertebral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Charpie, J R; Schreur, K D; Papadopoulos, S M; Webb, R C

    1994-01-01

    Contractions to serotonin (5-HT) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in infant (0-2 yr) and adult (38-71 yr) vertebral arteries were examined in the presence of either the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide production. In addition, endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine were characterized in arteries contracted with agonist. The results showed that: (a) Contractions of infant arteries to 5-HT or ET-1 decreased to 44 +/- 8% and 27 +/- 13%, respectively, within 10 min. Indomethacin or removal of endothelium abolished this decreased response, whereas L-NMMA had no effect. (b) Adult arteries produced sustained contractions to 5-HT or ET-1 that were unaffected by indomethacin, endothelium denudation, or L-NMMA. (c) Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine were greater in infant than adult arteries and were abolished by indomethacin (but not L-NMMA) in infants and L-NMMA (but not indomethacin) in adults. Thus, endothelium-dependent responses in infant arteries are attenuated because of increased prostaglandin activity not observed in adult tissues. Additionally, there is an age-dependent change in the primary mechanism responsible for acetylcholine-induced vasodilation. Apparently, endothelium dependency of acetylcholine-induced relaxation is highly dependent on cyclooxygenase activity in the infant vertebral artery, but in the adult artery, nitric oxide is linked to the vasodilator response. Images PMID:8132776

  6. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis in rat macrophages subjected to Shiga toxin 2 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baronetti, José Luis; Villegas, Natalia Angel; Paraje, María Gabriela; Albesa, Inés

    2011-04-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli are important food-borne pathogens. The main factor conferring virulence on this bacterium is its capacity to secrete Shiga toxins (Stxs), which have been reported to induce apoptosis in several cell types. However, the mechanisms of this apoptosis have not yet been fully elucidated. In addition, Stxs have been shown to stimulate macrophages to produce nitric oxide (NO), a well-known apoptosis inductor.The aim of this study was to investigate the participation of NO in apoptosis of rat peritoneal macrophages induced by culture supernatants or Stx2 from E. coli. Peritoneal macrophages incubated in the presence of E. coli supernatants showed an increase in the amounts of apoptosis and NO production. Furthermore, inhibition of NO synthesis induced by addition of aminoguanidine (AG) was correlated with a reduction in the percentage of apoptotic cells, indicating participation of this metabolite in the apoptotic process. Similarly, treatment of cells with Stx2 induced an increase in NO production and amount of apoptosis, these changes being reversed by addition of AG. In summary, these data show that treatment with E. coli supernatants or Stx2 induces NO-mediated apoptosis of macrophages. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Nitric oxide mediates bleomycin-induced angiogenesis and pulmonary fibrosis via regulation of VEGF.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M; Wright, Clayton A; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  8. Thyroid Hormone Enhances Nitric Oxide-Mediated Bacterial Clearance and Promotes Survival after Meningococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Altenbacher, Georg; Hagner, Matthias; Berglund, Pernilla; Gao, Yumin; Lu, Ting; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölinder, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Euthyroid sick syndrome characterized by reduced levels of thyroid hormones (THs) is observed in patients with meningococcal shock. It has been found that the level of THs reflects disease severity and is predictive for mortality. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of THs on host defense during meningococcal infection. We found that supplementation of thyroxine to mice infected with Neisseria meningitidis enhanced bacterial clearance, attenuated the inflammatory responses and promoted survival. In vitro studies with macrophages revealed that THs enhanced bacteria-cell interaction and intracellular killing of meningococci by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos)-mediated NO production. TH treatment did not activate expression of TH receptors in macrophages. Instead, the observed TH-directed actions were mediated through nongenomic pathways involving the protein kinases PI3K and ERK1/2 and initiated at the membrane receptor integrin αvβ3. Inhibition of nongenomic TH signaling prevented iNos induction, NO production and subsequent intracellular bacterial killing by macrophages. These data demonstrate a beneficial role of THs in macrophage-mediated N. meningitidis clearance. TH replacement might be a novel option to control meningococcal septicemia. PMID:22844479

  9. Antioxidant Systems are Regulated by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-translational Modifications (NO-PTMs)

    PubMed Central

    Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Padilla, María N.; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs) peroxiredoxins (Prx) and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH) cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance. PMID:26909095

  10. Nitric oxide mediates murine cytomegalovirus-associated pneumonitis in lungs that are free of the virus.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Nakazawa, H; Okada, K; Umezawa, K; Fukuyama, N; Koga, Y

    1997-01-01

    4 wk after intraperitoneal inoculation of 0.2 LD50 (50% lethal dose) of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in adult BALB/c mice, MCMV remained detectable in the salivary glands, but not in the lungs or other organs. When the T cells of these mice were activated in vivo by a single injection of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, interstitial pneumonitis was induced in the lungs that were free of the virus with an excessive production of the cytokines. In the lungs of such mice persistently infected with MCMV, the mRNA of the cytokines such as IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma were abundantly expressed 3 h after the anti-CD3 injection, and the elevated levels continued thereafter. A marked expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) was then noted in the lungs, suggesting that such cytokines as TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma may have induced iNOS. Although the increase in NO formation was demonstrated by the significant elevation of the serum levels of nitrite and nitrate, the interstitial pneumonitis was not associated with either increased superoxide formation or peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine nitration. Nevertheless, the administration of an NO antagonist also alleviated the interstitial pneumonitis provoked by anti-CD3 mAb. Based on these findings, it was concluded that MCMV-associated pneumonitis is mediated by a molecule of cytokine-induced NO other than peroxynitrite. PMID:9312183

  11. Role of oral and gut microbiome in nitric oxide-mediated colon motility.

    PubMed

    Walker, Miriam Y; Pratap, Siddharth; Southerland, Janet H; Farmer-Dixon, Cherae M; Lakshmyya, Kesavalu; Gangula, Pandu R

    2017-06-07

    Periodontal disease (PD), a severe form of gum disease, is among the most prevalent chronic infection in humans and is associated with complex microbial synergistic dysbiosis in the subgingival cavity. The immune system of the body interacts with the microbes as the plaque extends and propagates below the gingival sulcus. Once bacteria reach the gingival sulcus, it can enter the blood stream and affect various areas of the human body. The polymicrobial nature of periodontal disease, if left untreated, promotes chronic inflammation, not only within the oral cavity, but also throughout the human body. Alterations seen in the concentrations of healthy gut microbiota may lead to systemic alterations, such as gut motility disorders, high blood pressure, and atherosclerosis. Although gut microbiome has been shown to play a vital role in intestinal motility functions, the role of oral bacteria in this setting remains to be investigated. It is unclear whether oral microbial DNA is present in the large intestine and, if so, whether it alters the gut microbiome. In addition, polybacterial infection induced PD reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and antioxidant enzymes in rodent colon. In this review, we will discuss the interactions between oral and gut microbiome, specifics of how the oral microbiome may modulate the activities of the gut microbiome, and possible ramifications of these alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitric oxide-mediated mitochondrial damage in the brain: mechanisms and implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, J P; Almeida, A; Stewart, V; Peuchen, S; Land, J M; Clark, J B; Heales, S J

    1997-06-01

    Within the CNS and under normal conditions, nitric oxide (.NO) appears to be an important physiological signalling molecule. Its ability to increase cyclic GMP concentration suggests that .NO is implicated in the regulation of important metabolic pathways in the brain. Under certain circumstances .NO synthesis may be excessive and .NO may become neurotoxic. Excessive glutamate-receptor stimulation may lead to neuronal death through a mechanism implicating synthesis of both .NO and superoxide (O2.-) and hence peroxynitrite (ONOO-) formation. In response to lipopolysaccharide and cytokines, glial cells may also be induced to synthesize large amounts of .NO, which may be deleterious to the neighbouring neurones and oligodendrocytes. The precise mechanism of .NO neurotoxicity is not fully understood. One possibility is that it may involve neuronal energy deficiency. This may occur by ONOO- interfering with key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial calcium metabolism, or DNA damage with subsequent activation of the energy-consuming pathway involving poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase. Possible mechanisms whereby ONOO- impairs the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the relevance for neurotoxicity are discussed. The intracellular content of reduced glutathione also appears important in determining the sensitivity of cells to ONOO- production. It is concluded that neurotoxicity elicited by excessive .NO production may be mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction leading to an energy deficiency state.

  13. Evidence that spinal segmental nitric oxide mediates tachyphylaxis to peripheral local anesthetic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Sholas, M G; Berde, C B; DiCanzio, J; Zurakowski, D; Wilder, R T

    2001-09-01

    Tachyphylaxis to sciatic nerve blockade in rats correlates with hyperalgesia. Spinal inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with N(G)nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) has been shown to prevent hyperalgesia. Given systemically, L-NAME also prevents tachyphylaxis. The action of L-NAME in preventing tachyphylaxis therefore may be mediated at spinal sites. We compared systemic versus intrathecal potency of L-NAME in modulating tachyphylaxis to sciatic nerve block. Rats were prepared with intrathecal catheters. Three sequential sciatic nerve blocks were placed. Duration of block of thermal nocifensive, proprioceptive and motor responses was recorded. We compared spinal versus systemic dose-response to L-NAME, and examined effects of intrathecal arginine on tachyphylaxis. An additional group of rats underwent testing after T10 spinal cord transection. In these rats duration of sciatic nerve block was assessed by determining the heat-induced flexion withdrawal reflex. L-NAME was 25-fold more potent in preventing tachyphylaxis given intrathecally than intraperitoneally. Intrathecal arginine augmented tachyphylaxis. Spinalized rats exhibited tachyphylaxis to sciatic block. The increased potency of intrathecal versus systemic L-NAME suggests a spinal site of action in inhibiting tachyphylaxis. Descending pathways are not necessary for the development of tachyphylaxis since it occurs even after T10 spinal cord transection. Thus tachyphylaxis, like hyperalgesia, is mediated at least in part by a spinal site of action.

  14. Nitric Oxide Mediates Bleomycin-Induced Angiogenesis and Pulmonary Fibrosis via Regulation of VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V.; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A.; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M.; Wright, Clayton A.; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25919965

  15. Nitric oxide mediated modulation of norepinephrine transport: identification of a potential target for S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, David M; Gruskin, Sara; Smith, A Ian; Esler, Murray D

    2000-01-01

    Carrier mediated uptake (uptake-1) transport of norepinephrine (NE) plays a key role in the regulation of sympathetic neurotransmission. Recent investigations indicate that nitric oxide (NO) may modulate uptake-1 activity, possibly in a cyclic GMP independent manner. Carrier mediated transport of [3H-NE] and [3H-dopamine, DA] was examined in CHO cells transfected with cDNA for the NE and DA transporters (NET, DAT) respectively. While exposure to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (100 μM, SNAP) significantly reduced [3H-NE] uptake (P<0.001), no effect on [3H-DA] transport was apparent. Comparison of the amino acid sequences for NET and DAT identified cysteine residue 351 in NET, which was not present in DAT. Site-directed mutagenesis of Cys 351 to Ser produced a functional NET that was resistant to the inhibitory effects of SNAP. The presence of SNAP mediated nitrosylation of the cysteine residue in an 8-mer model peptide based around Cys 351 in NET was confirmed by both biochemical and mass spectroscopic means. These data indicate the potential regulatory role for NO in modulating sympathetic neurotransmission, and further confirm the importance of non-cyclic GMP dependent mechanisms in mediating the actions of NO. PMID:10882390

  16. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Galdino, G S; Duarte, I D; Perez, A C

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception. In both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests, central [intrathecal (it) and intracerebroventricular (icv)] pretreatment with inhibitors of the NO/cGMP/KATP pathway (L-NOArg, ODQ, and glybenclamide) prevented the antinociceptive effect induced by aerobic exercise (AE). Furthermore, pretreatment (it, icv) with specific NO synthase inhibitors (L-NIO, aminoguanidine, and L-NPA) also prevented this effect. Supporting the hypothesis of the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception, nitrite levels in the cerebrospinal fluid increased immediately after AE. Therefore, the present study suggests that, during exercise, the NO released centrally induced antinociception.

  17. Guard cell hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediate elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Li, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Guanqun; Liu, Yaru; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-10-01

    Climate change as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 influences plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Although the involvement of stomata in plant responses to elevated CO2 has been well established, the underlying mechanism of elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement remains largely unknown. We used diverse techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, biochemical methodologies and gene silencing to investigate the signaling pathway for elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Elevated CO2 -induced stomatal closure was dependent on the production of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (RBOH1)-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and NITRATE REDUCTASE (NR)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) in guard cells in an abscisic acid (ABA)-independent manner. Silencing of OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) compromised the elevated CO2 -induced accumulation of H2 O2 and NO, upregulation of SLOW ANION CHANNEL ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1) gene expression and reduction of stomatal aperture, whereas silencing of RBOH1 or NR had no effects on the expression of OST1. Our results demonstrate that as critical signaling molecules, RBOH1-dependent H2 O2 and NR-dependent NO act downstream of OST1 that regulate SLAC1 expression and elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement. This information is crucial to deepen the understanding of CO2 signaling pathway in guard cells.

  18. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation increases blood flow during the early stages of stress fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Shoghi, Kooresh I.; Silva, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the strong connection between angiogenesis and osteogenesis in skeletal repair conditions such as fracture and distraction osteogenesis, little is known about the vascular requirements for bone formation after repetitive mechanical loading. Here, established protocols of damaging (stress fracture) and nondamaging (physiological) forelimb loading in the adult rat were used to stimulate either woven or lamellar bone formation, respectively. Positron emission tomography was used to evaluate blood flow and fluoride kinetics at the site of bone formation. In the group that received damaging mechanical loading leading to woven bone formation (WBF), 15O water (blood) flow rate was significantly increased on day 0 and remained elevated 14 days after loading, whereas 18F fluoride uptake peaked 7 days after loading. In the group that received nondamaging mechanical loading leading to lamellar bone formation (LBF), 15O water and 18F fluoride flow rates in loaded limbs were not significantly different from nonloaded limbs at any time point. The early increase in blood flow rate after WBF loading was associated with local vasodilation. In addition, Nos2 expression in mast cells was increased in WBF-, but not LBF-, loaded limbs. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was used to suppress NO generation, resulting in significant decreases in early blood flow rate and bone formation after WBF loading. These results demonstrate that NO-mediated vasodilation is a key feature of the normal response to stress fracture and precedes woven bone formation. Therefore, patients with impaired vascular function may heal stress fractures more slowly than expected. PMID:24356518

  19. Downstream mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Lynch, Gordon S; McConell, Glenn K

    2010-12-01

    There is evidence that nitric oxide (NO) is required for the normal increases in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction, but the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We examined whether NO regulates glucose uptake during skeletal muscle contractions via cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent pathways. Isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from mice were stimulated to contract ex vivo, and potential NO signaling pathways were blocked by the addition of inhibitors to the incubation medium. Contraction increased (P < 0.05) NO synthase (NOS) activity (∼40%) and dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence (a marker of oxidant levels; ∼95%), which was prevented with a NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and antioxidants [nonspecific antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC); thiol-reducing agent, DTT], respectively. L-NMMA and NAC both attenuated glucose uptake during contraction by ∼50% (P < 0.05), and their effects were not additive. Neither the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, which prevents the formation of cGMP, the cGMP-dependent protein (PKG) inhibitor Rp-8-bromo-β-phenyl-1,N2-ethenoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate sodium salt nor white light, which breaks S-nitrosylated bonds, affects glucose uptake during contraction; however, DTT attenuated (P < 0.05) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake (by 70%). NOS inhibition and antioxidant treatment reduced contraction-stimulated increases in protein S-glutathionylation and tyrosine nitration (P < 0.05), without affecting AMPK or p38 MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, we provide evidence to suggest that NOS-derived oxidants regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contractions via a cGMP/PKG-, AMPK-, and p38 MAPK-independent pathway. In addition, it appears that NO and ROS may regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction through a similar pathway.

  20. Endogenous nitric oxide mediates alleviation of cadmium toxicity induced by calcium in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The effect of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on rice seedling growth under cadmium chloride (CdCl2) stress, as well as the possible role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in this process, was studied. The growth of rice seedlings was seriously inhibited by CdCl2, and the inhibition was significantly mitigated by CaCl2. However, hemoglobin (Hb) and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4, 4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) weakened the promotion effect of CaCl2. The results of NO fluorescence localization suggest that growth accelerated by CaCl2 might be associated with elevated NO levels. The content of Cd, protein thiols (PBT), and nonprotein thiols (NPT) in cell walls, cell organelles, and soluble fractions, respectively, of rice seedlings decreased considerably in the presence of CaCl2, whereas the content of pectin, hemicellulose 1 (HC1), and hemicellulose 2 (HC2) increased significantly. Elimination of endogenous NO in Cd+Ca treatment could promote the transportation of Cd2+ to cell organelles and soluble fractions and increase the content of NPT and PBT in leaves. In addition, transportation of Cd2+ to cell organelles and soluble fractions was retarded in roots, the content of NPT increased, and the content of PBT decreased. With elimination of endogenous NO in Cd+Ca treatment, the content of pectin, HC1, and HC2 decreased significantly. Thus, Ca may alleviate Cd toxicity via endogenous NO with variation in the levels of NPT, PBT, and matrix polysaccharides.

  1. Nitric Oxide Mediates Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Retinal Bipolar Cell Output via S-Nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Tooker, Ryan E.; Lipin, Mikhail Y.; Leuranguer, Valerie; Rozsa, Eva; Bramley, Jayne R.; Harding, Jacqueline L.; Reynolds, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Coding a wide range of light intensities in natural scenes poses a challenge for the retina: adaptation to bright light should not compromise sensitivity to dim light. Here we report a novel form of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, specifically, a “weighted potentiation” that selectively increases output of Mb-type bipolar cells in the goldfish retina in response to weak inputs but leaves the input–output ratio for strong stimuli unaffected. In retinal slice preparation, strong depolarization of bipolar terminals significantly lowered the threshold for calcium spike initiation, which originated from a shift in activation of voltage-gated calcium currents (ICa) to more negative potentials. The process depended upon glutamate-evoked retrograde nitric oxide (NO) signaling as it was eliminated by pretreatment with an NO synthase blocker, TRIM. The NO-dependent ICa modulation was cGMP independent but could be blocked by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), indicating that NO acted via an S-nitrosylation mechanism. Importantly, the NO action resulted in a weighted potentiation of Mb output in response to small (≤−30 mV) depolarizations. Coincidentally, light flashes with intensity ≥2.4 × 108 photons/cm2/s lowered the latency of scotopic (≤2.4 × 108 photons/cm2/s) light-evoked calcium spikes in Mb axon terminals in an NEM-sensitive manner, but light responses above cone threshold (≥3.5 × 109 photons/cm2/s) were unaltered. Under bright scotopic/mesopic conditions, this novel form of Mb output potentiation selectively amplifies dim retinal inputs at Mb → ganglion cell synapses. We propose that this process might counteract decreases in retinal sensitivity during light adaptation by preventing the loss of visual information carried by dim scotopic signals. PMID:24305814

  2. Leptin induces nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in rat white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Niang, Fatoumata; Benelli, Chantal; Ribière, Catherine; Collinet, Martine; Mehebik-Mojaat, Nadia; Penot, Graziella; Forest, Claude; Jaubert, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by white adipose tissue (WAT) and induces lipolysis and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) oxidation. During lipolysis, NEFA efflux is the result of triglyceride breakdown, NEFA oxidation, and re-esterification via glyceroneogenesis. Leptin's effects on glyceroneogenesis remain unexplored. We investigated the effect of a long-term treatment with leptin at a physiological concentration (10 μg/L) on lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in WAT explants and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Exposure of rat WAT explants to leptin for 2 h resulted in increased NEFA and glycerol efflux. However, a longer treatment with leptin (18 h) did not affect NEFA release and reduced glycerol output. RT-qPCR showed that leptin significantly downregulated the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1), and PPARγ genes. In agreement with its effect on mRNA, leptin also decreased the levels of PEPCK-C and HSL proteins. Glyceroneogenesis, monitored by [1-(14) C] pyruvate incorporation into lipids, was reduced. Because leptin increases nitric oxide (NO) production in adipocytes, we explored the role of NO in the leptin signaling pathway. Pretreatment of explants with the NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester eliminated the effect of leptin on lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis, and expression of the HSL, Pck1, and PPARγ genes. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL penicillamine mimicked leptin effects, thus demonstrating the role of NO in these pathways. The inverse time-dependent action of leptin on WAT is consistent with a process that limits NEFA re-esterification and energy storage while reducing glycerol release, thus preventing hypertriglyceridemia.

  3. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of neutrophils through caspase-8 and caspase-3-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Megha; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Awasthi, Deepika; Singh, Abhishek K; Chandra, Tulika; Kumaravelu, J; Barthwal, Manoj K; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an indispensable role in killing of invading pathogens by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO generation, and subsequently undergoing apoptosis. Unlike ROS/NOX2, role of NO/NOS still remains undefined in the apoptosis of neutrophils (PMNs) and the present study attempts to decipher the importance of NO/NOS in the neutrophil apoptosis. Prolonged treatment of human PMNs or mice bone marrow derived neutrophils (BMDN) with NO led to enhanced ROS generation, caspase-8/caspase-3 cleavage, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and finally cellular apoptosis. NO-induced ROS generation led to caspase-8 deglutathionylation and activation, which subsequently activated mitochondrial death pathway via BID (Bcl-2 family protein) cleavage. NO-mediated augmentation of caspase-8 and BID cleavage was significantly prevented in BMDN from neutrophil cytosolic factor-1 (NCF-1) knockout (KO) mice, implying the involvement of NOX2 in NO-induced apoptosis of PMNs. Furthermore, ROS, NO generation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were enhanced in a time-dependent manner in human PMNs and mice BMDN undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Pharmacological and genetic ablation of iNOS in human PMNs and mice BMDN significantly reduced the levels of apoptosis. Impaired apoptosis of BMDN from iNOS KO mice was due to reduced caspase-8 activity which subsequently prevented caspase-3 and -9 activation. Altogether, our results suggest a crucial role of NO/iNOS in neutrophil apoptosis via enhanced ROS generation and caspase-8 mediated activation of mitochondrial death pathway. PMID:27584786

  4. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3 (-)) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3 (-) fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3 (-) resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs.

  5. Nitric oxide mediates lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang Jyh; Peng, Tai-Chu; Lee, Ru Ping; Hsu, Kang; Chen, Chao-Fuh; Hung, Yu-Kuen; Wang, David; Chen, Hsing I

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to play a role in lung injury (LI) induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). However, controversy exists as to the potential beneficial or detrimental effect of NO. In the present study, an in situ, perfused rat lung model was used to study the possible role of NO in the LI induced by I/R. The filtration coefficient (Kfc), lung weight gain (LWG), protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage (PCBAL), and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) were measured to evaluate the degree of pulmonary hypertension and LI. I/R resulted in increased Kfc, LWG, and PCBAL. These changes were exacerbated by inhalation of NO (20-30 ppm) or 4 mM L-arginine, an NO precursor. The permeability increase and LI caused by I/R could be blocked by exposure to 5 mM N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a nonspecific NO synthase inhibitor), and this protective effect of L-NAME was reversed with NO inhalation. Inhaled NO prevented the increase in PAP caused by I/R, while L-arginine had no such effect. L-NAME tended to diminish the I/R-induced elevation in PAP, but the suppression was not statistically significant when compared to the values in the I/R group. These results indicate that I/R increases Kfc and promotes alveolar edema by stimulating endogenous NO synthesis. Exogenous NO, either generated from L-arginine or delivered into the airway, is apparently also injurious to the lung following I/R. Copyright 2003 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Nitric oxide mediates selective degeneration of hypothalamic orexin neurons through dysfunction of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Obukuro, Kanae; Nobunaga, Mizuki; Takigawa, Moeko; Morioka, Hiroshi; Hisatsune, Akinori; Isohama, Yoichiro; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Masato; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2013-07-31

    We addressed the role of nitric oxide (NO) in orexin neuron degeneration that has been observed under various pathological conditions. Administration of an NO donor NOC18 (50 nmol) into the third ventricle of mice resulted in a significant decrease of orexin-immunoreactive (-IR) neurons, in contrast to a modest change in melanin-concentrating hormone-IR neurons. In addition, NOC18 promoted formation of orexin-A-IR aggregates within orexin neurons. An endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer tunicamycin replicated the effect of NOC18 with regard to decrease of orexin-IR neurons and formation of aggregates. We also found that NOC18 caused an increase in S-nitrosation of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and a decrease in PDI activity in hypothalamic tissues. Moreover, PDI inhibitors, such as cystamine and securinine, caused a selective decrease of orexin neurons and promoted formation of orexin-A-IR aggregates. Aggregate formation in orexin-IR neurons was also induced by local injection of small interfering RNA targeting PDI. Interestingly, sleep deprivation for 7 consecutive days induced a selective decrease of orexin-IR neurons, which was preceded by aggregate formation in orexin-IR neurons and an increase in S-nitrosated PDI in the hypothalamus. Activity of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons in the lateral hypothalamus as assessed by c-Fos expression was elevated in response to sleep deprivation. Finally, sleep deprivation-induced decrease of orexin-IR neurons, formation of aggregates, and S-nitrosation of PDI were not observed in nNOS knock-out mice. These results indicate that nNOS-derived NO may mediate specific pathological events in orexin neurons, including neuropeptide misfolding via S-nitrosation and inactivation of PDI.

  7. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation increases blood flow during the early stages of stress fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Ryan E; Shoghi, Kooresh I; Silva, Matthew J

    2014-02-15

    Despite the strong connection between angiogenesis and osteogenesis in skeletal repair conditions such as fracture and distraction osteogenesis, little is known about the vascular requirements for bone formation after repetitive mechanical loading. Here, established protocols of damaging (stress fracture) and nondamaging (physiological) forelimb loading in the adult rat were used to stimulate either woven or lamellar bone formation, respectively. Positron emission tomography was used to evaluate blood flow and fluoride kinetics at the site of bone formation. In the group that received damaging mechanical loading leading to woven bone formation (WBF), (15)O water (blood) flow rate was significantly increased on day 0 and remained elevated 14 days after loading, whereas (18)F fluoride uptake peaked 7 days after loading. In the group that received nondamaging mechanical loading leading to lamellar bone formation (LBF), (15)O water and (18)F fluoride flow rates in loaded limbs were not significantly different from nonloaded limbs at any time point. The early increase in blood flow rate after WBF loading was associated with local vasodilation. In addition, Nos2 expression in mast cells was increased in WBF-, but not LBF-, loaded limbs. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was used to suppress NO generation, resulting in significant decreases in early blood flow rate and bone formation after WBF loading. These results demonstrate that NO-mediated vasodilation is a key feature of the normal response to stress fracture and precedes woven bone formation. Therefore, patients with impaired vascular function may heal stress fractures more slowly than expected.

  8. Nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of taurocholate uptake involves S-nitrosylation of NTCP.

    PubMed

    Schonhoff, Christopher M; Ramasamy, Umadevi; Anwer, M Sawkat

    2011-02-01

    The sodium-taurocholate (TC) cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) facilitates bile formation by mediating sinusoidal Na(+)-TC cotransport. During sepsis-induced cholestasis, there is a decrease in NTCP-dependent uptake of bile acids and an increase in nitric oxide (NO) levels in hepatocytes. In rat hepatocytes NO inhibits Na(+)-dependent uptake of taurocholate. The aim of this study was to extend these findings to human NTCP and to further investigate the mechanism by which NO inhibits TC uptake. Using a human hepatoma cell line stably expressing NTCP (HuH-NTCP), we performed experiments with the NO donors sodium nitroprusside and S-nitrosocysteine and demonstrated that NO inhibits TC uptake in these cells. Kinetic analyses revealed that NO significantly decreased the V(max) but not the K(m) of TC uptake by NTCP, indicating noncompetitive inhibition. NO decreased the amount of NTCP in the plasma membrane, providing a molecular mechanism for the noncompetitive inhibition of TC uptake. One way that NO can modify protein function is through a posttranslational modification known as S-nitrosylation: the binding of NO to cysteine thiols. Using a biotin switch technique we observed that NTCP is S-nitrosylated under conditions in which NO inhibits TC uptake. Moreover, dithiothreitol reversed NO-mediated inhibition of TC uptake and S-nitrosylation of NTCP, indicating that NO inhibits TC uptake via modification of cysteine thiols. In addition, NO treatment led to a decrease in Ntcp phosphorylation. Taken together these results indicate that the inhibition of TC uptake by NO involves S-nitrosylation of NTCP.

  9. Nitric oxide mediates the hormonal control of Crassulacean acid metabolism expression in young pineapple plants.

    PubMed

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Purgatto, Eduardo; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Magalhaes, Jose Ronaldo; Kaiser, Werner M; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-04-01

    Genotypic, developmental, and environmental factors converge to determine the degree of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression. To characterize the signaling events controlling CAM expression in young pineapple (Ananas comosus) plants, this photosynthetic pathway was modulated through manipulations in water availability. Rapid, intense, and completely reversible up-regulation in CAM expression was triggered by water deficit, as indicated by the rise in nocturnal malate accumulation and in the expression and activity of important CAM enzymes. During both up- and down-regulation of CAM, the degree of CAM expression was positively and negatively correlated with the endogenous levels of abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinins, respectively. When exogenously applied, ABA stimulated and cytokinins repressed the expression of CAM. However, inhibition of water deficit-induced ABA accumulation did not block the up-regulation of CAM, suggesting that a parallel, non-ABA-dependent signaling route was also operating. Moreover, strong evidence revealed that nitric oxide (NO) may fulfill an important role during CAM signaling. Up-regulation of CAM was clearly observed in NO-treated plants, and a conspicuous temporal and spatial correlation was also evident between NO production and CAM expression. Removal of NO from the tissues either by adding NO scavenger or by inhibiting NO production significantly impaired ABA-induced up-regulation of CAM, indicating that NO likely acts as a key downstream component in the ABA-dependent signaling pathway. Finally, tungstate or glutamine inhibition of the NO-generating enzyme nitrate reductase completely blocked NO production during ABA-induced up-regulation of CAM, characterizing this enzyme as responsible for NO synthesis during CAM signaling in pineapple plants.

  10. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3- fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3- resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs. PMID:26834770

  11. Passive leg movement and nitric oxide-mediated vascular function: the impact of age

    PubMed Central

    Groot, H. Jonathan; Layec, Gwenael; Rossman, Matthew J.; Ives, Stephen J.; Morgan, David E.; Gmelch, Ben S.; Bledsoe, Amber; Richardson, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    In young healthy men, passive leg movement (PLM) elicits a robust nitric oxide (NO)-dependent increase in leg blood flow (LBF), thus providing a novel approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function. While the magnitude of the LBF response to PLM is markedly reduced with age, the role of NO in this attenuated response in the elderly is unknown. Therefore, this study sought to determine the contribution of NO in the PLM-induced LBF with age. Fourteen male subjects (7 young, 24 ± 1 yr; and 7 old, 75 ± 3 yr) underwent PLM with and without NO synthase (NOS) inhibition achieved by intra-arterial infusion of NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). LBF was determined second-by-second by Doppler ultrasound, and central hemodynamics were measured by finger photoplethysmography. NOS inhibition blunted the PLM-induced peak increase in LBF in the young (control: 668 ± 106; l-NMMA: 431 ± 95 Δml/min; P = 0.03) but had no effect in the old (control: 266 ± 98; l-NMMA: 251 ± 92 Δml/min; P = 0.59). Likewise, the magnitude of the reduction in the overall (i.e., area under the curve) PLM-induced LBF response to NOS inhibition was less in the old (LBF: −31 ± 18 ml) than the young (LBF: −129 ± 21 ml; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that the age-associated reduction in PLM-induced LBF in the elderly is primarily due to a reduced contribution to vasodilation from NO and therefore support the use of PLM as a novel approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function across the lifespan. PMID:25576629

  12. Passive leg movement and nitric oxide-mediated vascular function: the impact of age.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Groot, H Jonathan; Layec, Gwenael; Rossman, Matthew J; Ives, Stephen J; Morgan, David E; Gmelch, Ben S; Bledsoe, Amber; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-03-15

    In young healthy men, passive leg movement (PLM) elicits a robust nitric oxide (NO)-dependent increase in leg blood flow (LBF), thus providing a novel approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function. While the magnitude of the LBF response to PLM is markedly reduced with age, the role of NO in this attenuated response in the elderly is unknown. Therefore, this study sought to determine the contribution of NO in the PLM-induced LBF with age. Fourteen male subjects (7 young, 24 ± 1 yr; and 7 old, 75 ± 3 yr) underwent PLM with and without NO synthase (NOS) inhibition achieved by intra-arterial infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). LBF was determined second-by-second by Doppler ultrasound, and central hemodynamics were measured by finger photoplethysmography. NOS inhibition blunted the PLM-induced peak increase in LBF in the young (control: 668 ± 106; 431 ± 95 Δml/min; P = 0.03) but had no effect in the old (control: 266 ± 98; 251 ± 92 Δml/min; P = 0.59). Likewise, the magnitude of the reduction in the overall (i.e., area under the curve) PLM-induced LBF response to NOS inhibition was less in the old (LBF: -31 ± 18 ml) than the young (LBF: -129 ± 21 ml; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that the age-associated reduction in PLM-induced LBF in the elderly is primarily due to a reduced contribution to vasodilation from NO and therefore support the use of PLM as a novel approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function across the lifespan.

  13. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M.; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A.; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  14. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Central Network Dynamics during Olfactory Perception

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Suguru; Kitamura, Yoshiichiro; Hamasaki, Yuuta; Saito, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates the dynamics of central olfactory networks and has been implicated in olfactory processing including learning. Land mollusks have a specialized olfactory lobe in the brain called the procerebral (PC) lobe. The PC lobe produces ongoing local field potential (LFP) oscillation, which is modulated by olfactory stimulation. We hypothesized that NO should be released in the PC lobe in response to olfactory stimulation, and to prove this, we applied an NO electrode to the PC lobe of the land slug Limax in an isolated tentacle-brain preparation. Olfactory stimulation applied to the olfactory epithelium transiently increased the NO concentration in the PC lobe, and this was blocked by the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME at 3.7 mM. L-NAME at this concentration did not block the ongoing LFP oscillation, but did block the frequency increase during olfactory stimulation. Olfactory stimulation also enhanced spatial synchronicity of activity, and this response was also blocked by L-NAME. Single electrical stimulation of the superior tentacle nerve (STN) mimicked the effects of olfactory stimulation on LFP frequency and synchronicity, and both of these effects were blocked by L-NAME. L-NAME did not block synaptic transmission from the STN to the nonbursting (NB)-type PC lobe neurons, which presumably produce NO in an activity-dependent manner. Previous behavioral experiments have revealed impairment of olfactory discrimination after L-NAME injection. The recording conditions in the present work likely reproduce the in vivo brain state in those behavioral experiments. We speculate that the dynamical effects of NO released during olfactory perception underlie precise odor representation and memory formation in the brain, presumably through regulation of NB neuron activity. PMID:26360020

  15. Nitric oxide-mediated activity in anti-cancer photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Rapozzi, Valentina; Della Pietra, Emilia; Zorzet, Sonia; Zacchigna, Marina; Bonavida, Benjamin; Xodo, Luigi Emilio

    2013-04-01

    Cell recurrence in cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an important issue that is poorly understood. It is becoming clear that nitric oxide (NO) is a modulator of PDT. By acting on the NF-κB/Snail/RKIP survival/anti-apoptotic loop, NO can either stimulate or inhibit apoptosis. We found that pheophorbide a/PDT (Pba/PDT) induces the release of NO in B78-H1 murine amelanotic melanoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Low-dose PDT induces low NO levels by stimulating the anti-apoptotic nature of the above loop, whereas high-dose PDT stimulates high NO levels inhibiting the loop and activating apoptosis. When B78-H1 cells are treated with low-dose Pba/PDT and DETA/NO, an NO-donor, intracellular NO increases and cell growth is inhibited according to scratch-wound and clonogenic assays. Western blot analyses showed that the combined treatment reduces the expression of the anti-apoptotic NF-κB and Snail gene products and increases the expression of the pro-apoptotic RKIP gene product. The combined effect of Pba and DETA/NO was also tested in C57BL/6 mice bearing a syngeneic B78-H1 melanoma. We used pegylated Pba (mPEG-Pba) due to its better pharmacokinetics compared to free Pba. mPEG-Pba (30 mg/Kg) and DETA/NO (0.4 mg/Kg) were i.p. injected either as a single molecule or in combination. After photoactivation at 660 nM (fluence of 193 J/cm(2)), the combined treatment delays tumor growth more efficiently than each individual treatment (p<0.05). Taken together, our results showed that the efficacy of PDT is strengthened when the photosensitizer is used in combination with an NO donor.

  16. Redox and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Sensory Neuron Ion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can intimately control neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by regulating the function of many ion channels. In peripheral sensory neurons, such regulation contributes towards the control of somatosensory processing; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of such regulation is necessary for the development of new therapeutic strategies and for the treatment of sensory dysfunctions, such as chronic pain. Recent Advances: Tremendous progress in deciphering nitric oxide (NO) and ROS signaling in the nervous system has been made in recent decades. This includes the recognition of these molecules as important second messengers and the elucidation of their metabolic pathways and cellular targets. Mounting evidence suggests that these targets include many ion channels which can be directly or indirectly modulated by ROS and NO. However, the mechanisms specific to sensory neurons are still poorly understood. This review will therefore summarize recent findings that highlight the complex nature of the signaling pathways involved in redox/NO regulation of sensory neuron ion channels and excitability; references to redox mechanisms described in other neuron types will be made where necessary. Critical Issues: The complexity and interplay within the redox, NO, and other gasotransmitter modulation of protein function are still largely unresolved. Issues of specificity and intracellular localization of these signaling cascades will also be addressed. Future Directions: Since our understanding of ROS and RNS signaling in sensory neurons is limited, there is a multitude of future directions; one of the most important issues for further study is the establishment of the exact roles that these signaling pathways play in pain processing and the translation of this understanding into new therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 486–504. PMID:24735331

  17. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  18. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  19. Skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation dynamics in heart failure: exercise training and nitric oxide-mediated function.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Ferguson, Scott K; McCullough, Danielle J; Behnke, Bradley J; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2014-03-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle O2 delivery-utilization matching such that microvascular oxygenation falls faster (i.e., speeds PO2mv kinetics) during increases in metabolic demand. Conversely, exercise training improves (slows) muscle PO2mv kinetics following contractions onset in healthy young individuals via NO-dependent mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would improve contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in CHF rats partly via improved NO-mediated function. CHF rats (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure = 17 ± 2 mmHg) were assigned to sedentary (n = 11) or progressive treadmill exercise training (n = 11; 5 days/wk, 6-8 wk, final workload of 60 min/day at 35 m/min; -14% grade downhill running) groups. PO2mv was measured via phosphorescence quenching in the spinotrapezius muscle at rest and during 1-Hz twitch contractions under control (Krebs-Henseleit solution), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; NO donor; 300 μM), and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nonspecific NO synthase blockade; 1.5 mM) superfusion conditions. Exercise-trained CHF rats had greater peak oxygen uptake and spinotrapezius muscle citrate synthase activity than their sedentary counterparts (p < 0.05 for both). The overall speed of the PO2mv fall during contractions (mean response time; MRT) was slowed markedly in trained compared with sedentary CHF rats (sedentary: 20.8 ± 1.4, trained: 32.3 ± 3.0 s; p < 0.05), and the effect was not abolished by L-NAME (sedentary: 16.8 ± 1.5, trained: 31.0 ± 3.4 s; p > 0.05). Relative to control, SNP increased MRT in both groups such that trained CHF rats had slower kinetics (sedentary: 43.0 ± 6.8, trained: 55.5 ± 7.8 s; p < 0.05). Improved NO-mediated function is not obligatory for training-induced improvements in skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation (slowed PO2mv kinetics) following contractions onset in rats with CHF.

  20. Human obesity and endothelium-dependent responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Campia, Umberto; Tesauro, Manfredi; Cardillo, Carmine

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an ongoing worldwide epidemic. Besides being a medical condition in itself, obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to stem from multiple abnormalities in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, disrupt vascular homeostasis by causing an imbalance between the NO pathway and the endothelin 1 system, with impaired insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that the vascular dysfunction of obesity is not just limited to the endothelium, but also involves the other layers of the vessel wall. In particular, obesity-related changes in medial smooth muscle cells seem to disrupt the physiological facilitatory action of insulin on the responsiveness to vasodilator stimuli, whereas the adventitia and perivascular fat appear to be a source of pro-inflammatory and vasoactive factors that may contribute to endothelial and smooth muscle cell dysfunction, and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. While obesity-induced vascular dysfunction appears to be reversible, at least in part, with weight control strategies, these have not proved sufficient to prevent the metabolic and cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. While a number of currently available drugs have shown potentially beneficial vascular effects in patients with obesity and the metabolic syndrome, elucidation of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular damage in obese patients is necessary to identify additional pharmacologic targets to prevent the cardiovascular complications of obesity, and their human and economic costs. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21895631

  1. Human obesity and endothelium-dependent responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Campia, Umberto; Tesauro, Manfredi; Cardillo, Carmine

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is an ongoing worldwide epidemic. Besides being a medical condition in itself, obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to stem from multiple abnormalities in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, disrupt vascular homeostasis by causing an imbalance between the NO pathway and the endothelin 1 system, with impaired insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that the vascular dysfunction of obesity is not just limited to the endothelium, but also involves the other layers of the vessel wall. In particular, obesity-related changes in medial smooth muscle cells seem to disrupt the physiological facilitatory action of insulin on the responsiveness to vasodilator stimuli, whereas the adventitia and perivascular fat appear to be a source of pro-inflammatory and vasoactive factors that may contribute to endothelial and smooth muscle cell dysfunction, and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. While obesity-induced vascular dysfunction appears to be reversible, at least in part, with weight control strategies, these have not proved sufficient to prevent the metabolic and cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. While a number of currently available drugs have shown potentially beneficial vascular effects in patients with obesity and the metabolic syndrome, elucidation of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular damage in obese patients is necessary to identify additional pharmacologic targets to prevent the cardiovascular complications of obesity, and their human and economic costs. This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3. © 2011 The Authors. British

  2. Particulate Matter Exposure Impairs Systemic Microvascular Endothelium-Dependent Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Porter, Dale W.; Barger, Mark; Castranova, Vincent; Boegehold, Matthew A.

    2004-01-01

    Acute exposure to airborne pollutants, such as solid particulate matter (PM), increases the risk of cardiovascular dysfunction, but the mechanisms by which PM evokes systemic effects remain to be identified. The purpose of this study was to determine if pulmonary exposure to a PM surrogate, such as residual oil fly ash (ROFA), affects endothelium-dependent dilation in the systemic microcirculation. Rats were intratracheally instilled with ROFA at 0.1, 0.25, 1 or 2 mg/rat 24 hr before experimental measurements. Rats intratracheally instilled with saline or titanium dioxide (0.25 mg/rat) served as vehicle or particle control groups, respectively. In vivo microscopy of the spinotrapezius muscle was used to study systemic arteriolar dilator responses to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, administered by ejection via pressurized micropipette into the arteriolar lumen. We used analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples to monitor identified pulmonary inflammation and damage. To determine if ROFA exposure affected arteriolar nitric oxide sensitivity, sodium nitroprusside was iontophoretically applied to arterioles of rats exposed to ROFA. In saline-treated rats, A23187 dilated arterioles up to 72 ± 7% of maximum. In ROFA- and TiO2-exposed rats, A23187-induced dilation was significantly attenuated. BAL fluid analysis revealed measurable pulmonary inflammation and damage after exposure to 1 and 2 mg ROFA (but not TiO2 or < 1 mg ROFA), as evidenced by significantly higher polymorphonuclear leukocyte cell counts, enhanced BAL albumin levels, and increased lactate dehydrogenase activity in BAL fluid. The sensitivity of arteriolar smooth muscle to NO was similar in saline-treated and ROFA-exposed rats, suggesting that pulmonary exposure to ROFA affected endothelial rather than smooth muscle function. A significant increase in venular leukocyte adhesion and rolling was observed in ROFA-exposed rats, suggesting local inflammation at the systemic microvascular level. These results

  3. Physical activity maintains aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation in the obese type 2 diabetic OLETF rat.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Aaron K; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Rector, R Scott; Booth, Frank W; Ibdah, Jamal A; Laughlin, M Harold

    2010-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that physical activity can attenuate the temporal decline of ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation during type 2 diabetes mellitus progression in the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rat. Sedentary OLETF rats exhibited decreased ACh-induced abdominal aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation from 13 to 20 wk of age (20-35%) and from 13 to 40 wk of age (35-50%). ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was maintained in the physically active OLETF group and control sedentary Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) group from 13 to 40 wk of age. Aortic pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA), indomethacin (Indo), and l-NNA + Indo did not alter the temporal decline in ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation. Temporal changes in the protein expression of SOD isoforms in the aortic endothelium or smooth muscle did not contribute to the temporal decline in ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in sedentary OLETF rats. A significant increase in the 40-wk-old sedentary LETO and physically active OLETF rat aortic phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide (p-eNOS)-to-eNOS ratio was observed versus 13- and 20-wk-old rats in each group that was not seen in the 40- versus 13- and 20-wk-old sedentary OLETF rats. These results suggest that temporal changes in the antioxidant system, EDHF, and cycloxygenase metabolite production in sedentary OLETF rat aortas do not contribute to the temporal decline in sedentary OLETF rat aortic ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation seen with type 2 diabetes mellitus progression. We also report that physical activity in conjunction with aging in the OLETF rat results in a temporal increase in the aortic endothelial p-eNOS-to-eNOS ratio that was not seen in sedentary OLETF rats. These results suggest that the sustained aortic ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in aged physically active OLETF rats may be the result of an increase in active aortic eNOS.

  4. Depression of endothelium-dependent relaxation in aorta from rats with Brugia pahangi lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, L; Tithof, P K; Lamb, V L; Williams, J F

    1991-06-01

    A role for altered endothelial cell function is emerging in the pathogenesis of disease. We have previously demonstrated that Dirofilaria immitis, the canine heartworm, depresses endothelium-dependent responses and alters the mechanism of relaxation in the in vivo femoral artery of infected dogs. Exposure of rat aorta to the parasite or parasite-conditioned medium selectively depresses endothelium-dependent relaxation. D. immitis is closely related to the major human filarial pathogens. This study was designed to examine the effect of chronic infection with the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi on endothelium-mediated responses of the rat aorta in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that endothelium-dependent responses are depressed in the aorta from rats infected with B. pahangi. Rings of thoracic and abdominal aorta were suspended in muscle baths for measurement of isometric tension. Dose-response relations to norepinephrine, endothelium-dependent dilators (acetylcholine, histamine, and A23187), and nitroglycerin were done. In some experiments, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (indomethacin and aspirin), guanylate cyclase (methylene blue), and nitric oxide formation (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; L-NOARG) were used. No differences in vascular reactivity were detected in the thoracic aorta. In contrast, endothelium-dependent responses in abdominal aorta of Brugia-infected rats were significantly depressed when compared with control aorta from noninfected rats. Acetylcholine relaxation was further depressed by indomethacin and aspirin. After L-NOARG, acetylcholine relaxation in control abdominal aorta was completely abolished; however, in abdominal aorta of Brugia-infected rats, acetylcholine still caused relaxation. Methylene blue inhibited acetylcholine relaxation in both control and Brugia-infected abdominal aorta; however, relaxation in Brugia-infected aorta was significantly greater than control. This study demonstrates that endothelium-dependent relaxation can be

  5. Influence of habitual high dietary fat intake on endothelium-dependent vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Caitlin A.; Stauffer, Brian L.; Greiner, Jared J.; DeSouza, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diets are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A potential underlying mechanism for the increased cardiovascular risk is endothelial dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is critical in the regulation of vascular tone and overall vascular health. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of dietary fat intake on endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Forty-four middle-aged and older sedentary, healthy adults were studied: 24 consumed a lower fat diet (LFD; 29% ± 1% calories from fat) and 20 consumed a high-fat diet (HFD; 41% ± 1% calories from fat). Four-day diet records were used to assess fat intake, and classifications were based on American Heart Association guidelines (<35% of total calories from fat). Forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of the endothelial NO synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA), as well as responses to sodium nitroprusside were determined by plethysmography. The FBF response to acetylcholine was lower (~15%; P < 0.05) in the HFD group (4.5 ± 0.2 to 12.1 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) than in the LFD group (4.6 ± 0.2 to 14.4 ± 0.6 mL/100 mL tissue/min). L-NMMA significantly reduced the FBF response to acetylcholine in the LFD group (~25%) but not in the HFD group. There were no differences between groups in the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside. These data indicate that a high-fat diet is associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilator dysfunction due, in part, to diminished NO bioavailability. Impaired NO-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk with high dietary fat intake. PMID:26058441

  6. Influence of habitual high dietary fat intake on endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Dow, Caitlin A; Stauffer, Brian L; Greiner, Jared J; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2015-07-01

    High-fat diets are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A potential underlying mechanism for the increased cardiovascular risk is endothelial dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is critical in the regulation of vascular tone and overall vascular health. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of dietary fat intake on endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Forty-four middle-aged and older sedentary, healthy adults were studied: 24 consumed a lower fat diet (LFD; 29% ± 1% calories from fat) and 20 consumed a high-fat diet (HFD; 41% ± 1% calories from fat). Four-day diet records were used to assess fat intake, and classifications were based on American Heart Association guidelines (<35% of total calories from fat). Forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of the endothelial NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA), as well as responses to sodium nitroprusside were determined by plethysmography. The FBF response to acetylcholine was lower (∼15%; P < 0.05) in the HFD group (4.5 ± 0.2 to 12.1 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) than in the LFD group (4.6 ± 0.2 to 14.4 ± 0.6 mL/100 mL tissue/min). L-NMMA significantly reduced the FBF response to acetylcholine in the LFD group (∼25%) but not in the HFD group. There were no differences between groups in the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside. These data indicate that a high-fat diet is associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilator dysfunction due, in part, to diminished NO bioavailability. Impaired NO-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk with high dietary fat intake.

  7. Effects of ageing and exercise training on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and structure of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Spier, Scott A; Delp, Michael D; Meininger, Cynthia J; Donato, Anthony J; Ramsey, Michael W; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2004-01-01

    Ageing reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in humans and animals, and in humans, exercise training reverses the ageing-associated reduction in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) by which 10–12 weeks of treadmill exercise enhances endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in muscles of differing fibre composition from young and old rats. Three- and 22-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were assigned to young sedentary, young exercise-trained, old sedentary, or old exercise-trained groups. Arterioles were isolated from the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles; luminal diameter changes were determined in response to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh, 10−9–10−4 mol l−1) alone and in the presence of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor l-NAME (10−5 mol l−1) or the combination of l-NAME and the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (10−5 mol l−1). Training ameliorated the ageing-induced reduction in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in soleus muscle arterioles. Treatment with l-NAME alone and in combination with indomethacin abolished differences in ACh vasodilatation occurring with ageing and training. Expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) mRNA in soleus arterioles was unaltered by ageing, whereas eNOS protein was increased with age; training elevated both eNOS mRNA and protein. In gastrocnemius muscle arterioles, ageing did not alter maximal vasodilatation, but ageing and training increased maximal arteriolar diameter. These results demonstrate that ageing-induced reductions and training-induced enhancement of endothelial vasodilatation both occur through the nitric oxide signalling mechanism in highly oxidative skeletal muscle, but ageing and training do not appear to act on the same portion of the signalling cascade. PMID:15004211

  8. Measurement of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in mice--brief report.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Dominik; Sansone, Roberto; Freudenberger, Till; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Weber, Gesine; Momma, Tony Y; Goy, Christine; Altschmied, Joachim; Haendeler, Judith; Fischer, Jens W; Kelm, Malte; Heiss, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated vasodilation after an increase in shear stress at the endothelial lining of conduit arteries during reactive hyperemia after ischemia is a fundamental principle of vascular physiology adapting blood flow to demand of supplied tissue. Flow-mediated vasodilation measurements have been performed in human studies and are of diagnostic and prognostic importance, but have been impossible because of technical limitations in transgenic mice to date, although these represent the most frequently used animal model in cardiovascular research. Using high-frequency ultrasound, we visualized, quantified, and characterized for the first time endothelium-dependent dilation of the femoral artery after temporal ischemia of the lower part of the hindlimb and demonstrated that the signaling was almost exclusively dependent on stimulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, similar to acetylcholine, completely abolished after pharmacological or genetic inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and endothelial denudation, substantially impaired in mice of increasing age and cholesterol-fed ApoE knock outs and increased by the dietary polyphenol (-)-epicatechin. Intra- and interindividual variability were similar to the human methodology. The physiology of flow-mediated vasodilation in mice resembles that in humans underscoring the significance of this novel technology to noninvasively, serially, and reliably quantify flow-mediated vasodilation in transgenic mice. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. The statins fluvastatin and pravastatin exert anti-flushing effects by improving vasomotor dysfunction through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in ovariectomized animals.

    PubMed

    Shuto, Hideki; Tominaga, Koji; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Ikeda, Munehiko; Kusaba, Kenji; Mitsunaga, Daisuke; Hirabara, Yasutoshi; Egawa, Takashi; Takano, Yukio; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2011-01-25

    Statins have pleiotropic vascular protective effects that are independent of their cholesterol-lowering effects. The aim of the present study was to determine if statins have anti-flushing actions in an animal model of forced exercise-induced temperature dysregulation in menopausal hot flushes, and to clarify the critical role of statins in regulating vascular reactivity in the tail arteries of ovariectomized rats. Administration of fluvastatin or pravastatin (3mg/kg/day for 7days, p.o.) significantly ameliorated the flushing of tail skin in ovariectomized mice, and the effect of each statin was comparable with that of estrogen replacement (1mg/kg/week for 3weeks, i.m.). In phenylephrine-pre-contracted rat-tail arteries, ovariectomy inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation, but augmented sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation. These ovariectomy-altered vasodilator responses were restored by fluvastatin treatment as well as by estrogen replacement. Nitrite/nitrate levels in the plasma of ovariectomized animals showed significantly lower values than those in sham-operated animals; this ovariectomy-reduced production of nitric oxide was improved by fluvastatin treatment. These data provide the first experimental evidence that statins such as fluvastatin and pravastatin exert anti-flushing effects by improving vasomotor dysfunction through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in ovariectomized animals. Thus, therapeutic methods that target improvement of vasomotor dysfunction could be novel strategies for reducing menopausal hot flushes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pycnogenol, French maritime pine bark extract, augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Kenji; Hidaka, Takayuki; Nakamura, Shuji; Umemura, Takashi; Jitsuiki, Daisuke; Soga, Junko; Goto, Chikara; Chayama, Kazuaki; Yoshizumi, Masao; Higashi, Yukihito

    2007-09-01

    Pycnogenol, an extract of bark from the French maritime pine, Pinus pinaster Ait., consists of a concentrate of water-soluble polyphenols. Pycnogenol contains the bioflavonoids catechin and taxifolin as well as phenolcarbonic acids. Antioxidants, such as bioflavonoids, enhance endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression and subsequent NO release from endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine Pycnogenol's effects on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo and active drug study. We evaluated forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an endothelium-independent vasodilator, in healthy young men before and after 2 weeks of daily oral administration of Pycnogenol (180 mg/day) (n=8) or placebo (n=8). FBF was measured by using strain-gauge plethysmography. Neither the placebo nor Pycnogenol altered forearm or systemic hemodynamics. Pycnogenol, but not placebo, augmented FBF response to ACh, from 13.1 +/- 7.0 to 18.5 +/- 4.0 mL/min per 100 mL tissue (p<0.05). SNP-stimulated vasodilation was similar before and after 2 weeks of treatment in the control and Pycnogenol groups. The administration of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished Pycnogenol-induced augmentation of the FBF response to ACh. These findings suggest that Pycnogenol augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing in NO production. Pycnogenol would be useful for treating various diseases whose pathogeneses involve endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibition and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in younger vs. older healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Eisenach, John H; Gullixson, Leah R; Allen, Alexander R; Kost, Susan L; Nicholson, Wayne T

    2014-10-01

    A major feature of endothelial dysfunction is reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which in ageing may be due to decreased production of endothelial prostacyclin, or nitric oxide (NO), or both. We tested this hypothesis in 12 younger (age 18-38 years, six women) and 12 older healthy adults (age 55-73 years, six post-menopausal women). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by the forearm vascular conductance (FVC) response to intra-arterial acetylcholine (ACh) (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 μg dl(-1) forearm tissue min(-1) ) before and 90 min after inhibition of the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) with oral celecoxib (400 mg), followed by the addition of endothelial NO synthase inhibition with intra-arterial N(G) -monomethyl-l arginine acetate (L-NMMA). Ageing was associated with a significantly reduced FVC response to ACh (P = 0.009, age-by-dose interaction; highest dose FVC ± SEM in ageing: 11.2 ± 1.4 vs. younger: 17.7 ± 2.4 units, P = 0.02). Celecoxib did not reduce resting FVC or the responses to ACh in any group. L-NMMA significantly reduced resting FVC and the responses to ACh in all groups, and absolute FVC values following L-NMMA were similar between groups. In healthy normotensive younger and older adults, there is minimal contribution of prostacyclin to ACh-mediated vasodilation, yet the NO component of vasodilation is reduced with ageing. In the clinical context, these findings suggest that acute administration of medications that inhibit prostacyclin (i.e. COX-2 inhibitors) evoke modest vascular consequences in healthy persons. Additional studies are necessary to test whether chronic use of COX-2 medications reduces endothelium dependent vasodilation in older persons with or without cardiovascular risk factors. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. α2A-adrenoceptors, but not nitric oxide, mediate the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition of moxonidine.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Puc, Luis E; Aguayo-Morales, Hilda; Silva-Belmares, Yesenia; González-Zavala, Maria A; Centurión, David

    2016-07-05

    Moxonidine centrally inhibits the sympathetic activity through the I1-imidazoline receptor and nitric oxide. In addition, inhibits the peripheral cardiac sympathetic outflow by α2-adrenoceptors/I1-imidazoline receptors, although the role of α2-adrenoceptor subtypes or nitric oxide in the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine are unknown. Therefore, the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine (10μg/kgmin) was evaluated before and after of the treatment with the following antagonists/inhibitor: (1) BRL 44408, (300μg/kg, α2A), imiloxan, (3000μg/kg, α2B), and JP-1302, (300μg/kg, α2C), in animals pretreated with AGN 192403 (3000μg/kg, I1 antagonist); (2) N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 34, 100, and 340μg/kgmin); and (3) the combinations of the highest dose of l-NAME plus AGN 192403 or BRL 44408. Additionally, the expression of the neuronal (nNOS) and inducible (iNOS) nitric oxide synthase in the stellate ganglion was determined after treatment with moxonidine (i.p. 0.56mg/kg daily, during one week). The cardiac sympatho-inhibition of 10μg/kgmin moxonidine was: (1) unaffected by imiloxan and JP-1302, under pretreatment with AGN 192403, or l-NAME (34, 100 and 340μg/kgmin) given alone; (2) partially antagonized by the combination of 340 μg/kgmin l-NAME plus BRL 44408; and (3) abolished by BRL 44408 under treatment with AGN 192403. Furthermore, moxonidine did not modify the nNOS or iNOS protein expression in the stellate ganglion, the main source of postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervating the heart. In conclusion, our results suggest that the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine is mediated by α2A-adrenoceptor subtype but not by nitric oxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Root-MUSIC analysis of nitric oxide-mediated changes in ophthalmic artery blood flow velocity waveforms.

    PubMed

    Agnew, C E; Rea, D J; McCann, A J; Lockhart, C J; Hamilton, P K; Quinn, C E; McVeigh, G E; McGivern, R C

    2009-09-01

    Clinical and experimental studies indicate that structural and functional changes in the microvasculature can predate or accompany risk factors for cardiovascular disease at the earliest stages in the disease process. In the current work, both simulated and actual Doppler ultrasound maximum blood velocity waveform envelopes recorded from the ophthalmic artery were analysed using a root-MUSIC and least squares fitting approach to determine amplitude frequency spectra. Both amplitude and frequency components of noise contaminated simulated waveforms were reliably determined indicating the robustness of the technique. The technique was then used to compare the spectral content of the ophthalmic artery blood velocity waveforms of normal controls in three test states: at baseline, following administration of GTN, a nitric oxide donor, and following administration of L-Name, a nitric oxide inhibitor. Principal components derived from root-MUSIC analysis discriminated between waveforms in baseline and non-baseline test states (p<0.00001) and between GTN and non-GTN test states (p=0.0002).

  14. Oral L-arginine improves endothelium-dependent dilation in hypercholesterolemic young adults.

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, P; Adams, M R; Powe, A J; Donald, A E; McCredie, R; Robinson, J; McCarthy, S N; Keech, A; Celermajer, D S; Deanfield, J E

    1996-01-01

    In hypercholesterolemic rabbits, oral L-arginine (the substrate for endothelium derived nitric oxide) attenuates endothelial dysfunction and atheroma formation, but the effect in hypercholesterolemic humans is unknown. Using high resolution external ultrasound, we studied arterial physiology in 27 hypercholesterolemic subjects aged 29+/-5 (19-40) years, with known endothelial dysfunction and LDL-cholesterol levels of 238+/-43 mg/dl. Each subject was studied before and after 4 wk of L-arginine (7 grams x 3/day) or placebo powder, with 4 wk washout, in a randomized double-blind crossover study. Brachial artery diameter was measured at rest, during increased flow (causing endothelium-dependent dilation, EDD) and after sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (causing endothelium-independent dilation). After oral L-arginine, plasma L-arginine levels rose from 115+/-103 to 231+/-125 micromol/liter (P<0.001), and EDD improved from 1.7+/-1.3 to 5.6+/-3.0% (P<0.001). In contrast there was no significant change in response to glyceryl trinitrate. After placebo there were no changes in endothelium-dependent or independent vascular responses. Lipid levels were unchanged after L-arginine and placebo. Dietary supplementation with L-arginine significantly improves EDD in hypercholesterolemic young adults, and this may impact favorably on the atherogenic process. PMID:8621785

  15. Endothelium-dependent contraction of rat thoracic aorta induced by gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Sanae, Fujiko; Miyaichi, Yukinori; Hayashi, Hisao

    2003-02-01

    The vascular effect of a component of hydrolysable tannins, gallic acid, was examined in isolated rat thoracic aorta. Gallic acid exerted a contractile effect on the phenylephrine- or prostaglandin F(2/alpha)-precontracted endothelium-intact arteries. In endothelium-denuded arteries, the contractile response to-gallic acid was absent. Pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 microM) abolished the gallic acid-induced contraction. Pretreatment with indomethacin (10 microM) or BQ610 (100 nM) had no observed effect. Pretreatment with gallic acid (1-10 microM) significantly attenuated the relaxation induced by acetylcholine, and that with 10 microM gallic acid also reduced the potency of sodium nitroprusside in the relaxation, without a reduction in efficacy, in endothelium-denuded arteries. These findings indicate that gallic acid induced endothelium-dependent contraction and strongly inhibited the endothelium-dependent relaxation rather than the endothelium-independent relaxation, probably through inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production. Since NO plays an important role in vasodilative regulation and inflammatory disorders, these findings may also indicate that gallic acid interferes with the inflammatory responses.

  16. Nitric Oxide Mediates 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Leaves of Elymus nutans Griseb. Exposed to Chilling Stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juanjuan; Chu, Xitong; Sun, Yongfang; Miao, Yanjun; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) are both extremely important signalling molecules employed by plants to control many aspects of physiology. In the present study, the role of NO in ALA-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of two sources of Elymus nutans Griseb. (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD) was investigated. Chilling stress enhanced electrolyte leakage, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide radical in two E. nutans, which were substantially alleviated by exogenous ALA and NO application. Pretreatment with NO scavenger PTIO or NOS inhibitor L-NNA alone and in combination with ALA induced enhancements in electrolyte leakage and the accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and superoxide radical in leaves of DX and ZD exposed to chilling stress, indicating that the inhibition of NO biosynthesis reduced the chilling resistance of E. nutans and the ALA-enhanced chilling resistance. Further analyses showed that ALA and NO enhanced antioxidant defense and activated plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and decreased the accumulation of ROS induced by chilling stress. A pronounced increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and NO release by exogenous ALA treatment was found in chilling-resistant DX plants exposed to chilling stress, while only a little increase was observed in chilling-sensitive ZD. Furthermore, inhibition of NO accumulation by PTIO or L-NNA blocked the protective effect of exogenous ALA, while both exogenous NO treatment and inhibition of endogenous NO accumulation did not induce ALA production. These results suggested that NO might be a downstream signal mediating ALA-induced chilling resistance in E. nutans.

  17. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  18. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  19. The Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Regulates Nitric Oxide-Mediated Apoptosis of Neurons Induced by Target Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lee J.; Adams, Neal A.; Pan, Yan; Price, Ann; Wong, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of mouse occipital cortex induces precisely timed and uniform p53-modulated and Bax-dependent apoptosis of thalamocortical projection neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) by 7 days postlesion. We tested the hypothesis that this neuronal apoptosis is initiated by oxidative stress and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Pre-apoptotic LGN neurons accumulate mitochondria, Zn2+ and Ca2+, and generate higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite, than LGN neurons with an intact cortical target. Pre-apoptosis of LGN neurons is associated with increased formation of protein carbonyls, protein nitration, and protein S-nitrosylation. Genetic deletion of nitric oxide synthase 1 (nos1) and inhibition of NOS1 with nitroindazole protected LGN neurons from apoptosis, revealing NO as a mediator. Putative components of the mPTP are expressed in mouse LGN, including the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), and cyclophilin D (CyPD). Nitration of CyPD and ANT in LGN mitochondria occurs by 2 days after cortical injury. Chemical cross-linking showed that LGN neuron pre-apoptosis is associated with formation of CyPD and VDAC oligomers, consistent with mPTP formation. Mice without CyPD are rescued from neuron apoptosis as are mice treated with the mPTP inhibitors TRO-19622 and TAT-Bcl-XL-BH4. Manipulation of the mPTP markedly attenuated the early pre-apoptotic production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in target-deprived neurons. Our results demonstrate in adult mouse brain neurons that the mPTP functions to enhance ROS production and the mPTP and NO trigger apoptosis; thus, the mPTP is a target for neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:21209222

  20. Nitric Oxide Mediates 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Leaves of Elymus nutans Griseb. Exposed to Chilling Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Juanjuan; Chu, Xitong; Sun, Yongfang; Miao, Yanjun; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) are both extremely important signalling molecules employed by plants to control many aspects of physiology. In the present study, the role of NO in ALA-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of two sources of Elymus nutans Griseb. (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD) was investigated. Chilling stress enhanced electrolyte leakage, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide radical in two E. nutans, which were substantially alleviated by exogenous ALA and NO application. Pretreatment with NO scavenger PTIO or NOS inhibitor L-NNA alone and in combination with ALA induced enhancements in electrolyte leakage and the accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and superoxide radical in leaves of DX and ZD exposed to chilling stress, indicating that the inhibition of NO biosynthesis reduced the chilling resistance of E. nutans and the ALA-enhanced chilling resistance. Further analyses showed that ALA and NO enhanced antioxidant defense and activated plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and decreased the accumulation of ROS induced by chilling stress. A pronounced increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and NO release by exogenous ALA treatment was found in chilling-resistant DX plants exposed to chilling stress, while only a little increase was observed in chilling-sensitive ZD. Furthermore, inhibition of NO accumulation by PTIO or L-NNA blocked the protective effect of exogenous ALA, while both exogenous NO treatment and inhibition of endogenous NO accumulation did not induce ALA production. These results suggested that NO might be a downstream signal mediating ALA-induced chilling resistance in E. nutans. PMID:26151364

  1. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of the Ability of Rickettsia prowazekii To Infect Mouse Fibroblasts and Mouse Macrophagelike Cells

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Jenifer; Liu, Hua; Gottlieb, Sheldon F.; Winkler, Herbert H.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) pathway in inhibiting the ability of Rickettsia prowazekii to initially infect (invade) mouse cytokine-treated, fibroblastic L929 cells and macrophagelike RAW264.7 cells and the ability of nitric oxide (NO) to damage isolated rickettsiae were investigated. Substantial amounts of nitrite (a degradation product of NO) were produced and the initial rickettsial infection was suppressed in cultures of L929 cells treated with crude lymphokine preparations (LK) or with gamma interferon (IFN-γ) plus tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not in L929 cell cultures treated with IFN-γ alone or TNF-α alone. The NOS inhibitors NG-methyl-l-arginine and aminoguanidine both inhibited nitrite production and prevented the suppression of the initial rickettsial infection. Antibody-mediated neutralization of the IFN-γ in the LK also inhibited both nitrite production and suppression of the initial rickettsial infection. Cultures of RAW264.7 cells treated with IFN-γ plus lipopolysaccharide exhibited suppression of the initial rickettsial infection, and the suppression was relieved by aminoguanidine. Addition of oxyhemoglobin (a scavenger of extracellular NO) during the rickettsial infection alleviated the suppression of the initial rickettsial infection observed in appropriately treated L929 cells and RAW264.7 cells. In addition, the oxyhemoglobin restored the rickettsia-mediated, rapid killing of the treated RAW264.7 cells. Incubation of isolated rickettsiae with NO inhibited their ability to infect L929 and IFN-γ-treated RAW264.7 cells and to rapidly kill IFN-γ-treated RAW264.7 cells. In contrast, incubation of L929 cells with a solution that contained NO and/or degradation products of NO did not affect their ability to be infected by rickettsiae. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that NO released from appropriately stimulated potential host cells kills extracellular rickettsiae and thus prevents the rickettsiae from

  2. Nitric oxide-mediated cutaneous microvascular function is impaired in polycystic ovary sydrome but can be improved by exercise training.

    PubMed

    Sprung, V S; Cuthbertson, D J; Pugh, C J A; Daousi, C; Atkinson, G; Aziz, N F; Kemp, G J; Green, D J; Cable, N T; Jones, H

    2013-03-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with cardiovascular disease. The contribution of the nitric oxide (NO) dilator system to cutaneous endothelial dysfunction is currently unknown in PCOS. Our aim was to examine whether women with PCOS demonstrate impaired cutaneous microvascular NO function and whether exercise training can ameliorate any impairment. Eleven women with PCOS (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass index, 34 ± 6 kg m(-2)) were compared with six healthy obese control women (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass index, 34 ± 5 kg m(-2)). Six women with PCOS (30 ± 7 years; 31 ± 6 kg m(-2)) then completed 16 weeks of exercise training. Laser Doppler flowmetry, combined with intradermal microdialysis of l-N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine, a nitric oxide antagonist, in response to incremental local heating of the forearm was assessed in women with PCOS and control women, and again in women with PCOS following exercise training. Cardiorespiratory fitness, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, hormone and lipid profiles were also assessed. Differences between women with PCOS and control women and changes with exercise were analysed using Student's unpaired t tests. Differences in the contribution of NO to cutaneous blood flow [expressed as a percentage of maximal cutaneous vasodilatation (CVCmax)] were analysed using general linear models. At 42°C heating, cutaneous NO-mediated vasodilatation was attenuated by 17.5%CVCmax (95% confidence interval, 33.3, 1.7; P = 0.03) in women with PCOS vs. control women. Exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness by 5.0 ml kg(-1) min(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.9, 9.2; P = 0.03) and NO-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation at 42°C heating by 19.6% CVCmax (95% confidence interval, 4.3, 34.9; P = 0.02). Cutaneous microvascular NO function is impaired in women with PCOS compared with obese matched control women but can be improved with exercise training.

  3. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13–52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while l-NMMA and l-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm. PMID:26801312

  4. Medullary ventrolateral nitric oxide mediates the cardiac effect of electroacupuncture at "Neiguan" acupoint on acute myocardial ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Juan-Xiu; Zhou, Pei-Hua; Wang, Jin; Li, Xia; Cao, Yin-Xiang; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Da-Nian

    2004-08-25

    Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats anesthetized with a mixture of urethane and chloralose. A rat model of acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) was made by ligation of the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery (LAD). After the LAD ligation, the ischemia area of the left ventricular wall became somewhat pale immediately. Under a light microscope, the pathological examination revealed that all the cells were swollen and in red color when the cardiac section was stained with hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP), which indicated a typical change in the myocardial ischemia. In the AMI model, it was found that cardiac functions were markedly attenuated, such as decreases in the heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), maximal rate for left ventricular pressure rising and declining (+/-dp/dt(max)), velocity of contractile element (V(CE)) and total area of cardiac force loop (L(0)), and an increase in the left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP). In such AMI rats, application of electroacupuncture (EA) at "Neiguan" acupoints (Pe 6) for 20 min could obviously improve the above-mentioned cardiac functions. After microinjection of nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was made into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the curative effect of EA on myocardial ischemia was reduced significantly or abolished, while after microinjection of normal saline of the same volume was made into the RVLM, the improving effect of EA remained. These results suggest that the effect of EA on myocardial ischemia is possibly mediated by the nitric oxide (NO) in the RVLM.

  5. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  6. Endogenous nitric oxide mediates He-Ne laser-induced adaptive responses in salt stressed-tall fescue leaves.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Limei; Han, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of endogenous nitric oxide in protective effects of He-Ne laser on salt stressed-tall fescue leaves. Salt stress resulted in significant increases of membrane injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, polyamine accumulation, and activities of SOD, POD, and APX, while pronounced decreases of antioxidant contents, CAT activity and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in seedlings leaves. He-Ne laser illumination caused a distinct alleviation of cellular injury that was reflected by the lower MDA amounts, polyamine accumulation and ROS levels at the stress period. In contrast, the laser treatment displayed a higher Ca(2+) concentration, antioxidant amounts, NO release, antioxidant enzyme, and NOS activities. These responses could be blocked due to the inhibition of NO biosynthesis by PTIO (NO scavenger) or LNNA (NOS inhibitor). The presented results demonstrated that endogenous NO might be involved in the progress of He-Ne laser-induced plant antioxidant system activation and ROS degradation in order to enhance adaptive responses of tall fescue to prolonged saline conditions.

  7. Sinorhizobium meliloti Controls Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-Translational Modification of a Medicago truncatula Nodule Protein.

    PubMed

    Blanquet, Pauline; Silva, Liliana; Catrice, Olivier; Bruand, Claude; Carvalho, Helena; Meilhoc, Eliane

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in various plant-microbe interactions. In the symbiosis between soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and model legume Medicago truncatula, NO is required for an optimal establishment of the interaction but is also a signal for nodule senescence. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for NO effects in the legume-rhizobium interaction. Here, we investigate the contribution of the bacterial NO response to the modulation of a plant protein post-translational modification in nitrogen-fixing nodules. We made use of different bacterial mutants to finely modulate NO levels inside M. truncatula root nodules and to examine the consequence on tyrosine nitration of the plant glutamine synthetase, a protein responsible for assimilation of the ammonia released by nitrogen fixation. Our results reveal that S. meliloti possesses several proteins that limit inactivation of plant enzyme activity via NO-mediated post-translational modifications. This is the first demonstration that rhizobia can impact the course of nitrogen fixation by modulating the activity of a plant protein.

  8. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system.

  9. Increasing susceptibility of nitric oxide-mediated inhibitory platelet signaling during storage of apheresis-derived platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Kobsar, Anna; Klinker, Erdwine; Kuhn, Sabine; Koessler, Angela; Yilmaz, Pinar; Boeck, Markus; Koessler, Juergen

    2014-07-01

    Storage of platelets (PLTs) affects PLT integrity and functionality, a process named the PLT storage lesion. Normal PLT function essentially depends on the balanced interaction of activating and inhibitory signaling pathways. As there are poor data on the alterations of inhibitory signaling during storage of PLT concentrates, this study investigates the modulation capability of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated inhibitory pathways by use of the nitric oxide donor diethylamine diazenium diolate (DEA/NO). PLTs were obtained from whole blood (WB) and from apheresis-derived PLT concentrates (APCs) stored for 0, 2, and 5 days. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation, cyclic nucleotide concentrations, fibrinogen binding, and agonist-induced aggregation were measured without or after stimulation with DEA/NO. DEA/NO-induced VASP phosphorylation was significantly higher in PLTs from APCs on Days 2 and 5 compared to WB, conditioned by a stronger increase of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), but not cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), in stored PLTs. A quantity of 5 nmol/L DEA/NO neither influenced thrombin receptor activator peptide 6 and collagen-induced aggregation nor fibrinogen binding in freshly collected PLTs, whereas it significantly inhibited both in stored PLTs. Stored PLTs showed an impairment of intracellular cGMP regulation, resulting in exceeding inhibition of agonist-induced aggregation and fibrinogen binding in the course of storage. The observed effects could be an important mechanism contributing to the storage lesion with reduced activating potential of PLTs. © 2014 AABB.

  10. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system. PMID:27192939

  11. Lichen metabolites prevent UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and induce apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Piovano, M; Lombardo, L; Garbarino, J; Cardile, V

    2008-09-26

    In humans both UV-A and UV-B can cause gene mutations and suppress immunity, which leads to skin cancer, including melanoma. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) appears particularly promising as ROS and RNS production by both UV-A and UV-B contributes to inflammation, immunosuppression, gene mutation and carcinogenesis. We evaluated the effect of two lichen compounds, sphaerophorin (depside) and pannarin (depsidone) on pBR322 DNA cleavage induced by hydroxyl radicals (()OH), and by nitric oxide (NO), and their superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenging capacity. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of these compounds against human melanoma cells (M14 cell line). Sphaerophorin and pannarin showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and exhibited a superoxide dismutase like effect. The data obtained in cell culture show that these lichen metabolites inhibit the growth of melanoma cells, inducing an apoptotic cell death, demonstrated by the fragmentation of genomic DNA (COMET and TUNEL Assays) and by a significant increase of caspase-3 activity, and correlated, at least in part, to the increase of ROS generation, These results confirm the promising biological properties of sphaerophorin and pannarin and encourage further investigations on their molecular mechanisms.

  12. Nitric oxide mediates angiogenesis induced in vivo by platelet-activating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Lupia, E.; de Martino, A.; Battaglia, E.; Arese, M.; Tizzani, A.; Bussolino, F.; Camussi, G.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the role of an endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO) in the in vitro migration of endothelial cells and in the in vivo angiogenic response elicited by platelet-activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), but not its enantiomer D-NAME, prevented chemotaxis of endothelial cells induced in vitro by PAF and by TNF. The motogenic activity of TNF was also inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist. In contrast, chemotaxis induced by bFGF was not prevented by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. Angiogenesis was studied in vivo in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model, the angiogenesis induced by PAF and TNF was inhibited by WEB 2170 and L-NAME but not by D-NAME. In contrast, angiogenesis induced by bFGF was not affected by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. TNF, but not bFGF, induced PAF synthesis within Matrigel. These results suggest that NO mediates the angiogenesis induced by PAF as well as that induced by TNF, which is dependent on the production of PAF. In contrast, the angiogenic effect of bFGF appears to be both PAF and NO independent. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9250168

  13. Salt stress reduces root meristem size by nitric oxide-mediated modulation of auxin accumulation and signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-05-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Nitric oxide-mediated anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like effects in animal models of anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Spiacci, A; Kanamaru, F; Guimarães, F S; Oliveira, R M W

    2008-01-01

    The effects of microinjection of the nitric oxide (NO) precursor l-arginine (l-Arg), the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors N-methyl-l-arginine (l-NAME) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), and the cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) analog 8-Br-cGMP into the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) were assessed in rats using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and the forced swim test (FST). l-Arg (100 and 200 nmol) produced an anxiolytic-like effect in the EPM. 8-Br-cGMP (25 and 50 nmol) dose-dependently increased locomotor activity. In the FST, antidepressant-like effects were produced by l-Arg (50 and 100 nmol) and 8-Br-cGMP (12.5 and 25 nmol). Dual effects were observed with NOS inhibitors l-NAME and 7-NI in both the EPM and FST. While low doses of l-NAME (25 nmol) or 7-NI (1 nmol) induced a selective increase in EPM open arm exploration and a decrease in immobility time in the FST, high doses (l-NAME 400 nmol, 7-NI 10 nmol) decreased locomotor activity. These results show that interference with NO-mediated neurotransmission in the DRN induced significant and complex motor and emotional effects. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in these effects.

  15. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  16. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  17. Impact of nitric-oxide-mediated vasodilation and oxidative stress on renal medullary oxygenation: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Brendan C.; Edwards, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation in preventing medullary hypoxia, as well as the likely pathways by which superoxide (O2−) conversely enhances medullary hypoxia. To do so, we expanded a previously developed mathematical model of solute transport in the renal medulla that accounts for the reciprocal interactions among oxygen (O2), NO, and O2− to include the vasoactive effects of NO on medullary descending vasa recta. The model represents the radial organization of the vessels and tubules, centered around vascular bundles in the outer medulla and collecting ducts in the inner medulla. Model simulations suggest that NO helps to prevent medullary hypoxia both by inducing vasodilation of the descending vasa recta (thus increasing O2 supply) and by reducing the active sodium transport rate (thus reducing O2 consumption). That is, the vasodilative properties of NO significantly contribute to maintaining sufficient medullary oxygenation. The model further predicts that a reduction in tubular transport efficiency (i.e., the ratio of active sodium transport per O2 consumption) is the main factor by which increased O2− levels lead to hypoxia, whereas hyperfiltration is not a likely pathway to medullary hypoxia due to oxidative stress. Finally, our results suggest that further increasing the radial separation between vessels and tubules would reduce the diffusion of NO towards descending vasa recta in the inner medulla, thereby diminishing its vasoactive effects therein and reducing O2 delivery to the papillary tip. PMID:26831340

  18. Role of Metabolic Environment on Nitric Oxide Mediated Inhibition of Neointimal Hyperplasia in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male Lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury, and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81%–82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes. PMID:24333562

  19. Abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits light-induced stomatal opening through calcium- and nitric oxide-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling component of ABA-induced stomatal closure. However, only fragmentary data are available about NO effect on the inhibition of stomatal opening. Here, we present results supporting that, in Vicia faba guard cells, there is a critical Ca2+-dependent NO increase required for the ABA-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening. Light-induced stomatal opening was inhibited by exogenous NO in V. faba epidermal strips. Furthermore, ABA-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening was blocked by the specific NO scavenger cPTIO, supporting the involvement of endogenous NO in this process. Since the raise in Ca2+ concentration is a pre-requisite in ABA-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening, it was interesting to establish how does Ca2+, NO and ABA interact in the inhibition of light-induced stomatal opening. The permeable Ca2+ specific buffer BAPTA-AM blocked both ABA- and Ca2+- but not NO-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening. The NO synthase (NOS) specific inhibitor L-NAME prevented Ca2+-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening, indicating that a NOS-like activity was required for Ca2+ signaling. Furthermore, experiments using the NO specific fluorescent probe DAF-2DA indicated that Ca2+ induces an increase of endogenous NO. These results indicate that, in addition to the roles in ABA-triggered stomatal closure, both NO and Ca2+ are active components of signaling events acting in ABA inhibition of light-induced stomatal opening. Results also support that Ca2+ induces the NO production through the activation of a NOS-like activity.

  20. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Antioxidative Mechanism in Yeast through the Activation of the Transcription Factor Mac1

    PubMed Central

    Nasuno, Ryo; Aitoku, Miho; Manago, Yuki; Nishimura, Akira; Sasano, Yu; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses various defense mechanisms against environmental stresses that generate reactive oxygen species, leading to growth inhibition or cell death. Our recent study showed a novel antioxidative mechanism mediated by nitric oxide (NO) in yeast cells, but the mechanism underlying the oxidative stress tolerance remained unclear. We report here one of the downstream pathways of NO involved in stress-tolerance mechanism in yeast. Our microarray and real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that exogenous NO treatment induced the expression of genes responsible for copper metabolism under the control of the transcription factor Mac1, including the CTR1 gene encoding high-affinity copper transporter. Our ChIP analysis also demonstrated that exogenous NO enhances the binding of Mac1 to the promoter region of target genes. Interestingly, we found that NO produced under high-temperature stress conditions increased the transcription level of the CTR1 gene. Furthermore, NO produced during exposure to high temperature also increased intracellular copper content, the activity of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase Sod1, and cell viability after exposure to high-temperature in a manner dependent on Mac1. NO did not affect the expression of the MAC1 gene, indicating that NO activates Mac1 through its post-translational modification. Based on the results shown here, we propose a novel NO-mediated antioxidative mechanism that Mac1 activated by NO induces the CTR1 gene, leading to an increase in cellular copper level, and then Cu(I) activates Sod1. This is the first report to unveil the mechanism of NO-dependent antioxidative system in yeast. PMID:25423296

  1. Enhanced nitric oxide-mediated autophagy contributes to the hepatoprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning during ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun-Kyu; Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-08-31

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Autophagy is an essential cytoprotective system that is rapidly activated by multiple stressors. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as an inducer of IPC. We examined the impact of autophagy in liver IPC and its regulation by NO. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion. IPC was achieved for 10 min of ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion prior to sustained ischemia. N(ω)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 15 mg/kg, i.v., all NOS inhibitor) and aminoguanidine (AG, 10 mg/kg, i.v., iNOS inhibitor) were injected 10 min before IPC. SB203580 (10 mg/kg, i.p., p38 inhibitor) was injected 30 min before IPC. I/R increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. IPC attenuated this increase, which was abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. Microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II levels increased and p62 protein levels decreased after I/R; these changes were augmented by IPC and abolished by L-NAME. I/R increased liver protein expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)12-Atg5 complex and lysosome-associated membrane protein-2. IPC augmented the expression of these proteins, which were abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. IPC also augmented the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK induced by I/R and this phosphorylation was abolished by L-NAME. Our findings suggest that IPC-mediated NO protects against I/R-induced liver injury by enhancing autophagic flux.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide enhances salt tolerance through nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of ion homeostasis in barley seedling roots

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Fei-Hua; He, En-Ming; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are emerging as messenger molecules involved in the modulation of plant physiological processes. Here, we investigated a signalling network involving H2S and NO in salt tolerance pathway of barley. NaHS, a donor of H2S, at a low concentration of either 50 or 100 μM, had significant rescue effects on the 150 mM NaCl-induced inhibition of plant growth and modulated the K+/Na+ balance by decreasing the net K+ efflux and increasing the gene expression of an inward-rectifying potassium channel (HvAKT1) and a high-affinity K+ uptake system (HvHAK4). H2S and NO maintained the lower Na+ content in the cytoplast by increasing the amount of PM H+-ATPase, the transcriptional levels of PM H+-ATPase (HvHA1) and Na+/H+ antiporter (HvSOS1). H2S and NO modulated Na+ compartmentation into the vacuoles with up-regulation of the transcriptional levels of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (HvVNHX2) and H+-ATPase subunit β (HvVHA-β) and increased in the protein expression of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (NHE1). H2S mimicked the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) by increasing NO production, whereas the function was quenched with the addition of NO scavenger. These results indicated that H2S increased salt tolerance by maintaining ion homeostasis, which were mediated by the NO signal. PMID:26213372

  3. Carbon monoxide enhances the chilling tolerance of recalcitrant Baccaurea ramiflora seeds via nitric oxide-mediated glutathione homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-gui; Chen, Jin-hui; Kong, Xiang-xiang; Todd, Christopher D; Yang, Yong-ping; Hu, Xiang-yang; Li, De-zhu

    2012-08-15

    Both carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) play fundamental roles in plant responses to environmental stress. Glutathione (GSH) homeostasis through the glutathione-ascorbate cycle regulates the cellular redox status and protects the plant from damage due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Most recalcitrant seeds are sensitive to chilling stress, but the roles of and cross talk among CO, NO, ROS, and GSH in recalcitrant seeds under low temperature are not well understood. Here, we report that the germination of recalcitrant Baccaurea ramiflora seeds shows sensitivity to chilling stress, but application of exogenous CO or NO markedly increased GSH accumulation, enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes involved in the glutathione-ascorbate cycle, decreased the content of H(2)O(2) and RNS, and improved the tolerance of seeds to low-temperature stress. Compared to orthodox seeds such as maize, only transient accumulation of CO and NO was induced and only a moderate increase in GSH was shown in the recalcitrant B. ramiflora seeds. Exogenous CO or NO treatment further increased the GSH accumulation and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity in B. ramiflora seeds under chilling stress. In contrast, suppressing CO or NO generation, removing GSH, or blocking GSNOR activity resulted in increases in ROS and RNS and impaired the germination of CO- or NO-induced seeds under chilling stress. Based on these results, we propose that CO acts as a novel regulator to improve the tolerance of recalcitrant seeds to low temperatures through NO-mediated glutathione homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sub-Nanomolar Sensitivity of Nitric Oxide Mediated Regulation of cGMP and Vasomotor Reactivity in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kara F.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent dilator of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) by modulating intracellular cGMP ([cGMP]i) through the binding and activation of receptor guanylyl cylases (sGC). The kinetic relationship of NO and sGC, as well as the subsequent regulation of [cGMP]i and its effects on blood vessel vasodilation, is largely unknown. In isolated VSM cells exposed to both pulsed and clamped NO we observed transient and sustained increases in [cGMP]i, with sub-nanomolar sensitivity to NO (EC50 = 0.28 nM). Through the use of pharmacological inhibitors of sGC, PDE5, and PKG, a comprehensive VSM-specific modeling algorithm was constructed to elucidate the concerted activity profiles of sGC, PDE5, phosphorylated PDE5, and PDE1 in the maintenance of [cGMP]i. In small pressure-constricted arteries of the resistance vasculature we again observed both transient and sustained relaxations upon delivery of pulsed and clamped NO, while maintaining a similarly high sensitivity to NO (EC50 = 0.42 nM). Our results propose an intricate dependency of the messengers and enzymes involved in cGMP homeostasis, and vasodilation in VSM. Particularly, the high sensitivity of sGC to NO in primary tissue indicates how small changes in the concentrations of NO, irrespective of the form of NO delivery, can have significant effects on the dynamic regulation of vascular tone. PMID:22807915

  5. Inhibition of root meristem growth by cadmium involves nitric oxide-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The root is the first plant organ to get in contact with the toxin cadmium (Cd), which is a widespread soil contaminant. Cd inhibits the growth of the primary root, but the mechanisms underlying this inhibition remain elusive. In this study, we used physiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches to investigate the roles of nitric oxide (NO) and auxin in Cd-mediated inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem growth. Our study demonstrated that in the first 12 h of exposure, Cd inhibits primary root elongation through a decrease in the sizes of both the elongation and meristematic zones. Following Cd exposure, a decrease in auxin levels is associated with reduced PIN1/3/7 protein accumulation, but not with reduced PIN1/3/7 transcript levels. Additionally, Cd stabilized AXR3/IAA17 protein to repress auxin signalling in this Cd-mediated process. Furthermore, decreasing Cd-induced NO accumulation with either NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(ω) -nitro-l-Arg-methylester (l-NAME) compromised the Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem development, reduction in auxin and PIN1/3/7 accumulation, as well as stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO participates in Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, our data suggest that Cd inhibits root meristem growth by NO-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Role of metabolic environment on nitric oxide mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Monica P; Emond, Zachary M; Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R

    2014-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60 mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81-82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes.

  7. Cordycepin induces human lung cancer cell apoptosis by inhibiting nitric oxide mediated ERK/Slug signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hoo; Park, Soo Jung; Ko, Won Gyu; Kang, Seong-Mun; Lee, Da Bin; Bang, Junho; Park, Byung-Joo; Wee, Chung-Beum; Kim, Dae Joon; Jang, Ik-Soon; Ko, Jae-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule and a component of the inflammatory cascade. Besides, it is also involved in tumorigenesis. Aberrant upregulation and activation of the ERK cascade by NO often leads to tumor cell development. However, the role of ERK inactivation induced by the negative regulation of NO during apoptosis is not completely understood. In this study, treatment of A549 and PC9 human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with cordycepin led to a reduction in their viability. Analysis of the effect of cordycepin treatment on ERK/Slug signaling activity in the A549 cell line revealed that LPS-induced inflammatory microenvironments could stimulate the expression of TNF-α, CCL5, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and upregulate NO, phospho-ERK (p-ERK), and Slug expression. In addition, constitutive expression of NO was observed. Cordycepin inhibited LPS-induced stimulation of iNOS, NO, p-ERK, and Slug expression. L-NAME, an inhibitor of NOS, inhibited p-ERK and Slug expression. It was also found that cordycepin-mediated inhibition of ERK downregulated Slug, whereas overexpression of ERK led to an upregulation of Slug levels in the cordycepin-treated A549 cells. Inhibition of Slug by siRNA induced Bax and caspase-3, leading to cordycepin-induced apoptosis. Cordycepin-mediated inhibition of ERK led to a reduction in phospho-GSK3β (p-GSK3β) and Slug levels, whereas LiCl, an inhibitor of GSK3β, upregulated p-GSK3β and Slug. Overall, the results obtained indicate that cordycepin inhibits the ERK/Slug signaling pathway through the activation of GSK3β which, in turn, upregulates Bax, leading to apoptosis of the lung cancer cells. PMID:28401001

  8. Nitric oxide mediates strigolactone signaling in auxin and ethylene-sensitive lateral root formation in sunflower seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Niharika; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) play significant role in shaping root architecture whereby auxin-SL crosstalk has been observed in SL-mediated responses of primary root elongation, lateral root formation and adventitious root (AR) initiation. Whereas GR24 (a synthetic strigolactone) inhibits LR and AR formation, the effect of SL biosynthesis inhibitor (fluridone) is just the opposite (root proliferation). Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) leads to LR proliferation but completely inhibits AR development. The diffusive distribution of PIN1 in the provascular cells in the differentiating zone of the roots in response to GR24, fluridone or NPA treatments further indicates the involvement of localized auxin accumulation in LR development responses. Inhibition of LR formation by GR24 treatment coincides with inhibition of ACC synthase activity. Profuse LR development by fluridone and NPA treatments correlates with enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt in the apical region and differentiating zones of LR, indicating a critical role of [Ca(2+)] in LR development in response to the coordinated action of auxins, ethylene and SLs. Significant enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) activity (enzyme responsible for SL biosynthesis) in tissue homogenates in presence of cPTIO (NO scavenger) indicates the role of endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCD activity. Differences in the spatial distribution of NO in the primary and lateral roots further highlight the involvement of NO in SL-modulated root morphogenesis in sunflower seedlings. Present work provides new report on the negative modulation of SL biosynthesis through modulation of CCD activity by endogenous nitric oxide during SL-modulated LR development.

  9. Nitric oxide mediates strigolactone signaling in auxin and ethylene-sensitive lateral root formation in sunflower seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Niharika; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) play significant role in shaping root architecture whereby auxin-SL crosstalk has been observed in SL-mediated responses of primary root elongation, lateral root formation and adventitious root (AR) initiation. Whereas GR24 (a synthetic strigolactone) inhibits LR and AR formation, the effect of SL biosynthesis inhibitor (fluridone) is just the opposite (root proliferation). Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) leads to LR proliferation but completely inhibits AR development. The diffusive distribution of PIN1 in the provascular cells in the differentiating zone of the roots in response to GR24, fluridone or NPA treatments further indicates the involvement of localized auxin accumulation in LR development responses. Inhibition of LR formation by GR24 treatment coincides with inhibition of ACC synthase activity. Profuse LR development by fluridone and NPA treatments correlates with enhanced [Ca2+]cyt in the apical region and differentiating zones of LR, indicating a critical role of [Ca2+] in LR development in response to the coordinated action of auxins, ethylene and SLs. Significant enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) activity (enzyme responsible for SL biosynthesis) in tissue homogenates in presence of cPTIO (NO scavenger) indicates the role of endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCD activity. Differences in the spatial distribution of NO in the primary and lateral roots further highlight the involvement of NO in SL-modulated root morphogenesis in sunflower seedlings. Present work provides new report on the negative modulation of SL biosynthesis through modulation of CCD activity by endogenous nitric oxide during SL-modulated LR development. PMID:26076049

  10. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Hormonal Control of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Expression in Young Pineapple Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Purgatto, Eduardo; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Magalhaes, Jose Ronaldo; Kaiser, Werner M.; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-01-01

    Genotypic, developmental, and environmental factors converge to determine the degree of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression. To characterize the signaling events controlling CAM expression in young pineapple (Ananas comosus) plants, this photosynthetic pathway was modulated through manipulations in water availability. Rapid, intense, and completely reversible up-regulation in CAM expression was triggered by water deficit, as indicated by the rise in nocturnal malate accumulation and in the expression and activity of important CAM enzymes. During both up- and down-regulation of CAM, the degree of CAM expression was positively and negatively correlated with the endogenous levels of abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinins, respectively. When exogenously applied, ABA stimulated and cytokinins repressed the expression of CAM. However, inhibition of water deficit-induced ABA accumulation did not block the up-regulation of CAM, suggesting that a parallel, non-ABA-dependent signaling route was also operating. Moreover, strong evidence revealed that nitric oxide (NO) may fulfill an important role during CAM signaling. Up-regulation of CAM was clearly observed in NO-treated plants, and a conspicuous temporal and spatial correlation was also evident between NO production and CAM expression. Removal of NO from the tissues either by adding NO scavenger or by inhibiting NO production significantly impaired ABA-induced up-regulation of CAM, indicating that NO likely acts as a key downstream component in the ABA-dependent signaling pathway. Finally, tungstate or glutamine inhibition of the NO-generating enzyme nitrate reductase completely blocked NO production during ABA-induced up-regulation of CAM, characterizing this enzyme as responsible for NO synthesis during CAM signaling in pineapple plants. PMID:20147491

  11. Vascular microRNA-204 is remotely governed by the microbiome and impairs endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by downregulating Sirtuin1

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Ajit; Kim, Young-Rae; Kumar, Santosh; Li, Qiuxia; Kassan, Modar; Jacobs, Julia S.; Irani, Kaikobad

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota promotes atherosclerosis, and vascular endothelial dysfunction, signalled by impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, is an early marker of atherosclerosis. Here we show that vascular microRNA-204 (miR-204) expression is remotely regulated by the microbiome, and impairs endothelial function by targeting the Sirtuin1 lysine deacetylase (Sirt1). MiR-204 is downregulated, while Sirt1 is upregulated, in aortas of germ-free mice. Suppression of gut microbiome with broad-spectrum antibiotics decreases miR-204, increases Sirt1 and bioavailable vascular nitric oxide, and improves endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in mouse aortas. Antibiotics curtail aortic miR-204 upregulation, and rescue decline of aortic Sirt1 and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, triggered by high-fat diet feeding. Improvement of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by antibiotics is lost in mice lacking endothelial Sirt1. Systemic antagonism of miR-204 rescues impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and vascular Sirt1, and decreases vascular inflammation induced by high-fat diet. These findings reveal a gut microbe-vascular microRNA–Sirtuin1 nexus that leads to endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27586459

  12. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatory signalling modulates α1 -adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting skeletal muscle of humans.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Christopher M; Kirby, Brett S; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-12-15

    + ACh, ATP, SNP, or KCl infusions in healthy adults. Robust vasoconstriction to PE was observed during vasodilator infusion alone and mild exercise, and this was blunted during moderate intensity exercise (ΔFVC: -34 ± 4 and -34 ± 3 vs. -13 ± 2%, respectively, P < 0.05). Infusion of ACh or ATP during mild exercise significantly attenuated PE vasoconstriction similar to levels observed during moderate exercise (ACh: -3 ± 4; ATP: -18 ± 4%). In contrast, infusion of SNP or KCl during mild exercise did not attenuate PE-mediated vasoconstriction (-32 ± 5 and -46 ± 3%). To further study the role of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH), ACh trials were repeated with combined nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibition. Here, PE-mediated vasoconstriction was blunted at rest (blockade: -20 ± 5 vs. -31 ± 3% vs.; P < 0.05) and remained blunted during exercise (blockade: -15 ± 5 vs. -14 ± 5%). We conclude that stimulation of EDH-like vasodilatation can blunt α1 -adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting skeletal muscle of humans. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  13. Impairment of Coronary Arteriolar Endothelium-Dependent Dilation after Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Inhalation: A Time-Course Study

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Cumpston, Amy M.; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T.; Sager, Tina M.; Frazer, David G.; Mercer, Robert R.; Scabilloni, James; Andrew, Michael E.; Castranova, Vincent; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials have been developed for widespread applications due to many highly unique and desirable characteristics. The purpose of this study was to assess pulmonary inflammation and subepicardial arteriolar reactivity in response to multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) inhalation and evaluate the time course of vascular alterations. Rats were exposed to MWCNT aerosols producing pulmonary deposition. Pulmonary inflammation via bronchoalveolar lavage and MWCNT translocation from the lungs to systemic organs was evident 24 h post-inhalation. Coronary arterioles were evaluated 24–168 h post-exposure to determine microvascular response to changes in transmural pressure, endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity. Myogenic responsiveness, vascular smooth muscle reactivity to nitric oxide, and α-adrenergic responses all remained intact. However, a severe impact on endothelium-dependent dilation was observed within 24 h after MWCNT inhalation, a condition which improved, but did not fully return to control after 168 h. In conclusion, results indicate that MWCNT inhalation not only leads to pulmonary inflammation and cytotoxicity at low lung burdens, but also a low level of particle translocation to systemic organs. MWCNT inhalation also leads to impairments of endothelium-dependent dilation in the coronary microcirculation within 24 h, a condition which does not fully dissipate within 168 h. The innovations within the field of nanotechnology, while exciting and novel, can only reach their full potential if toxicity is first properly assessed. PMID:23203034

  14. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the elderly athletes.

    PubMed

    Galetta, F; Franzoni, F; Plantinga, Y; Ghiadoni, L; Rossi, M; Prattichizzo, F; Carpi, A; Taddei, S; Santoro, G

    2006-09-01

    Regular exercise is a key component of cardiovascular risk prevention strategies, because it is associated with a variety of beneficial metabolic and vascular effects that reduce mortality and the incidence of cardiovascular adverse events. Endothelium plays an important role in the local regulation of vascular tone and structure, mainly by nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and action. Aim of the present study was to evaluate in elderly athletes the effect of regular aerobic exercise on arterial blood pressure (BP) and on endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. The study population included 30 male subjects (mean age 65.6+/-5.6 years), who had practiced endurance running at a competitive level for at least 40 years, and 28 age- and sex-matched subjects (mean age 64.5+/-4.5 years) with sedentary lifestyle and free of cardiovascular disease. Athletes and control subjects underwent standard 12-lead ECG, clinic BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and endothelium-dependent FMD and endothelium-independent response to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), 400 microg, in the brachial artery by high-resolution ultrasonography. Systolic clinic and ambulatory 24-h BP were significantly lower in the athletes, than in the controls (P<0.001, respectively). Systolic and diastolic 24-h BP variability, when assessed either by the standard deviation (S.D.), or by the coefficient of variation (CV), were also significantly lower in the athletes (P<0.01). The athletes also had a lower 24-h, day-time and night-time heart rate (HR) (P<0.01), as well as a lower HR variability (P<0.01). As regards circadian BP change, the %Delta was statistically significant greater in athletes (P<0.05). Elderly athletes showed higher FMD than elderly sedentary subjects (P<0.001), whereas no differences were shown in the response to GTN. Our results, suggest that long-term physical activity can counteract the age-related endothelial dysfunction that characterizes sedentary aging, preserving

  15. EDH: endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and microvascular signalling.

    PubMed

    Garland, C J; Dora, K A

    2017-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) is a powerful vasodilator influence in small resistance arteries and thus an important modulator of blood pressure and flow. As the name suggests, EDHF was thought to describe a diffusible factor stimulating smooth muscle hyperpolarization (and thus vasodilatation). However, this idea has evolved with the recognition that a factor can operate alongside the spread of hyperpolarizing current from the endothelium to the vascular smooth muscle (VSM). As such, the pathway is now termed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). EDH is activated by an increase in endothelial [Ca(2+) ]i , which stimulates two Ca(2+) -sensitive K channels, SKCa and IKCa . This was discovered because apamin and charybdotoxin applied in combination blocked EDHF responses, but iberiotoxin - a blocker of BKCa - was not able to substitute for charybdotoxin. SKCa and IKCa channels are arranged in endothelial microdomains, particularly within projections towards the adjacent smooth muscle, which are rich in IKCa channels and close to interendothelial gap junctions where SKCa channels, are prevalent. KCa activation hyperpolarizes endothelial cells, and K(+) efflux through them can act as a diffusible 'EDHF' by stimulating VSM Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase and inwardly rectifying K channels (KIR ). In parallel, hyperpolarizing current spreads from the endothelium to the smooth muscle through myoendothelial gap junctions located on endothelial projections. The resulting radial EDH is complemented by the spread of 'conducted' hyperpolarization along the endothelium of arteries and arterioles to affect conducted vasodilatation (CVD). Retrograde CVD effectively integrates blood flow within the microcirculation, but how the underlying hyperpolarization is sustained is unclear. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Arabidopsis Prohibitin Gene PHB3 Functions in Nitric Oxide-Mediated Responses and in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Nitric Oxide Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Ries, Amber; Wu, Kati; Yang, Albert; Crawford, Nigel M

    2010-01-01

    To discover genes involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, a genetic screen was employed to identify mutants defective in NO accumulation after treatment with the physiological inducer hydrogen peroxide. In wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants, NO levels increase eightfold in roots after H(2)O(2) treatment for 30 min. A mutant defective in H(2)O(2)-induced NO accumulation was identified, and the corresponding mutation was mapped to the prohibitin gene PHB3, converting the highly conserved Gly-37 to an Asp in the protein's SPFH domain. This point mutant and a T-DNA insertion mutant were examined for other NO-related phenotypes. Both mutants were defective in abscisic acid-induced NO accumulation and stomatal closure and in auxin-induced lateral root formation. Both mutants were less sensitive to salt stress, showing no increase in NO accumulation and less inhibition of primary root growth in response to NaCl treatment. In addition, light-induced NO accumulation was dramatically reduced in cotyledons. We found no evidence for impaired H(2)O(2) metabolism or signaling in the mutants as H(2)O(2) levels and H(2)O(2)-induced gene expression were unaffected by the mutations. These findings identify a component of the NO homeostasis system in plants and expand the function of prohibitin genes to include regulation of NO accumulation and NO-mediated responses.

  17. Hindlimb unweighting decreases endothelium-dependent dilation and eNOS expression in soleus not gastrocnemius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Rush, J. W.; Ray, C. A.; Price, E. M.; Hasser, E. M.; Laughlin, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting (HLU) decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) in arteries of skeletal muscle with reduced blood flow during HLU. Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were exposed to HLU (n = 15) or control (n = 15) conditions for 14 days. ACh-induced dilation was assessed in muscle with reduced [soleus (Sol)] or unchanged [gastrocnemius (Gast)] blood flow during HLU. eNOS and SOD-1 expression were measured in feed arteries (FA) and in first-order (1A), second-order (2A), and third-order (3A) arterioles. Dilation to infusion of ACh in vivo was blunted in Sol but not Gast. In arteries of Sol muscle, HLU decreased eNOS mRNA and protein content. eNOS mRNA content was significantly less in Sol FA (35%), 1A arterioles (25%) and 2A arterioles (18%). eNOS protein content was less in Sol FA (64%) and 1A arterioles (65%) from HLU rats. In arteries of Gast, HLU did not decrease eNOS mRNA or protein. SOD-1 mRNA expression was less in Sol 2A arterioles (31%) and 3A arterioles (29%) of HLU rats. SOD-1 protein content was less in Sol FA (67%) but not arterioles. SOD-1 mRNA and protein content were not decreased in arteries from Gast. These data indicate that HLU decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation, eNOS expression, and SOD-1 expression primarily in arteries of Sol muscle where blood flow is reduced during HLU.

  18. Endothelium-dependent and-independent relaxation induced by resveratrol in rat superior mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Xu, Cangbao; Wei, Yahui; Zhang, Yaping; Cao, Ailan

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (Res) is a specific agonist of sirtuin 1, and has many cardioprotective effects. Although Res is able to relax various vascular beds, its pharmacological properties in rat superior mesenteric arteries and the underlying mechanism are not well clarified. The aim of present study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effects of Res on rat superior mesenteric arteries and the mechanisms involved. The isometric tension of rat superior mesenteric arterial rings was recorded in vitro using myography. It was found that Res concentration-dependently relaxed endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine hydrochloride (Emax, 97.66±0.79%; pD2, 4.30±0.14) or KCl (Emax, 101.3±0.6%; pD2, 4.12±0.03). The vasorelaxant effect of Res on the superior mesenteric artery rings was partially endothelium-dependent. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 µM) significantly inhibited the Res-induced vasorelaxant effect. However, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM) and indomethacin (5 µM) each had no effect on the Res-induced vasorelaxation. In artery rings without endothelium, the vasorelaxation induced by Res was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine (100 µM) and glibenclamide (10 µM). However, barium chloride dehydrate (10 µM) and tetraethylammonium chloride (1 mM) did not affect the vasorelaxation induced by Res. Moreover, Res also inhibited the contraction induced by an increase in external calcium concentration in Ca2+-free medium plus KCl (60 mM). These results suggest that Res induces relaxation in superior mesenteric arterial rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, involving nitric oxide release, and also through an endothelium-independent pathway, with opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels and blockade of extracellular Ca2+ influx. PMID:27698719

  19. Effects of sapropterin on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with CADASIL: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Renata; Campolo, Jonica; Frontali, Marina; Taroni, Franco; Federico, Antonio; Inzitari, Domenico; Tavani, Alessandra; Romano, Silvia; Puca, Emanuele; Orzi, Francesco; Francia, Ada; Mariotti, Caterina; Tomasello, Chiara; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Stromillo, Maria Laura; Pantoni, Leonardo; Pescini, Francesca; Valenti, Raffaella; Pelucchi, Claudio; Parolini, Marina; Parodi, Oberdan

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by NOTCH3 mutations, is characterized by vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells abnormalities, altered vasoreactivity, and recurrent lacunar infarcts. Vasomotor function may represent a key factor for disease progression. Tetrahydrobiopterin, essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthesis in endothelial cells, ameliorates endothelial function. We assessed whether supplementation with sapropterin, a synthetic tetrahydrobiopterin analog, improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in CADASIL patients. In a 24-month, multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, CADASIL patients aged 30 to 65 years were randomly assigned to receive placebo or sapropterin 200 to 400 mg BID. The primary end point was change in the reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry at 24 months. We also assessed the safety and tolerability of sapropterin. Analysis was done by intention-to-treat. The intention-to-treat population included 61 patients. We found no significant difference between sapropterin (n=32) and placebo (n=29) in the primary end point (mean difference in reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry changes 0.19 [95% confidence interval, -0.18, 0.56]). Reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry increased after 24 months in 37% of patients on sapropterin and in 28% on placebo; however, after adjustment for age, sex, and clinical characteristics, improvement was not associated with treatment arm. The proportion of patients with adverse events was similar on sapropterin and on placebo (50% versus 48.3%); serious adverse events occurred in 6.3% versus 13.8%, respectively. Sapropterin was safe and well-tolerated at the average dose of 5 mg/kg/day, but did not affect endothelium-dependent vasodilation in CADASIL patients. https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu. Unique

  20. Hindlimb unweighting decreases endothelium-dependent dilation and eNOS expression in soleus not gastrocnemius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Rush, J. W.; Ray, C. A.; Price, E. M.; Hasser, E. M.; Laughlin, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting (HLU) decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) in arteries of skeletal muscle with reduced blood flow during HLU. Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were exposed to HLU (n = 15) or control (n = 15) conditions for 14 days. ACh-induced dilation was assessed in muscle with reduced [soleus (Sol)] or unchanged [gastrocnemius (Gast)] blood flow during HLU. eNOS and SOD-1 expression were measured in feed arteries (FA) and in first-order (1A), second-order (2A), and third-order (3A) arterioles. Dilation to infusion of ACh in vivo was blunted in Sol but not Gast. In arteries of Sol muscle, HLU decreased eNOS mRNA and protein content. eNOS mRNA content was significantly less in Sol FA (35%), 1A arterioles (25%) and 2A arterioles (18%). eNOS protein content was less in Sol FA (64%) and 1A arterioles (65%) from HLU rats. In arteries of Gast, HLU did not decrease eNOS mRNA or protein. SOD-1 mRNA expression was less in Sol 2A arterioles (31%) and 3A arterioles (29%) of HLU rats. SOD-1 protein content was less in Sol FA (67%) but not arterioles. SOD-1 mRNA and protein content were not decreased in arteries from Gast. These data indicate that HLU decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation, eNOS expression, and SOD-1 expression primarily in arteries of Sol muscle where blood flow is reduced during HLU.

  1. The DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin and the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 improve endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat mesenteric arteries in the presence of high glucose.

    PubMed

    Salheen, S M; Panchapakesan, U; Pollock, C A; Woodman, O L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1R agonist, exendin-4 on the mechanism(s) of endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat mesenteric arteries exposed to high glucose concentration (40 mM). Organ bath techniques were employed to investigate vascular endothelial function in rat mesenteric arteries in the presence of normal (11 mM) or high (40 mM) glucose concentrations. Pharmacological tools (1μM TRAM-34, 1μM apamin, 100 nM Ibtx, 100 μM l-NNA, 10 μM ODQ) were used to distinguish between NO and EDHF-mediated relaxation. Superoxide anion levels were assessed by L-012 and lucigenin enhanced-chemiluminescence techniques. Incubation of mesenteric rings with high glucose for 2 h caused a significant increase in superoxide anion generation and a significant impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation. Exendin-4 and DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin, but not sitagliptin or vildagliptin, significantly reduced vascular superoxide and improved endothelium-dependent relaxation in the presence of high glucose. The beneficial actions of exendin-4, but not linagliptin, were attenuated by the GLP-1R antagonist exendin fragment (9-39). Further experiments demonstrated that the presence of high glucose impaired the contribution of both nitric oxide and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarisation to relaxation and that linagliptin improved both mechanisms involved in endothelium-dependent relaxation. These findings demonstrate that high glucose impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation can be improved by exendin-4 and linagliptin, likely due to their antioxidant activity and independently of any glucose lowering effect.

  2. Natural course of the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations after balloon endothelium removal in porcine coronary arteries. Possible dysfunction of a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, H; Flavahan, N A; Vanhoutte, P M

    1989-09-01

    caused by serotonin and aggregating platelets; this endothelium-dependent depression was markedly impaired in the previously denuded arteries throughout the study. Direct relaxation of the coronary smooth muscle to nitric oxide or sodium nitroprusside or direct contraction to KCl or serotonin were comparable between the control and previously denuded arteries. These experiments indicate that endothelium-dependent relaxations progressively worsen after regeneration of the endothelium and that the dysfunction of a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein partly account for the endothelial dysfunction in the chronic regenerated state.

  3. Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxant Effects of Dealcoholized Wine Powder of Wild Grape (Vitis coignetiae) in the Rat Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang Keun; Park, Ho-Young; Ryu, Mee-Ra; Kim, Yoonsook

    2016-01-01

    The vasorelaxant effects of dealcoholized wild grape (Vitis coignetiae) wine were investigated with isolated rat thoracic aorta. In our present study, we demonstrate that wild grape wine powder (WGWP) induced relaxation of aortic rings preconstricted with norepinephrine in a dose-dependent manner (at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1 mg/mL). The vasorelaxant effect of WGWP was dependent on intact endothelia, which was attenuated by incubation with inhibitors of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, such as NG-nitro-L-arginine (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), methylene blue (guanylate cyclase inhibitor), and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor). Moreover, treatment with WGWP and atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist) or diphenylhydramine (histamine receptor antagonist) significantly inhibited endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Our results suggest that WGWP induces relaxation in rat aortic rings in an endothelium-dependent manner. Results further indicate that this effect occurs via nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and prostacyclin-cAMP pathway through a muscarinic receptor and histamine receptor. PMID:27840653

  4. Circulating microparticles from patients with valvular heart disease and cardiac surgery inhibit endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Hu, Xiao-Xia; Lin, Ze-Bang; Chang, Feng-Jun; Ou, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Ou, Jing-Song

    2015-09-01

    Vascular function is very important for maintaining circulation after cardiac surgery. Circulating microparticles (MPs) generated in various diseases play important roles in causing inflammation, coagulation, and vascular injury. However, the impact of MPs generated from patients who have valvular heart disease (VHD), before and after cardiac surgery, on vascular function remains unknown. This study is designed to investigate the impact of such MPs on vasodilation. Microparticles were isolated from age-matched healthy subjects and patients who had VHD, before cardiac surgery, and at 12 hours and 72 hours afterward. The number of MPs was measured and compared. Effects evaluated were of the impact of MPs on: vasodilation of mice aorta; the phosphorylation and expression of Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), protein kinase C-βII (PKC-βII), and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K); expression of caveolin-1; the association of eNOS with heat shock protein 90 (HSP90); and generation of nitric oxide and superoxide anion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Compared with the healthy subjects, VHD patients had significantly higher levels of circulating MPs and those MPs before cardiac surgery can: impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation; inhibit phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS; increase activation of PKC-βII and p70S6K; enhance expression of caveolin-1; reduce the association of HSP90 with eNOS; decrease nitric oxide production, and increase superoxide anion generation. These deleterious effects were even stronger in postoperative MPs. Our data demonstrate that MPs generated from VHD patients before and after cardiac surgery contributed to endothelial dysfunction, by uncoupling and inhibiting eNOS. Circulating MPs are potential therapeutic targets for the maintenance of vascular function postoperatively. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Effect of Apocynum venetum Leaf Extract via Src/PI3K/Akt Signalling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yeh Siang; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani; Kwan, Chiu Yin; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2015-01-01

    Botanical herbs are consumed globally not only as an essential diet but also as medicines or as functional/recreational food supplements. The extract of the Apocynum venetum leaves (AVLE), also known as Luobuma, exerts its antihypertensive effect via dilating the blood vessels in an endothelium- and concentration-dependent manner with optimal effect seen at as low as 10 µg/mL. A commercial Luoboma “antihypertensive tea” is available commercially in the western province of China. The present study seeks to investigate the underlying cellular mechanisms of the nitric oxide (NO)-releasing property of AVLE in rat aortas and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by AVLE was assessed in organ chambers in the presence or absence of polyethyleneglycol catalase (PP2, 20 µM; inhibitor of Src kinase), wortmannin (30 nM) and LY294002 (20 µM; PI3 (phosphatidylinositol3)-Kinase inhibitor), NG-nitro-l-arginine (L-NAME, 100 µM; endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (eNOS)) and ODQ (1 µM; soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor). Total nitrite and nitrate (NOx) level and protein expression of p-Akt and p-eNOS were measured. AVLE-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was reduced by PP2, wortmannin and LY294002 and abolished by L-NAME and ODQ. AVLE significantly increased total NOx level in rat aortas and in HUVECs compared to control. It also instigated phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in cultured HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner and this was markedly suppressed by PP2, wortmannin and LY294002. AVLE also inhibited superoxide generated from both NADPH oxidase and xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Taken together, AVLE causes endothelium-dependent NO mediated relaxations of rat aortas through Src/PI3K/Akt dependent NO signalling pathway and possesses superoxide scavenging activity. PMID:26133970

  6. Hormonal therapy with estradiol and drospirenone improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the coronary bed of ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Borgo, M.V.; Claudio, E.R.G.; Silva, F.B.; Romero, W.G.; Gouvea, S.A.; Moysés, M.R.; Santos, R.L.; Almeida, S.A.; Podratz, P.L.; Graceli, J.B.; Abreu, G.R.

    2015-01-01

    Drospirenone (DRSP) is a progestin with anti-aldosterone properties and it reduces blood pressure in hypertensive women. However, the effects of DRSP on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation have not been evaluated. This study investigated the effects of combined therapy with estrogen (E2) and DRSP on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the coronary bed of ovariectomized (OVX) spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=87) at 12 weeks of age were randomly divided into sham operated (Sham), OVX, OVX treated with E2 (E2), and OVX treated with E2 and DRSP (E2+DRSP) groups. Hemodynamic parameters were directly evaluated by catheter insertion into the femoral artery. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to bradykinin in the coronary arterial bed was assessed using isolated hearts according to a modified Langendorff method. Coronary protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) was assessed by Western blotting. Histological slices of coronary arteries were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and morphometric parameters were analyzed. Oxidative stress was assessed in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence. Ovariectomy increased systolic blood pressure, which was only prevented by E2+DRSP treatment. Estrogen deficiency caused endothelial dysfunction, which was prevented by both treatments. However, the vasodilator response in the E2+DRSP group was significantly higher at the three highest concentrations compared with the OVX group. Reduced ER-α expression in OVX rats was restored by both treatments. Morphometric parameters and oxidative stress were augmented by OVX and reduced by E2 and E2+DRSP treatments. Hormonal therapy with E2 and DRSP may be an important therapeutic option in the prevention of coronary heart disease in hypertensive post-menopausal women. PMID:26577845

  7. Hormonal therapy with estradiol and drospirenone improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the coronary bed of ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Borgo, M V; Claudio, E R G; Silva, F B; Romero, W G; Gouvea, S A; Moysés, M R; Santos, R L; Almeida, S A; Podratz, P L; Graceli, J B; Abreu, G R

    2016-01-01

    Drospirenone (DRSP) is a progestin with anti-aldosterone properties and it reduces blood pressure in hypertensive women. However, the effects of DRSP on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation have not been evaluated. This study investigated the effects of combined therapy with estrogen (E2) and DRSP on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the coronary bed of ovariectomized (OVX) spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=87) at 12 weeks of age were randomly divided into sham operated (Sham), OVX, OVX treated with E2 (E2), and OVX treated with E2 and DRSP (E2+DRSP) groups. Hemodynamic parameters were directly evaluated by catheter insertion into the femoral artery. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to bradykinin in the coronary arterial bed was assessed using isolated hearts according to a modified Langendorff method. Coronary protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) was assessed by Western blotting. Histological slices of coronary arteries were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and morphometric parameters were analyzed. Oxidative stress was assessed in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence. Ovariectomy increased systolic blood pressure, which was only prevented by E2+DRSP treatment. Estrogen deficiency caused endothelial dysfunction, which was prevented by both treatments. However, the vasodilator response in the E2+DRSP group was significantly higher at the three highest concentrations compared with the OVX group. Reduced ER-α expression in OVX rats was restored by both treatments. Morphometric parameters and oxidative stress were augmented by OVX and reduced by E2 and E2+DRSP treatments. Hormonal therapy with E2 and DRSP may be an important therapeutic option in the prevention of coronary heart disease in hypertensive post-menopausal women.

  8. Irisin relaxes mouse mesenteric arteries through endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Wan, Fangzhu; Wang, Fang; Wu, Qi

    2015-12-25

    Irisin, a newly discovered myokine, has been shown to produce modest weight loss and improve glucose intolerance in mice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of irisin on vascular activity and the mechanisms involved. Experiments were performed on mouse mesenteric arteries. We demonstrated that irisin induced relaxation in mesenteric arteries with or without endothelium in a concentration-dependent manner. It was further demonstrated that the irisin-induced vasorelaxation effects on endothelium-intact mesenteric arteries were reduced by pretreatment with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 1H-[1, 2, 4] oxadizolo [4, 3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). However, pretreatment with indomethacin (INDO), a nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor did not modulate irisin-induced relaxation. In addition, the contraction due to extracellular Ca(2+) influx and intracellular Ca(2+) release was also inhibited by irisin. In summary, these results suggested that the endothelium-dependent relaxation of irisin is mediated by the nitric oxide (NO)-guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic phosphate (cGMP)-dependent pathway but not the prostaglandin I2 (PGI2)-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent mechanism. Endothelium-independent relaxation may be depend on inhibiting Ca(2+) influx through blocking VDCCs and intracellular Ca(2+) release through both IP3R and RyR channels.

  9. Endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of rat aorta induced by extract of Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyun; Li, Sujuan; Wang, Peng; Yan, Saimei; Hu, Lin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Yang, Cui; Leung, George Pakheng

    2014-09-25

    Schizophyllum commune (SC) is widely consumed by Chinese, especially in southern part of China. The aim of the present study was to assess the extract of SC on vascular tone and the mechanisms involved. Experiments were performed on aorta of 18-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Dried SC was extracted with 50% ethanol, 90% ethanol and deionized water, respectively. The effects of SC on the isometric tension of rat aortic rings were measured. Protein expression for the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was also determined in the primarily cultured rat aortic arterial endothelial cells (RAECs). The results showed that the water extract of SC induced a marked relaxation in aortic rings with or without endothelium. After the pretreatments of N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, indomethacin, RP-cAMP, and methylene blue, the SC-induced relaxation was significantly decreased. In addition, the contraction due to Ca(2+) influx and intracellular Ca(2+) release was also inhibited by SC. Furthermore, expression of the eNOS protein was significantly elevated in RAECs after treatment of SC. In conclusion, the water extract of SC induces an endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation in rat aorta. The relaxing effect of SC involves the modulation of NO-cGMP-dependent pathways, PGI2-cAMP-depedent pathways, Ca(2+) influx though calcium channels and intracellular Ca(2+) release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Diabetes impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation of human penile vascular tissues mediated by NO and EDHF.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Javier; Cuevas, Pedro; Fernández, Argentina; Gabancho, Sonia; Allona, Antonio; Martín-Morales, Antonio; Moncada, Ignacio; Videla, Sebastián; Sáenz de Tejada, Iñigo

    2003-12-26

    Standard treatments for erectile dysfunction (ED) (i.e., PDE5 inhibitors) are less effective in diabetic patients for unknown reasons. Endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) of human corpus cavernosum (HCC) depends on nitric oxide (NO), while in human penile resistance arteries (HPRA) endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) and NO participate. Here we show that diabetes significantly reduced EDR induced by acetylcholine (ACh) in HCC and HPRA. Relaxation attributed to EDHF was also impaired in HPRA from diabetic patients. The PDE5 inhibitor, sildenafil (10nM), reversed diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction in HCC, but not in HPRA. Calcium dobesilate (DOBE; 10 microM) fully reversed diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction in HPRA by specifically potentiating the EDHF-mediated component of EDR. Impairment by diabetes of NO and EDHF-dependent responses precluded the complete recovery of endothelial function in HPRA by sildenafil. This could explain the poor clinical response to PDE5 inhibitors of diabetic men with ED and suggests that a pharmacological approach that combines enhancement of NO/cGMP and EDHF pathways could be necessary to treat ED in many diabetic men.

  11. Activation of TRPV1 by Dietary Capsaicin Improves Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxation and Prevents Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dachun; Luo, Zhidan; Ma, Shuangtao; Wong, Wing Tak; Ma, Liqun; Zhong, Jian; He, Hongbo; Zhao, Zhigang; Cao, Tingbing; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Arendshorst, William J.; Huang, Yu; Tepel, Martin; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Some plant-based diets lower the cardiometabolic risks and prevalence of hypertension. New evidence implies a role for the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases. Little is known about impact of chronic TRPV1 activation on the regulation of vascular function and blood pressure. Here we report that chronic TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin increases the phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) and eNOS and thus production of nitric oxide (NO) in endothelial cells, which is calcium dependent. TRPV1 activation by capsaicin enhances endothelium-dependent relaxation in wild-type mice, an effect absent in TRPV1-deficient mice. Long-term stimulation of TRPV1 can activate PKA, which contributes to increased eNOS phosphorylation, improves vasorelaxation, and lowers blood pressure in genetically hypertensive rats. We conclude that TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin improves endothelial function. TRPV1-mediated increase in NO production may represent a promising target for therapeutic intervention of hypertension. PMID:20674858

  12. Involvement of endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms in midazolam-induced vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Gian Luca; Di Fabio, Alessandro; Catena, Cristiana; Chiuch, Alessandra; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2011-08-01

    Benzodiazepine (BDZ) infusion has been shown to reduce blood pressure in both humans and animals. Although the inhibitory effects of BDZ on the central nervous system have been well documented, less is known about the direct effects of BDZ on the vascular bed. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of the BDZ midazolam on the vascular system in C57/BL6 mouse aortic rings and to investigate the mechanisms of its direct vascular action. We found that midazolam induced reversible, dose-dependent vasodilation in potassium- and phenylephrine-precontracted rings. In rings that were precontracted with potassium or phenylephrine, treatment with 10 μmol l(-1) midazolam increased vasodilation by 15 and 60%, respectively, compared with baseline. Vasodilation increased by 80 and 87%, respectively, after treatment with 50 μmol l(-1) midazolam. Only the low concentration of midazolam (10 μmol l(-1)) induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in phenylephrine-precontracted rings. Vasodilation increased by 60% in rings with endothelium and by 20% in rings without endothelium. Conversely, only the high concentration of midazolam (50 μmol l(-1)) reduced the CaCl(2)-induced vasoconstriction of aortic rings with EC(50) (the concentration giving 50% of the maximal effect) values of 1 and 6 mmol l(-1) for vehicle- and midazolam-treated rings, respectively. Furthermore, the incubation of phenylephrine-precontracted rings with an inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the inhibitors of central or peripheral type BDZ receptors (flumazenil or PK 11195, respectively) produced no change in midazolam-induced vasodilation. Thus, low concentrations of midazolam induce vasodilation via an endothelium-dependent mechanism that does not involve NO production. In contrast, high concentrations of midazolam induce vasodilation via an endothelium-independent mechanism that implies reduced sensitivity of aortic rings to calcium ions. Additionally

  13. Vascular effects of Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus): endothelium-dependent NO- and EDHF-mediated relaxation depending on vessel size.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Chiu-Yin; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Sim, Si-Mui; Deyama, Takeshi; Nishibe, Sansei

    2004-05-01

    Siberian ginseng (SG) has been widely and historically consumed as a health food product for the improvement of self well-being, but whether vascular relaxation may contribute to such a therapeutic health effect has not been studied. We therefore investigated the vasorelaxant effect of the aqueous extract of the roots of SG (Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim) using several in vitro vascular rings prepared from dog carotid artery, rat aorta and rat mesenteric artery. SG extract (0.04-0.8 mg/ml) caused concentration-dependent relaxation in dog carotid arterial rings pre-contracted with 100 microM phenylephrine (PE), and the relaxation was primarily endothelium-dependent. Treatment with 100 microM L-NOARG (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) either prevented or totally reverted SG-induced relaxation, suggesting that the endothelium-dependent relaxation was mediated by NO. Similar endothelium-dependent vascular relaxant responses were also obtained with rat aortic and mesenteric arterial rings, except that it occurred over a relatively higher concentration range of SG (0.5-2.0 mg/ml). When tested in the presence of 300 microM L-NAME, the vasorelaxant effect of SG was inhibited totally in rat aorta but only partially in rat mesenteric artery. The relaxation to SG that was insensitive to L-NAME in rat mesenteric arterial rings was eliminated when the rings (both proximal and distal ends) were pre-treated with a combination of 300 microM L-NAME and 15 mM KCl indicating the involvement of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). This vasorelaxant response of the SG extract was inhibited partially by atropine (1 microM), completely by TEA (5 mM), but not by indomethacin (1 microM) or propranolol (10 microM). SG up to 2 mg/ml had no effect on KCl-induced contraction in any of the vascular rings studied. When compared with carbachol-induced (CCh) relaxation, SG resembles CCh in that the sensitivity to L-NAME inhibition is dependent on vascular size, i.e. aorta

  14. Plasma myeloperoxidase is inversely associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation in elderly subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Leonard P; Teerlink, Tom; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Henry, Ronald M A; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Heine, Robert J; Scheffer, Peter G

    2010-12-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a biomarker related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide scavenging, has been shown to impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Because elevated hydrogen peroxide concentrations in diabetic vessels may enhance MPO activity, we hypothesized that a stronger association of MPO with flow-mediated dilation (FMD) may be found in subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism. Myeloperoxidase concentrations were measured in EDTA plasma samples from participants of a population-based cohort study, including 230 subjects with normal glucose metabolism and 386 with abnormal glucose metabolism. Vascular function was expressed as FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation of the brachial artery. In subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism, MPO was negatively associated with FMD (-20.9 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -41.7 to -0.2] -μm change in FMD per SD increment of MPO). This association remained significant after adjustment for nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (-31.1 [95% CI, -50.0 to -12.3]) and was not attenuated after further adjustment for established risk factors. In subjects with normal glucose metabolism, MPO was not significantly associated with FMD (2.0 [95% CI, -16.0 to 20.0]). In conclusion, in subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism, plasma levels of MPO are inversely associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation, possibly reflecting enhancement of MPO activity by vascular oxidative stress.

  15. Novel aspects of endothelium-dependent regulation of vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Villar, I C; Francis, S; Webb, A; Hobbs, A J; Ahluwalia, A

    2006-09-01

    The vascular endothelium plays a crucial role in the regulation of vascular homeostasis and in preventing the initiation and progress of cardiovascular disease by controlling mechanical functions of the underlying vascular smooth muscle. Three vasodilators: nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin, and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, produced by the endothelium, underlie this activity. These substances act in a co-ordinated interactive manner to maintain normal endothelial function and operate as support mechanisms when one pathway malfunctions. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how gender influences the interaction of these factors resulting in the vascular protective effects seen in pre-menopausal women. We also discuss how endothelial NO synthase (NOS) can act in both a pro- and anti-inflammatory action and therefore is likely to be pivotal in the initiation and time course of an inflammatory response, particularly with respect to inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. Finally, we review recent evidence demonstrating that it is not solely NOS-derived NO that mediates many of the beneficial effects of the endothelium, in particular, nitrite acts as a store of NO released during pathological episodes associated with NOS inactivity (ischemia/hypoxia). Each of these more recent findings has emphasized new pathways involved in endothelial biology, and following further research and understanding of the significance and mechanisms of these systems, it is likely that new and improved treatments for cardiovascular disease will result.

  16. Associations of resting heart rate with endothelium-dependent vasodilation and shear rate.

    PubMed

    Laosiripisan, Jitanan; Parkhurst, Kristin L; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and a hemodynamic factor that can modulate blood flow as it affects the frequency of shear stimuli acting on the arterial wall. However, the association between heart rate and endothelium-dependent vasodilation remains highly controversial. We determined the association between heart rate at rest and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in 98 apparently healthy adults (18-63 years). The mild and positive association between heart rate and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was no longer significant when age and sex or baseline diameter were controlled for. The path analyses revealed that heart rate was not directly related to FMD but the association was indirectly mediated by shear rate, which was confirmed by a bias-corrected bootstrap 95% CIs (0.0157-0.1056). We concluded that even though heart rate and endothelium-dependent vasodilation were associated with shear rate, there was no independent relation between heart rate and FMD.

  17. Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxant actions and mechanisms induced by total flavonoids of Elsholtzia splendens in rat aortas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Ping; Lu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Guo-Lin; Li, Xu-Yun; Peng, Hong-Yun; Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Liang; Ye, Zhi-Guo; Bruce, Iain C; Xia, Qiang; Qian, Ling-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Elsholtzia splendens (ES) is, rich in flavonoids, used to repair copper contaminated soil in China, which has been reported to benefit cardiovascular systems as folk medicine. However, few direct evidences have been found to clarify the vasorelaxation effect of total flavonoids of ES (TFES). The vasoactive effect of TFES and its underlying mechanisms in rat thoracic aortas were investigated using the organ bath system. TFES (5-200mg/L) caused a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in endothelium-intact rings, which was not abolished but significantly reduced by the removal of endothelium. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (100μM) and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,2-α]quinoxalin-1-one (30μM) significantly blocked the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of TFES. Meanwhile, NOS activity in endothelium-intact aortas was concentration-dependently elevated by TFES. However, indomethacin (10μM) did not affect TFES-induced vasorelaxation. Endothelium-independent vasorelaxation of TFES was significantly attenuated by KATP channel blocker glibenclamide. The accumulative Ca(2+)-induced contraction in endothelium-denuded aortic rings primed with KCl or phenylephrine was markedly weakened by TFES. These results revealed that the NOS/NO/cGMP pathway is likely involved in the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation induced by TFES, while activating KATP channel, inhibiting intracellular Ca(2+) release, blocking Ca(2+) channels and decreasing Ca(2+) influx into vascular smooth muscle cells might contribute to the endothelium-independent vasorelaxation conferred by TFES.

  18. Nitric oxide mediates aortic disease in mice deficient in the metalloprotease Adamts1 and in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oller, Jorge; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Ruiz, E Josue; Villahoz, Silvia; Renard, Marjolijn; Canelas, Lizet I; Briones, Ana M; Alberca, Rut; Lozano-Vidal, Noelia; Hurlé, María A; Milewicz, Dianna; Evangelista, Arturo; Salaices, Mercedes; Nistal, J Francisco; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; De Backer, Julie; Campanero, Miguel R; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Heritable thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), including Marfan syndrome (MFS), currently lack a cure, and causative mutations have been identified for only a fraction of affected families. Here we identify the metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) as therapeutic targets in individuals with TAAD. We show that Adamts1 is a major mediator of vascular homeostasis, given that genetic haploinsufficiency of Adamts1 in mice causes TAAD similar to MFS. Aortic nitric oxide and Nos2 levels were higher in Adamts1-deficient mice and in a mouse model of MFS (hereafter referred to as MFS mice), and Nos2 inactivation protected both types of mice from aortic pathology. Pharmacological inhibition of Nos2 rapidly reversed aortic dilation and medial degeneration in young Adamts1-deficient mice and in young or old MFS mice. Patients with MFS showed elevated NOS2 and decreased ADAMTS1 protein levels in the aorta. These findings uncover a possible causative role for the ADAMTS1-NOS2 axis in human TAAD and warrant evaluation of NOS2 inhibitors for therapy.

  19. Nitric oxide-mediated toxicity in paraquat-exposed SH-SY5Y cells: a protective role of 7-nitroindazole.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Ortiz, Miguel A; Morán, José M; González-Polo, Rosa A; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Soler, Germán; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Fuentes, José M

    2009-08-01

    The precise mechanism underlying the role of nitric oxide (NO) or nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) in paraquat-mediated toxicity is yet to be fully elucidated. The importance of the NADPH-diaphorase activity of NOSs in paraquat toxicity, in addition to the production of NO, has previously been reported as a mechanism of toxicity. However, other studies have highlighted the toxicity of NO alone and, conversely a protective role of NO in paraquat-mediated toxicity has also been described. The goal of this study was to clarify the involvement of NO and NOS in paraquat-mediated toxicity in an SH-SY5Y cell system, and to evaluate the putative role of 7-nitroindazole as a protective agent in human neural cells. Our results indicate that the three previously described isoforms of NOS are expressed in SH-SY5Y cells, with the data showing that these synthases act as paraquat diaphorases. While this process could occur at the expense of NO production, NO alone does play a toxic role, with its production leading to the formation of the toxicant peroxynitrite. Although the efficacies of the different inhibitors tested cannot be directly compared because the various NOS forms were probably inhibited to differing extents, the results support the idea that endogenous and inducible NO is a neurotoxic mediator of the effects of paraquat. The NADPH-diaphorase activity of NOS and NO production are therefore factors implicated in the toxicity mediated by the herbicide paraquat.

  20. Endothelium-dependent responses in isolated blood vessels of lower vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Miller, V M; Vanhoutte, P M

    1986-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine have been identified in mammalian arteries and veins. To determine the occurrence of such relaxations in other classes of vertebrates, rings of descending aortas of turtles, cayman and bullfrogs and ventral aortas of trout were suspended for isometric force measurements. Acetylcholine and the calcium ionophore A23187 initiated concentration-dependent relaxations in aortas from cayman and bullfrogs contracted with norepinephrine. These relaxations were not affected by meclofenamate, were reversed by methylene blue and abolished by endothelium removal. Acetylcholine caused concentration-dependent contractions in aortas (with and without endothelium) from trout and turtles; these tissues contracted minimally to norepinephrine. In the aortas of the trout contracted with acetylcholine, the calcium ionophore A23187 initiated endothelium-dependent relaxations which were reversed by methylene blue and abolished by meclofenamate. A23187 contracted turtle aortas; an effect reduced by endothelium removal. These data demonstrate endothelium-dependent relaxations and contractions in blood vessels of reptiles, amphibians and teleosts. Thus, endothelium-dependent modulation of the responses of the vascular smooth muscle represents a cardiovascular regulatory mechanism which appears early in vertebrate phylogeny.

  1. Androgen deprivation therapy reversibly increases endothelium-dependent vasodilation in men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Paul L; Jarolim, Petr; Basaria, Shehzad; Zuflacht, Jonah P; Milian, Jessica; Kadivar, Samoneh; Graham, Powell L; Hyatt, Andrew; Kantoff, Philip W; Beckman, Joshua A

    2015-04-20

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a standard treatment for patients with aggressive prostate cancer. Although ADT improves survival, it increases the risk of diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests that ADT increases adverse cardiovascular events as early as 3 months after initiation in patients with cardiovascular disease, but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that ADT may impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation due to increases in lipids and insulin resistance and may provide a link for heightened cardiovascular risk in this population. We prospectively evaluated conduit artery endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation, lipids, and insulin resistance in 16 consecutively treated men (mean age 66 ± 7 years; 25% with diabetes) with prostate cancer before and after 3 months of ADT. High-resolution B-mode ultrasound was used to assess flow-mediated (endothelium-dependent) and nitroglycerine-mediated (endothelium-independent) brachial artery vasodilation. ADT significantly increased insulin resistance, total cholesterol, HDL, and LDL. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was greater at 3 months than at baseline (10.8% [interquartile range: 7.7% to 14.6%] versus 8.9% [interquartile range: 4.0% to 12.6%], respectively; P=0.046, allometric P=0.037). Nitroglycerine-mediated vasodilation did not change from baseline (P>0.2). The subset of participants on ADT for 6 months returned for reevaluation at 1 year. In this group, endothelium-dependent vasodilation increased from baseline to 3 months and returned to baseline 6 months after ADT withdrawal (9.4% [interquartile range: 6.9% to 10.9%], 11.6% [interquartile range: 7.9% to 15.2%], and 9.0% [interquartile range: 5.1% to 12.5%], respectively; P=0.05). In contrast to our expectation, ADT improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation and its cessation returned endothelium-dependent vasodilation to baseline. Determining the mechanism of this change requires further investigation. © 2015 The Authors. Published

  2. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all nociceptive models with the recorded ED50 value of 279.3 mg/kg for the ACT, while, for the early and late phases of the FT, the value was >500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems.

  3. Activated Macrophages as a Novel Determinant of Tumor Cell Radioresponse: The Role of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of Cellular Respiration and Oxygen Sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Heng; De Ridder, Mark; Verovski, Valeri N.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Law, Kalun; Monsaert, Christinne; Van den Berge, Dirk L.; Verellen, Dirk; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Storme, Guy A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is known to inhibit metabolic oxygen consumption because of interference with mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study examined whether activation of iNOS (a) directly in tumor cells or (b) in bystander macrophages may improve radioresponse through sparing of oxygen. Methods and Materials: EMT-6 tumor cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma, and examined for iNOS expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzymatic activity. Tumor cells alone, or combined with macrophages were subjected to metabolic hypoxia and analyzed for radiosensitivity by clonogenic assay, and for oxygen consumption by electron paramagnetic resonance and a Clark-type electrode. Results: Both tumor cells and macrophages displayed a coherent picture of iNOS induction at transcriptional/translational levels and NO/nitrite production, whereas macrophages showed also co-induction of the inducible heme oxygenase-1, which is associated with carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin production. Activation of iNOS in tumor cells resulted in a profound oxygen sparing and a 2.3-fold radiosensitization. Bystander NO-producing, but not CO-producing, macrophages were able to block oxygen consumption by 1.9-fold and to radiosensitize tumor cells by 2.2-fold. Both effects could be neutralized by aminoguanidine, a metabolic iNOS inhibitor. An improved radioresponse was clearly observed at macrophages to tumor cells ratios ranging between 1:16 to 1:1. Conclusions: Our study is the first, as far as we are aware, to provide evidence that iNOS may induce radiosensitization through oxygen sparing, and illuminates NO-producing macrophages as a novel determinant of tumor cell radioresponse within the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  4. Nitric oxide-mediated antitumor activity induced by the extract from Grifola frondosa (Maitake mushroom) in a macrophage cell line, RAW264.7.

    PubMed

    Sanzen, I; Imanishi, N; Takamatsu, N; Konosu, S; Mantani, N; Terasawa, K; Tazawa, K; Odaira, Y; Watanabe, M; Takeyama, M; Ochiai, H

    2001-12-01

    We have investigated D-fraction (MDF) extracted from Grifola frondosa (Maitake mushroom) on the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 (RAW) cells, a murine monocyte/macrophage cell line, with special reference to antitumor activity of MDF against human hepatoma-derived huH-1 cells. MDF could induce iNOS mRNA expression in RAW cells in a dose range of more than 30 microg/ml, but the effect of 10 microg/ml of MDF was negligible. The iNOS mRNA expression induced by 100 microg/ml of MDF was 6 hrs later, but lasted for a longer time than that of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a representative iNOS inducer. Although iNOS mRNA levels in MDF-stimulated cells were almost equal to LPS-stimulated cells at the peak time, the cumulative amount of nitrite was only about 50% compared with that of LPS-treated cells. When huH-I cells were cultured in MDF containing media in a 24-well plate with inserted porous bottom in the presence or absence of RAW cells, the viability of huH-1 cells decreased significantly only in the presence of RAW cells in MDF dose-dependent manner. This antitumor activity of RAW cells in the presence of MDF was abolished or attenuated by the addition of L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor, confirming that this phenomenon is due to iNOS-mediated NO production by RAW cells, but not direct cytotoxic activity of MDF against huH-1 cells. These data suggest that MDF is a novel inducer for iNOS which contributes at least in part to antitumor activity of MDF.

  5. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all nociceptive models with the recorded ED50 value of 279.3 mg/kg for the ACT, while, for the early and late phases of the FT, the value was >500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems. PMID:27190528

  6. Calycosin and Formononetin Induce Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation by the Activation of Large-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels (BKCa)

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hisa Hui Ling; Vong, Chi Teng; Leung, George Pak-Heng; Seto, Sai Wang; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Calycosin and formononetin are two structurally similar isoflavonoids that have been shown to induce vasodilation in aorta and conduit arteries, but study of their actions on endothelial functions is lacking. Here, we demonstrated that both isoflavonoids relaxed rat mesenteric resistance arteries in a concentration-dependent manner, which was reduced by endothelial disruption and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition, indicating the involvement of both endothelium and vascular smooth muscle. In addition, the endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but not the endothelium-independent vasodilation, was blocked by BKCa inhibitor iberiotoxin (IbTX). Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model, we showed calycosin and formononetin induced dose-dependent outwardly rectifying K+ currents using whole cell patch clamp. These currents were blocked by tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl), charybdotoxin (ChTX), or IbTX, but not apamin. We further demonstrated that both isoflavonoids significantly increased nitric oxide (NO) production and upregulated the activities and expressions of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS). These results suggested that calycosin and formononetin act as endothelial BKCa activators for mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation through enhancing endothelium hyperpolarization and NO production. Since activation of BKCa plays a role in improving behavioral and cognitive disorders, we suggested that these two isoflavonoids could provide beneficial effects to cognitive disorders through vascular regulation. PMID:27994632

  7. Exercise training-induced adaptations in mediators of sustained endothelium-dependent coronary artery relaxation in a porcine model of ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Heaps, Cristine L.; Robles, Juan Carlos; Sarin, Vandana; Mattox, Mildred L.; Parker, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that exercise training enhances sustained relaxation to persistent endothelium-dependent vasodilator exposure via increased nitric oxide contribution in small coronary arteries of control and ischemic hearts. Methods Yucatan swine were designated to a control group or a group in which an ameroid constrictor was placed around the proximal LCX. Subsequently, pigs from both groups were assigned to exercise (5 days/week; 16 weeks) or sedentary regimens. Coronary arteries (~100–350 μm) were isolated from control pigs and from both nonoccluded and collateral-dependent regions of chronically-occluded hearts. Results In arteries from control pigs, training significantly enhanced relaxation responses to increasing concentrations of bradykinin (10−10 to 10−7 M) and sustained relaxation to a single bradykinin concentration (30 nM), which were abolished by NOS inhibition. Training also significantly prolonged bradykinin-mediated relaxation in collateral-dependent arteries of occluded pigs, which was associated with more persistent increases in endothelial cellular Ca2+ levels, and reversed with NOS inhibition. Protein levels for eNOS and p-eNOS-(Ser1179), but not caveolin-1, Hsp90, or Akt, were significantly increased with occlusion, independent of training state. Conclusions Exercise training enhances sustained relaxation to endothelium-dependent agonist stimulation in small arteries of control and ischemic hearts by enhanced nitric oxide contribution and endothelial Ca2+ responses. PMID:24447072

  8. Betulinic acid ameliorates endothelium-dependent relaxation in L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats by reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jia-Yin; Qian, Ling-Bo; Zhu, Lie-Gang; Liang, Hao-Te; Tan, Yi-Nuo; Lu, Han-Ti; Lu, Jian-Feng; Wang, Hui-Ping; Xia, Qiang

    2011-10-09

    Zizyphi Spinosi semen (ZSS) is one of the most widely used traditional Chinese herbs with protective effects on the cardiovascular system. It is not clear whether betulinic acid (BA), the key active constituent of ZSS, has beneficial cardiovascular effects on N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of BA on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated aortic rings from L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats and its underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with L-NAME (15 mg/kg/d, i.p.) for 4 weeks to induce hypertension. After treatment with L-NAME for 2 weeks, rats with mean blood pressure >120 mm Hg measured by tail-cuff method were considered hypertensive and then injected with BA (0.8, 4, 20 mg/kg/d, i.p.) for the last 2 weeks. The effect of BA on the tension of rat thoracic aortic rings was measured in an organ bath system. The levels of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in aortas were assayed. We found that BA (0.1-100 μM) evoked a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in endothelium-intact normal rat aortic rings, which was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME (100 μM) or methylene blue (MB, 10 μM), but not by indomethacin (10 μM). Pretreatment with EC(50) (1.67 μM) concentration of BA enhanced the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasorelaxation, which was also markedly reversed by both L-NAME and MB. The blood pressure in hypertensive rats increased to 135.22±5.38 mm Hg (P<0.01 vs. control group), which was markedly attenuated by high dose of BA. The ACh-induced vasorelaxation in hypertensive rat aortic rings was impaired, which was markedly improved by chronic treatment with BA (20 mg/kg/d) for 2 weeks. The increase of ROS level and the decrease of NO level, SOD and eNOS activities in hypertensive rat aortas were all

  9. Carbon monoxide enhances salt tolerance by nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of ion homeostasis and up-regulation of antioxidant defence in wheat seedling roots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanjie; Ling, Tengfang; Han, Yi; Liu, Kaili; Zheng, Qingsong; Huang, Liqin; Yuan, Xingxing; He, Ziyi; Hu, Bing; Fang, Lei; Shen, Zhenguo; Yang, Qing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2008-12-01

    Salt stress induced an increase in endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) production and the activity of the CO synthetic enzyme haem oxygenase (HO) in wheat seedling roots. In addition, a 50% CO aqueous solution, applied daily, not only resulted in the enhancement of CO release, but led to a significant reversal in dry weight (DW) and water loss caused by 150 mm NaCl treatment, which was mimicked by the application of two nitric oxide (NO) donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and diethylenetriamine NO adduct (DETA/NO). Further analyses showed that CO, as well as SNP, apparently up-regulated H(+)-pump and antioxidant enzyme activities or related transcripts, thus resulting in the increase of K/Na ratio and the alleviation of oxidative damage. Whereas, the CO/NO scavenger haemoglobin (Hb), NO scavenger or synthetic inhibitor methylene blue (MB) or N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) differentially blocked these effects. Furthermore, CO was able to mimic the effect of SNP by strongly increasing NO release in the root tips, whereas the CO-induced NO signal was quenched by the addition of l-NAME or cPTIO, the specific scavenger of NO. The results suggested that CO might confer an increased tolerance to salinity stress by maintaining ion homeostasis and enhancing antioxidant system parameters in wheat seedling roots, both of which were partially mediated by NO signal.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediated cold- and dehydration-induced myo-inositol phosphate synthase that confers multiple resistances to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiali; Wang, Congying; Xiang, Bin; Han, Ruihong; Guo, Zhenfei

    2013-02-01

    myo-Inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS) is the key enzyme of myo-inositol synthesis, which is a central molecule required for cell metabolism and plant growth as a precursor to a large variety of compounds. A full-length fragment of MfMIPS1 cDNA was cloned from Medicago falcata that is more cold-tolerant than Medicago sativa. While MfMIPS1 transcript was induced in response to cold, dehydration and salt stress, MIPS transcript and myo-inositol were maintained longer and at a higher level in M. falcata than in M. sativa during cold acclimation at 5 °C. MfMIPS1 transcript was induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO), but was not responsive to abscisic acid (ABA). Pharmacological experiments revealed that H(2) O(2) and NO are involved in the regulation of MfMIPS1 expression by cold and dehydration, but not by salt. Overexpression of MfMIPS1 in tobacco increased the MIPS activity and levels of myo-inositol, galactinol and raffinose, resulting in enhanced resistance to chilling, drought and salt stresses in transgenic tobacco plants. It is suggested that MfMIPS1 is induced by diverse environmental factors and confers resistance to various abiotic stresses.

  11. Nitric oxide-mediated antiplasmodial activity in human and murine hepatocytes induced by gamma interferon and the parasite itself: enhancement by exogenous tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed Central

    Mellouk, S; Hoffman, S L; Liu, Z Z; de la Vega, P; Billiar, T R; Nussler, A K

    1994-01-01

    Expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase has been shown to inhibit the development of several pathogens, including fungi, bacteria, parasites, and viruses. However, there is still controversy as to whether this effector mechanism can inhibit the development of human pathogens. We now report that gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induces the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum-infected primary human hepatocytes from cultures and that the antimalarial activity is dependent on NO. Infection with the parasite alone in the absence of added IFN-gamma caused a 10-fold increase in NO formation. Both spontaneous inhibition and IFN-gamma-induced inhibition of Plasmodium yoelii-infected murine hepatocytes were increased with the addition of the NO synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, or sepiapterin, which is converted to tetrahydrobiopterin. These results indicate that under in vitro conditions the parasite itself provides a signal that triggers induction of the NO pathway in human and murine hepatocytes and that NO formation in infected hepatocytes is limited by tetrahydrobiopterin availability. PMID:8063424

  12. Salt Stress Reduces Root Meristem Size by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Auxin Accumulation and Signaling in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. PMID:25818700

  13. Nitric oxide mediates coral bleaching through an apoptotic-like cell death pathway: evidence from a model sea anemone-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Thomas D; Bradley, Benjamin J; Davy, Simon K

    2013-12-01

    Coral bleaching (involving the loss of symbiotic algae from the cnidarian host) is a major threat to coral reefs and appears to be mediated at the cellular level by nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we examined the specific role of NO in bleaching using the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella, a model system for the study of corals. Exposure of A. pulchella to high-temperature shock (26-33°C over <1 h) or an NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione) resulted in significant increases in host caspase-like enzyme activity. These responses were reflected in the intensities of bleaching, which were significantly higher in heat- or NO-treated specimens than in controls maintained in seawater at 26°C. Notably, the inhibition of caspase-like activity prevented bleaching even in the presence of an NO donor or at elevated temperature. The additional use of an NO scavenger controlled for effects mediated by agents other than NO. We also exposed A. pulchella to a more ecologically relevant treatment (an increase from 26 to 33°C over 6-7 d). Again, host NO synthesis correlated with the activation of caspase-like enzyme activity. Therefore, we conclude that NO's involvement in cnidarian bleaching arises through the regulation of host apoptotic pathways.

  14. Nitrate reductase mutation alters potassium nutrition as well as nitric oxide-mediated control of guard cell ion channels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Yizhou; Wang, Jian-Wen; Babla, Mohammad; Zhao, Chenchen; García-Mata, Carlos; Sani, Emanuela; Differ, Christopher; Mak, Michelle; Hills, Adrian; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining potassium (K(+) ) nutrition and a robust guard cell K(+) inward channel activity is considered critical for plants' adaptation to fluctuating and challenging growth environment. ABA induces stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) along with subsequent ion channel-mediated loss of K(+) and anions. However, the interactions of NO synthesis and signalling with K(+) nutrition and guard cell K(+) channel activities have not been fully explored in Arabidopsis. Physiological and molecular techniques were employed to dissect the interaction of nitrogen and potassium nutrition in regulating stomatal opening, CO2 assimilation and ion channel activity. These data, gene expression and ABA signalling transduction were compared in wild-type Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the nitrate reductase mutant nia1nia2. Growth and K(+) nutrition were impaired along with stomatal behaviour, membrane transport, and expression of genes associated with ABA signalling in the nia1nia2 mutant. ABA-inhibited K(+) in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for complete stomatal closure in nia1nia2. While NO is an important signalling component in ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis, our findings demonstrate a more complex interaction associating potassium nutrition and nitrogen metabolism in the nia1nia2 mutant that affects stomatal function. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Nitric oxide-mediated vascular function in sepsis using passive leg movement as a novel assessment: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ashley D; Rossman, Matthew J; Witman, Melissa A; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Groot, H Jonathan; Garten, Ryan S; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-05-01

    Post-cuff occlusion flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a proposed indicator of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and vascular function. FMD is reduced in patients with sepsis and may be a marker of end organ damage and mortality. However, FMD likely does not solely reflect NO-mediated vasodilation, is technically challenging, and often demonstrates poor reproducibility. In contrast, passive leg movement (PLM), a novel methodology to assess vascular function, yields a hyperemic response that is predominately NO-dependent, reproducible, and easily measured. This study evaluated PLM as an approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function in patients with sepsis. We hypothesized that PLM-induced hyperemia, quantified by the increase in leg blood flow (LBF), would be attenuated in sepsis. In a cross-sectional study, 17 subjects in severe sepsis or septic shock were compared with 16 matched healthy controls. Doppler ultrasound was used to assess brachial artery FMD and the hyperemic response to PLM in the femoral artery. FMD was attenuated in septic compared with control subjects (1.1 ± 1.7% vs. 6.8 ± 1.3%; values are means ± SD). In terms of PLM, baseline LBF (196 ± 33 ml/min vs. 328 ± 20 ml/min), peak change in LBF from baseline (133 ± 28 ml/min vs. 483 ± 86 ml/min), and the LBF area under the curve (16 ± 8.3 vs. 143 ± 33) were all significantly attenuated in septic subjects. Vascular function, as assessed by both FMD and PLM, is attenuated in septic subjects compared with controls. These data support the concept that NO bioavailability is attenuated in septic subjects, and PLM appears to be a novel and feasible approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function in sepsis.

  16. Helium preconditioning protects against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia via nitric oxide mediated up-regulation of antioxidases in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Liu, K; Kang, Z M; Sun, X J; Liu, W W; Mao, Y F

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the neuroprotective effects of helium preconditioning (He-PC) in a neonatal hypoxia/ischemia (HI) rat model. Seven-day old rat pups were divided into normal control group, He-PC group, HI group, He-PC+HI group, L-NAME+HI group and L-NAME+He-PC+HI group. HI was induced by exposure to 80% oxygen for 90 min. He-PC was conducted with 70% helium-30% oxygen for three 5-min periods. Three hours after He-PC, animals in control group and He-PC group were sacrificed, and the brain was collected for the detection of NO content. At 24h after HI, animals in control group, HI group, He-PC+HI group, and L-NAME+He-PC+HI group were sacrificed, and the brain was collected for detection of infarct ratio, antioxidases (SOD, HO-1 and Nrf2), DNA binding activity of Nrf2 and TUNEL staining. Three weeks later, the neurological function and brain atrophy were determined. Results showed pretreatment with L-NAME alone failed to exert protective effect on HI. He-PC significantly increased NO content, reduced the brain infarct area, increased anti-oxidases expression and DNA binding activity of Nrf2, decreased the apoptotic cells, and improved the neurological function and brain atrophy. In addition, this protection was markedly inhibited by L-NAME (a non-selective NOS inhibitor). These findings suggest that the He-PC may induce NO production to activate Nrf2, exerting neuroprotective effect on neonatal HI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impaired Nitric Oxide Mediated Vasodilation In The Peripheral Circulation In The R6/2 Mouse Model Of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Andrew D.; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A.; Morton, A. Jennifer; Giussani, Dino A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the Huntington’s disease (HD) extends beyond the nervous system to other sites, including the cardiovascular system. Further, the cardiovascular pathology pre-dates neurological decline, however the mechanisms involved remain unclear. We investigated in the R6/2 mouse model of HD nitric oxide (NO) dependent and independent endothelial mechanisms. Femoral artery reactivity was determined by wire myography in wild type (WT) and R6/2 mice at 12 and 16 weeks of adulthood. WT mice showed increased endothelial relaxation between 12 and 16 weeks (Rmax: 72 ± 7% vs. 97 ± 13%, P < 0.05). In contrast, R6/2 mice showed enhanced endothelial relaxation already by 12 weeks (Rmax at 12w: 72 ± 7% vs. 94 ± 5%, WT vs. R6/2, P < 0.05) that declined by 16 weeks compared with WT mice (Rmax at 16w: 97 ± 13% vs. 68 ± 7%, WT vs. R6/2, P < 0.05). In WT mice, the increase in femoral relaxation between 12 and 16 weeks was due to enhanced NO dependent mechanisms. By 16 weeks of adult age, the R6/2 mouse developed overt endothelial dysfunction due to an inability to increase NO dependent vasodilation. The data add to the growing literature of non-neural manifestations of HD and implicate NO depletion as a key mechanism underlying the HD pathophysiology in the peripheral vasculature. PMID:27181166

  18. Boldo prevents UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and reduces the expression of Hsp70 protein in melanoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandra; Cardile, Venera; Caggia, Silvia; Gunther, Germán; Troncoso, Nicolas; Garbarino, Juan

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of a methanolic extract of Peumus boldus leaves on UV light and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated DNA damage. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of this natural product against human melanoma cells (M14). Boldine, catechin, quercetin and rutin were identified using a HPLC method. The extract was incubated with plasmid DNA and, before irradiating the samples with UV-R, H(2) O(2) was added. For analysis of DNA single-strand breaks induced by NO, the experiments were performed by incubating the extract with Angeli's salt. In the study on M14 cell line, cell viability was measured using MTT assay. Release of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of membrane breakdown, was also measured. For the detection of apoptosis, the evaluation of DNA fragmentation (COMET assay) and caspase-3 activity assay were employed. The expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) was detected by Western blot analysis. Generation of reactive oxygen species was measured by using a fluorescent probe. The extract (demonstrating the synergistic effect of the constituents boldine and flavonoids), showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and selectively inhibited the growth of melanoma cells. But a novel finding was that apoptosis evoked by this natural product in M14 cells, appears to be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of Hsp70 expression, which may be correlated with a modulation of redox-sensitive mechanisms. These results confirm the promising biological properties of Peumus boldus and encourage in-vivo investigations into its potential anti-cancer activity. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Role of iron in the nitric oxide-mediated fungicidal mechanism of IFN-gamma-activated murine macrophages against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Angel; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz E

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential growth element of virtually all microorganisms and its restriction is one of the mechanisms used by macrophages to control microbial multiplication. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, an important systemic mycosis in Latin America, is inhibited in its conidia-to-yeast conversion in the absence of iron. We studied the participation of iron in the nitric oxide (NO)-mediated fungicidal mechanism against conidia. Peritoneal murine macrophages activated with 50 U/mL of IFN-gamma or treated with 35 microM Deferoxamine (DEX) and infected with P. brasiliensis conidia, were co-cultured and incubated for 96 h in the presence of different concentrations of holotransferrin (HOLO) and FeS04. The supernatants were withdrawn in order to assess NO2 production by the Griess method. The monolayers were fixed, stained and observed microscopically. The percentage of the conidia-to-yeast transition was estimated by counting 200 intracellular propagules. IFN-gamma-activated or DEX-treated Mthetas presented marked inhibition of the conidia-to-yeast conversion (19 and 56%, respectively) in comparison with non-activated or untreated Mthetas (80%). IFN-gamma-activated macrophages produced high NO levels in comparison with the controls. Additionally, when the activated or treated-macrophages were supplemented with iron donors (HOLO or FeSO4), the inhibitory action was reversed, although NO production remained intact. These results suggest that the NO-mediated fungicidal mechanism exerted by IFN-gamma-activated macrophages against P. brasiliensis conidia, is dependent of an iron interaction.

  20. Glutathione plays an essential role in nitric oxide-mediated iron-deficiency signaling and iron-deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Wang, Yi-Wen; Tsednee, Munkhtsetseg; Karunakaran, Krithika; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a common agricultural problem that affects both the productivity and nutritional quality of plants. Thus, identifying the key factors involved in the tolerance of Fe deficiency is important. In the present study, the zir1 mutant, which is glutathione deficient, was found to be more sensitive to Fe deficiency than the wild type, and grew poorly in alkaline soil. Other glutathione-deficient mutants also showed various degrees of sensitivity to Fe-limited conditions. Interestingly, we found that the glutathione level was increased under Fe deficiency in the wild type. By contrast, blocking glutathione biosynthesis led to increased physiological sensitivity to Fe deficiency. On the other hand, overexpressing glutathione enhanced the tolerance to Fe deficiency. Under Fe-limited conditions, glutathione-deficient mutants, zir1, pad2 and cad2 accumulated lower levels of Fe than the wild type. The key genes involved in Fe uptake, including IRT1, FRO2 and FIT, are expressed at low levels in zir1; however, a split-root experiment suggested that the systemic signals that govern the expression of Fe uptake-related genes are still active in zir1. Furthermore, we found that zir1 had a lower accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) and NO reservoir S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Although NO is a signaling molecule involved in the induction of Fe uptake-related genes during Fe deficiency, the NO-mediated induction of Fe-uptake genes is dependent on glutathione supply in the zir1 mutant. These results provide direct evidence that glutathione plays an essential role in Fe-deficiency tolerance and NO-mediated Fe-deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Bisphenol A inhibits duodenal movement ex vivo of rat through nitric oxide-mediated soluble guanylyl cyclase and α-adrenergic signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Kaushik; Tarafder, Panchali; Paul, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is directly exposed to bisphenol A (BPA)-tainted foods and beverages stored in polycarbonate plastic containers. The effect of BPA on the movement of small intestine has not been reported until now. We report here the effect of BPA on the movement of the duodenum ex vivo in a rat model. We found significant inhibition of duodenal movement by BPA (10-320 µM). We suggest that BPA-induced inhibition of duodenal movement might be due to the suppression of stimulatory and/or activation of inhibitory motor neurons in enteric plexuses innervating the longitudinal and circular visceral smooth muscle cells in the duodenal wall. We observed a significant reversal of BPA-induced depression of duodenal movement by methylene blue, a soluble guanylyl cyclase blocker and N-ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor; but significant potentiation of the movement by sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor. From the results, we may suggest that BPA-induced inhibition of the movement might be partially due to activation of inhibitory motor neurons that secrete NO, a relaxant, on to smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, we found significant reversal of BPA-induced depression of the movement in phentolamine, an α-adrenergic receptor blocker, pretreated preparation. This result proves that norepinephrine secreting motor neurons may also be involved in BPA-induced inhibition of the movement. From the results, we conclude that BPA inhibits the movement of the duodenum through NO-mediated soluble guanylyl cyclase and α-adrenergic signaling pathways in visceral smooth muscle cells. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. TRPA1, NMDA receptors and nitric oxide mediate mechanical hyperalgesia induced by local injection of magnesium sulfate into the rat hind paw.

    PubMed

    Srebro, Dragana P; Vučković, Sonja M; Savić Vujović, Katarina R; Prostran, Milica Š

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that while magnesium, an antagonist of the glutamate subtype of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, possesses analgesic properties, it can induce writhing in rodents. The aim of this study was to determine the effect and mechanism of action of local (intraplantar) administration of magnesium sulfate (MS) on the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli. The PWT was evaluated by the electronic von Frey test in male Wistar rats. Tested drugs were either co-administered intraplantarly (i.pl.) with MS or given into the contralateral paw to exclude systemic effects. MS at doses of 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6.2 mg/paw (i.pl.) induced a statistically significant (as compared to 0.9% NaCl) and dose-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia. Only isotonic MS (250 mmol/l or 6.2% or 6.2 mg/paw) induced mechanical hyperalgesia that lasted at least six hours. Isotonic MS-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by co-injection of camphor, a non-selective TRPA1 antagonist (0.3, 1 and 2.5 μg/paw), MK-801, a NMDA receptor antagonist (0.001, 0.025 and 0.1 μg/paw), L-NAME, a non-selective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor (20, 50 and 100 μg/paw), ARL 17477, a selective neuronal NOS inhibitor (5.7 and 17 μg/paw), SMT, a selective inducible NOS inhibitor (1 and 2.78 μg/paw), and methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor (5, 20 and 125 μg/paw). Drugs injected into the contralateral hind paw did not produce significant effects. These results suggest that an i.pl. injection of MS produces local peripheral mechanical hyperalgesia via activation of peripheral TRPA1 and NMDA receptors and peripheral production of NO.

  3. Zinc finger transcription factors as molecular targets for nitric oxide-mediated immunosuppression: inhibition of IL-2 gene expression in murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Berendji, D; Kolb-Bachofen, V; Zipfel, P F; Skerka, C; Carlberg, C; Kröncke, K D

    1999-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has frequently been shown to display immunosuppressive activities. We describe here a molecular mechanism contributing to this effect. Murine T cell lymphoma EL4-6.1 cells were activated with the physiological stimulus interleukin (IL)-1beta to express IL-2 mRNA in the presence or absence of subtoxic concentrations of the physiological spontaneous NO donor S-nitrosocysteine (SNOC). Subsequently, semiquantitative RT-PCR and gel shift assays with nuclear extracts were performed to analyze the effects of NO on IL-2 mRNA expression and on the activity of the dominant regulating transcription factors Sp1, EGR-1, and NFATc. NO inhibits IL-1beta-induced IL-2 mRNA expression in EL4-6.1 cells. The suppressive activity of NO was concentration dependent and found to be completely reversible. Importantly, NO at the concentrations used induced neither apoptosis nor necrosis. Dominant regulation of IL-2 gene expression is known to reside in the zinc finger transcription factors Sp1 or EGR-1 and in the non-zinc finger protein NFAT. NO abrogates the DNA binding activities of recombinant Sp1 and EGR-1. More importantly, gel shift assays also showed a lack of DNA binding of native Sp1 derived from NO-treated nuclear extracts and that from NO-treated viable lymphocytes. This effect is selective, as the DNA binding activity of recombinant NFATc was not affected by NO. Inactivation of zinc finger transcription factors by NO appears to be a molecular mechanism in the immunosuppressive activity of NO in mammals, thus contributing to NO-mediated inhibition of IL-2 gene expression after physiological stimuli. The exact understanding of the molecular mechanism leading to NO-mediated, fully reversible suppression of immune reactions may lead to use of this naturally occurring tool as an aid in inflammatory diseases.

  4. The anabolic action of intermittent parathyroid hormone on cortical bone depends partly on its ability to induce nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gohin, S; Carriero, A; Chenu, C; Pitsillides, A A; Arnett, T R; Marenzana, M

    2016-03-01

    There is strong evidence that vasodilatory nitric oxide (NO) donors have anabolic effects on bone in humans. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), the only osteoanabolic drug currently approved, is also a vasodilator. We investigated whether the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME might alter the effect of PTH on bone by blocking its vasodilatory effect. BALB/c mice received 28 daily injections of PTH[1-34] (80 µg/kg/day) or L-NAME (30 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination. Hindlimb blood perfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging. Bone architecture, turnover and mechanical properties in the femur were analysed respectively by micro-CT, histomorphometry and three-point bending. PTH increased hindlimb blood flow by >30% within 10 min of injection (P < 0.001). Co-treatment with L-NAME blocked the action of PTH on blood flow, whereas L-NAME alone had no effect. PTH treatment increased femoral cortical bone volume and formation rate by 20% and 110%, respectively (P < 0.001). PTH had no effect on trabecular bone volume in the femoral metaphysis although trabecular thickness and number were increased and decreased by 25%, respectively. Co-treatment with L-NAME restricted the PTH-stimulated increase in cortical bone formation but had no clear-cut effects in trabecular bone. Co-treatment with L-NAME did not affect the mechanical strength in femurs induced by iPTH. These results suggest that NO-mediated vasorelaxation plays partly a role in the anabolic action of PTH on cortical bone.

  5. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  6. Increased nitric oxide-mediated neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex is associated with the long lasting anxiogenic-like effect of predator exposure.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Piorino, Erick Moraes; Ferreira, Frederico Rogério; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2013-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder caused by the experience of a severe traumatic event. In rats this disorder has been modeled by exposure to a predator threat. PTSD has been associated to structural and functional changes in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Direct injections into this brain region of glutamate antagonists or inhibitors of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzyme cause anxiolytic-like effects in rodents. In the present work we investigated if the behavioral changes induced by predator exposure are associated with changes in the mPFC nitrergic system. Since the hippocampus, amygdala and dorsal periaqueductal grey have also been associated to anxiety disorders, including PTSD, we also verified if this procedure would modify the nitrergic system in these regions. Male Wistar rats were exposed to a dummy or live cat for ten minutes and tested in the elevated plus maze test (EPM) seven days later. Immediately after the test their brains were removed for neuronal NOS (nNOS) immunohistochemistry detection and measurements of nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels. Exposure to the live cat increased freezing responses. One week later the animals that froze when confronted with the cat presented a decreased percentage of entries in the open arms of the EPM and an increased number of nNOS positive neurons in the mPFC and basolateral nucleus of amygdala, but not in the hippocampus, central and medial nuclei of amygdaloid complex or dorsal-lateral periaqueductal grey. Moreover, cat exposed animals showed increased NOx levels in the mPFC but not in the hippocampus one week later. The number of nNOS neurons and NOx levels in the mPFC showed a significant correlation with freezing time during cat exposure. Our results suggest that plastic modifications of the nitrergic system in the mPFC could be related to long lasting behavioral changes induced by severe traumatic events such as predator exposure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Nitric oxide mediates the vagal protective effect on ventricular fibrillation via effects on action potential duration restitution in the rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Brack, Kieran E; Patel, Vanlata H; Coote, John H; Ng, G André

    2007-09-01

    We have previously shown that direct vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) reduces the slope of action potential duration (APD) restitution while simultaneously protecting the heart against induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the absence of any sympathetic activity or tone. In the current study we have examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the effect of VNS. Monophasic action potentials were recorded from a left ventricular epicardial site on innervated, isolated rabbit hearts (n = 7). Standard restitution, effective refractory period (ERP) and VF threshold (VFT) were measured at baseline and during VNS in the presence of the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA, 200 microm) and during reversing NO blockade with L-arginine (L-Arg, 1 mm). Data represent the mean +/- S.E.M. The restitution curve was shifted upwards and became less steep with VNS when compared to baseline. L-NA blocked the effect of VNS whereas L-Arg restored the effect of VNS. The maximum slope of restitution was reduced from 1.17 +/- 0.14 to 0.60 +/- 0.09 (50 +/- 5%, P < 0.0001) during control, from 0.98 +/- 0.14 to 0.93 +/- 0.12 (2 +/- 10%, P = NS) in the presence of L-NA and from 1.16 +/- 0.17 to 0.50 +/- 0.10 (41 +/- 9%, P = 0.003) with L-Arg plus L-NA. ERP was increased by VNS in control from 119 +/- 6 ms to 130 +/- 6 ms (10 +/- 5%, P = 0.045) and this increase was not affected by L-NA (120 +/- 4 to 133 +/- 4 ms, 11 +/- 3%, P = 0.0019) or L-Arg with L-NA (114 +/- 4 to 123 +/- 4 ms, 8 +/- 2%, P = 0.006). VFT was increased from 3.0 +/- 0.3 to 5.8 +/- 0.5 mA (98 +/- 12%, P = 0.0017) in control, 3.4 +/- 0.4 to 3.8 +/- 0.5 mA (13 +/- 12%, P = 0.6) during perfusion with L-NA and 2.5 +/- 0.4 to 6.0 +/- 0.7 mA (175 +/- 50%, P = 0.0017) during perfusion with L-Arg plus L-NA. Direct VNS increased VFT and flattened the slope of APD restitution curve in this isolated rabbit heart preparation with intact autonomic nerves. These effects were blocked using L-NA and reversed by replenishing

  8. Nitric oxide mediates the vagal protective effect on ventricular fibrillation via effects on action potential duration restitution in the rabbit heart

    PubMed Central

    Brack, Kieran E; Patel, Vanlata H; Coote, John H; Ng, G André

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that direct vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) reduces the slope of action potential duration (APD) restitution while simultaneously protecting the heart against induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the absence of any sympathetic activity or tone. In the current study we have examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the effect of VNS. Monophasic action potentials were recorded from a left ventricular epicardial site on innervated, isolated rabbit hearts (n = 7). Standard restitution, effective refractory period (ERP) and VF threshold (VFT) were measured at baseline and during VNS in the presence of the NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NA, 200 μm) and during reversing NO blockade with l-arginine (l-Arg, 1 mm). Data represent the mean ± s.e.m. The restitution curve was shifted upwards and became less steep with VNS when compared to baseline. l-NA blocked the effect of VNS whereas l-Arg restored the effect of VNS. The maximum slope of restitution was reduced from 1.17 ± 0.14 to 0.60 ± 0.09 (50 ± 5%, P < 0.0001) during control, from 0.98 ± 0.14 to 0.93 ± 0.12 (2 ± 10%, P = NS) in the presence of l-NA and from 1.16 ± 0.17 to 0.50 ± 0.10 (41 ± 9%, P = 0.003) with l-Arg plus l-NA. ERP was increased by VNS in control from 119 ± 6 ms to 130 ± 6 ms (10 ± 5%, P = 0.045) and this increase was not affected by l-NA (120 ± 4 to 133 ± 4 ms, 11 ± 3%, P = 0.0019) or l-Arg with l-NA (114 ± 4 to 123 ± 4 ms, 8 ± 2%, P = 0.006). VFT was increased from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 5.8 ± 0.5 mA (98 ± 12%, P = 0.0017) in control, 3.4 ± 0.4 to 3.8 ± 0.5 mA (13 ± 12%, P = 0.6) during perfusion with l-NA and 2.5 ± 0.4 to 6.0 ± 0.7 mA (175 ± 50%, P = 0.0017) during perfusion with l-Arg plus l-NA. Direct VNS increased VFT and flattened the slope of APD restitution curve in this isolated rabbit heart preparation with intact autonomic nerves. These effects were blocked using l-NA and reversed by replenishing the substrate for NO production

  9. Assessment of enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation by intermittent fasting in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Razzak, Rima L Abdul; Abu-Hozaifa, Bodour M; Bamosa, Abdullah O; Ali, Nemah M

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF), a type of feeding regimen where the frequency of eating is reduced enhances cardiovascular stress adaptation and improves cardiovascular risk factors in rats. Data on the effect of IF on the endothelium is not common, so we examined whether IF showed similarity to documented beneficial effects of caloric restriction on endothelium-dependent vasodilatory responses of rat aortic rings. 25 young male Wistar rats had ad libitum (AL) access to food and 25 others were provided with food every other day for 2 months, during which their weight was measured every 2 weeks. Vascular reactivity of abdominal aorta was simultaneously evaluated using dual wire myographs. Weight gain was greater in the AL group (P<0.001) at all weighing intervals. Acetylcholine (ACh; 10(-10)-10(-5)M) produced greater (P<0.05) vasorelaxation in IF rats at the two highest concentrations. IF reduces weight gain in young male rats and improves their aortic endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

  10. Low-intensity voluntary running lowers blood pressure with simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and insulin sensitivity in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng-Wei; Qian, Feng-Lei; Wang, Jian; Tao, Tao; Guo, Jing; Wang, Lie; Lu, Ai-Yun; Chen, Hong

    2008-03-01

    Our objective is to examine the effects of voluntary running at different intensity levels on blood pressure, endothelium-dependent vessel dysfunction and insulin resistance in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with severe hypertension. Ten-month-old male and female SHR with severe hypertension were assigned to voluntary running at either low intensity (30% of maximal aerobic velocity) or moderate intensity (60% of maximal aerobic velocity) on a motor-driven treadmill for 6 weeks, 20 min per day and 7 days per week. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats and SHR were kept under sedentary conditions as controls. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the tail-cuff method. At the end of the exercise training, blood samples were collected for glucose, insulin and lipids assay, and aortae were isolated to examine their function in vitro. Low-intensity but not moderate-intensity running significantly lowered blood pressure in both male and female SHR (p<0.01). There was significant impairment in acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in SHR (p<0.01), which was improved by low-intensity training (p<0.05). Nitric oxide synthase blockade abrogated the improvement in endothelium-dependent relaxation. Hypertensive rats had elevated blood glucose and insulin levels with lowered insulin sensitivity that was ameliorated by low-intensity running. A significant increase in blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and a significant decrease in triglycerides were found in exercised SHR. In conclusion, low-intensity voluntary exercise lowers hypertension in aged SHR with severe hypertension. Exercise-induced simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation and insulin sensitivity may act concomitantly in attenuating cardiovascular risk factors in aged hypertensive rats with significantly high blood pressure.

  11. Tocotrienol-Rich Tocomin Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Improves Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Aortae from Rats Fed a High-Fat Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Saher F.; Nguyen, Jason C. D.; Jenkins, Trisha A.; Woodman, Owen L.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that tocomin, a mixture high in tocotrienol content and also containing tocopherol, acutely preserves endothelial function in the presence of oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether tocomin treatment would preserve endothelial function in aortae isolated from rats fed a high-fat diet known to cause oxidative stress. Wistar hooded rats were fed a western diet (WD, 21% fat) or control rat chow (standard diet, 6% fat) for 12 weeks. Tocomin (40 mg/kg/day sc) or its vehicle (peanut oil) was administered for the last 4 weeks of the feeding regime. Aortae from WD rats showed an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation that was associated with an increased expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox2 subunit and an increase in the vascular generation of superoxide measured using L-012 chemiluminescence. The increase in vascular oxidative stress was accompanied by a decrease in basal NO release and impairment of the contribution of NO to ACh-induced relaxation. The impaired relaxation is likely contributed to by a decreased expression of eNOS, calmodulin, and phosphorylated Akt and an increase in caveolin. Tocotrienol rich tocomin, which prevented the diet-induced changes in vascular function, reduced vascular superoxide production and abolished the diet-induced changes in eNOS and other protein expression. Using selective inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels we demonstrated that tocomin increased NO-mediated relaxation, without affecting the contribution of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization type relaxation to the endothelium-dependent relaxation. The beneficial actions of tocomin in this diet-induced model of obesity suggest that it may have potential to be used as a therapeutic agent to prevent vascular disease in obesity. PMID:27800483

  12. Role of AMP-activated Protein Kinase in NO- and EDHF-mediated Endothelium-dependent Relaxations to Red Wine Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Kane, Modou Oumy; Sene, Mbaye; Anselm, Eric; Dal, Stéphanie; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Augier, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown that regular consumption of moderate amounts of wine, in particular red wine, is associated with a decreased total mortality due, in part, to a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases. The protective effect has been attributable to polyphenols, which are potent vasodilators and have anti-thrombotic properties. Polyphenols have been shown to induce pronounced endothelium-dependent relaxations of arteries by causing the redox-sensitive PI3-kinase-dependent formation of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). The aim of the present study was to determine the role of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the red wine polyphenols (RWPs)-induced endothelial formation of NO and EDHF. Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ chambers. Cultured porcine coronary artery endothelial cells porcine coronary artery segements were used to study the phosphorylation level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) at serine 1177, and AMPK at the Threonine 172 by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. RWPs caused endothelium-dependent relaxations in rings from rat aorta and mesenteric artery, and in those from porcine coronary artery. NO-mediated relaxations to RWPs as assessed in the presence of indomethacin and charybdotoxin plus apamin, were inhibited by compound C (an inhibitor of AMPK). Compound C also reduced EDHF-mediated relaxations as assessed in the presence of indomethacin and N(G)-nitro L-arginine. In contrast, compound C did not affect endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine and those to sodium nitroprusside. Moreover, RWPs induced the phosphorylation of AMPK at threonine 172 and eNOS at serine 1177 in endothelial cells; these responses were inhibited by compound C. The present findings indicate that RWPs cause both NO and EDHF-mediated relaxations in several types of isolated arteries and that these effects are dependent on the activation of the AMP-activated protein

  13. Grape juice causes endothelium-dependent relaxation via a redox-sensitive Src- and Akt-dependent activation of eNOS.

    PubMed

    Anselm, Eric; Chataigneau, Marta; Ndiaye, Mamadou; Chataigneau, Thierry; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2007-01-15

    An enhanced endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), is thought to contribute to the protective effect of moderate consumption of red wine on coronary diseases. The present study has characterized endothelium-dependent relaxations to Concord grape juice (CGJ), a non-alcoholic rich source of grape-derived polyphenols, in the coronary artery. Porcine coronary artery rings were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of changes in isometric tension in the presence of indomethacin. NO formation was assessed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and the phosphorylation of Src, Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) by Western blot analysis in cultured endothelial cells. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to CGJ were slightly but significantly reduced by L-NA, not affected by charybdotoxin (CTX) plus apamin (APA, two inhibitors of EDHF-mediated responses) whereas the combination of L-NA, CTX plus APA reduced maximal relaxation to about 50%. In the presence of CTX plus APA, relaxations to CGJ were markedly reduced by the membrane permeant mimetic of superoxide dismutase (SOD), MnTMPyP, the membrane permeant analogue of catalase polyethyleneglycol-catalase (PEG-catalase), PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase, and by wortmannin, an inhibitor of the PI3-kinase. CGJ stimulated the formation of reactive oxygen species and the N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine-, PP2- and wortmannin-sensitive formation of NO in endothelial cells. The formation of NO was associated with a redox-sensitive and time-dependent phosphorylation of Src, Akt and eNOS. CGJ induces endothelium-dependent relaxations of coronary arteries, which involve a NO-mediated component and also, to a minor extent, an EDHF-mediated component. In addition, CGJ-induced NO formation is due to the redox-sensitive activation of Src kinase with the subsequent PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS.

  14. Role of gender and estrogen receptors in the rat aorta endothelium-dependent relaxation to red wine polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Kane, Modou Oumy; Anselm, Eric; Rattmann, Yanna Dantas; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2009-01-01

    Regular intake of moderate amounts of beverages rich in polyphenols such as red wine is associated with a protective effect on the vascular system, in part, by increasing the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO), a major vasoprotective factor. Since estrogens are potent inducers of NO formation and polyphenols have been shown to have phytoestrogen properties, we determined whether estrogen receptors mediate the stimulatory effect of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) on the endothelial formation of NO using isolated rat aortic rings and cultured endothelial cells. RWPs caused endothelium-dependent relaxations, which were more pronounced in the aorta of female than male rats. Increased relaxations were also observed to acetylcholine but not to sodium nitroprusside. Relaxations to RWPs were abolished by nitro l-arginine and MnTMPyP, markedly reduced by polyethyleneglycol-catalase and wortmannin, and not affected by the estrogen antagonist ICI 182,780 in aortic rings from males and females. eNOS expression was higher in aortic sections of female than male rats. RWPs caused the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells, which was unaffected by ICI 182,780. Thus, RWPs cause redox-sensitive PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent NO-mediated relaxations, which are more pronounced in the aorta of female than male rats; an effect most likely due to the increased expression level of eNOS rather than activation of estrogen receptors.

  15. Selective impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation by sevoflurane: oxygen free radicals participation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Okabe, E

    1992-03-01

    To determine whether sevoflurane alters endothelium-mediated vasodilation of vascular smooth muscle, isolated ring preparations of canine mesenteric arteries were suspended for isometric tension recordings in modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution at 37 degrees C. Following contraction with norepinephrine, cumulative concentration-response curves were generated using endothelium-dependent vasodilators (acetylcholine, bradykinin, and calcium ionophore A23187) or nitroglycerin. The relaxation produced by acetylcholine, bradykinin, or A23187 was impaired by sevoflurane (2.3 and 4.6 vol%); sevoflurane did not affect relaxation caused by nitroglycerin, which, in these vessels, acts by an endothelium-independent mechanism. Under the same experimental conditions as those used for the concentration-response relationship, electron spin resonance spin-trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide verified generation of hydroxyl radical from the sevoflurane-delivered bathing media; the generation of hydroxyl radical was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, a scavenger of superoxide anion radical, or by the powerful iron chelator deferoxamine. Furthermore, sevoflurane-induced impairment of the relaxation caused by the endothelium-dependent vasodilators used was significantly decreased by superoxide dismutase. These results indicate that superoxide anion radical and/or closely related species of oxygen free radicals, possibly hydroxyl radical, are involved in the observed effect of sevoflurane. We propose that sevoflurane selectively impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in canine mesenteric arteries by an oxygen free radical mechanism, mainly due to inactivation of endothelium-derived relaxing factor.

  16. L-Carnitine supplementation impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries from rats.

    PubMed

    Valgas da Silva, Carmem P; Rojas-Moscoso, Julio A; Antunes, Edson; Zanesco, Angelina; Priviero, Fernanda B M

    2014-07-01

    L-Carnitine (L-Car) is taken as fat burner. The risks of L-Car supplementation for the cardiovascular system are unclear. We evaluated the relaxing responses of the mesenteric and aorta rings from rats after four weeks of L-Car supplementation and/or physical training. Concentration response curves to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), as well as cyclic GMP levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated. Physical training decreased body weight gain that was potentiated by L-Car. In mesenteric rings, L-Car impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation whereas endothelium independent relaxation was increased. In aorta, exercise improved endothelium-dependent relaxation; however, it was partially inhibited by L-Car. SNP-induced relaxation was similar in aorta of all groups. Basal cGMP were increased in aorta of exercised rats. SOD activity and MDA levels were unaltered. In conclusion, L-Car and physical exercise promotes body weight loss; however, it impairs endothelium-dependent vaso-relaxation possibly involving alterations in muscarinic receptors/eNOS/NO signalling pathway in mesenteric artery.

  17. Coronary β2-adrenoreceptors mediate endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity in humans: novel insights from an in vivo intravascular ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Liew, Gary Y H; Nicholls, Stephen J; Nelson, Adam J; Leong, Darryl P; Carbone, Angelo; Copus, Barbara; Wong, Dennis T L; Beltrame, John F; Worthley, Stephen G; Worthley, Matthew I

    2012-02-01

    The interaction between coronary β(2)-adrenoreceptors and segmental plaque burden is complex and poorly understood in humans. We aimed to validate intracoronary (IC) salbutamol as a novel endothelium-dependent vasodilator utilizing intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and thus assess relationships between coronary β(2)-adrenoreceptors, regional plaque burden and segmental endothelial function. In 29 patients with near-normal coronary angiograms, IVUS-upon-Doppler Flowire imaging protocols were performed. Protocol 1: incremental IC salbutamol (0.15, 0.30, 0.60 μg/min) infusions (15 patients, 103 segments); protocol 2: salbutamol (0.30 μg/min) infusion before and after IC administration of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (10 patients, 82 segments). Vehicle infusions (IC dextrose) were performed in 4 patients (21 segments). Macrovascular response [% change segmental lumen volume (ΔSLV)] and plaque burden [per cent atheroma volume (PAV)] were studied in 5-mm coronary segments. Microvascular response [per cent change in coronary blood flow (ΔCBF)] was calculated following each infusion. Intracoronary salbutamol demonstrated significant dose-response ΔSLV and ΔCBF from baseline, respectively (0.15 μg/min: 3.5 ± 1.3%, 28 ± 14%, P = 0.04, P = NS; 0.30 μg/min: 5.5 ± 1.4%, 54 ± 17%, P = 0.001, P < 0.0001; 0.60 μg/min: 4.8 ± 1.6%, 66 ± 15%, P = 0.02, P < 0.0001), with ΔSLV responses further exemplified in low vs. high plaque burden groups. Salbutamol vasomotor responses were suppressed by l-NMMA, supporting nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms. Vehicle infusions resulted in no significant ΔSLV or ΔCBF. Multivariate analysis including conventional cardiovascular risk factors, PAV, segmental remodelling and plaque eccentricity indices identified PAV as the only significant predictor of a ΔSLV to IC salbutamol (coefficient -0.18, 95% CI -0.32 to -0.044, P = 0.015). Conclusions Intracoronary salbutamol is a novel endothelium-dependent epicardial and

  18. Vascular Protective Effect of an Ethanol Extract of Camellia japonica Fruit: Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Coronary Artery and Reduction of Smooth Muscle Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hee; Shim, Bong-Sup; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hyun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Won; Yoo, Seok-Bong; Wi, An-Jin; Park, Whoa-Shig; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Dong-Wok; Oak, Min-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Camellia japonica is a popular garden plant in Asia and widely used as cosmetic sources and traditional medicine. However, the possibility that C. japonica affects cardiovascular system remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular effects of an extract of C. japonica. Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ baths using porcine coronary arteries and inhibition of proliferation and migration were assessed using human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). All four different parts, leaf, stem, flower, and fruits, caused concentration-dependent relaxations and C. japonica fruit (CJF) extract showed the strongest vasorelaxation and its effect was endothelium dependent. Relaxations to CJF were markedly reduced by inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibitor of PI3-kinase, but not affected by inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated response. CJF induced activated a time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS in endothelial cells. Altogether, these studies have demonstrated that CJF is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator and this effect was involved in, at least in part, PI3K-eNOS-NO pathway. Moreover, CJF attenuated TNF-α induced proliferation and PDGF-BB induced migration of VSMCs. The present findings indicate that CJF could be a valuable candidate of herbal medicine for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

  19. Effects of exercise training and detraining on cutaneous microvascular function in man: the regulatory role of endothelium-dependent dilation in skin vasculature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated how exercise training and detraining affect the cutaneous microvascular function and the regulatory role of endothelium-dependent dilation in skin vasculature. Ten healthy sedentary subjects cycled on an ergometer at 50% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) for 30 min daily, 5 days a week, for 8 weeks, and then detrained for 8 weeks. Plasma nitric oxide (NO) metabolites (nitrite plus nitrate) were measured by a microplate fluorometer. The cutaneous microvascular perfusion responses to six graded levels of iontophoretically applied 1% acetylcholine (ACh) and 1% sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in the forearm skin were determined by laser Doppler. After training, (1) resting heart rate and blood pressure were reduced, whereas VO(2max), skin blood flow and cutaneous vascular conductance to acute exercise were enhanced; (2) plasma NO metabolite levels and ACh-induced cutaneous perfusion were increased; (3) skin vascular responses to SNP did not change significantly. However, detraining reversed these effects on cutaneous microvascular function and plasma NO metabolite levels. The results suggest that endothelium-dependent dilation in skin vasculature is enhanced by moderate exercise training and reversed to the pretraining state with detraining.

  20. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  1. Effects of indapamide on endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated canine femoral arteries.

    PubMed

    Schini, V B; Dewey, J; Vanhoutte, P M

    1990-05-02

    Indapamide is an effective antihypertensive agent in humans and in experimental hypertensive animals. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether indapamide affects endothelium-dependent and independent relaxations in canine femoral arteries. Rings (with or without endothelium) were contracted with prostaglandin F2 alpha (2 X 10(-6) mol/liter) before the addition, in a cumulative fashion, of relaxing agents. Indapamide (10(-7) to 10(-4) mol/liter) had no direct effect on unstimulated or prostaglandin-stimulated preparations; it did not alter relaxations of preparations with endothelium induced by acetylcholine, bradykinin, adenosine diphosphate or the calcium ionophore A23187. Similarly, it did not affect relaxations induced by sodium nitroprusside, prostacyclin or forskolin in preparations with or without endothelium. Indomethacin shifted the concentration-response curve to bradykinin to the right and did not alter that to the other relaxing drugs. The reduced relaxation to bradykinin was reversed in a concentration-dependent manner by indapamide (10(-7) to 10(-5) mol/liter). In the presence of indomethacin, indapamide shifted the concentration response curve to prostacyclin (in rings with endothelium) and to forskolin (in rings with and without endothelium) to the left. Thus, indapamide does not directly affect endothelium-dependent and independent relaxations. However, when prostanoid production is impaired, indapamide facilitates the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor(s), and to a lesser extent, the direct action on vascular smooth muscle of prostanoids (prostacyclin) released from the endothelium.

  2. Effects of trientine, a metal chelator, on defective endothelium-dependent relaxation in the mesenteric vasculature of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Inkster, Melanie E; Cotter, Mary A; Cameron, Norman E

    2002-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus compromises endothelium-dependent relaxation of blood vessels. This has been linked to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which neutralise nitric oxide (NO) and interfere with vasodilator function. Experiments using chelators have emphasised the importance of ROS produced by transition metal catalysed reactions. However, particularly for the small arteries and arterioles that control microcirculatory blood flow, NO is not the only endothelium-derived mediator; endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) has a major role. EDHF-mediated vasodilation is severely curtailed by diabetes; however, little information exists on the underlying pathophysiology. Deficits in the EDHF system, alone or in combination with the NO system, are crucial for the development of diabetic microvascular complications. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved, the aim was to examine the effects of diabetes and preventive and intervention chelator therapy with trientine on a preparation that has well-defined NO and EDHF-mediated responses, the rat mesenteric vascular bed. In phenylephrine-preconstricted preparations, maximum vasodilation to acetylcholine was reduced by 35 and 44% after 4 and 8 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, respectively. Trientine treatment over the first 4 weeks gave 72% protection; intervention therapy over the final 4 weeks prevented deterioration and corrected the initial deficit by 68%. These responses depend on both NO and EDHF. When the latter mechanism was isolated by NO synthase inhibition, diabetic deficits of 53.4 (4 weeks) and 65.4% (8 weeks) were revealed, that were 65% prevented and 50% corrected by trientine treatment. Neither diabetes nor trientine altered vascular smooth muscle responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Thus, the data suggest that metal catalysed ROS production makes a substantial contribution to defects in both the EDHF and NO endothelial mechanisms in diabetes, which has

  3. Palm oil tocotrienol fractions restore endothelium dependent relaxation in aortic rings of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Muharis, Syed Putra; Top, Abdul Gapor Md; Murugan, Dharmani; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are closely associated with impaired endothelial function. Studies have demonstrated that regular consumption of edible palm oil may reverse endothelial dysfunction. The present study investigates the effect of palm oil fractions: tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF), alpha-tocopherol and refined palm olein (vitamin E-free fraction) on the vascular relaxation responses in the aortic rings of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). We hypothesize that the TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions are able to improve endothelial function in both diabetic and hypertensive rat aortic tissue. A 1,1-diphenyl picryl hydrazyl assay was performed on the various palm oil fractions to evaluate their antioxidant activities. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and endothelium-independent (sodium nitroprusside) relaxations were examined on streptozotocin-induced diabetic and SHR rat aorta following preincubation with the different fractions. In 1-diphenyl picryl hydrazyl antioxidant assay, TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions exhibited a similar degree of activity while palm olein exhibited poor activity. TRF and alpha-tocopherol significantly improved acetylcholine-induced relaxations in both diabetic (TRF, 88.5% +/- 4.5%; alpha-tocopherol, 87.4% +/- 3.4%; vehicle, 65.0 +/- 1.6%) and SHR aorta (TRF, 72.1% +/- 7.9%; alpha-tocopherol, 69.8% +/- 4.0%, vehicle, 51.1% +/- 4.7%), while palm olein exhibited no observable effect. These results suggest that TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions possess potent antioxidant activities and provide further support to the cardiovascular protective effects of palm oil vitamin E. TRF and alpha-tocopherol may potentially improve vascular endothelial function in diabetes and hypertension by their sparing effect on endothelium derived nitric oxide bioavailability.

  4. Endothelium-dependent relaxation in pulmonary arteries of L-NAME-treated Wistar and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Matsuda, Kyoko; Kawata, Kyoko; Negishi, Maki; Shinomiya, Kazuaki; Shimamur, Keiichi; Sunano, Satoru

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate whether the elevated blood pressure induced by chronic treatment with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) contributes to an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR), the effects of chronic treatment of Wistar rats with L-NAME on systolic blood pressure, pulmonary arterial blood pressure and EDR of the pulmonary arteries were studied and compared with those of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). While the systolic blood pressure (SBP) of Wistar rats was increased above that of controls by chronic treatment with L-NAME, it was still significantly lower than that of SHRSP. Chronic treatment with L-NAME did not affect pulmonary arterial blood pressure. On the other hand, the pulmonary arterial blood pressure of SHRSP was slightly but significantly higher than that of the control normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). EDR in response to acetylcholine in the pulmonary artery of L-NAME-treated rats was significantly smaller than that in control Wistar rats. The EDR markedly increased in the presence of L-arginine and completely disappeared in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine. Indomethacin hardly affected EDR. In preparations from SHRSP, the EDR was not different from that in those from WKY. Relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was identical in all preparations. Elevation of SBP and the impairment of EDR observed in L-NAME-treated rats recovered two weeks following cessation of treatment. These results suggest that the impaired EDR in the pulmonary artery of L-NAME-treated rats is not due to an L-NAME-induced increase in blood pressure but due to the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by the drug remaining in the endothelium.

  5. Effects of calcium dobesilate on the synthesis of endothelium-dependent relaxing factors in rabbit isolated aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, E; Lorente, R; Tejerina, T

    1997-01-01

    Some cardiovascular disturbances which occur in diabetics are a consequence of alterations in vascular contractility as well as in endothelium-dependent relaxation. Calcium dobesilate (DOBE) is a drug used in diabetic retinopathy and its mechanism of action is not yet understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DOBE on synthesis and release of endothelium-dependent relaxing factor (EDRF) and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in rabbit isolated aorta. Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine (ACh) (10−8–10−5 M) increased in the presence of DOBE 10−5 M only when vascular endothelium was kept intact. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10−8–10−4 M progressively decreased the enhancing effect of DOBE on endothelium-dependent relaxation whereas it was progressively increased by L-Arg. DOBE 10−5 M increased in a non-significant manner endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by ACh when the arteries were incubated with both L-NAME 10−4 M and indomethacin 10−6 M. DOBE (10−6 M and 10−5 M) was able to scavenge superoxide anion radicals generated by the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase reaction. These results provide evidence that DOBE is able to affect the vascular disorders associated with diabetes mellitus since it enhances the synthesis of endothelium-dependent relaxing factors. PMID:9208138

  6. Endothelium-dependent relaxation and hyperpolarization evoked by bradykinin in canine coronary arteries: enhancement by exercise-training.

    PubMed Central

    Mombouli, J. V.; Nakashima, M.; Hamra, M.; Vanhoutte, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    bradykinin were also shifted to the left by perindoprilat. The shift induced by the ACE-inhibitor in either type of preparation was not significantly different. 8. These findings demonstrate that exercise-training augments the sensitivity of the coronary artery of the dog to the endothelium-dependent effects of bradykinin. This sensitization to bradykinin may reflect an increased role of both NO and EDHF, and is not the consequence of differences in ACE activity in the receptor compartment. PMID:8821528

  7. Endothelium-Dependent Contractions of Isolated Arteries to Thymoquinone Require Biased Activity of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase with Subsequent Cyclic IMP Production.

    PubMed

    Detremmerie, Charlotte M; Chen, Zhengju; Li, Zhuoming; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Leung, Susan W S; Xu, Aimin; Gao, Yuansheng; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Preliminary experiments on isolated rat arteries demonstrated that thymoquinone, a compound widely used for its antioxidant properties and believed to facilitate endothelium-dependent relaxations, as a matter of fact caused endothelium-dependent contractions. The present experiments were designed to determine the mechanisms underlying this unexpected response. Isometric tension was measured in rings (with and without endothelium) of rat mesenteric arteries and aortae and of porcine coronary arteries. Precontracted preparations were exposed to increasing concentrations of thymoquinone, which caused concentration-dependent, sustained further increases in tension (augmentations) that were prevented by endothelium removal, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester [L-NAME; nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor], and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; soluble guanylyl cyclase [sGC] inhibitor). In L-NAME-treated rings, the NO-donor diethylenetriamine NONOate restored the thymoquinone-induced augmentations; 5-[1-(phenylmethyl)-1H-indazol-3-yl]-2-furanmethanol (sGC activator) and cyclic IMP (cIMP) caused similar restorations. By contrast, in ODQ-treated preparations, the cell-permeable cGMP analog did not restore the augmentation by thymoquinone. The compound augmented the content (measured with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) of cIMP, but not that of cGMP; these increases in cIMP content were prevented by endothelium removal, L-NAME, and ODQ. The augmentation of contractions caused by thymoquinone was prevented in porcine arteries, but not in rat arteries, by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)homopiperazine dihydrochloride and trans-4-[(1R)-1-aminoethyl]-N-4-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride (Rho-kinase inhibitors); in the latter, but not in the former, it was reduced by 3,5-dichloro-N-[[(1α,5α,6-exo,6α)-3-(3,3-dimethylbutyl)-3-azabicyclo[3.1.0]hex-6-yl]methyl]-benzamide hydrochloride (T-type calcium channel inhibitor

  8. High Dietary Sodium Intake Impairs Endothelium-Dependent Dilation in Healthy Salt-Resistant Humans

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, Jennifer J.; Greaney, Jody L.; Wenner, Megan M.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon L.; Sanders, Paul W.; Farquhar, William B.; Edwards, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Excess dietary sodium has been linked to the development of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. In humans, the effects of sodium consumption on endothelial function have not been separated from the effects on blood pressure. The present study was designed to determine if dietary sodium intake affected endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) independently of changes in blood pressure. Fourteen healthy salt resistant adults were studied (9M, 5F; age 33 ± 2.4 years) in a controlled feeding study. After a baseline run-in diet, participants were randomized to a 7 day high sodium (HS) (300-350 mmol/day) and 7 day low sodium (LS) (20 mmol/day) diet. Salt resistance, defined as a ≤ 5 mm Hg change in a 24-hour mean arterial pressure, was individually assessed while on the low sodium and high sodium diets and confirmed in the subjects undergoing study (LS: 85±1 mm Hg; HS: 85±2 mmHg). EDD was determined in each subject via brachial artery flow-mediated dilation on the last day of each diet. Sodium excretion increased during the high sodium diet (p < 0.01). EDD was reduced on the high sodium diet (Low: 10.3±0.9%, High: 7.3±0.7%, p < 0.05). The HS diet significantly suppressed plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma angiotensin II, and aldosterone (p < 0.05). These data demonstrate that excess salt intake in humans impairs endothelium-dependent dilation independently of changes in blood pressure. PMID:23263240

  9. [HYDROGEN SULFIDE DONOR, NAHS, RECOVERS CONSTITUTIVE NO SYNTHESIS AND ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXATION OF ISOLATED AORTA IN OLD RATS].

    PubMed

    Drachuk, K O; Kotsjuruba, A V; Sagach, V F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to show the effect of H₂S donor, NaHS on the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, free radical state and cNOS uncoupling in old rats. In the aorta of old rats a combined oxidative and nitrosative stress develops that leads to cNOS uncoupling and decreased constitutive synthesis of the NO. That biochemical changes correlate with lowering of the endothelium-dependent relaxation of aortic smooth muscles (7.5 ± 1.4%, compared with 64.9 ± 3.5% in adults). It was found that, due to the combined inhibition of oxidative and nitrosative stress, NaHS restores constitutive de novo synthesis of NO by restoring cNOS coupling. Additionally, NaHS improves endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by increasing (by 6.5 times) Ach-induced relaxation of aortic smooth muscles.

  10. Type 1 diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia reveal the contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to endothelium-dependent relaxation of the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Malakul, Wachirawadee; Thirawarapan, Suwan; Suvitayavat, Wisuda; Woodman, Owen L

    2008-02-01

    1. The present study evaluated the effect of diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and their combination on the contribution of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) to relaxation of rat isolated aortic rings and the potential contribution of oxidant stress to the disturbance of endothelial function. 2. Thoracic aortic rings from control, diabetic, hypercholesterolaemic and diabetic plus hypercholesterolaemic rats were suspended in organ baths for tension recording. Generation of superoxide by the aorta was measured using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. 3. The maximal response to acetylcholine (ACh) was significantly reduced in diabetic or hypercholesterolaemic rats compared with control rats. In rats with diabetes plus hypercholesterolaemia, both the sensitivity and maximal response to ACh was impaired. In control rats, the response to ACh was abolished by the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) or inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase with 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). In contrast, in rats with diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia or both, relaxation to ACh was resistant to inhibition by L-NNA or ODQ, but abolished by additional inhibition of K(Ca) channels with charybdotoxin plus apamin. 4. The generation of superoxide was not significantly enhanced in aortic rings from either diabetic or hypercholesterolaemic rats, but was significantly increased in aortic rings from rats with diabetes plus hypercholesterolaemia. 5. These results suggest that when diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia impair endothelium-dependent relaxation, due to a diminished contribution from NO, a compensatory contribution of EDHF to endothelium-dependent relaxation of the aorta is revealed. The attenuation of NO-mediated relaxation, at least in the presence of both diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia, is associated with enhanced superoxide generation.

  11. Does endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor play a role in endothelium-dependent component of electrical field stimulation-induced vasorelaxation of rat mesenteric arterial rings?

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Melike Hacer; Uma, Serdar

    2009-01-01

    Electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced, nonadrenergic, noncholinergic vasodilation was investigated in rat mesenteric arterial rings. Tetrodotoxin (10(-6) M), capsaicin (10(-5) M), or L-NAME (10(-4) M) failed to change the EFS-induced relaxations, whereas they were increased with indomethacin (10(-5) M). Removal of the endothelium caused approximately 20% reduction in the maximum response, whereas precontraction with 40 mM KCI abolished the relaxations at all frequencies. Iberiotoxin (3 x 10(-7) M) attenuated the relaxations in endothelium-intact tissues but blocked completely those in endothelium-denuded arteries. Combination of TRAM-34 (10(-5) M) with apamin (5 x 10(-7) M) and single administrations of NiCI2 (5 x 10(-4) M), ruthenium red (3 x 10(-5) M), and 18[alpha]-glycyrrhetinic acid (10(-4) M) significantly reduced the responses only in endothelium-intact tissues. These data indicate that in rat mesenteric arteries, EFS leads to vasodilation through both endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent mechanisms. The major component of the relaxation is endothelium independent and seems to occur via BK(Ca) channels, whereas endothelium-dependent component is likely to be mediated by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor rather than nitric oxide, prostacyclin, or a neural substance. We propose that Ca2+ entry into endothelial cells via nonspecific cation channels in response to EFS induces hyperpolarization by activating endothelial IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels, which is spread to the smooth muscle via gap junctions to produce relaxation.

  12. Visfatin Impairs Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Rat and Human Mesenteric Microvessels through Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Javier; Villalobos, Laura A.; Cercas, Elena; Leivas, Alejandra; Bermejo, Elena; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Peiró, Concepción

    2011-01-01

    Visfatin, also known as extracellular pre–B-cell colony–enhancing factor (PBEF) and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), is an adipocytokine whose circulating levels are enhanced in metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Circulating visfatin levels have been positively associated with vascular damage and endothelial dysfunction. Here, we investigated the ability of visfatin to directly impair vascular reactivity in mesenteric microvessels from both male Sprague-Dawley rats and patients undergoing non-urgent, non-septic abdominal surgery. The pre-incubation of rat microvessels with visfatin (50 and 100 ng/mL) did not modify the contractile response to noradrenaline (1 pmol/L to 30 µmol/L), as determined using a small vessel myograph. However, visfatin (10 to 100 ng/mL) concentration-dependently impaired the relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh; 100 pmol/L to 3 µmol/L), without interfering with the endothelium-independent relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (1 nmol/L to 3 µmol/L). In both cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and rat microvascular preparations, visfatin (50 ng/mL) stimulated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, as determined by lucigenin-derived chemiluminiscence. The relaxation to ACh impaired by visfatin was restored by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 µmol/L). Additionally, the Nampt inhibitor APO866 (10 mmol/L to 10 µmol/L), but not an insulin receptor-blocking antibody, also prevented the stimulation of NADPH oxidase and the relaxation impairment elicited by visfatin. Accordingly, the product of Nampt activity nicotinamide mononucleotide (100 nmol/L to 1 mmol/L) stimulated endothelial NADPH oxidase activity and concentration-dependently impaired ACh-induced vasorelaxation. In human mesenteric microvessels pre-contracted with 35 mmol/L potassium chloride, the endothelium-dependent vasodilation to bradykinin (1 nmol/L to 3 µmol/L) was equally impaired by

  13. Alterations in endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and relaxation in mesenteric arteries from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, Mitsuhiro; Hattori, Yuichi; Kanno, Morio; Sakuma, Ichiro; Kitabatake, Akira

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and relaxation are altered during experimental diabetes mellitus. Membrane potentials were recorded in mesenteric arteries from rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and age-matched controls. The resting membrane potentials were not significantly different between control and diabetic mesenteric arteries (−55.3±0.5 vs −55.6±0.4 mV). However, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization produced by acetylcholine (ACh; 10−8–10−5 M) was significantly diminished in amplitude in diabetic arteries compared with that in controls (maximum −10.4±1.1 vs −17.2±0.8 mV). Furthermore, the hyperpolarizing responses of diabetic arteries were more transient. ACh-induced hyperpolarization observed in control and diabetic arteries remained unaltered even after treatment with 3×10−4 M NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), 10−5 M indomethacin or 60 u ml−1 superoxide dismutase. Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization with 10−6 M A23187, a calcium ionophore, was also decreased in diabetic arteries compared to controls (−8.3±1.4 vs −18.0±1.9 mV). However, endothelium-independent hyperpolarizing responses to 10−6 M pinacidil, a potassium channel opener, were similar in control and diabetic arteries (−20.0±1.4 vs −19.2±1.1 mV). The altered endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations in diabetic arteries were almost completely prevented by insulin therapy. Endothelium-dependent relaxations by ACh in the presence of 10−4 M L-NOARG and 10−5 M indomethacin in diabetic arteries were also reduced and more transient compared to controls. These data indicate that endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization is reduced by diabetes, and this would, in part, account for the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations in mesenteric arteries from diabetic rats. PMID:9257918

  14. Hypertension and impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation of arteries from spontaneously hypertensive and L-NAME-treated Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, F; Miyake, Y; Hirakawa, A; Nakahira, T; Yamaoka, M; Shimamura, K; Yamamoto, K; Sunano, S

    2001-04-01

    Effects of chronic treatment of normotensive Wistar rats with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) on blood pressure and on endothelium-dependent relaxation of the aorta, carotid and iliac arteries were studied. The endothelium-dependent relaxation was compared in arteries from normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and genetically hypertensive rats (stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats, SHRSP). Chronic treatment of normotensive Wistar rats with L-NAME caused an elevation of blood pressure. The elevated blood pressure at 15 weeks of age was significantly higher in these animals than that of untreated Wistar rats, but lower than that of SHRSP. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of the arteries induced by acetylcholine (ACh) was almost abolished by chronic treatment with L-NAME. The remaining small relaxation in arteries from L-NAME-treated rats was completely inhibited by application of L-NAME (10(-4) M). In such preparations, higher concentrations of ACh induced a contraction, which was abolished by removal of the endothelium or by an application of indomethacin (10(-5) M). Endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was similar between preparations from untreated and L-NAME-treated Wistar rats. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly impaired in preparations from SHRSP, when compared with that in those from WKY. However, the impairment was less prominent in preparations from SHRSP than in those from L-NAME-treated rats. These results suggest that the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation in the arteries from L-NAME-treated rats is not due to the elevated blood pressure resulting from the chronic treatment, and that impairment of NO synthesis by the endothelium does not play a major role in the initiation of hypertension in SHRSP.

  15. TRP channel Ca2+ sparklets: fundamental signals underlying endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michelle N.

    2013-01-01

    Important functions of the vascular endothelium, including permeability, production of antithrombotic factors, and control of vascular tone, are regulated by changes in intracellular Ca2+. The molecular identities and regulation of Ca2+ influx channels in the endothelium are incompletely understood, in part because of experimental difficulties associated with application of patch-clamp electrophysiology to native endothelial cells. However, advances in confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and the development of fast, high-affinity Ca2+-binding fluorophores have recently allowed for direct visualization and characterization of single-channel transient receptor potential (TRP) channel Ca2+ influx events in endothelial cells. These events, called “TRP channel Ca2+ sparklets,” have been optically recorded from primary endothelial cells and the intact endothelium, and the biophysical properties and fundamental significance of these Ca2+ signals in vasomotor regulation have been characterized. This review will first briefly discuss the role of endothelial cell TRP channel Ca2+ influx in endothelium-dependent vasodilation, describe improved methods for recording unitary TRP channel activity using optical methods, and highlight discoveries regarding the regulation and physiological significance of TRPV4 Ca2+ sparklets in the vascular endothelium enabled by this new technology. Perspectives on the potential use of these techniques to evaluate changes in TRP channel Ca2+ influx activity associated with endothelial dysfunction are offered. PMID:24025865

  16. Serum alkaline phosphatase negatively affects endothelium-dependent vasodilation in naïve hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Perticone, Francesco; Perticone, Maria; Maio, Raffaele; Sciacqua, Angela; Andreucci, Michele; Tripepi, Giovanni; Corrao, Salvatore; Mallamaci, Francesca; Sesti, Giorgio; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-10-01

    Tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, promoting arterial calcification in experimental models, is a powerful predictor of total and cardiovascular mortality in general population and in patients with renal or cardiovascular diseases. For this study, to evaluate a possible correlation between serum alkaline phosphatase levels and endothelial function, assessed by strain gauge plethysmography, we enrolled 500 naïve hypertensives divided into increasing tertiles of alkaline phosphatase. The maximal response to acetylcholine was inversely related to alkaline phosphatase (r=−0.55; P<0.001), and this association was independent (r=−0.61; P<0.001) of demographic and classical risk factors, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum phosphorus and calcium, C-reactive protein, and albuminuria. At multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk of endothelial dysfunction was ≈3-fold higher in patients in the third tertile than that of patients in the first tertile. We also tested the combined role of alkaline phosphatase and serum phosphorus on endothelial function. The steepness of the alkaline phosphatase/vasodilating response to acetylcholine relationship was substantially attenuated (P<0.001) in patients with serum phosphorus above the median value when compared with patients with serum phosphorus below the median (−5.0% versus −10.2% per alkaline phosphatase unit, respectively), and this interaction remained highly significant (P<0.001) after adjustment of all the previously mentioned risk factors. Our data support a strong and significant inverse relationship between alkaline phosphatase and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which was attenuated by relatively higher serum phosphorus levels.

  17. Superoxide dismutase reduces the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation in the spontaneously hypertensive rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Yanamoto, Aiko; Sunano, Satoru

    2004-04-01

    The involvement of the superoxide anion in endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) was examined in noradrenaline-contracted aortic smooth muscle preparations isolated from normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-9)-10(-5) M) induced EDR in both WKY and SHRSP preparations in a concentration-dependent manner, but with a significantly smaller amplitude in those from SHRSP than in those from WKY. The ACh-induced EDR was inhibited by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), in a concentration-dependent manner, both in WKY and SHRSP. The EDR produced in WKY in the presence of 3 x 10(-6) M L-NOARG was similar in magnitude to that produced in SHRSP in the absence of L-NOARG. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, 300 units/ml) increased the amplitude of EDR in SHRSP but not in WKY, with no alteration of the threshold or of the maximal amplitude. The maximal amplitude of EDR produced in SHRSP in the presence of SOD was still smaller than that in WKY. In WKY, a possible involvement of superoxide in the EDR was examined in aortae whose EDR was partially inhibited by treatment with a subthreshold concentration (3 x 10 (-6) M) of L-NOARG. In the L-NOARG-conditioned aorta, the reduced EDR was partially but significantly recovered by SOD. These results suggest that the impaired EDR in aortae of SHRSP may be causally related to a higher production of superoxide. The L-NOARG-induced inhibition of EDR in WKY may be produced, in part, by the reduction of effective NO due to its destruction by superoxide.

  18. Antihypertensive and endothelium-dependent vasodilator effects of aqueous extract of Cistus ladaniferus.

    PubMed

    Belmokhtar, Mounia; Bouanani, Nour Elhouda; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Mekhfi, Hassane; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohamed; Matéo, Philippe; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq

    2009-11-06

    Cistus ladaniferus L. (Cistaceae) is a medicinal plant originated from the Mediterranean region which exerts different pharmacological effects. In the present study, our goal was to examine whether the plant possessed antihypertensive properties. Aqueous extract of Cistus leaves (AEC, 500mg/kg/day) reduced systemic blood pressure (SBP) in two animal models of hypertension, the l-NAME and renovascular two kidney-one clip (2K-1C) hypertensive rats. In the former, AEC prevented the increase in SBP when co-administered with l-NAME during four weeks (164+/-3mm Hg in l-NAME vs. 146+/-1mm Hg in l-NAME+AEC, p<0.001). In the latter, AEC reversed the increase in SBP when administered during four weeks after installation of the hypertension (146+/-5mm Hg with AEC vs. 179+/-6mm Hg without, p<0.05). AEC treatment also reversed the endothelial dysfunction observed in both animal models of hypertension. A direct effect on cardiac and vascular tissue was also tested by examining the contractile effects of AEC in rat isolated aortic rings and Langendorff perfused hearts. AEC (10mg/L) had no effect on left ventricular developed pressure and heart rate in isolated perfused heart. However, AEC produced a strong relaxation of pre-contracted rat aortic rings (80+/-2% relaxation, n=25). When the rings were denuded from endothelium or were incubated with 1mM Nomega-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA), the relaxant effect of AEC was lost. We conclude that C. ladaniferus possesses antihypertensive properties which are mainly due to an endothelium-dependent vasodilatory action.

  19. Excess L-arginine restores endothelium-dependent relaxation impaired by monocrotaline pyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Wei; Oike, Masahiro . E-mail: moike@pharmaco.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ohnaka, Keizo; Koyama, Tetsuya; Ito, Yushi

    2005-09-15

    The pyrrolizidine alkaloid plant toxin monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP) causes pulmonary hypertension in experimental animals. The present study aimed to examine the effects of MCTP on the endothelium-dependent relaxation. We constructed an in vitro disease model of pulmonary hypertension by overlaying MCTP-treated bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAEs) onto pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell-embedded collagen gel lattice. Acetylcholine (Ach) induced a relaxation of the control CPAEs-overlaid gels that were pre-contracted with noradrenaline, and the relaxation was inhibited by L-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). In contrast, when MCTP-treated CPAEs were overlaid, the pre-contracted gels did not show a relaxation in response to Ach in the presence of 0.5 mM L-arginine. Expression of endothelial NOS protein, Ach-induced Ca{sup 2+} transients and cellular uptake of L-[{sup 3}H]arginine were significantly smaller in MCTP-treated CPAEs than in control cells, indicating that these changes were responsible for the impaired NO production in MCTP-treated CPAEs. Since cellular uptake of L-[{sup 3}H]arginine linearly increased according to its extracellular concentration, we hypothesized that the excess concentration of extracellular L-arginine might restore NO production in MCTP-treated CPAEs. As expected, in the presence of 10 mM L-arginine, Ach showed a relaxation of the MCTP-treated CPAEs-overlaid gels. These results indicate that the impaired NO production in damaged endothelial cells can be reversed by supplying excess L-arginine.

  20. Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation and Angiotensin II Sensitivity in Experimental Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Wiegman, Marjon J.; Plösch, Torsten; Zeeman, Gerda G.; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Henning, Robert H.; Buikema, Hendrik; Faas, Marijke M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated endothelial dysfunction and the role of angiotensin (Ang)-II type I (AT1-R) and type II (AT2-R) receptor in the changes in the Ang-II sensitivity in experimental preeclampsia in the rat. Methods Aortic rings were isolated from low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infused pregnant rats (experimental preeclampsia; n=9), saline-infused pregnant rats (n=8), and saline (n=8) and LPS (n=8) infused non-pregnant rats. Endothelium-dependent acetylcholine--mediated relaxation was studied in phenylephrine-preconstricted aortic rings in the presence of vehicle, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and/or indomethacin. To evaluate the role for AT1-R and AT2-R in Ang-II sensitivity, full concentration response curves were obtained for Ang-II in the presence of losartan or PD123319. mRNA expression of the AT1-R and AT2-R, eNOS and iNOS, COX1 and COX2 in aorta were evaluated using real-time RT-PCR. Results The role of vasodilator prostaglandins in the aorta was increased and the role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and response of the AT1-R and AT2-R to Ang-II was decreased in pregnant saline infused rats as compared with non-pregnant rats. These changes were not observed during preeclampsia. Conclusion Pregnancy induced adaptations in endothelial function, which were not observed in the rat model for preeclampsia. This role of lack of pregnancy induced endothelial adaptation in the pathophysiology of experimental preeclampsia needs further investigation. PMID:24223202

  1. Obesity and risk of vascular disease: importance of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias; Baretella, Oliver; Meyer, Matthias R

    2012-02-01

    Obesity has become a serious global health issue affecting both adults and children. Recent devolopments in world demographics and declining health status of the world's population indicate that the prevalence of obesity will continue to increase in the next decades. As a disease, obesity has deleterious effects on metabolic homeostasis, and affects numerous organ systems including heart, kidney and the vascular system. Thus, obesity is now regarded as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and stroke. In the arterial system, endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. Endothelial vasoactive factors regulate vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions and maintain basal vascular tone. Obesity results in an imbalance between endothelium-derived vasoactive factors favouring vasoconstriction, cell growth and inflammatory activation. Abnormal regulation of these factors due to endothelial cell dysfunction is both a consequence and a cause of vascular disease processes. Finally, because of the similarities of the vascular pathomechanisms activated, obesity can be considered to cause accelerated, 'premature' vascular aging. Here, we will review some of the pathomechanisms involved in obesity-related activation of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction, the clinical relevance of obesity-associated vascular risk, and therapeutic interventions using 'endothelial therapy' aiming at maintaining or restoring vascular endothelial health. This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. An endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor distinct from NO and prostacyclin is a major endothelium-dependent vasodilator in resistance vessels of wild-type and endothelial NO synthase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, Ralf P.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich-Hubertus; Félétou, Michel; Gödecke, Axel; Huang, Paul L.; Vanhoutte, Paul M.; Fleming, Ingrid; Busse, Rudi

    2000-01-01

    In addition to nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI2), the endothelium generates the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). We set out to determine whether an EDHF-like response can be detected in wild-type (WT) and endothelial NO synthase knockout mice (eNOS −/−) mice. Vasodilator responses to endothelium-dependent agonists were determined in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, bradykinin induced a pronounced, dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) which did not differ between WT and eNOS −/− mice and was unaffected by treatment with Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and diclofenac. In the saline-perfused hindlimb of WT and eNOS −/− mice, marked Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NA, 300 μmol/liter)- and diclofenac-insensitive vasodilations in response to both bradykinin and acetylcholine (ACh) were observed, which were more pronounced than the agonist-induced vasodilation in the hindlimb of WT in the absence of l-NA. This endothelium-dependent, NO/PGI2-independent vasodilatation was sensitive to KCl (40 mM) and to the combination of apamin and charybdotoxin. Gap junction inhibitors (18α-glycyrrhetinic acid, octanol, heptanol) and CB-1 cannabinoid-receptor agonists (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, HU210) impaired EDHF-mediated vasodilation, whereas inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes, soluble guanylyl cyclase, or adenosine receptors had no effect on EDHF-mediated responses. These results demonstrate that in murine resistance vessels the predominant agonist-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in vivo and in vitro is not mediated by NO, PGI2, or a cytochrome P450 metabolite, but by an EDHF-like principle that requires functional gap junctions. PMID:10944233

  3. Variation in genes in the endothelin pathway and endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Lind, L; Syvänen, A-C; Axelsson, T; Lundmark, P; Hägg, S; Larsson, A

    2013-05-01

    Indirect evidences by blockade of the endothelin receptors have suggested a role of endothelin in endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study aimed to investigate whether circulating levels of endotehlin-1 or genetic variations in genes in the endothelin pathway were related to endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In 1016 seventy-year-old participants of the population-based Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (52% women), we measured endothelium-dependent vasodilation using the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine given in the brachial artery (EDV) and the brachial artery ultrasound technique with measurement of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). Plasma endothelin-1 levels were measured and 60 SNPs in genes in the endothelin pathway (ECE1, EDN1, EDNRA, EDNRB) were genotyped. No significant associations were found between circulating endothelin levels and EDV or FMD. No single genotype was related to EDV or FMD following adjustment for multiple testing, but a genotype score for 3 SNPs (rs11618266 in EDNRB, rs17675063 in EDNRA, rs3026868 in ECE1) was significantly related to EDV (beta coefficient 0.070, 95% CI 0.025-0.12, P = 0.002) when adjusting for gender, systolic blood pressure, HDL and LDL cholesterol, serum triglycerides, BMI, diabetes, smoking, antihypertensive medication or statins and CRP. This score was also related to nitroprusside-induced vasodilation in the forearm. A combination of genotypes in the endothelin pathway was related to both endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation in forearm resistance vessels, but not in the brachial artery in an elderly population, giving evidence for a role of the endothelin system in resistance vessel reactivity independent of major cardiovascular risk factors. Acta Physiologica © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  4. The ent-15α-Acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic Acid Relaxes Rat Artery Mesenteric Superior via Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Êurica Adélia Nogueira; Herculano, Edla de Azevedo; da Costa, Cintia Danieli Ferreira; Furtado, Fabiola Fialho; da-Cunha, Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of the ent-15α-acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (KA-acetoxy). In rat mesenteric artery rings, KA-acetoxy induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels precontracted with phenylephrine. In the absence of endothelium, the vasorelaxation was significantly shifted to the right without reduction of the maximum effect. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, an inhibitor of the NO-synthase (NOS), indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, L-NAME + indomethacin, atropine, a nonselective antagonist of the muscarinic receptors, ODQ, selective inhibitor of the guanylyl cyclase enzyme, or hydroxocobalamin, a nitric oxide scavenger. The relaxation was completely reversed in the presence of L-NAME + 1 mM L-arginine or L-arginine, an NO precursor. Diterpene-induced relaxation was not affected by TEA, a nonselective inhibitor of K+ channels. The KA-acetoxy antagonized CaCl2-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner and also inhibited an 80 mM KCl-induced contraction. The KA-acetoxy did not interfere with Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The vasorelaxant induced by KA-acetoxy seems to involve the inhibition of the Ca2+ influx and also, at least in part, by endothelial muscarinic receptors activation, NO and PGI2 release. PMID:23346202

  5. Association and cosegregation of stroke with impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in stroke prone, spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, M; Iaccarino, G; Vecchione, C; Rizzoni, D; Russo, R; Rubattu, S; Condorelli, G; Ganten, U; Ganten, D; Trimarco, B; Lindpaintner, K

    1996-01-01

    While hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, it is not its sole determinant. Despite similar blood pressures, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) do not share the predisposition to cerebrovascular disease typical of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). We investigated vascular function in male SHR and SHRSP as well as in SHRSP/SHR-F2 hybrid animals. Animals were maintained on the appropriate dietary regimen necessary for the manifestation of stroke. Among the hybrid animals, a group of stroke-prone and a group of stroke-resistant rats were selected. Blood pressure was similar in all groups. Endothelium-independent vascular reactivity tested on isolated rings of thoracic aorta and basilar artery after death showed similar contractile and dilatory responses to serotonin and nitroglycerin, respectively, in all groups. In contrast, endothelium-dependent relaxation, in response to acetylcholine or substance P, was markedly reduced in SHRSP compared with SHR. Similarly, reduced vasodilatory responses were present in aortae of F2 rats that had suffered a stroke when compared with SHR or F2 rats resistant to stroke. The observed association and cosegregation of stroke with significant and specific impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation among SHRSP and stroke-prone F2 hybrids, respectively, suggest a potential causal role of altered endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation in the pathogenesis of stroke. PMID:8755632

  6. Some electrical properties of the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization recorded from rat arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G; Suzuki, H

    1989-01-01

    Methylene Blue, ACh and histamine also produced a hyperpolarization similar to that seen in the control. 10. It is concluded that in arteries of the rat, ACh and histamine release a hyperpolarizing substance from the endothelial cells. This substance may be different from the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), and is released mainly transiently. The hyperpolarization is generated by an increase in potassium conductance of the membrane, and this has some contribution to the endothelium-dependent relaxation. PMID:2795490

  7. Effect of prolonged incubation with copper on endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat isolated aorta

    PubMed Central

    Chiarugi, Alberto; Pitari, Giovanni Mario; Costa, Rosa; Ferrante, Margherita; Villari, Loredana; Amico-Roxas, Matilde; Godfraind, Théophile; Bianchi, Alfredo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of prolonged exposure to copper (Cu2+) on vascular functioning of isolated rat aorta. Aortic rings were exposed to CuSO4 (3–24 h) in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium with or without 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS) and then challenged with vasoconstrictors or vasodilators in the absence of Cu2+. Exposure to 2 μM Cu2+ in the absence of FBS did not modify the response to phenylephrine (PE) or acetylcholine (ACh) in aortic rings incubated for 24 h. Identical exposure in the presence of FBS increased the contractile response to 1 μM PE by 30% (P<0.05) and impaired the relaxant response to 3 μM ACh or 1 μM A23187 (ACh, from 65.7±7.1 to 6.2±1.1%, n=8; A23187, from 74.6±8.2 to 12.0±0.8%, n=6; P<0.01 for both). Cu2+ exposure did not affect the relaxant response to NO-donors. Impairment of vasorelaxation appeared 3 h after incubation with 2 μM Cu2+ and required 12 h to attain a steady state. Vasorelaxation to ACh was partially restored by 1 mM tiron (intracellular scavenger of superoxide ions; maximum relaxation 34.2±6.4%, n=10, P<0.01 vs Cu2+ alone), whereas catalase, superoxide dismutase or cycloheximide were ineffective. Twenty-four hour-exposure to 2 μM Cu2+ did not affect endothelium integrity or eNOS expression, and increased the Cu content in arterial rings from 6.8±1.1 to 18.9±2.9 ng mg−1 wet weight, n=8; P<0.01. Our results show that, in the presence of FBS, prolonged exposure to submicromolar concentrations of Cu2+ impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in aortic rings, probably through an intracellular generation of superoxide ions. PMID:12163352

  8. Captopril, but not nifedipine, improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Millgård, J; Hägg, A; Sarabi, M; Lind, L

    1998-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor captopril and the Ca-antagonist nifedipine on endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) in the forearm of hypertensive patients. Twenty-three middle-aged untreated hypertensive patients underwent evaluation of EDV and endothelium-independent vasodilation (EIDV) in the forearm, by means of local intra-arterial infusions of methacholine (MCh, evaluating EDV) and sodium-nitroprusside (SNP, evaluating EIDV), before and 1 h after intake of either captopril (25 mg) or nifedipine (10 mg) in a randomised, double-blind fashion. A matched normotensive control group was investigated at baseline conditions only. Five of the hypertensives were also evaluated after 3 months of treatment with captopril 25 mg twice daily in an open pilot study. First, the vasodilation induced by methacholine (MCh), but not SNP, was significantly attenuated in the hypertensive patients compared to the normotensive controls (P < 0.001 at MCh 4 microg/min). Second, although the two drugs induced a similar decline in blood pressure (BP) 1 h after administration (-11 to 10 mm Hg/-8 to 7 mm Hg), captopril significantly potentiated the vasodilator response to MCh (+32+/-13%, MCh 4 micr og/min, P < 0.01) but not SNP, while nifedipine did not significantly alter the response to either MCh or SNP. The improvement in vasodilator response to MCh induced by captopril was closely related to the reduction in BP (r = 0.72, P < 0.01). Third, in the pilot study, 3 months of captopril treatment induced a significant potentiation of the vasodilator response to MCh (+34+/-17%, MCh 4 microg/min, P < 0.05) in parallel with a significant BP reduction (-22+/-24/13+/-13 mm Hg, P < 0.05), while the response to SNP was unchanged. In conclusion, the present study confirmed that essential hypertension is associated with a defect in EDV. Furthermore, an improvement in EDV was seen in hypertensive patients shortly after

  9. Crataegus special extract WS 1442 causes endothelium-dependent relaxation via a redox-sensitive Src- and Akt-dependent activation of endothelial NO synthase but not via activation of estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Anselm, Eric; Socorro, Vanesca Frota Madeira; Dal-Ros, Stéphanie; Schott, Christa; Bronner, Christian; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2009-03-01

    This study determined whether the Crataegus (Hawthorn species) special extract WS 1442 stimulates the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO), a vasoprotective factor, and characterized the underlying mechanism. Vascular reactivity was assessed in porcine coronary artery rings, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in artery sections by microscopy, and phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells by Western blot analysis. WS 1442 caused endothelium-dependent relaxations in coronary artery rings, which were reduced by N-nitro-L-arginine (a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase) and by charybdotoxin plus apamin (two inhibitors of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses). Relaxations to WS 1442 were inhibited by intracellular ROS scavengers and inhibitors of Src and PI3-kinase, but not by an estrogen receptor antagonist. WS 1442 stimulated the endothelial formation of ROS in artery sections, and a redox-sensitive phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells. WS 1442 induced endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxations of coronary artery rings through the redox-sensitive Src/PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS.

  10. [Endothelium-dependent relaxation of Wistar rat aorta in late pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Dieye, A M; Faye, B; Gairard, A

    2001-01-01

    Some authors usually described an enhanced vascular reactivity to vasodilatoragents during pregancy. We would like toverifythis hypothesis with acetylcholin which is the vasodilator agent habitually used in animal experimentation. Young adult Wistar rats, pregnant and nonpregnant, were used. Rats received either a control diet, or this control diet supplemented with nitroargininin (0.063 % i.e. 30 mg/kg for7 days [treated group], from day 13th to day 20th for pregnants. Relaxation of rings thoracic aorta, with or without endothelium, in the presence of acetylcholin in cumulative was studied after contraction induced by depolarisation with KCl or after noradrenalin addition. The results show that relaxation in the presence of acetylcholin needs functional endothelial cells and that the nitric oxide plays a key role in this relaxation. So, there is no difference in vascular reactivity in late pregnant rats compared to nonpregnant rats. In addition, chronic inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis in pregnant rats do not modify pregnancy reactivity to nitric oxide because relaxation to S-nitroso-N acetyl penicillamin, which is a nitric oxide donor, is not different in control pregnant rats compared to treated pregnant rats. A judicious observation of work conditions with a particular attention with calcium concentration in organ bath solutions would certainly explain contradictory results obtained by different authors on vascular reactivity in vitro during gestation.

  11. Paullinia pinnata extracts rich in polyphenols promote vascular relaxation via endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zamble, Alexis; Carpentier, Marie; Kandoussi, Abdelmejid; Sahpaz, Sevser; Petrault, Olivier; Ouk, Tawarak; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart; Bordet, Régis; Duriez, Patrick; Bailleul, François; Martin-Nizard, Françoise

    2006-04-01

    Paullinia pinnata L. (Sapindaceae) is an African tropical plant whose roots and leaves are used in traditional medicine for many purposes, especially for erectile dysfunction, but its action mechanism is unknown. P. pinnata root and leaf methanolic extracts are rich in phenolic compounds. This study shows that both extracts are highly antioxidative and induce a slight transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha. They also increased and decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase and endothelin-1 mRNA levels in bovine aortic endothelial cells, respectively. In this study P. pinnata methanolic extracts in cumulative doses elicited in a dose-dependent manner the relaxation of phenylephrine precontracted isolated rat aortic rings. N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester significantly attenuated the capacity of both extracts to induce arterial relaxation, indicating that this arterial relaxation was mediated by endothelial nitric oxide release. It could be suggested that the arterial relaxation induced by both extracts could be mainly linked to their capacities to inhibit nitric oxide oxidation through their antioxidant properties.

  12. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pig aorta: relationship to stimulation of 86Rb efflux from isolated endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J. L.; Martin, W.

    1983-01-01

    Bradykinin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and acetylcholine each relaxed histamine-contracted strips of pig aorta in a dose-dependent manner. These relaxations were abolished when the endothelium was removed. Relaxation induced by ATP was mimicked by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) but adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine were about 120 times less potent. Relaxation induced by acetylcholine was antagonized by atropine in a competitive manner, and carbachol induced the same degree of relaxation as acetylcholine, but was about 10 times less potent. The calcium ionophore, A23187, also induced a dose-dependent relaxation of pig aortic strips provided the endothelium was present, suggesting that a rise in the level of ionized calcium within the endothelial cells is one means by which vascular smooth muscle relaxation can be triggered. Bradykinin, ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine and A23187 each induced a dose-dependent increase in 86Rb efflux from preloaded pig aortic endothelial cells. The dose-response curves for stimulation of 86Rb efflux and for endothelium-dependent relaxation were similar for each individual compound. ADP was equipotent with ATP, but AMP and adenosine were about 120 times less potent. Neither acetylcholine nor carbachol, in concentrations that induce endothelium-dependent relaxation, had any effect on 86Rb efflux from isolated aortic endothelial cells. Lanthanum, which blocks calcium influx, abolished the increases in 86Rb efflux induced by bradykinin and ATP, and the calcium ionophore A23187 was the most effective stimulant of 86Rb efflux, suggesting that the potassium transport induced by these agents is calcium-activated. It is concluded that endothelial responses to bradykinin and ATP can be assessed by monitoring 86Rb efflux, which probably reflects a calcium-activated efflux of potassium associated with the endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation induced by these agents. This pathway is apparently not involved in endothelial responses to

  13. Relationships between three different tests to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation and cardiovascular risk in a middle-aged sample.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lars

    2013-08-01

    For a couple of decades, flow-mediated vasodilation in the brachial artery (FMD) and acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation in the forearm (EDV) have been used to assess endothelium-dependent vasodilation. During recent years a third technique, peripheral artery tonometry (PAT) using EndoPat, has been introduced. We now aimed to investigate the relationships between these techniques, and their relation to cardiovascular risk. In the population-based Prospective investigation of Obesity, Energy and Metabolism (POEM) study conducted in individuals all aged 50 years (50% women), EDV, FMD and the reactive hyperemia index were measured in the first 222 individuals. Cardiovascular risk was assessed by the Framingham risk score. No significant relationships were seen between the three different tests to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation. EDV (r = -0.21, P = 0.004) and FMD (r = -0.19, P = 0.004), but not PAT were significantly related to the Framingham score in an inverse way. Also sodium nitroprusside-mediated vasodilation in the forearm, reflecting endothelium-independent vasodilation (EIDV), was related to the Framingham score in an inverse way (r = -0.30, P < 0.0001). No close relationships were seen between the three tests of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, suggesting that they each contribute with unique information on vasoreactivity. EDV, EIDV and FMD, but not PAT, were related to the Framingham score, suggesting that vasoreactivity in some vascular beds are related to cardiovascular risk in middle-aged individuals.

  14. Effect of ascorbic acid on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation of human arterial conduits for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Mangoush, Omar; Nakamura, Koki; Al-Ruzzeh, Sharif; Athanasiou, Thanos; Chester, Adrian; Amrani, Mohamed

    2003-10-01

    Techniques aimed at improving the performance of arterial conduits will maximize the clinical benefit achievable with coronary artery bypass surgery. Controlling oxidant stress could be a strategy for preventing early graft deterioration. We tested the effect of a free radical scavenger, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), on preserving the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation function in vitro of radial artery and internal thoracic artery. We also tested its effect on the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by each graft. Radial artery (RA, n=25) and internal thoracic (ITA, n=19) segments were obtained from coronary artery bypass grafting patients. Each segment was divided into 3-4 mm vascular rings and incubated with or without ascorbic acid (10(-3) mol/l) for 1 h or 72 h. Using the organ bath technique, the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation function was tested in vitro by the addition of cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-5) mol/l) following vasocontraction by endothelin-1 (3 x 10(-8) mol/l). ROS were measured by using chemiluminescence technique at 1-h and after 72 h incubation with or without ascorbic acid. There were no differences in the vasodilatation function between control and ascorbic acid group of both arteries in the 1-hour incubation experiment. However, in the 72 h incubation experiment, ascorbic acid preserved the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation function of RA compared with control group (35.8+/-2.2% vs. 25.9+/-2.1%; P=0.005), but not ITA (39+/-3.5% vs. 40.5+/-9.3%; P=0.438). After 72 h incubation, RA generated significantly more free radicals compared with 1 h (133.7+/-151.5 vs. 16.8+/-16.8 cps/mg x 100; P=0.01); however, AA has no statistically significant effect on decreasing the amount of free radicals generated by both arteries. In RA, ascorbic acid is able to preserve the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation function after 72 h incubation, but not after 1 h. However, the mechanism of action of AA is not

  15. Intradermal administration of endothelin-1 attenuates endothelium-dependent and -independent cutaneous vasodilation via Rho kinase in young adults.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Amano, Tatsuro; Halili, Lyra; Louie, Jeffrey C; Zhang, Sarah Y; McNeely, Brendan D; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-01-01

    We recently showed that intradermal administration of endothelin-1 diminished endothelium-dependent and -independent cutaneous vasodilation. We evaluated the hypothesis that Rho kinase may be a mediator of this response. We also sought to evaluate if endothelin-1 increases sweating. In 12 adults (25 ± 6 yr), we measured cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweating during 1) endothelium-dependent vasodilation induced via administration of incremental doses of methacholine (0.25, 5, 100, and 2,000 mM each for 25 min) and 2) endothelium-independent vasodilation induced via administration of 50 mM sodium nitroprusside (20-25 min). Responses were evaluated at four skin sites treated with either 1) lactated Ringer solution (Control), 2) 400 nM endothelin-1, 3) 3 mM HA-1077 (Rho kinase inhibitor), or 4) endothelin-1+HA-1077. Pharmacological agents were intradermally administered via microdialysis. Relative to the Control site, endothelin-1 attenuated endothelium-dependent vasodilation (CVC at 2,000 mM methacholine, 80 ± 10 vs. 56 ± 15%max, P < 0.01); however, this response was not detected when the Rho kinase inhibitor was simultaneously administered (CVC at 2,000 mM methacholine for Rho kinase inhibitor vs. endothelin-1 + Rho kinase inhibitor sites: 73 ± 9 vs. 72 ± 11%max, P > 0.05). Endothelium-independent vasodilation was attenuated by endothelin-1 compared with the Control site (CVC, 92 ± 13 vs. 70 ± 14%max, P < 0.01). However, in the presence of Rho kinase inhibition, endothelin-1 did not affect endothelium-independent vasodilation (CVC at Rho kinase inhibitor vs. endothelin-1+Rho kinase inhibitor sites: 81 ± 9 vs. 86 ± 10%max, P > 0.05). There was no between-site difference in sweating throughout (P > 0.05). We show that in young adults, Rho kinase is an important mediator of the endothelin-1-mediated attenuation of endothelium-dependent and -independent cutaneous vasodilation, and that endothelin-1 does not increase sweating. Copyright © 2017 the

  16. Chronic moderate hypoxia and protein malnutrition both induce growth retardation, but have distinct effects on arterial endothelium-dependent reactivity in the chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Ruijtenbeek, Karin; Kessels, Lilian C G A; De Mey, Jo G R; Blanco, Carlos E

    2003-04-01

    Deviations in the rate of intrauterine growth may change organ system development, resulting in cardiovascular disease in adult life. Arterial endothelial dysfunction often plays an important role in these diseases. The effects of two interventions that reduce fetal growth, chronic hypoxia and protein malnutrition, on arterial endothelial function were investigated. Eggs of White Leghorn chickens were incubated either in room air or in 15% O2 from d 6 until d 19 of the 21-d incubation. Protein malnutrition was induced by removal of 10% of the total albumen content at d 0. In vitro reactivity of the femoral artery in response to vasodilators was measured at d 19. Both chronic hypoxia and protein malnutrition reduced embryonic body weight at d 19 by 14% without affecting relative brain weight. Chronic hypoxia or protein malnutrition did not change sensitivity to the exogenous nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (5.74 +/- 0.15 versus 5.85 +/- 0.23 and 6.05 +/- 0.18 versus 6.01 +/- 0.34, respectively). Whereas protein malnutrition did not modify arterial sensitivity to acetylcholine (7.00 +/- 0.10 versus 7.12 +/- 0.05), chronic hypoxia reduced sensitivity to this endothelium-dependent vasodilator (6.57 +/- 0.07 versus 7.02 +/- 0.06). In the presence of Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, this difference in sensitivity to acetylcholine was no longer apparent (6.31 +/- 0.13 versus 6.27 +/- 0.06), indicating that chronic exposure to hypoxia reduced sensitivity to acetylcholine by lowering nitric oxide release. In additional experiments, a decrease in basal nitric oxide release in arteries of 3- to 4-wk-old chickens that had been exposed to in ovo chronic hypoxia was observed (increase in K+ contraction: -0.16 +/- 0.33 N/m versus 0.68 +/- 020 N/m). Protein malnutrition and chronic hypoxia both induce disproportionate growth retardation, but only the latter impairs arterial endothelial function. Intrauterine exposure to chronic hypoxia induces changes in arterial

  17. Endurance training enhances vasodilation induced by nitric oxide in human skin.

    PubMed

    Boegli, Yann; Gremion, Gerald; Golay, Sandrine; Kubli, Sandrine; Liaudet, Lucas; Leyvraz, Pierre-François; Waeber, Bernard; Feihl, François

    2003-11-01

    Endurance training modifies the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow, as manifested by a greater augmentation of skin perfusion for the same increase in core temperature in athletes, in comparison with sedentary subjects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a component of this adaptation might reside in a higher ability of cutaneous blood vessels to respond to vasodilatory stimuli. We recruited healthy nonsmoking males, either endurance trained or sedentary, in two different age ranges (18-35 y and >50 y). Skin blood flow was measured in the forearm skin, using a laser Doppler imager, allowing to record the vasodilatory responses to the following stimuli: iontophoresis of acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent vasodilator), iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside (a nitric oxide donor), and release of a temporary interruption of arterial inflow (reactive hyperemia). There was no effect of training on reactive hyperemia or the response to acetylcholine. In contrast, the increase in perfusion following the iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside, expressed in perfusion units, was larger in trained than in sedentary subjects (younger: 398 +/- 54 vs 350 +/- 87, p < 0.05; older 339 +/- 72 vs 307 +/- 66, p < 0.05). In conclusion, endurance training enhances the vasodilatory effects of nitric oxide in the human dermal microcirculation, at least in forearm skin. These observations have considerable physiologic interest in view of recent data indicating that nitric oxide mediates in part the cutaneous vasodilation induced by heat stress in humans. Therefore, the augmentation of nitric oxide bioactivity in the dermal microcirculation might be one mechanism whereby endurance training modifies the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow.

  18. Impaired muscarinic endothelium-dependent relaxation and cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate formation in atherosclerotic human coronary artery and rabbit aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Bossaller, C; Habib, G B; Yamamoto, H; Williams, C; Wells, S; Henry, P D

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of vascular relaxation on an intact endothelium and the relationship between relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation were determined in coronary arteries isolated from cardiac transplantation patients with or without coronary atherosclerosis. In nonatherosclerotic arteries, the endothelium-dependent agent acetylcholine produced concentration-related relaxations. In atherosclerotic arteries, endothelium-dependent relaxations were abolished with acetylcholine, partly suppressed with substance P and histamine, and completely preserved with the ionophore A23187. In these arteries, the endothelium-independent agent nitroglycerin remained fully active. Accumulation of cyclic GMP in atherosclerotic strips was suppressed with acetylcholine but unattenuated with A23187 and nitroglycerin. In aortas from rabbits with diet-induced atherosclerosis, there was likewise an impaired cholinergic relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation in the presence of preserved responses to A23187 and nitroglycerin. The results demonstrate that impaired cholinergic responses in atherosclerotic arteries reflect a muscarinic defect and not an inability of endothelium to release endothelial factor or smooth muscle to respond to it. PMID:2432088

  19. Endothelium-dependent control of cerebrovascular functions through age: exercise for healthy cerebrovascular aging.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Virginie; Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Thorin, Eric

    2013-09-01

    Cognitive performances are tightly associated with the maximal aerobic exercise capacity, both of which decline with age. The benefits on mental health of regular exercise, which slows the age-dependent decline in maximal aerobic exercise capacity, have been established for centuries. In addition, the maintenance of an optimal cerebrovascular endothelial function through regular exercise, part of a healthy lifestyle, emerges as one of the key and primary elements of successful brain aging. Physical exercise requires the activation of specific brain areas that trigger a local increase in cerebral blood flow to match neuronal metabolic needs. In this review, we propose three ways by which exercise could maintain the cerebrovascular endothelial function, a premise to a healthy cerebrovascular function and an optimal regulation of cerebral blood flow. First, exercise increases blood flow locally and increases shear stress temporarily, a known stimulus for endothelial cell maintenance of Akt-dependent expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide generation, and the expression of antioxidant defenses. Second, the rise in circulating catecholamines during exercise not only facilitates adequate blood and nutrient delivery by stimulating heart function and mobilizing energy supplies but also enhances endothelial repair mechanisms and angiogenesis. Third, in the long term, regular exercise sustains a low resting heart rate that reduces the mechanical stress imposed to the endothelium of cerebral arteries by the cardiac cycle. Any chronic variation from a healthy environment will perturb metabolism and thus hasten endothelial damage, favoring hypoperfusion and neuronal stress.

  20. Heme oxygenase 2: endothelial and neuronal localization and role in endothelium-dependent relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Zakhary, R; Gaine, S P; Dinerman, J L; Ruat, M; Flavahan, N A; Snyder, S H

    1996-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2), which synthesizes carbon monoxide (CO), has been localized by immunohistochemistry to endothelial cells and adventitial nerves of blood vessels. HO-2 is also localized to neurons in autonomic ganglia, including the petrosal, superior cervical, and nodose ganglia, as well as ganglia in the myenteric plexus of the intestine. Enzyme studies demonstrated that tin protoporphyrin-9 is a selective inhibitor of HO with approximately 10-fold selectivity for HO over endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase. Inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin 9 reverses the component of endothelial-derived relaxation of porcine distal pulmonary arteries not reversed by an inhibitor of NOS. Thus, CO, like NO, may have endothelial-derived relaxing activity. The similarity of NOS and HO-2 localizations and functions in blood vessels and the autonomic nervous system implies complementary and possibly coordinated physiologic roles for these two mediators. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8570637

  1. Nitric oxide mediates root K+/Na+ balance in a mangrove plant, Kandelia obovata, by enhancing the expression of AKT1-type K+ channel and Na+/H+ antiporter under high salinity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Xiong, Duan-Ye; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Xiao, Qiang; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that nitric oxide (NO) enhances salt tolerance of glycophytes. However, the effect of NO on modulating ionic balance in halophytes is not very clear. This study focuses on the role of NO in mediating K(+)/Na(+) balance in a mangrove species, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong. We first analyzed the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, on ion content and ion flux in the roots of K. obovata under high salinity. The results showed that 100 μM SNP significantly increased K(+) content and Na(+) efflux, but decreased Na(+) content and K(+) efflux. These effects of NO were reversed by specific NO synthesis inhibitor and scavenger, which confirmed the role of NO in retaining K(+) and reducing Na(+) in K. obovata roots. Using western-blot analysis, we found that NO increased the protein expression of plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, which were crucial proteins for ionic balance. To further clarify the molecular mechanism of NO-modulated K(+)/Na(+) balance, partial cDNA fragments of inward-rectifying K(+) channel, PM Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, PM H(+)-ATPase, vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit c were isolated. Results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that NO increased the relative expression levels of these genes, while this increase was blocked by NO synthesis inhibitors and scavenger. Above results indicate that NO greatly contribute to K(+)/Na(+) balance in high salinity-treated K. obovata roots, by activating AKT1-type K(+) channel and Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, which are the critical components in K(+)/Na(+) transport system.

  2. Endothelin A (ET(A)) receptors are involved in augmented adrenergic vasoconstriction and blunted nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of penile arteries from insulin-resistant obese zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ana; Contreras, Cristina; Martínez, Pilar; Muñoz, Mercedes; Martínez, Ana Cristina; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo; Prieto, Dolores

    2014-06-01

    Endothelin 1 (ET-1) levels and receptors are up-regulated in the erectile tissue of diabetic patients and animal models of erectile dysfunction (ED). The present study assessed the role of ET-1 receptors in the impaired adrenergic vasoconstriction and nitrergic relaxation of penile arteries from a rat model of insulin resistance. The effect of ET receptor antagonists was evaluated on the contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) of penile arteries from obese Zucker rats (OZRs) compared with lean Zucker rats (LZRs). ET receptor expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Changes in neural nitrergic relaxation and adrenergic vasoconstriction and the expression of ET receptors in perivascular nerves were assessed. ET-1 (10(-10)  M) enhanced EFS-induced vasoconstriction, and treatment with the adrenergic neurotoxin guanethidine reduced the contractions induced by ET-1 in penile arteries from both LZRs and OZRs, thus supporting the hypothesis that ET-1 releases noradrenaline from adrenergic nerves. ET-1 antagonized neural nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxant responses in LZR arteries, antagonizing relaxations induced by the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine to a larger extent in arteries from OZRs. ET(A) and ET(B) receptors were expressed in perivascular fibers colocalized with the neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 in penile arteries from OZRs. The ET(A) receptor antagonist BQ-123 reversed the enhancing effect of ET-1 on the vasoconstriction elicited by EFS and the ET-1-induced inhibition of nitrergic relaxations in LZRs, restoring them to control levels in penile arteries of OZRs. ET-1 enhances adrenergic vasoconstriction through presynaptic ET(A) receptors and antagonizes neural NO-mediated relaxation through postsynaptic smooth muscle ET(A) receptors in penile arteries from OZRs, which likely contributes to the augmented vasoconstriction and blunted nitrergic relaxation of erectile tissue under conditions of insulin resistance

  3. Nitric Oxide Mediates Root K+/Na+ Balance in a Mangrove Plant, Kandelia obovata, by Enhancing the Expression of AKT1-Type K+ Channel and Na+/H+ Antiporter under High Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Xiao, Qiang; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that nitric oxide (NO) enhances salt tolerance of glycophytes. However, the effect of NO on modulating ionic balance in halophytes is not very clear. This study focuses on the role of NO in mediating K+/Na+ balance in a mangrove species, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong. We first analyzed the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, on ion content and ion flux in the roots of K. obovata under high salinity. The results showed that 100 μM SNP significantly increased K+ content and Na+ efflux, but decreased Na+ content and K+ efflux. These effects of NO were reversed by specific NO synthesis inhibitor and scavenger, which confirmed the role of NO in retaining K+ and reducing Na+ in K. obovata roots. Using western-blot analysis, we found that NO increased the protein expression of plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter, which were crucial proteins for ionic balance. To further clarify the molecular mechanism of NO-modulated K+/Na+ balance, partial cDNA fragments of inward-rectifying K+ channel, PM Na+/H+ antiporter, PM H+-ATPase, vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter and vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit c were isolated. Results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that NO increased the relative expression levels of these genes, while this increase was blocked by NO synthesis inhibitors and scavenger. Above results indicate that NO greatly contribute to K+/Na+ balance in high salinity-treated K. obovata roots, by activating AKT1-type K+ channel and Na+/H+ antiporter, which are the critical components in K+/Na+ transport system. PMID:23977070

  4. 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate and tetrahydrobiopterin can modulate electrotonically mediated endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Tudor M; Chaytor, Andrew T; Bakker, Linda M; Edwards, David H

    2005-05-10

    We have investigated the ability of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) to modulate nitric oxide (NO)-independent vascular relaxations that are mediated by the sequential spread of endothelial hyperpolarization through the wall of the rabbit iliac artery by means of myoendothelial and homocellular smooth muscle gap junctions. Relaxations and subintimal smooth muscle hyperpolarizations evoked by cyclopiazonic acid were depressed by the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, whose effects were prevented by 5-MTHF and BH(4), but not by their oxidized forms folic acid and 7,8-dihydrobiopterin. Analogously, 5-MTHF and BH(4), but not folic acid or 7,8-dihydrobiopterin, attenuated the depression of subintimal hyperpolarization by a connexin-mimetic peptide targeted against Cx37 and Cx40 ((37,40)Gap 26) and the depression of subadventitial hyperpolarization by a peptide targeted against Cx43 ((43)Gap 26), thus reflecting the known differential expression of Cx37 and Cx40 in the endothelium and Cx43 in the media of the rabbit iliac artery. The inhibitory effects of 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and (37,40)Gap 26 against subintimal hyperpolarization were prevented by catalase, which destroys H(2)O(2). 5-MTHF and BH(4) thus appear capable of modulating electrotonic signaling by means of myoendothelial and smooth muscle gap junctions by reducing oxidant stress, potentially conferring an ability to reverse the endothelial dysfunction found in disease states through mechanisms that are independent of NO.

  5. The Gatekeepers in the Mouse Ophthalmic Artery: Endothelium-Dependent Mechanisms of Cholinergic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Manicam, Caroline; Staubitz, Julia; Brochhausen, Christoph; Grus, Franz H; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Gericke, Adrian

    2016-02-02

    Cholinergic regulation of arterial luminal diameter involves intricate network of intercellular communication between the endothelial and smooth muscle cells that is highly dependent on the molecular mediators released by the endothelium. Albeit the well-recognized contribution of nitric oxide (NO) towards vasodilation, the identity of compensatory mechanisms that maintain vasomotor tone when NO synthesis is deranged remain largely unknown in the ophthalmic artery. This is the first study to identify the vasodilatory signalling mechanisms of the ophthalmic artery employing wild type mice. Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasodilation was only partially attenuated when NO synthesis was inhibited. Intriguingly, the combined blocking of cytochrome P450 oxygenase (CYP450) and lipoxygenase (LOX), as well as CYP450 and gap junctions, abolished vasodilation; demonstrating that the key compensatory mechanisms comprise arachidonic acid metabolites which, work in concert with gap junctions for downstream signal transmission. Furthermore, the voltage-gated potassium ion channel, Kv1.6, was functionally relevant in mediating vasodilation. Its localization was found exclusively in the smooth muscle. In conclusion, ACh-induced vasodilation of mouse ophthalmic artery is mediated in part by NO and predominantly via arachidonic acid metabolites, with active involvement of gap junctions. Particularly, the Kv1.6 channel represents an attractive therapeutic target in ophthalmopathologies when NO synthesis is compromised.

  6. The Gatekeepers in the Mouse Ophthalmic Artery: Endothelium-Dependent Mechanisms of Cholinergic Vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Manicam, Caroline; Staubitz, Julia; Brochhausen, Christoph; Grus, Franz H.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Gericke, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic regulation of arterial luminal diameter involves intricate network of intercellular communication between the endothelial and smooth muscle cells that is highly dependent on the molecular mediators released by the endothelium. Albeit the well-recognized contribution of nitric oxide (NO) towards vasodilation, the identity of compensatory mechanisms that maintain vasomotor tone when NO synthesis is deranged remain largely unknown in the ophthalmic artery. This is the first study to identify the vasodilatory signalling mechanisms of the ophthalmic artery employing wild type mice. Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasodilation was only partially attenuated when NO synthesis was inhibited. Intriguingly, the combined blocking of cytochrome P450 oxygenase (CYP450) and lipoxygenase (LOX), as well as CYP450 and gap junctions, abolished vasodilation; demonstrating that the key compensatory mechanisms comprise arachidonic acid metabolites which, work in concert with gap junctions for downstream signal transmission. Furthermore, the voltage-gated potassium ion channel, Kv1.6, was functionally relevant in mediating vasodilation. Its localization was found exclusively in the smooth muscle. In conclusion, ACh-induced vasodilation of mouse ophthalmic artery is mediated in part by NO and predominantly via arachidonic acid metabolites, with active involvement of gap junctions. Particularly, the Kv1.6 channel represents an attractive therapeutic target in ophthalmopathologies when NO synthesis is compromised. PMID:26831940

  7. Interleukin-6 impairs endothelium-dependent NO-cGMP-mediated relaxation and enhances contraction in systemic vessels of pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Orshal, Julia M; Khalil, Raouf A

    2004-06-01

    IL-6 is elevated in plasma of preeclamptic women, and twofold elevation of plasma IL-6 increases vascular resistance and arterial pressure in pregnant rats, suggesting a role of the cytokine in hypertension of pregnancy. However, whether the hemodynamic effects of IL-6 reflect direct effects of the cytokine on the mechanisms of vascular contraction/relaxation is unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that IL-6 directly impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation and enhances vascular contraction in systemic vessels of pregnant rats. Active stress was measured in aortic strips isolated from virgin and late pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats and then nontreated or treated for 1 h with IL-6 (10 pg/ml to 10 ng/ml). In endothelium-intact vascular strips, phenylephrine (Phe, 10(-5) M) caused an increase in active stress that was smaller in pregnant (4.2 +/- 0.3) than virgin rats (5.1 +/- 0.3 x 10(4) N/m(2)). IL-6 (1,000 pg/ml) caused enhancement of Phe contraction that was greater in pregnant (10.6 +/- 0.7) than virgin rats (7.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(4) N/m(2)). ACh and bradykinin caused relaxation of Phe contraction and increases in vascular nitrite production that were greater in pregnant than virgin rats. IL-6 caused reductions in ACh- and bradykinin-induced vascular relaxation and nitrite production that were more prominent in pregnant than virgin rats. Incubation of endothelium-intact strips in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-4) M) to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthase, or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3]-quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10(-5) M) to inhibit cGMP production in smooth muscle, inhibited ACh-induced relaxation and enhanced Phe-induced stress in nontreated but to a lesser extent in IL-6-treated vessels, particularly those of pregnant rats. Removal of the endothelium enhanced Phe-induced stress in nontreated but not IL-6-treated vessels, particularly those of pregnant rats. In endothelium-denuded strips, relaxation of Phe contraction with

  8. Chicago sky blue and a helium neon laser abolish endothelium dependent relaxation in vivo in the microcirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, H.; Nelson, G.H.; Rosenblum, W.I. )

    1989-12-01

    Chicago sky blue, also known as Niagara sky blue, is a vital dye that can successfully be used as an intravascular energy absorbing target for the light from a helium-neon (HeNe) laser. The result of this light/dye interaction is endothelium damage which can be controlled by adjusting the duration of the laser exposure and the amount of dye injected intravenously. The endothelial damage probably is the result of the heat generated by the dyes absorption of energy at the interface between plasma and endothelium. The most minimal damage resulted in selective loss of the dilation normally produced by acetylcholine and bradykinin, two endothelium dependent dilators. The dilation produced by sodium nitroprusside, a dilator acting directly on vascular smooth muscle, was preserved. More severe injury (i.e. more prolonged exposure to light and/or more dye), resulted in local platelet aggregation at the site of laser impact.

  9. Chicago sky blue and a helium neon laser abolish endothelium dependent relaxation in vivo in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, H; Nelson, G H; Rosenblum, W I

    1989-12-01

    Chicago sky blue, also known as Niagara sky blue, is a vital dye that can successfully be used as an intravascular energy absorbing target for the light from a helium-neon (HeNe) laser. The result of this light/dye interaction is endothelium damage which can be controlled by adjusting the duration of the laser exposure and the amount of dye injected intravenously. The endothelial damage probably is the result of the heat generated by the dyes absorption of energy at the interface between plasma and endothelium. The most minimal damage resulted in selective loss of the dilation normally produced by acetylcholine and bradykinin, two endothelium dependent dilators. The dilation produced by sodium nitroprusside, a dilator acting directly on vascular smooth muscle, was preserved. More severe injury (i.e. more prolonged exposure to light and/or more dye, resulted in local platelet aggregation at the site of laser impact.

  10. Contribution of prostanoids to endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in the digital circulation of women with primary Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Easter, Melanie J; Marshall, Janice M

    2005-07-01

    In 15 women with PR (primary Raynaud's) disease and in 15 matched control women, ACh (acetylcholine) was delivered by iontophoresis to the dorsum of the finger (seven 20 s pulses of 0.1 mA, followed by one 20 s pulse of 0.2 mA, applied at 60 s intervals). Cutaneous RCF (red cell flux) was recorded from the same site by the laser Doppler technique. ACh evoked progressive increases in RCF that were comparable in pre- and post-menopausal women with PR [maxima of 294+/-113 and 259+/-59 pu (perfusion units) respectively, n = 7 and 8 respectively], and in pre-menopausal controls (225+/-92 pu, n = 7), but smaller in post-menopausal controls (140+/-63 pu, n = 8; P < 0.05). Aspirin (600 mg, orally), a COX (cyclo-oxygenase) inhibitor, potentiated the ACh-evoked dilator responses in pre- and post-menopausal women with PR (343+/-129 and 311+/-48 pu respectively) and post-menopausal controls (277+/-124 pu; P < 0.05), but had no effect in pre-menopausal controls (225+/-92 pu). These results suggest that vasoconstrictor COX products limit ACh-evoked endothelium-dependent cutaneous dilatation in the digits in pre- and post-menopausal women with PR and in post-menopausal, but not pre-menopausal, control women. We propose that PR disease is associated with abnormality in the ability of oestrogen to modulate the synthesis of endothelium-dependent vasodilator and/or vasoconstrictor COX products.

  11. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher P.; Hind, William H.; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Methods and results Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. PMID:26092099

  12. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christopher P; Hind, William H; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼ 40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  13. Endothelium-dependent responses in coronary arteries are changed with puberty in male pigs.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Ritu; Ronningen, Karen L; Severson, Sandra R; LaBreche, Peter; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Bracamonte, Margarita P; Miller, Virginia M

    2003-09-01

    In humans, cardiovascular disease begins in young adulthood and is more prevalent in males than females. However, little is known about vascular function during transition to adulthood in males. The aim of this study was to define changes in production of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) and coronary arterial responses during puberty. Plasma was collected from juvenile (2-3 mo of age) and adult (5-6 mo of age) male pigs (n = 8/group) for measurement of NO, and aortic endothelial cells were collected for measurement of mRNA and protein for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Although plasma NO was higher in juvenile (67.0 +/- 25.6 microM) than in adult (15.0 +/- 7.1 microM) male pigs, eNOS protein was similar in both groups. However, levels of mRNA for eNOS were lower in aortic endothelial cells from juvenile pigs. In rings of coronary arteries suspended in organ chambers for measurement of isometric force and contracted with PGF2alpha, relaxations to an alpha2-adrenergic agonist were significantly inhibited by indomethacin only in juvenile pigs [EC50 (-log M), 6.7 +/- 0.3 with indomethacin and 7.7 +/- 0.3 under control conditions]. NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) inhibited relaxations in both groups. On the contrary, in the presence of indomethacin, relaxations to bradykinin were inhibited by l-NMMA only in arteries from adult pigs [EC50 (-log M), 8.9 +/- 0.3 with indomethacin and 8.6 +/- 0.3 with addition of l-NMMA]. These results suggest that hormonal changes associated with sexual maturity may affect posttranscriptional and/or translational regulation of eNOS protein and result in lower plasma NO in adult male pigs. In addition, endothelium-derived inhibitory cyclooxygenase products seem to predominate in juveniles.

  14. Reduced Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation to Anandamide in Mesenteric Arteries from Young Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Nubia S.; Filgueira, Fernando P.; Prakash, Roshini; Giachini, Fernanda R.; Ergul, Adviye; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Webb, R. Clinton; Tostes, Rita C.; Fortes, Zuleica B.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired vascular function, manifested by an altered ability of the endothelium to release endothelium-derived relaxing factors and endothelium-derived contracting factors, is consistently reported in obesity. Considering that the endothelium plays a major role in the relaxant response to the cannabinoid agonist anandamide, the present study tested the hypothesis that vascular relaxation to anandamide is decreased in obese rats. Mechanisms contributing to decreased anandamide-induced vasodilation were determined. Resistance mesenteric arteries from young obese Zucker rats (OZRs) and their lean counterparts (LZRs) were used. Vascular reactivity was evaluated in a myograph for isometric tension recording. Protein expression and localization were analyzed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence, respectively. Vasorelaxation to anandamide, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside, as well as to CB1, CB2, and TRPV1 agonists was decreased in endothelium-intact mesenteric arteries from OZRs. Incubation with an AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) activator or a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor restored anandamide-induced vascular relaxation in OZRs. CB1 and CB2 receptors protein expression was decreased in arteries from OZRs. Incubation of mesenteric arteries with anandamide evoked endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), AMPK and acetyl CoA carboxylase phosphorylation in LZRs, whereas it decreased phosphorylation of these proteins in OZRs. In conclusion, obesity decreases anandamide-induced relaxation in resistance arteries. Decreased cannabinoid receptors expression, increased anandamide degradation, decreased AMPK/eNOS activity as well as impairment of the response mediated by TRPV1 activation seem to contribute to reduce responses to cannabinoid agonists in obesity. PMID:23667622

  15. Retrospectively gated MRI for in vivo assessment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and endothelial permeability in murine models of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bar, Anna; Skórka, Tomasz; Jasiński, Krzysztof; Sternak, Magdalena; Bartel, Żaneta; Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is linked to impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and permeability changes. Here, we quantify both of these phenomena associated with endothelial dysfunction by MRI in vivo in mice. Endothelial function was evaluated in the brachiocephalic artery (BCA) and left carotid artery (LCA) in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice as compared with control mice (C57BL/6J). The 3D IntraGate® FLASH sequence was used for evaluation of changes in vessels' cross-sectional area (CSA) and volume following acetylcholine (Ach) administration. Evaluation of endothelial permeability after administration of contrast agent (Galbumin, BioPAL) was based on the variable flip angle method for the assessment of parameters based on the relaxation time (T1 ) value. In order to confirm the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in response to Ach, L-NAME-treated mice were also analyzed. To confirm that endothelial permeability changes accompany the impairment of Ach-dependent vasodilatation, permeability changes were analyzed in isolated, perfused carotid artery. In C57BL/6J mice, Ach-induced vasodilatation led to an approximately 25% increase in CSA in both vessels, which was temporarily dissociated from the effect of Ach on heart rate. In ApoE/LDLR(-/-) or HFD-fed mice Ach induced a paradoxical vasoconstriction that amounted to approximately 30% and 50% decreases in CSA of BCA and LCA respectively. In ApoE/LDLR(-/-) and HFD-fed mice endothelial permeability in BCA was also increased (fall in T1 by about 25%). In L-NAME-treated mice Ach-induced vasodilatation in BCA was lost. In isolated, perfused artery from ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice endothelial permeability was increased. MRI-based assessment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation induced by Ach and endothelial permeability using a retrospectively self-gated 3D gradient-echo sequence (IntraGate® FLASH) enables the reliable detection of systemic endothelial dysfunction in mice and provides an important tool

  16. Anti-ischemic activity and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant effect of hydrolysable tannins from the leaves of Rhus coriaria (Sumac) in isolated rabbit heart and thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Giangiacomo; Rossoni, Giuseppe; Santagati, Natale Alfredo; Facino, Roberto Maffei

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the cardioprotective activity of hydrolysable gallotannins from Rhus coriaria L. leaves extract (RCLE) in isolated rabbit heart preparations, submitted to low-flow ischemia/reperfusion damage. RCLE induces a dose-dependent normalization of coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), reducing left ventricular contracture during ischemia, and improving left ventricular developed pressure and the maximum rate of rise and fall of left ventricular pressure at reperfusion. Creatinine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) outflow were significantly reduced during reperfusion. In parallel there was a rise in the release of the cytoprotective 6-ketoprostaglandin F (1alpha) (6-keto-PGF (1alpha)) and a decrease of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), both significant only at the highest RCLE concentrations (150-500 microg/mL). The vasorelaxant activity of RCLE was studied in isolated rabbit aorta rings precontracted with norepinephrine (NE) with and without endothelium. The vasorelaxation induced by RCLE was predominantly endothelium-dependent as demonstrated by the loss of RCLE vasorelaxant ability in i) de-endothelized rings and ii) in intact aortic rings after pretreatment with NG-monomethyl- L-arginine (L-NMMA) and 1 H-[1.2.4]oxadiazolo[4.3- A]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). The inhibition of vasorelaxation in intact rings by indomethacin (INDO) demonstrates the ability of RCLE to modulate the coronary endothelium cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. The K-ATP channel antagonist glibenclamide (GLIB) was ineffective. The antioxidant activity of RCLE, investigated in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) model and in living cell systems (rat erythrocytes), was stronger than that of gallic acid, ascorbic acid and trolox. The structure of its main bioactive constituents, profiled by HPLC-ESI-HR-S, comprised a mixture of polygalloylated D-glucopyranose with different degrees of galloylation and 3- O-methylgallic acid. The cardiovascular protective

  17. Evidence that A2 purinoceptors are involved in endothelium-dependent relaxation of the rat thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Rose'Meyer, R. B.; Hope, W.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of adenosine and some adenosine analogues on the isolated thoracic aorta from rats was compared with the effect of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP). 2. Both ATP and adenosine analogues caused relaxation of the noradrenaline (30 nM)-contracted thoracic aorta. 3. The order of potency for adenosine analogues was 5'-(N-ethyl) carboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than L-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine (L-PIA), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine indicating the presence of adenosine A2 receptors. 4. Removal of the endothelium or prior treatment with haemoglobin (10 microM) attenuated relaxant responses to both ATP and NECA, attenuation being greater for ATP than NECA. 5. 8-Phenyltheophylline (10 microM) reduced relaxant responses to NECA but not to ATP in the intact tissue. 6. These results provide evidence that there are two components to relaxation of the rat thoracic aorta induced by purinoceptor agonists. The first is an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving release of endothelium-derived relaxant factor (EDRF) and the second is due to a direct effect on smooth muscle. PMID:2390681

  18. Effects of Buddhism walking meditation on depression, functional fitness, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in depressed elderly.

    PubMed

    Prakhinkit, Susaree; Suppapitiporn, Siriluck; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Suksom, Daroonwan

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of the novel Buddhism-based walking meditation (BWM) and the traditional walking exercise (TWE) on depression, functional fitness, and vascular reactivity. This was a randomized exercise intervention study. The study was conducted in a university hospital setting. Forty-five elderly participants aged 60-90 years with mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms were randomly allocated to the sedentary control, TWE, and BWM groups. The BWM program was based on aerobic walking exercise incorporating the Buddhist meditations performed 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Depression score, functional fitness, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation as measured by the flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were the outcome measures used. Muscle strength, flexibility, agility, dynamic balance, and cardiorespiratory endurance increased in both exercise groups (p<0.05). Depression score decreased (p<0.05) only in the BWM group. FMD improved (p<0.05) in both exercise groups. Significant reduction in plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein were found in both exercise groups, whereas low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, cortisol, and interleukin-6 concentrations decreased only in the BWM group. Buddhist walking meditation was effective in reducing depression, improving functional fitness and vascular reactivity, and appears to confer greater overall improvements than the traditional walking program.

  19. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  20. Nitric oxide mediates local activity-dependent excitatory synapse development.

    PubMed

    Nikonenko, Irina; Nikonenko, Alexander; Mendez, Pablo; Michurina, Tatyana V; Enikolopov, Grigori; Muller, Dominique

    2013-10-29

    Learning related paradigms play an important role in shaping the development and specificity of synaptic networks, notably by regulating mechanisms of spine growth and pruning. The molecular events underlying these synaptic rearrangements remain poorly understood. Here we identify NO signaling as a key mediator of activity-dependent excitatory synapse development. We find that chronic blockade of NO production in vitro and in vivo interferes with the development of hippocampal and cortical excitatory spine synapses. The effect results from a selective loss of activity-mediated spine growth mechanisms and is associated with morphological and functional alterations of remaining synapses. These effects of NO are mediated by a cGMP cascade and can be reproduced or prevented by postsynaptic expression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phospho-mimetic or phospho-resistant mutants. In vivo analyses show that absence of NO prevents the increase in excitatory synapse density induced by environmental enrichment and interferes with the formation of local clusters of excitatory synapses. We conclude that NO plays an important role in regulating the development of excitatory synapses by promoting local activity-dependent spine-growth mechanisms.

  1. Brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L induces endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of rat aortic rings

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu; Chen, Yu-cai; Lin, Yi-huang; Guo, Jing; Niu, Zi-ran; Li, Li; Wang, Shou-bao; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Brazilin is one of the major constituents of Caesalpinia sappan L with various biological activities. This study sought to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of brazilin on isolated rat thoracic aorta and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Endothelium-intact and -denuded aortic rings were prepared from rats. The tension of the preparations was recorded isometrically with a force displacement transducer connected to a polygraph. The phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and myosin light chain (MLC) were analyzed using Western blotting assay. Results: Application of brazilin (10–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently relaxed the NE- or high K+-induced sustained contraction of endothelium-intact aortic rings (the EC50 was 83.51±5.6 and 79.79±4.57 μmol/L, respectively). The vasorelaxant effect of brazilin was significantly attenuated by endothelium removal or by pre-incubation with L-NAME, methylene blue or indomethacin. In addition, pre-incubation with brazilin dose-dependently attenuated the vasoconstriction induced by KCl, NE or Ang II. Pre-incubation with brazilin also markedly suppressed the high K+-induced extracellular Ca2+ influx and NE-induced intracellular Ca2+ release in endothelium-denuded aortic rings. Pre-incubation with brazilin dose-dependently inhibited the NE-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and MLC in both endothelium-intact and -denuded aortic rings. Conclusion: Brazilin induces relaxation in rat aortic rings via both endothelium-dependent and -independent ways as well as inhibiting NE-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and MLC. Brazilin also attenuates vasoconstriction via blocking voltage- and receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. PMID:26564314

  2. Long-lasting endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated arteries caused by an extract from the bark of Combretum leprosum

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Francisco das Chagas; Cavalcanti, Paulo Marques da Silva; Passaglia, Rita de Cassia Aleixo Tostes; Ballejo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe and to characterize the relaxing effect of an extract of the bark of Combretum leprosum on isolated arterial rings from different animals. Methods Rings (3 to 4mm) from rabbit, rat, or porcine arteries rings were suspended in an organ bath (Krebs, 37°C, 95%O2/5%CO2) to record isometric contractions. After the stabilization period (2 to 3 hours) contractions were induced by the addition of phenylephrine (0.1 to 0.3µM) or U46619 (10 to 100nM), and Combretum leprosum extract was added on the plateau of the contractions. Experiments were performed to determine the potency, duration, reversibility, and to get insights on the potential mechanism involved in extract-induced relaxations. Results In all rings tested, Combretumleprosum extract (1.5μg/mL) was able to cause relaxations, which were strictly endothelium-dependent. In rabbit or rat thoracic aorta rings, the relaxations were reversed by vitamin B12a or L-NG-nitroarginine. In porcine right coronary arteries and rabbit abdominal aorta, extract caused both L-NG-nitroarginine-sensitive and L-NG-nitroarginine-resistant relaxations. In rabbit thoracic aorta, the extract was relatively potent (EC50=0.20µg/mL) and caused relaxations; intriguingly the endothelium continued to produce relaxing factors for a long period after removing the extract. The magnitude of extract-induced relaxations was significantly reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca2+; in addition, the TRPs channels blocker ruthenium red (10µM) was able to revert extract-induced relaxations. Phytochemical analyses indicated that the extract was rich in polyphenol-like reacting substances. Conclusions Combretum leprosum extract contains bioactive compounds capable of promoting Ca2+-dependent stimulation of endothelial cells which results in a prolonged production of relaxing factors. PMID:26466063

  3. Endothelium-dependent relaxation evoked by ATP and UTP in the aorta of P2Y2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Guns, Pieter-Jan D F; Van Assche, Tim; Fransen, Paul; Robaye, Bernard; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Bult, Hidde

    2006-03-01

    Based on pharmacological criteria, we previously suggested that in the mouse aorta, endothelium-dependent relaxation by nucleotides is mediated by P2Y1 (adenosine diphosphate (ADP)), P2Y2 (adenosine triphosphate (ATP)) and P2Y6 (uridine diphosphate (UDP)) receptors. For UTP, it was unclear whether P2Y2, P2Y6 or yet another subtype was involved. Therefore, in view of the lack of selective purinergic agonists and antagonists, we used P2Y2-deficient mice to clarify the action of UTP. Thoracic aorta segments (width 2 mm) of P2Y2-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice were mounted in organ baths to measure isometric force development and intracellular calcium signalling. Relaxations evoked by ADP, UDP and acetylcholine were identical in knockout and WT mice, indicating that the receptors for these agonists function normally. P2Y2-deficient mice showed impaired ATP- and adenosine 5'[gamma-thio] triphosphate (ATPgammaS)-evoked relaxation, suggesting that in WT mice, ATP and ATPgammaS activate predominantly the P2Y2 subtype. The ATP/ATPgammaS-evoked relaxation and calcium signals in the knockout mice were partially rescued by P2Y1, as they were sensitive to 2'-deoxy-N6-methyladenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate (MRS2179), a P2Y1-selective antagonist. In contrast to ATP, the UTP-evoked relaxation was not different between knockout and WT mice. Moreover, the action of UTP was not sensitive to MRS2179. Therefore, the action of UTP is probably mediated mainly by a P2Y6(like) receptor subtype. In conclusion, we demonstrated that ATP-evoked relaxation of the murine aorta is mainly mediated by P2Y2. But this P2Y2 receptor has apparently no major role in UTP-evoked relaxation. The vasodilator effect of UTP is probably mediated mainly by a P2Y6(like) receptor.

  4. Involvement of thromboxane A2 in the endothelium-dependent contractions induced by myricetin in rat isolated aorta

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Rosario; Andriambeloson, Emile; Duarte, Juan; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Jiménez, José; Pérez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Tamargo, Juan

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to analyse the mechanism of the contractile response induced by the bioflavonoid myricetin in isolated rat aortic rings.Myricetin induced endothelium-dependent contractile responses (maximal value=21±2% of the response induced by 80 mM KCl and pD2=5.12±0.03). This effect developed slowly, reached a peak within 6 min and then declined progressively.Myricetin-induced contractions were almost abolished by the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor, quinacrine (10 μM), the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (10 μM), the thromboxane synthase inhibitor, dazoxiben (100 μM), the putative thromboxane A2 (TXA2)/prostaglandin endoperoxide receptor antagonist, ifetroban (3 μM). These contractions were abolished in Ca2+-free medium but were not affected by the Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil (10 μM).In cultured bovine endothelial cells (BAEC), myricetin (50 μM) produced an increase in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i) which peaked within 1 min and remained sustained for 6 min, as determined by the fluorescent probe fura 2. This rise in [Ca2+]i was abolished after removal of extracellular Ca2+ in the medium.Myricetin (50 μM) significantly increased TXB2 production both in aortic rings with and without endothelium and in BAEC. These increases were abolished both by Ca2+-free media and by indomethacin.Taken together, these results suggests that myricetin stimulates Ca2+ influx and subsequently triggers the activation of the PLA2 and cyclo-oxygenase pathways releasing TXA2 from the endothelium to contract rat aortic rings. The latter response occurs via the activation of Tp receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:10455307

  5. Great heterogeneity of commercial fruit juices to induce endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated porcine coronary arteries: role of the phenolic content and composition.

    PubMed

    Auger, Cyril; Pollet, Brigitte; Arnold, Cécile; Marx, Céline; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2015-01-01

    Since polyphenol-rich products such as red wine, grape juice, and grape extracts have been shown to induce potent endothelium-dependent relaxations, we have evaluated whether commercial fruit juices such as those from berries are also able to induce endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated coronary arteries and, if so, to determine whether this effect is related to their phenolic content. Among the 51 fruit juices tested, 2/12 grape juices, 3/7 blackcurrant juices, 4/5 cranberry juices, 1/6 apple juices, 0/5 orange juices, 2/6 red fruit and berry juices, 3/6 blends of red fruit juices, and 0/4 non-red fruit juices were able to induce relaxations achieving more than 50% at a volume of 1%. The active fruit juices had phenolic contents ranging from 0.31 to 1.86 g GAE/L, which were similar to those of most of the less active juices with the exception of one active grape juice (2.14 g GAE/L) and one active blend of red fruit juices (3.48 g GAE/L). Altogether, these findings indicate that very few commercial fruit juices have the ability to induce potent endothelium-dependent relaxations, and that this effect is not related to their quantitative phenolic content, but rather to their qualitative phenolic composition.

  6. Endothelium-dependent relaxation and hyperpolarization of canine coronary artery smooth muscles in relation to the electrogenic Na-K pump.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G.; Hashitani, H.; Suzuki, H.

    1989-01-01

    1 In the smooth muscle cells of canine coronary artery, acetylcholine (ACh) produced a transient, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization of the membrane. A similar hyperpolarization was also elicited by exposure to Krebs solution after incubation of the artery in K-free solution for 30 min. 2 A hyperpolarization of reproducible amplitude was generated when ACh was applied at intervals greater than 30 min. Repetitive application of ACh at 15 min intervals caused a successive reduction in the amplitude of hyperpolarization. 3 The reduction in the amplitude of relaxation during five successive applications of ACh at 15 min intervals was less than 10% of the first relaxation. 4 The ACh-induced hyperpolarization was blocked by atropine but not by ouabain, whereas the K-free induced hyperpolarization was blocked by ouabain. In low Na (Li-substituted) solution, ACh still induced a hyperpolarization but the K-free induced hyperpolarization was absent. 5 In coronary artery precontracted by high-K solution, ACh produced an endothelium-dependent relaxation, without membrane hyperpolarization. The associated relaxation was resistant to ouabain but sensitive to atropine. 6 It is concluded that in the canine coronary artery, the electrogenic Na-K pump does not contribute to the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization or relaxation. The results are consistent with the release of two different inhibitory factors from the vascular endothelium. PMID:2590775

  7. Long-term Treatment with Hesperidin Improves Endothelium-dependent Vasodilation in Femoral Artery of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: The Involvement of NO-synthase and Kv Channels.

    PubMed

    Dobiaš, Lukáš; Petrová, Miriam; Vojtko, Róbert; Kristová, Viera

    2016-10-01

    Hesperidin is the most common flavonoid found in citrus fruits and is expected to exert vasodilation action relevant to its health benefits. The present study aimed to explore the effect of hesperidin on the vascular responses in normotensive and hypertensive rats and the involvement of NO-synthase and Kv channels. The 15-week-old Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were randomized to orally receive either hesperidin (50 mg/kg/day) or a corresponding volume of the water for 4 weeks. Vascular responses of isolated femoral arteries were studied with myograph in control conditions and during inhibition of NO-synthase with l-NNA and Kv channels with 4-AP. Hesperidin had no effect on blood pressure. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Wistar and SHR was significantly improved by the treatment with hesperidin. The contraction responses after l-NNA were increased in all groups of rats to similar extent, but relaxatory responses were significantly attenuated only in SHR. The inhibition of Kv channels significantly reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatory responses in only in SHR administered with hesperidin. The results of our experiment indicate that hesperidin might improve the endothelium-dependent vasodilation during hypertension, possibly through the enhancement of Kv channels function. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Endothelial Cell-Derived Nitric Oxide Mobilization is Attenuated in Copper-Deficient Rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The attenuation of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is a consistent finding in both conduit and resistance vessels during dietary Cu deficiency. While the effect is well established, evidence for the mechanism is still circumstantial. This study was designed to determine...

  9. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  10. Endothelium-dependent relaxation evoked by ATP and UTP in the aorta of P2Y2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Guns, Pieter-Jan D F; Van Assche, Tim; Fransen, Paul; Robaye, Bernard; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Bult, Hidde

    2006-01-01

    Based on pharmacological criteria, we previously suggested that in the mouse aorta, endothelium-dependent relaxation by nucleotides is mediated by P2Y1 (adenosine diphosphate (ADP)), P2Y2 (adenosine triphosphate (ATP)) and P2Y6 (uridine diphosphate (UDP)) receptors. For UTP, it was unclear whether P2Y2, P2Y6 or yet another subtype was involved. Therefore, in view of the lack of selective purinergic agonists and antagonists, we used P2Y2-deficient mice to clarify the action of UTP. Thoracic aorta segments (width 2 mm) of P2Y2-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice were mounted in organ baths to measure isometric force development and intracellular calcium signalling. Relaxations evoked by ADP, UDP and acetylcholine were identical in knockout and WT mice, indicating that the receptors for these agonists function normally. P2Y2-deficient mice showed impaired ATP- and adenosine 5′[γ-thio] triphosphate (ATPγS)-evoked relaxation, suggesting that in WT mice, ATP and ATPγS activate predominantly the P2Y2 subtype. The ATP/ATPγS-evoked relaxation and calcium signals in the knockout mice were partially rescued by P2Y1, as they were sensitive to 2′-deoxy-N6-methyladenosine 3′,5′-bisphosphate (MRS2179), a P2Y1-selective antagonist. In contrast to ATP, the UTP-evoked relaxation was not different between knockout and WT mice. Moreover, the action of UTP was not sensitive to MRS2179. Therefore, the action of UTP is probably mediated mainly by a P2Y6(like) receptor subtype. In conclusion, we demonstrated that ATP-evoked relaxation of the murine aorta is mainly mediated by P2Y2. But this P2Y2 receptor has apparently no major role in UTP-evoked relaxation. The vasodilator effect of UTP is probably mediated mainly by a P2Y6(like) receptor. PMID:16415908

  11. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) relaxes the isolated rat thoracic aorta through endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Young Joo; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2011-11-18

    The rhizome of the Cimicifuga racemosa (commonly known as black cohosh) has been used in treatment of climacteric complaints for decades in North America and Europe. A number of studies investigated the estrogenic potential of black cohosh, but its effectiveness is still controversial. Recently, it was reported that the extract of black cohosh acted as an agonist at the serotonin (5-HT) receptor and 5-HT derivative was isolated out of the black cohosh extract. Because it is well known that the 5-HT elicited the various cardiovascular effects including vasorelaxation, we investigated the vasorelaxant effects of the extract of black cohosh and its possible mechanisms of action. The extract of black cohosh (BcEx) was examined for its vasorelaxant effects in isolated rat aorta. The aortic rings were equilibrated under resting tension and induced reproducible contraction in organ bath. The control contraction was produced by 300 nM NE, and then BcEx were added. In experiments where specific inhibitors were used, they were added 20 min before NE contraction. BcEx elicited two phases of relaxation in rat aorta pre-contracted with norepinephrine. The first, a rapid relaxation, which occurred within seconds of BcEx administration, was eliminated by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA) or methylene blue. The endogenous NO synthase substrate l-Arg markedly reversed the action of l-NNA, indicating that BcEx elicited the vasorelaxant effect via the NO/cGMP pathway. The second, slowly developing relaxation was not affected by the endothelium denudation. BcEx-induced endothelium-independent vasorelaxation appears to involve the inhibition of calcium influx mediated by the opening of inward rectifier potassium channels. BcEx elicits the vasorelaxant effect via endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms and may contribute to a better understanding of a potential link between the use of black cohosh and its beneficial effects on vascular health. Copyright © 2011

  12. Pomegranate Extract Enhances Endothelium-Dependent Coronary Relaxation in Isolated Perfused Hearts from Spontaneously Hypertensive Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Nathalie T. B.; Rouver, Wender do N.; Freitas-Lima, Leandro C.; de Paula, Tiago D.-C.; Duarte, Andressa; Silva, Josiane F.; Lemos, Virgínia S.; Santos, Alexandre M. C.; Mauad, Helder; Santos, Roger L.; Moysés, Margareth R.

    2017-01-01

    prevented the decreasing in plasmatic nitrite. We observed a reduction in total cholesterol and LDL in the Sham-PHE group. The treatment with PHE enhances the endothelium-dependent coronary relaxation and improves cardiovascular parameters, which suggests a therapeutic role of PHE. PMID:28101057

  13. Endomorphins restored the endothelium-dependent relaxation of the rabbit aorta rings exposed to high D-glucose condition via NO-cGMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Wei-Min; Che, Juan-Juan; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Rui

    2006-01-01

    Rings of rabbit aorta that were both incubated in a high concentration of D-glucose and contracted submaximally by phenylephrine showed significantly decreased endothelium-dependent relaxations induced by acetylcholine. The cGMP production of aorta rings was also reduced. Treatment with endomorphins (1-1000 nmol/L) restored acetylcholine-induced relaxations of aorta rings incubated in high glucose concentrations and increased the cGMP synthesis. Moreover, this effect of endomorphins on endothelium was antagonized by naloxone, and the increase in the production of cGMP was also blocked.

  14. Endothelium-dependent relaxation and noradrenaline sensitivity in mesenteric resistance arteries of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, P. D.; McCarthy, A. L.; Thomas, C. R.; Poston, L.

    1992-01-01

    1. Noradrenaline sensitivity and acetylcholine-induced relaxation were investigated in mesenteric resistance arteries of control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. 2. The diabetic rats demonstrated enhanced vascular sensitivity to noradrenaline compared with age-matched controls (pEC50 5.99 +/- 0.06 for diabetic rats, n = 25, versus 5.82 +/- 0.03 for controls, n = 45, P < 0.05). 3. Significant impairment of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in arteries from the diabetic animals compared with controls (pEC50 6.81 +/- 0.17 for diabetic rats, n = 21, versus 7.54 +/- 0.17 for controls, n = 45, P < 0.001). 4. The difference between acetylcholine-induced relaxation in diabetic and control arteries remained in the presence of 10 microM indomethacin (pEC50 6.41 +/- 0.11 for diabetic rats, n = 16, versus 7.59 +/- 0.08 for controls, n = 20, P < 0.001). 5. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 1 mM) produced profound inhibition of acetylcholine-induced relaxation in diabetic arteries but partial inhibition in controls. The incomplete inhibition of acetylcholine-induced relaxation by L-NMMA in the control arteries was the result of ineffective inhibition of nitric oxide synthase since an alternative inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 0.1 mM), led to similar inhibition to that seen in the diabetic arteries with L-NMMA. The endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF)-mediated component of acetylcholine-induced relaxation determined by use of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors was, therefore, apparently reduced in diabetic rats compared with control animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1422588

  15. Preservation of endothelium-dependent relaxation in cholesterol-fed and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by the chronic administration of cholestyramine.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, K.; Sugiura, M.; Kojima, S.; Kasuya, Y.

    1996-01-01

    1. Experiments were designed to investigate the effects of the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-lowering drugs cholestyramine on serum LDL levels and endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) in cholesterol-fed or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. 2. In aortic rings from control mice, ACh or A23187 caused concentration-dependent relaxation. The relaxations caused by ACh or A23187 were significantly attenuated in aortic rings from cholesterol-fed and STZ-diabetic mice. The attenuated vasodilatation in both cholesterol-fed and diabetic mice was returned to normal by chronic administration of cholestyramine. The endothelium-independent relaxations of aortic rings induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not significantly different between control, cholesterol-fed and STZ-induced diabetic mice. 3. The increased LDL levels in cholesterol-fed and diabetic mice were returned to normal by the chronic administration of cholestyramine. Chronic administration of cholestyramine had no effects on serum glucose levels. 4. These results suggest that attenuated endothelium-dependent vasodilatations in both cholesterol-fed and STZ-diabetic mice are improved by the chronic administration of cholestyramine, and these effects are, at least in part, due to lowering serum LDL levels. PMID:8735642

  16. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation is related to the occurrence of cortical brain infarcts at MR imaging: The Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lars; Nylander, Ruta; Johansson, Lars; Kullberg, Joel; Ahlström, Håkan; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2017-03-01

    Infarcts in the brain can be divided into larger cortical and smaller deep lacunar infarcts. The pathogenesis differs between these two types of infarctions. This study aims to investigate the relationship between measures of endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) and occurrence of cortical and lacunar infarcts in a population-based sample. In the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, 1016 subjects aged 70 were evaluated by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine (EDV) and brachial artery ultrasound to assess flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD). Six to seven years later MRI of the brain was performed, and the prevalence of cortical and lacunar infarcts was visually assessed in 407 randomly selected subjects. Lacunar infarcts were found in 22% and cortical infarcts in 5·9% of the subjects. EDV and FMD were both significantly related to the occurrence of cortical, but not lacunar infarcts. In a model adjusting for gender, waist circumference, body mass index, fasting blood glucose, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL and LDL cholesterol, serum triglycerides, smoking, antihypertensive treatment and statin use, both EDV and FMD were independent predictors of cortical infarcts (P = 0·035 and P = 0·008, respectively). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in both forearm resistance vessels and the brachial artery was related to the occurrence of cortical, but not lacunar, infarcts at MRI in a population-based sample independently of traditional risk factors. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. An ethanolic extract of Lindera obtusiloba stems causes NO-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortic rings and prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Ok; Oak, Min-Ho; Jung, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Hyun; Auger, Cyril; Kim, Kyoung Rak; Lee, Seung-Woo; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2011-06-01

    Lindera obtusiloba is a medical herb traditionally used in Asia for the improvement of blood circulation, treatment of inflammation, and prevention of liver damage. The possibility that L. obtusiloba affects vascular reactivity remains to be examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate both the in vitro and in vivo vascular effects of an ethanolic extract of L. obtusiloba stems (LOE). Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ chambers using rat aortic rings and the activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. LOE induced endothelium-dependent relaxations, which were abolished by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N (ω)-nitro-L: -arginine) and guanylyl cyclase (1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-L-one), significantly reduced by inhibitors of PI3 kinase (wortmannin and LY294002), and not affected by inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses (charybdotoxin plus apamin). LOE prevented contractile responses to phenylephrine and angiotensin II in rings with endothelium, but not in those without endothelium. LOE caused a concentration-dependent phosphorylation of Akt at Serine473 and eNOS at Serine1177 in endothelial cells. Thereafter, the vasoprotective effect of LOE was investigated in an experimental model of hypertension in rats. Intake of LOE prevented the angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, and endothelial dysfunction to acetylcholine and oxidative stress as assessed using dihydroethidine in aortic rings. The present findings indicate that LOE has vasoprotective and antihypertensive properties most likely by stimulating the endothelial formation of NO and inhibiting oxidative stress.

  18. The endothelium-dependent vasodilator action of a new beverage made of red wine vinegar and grape juice.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Akira; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Honsho, Sachiko; Sakaguchi, Yasue; Akie, Yasuki; Nakamura, Yuji; Hashimoto, Keitaro

    2005-04-01

    A new non-alcoholic beverage made of red wine vinegar and grape juice (Budo-no-megumi) has been recently demonstrated to lower the blood pressure of human as well as rats. In this study, we pharmacologically analyzed the mechanism of its hypotensive action. The thoracic aorta with intact endothelium was isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats, and incubated with a Tyrode's solution. The beverage in concentrations of 0.25 to 2% relaxed the pre-contracted aorta with an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine in a concentration-dependent manner, 2% of which induced 59% relaxation. In contrast, the vasodilator response disappeared in the aorta without endothelium. L-Nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, significantly reduced the vasodilator effect of the beverage, whereas indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, hardly affected it. These results suggest that the beverage can activate the nitric oxide synthase activity to exert vasodilation, which may partly explain its previously reported hypotensive action.

  19. Potentiation of vasoconstrictor response and inhibition of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by gallic acid in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Sanae, Fujiko; Miyaichi, Yukinori; Hayashi, Hisao

    2002-08-01

    In the isolated rat thoracic aorta, gallic acid potentiated the vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine. The potentiation produced by gallic acid was absent in endothelium-denuded arteries. The potentiation was abolished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, and slightly attenuated by an addition of L-arginine, while indomethacin or BQ610 had no effect. The potentiation of response to phenylephrine was not found for structural modifications of gallic acid, except for caffeic acid. Gallic acid also inhibited vasorelaxation induced by acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside or prostacyclin, especially that by acetylcholine. The effect on vasorelaxation induced by acetylcholine was decreased by esterification of the carboxy group of gallic acid, and in the absence or by the methylation of the o-dihydroxy group. Caffeic acid inhibited the vasorelaxation, though the effect was smaller than that of gallic acid. These findings indicate that gallic acid produces a potentiation of contractile response and inhibition of vasorelaxant responses, probably through inactivation of nitric oxide (NO), in which endothelially produced NO is principally involved, and that the modification of functional groups of the gallic acid molecule abolishes the potentiation of contractile response and attenuates the inhibition of vasorelaxant responses.

  20. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  1. Adrenergic stimulation-released histamine taken-up in adrenergic nerves induces endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Yuto; Takatori, Shingo; Hattori, Sayo; Zamami, Yoshito; Koyama, Toshihiro; Tangsucharit, Panot; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether histamine was taken up by perivascular adrenergic nerves and released by periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) to induce vascular responses. In rat mesenteric vascular beds treated with capsaicin to eliminate calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)ergic vasodilation and with active tone, PNS (1 - 4 Hz) induced only adrenergic nerve-mediated vasoconstriction. Histamine treatment for 20 min induced PNS-induced vasoconstriction followed by vasodilation without affecting CGRP-induced vasodilation. Chlorpheniramine, guanethidine, combination of histamine and desipramine, and endothelium-removal abolished PNS-induced vasodilation in histamine-treated preparations. These results suggest that histamine taken up by and released from adrenergic nerves by PNS causes endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rat mesenteric arteries.

  2. Blood pressure lowering effect of the extract of aerial parts of Capparis aphylla is mediated through endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abdul Jabbar; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was aimed to provide pharmacological evidences for the medicinal use of Capparis aphylla in hypertension. In normotensive anesthetized rats, intravenous administration of the crude extract of Capparis aphylla (Ca.Cr; 3-100 mg/kg) caused a fall in mean arterial pressure (MAP), which was partially blocked in the presence of atropine (2 mg/kg). In isolated rabbit aortic rings, Ca.Cr inhibited phenylephrine (1 μM) and high K(+) (80 mM) precontractions with respective EC(50) values of 0.10 (0.07-0.15) and 1.22 mg/mL (1.00-1.50), suggesting calcium channel blocking (CCB) activity with a predominant inhibitory effect on receptor operated Ca(2+) channels. Pretreatment of the arotic rings with Ca.Cr (0.1-1 mg/mL) caused a rightward shift in the Ca(2+) concentration response curves, similar to verapamil. In isolated rat aorta preparations, Ca.Cr caused a partial endothelium-dependent L-NAME/atropine-sensitive vasodilator effect. In guinea-pig atria, Ca.Cr suppressed both rate and force of spontaneous atrial contractions with respective EC(50) values of 1.35 (1.01-1.79) and 1.60 mg/mL (1.18-2.17), which remained unchanged in the presence of atropine (1 μM). These data indicate that the blood pressure (BP) lowering effect of the crude extract of Capparis aphylla is mediated through a vasodilator and cardiac depressant effect. The vasodilator effect is partly mediated by an endothelium-dependent, atropine-sensitive NO pathway, while the CCB effect is partly responsible for endothelium-independent vasodilatation and also for the cardiac depressant effect; thus, this study provides pharmacologic evidence with respect to the medicinal use of the plant in hypertension.

  3. Kaempferol enhances endothelium-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary artery through activation of large-conductance a2+-activated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y C; Leung, S W S; Leung, G P H; Man, R Y K

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Kaempferol, a plant flavonoid present in normal human diet, can modulate vasomotor tone. The present study aimed to elucidate the signalling pathway through which this flavonoid enhanced relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. Experimental Approach The effect of kaempferol on the relaxation of porcine coronary arteries to endothelium-dependent (bradykinin) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside) relaxing agents was studied in an in vitro organ chamber setup. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to determine the effect of kaempferol on potassium channels in porcine coronary artery smooth muscle cells (PCASMCs). Key Results At a concentration without direct effect on vascular tone, kaempferol (3 × 10−6 M) enhanced relaxations produced by bradykinin and sodium nitroprusside. The potentiation by kaempferol of the bradykinin-induced relaxation was not affected by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of NO synthase (10−4 M) or TRAM-34 plus UCL 1684, inhibitors of intermediate- and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, respectively (10−6 M each), but was abolished by tetraethylammonium chloride, a non-selective inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels (10−3 M), and iberiotoxin, a selective inhibitor of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa1.1; 10−7 M). Iberiotoxin also inhibited the potentiation by kaempferol of sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. Kaempferol stimulated an outward-rectifying current in PCASMCs, which was abolished by iberiotoxin. Conclusions and Implications The present results suggest that, in smooth muscle cells of the porcine coronary artery, kaempferol enhanced relaxations caused by endothelium-derived and exogenous NO as well as those due to endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization. This vascular effect of kaempferol involved the activation of KCa1.1 channels. PMID:25652142

  4. Endothelium-dependent and BRL 34915-induced vasodilatation in rat isolated perfused mesenteric arteries: role of G-proteins, K+ and calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Adeagbo, A. S.; Malik, K. U.

    1990-01-01

    1. In the isolated perfused, noradrenaline (NA)-constricted mesenteric arteries of the rat, acetylcholine (0.003-1 nmol), histamine (0.01-10 nmol) and the calcium ionophore A23187 (0.01-1 nmol), caused endothelium-dependent vasodilatation while the vasodilatation by the K+ channel activator BRL 34915 (0.1-1 nmol) was independent of endothelium. 2. The guanylate cyclase inhibitor, methylene blue at 10 microM did not inhibit the action of any of the vasodilators but at 50 microM reduced the vasodilator effect of acetylcholine (ACh), histamine and A23187. 3. Infusion of ouabain or perfusion with K(+)-free or excess K+ (50 mM) Krebs solution reduced the vasodilator effect of ACh, histamine and A23187, suggesting the action of these agents involves, at least in part, activation of Na+/K(+)-ATPase. The vasodilator effect of BRL 34915 was not affected by ouabain, but abolished during perfusion with Krebs solution containing excess K+ or depleted of K+. 4. Five structurally distinct K+ channel blockers (apamin, crude scorpion venom, procaine, quinidine and tetraethylammonium) attenuated the vasodilator effect of ACh, histamine and A23187. The K+ channel blockers, except apamin and crude scorpion venom, also inhibited the vasodilatation produced by BRL 34915. 5. The vasodilator effect of ACh, histamine or A23187 was not altered in mesenteric vessels of pertussis toxin-treated rats, suggesting that the K+ channels associated with the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of these agents are either not coupled to G-proteins or are coupled to G-proteins that are insensitive to pertussis toxin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2167732

  5. Inability of HDL from type 2 diabetic patients to counteract the inhibitory effect of oxidised LDL on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

    PubMed

    Perségol, L; Vergès, B; Foissac, M; Gambert, P; Duvillard, L

    2006-06-01

    In healthy normolipidaemic and normoglycaemic control subjects, HDL are able to reverse the inhibition of vasodilation that is induced by oxidised LDL. In type 2 diabetic patients, HDL are glycated and more triglyceride-rich than in control subjects. These alterations are likely to modify the capacity of HDL to reverse the inhibition of vasodilation induced by oxidised LDL. Using rabbit aorta rings, we compared the ability of HDL from 16 type 2 diabetic patients and 13 control subjects to suppress the inhibition of vasodilation that is induced by oxidised LDL. Oxidised LDL inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation (maximal relaxation [Emax] = 58.2+/-14.6 vs 99.3+/-5.2% for incubation without any lipoprotein, p < 0.0001). HDL from control subjects significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of oxidised LDL on vasodilatation (Emax = 77.6+/-12.9 vs 59.5+/-7.7%, p < 0.001), whereas HDL from type 2 diabetic patients had no effect (Emax = 52.4+/-20.4 vs 57.2+/-18.7%, NS). HDL triglyceride content was significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients than in control subjects (5.3+/-2.2 vs 3.1+/-1.4%, p < 0.01) and was highly inversely correlated to Emax for oxidised LDL+HDL in type 2 diabetic patients (r = -0.71, p < 0.005). In type 2 diabetes mellitus, the ability of HDL to counteract the inhibition of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation induced by oxidised LDL is impaired and is inversely correlated with HDL triglyceride content. These findings suggest that HDL are less atheroprotective in type 2 diabetic patients than in control subjects.

  6. HDL particles from type 1 diabetic patients are unable to reverse the inhibitory effect of oxidised LDL on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

    PubMed

    Perségol, L; Foissac, M; Lagrost, L; Athias, A; Gambert, P; Vergès, B; Duvillard, L

    2007-11-01

    In healthy individuals, HDL can counteract the inhibition of vasorelaxation induced by oxidised LDL. Several abnormalities such as increased size, glycation and decreased paraoxonase activity have been reported for HDL from type 1 diabetic patients. Thus, we hypothesised that the ability of HDL to protect vessels against impairments of vasorelaxation would be decreased in these patients. We compared the ability of HDL from 18 type 1 diabetic patients and 12 control participants to counteract the inhibition of endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by oxidised LDL on rabbit aorta rings. Serum triacylglycerol and total cholesterol, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol were similar in type 1 diabetic and control participants. Fasting glycaemia and the HDL-fructosamine level were higher in diabetic patients than in controls (9.06 +/- 3.55 vs 5.27 +/- 0.23 mmol/l, p < 0.005; and 10.2 +/- 3.2 vs 7.7 +/- 2.5 micromol/g protein, p < 0.05, respectively). HDL composition, size and paraoxonase activity were similar in both groups. HDL from controls reduced the inhibitory effect of oxidised LDL on maximal relaxation (E (max); 79.3 +/- 11.8 vs 66.4 +/- 11.7%, p < 0.05), whereas HDL from type 1 diabetic patients had no effect (E (max) = 70.6 +/- 17.4 vs 63.9 +/- 17.2%, NS). In type 1 diabetic patients, E (max) was not correlated with glycaemia or the HDL-fructosamine level. HDL particles from type 1 diabetic patients do not protect against inhibition of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation induced by oxidised LDL, in contrast to HDL particles from healthy individuals. This defect cannot be explained by abnormalities in HDL composition, size or paraoxonase activity, and may contribute to the early development of atherosclerotic lesions in type 1 diabetic patients.

  7. Vascular Endothelium-Dependent and Independent Actions of Oleanolic Acid and Its Synthetic Oleanane Derivatives as Possible Mechanisms for Hypotensive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P.; Metzinger, Thomas; van Heerden, Fanie R.; Mubagwa, Kanigula; Dessy, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plant-derived oleanolic acid (OA) and its related synthetic derivatives (Br-OA and Me-OA) possess antihypertensive effects in experimental animals. The present study investigated possible underlying mechanisms in rat isolated single ventricular myocytes and in vascular smooth muscles superfused at 37°C. Methods Cell shortening was assessed at 1 Hz using a video-based edge-detection system and the L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) was measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in single ventricular myocytes. Isometric tension was measured using force transducer in isolated aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries. Vascular effects were measured in endothelium-intact and denuded vessels in the presence of various enzyme or channel inhibitors. Results OA and its derivatives increased cell shortening in cardiomyocytes isolated from normotensive rats but had no effect in those isolated from hypertensive animals. These triterpenes also caused relaxation in aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries pre-contracted with either phenylephrine or KCl-enriched solution. The relaxation was only partially inhibited by endothelium denudation, and also partly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin, with no additional inhibitory effect of the NO synthase inhibitor, N-ω-Nitro-L-arginine. A combination of both ATP-dependent channel inhibition by glibenclaminde and voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibition by 4-aminopyridine was necessary to fully inhibit the relaxation. Conclusion These data indicate that the effects of OA and its derivatives are mediated via both endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms suggesting the involvement of COX in the endothelium-dependent effects and of vascular muscle K+ channels in the endothelium-independent effects. Finally, our results support the view that the antihypertensive action of OA and its derivatives is due to a decrease of vascular resistance with no negative inotropic effect on the heart. PMID:26799746

  8. Reactive oxygen species-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortic rings: protection by methanolic extracts of Phoebe grandis.

    PubMed

    Yeh-Siang, Lau; Subramaniam, Gopal; Hadi, A Hamid A; Murugan, Dharmani; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2011-04-06

    Generation of reactive oxygen species plays a pivotal role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present study describes the effects of the methanolic extract of Phoebe grandis (MPG) stem bark on reactive oxygen species-induced endothelial dysfunction in vitro. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent relaxation (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) was investigated from isolated rat aorta of Sprague-Dawley (SD) in the presence of the β-NADH (enzymatic superoxide inducer) and MPG extract. Superoxide anion production in aortic vessels was measured by lucigen chemiluminesence. Thirty minutes incubation of the rat aorta in vitro with β-NADH increased superoxide radical production and significantly inhibited ACh-induced relaxations. Pretreatment with MPG (0.5, 5 and 50 μg/mL) restored the ACh-induced relaxations (R(max): 92.29% ± 2.93, 91.02% ± 4.54 and 88.31 ± 2.36, respectively) in the presence of β-NADH. MPG was ineffective in reversing the impaired ACh-induced relaxations caused by pyrogallol, a non-enzymatic superoxide generator. Superoxide dismutase (a superoxide scavenger), however, reversed the impaired ACh relaxations induced by both β-NADH and pyrogallol. MPG also markedly inhibited the β-NADH-induced generation of the superoxide radicals. Furthermore, MPG scavenging peroxyl radicals generated by tBuOOH (10⁻⁴ M).These results indicate that MPG may improve the endothelium dependent relaxations to ACh through its scavenging activity as well as by inhibiting the NADH/NADPH oxidase induced generation of superoxide anions.

  9. Atherosclerosis measured by whole body magnetic resonance angiography and carotid artery ultrasound is related to arterial compliance, but not to endothelium-dependent vasodilation - the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lars; Andersson, Jessika; Hansen, Tomas; Johansson, Lars; Ahlström, Håkan

    2009-09-01

    Arterial compliance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation are two characteristics of the vessel wall. In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, we studied the relationships between arterial compliance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation versus atherosclerosis as measured with two imaging modalities. In the population-based PIVUS study (1016 subjects aged 70), arterial compliance was determined by ultrasound in the carotid artery and the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio by echocardiography, while endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine and brachial artery ultrasound. Intima-media thickness was evaluated by ultrasound in the carotid artery (n = 954). Stenosis in the carotid, aorta, renal, upper and lower leg arteries were determined by magnetic resonance angiography in a random subsample of 306 subjects. After adjustments for gender, Framingham risk score, obesity, myocardial infarction and stroke, distensibility in the carotid artery and the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio were both significantly related to a weighted index of stenosis in the five arterial territories evaluated by magnetic resonance angiography (p<0.02 for both). Distensibility in the carotid artery (P = 0.021), but not the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio (P = 0.08), was also significantly related to intima-media thickness. In the elderly population, atherosclerosis is mainly related to arterial compliance, but not to endothelium-dependent vasodilation in peripheral conduit or resistance vessels.

  10. [Changes in endothelium-dependent dilation and α1-adrenoreactivity of rat aorta caused by inducible NO-synthase inhibition after motor activity restrictions].

    PubMed

    Solodkov, A P; Iatskovskaia, N M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of work was to study the influence of the highly selective blocker of the inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) of S-methylthiourea on the alteration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilation and α1-adrenoreactivity of the isolated rat aortic rings which underwent a short-term restriction of physical activity. The experiments were carried out on rat aortic rings preparations from female-rats bathed in Krebs-Henseleit solution, bubbled with 95% O2 and 5% CO2 and contracting in isometric mode. Endothelium-dependent dilation was caused by cumulative addition of acetylcholine (10-(10)-10(-4) M) after phenylephrine precontraction(10(-6) M). Adrenoreactivity was assessed through the response to increasing concentrations of α1-adrenergic receptor agonist. The 60-minute immobilization stress, characterized by the increase of the relative weight of the adrenal glands by 19.5%, the concentration of glucocorticoids (twice as much), of NO2/NO3 (stable NO degradation products) by 35%, the reduction in the level of thyroxine (by 16%), triiodothyronine (by 10%) and the increase in thyrotropic hormone by 45%, interleukin-1b (twice as much) and the appearance of tumour necrosis factor alpha in the blood serum, was accompanied by the two types of reaction of isolated aortic rings to acetylcholine and phenylephrine. The first one was expressed in the enhancing of acetylcholine-induced dilation of isolated aortic rings and the reduction of its response to α1-adrenergic stimulant phenylephrine. The second one showed a decrease in the response of isolated aortic rings to acetylcholine and enhancing the response to phenylephrine. But both of these reaction types were eliminated by using highly selective inducible NO-synthase inhibitor with S-methylisothiourea. However, it was differently directed with a different type of reaction. Taken together, these results suggest that the iNOS is formed in the cells of rat aorta under short-term stress. In some cases it can be a source of a large

  11. Chronic administration of nicotine-free cigarette smoke extract impaired endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation in rats via increased vascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shimosato, Takashi; Geddawy, Ayman; Tawa, Masashi; Imamura, Takeshi; Okamura, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been implicated in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular disorders and atherosclerosis. Here, we examined the effects of nicotine-free cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on the regulation of cardiovascular function. Rats were subcutaneously administered PBS or nicotine-free CSE at 0.05 to 1.5 mL/day per rat for 4 weeks. Blood pressure, cardiac function, and vascular responsiveness were measured at 4 weeks after administration. Furthermore, acute effects of nicotine-free CSE were also studied in the aorta isolated from normal rats. Blood pressure and left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) were significantly increased in the nicotine-free CSE-administered rats, but heart rate, dP/dt(max), and dP/dt(min) were not affected. Endothelium-dependent relaxation by acetylcholine (ACh) in the nicotine-free CSE-treated rats was significantly attenuated compared to PBS-treated rats, but endothelium-independent relaxation by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) did not differ. Pretreatment with superoxide dismutase restored the attenuated ACh-induced relaxation. Contractions by phenylephrine, angiotensin II, and KCl did not differ between two groups. In vitro acute nicotine-free CSE treatment did not alter the response to ACh or SNP. These results suggest that chronic nicotine-free CSE administration impairs endothelial function by increased production of superoxide derived from the vascular wall components other than smooth muscles and induces slight hypertension accompanied with LVSP elevation.

  12. Tocotrienol Rich Palm Oil Extract Is More Effective Than Pure Tocotrienols at Improving Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in the Presence of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Saher F.; Woodman, Owen L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative endothelial dysfunction is a critical initiator of vascular disease. Vitamin E is an effective antioxidant but attempts to use it to treat vascular disorders have been disappointing. This study investigated whether tocotrienols, the less abundant components of vitamin E compared to tocopherols, might be more effective at preserving endothelial function. Superoxide generated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase or rat aorta was measured using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. The effect of α-tocopherol, α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols and a tocotrienol rich palm oil extract (tocomin) on levels of superoxide was assessed. Endothelial function in rat aorta was assessed in the presence of the auto-oxidant pyrogallol. Whilst all of the compounds displayed antioxidant activity, the tocotrienols were more effective when superoxide was produced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase whereas tocomin and α-tocopherol were more effective in the isolated aorta. Tocomin and α-tocopherol restored endothelial function in the presence of oxidant stress but α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols were ineffective. The protective effect of tocomin was replicated when the tocotrienols were present with, but not without, α-tocopherol. Tocotrienol rich tocomin is more effective than α-tocopherol at reducing oxidative stress and restoring endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat aortae and although α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols effectively scavenged superoxide, they did not improve endothelial function. PMID:26075031

  13. Exercise training-enhanced, endothelium-dependent dilation mediated by altered regulation of BKCa channels in collateral-dependent porcine coronary arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei; Parker, Janet L.; Heaps, Cristine L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that exercise training increases the contribution of large-conductance, Ca2+-dependent K+ (BKCa) channels to endothelium-mediated dilation in coronary arterioles from collateral-dependent myocardial regions of chronically occluded pig hearts and may function downstream of H2O2. Methods An ameroid constrictor was placed around the proximal left circumflex coronary artery to induce gradual occlusion in Yucatan miniature swine. Eight weeks postoperatively, pigs were randomly assigned to sedentary or exercise training (treadmill; 14 wk) regimens. Results Exercise training significantly enhanced bradykinin-mediated dilation in collateral-dependent arterioles (~125 μm diameter) compared with sedentary pigs. The BKCa-channel blocker, iberiotoxin alone or in combination with the H2O2 scavenger, polyethylene glycol catalase, reversed exercise training-enhanced dilation in collateral-dependent arterioles. Iberiotoxin-sensitive whole-cell K+ currents (i.e., BKCa-channel currents) were not different between smooth muscle cells of nonoccluded and collateral-dependent arterioles of sedentary and exercise trained groups. Conclusions These data provide evidence that BKCa-channel activity contributes to exercise training-enhanced endothelium-dependent dilation in collateral-dependent coronary arterioles despite no change in smooth muscle BKCa-channel current. Taken together, our findings suggest that a component of the bradykinin signaling pathway, which stimulates BKCa channels, is enhanced by exercise training in collateral-dependent arterioles and suggest a potential role for H2O2 as the mediator. PMID:23002811

  14. Lipopolysaccharide impairs endothelial nitric oxide synthesis in rat renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Piepot, H A; Boer, C; Groeneveld, A B; Van Lambalgen, A A; Sipkema, P

    2000-06-01

    Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation may contribute to hypoperfusion and failure of abdominal organs, including the kidneys during endotoxin or septic shock. In this study, the short-term (2 h) effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rat renal and superior mesenteric arteries were documented. Rat renal and mesenteric arteries were dissected and exposed in vitro to LPS for two hours. The effects of LPS on vascular reactivity were determined and compared with time-matched controls. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) release was determined using an NO microsensor in adjacent vessel segments. LPS impaired maximal acetylcholine (ACh)-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in renal arteries (62.5 +/- 8.8% vs. 34.4 +/- 7.5% in controls and LPS-exposed arteries), but not in mesenteric arteries. LPS did not alter the sensitivity of renal arteries to exogenous NO. ACh-dependent vasodilation was abolished after blocking NO synthesis with 10-4 mol/L L-NA in control and LPS-incubated renal arteries. When compared with controls, NO release induced by ACh and the receptor-independent calcium ionophore A23187 was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in LPS-exposed renal segments and was fully abolished in endothelium-denuded segments, indicating that LPS attenuated receptor-dependent as well as receptor-independent endothelial NO release. In contrast, ACh- and A23187-induced NO release was normal in LPS-exposed mesenteric arteries. These results indicate that LPS-induced selective impairment of ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat renal arteries is caused by decreased endothelial NO release. This may contribute to the propensity for acute renal failure during septic shock.

  15. Parallel decrease in arterial distensibility and in endothelium-dependent dilatation in young women with a history of pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Pàez, Olga; Alfie, José; Gorosito, Marta; Puleio, Pablo; de Maria, Marcelo; Prieto, Noemì; Majul, Claudio

    2009-10-01

    Pre-eclampsia not only complicates 5 to 8% of pregnancies but also increases the risk of maternal cardiovascular disease and mortality later in life. We analyzed three different aspects of arterial function (pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and flow-mediated dilatation), in 55 nonpregnant, normotensive women (18-33 years old) according to their gestational history: 15 nulliparous, 20 with a previous normotensive, and 20 formerly pre-eclamptic pregnancy. Former pre-eclamptic women showed a significantly higher augmentation index and pulse wave velocity (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) and lower flow-mediated dilatation (p = 0.01) compared to control groups. In contrast, sublingual nitroglycerine elicited a comparable vasodilatory response in the three groups. The augmentation index correlated significantly with pulse wave velocity and flow-mediated dilatation (R = 0.28 and R = -0.32, respectively, P < 0.05 for both). No significant correlations were observed between augmentation index or flow-mediated dilatation with age, body mass index (BMI), brachial blood pressure, heart rate, or metabolic parameters (plasma cholesterol, glucose, insulin, or insulin resistance). Birth weight maintained a significantly inverse correlation with the augmentation index (R = -0.51, p < 0.002) but not with flow-mediated dilatation. Our findings revealed a parallel decrease in arterial distensibility and endothelium-dependent dilatation in women with a history of pre-eclampsia compared to nulliparous women and women with a previous normal pregnancy. A high augmentation index was the most consistent alteration associated with a history of pre-eclampsia. The study supports the current view that the generalized arterial dysfunction associated with pre-eclampsia persists subclinically after delivery.

  16. Angiotensin-(1-7) Selectively Induces Relaxation and Modulates Endothelium-Dependent Dilation in Mesenteric Arteries of Salt-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Raffai, Gábor; Lombard, Julian H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of angiotensin-(1-7) and AVE0991 on active tone and vasodilator responses to bradykinin and acetylcholine in isolated mesenteric arteries from Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-salt (HS; 4% NaCl) versus a normal salt (NS; 0.4% NaCl) diet. Angiotensin-(1-7) and AVE0991 elicited relaxation, and angiotensin-(1-7) unmasked vasodilator responses to bradykinin in arteries from HS-fed rats. These effects of angiotensin-(1-7) and AVE0991 were inhibited by endothelium removal, A779, PD123319, HOE140 and L-NAME. Angiotensin-(1-7) also restored the acetylcholine-induced relaxation that was suppressed by the HS diet. Vasodilator responses to bradykinin and acetylcholine in the presence of angiotensin-(1-7) were mimicked by captopril and the AT2 receptor agonist CGP42112 in arteries from HS-fed rats. Thus, in contrast to salt-induced impairment of vascular relaxation in response to vasodilator stimuli, angiotensin-(1-7) induces endothelium-dependent and NO-mediated relaxation, unmasks bradykinin responses via activation of mas and AT2 receptors, and restores acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in HS-fed rats. AT2 receptor activation and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition shared the ability of angiotensin-(1-7) to enhance bradykinin and acetylcholine responses in HS-fed rats. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential for mas and/or AT2 receptor activation and ACE inhibition in restoring endothelial function impaired by elevated dietary salt intake or other pathological conditions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. A factorial randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of micronutrients supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on maternal endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and oxidative stress of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies have suggested a relationship between metabolic abnormalities and impaired fetal growth with the development of non-transmissible chronic diseases in the adulthood. Moreover, it has been proposed that maternal factors such as endothelial function and oxidative stress are key mechanisms of both fetal metabolic alterations and subsequent development of non-transmissible chronic diseases. The objective of this project is to evaluate the effect of micronutrient supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on endothelium-dependent vasodilation maternal and stress oxidative of the newborn. Methods and design 320 pregnant women attending to usual prenatal care in Cali, Colombia will be included in a factorial randomized controlled trial. Women will be assigned to the following intervention groups: 1. Control group: usual prenatal care (PC) and placebo (maltodextrine). 2. Exercise group: PC, placebo and aerobic physical exercise. 3. Micronutrients group: PC and a micronutrients capsule consisting of zinc (30 mg), selenium (70 μg), vitamin A (400 μg), alphatocopherol (30 mg), vitamin C (200 mg), and niacin (100 mg). 4. Combined interventions Group: PC, supplementation of micronutrients, and aerobic physical exercise. Anthropometric measures will be taken at the start and at the end of the interventions. Discussion Since in previous studies has been showed that the maternal endothelial function and oxidative stress are related to oxidative stress of the newborn, this study proposes that complementation with micronutrients during pregnancy and/or regular physical exercise can be an early and innovative alternative to strengthen the prevention of chronic diseases in the population. Trial registration NCT00872365. PMID:21356082

  18. Mechanisms underlying the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory effect of an aqueous extract of Elaeis Guineensis Jacq. (Arecaceae) in porcine coronary artery rings.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Mamadou; Anselm, Eric; Séne, Madièye; Diatta, Williams; Dièye, Amadou Moctar; Faye, Babacar; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2009-12-30

    This study was undertaken to investigate the vasodilatory effect of an aqueous extract of Elaeis guineensis Jacq (EGE) in the porcine coronary artery and elicit its possible mechanism(s) of action. Vascular effects of crude extract of dried and powdered leaves of Elaeis guineensis were evaluated on isolated coronary arteries on organ chambers. Determination of eNOS expression and the phosphorylation level of eNOS were determined by Western blot analysis. In the presence of indomethacin, EGE caused pronounced relaxations in endothelium-intact but not in endothelium-denuded coronary artery rings. Relaxations to EGE were significantly reduced by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA, a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase), slightly but not significantly by charybdotoxin plus apamin (two potent inhibitors of EDHF-mediated responses) and abolished by the combination of L-NA and charybdotoxin plus apamin. Relaxations to EGE were abolished by the membrane permeant, SOD mimetic, MnTMPyP, and significantly reduced by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3-kinase. Exposure of endothelial cells to EGE increased the phosphorylation level of eNOS at Ser1177 in a time and concentration-dependent manner. MnTMPyP abolished the EGE-induced phosphorylation of eNOS.In conclusion, the obtained data indicate that EGE induces pronounced endothelium-dependent relaxations of the porcine coronary artery, which involve predominantly NO. The stimulatory effect of EGE on eNOS involves the redox-sensitive phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 most likely via the PI3-kinase pathway.

  19. Downregulation of Endothelial Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 4 Channel and Small-Conductance of Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Underpins Impaired Endothelium-Dependent Hyperpolarization in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seki, Takunori; Goto, Kenichi; Kiyohara, Kanako; Kansui, Yasuo; Murakami, Noboru; Haga, Yoshie; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Kitazono, Takanari

    2017-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)-mediated responses are impaired in hypertension, but the underlying mechanisms have not yet been determined. The activation of small- and intermediate-conductance of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SKCa and IKCa) underpins EDH-mediated responses. It was recently reported that Ca(2+) influx through endothelial transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channel (TRPV4) is a prerequisite for the activation of SKCa/IKCa in endothelial cells in specific beds. Here, we attempted to determine whether the impairment of EDH in hypertension is attributable to the dysfunction of TRPV4 and S/IKCa, using isolated superior mesenteric arteries of 20-week-old stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) and age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. In the WKY arteries, EDH-mediated responses were reduced by a combination of SKCa/IKCa blockers (apamin plus TRAM-34; 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethl]-1H-pyrazole) and by the blockade of TRPV4 with the selective antagonist RN-1734 or HC-067047. In the SHRSP arteries, EDH-mediated hyperpolarization and relaxation were significantly impaired when compared with WKY. GSK1016790A, a selective TRPV4 activator, evoked robust hyperpolarization and relaxation in WKY arteries. In contrast, in SHRSP arteries, the GSK1016790A-evoked hyperpolarization was small and relaxation was absent. Hyperpolarization and relaxation to cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine, a selective SKCa activator, were marginally decreased in SHRSP arteries compared with WKY arteries. The expression of endothelial TRPV4 and SKCa protein was significantly decreased in the SHRSP mesenteric arteries compared with those of WKY, whereas function and expression of IKCa were preserved in SHRSP arteries. These findings suggest that EDH-mediated responses are impaired in superior mesenteric arteries of SHRSP because of a reduction in both TRPV4 and SKCa input to EDH. © 2016 American Heart

  20. Hydroalcoholic extract and pure compounds from Senecio nutans Sch. Bip (Compositae) induce vasodilation in rat aorta through endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Adrián; Palacios, Javier; Quispe, Cristina; Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka R; Morales, Glauco; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Cifuentes, Fredi

    2016-11-04

    Senecio nutans Sch. Bip. (Compositae) is an endemic plant of South America, and is used in herbal medicine in Andean communities for treating acute mountain sickness. Currently, the direct effects of hydroalcoholic extract of S. nutans (HAE S. nutans) or its isolated compounds on the vascular system are not well described. The aim of this study was to determine the effects and mechanism of action of S. nutans on vascular function in healthy rats. Seven compounds were isolated from the HAE S. nutans, and their structures were characterized using spectroscopic techniques as 1D and 2D NMR, and mass spectrometry. Vascular reactivity experiments were carried out in rat aorta. S. nutans-dependent vasodilation and phenylephrine-dependent contraction were measured in endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings of male rats. Seven pure compounds were isolate from HAE S. nutans, but two pure compounds showed significant vasodilation in rat aorta: 4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)acetophenone (compound E) and 5-acetyl-6-hydroxy-2-isopropenyl-2,3-dihydrobenzofurane (compound G). Although HAE S. nutans induced vasodilation in absence of endothelium, the vasodilation in intact aorta, via NO, was higher. HAE S. nutans reduced calcium-dependent contraction in endothelium-intact, but not in endothelium-denuded aortic rings. HAE S. nutans and its isolated compounds caused vasodilation in rat aorta in absence of endothelium, suggesting its vasodilator properties is endothelium-dependent (NO) and or independent, and may involve a modulation of the calcium channels. This result is of clinical interest as potential therapy control of blood pressure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of KCa2.3 and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) in the rat middle cerebral artery: the role of lipoxygenase metabolites and isoprostanes.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Kathryn M; Campbell, William B; McNeish, Alister J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose. In rat middle cerebral arteries, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) is mediated by activation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels specifically KCa2.3 and KCa3.1. Lipoxygenase (LOX) products function as endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) in rabbit arteries by stimulating KCa2.3. We investigated if LOX products contribute to EDH in rat cerebral arteries. Methods. Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites produced in middle cerebral arteries were measured using HPLC and LC/MS. Vascular tension and membrane potential responses to SLIGRL were simultaneously recorded using wire myography and intracellular microelectrodes. Results. SLIGRL, an agonist at PAR2 receptors, caused EDH that was inhibited by a combination of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 blockade. Non-selective LOX-inhibition reduced EDH, whereas inhibition of 12-LOX had no effect. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibition enhanced the KCa2.3 component of EDH. Following NO synthase (NOS) inhibition, the KCa2.3 component of EDH was absent. Using HPLC, middle cerebral arteries metabolized (14)C-AA to 15- and 12-LOX products under control conditions. With NOS inhibition, there was little change in LOX metabolites, but increased F-type isoprostanes. 8-iso-PGF2α inhibited the KCa2.3 component of EDH. Conclusions. LOX metabolites mediate EDH in rat middle cerebral arteries. Inhibition of sEH increases the KCa2.3 component of EDH. Following NOS inhibition, loss of KCa2.3 function is independent of changes in LOX production or sEH inhibition but due to increased isoprostane production and subsequent stimulation of TP receptors. These findings have important implications in diseases associated with loss of NO signaling such as stroke; where inhibition of sEH and/or isoprostane formation may of benefit.

  2. Regulation of KCa2.3 and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) in the rat middle cerebral artery: the role of lipoxygenase metabolites and isoprostanes

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Kathryn M.; Campbell, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose. In rat middle cerebral arteries, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) is mediated by activation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels specifically KCa2.3 and KCa3.1. Lipoxygenase (LOX) products function as endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) in rabbit arteries by stimulating KCa2.3. We investigated if LOX products contribute to EDH in rat cerebral arteries. Methods. Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites produced in middle cerebral arteries were measured using HPLC and LC/MS. Vascular tension and membrane potential responses to SLIGRL were simultaneously recorded using wire myography and intracellular microelectrodes. Results. SLIGRL, an agonist at PAR2 receptors, caused EDH that was inhibited by a combination of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 blockade. Non-selective LOX-inhibition reduced EDH, whereas inhibition of 12-LOX had no effect. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibition enhanced the KCa2.3 component of EDH. Following NO synthase (NOS) inhibition, the KCa2.3 component of EDH was absent. Using HPLC, middle cerebral arteries metabolized 14C-AA to 15- and 12-LOX products under control conditions. With NOS inhibition, there was little change in LOX metabolites, but increased F-type isoprostanes. 8-iso-PGF2α inhibited the KCa2.3 component of EDH. Conclusions. LOX metabolites mediate EDH in rat middle cerebral arteries. Inhibition of sEH increases the KCa2.3 component of EDH. Following NOS inhibition, loss of KCa2.3 function is independent of changes in LOX production or sEH inhibition but due to increased isoprostane production and subsequent stimulation of TP receptors. These findings have important implications in diseases associated with loss of NO signaling such as stroke; where inhibition of sEH and/or isoprostane formation may of benefit. PMID:24949235

  3. Relation of Season and Temperature to Endothelium-Dependent Flow-Mediated Vasodilation in Subjects Without Clinical Evidence of Cardiovascular Disease (From The Framingham Heart Study)

    PubMed Central

    Widlansky, Michael E.; Vita, Joseph A.; Keyes, Michelle J.; Larson, Martin G.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Levy, Daniel; Mitchell, Gary F.; Osypiuk, Ewa W.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple studies have documented an increased incidence of cardiovascular events in the winter, but the pathophysiological mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We hypothesized that brachial flow and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) would vary by season and temperature. We related season and temperature to ultrasonic brachial artery endothelium-dependent FMD% (n=2587), baseline flow velocity and maximal reactive hyperemia (n=1973) in the Framingham Offspring cohort (mean age 61±10 years; 53% women). We obtained outdoor temperature from National Climate Data Center records for Bedford, Massachusetts (about 14 miles from testing site) and we measured the examination room temperature. In multivariable models, FMD% was highest in summer and lowest in winter (3.01±0.09 vs. 2.56±0.10%, respectively; P=0.02 for differences across all 4 seasons). FMD% was highest in the warmest and lowest in the coldest outdoor temperature quartiles. In stepwise models adjusting for risk factors, and selecting among season, outdoor temperature, and room temperature, FMD% was associated with season (P=0.02); temperature did not enter the model. In contrast, hyperemic flow velocity was significantly lower for cooler, and higher for warmer room temperatures (P=0.02 overall); season did not enter the model. Season, outdoor and room temperature were each retained in a stepwise model of baseline flow velocity (P<0.0001, P=0.02, P<0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, we observed a significant association between season and FMD. Microvascular vasodilator function, as reflected by hyperemic flow, was more strongly related to temperature than season. In conclusion, we speculate that endothelial dysfunction may be 1 of the mechanisms influencing seasonal variation in cardiovascular events. PMID:17659939

  4. AGEs breaking and antioxidant treatment improves endothelium-dependent dilation without effect on flow-mediated remodeling of resistance arteries in old Zucker diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    restored relaxation to the level found in LZ rats. Conclusions ALT-711 did not improve outward remodeling in mature ZDF rats but it reduced oxidative stress and consequently improved endothelium-dependent relaxation. In mature LZ rats, ALT-711 improved outward remodeling and reduced AGEs level. Consequently, AGEs breaking is differently useful in ageing whether it is associated with diabetes or not. PMID:24581152

  5. AGEs breaking and antioxidant treatment improves endothelium-dependent dilation without effect on flow-mediated remodeling of resistance arteries in old Zucker diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Freidja, Mohamed L; Vessières, Emilie; Toutain, Bertrand; Guihot, Anne-Laure; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Loufrani, Laurent; Fassot, Céline; Henrion, Daniel

    2014-03-03

    level found in LZ rats. ALT-711 did not improve outward remodeling in mature ZDF rats but it reduced oxidative stress and consequently improved endothelium-dependent relaxation. In mature LZ rats, ALT-711 improved outward remodeling and reduced AGEs level. Consequently, AGEs breaking is differently useful in ageing whether it is associated with diabetes or not.

  6. Beneficial Effects of Calcitriol on Hypertension, Glucose Intolerance, Impairment of Endothelium-Dependent Vascular Relaxation, and Visceral Adiposity in Fructose-Fed Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chu-Lin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Lee, Tony J. F.; Fang, Te-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Besides regulating calcium homeostasis, the effects of vitamin D on vascular tone and metabolic disturbances remain scarce in the literature despite an increase intake with high-fructose corn syrup worldwide. We investigated the effects of calcitriol, an active form of vitamin D, on vascular relaxation, glucose tolerance, and visceral fat pads in fructose-fed rats. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 6 per group). Group Con: standard chow diet for 8 weeks; Group Fru: high-fructose diet (60% fructose) for 8 weeks; Group Fru-HVD: high-fructose diet as Group Fru, high-dose calcitriol treatment (20 ng / 100 g body weight per day) 4 weeks after the beginning of fructose feeding; and Group Fru-LVD: high-fructose diet as Group Fru, low-dose calcitriol treatment (10 ng / 100 g body weight per day) 4 weeks after the beginning of fructose feeding. Systolic blood pressure was measured twice a week by the tail-cuff method. Blood was examined for serum ionized calcium, phosphate, creatinine, glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Intra-peritoneal glucose intolerance test, aortic vascular reactivity, the weight of visceral fat pads, adipose size, and adipose angiotensin II levels were analyzed at the end of the study. The results showed that the fructose-fed rats significantly developed hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, heavier weight and larger adipose size of visceral fat pads, and raised adipose angiotensin II expressions compared with the control rats. High- and low-dose calcitriol reduced modestly systolic blood pressure, increased endothelium-dependent aortic relaxation, ameliorated glucose intolerance, reduced the weight and adipose size of visceral fat pads, and lowered adipose angiotensin II expressions in the fructose-fed rats. However, high-dose calcitriol treatment mildly increased serum ionized calcium levels (1.44 ± 0.05 mmol/L). These results suggest a protective role of calcitriol treatment on endothelial function, glucose

  7. Association of the Glu504Lys polymorphism in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene with endothelium-dependent dilation disorder in Chinese Han patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Zheng, S; Shu, Y; Wang, Y; Chen, X

    2016-05-01

    In essential hypertension (EH), 30-50% of the variability in blood pressure is determined by genetic factors. The aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene Glu504Lys polymorphism is associated with 'alcohol flush' and might be associated with EH. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of the Glu504Lys polymorphism in the ALDH2 gene with endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) disorder in Chinese Han patients with EH. This case-control study enrolled 1210 patients with EH. The control group consisted of 1089 healthy subjects with normal blood pressure. Patients with EH were divided into normal brachial arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) (EH1 group, n = 354) versus endothelial dysfunction (EH2 group, n = 856). ALDH2 gene Glu504Lys polymorphism was detected using a DNA microarray. The ALDH2 AA/AG genotypes and the A allele frequencies were significantly higher in the EH group compared with healthy controls (both P < 0.05) and significantly higher in the EH2 group compared with the EH1 group (79.8 vs 51.4%; 45.0 vs 29.1%, respectively; both P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the ALDH2 gene Glu504Lys polymorphism was independently associated with EH (dominant: odds ratio (OR) = 1.38; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.14-2.82; P = 0.01; additive: OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.12-2.44; P = 0.02) as well as with EDD in patients with EH (dominant: OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.16-3.01, P = 0.02; additive: OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.10-2.87, P = 0.03). The ALDH2 Glu504Lys polymorphism was associated with EDD disorders in Chinese Han patients with EH, providing further evidence that this mutation and 'alcohol flush' are not harmless in this Asian population. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Association of apolipoprotein-CIII (apoC-III), endothelium-dependent vasodilation and peripheral neuropathy in a multi-ethnic population with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pek, Sharon Li Ting; Sum, Chee Fang; Yeoh, Lee Ying; Lee, Simon Biing Ming; Tang, Wern Ee; Lim, Su Chi; Tavintharan, Subramaniam

    2017-07-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Apart from hyperglycemia, its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Apolipoprotein-CIII (apoC-III) associated with triglyceride metabolism, is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Its role in DPN is not well-established. We studied the associations of apoC-III, endothelial function and DPN. In patients with T2D, anthropometric data, fasting blood, and urine were collected for biochemistry and urine albumin/creatinine measurements (uACR). Endothelial function assessments were performed by laser Doppler flowmetry/imaging. DPN was considered present if there was an abnormal finding in monofilament (≤8 of 10 points) or neurothesiometer testing≥25V on either foot. Plasma apoC-III was assessed by ELISA. Monofilament and neurothesiometer readings were measured in 1981 patients, mean age 57.4±10.8 years old. DPN prevalence was 10.8% (n=214). Patients with DPN compared to those without, were significantly older (p<0.0001), with longer duration of T2D (p<0.0001), had higher BMI (p=0.006), higher glucose (p=0.015) and HbA1c (p<0.0001), Systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p<0.0001), lower eGFR (p<0.0001), higher urine ACR (p<0.0001), poorer endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation (both p<0.0001), higher VCAM-1 (p<0.0001) and higher apoC-III [285.3 (195.2-405.6) vs 242.9(165.0-344.0) μg/ml]. After adjustment, log transformed apoC-III, remained independently associated with the presence of DPN (B=0.965, SE=0.397, p=0.015). Plasma apoC-III is higher in patients with DPN. Apart from its known association with lipids and macrovascular complications, this study suggests its association with DPN. Whether regulating apoC-III metabolism may be an important new therapeutic approach to managing dyslipidemia and microvascular complications in T2D remains to be proven in future mechanistic and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High-calcium diet enhances vasorelaxation in nitric oxide-deficient hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jolma, P; Kalliovalkama, J; Tolvanen, J P; Kööbi, P; Kähönen, M; Hutri-Kähönen, N; Wu, X; Pörsti, I

    2000-09-01

    Because the effects of calcium supplementation on arterial tone in nitric oxide-deficient hypertension are unknown, we investigated the influence of elevating dietary calcium from 1.1 to 3.0% in Wistar rats treated with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg. kg(-1). day(-1)) for 8 wk. A high-calcium diet attenuated the development of hypertension induced by L-NAME and abrogated the associated impairments of endothelium-independent mesenteric arterial relaxations to nitroprusside, isoproterenol, and cromakalim. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine during nitric oxide synthase inhibition in vitro were decreased in L-NAME rats and improved by calcium supplementation. The inhibition of cyclooxygenase by diclofenac augmented the responses to acetylcholine in L-NAME rats but not in calcium + L-NAME rats. When hyperpolarization of smooth muscle was prevented by KCl precontraction, the responses to acetylcholine during combined nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibition were similar in all groups. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase enhanced the acetylcholine-induced relaxations in L-NAME rats but not in calcium + L-NAME rats. In conclusion, calcium supplementation reduced blood pressure during chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition and abrogated the associated impairments in endothelium-dependent and -independent arterial relaxation. The augmented vasorelaxation after increased calcium intake in L-NAME hypertension may be explained by enhanced hyperpolarization and increased sensitivity to nitric oxide in arterial smooth muscle and decreased vascular production of superoxide and vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  10. Natural product extract of Dicksonia sellowiana induces endothelium-dependent relaxations by a redox-sensitive Src- and Akt-dependent activation of eNOS in porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Rattmann, Yanna D; Anselm, Eric; Kim, Jong-Hun; Dal-Ros, Stéphanie; Auger, Cyril; Miguel, Obdulio G; Santos, Adair R S; Chataigneau, Thierry; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2012-01-01

    The consumption of polyphenol-rich food is associated with a decreased mortality from coronary diseases. This study examined whether a standardized hydroalcoholic extract of Dicksonia sellowiana (HEDS) triggered endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary artery rings and characterized the underlying mechanism. The phosphorylation level of Src, Akt and eNOS was assessed by Western blot analysis, the formation of reactive oxygen species by dihydroethidine staining and the level of eNOS Ser1177 phosphorylation by immunohistochemical staining in sections of coronary arteries. HEDS-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations were strongly reduced by Nω-nitro-L-arginine, an eNOS inhibitor, and by its combination with charybdotoxin plus apamin, inhibitors of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses. These relaxations were markedly reduced by MnTMPyP (a membrane-permeant mimetic of superoxide dismutase), polyethylene glycol catalase (PEG-catalase; a membrane-permeant analog of catalase), and by wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3-kinase). HEDS-induced sustained phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells was abolished by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase and wortmannin. Oral administration of HEDS induced a significant decrease of mean arterial pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These findings indicate that HEDS caused endothelium-dependent relaxations of coronary artery rings through the redox-sensitive activation of the endothelial PI3-kinase/Akt pathway leading to the subsequent activation of eNOS by phosphorylation. HEDS also has antihypertensive properties. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Involvement of endothelium/nitric oxide in vasorelaxation induced by purified green tea (-)epicatechin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Chan, N W; Lau, C W; Yao, X Q; Chan, F L; Chen, Z Y

    1999-04-19

    The present study investigated the involvement of endothelial nitric oxide in relaxation induced by purified green tea (-)epicatechin in rat isolated mesenteric arteries. (-)Epicatechin caused both endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation. NG-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM) and methylene blue (10 microM) significantly attenuated (-)epicatechin-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact tissues. L-Arginine (1 mM) partially antagonized the effect of L-NAME. (-)Epicatechin-induced relaxation was inhibited by Rp-guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate triethylamine. In contrast, indomethacin and glibenclamide had no effect. (-)Epicatechin (100 microM) significantly increased the tissue content of cyclic GMP and NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) or removal of the endothelium abolished this increase. (-)Epicatechin (100 microM) induced an increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Iberiotoxin at 100 nM attenuated (-)epicatechin-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact arteries and this effect was absent in the presence of 100 microM L-NAME. In summary, (-)epicatechin-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation is primarily mediated by nitric oxide and partially through nitric oxide-dependent activation of iberiotoxin-sensitive K+ channels. In addition, there may be a causal link between increased Ca2+ levels and nitric oxide release in response to (-)epicatechin.

  12. Increased contribution of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway in aorta of mice lacking the gene for vimentin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Henrion, D; Ebrahimian, T; Benessiano, J; Colucci-Guyon, E; Langa, F; Lévy, B I; Boulanger, C M

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were designed to investigate endothelial function in the aorta of mice lacking the gene for the cytoskeleton protein vimentin (vim -/- ). Rings with and without endothelium from wild-type (vim +/+ ), heterozygous (vim +/- ), and homozygous (vim -/- ) mice were suspended in organ chambers to record of changes in isometric tension. During phenylephrine contraction, acetylcholine evoked comparable endothelium-dependent relaxations in the three groups. In the presence of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine, acetylcholine caused endothelium-dependent contractions, which were greater in vim -/- than in vim +/+ and vim +/- aortas. Indomethacin did not affect relaxation to acetylcholine in vim +/+ or in vim +/-, but it significantly increased the maximal response in vim -/- (67 +/- 7 vs. 102 +/- 4%). Response to acetylcholine in vim -/- aortas was not affected by cyclooxygenase type 2 inhibitor NS-398, the thromboxane receptor antagonist SQ-29,548, or superoxide dismutase. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were not different between vim +/+ and vim -/- mice and were not affected by cyclooxygenase inhibition. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels, which were increased to a comparable level by acetylcholine in vim +/+ and vim -/-, were augmented by indomethacin in vim -/- aortas but not in vim +/+ aortas. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was not different between vim +/+ and vim -/- preparations. These results suggest that despite comparable endothelium-dependent responses to acetylcholine, endothelial cells from vim -/- mice release a cyclooxygenase product that compensates the augmented contribution of nitric oxide.

  13. Vascular Tone Regulation Induced by C-Type Natriuretic Peptide: Differences in Endothelium-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms Involved in Normotensive and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Caniffi, Carolina; Cerniello, Flavia M.; Gobetto, María N.; Sueiro, María L.; Arranz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Given that the role of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) in the regulation of vascular tone in hypertensive states is unclear, we hypothesized that impaired response of the nitric oxide system to CNP in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) could affect vascular relaxation induced by the peptide in this model of hypertension, and that other endothelial systems or potassium channels opening could also be involved. We examined the effect of CNP on isolated SHR aortas, and the hindlimb vascular resistance (HVR) in response to CNP administration compared to normotensive rats. Aortas were mounted in an isometric organ bath and contracted with phenylephrine. CNP relaxed arteries in a concentration-dependent manner but was less potent in inducing relaxation in SHR. The action of CNP was diminished by removal of the endothelium, inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, and inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one in both groups. In contrast, blockade of cyclooxygenase or subtype 2 bradykinin receptor increased CNP potency only in SHR. In both Wistar and SHR, CNP relaxation was blunted by tetraethylammonium and partially inhibited by BaCl2 and iberiotoxin, indicating that it was due to opening of the Kir and BKCa channels. However, SHR seem to be more sensitive to Kir channel blockade and less sensitive to BKCa channel blockade than normotensive rats. In addition, CNP decreases HVR in Wistar and SHR, but the effect of CNP increasing blood flow was more marked in SHR. We conclude that CNP induces aorta relaxation by activation of the nitric oxide system and opening of potassium channels, but the response to the peptide is impaired in conductance vessel of hypertensive rats. PMID:27936197

  14. Regulation of nitric oxide synthesis by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    MacAllister, R. J.; Parry, H.; Kimoto, M.; Ogawa, T.; Russell, R. J.; Hodson, H.; Whitley, G. S.; Vallance, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), an enzyme that metabolizes the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors NG-monomethyl-arginine and NG,NG-dimethy-L-arginine to citrulline, was identified by Western blotting in rat and human tissue homogenates. 2. S-2-amino-4(3-methylguanidino)butanoic acid (4124W) inhibited the metabolism of [14C]-NG-monomethyl-L-arginine to [14C]-citrulline by rat liver homogenates (IC50 416 +/- 66 microM; n = 9), human cultured endothelial cells (IC50 250 +/- 34 microM; n = 9) and isolated purified dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase. 3. Addition of 4124W to culture medium increased the accumulation of endogenously-generated NG,NG-dimethy-L-arginine in the supernatant of human cultured endothelial cells from 3.1 +/- 0.3 to 5 +/- 0.7 microM (n = 15; P < 0.005). 4. 4124W (1 microM - 1 mM) had no direct effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity but caused endothelium-dependent contraction of rat aortic rings (1 mM 4124W increased tone by 81.5 +/- 9.6% of that caused by phenylephrine 100 nM). This effect was reversed by L-arginine (100 microM). 4124W reversed endothelium-dependent relaxation of human saphenous vein (19.2 +/- 6.7% reversal of bradykinin-induced relaxation at 1 mM 4124W). 5. These data suggest that inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase increases the intracellular contraction of NG,NG-dimethyl-L-arginine sufficiently to inhibit nitric oxide synthesis. Inhibiting the activity of DDAH may provide an alternative mechanism for inhibition of nitric oxide synthases and changes in the activity of DDAH could contribute to pathophysiological alterations in NO generation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8982498

  15. [Effects of endotheline and nitric oxide on vascular tonicity in patients with chronic cardiac failure].

    PubMed

    Denisov, E N; Kots, Ia I; Bakhtiiarov, R Z; Gumanova, N G

    2007-01-01

    To examine effects of endotheline-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) on endothelium-dependent mechanisms of vascular tonicity regulation in patients with chronic cardiac failure (CCF) of FC I-IV (NYHA). Vascular reactions of 94 patients with CCF of FC I-IV were examined according to D.S. Celermajer method using ultrasound of high resolution. Tissue oxygenation was studied with transcutaneous polarography (TCM-2, Radiometer). Parameters of circulating erythrocytes were studied by impurity spectrum. Endothelial NO-synthase expression was determined with application of monoclonal antibodies to endothelial NO-synthase. NO metabolites were studied with colorimetric method using Griss reagent. ET-1 was measured in plasma by enzyme immunoassay. The control group consisted of 28 healthy men aged 20 to 54 years. Patients with CCF of FC I-IV have reduced endothelium-dependent vascular reactions progressing with aggravation of CCF. The causes of the disorders lie in altered metabolism of ET-1 and NO in CCF. CCF patients demonstrate changes in endothelium-dependent mechanisms of vascular tonicity regulation caused by disturbed metabolism of ET-1 and NO developing in abnormal regime of tissue oxygenation and depending on CCF severity.

  16. Nitric oxide neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M

    1996-06-01

    Derangements in glutamate neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including, stroke, epilepsy, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtype of glutamate receptors results in the influx of calcium which binds calmodulin and activates neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to convent L-arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). NO has many roles in the central nervous system as a messenger molecule, however, when generated in excess NO can be neurotoxic. Excess NO is in part responsible for glutamate neurotoxicity in primary neuronal cell culture and in animal models of stroke. It is likely that most of the neurotoxic actions of NO are mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOO-), the reaction product from NO and superoxide anion. In pathologic conditions, peroxynitrite and oxygen free radicals can be generated in excess of a cell antioxidant capacity resulting in severe damage to cellular constituents including proteins, DNA and lipids. The inherent biochemical and physiological characteristics of the brain, including high lipid concentrations and energy requirements, make it particularly susceptible to free radical and oxidant mediated insult. Increasing evidence indicates that many neurologic disorders may have components of free radical and oxidative stress induced injury.

  17. Participation of K+ channels in the endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent components of the relaxant effect of rosuvastatin in rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    López, Jorge; Mendoza, Roberto; Cleva Villanueva, Guadalupe; Martínez, Gustavo; Castillo, Enrique F; Castillo, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Rosuvastatin was tested on rat aortic rings in the presence and absence of K(+) channel blockers, mevalonic acid, and inhibitors of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, or endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor synthesis. The direct vascular effects of rosuvastatin were then evaluated by obtaining dose-response curves. Rosuvastatin relaxed aortic rings with and, to a lesser degree, without endothelium. Under both these conditions this effect was partially inhibited by L-NAME, tetraethylammonium, apamin + charybdotoxin (only administered together), or mevalonic acid. The combination of L-NAME with any of the other 3 treatments completely inhibited the effect of rosuvastatin, but indomethacin, clotrimazol, glibenclamide, charybdotoxin, or apamin alone had no effect. Therefore, the relaxation induced by rosuvastatin, even in the absence of endothelium, is partially related to 2 different mechanisms, one that is isoprenoid dependent and NO mediated and the other that is tied to the opening of Ca( 2+)-dependent K(+) channels of the slow subfamily.

  18. Nitric oxide mediates prolyl hydroxylase 3 expression in mesangial cells and in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Aglan, Ahmed; Longen, Sebastian; Dehne, Nathalie; Köhler, Yvette; Hassan, Mohamed; Beck, Martina; Tredup, Claudia; Boosen, Meike; Hsieh, Tzung-Harn Louise; Schaefer, Liliana; Beck, Karl-Friedrich; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2017-03-01

    Renal mesangial cells are regarded as main players in glomerular inflammatory diseases. To investigate a possible crosstalk between inflammatory and hypoxia-driven signaling processes, we stimulated cultured mouse mesangial cells with different inflammatory agents and analyzed the expression of prolyl hydroxylase domain containing proteins (PHDs), the main regulators of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stability. Administration of IL-1β (1 nM) and TNF-α (1 nM), a combination further referred to as cytokine mix (CM), resulted in a fivefold increase in PHD3 but not PHD1 and PHD2 mRNA expression compared to untreated controls. In contrast, a combination of IL-1β, TNF-α with lipopolysaccharide (10 μg/ml), and interferon-γ (20 ng/ml) designated as CM+ showed a high (60-fold) induction of PHD3 and a moderate (twofold) induction of PHD2 mRNA expression. Interestingly, CM+ but not CM induced the expression of inducible NO synthase and endogenously produced NO was responsible for the immense induction of PHD3 in mesangial cells treated with CM+. We found that CM+ affected PHD3 expression mainly via the NO/HIF axis, whereas PHD3 regulation by CM occurred in a NF-κB-dependent manner. In turn, silencing of PHD3 expression resulted in a decrease in the mRNA expression of ICAM-1, MIP-2, MCP-1, and CXCL-10, which are under control of NF-κB. In a rat model of mesangio-proliferative glomerulonephritis, PHD3 mRNA and protein expression was markedly induced and this effect was nearly abolished when rats were treated with the iNOS-specific inhibitor L-NIL, thus confirming our findings also in vivo.

  19. Nitric oxide-mediated sensitization of resistant tumor cells to apoptosis by chemo-immunotherapeutics☆

    PubMed Central

    Bonavida, Benjamin; Garban, Hermes

    2015-01-01

    The generation of NO by the various NO synthases in normal and malignant tissues is manifested by various biological effects that are involved in the regulation of cell survival, differentiation and cell death. The role of NO in the cytotoxic immune response was first revealed by demonstrating the induction of iNOS in target cells by immune cytokines (e.g. IFN-γ, IL-1, TNF-α, etc.) and resulting in the sensitization of resistant tumor cells to death ligands-induced apoptosis. Endogenous/exogenous NO mediated its immune sensitizing effect by inhibiting NF-κΒ activity and downstream, inactivating the repressor transcription factor YY1, which inhibited both Fas and DR5 expressions. In addition, NO-mediated inhibition of NF-κΒ activity and inhibition downstream of its anti-apoptotic gene targets sensitized the tumor cells to apoptosis by chemotherapeutic drugs. We have identified in tumor cells a dysregulated pro-survival/anti-apoptotic loop consisting of NF-κB/Snail/YY1/RKIP/PTEN and its modification by NO was responsible, in large, for the reversal of chemo and immune resistance and sensitization to apoptotic mechanisms by cytotoxic agents. Moreover, tumor cells treated with exogenous NO donors resulted in the inhibition of NF-κΒ activity via S-nitrosylation of p50 and p65, inhibition of Snail (NF-κΒ target gene), inhibition of transcription repression by S-nitrosylation of YY1 and subsequent inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), induction of RKIP (inhibition of the transcription repressor Snail), and induction of PTEN (inhibition of the repressors Snail and YY1). Further, each gene product modified by NO in the loop was involved in chemo-immunosensitization. These above findings demonstrated that NO donors interference in the regulatory circuitry result in chemo-immunosensitization and inhibition of EMT. Overall, these observations suggest the potential anti-tumor therapeutic effect of NO donors in combination with subtoxic chemo-immuno drugs. This combination acts on multiple facets including reversal of chemo-immune resistance, and inhibition of both EMT and metastasis. PMID:26432660

  20. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  1. The basics about nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Bruckdorfer, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gas and a free radical which is now recognised to have very important physiological roles. It is synthesised enzymatically from the amino acid L-arginine in a number of tissues using the three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, one of which is inducible and can form much large amounts of NO. NO is important in the endothelium-dependent regulation of blood flow and pressure as well as inhibiting the activation of blood platelets. NO is recognised as a neurotransmitter at least in certain types of nerves. Along with other free radicals, NO is also important in the primary defence mechanisms against attack by micro-organisms. NO has a close interaction with iron-containing proteins and binds to haem. By this process NO activates a haem-containing enzyme called soluble guanylyl cyclase which is activated a thousand fold to produce the signalling molecule cyclic GMP. This has many effects at the molecular level to set in train the pathways which propagate the diverse physiological actions of NO. Although this pathway through cyclic GMP is important, this is by no means the only mechanism by which NO influences the activities of the cell. These alternative pathways depend on modification of the structure of enzymes and structural proteins in several different ways. Most of these modifications result from the actions of NO with other free radicals such as oxygen and superoxide anions to produce reactive oxidants. The oxidants modify the proteins by, among others, nitrosation and nitration of proteins of thiol groups and aromatic amino acids respectively. These changes introduce potential new subtleties to the effects on NO on cellular function which are only now being explored. Protein modifications by NO are even more evident in many inflammatory disorders and may account, at least to some extent, to the pathology seen in these conditions.

  2. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Badran, Mohammad; Abuyassin, Bisher; Golbidi, Saeid; Ayas, Najib; Laher, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is often present in diabetic (DB) patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7(m) +/+ Lepr(db) /J) (db/db) mice (10 weeks old) and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA) for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic), IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic), IADB (intermittent air diabetic), and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic) groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO) were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice.

  3. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ayas, Najib

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is often present in diabetic (DB) patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7m +/+ Leprdb/J) (db/db) mice (10 weeks old) and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA) for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic), IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic), IADB (intermittent air diabetic), and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic) groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO) were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice. PMID:27840666

  4. Age-related changes to vascular protease-activated receptor 2 in metabolic syndrome: a relationship between oxidative stress, receptor expression, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kana; Kagota, Satomi; McGuire, John J; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2017-04-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is expressed in vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide (NO) - cyclic GMP-mediated vasodilation in response to 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fLIGRLO), a PAR2-activating peptide, is impaired in aortas from aged SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr (SHRSP.ZF) rats with metabolic syndrome. Here we investigated mechanisms linking PAR2's vascular effects to phenotypic characteristics of male SHRSP.ZF rats at 10, 20, and 30 weeks of age. We found vasodilation responses to either 2fLIGRLO or enzyme-mediated PAR2 activation by trypsin were sustained until 20 weeks and lessened at 30 weeks. PAR2 protein and mRNA levels were lower in aortas at 30 weeks than at 10 and 20 weeks. PAR2-mediated responses positively correlated with PAR2 protein and mRNA levels. Decreased cGMP accumulation in the presence of 2fLIGRLO paralleled the decreased relaxations elicited by nitroprusside and the cGMP analog 8-pCPT-cGMP, and the less soluble guanylyl cyclase protein at 30 weeks. 2fLIGRLO-induced relaxation was negatively correlated with serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, an index of oxidative stress, which increased with age. Forward stepwise data regression supported a model of age-related decreases in PAR2 function resulting from decreased PAR2 mRNA and increased oxidative stress. We conclude that decreased responsiveness of aortic smooth muscle to NO and downregulation of receptor expression impair PAR2 functions at later stages of metabolic syndrome in SHRSP.ZF rats.

  5. A chemically defined 2,3-trans procyanidin fraction from willow bark causes redox-sensitive endothelium-dependent relaxation in porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Kaufeld, Aurica M; Pertz, Heinz H; Kolodziej, Herbert

    2014-07-25

    Extracts of the bark of willow species (Salix spp.) are popular herbal remedies to relieve fever and inflammation. The effects are attributed to salicin and structurally related phenolic metabolites, while polyphenols including procyanidins are suggested to contribute to the overall effect of willow bark. This study aimed at investigating the relaxant response to a highly purified and chemically defined 2,3-trans procyanidin fraction in porcine coronary arteries. The procyanidin sample produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in U46619-precontracted tissues. Relaxation was predominantly mediated through the redox-sensitive activation of the endothelial phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, leading to the subsequent activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by phosphorylation, as evidenced by Western blotting using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). That the relaxant response to Salix procyanidins was reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent with O2(-) as the key species followed from densitometric analysis using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA assay) and employment of various ROS inhibitors, respectively. The data also suggested the modification of intracellular Ca(2+) levels and KCa channel functions. In addition, our organ bath studies showed that Salix procyanidins reversed the abrogation of the relaxant response to bradykinin by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) in coronary arteries, suggesting a vasoprotective effect of willow bark against detrimental oxLDL in pathological conditions. Taken together, our findings suggest for the first time that 2,3-trans procyanidins may contribute not only to the beneficial effects of willow bark but also to health-promoting benefits of diverse natural products of plant origin.

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development.

  7. Nitric oxide, malnutrition and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Brunini, Tatiana M C; Moss, Monique B; Siqueira, Mariana A S; Santos, Sérgio F F; Lugon, Jocemir R; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2007-04-01

    The conditionally essential amino acid L-arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, a key second messenger involved in physiological functions including endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. Extracellular L-arginine transport seems to be essential for the production of NO by the action of NO synthases (NOS), even when the intracellular levels of L-arginine are available in excess (L-arginine paradox). Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a complex clinical condition associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis leading to cardiovascular events. Various studies document that markers of malnutrition and inflammation, such as low body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). There is considerable literature demonstrating that a disturbance in the nitric oxide control mechanism plays a role in mediating the haemodynamic and haemostatic disorders present in CRF. Endogenous analogues of L-arginine, ADMA and L-NMMA, which can inhibit NO synthesis and L-arginine transport, are increased whilst L-arginine is reduced in plasma from all stages of CRF patients. In this context, the uptake of L-arginine in blood cells is increased in undialysed CRF patients and in patients treated by CAPD and haemodialysis. In platelets obtained from haemodialysis patients, the activation of L-arginine transport and NO production was limited to well-nourished patients. Impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity, coupled with malnutrition and inflammation, may contribute to increased incidence of atherothrombotic events in CRF. This article summarizes the current knowledge of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and malnutrition in CRF and briefly describes possible therapeutic interventions.

  8. Modulation of nitric-oxide synthase by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Tonnessen, B H; Severson, S R; Hurt, R D; Miller, V M

    2000-11-01

    Effects of nicotine on arterial endothelium-dependent relaxations mediated by nitric oxide are controversial. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that nicotine can directly alter activity of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS). NOS from aortic endothelial cells of untreated dogs and recombinant eNOS, neuronal NOS, and inducible NOS were used for these experiments. NOS activity was determined as conversion of L-[(3)H]arginine to L-[(3)H]citrulline in the absence or presence of nicotine (10(-7)-10(-3) M) in vitro. In separate assays, concentrations of cofactors NADPH, FAD, and tetrahydrobioprotein were reduced by half to assess for possible interaction with nicotine. With enzyme from aortic endothelial cells, total and calcium-dependent accumulation of citrulline increased by 30% in the presence of 10(-5) M nicotine. Nicotine dose dependently also increased citrulline accumulation by recombinant eNOS and neuronal NOS but not inducible NOS. Effects of nicotine on accumulation of citrulline by isolated eNOS and recombinant eNOS were further modulated by changes in the concentration of NADPH in the incubation solution. Our data demonstrate a significant effect of nicotine on eNOS-mediated citrulline accumulation. These results suggest that effects of nicotine on production of nitric oxide may depend on NADPH or oxygen radical interactions with NOS and thus may explain, in part, inconsistent findings of changes in production of endothelium-derived nitric oxide with nicotine administration.

  9. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  10. [Nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Whole blood viscosity and erythrocyte deformability are related to endothelium-dependent vasodilation and coronary risk in the elderly. The prospective investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS) study.

    PubMed

    Sandhagen, Bo; Lind, Lars

    2012-01-01

    It has previously been shown that a high hemoglobin value, a major determinant of whole blood viscosity (WBV), predicts cardiovascular events. One putative mechanism might be an impaired endothelial function. Erythrocyte deformability is another rheologic feature of the erythrocyte being of importance for the flow properties of the blood, especially in the capillaries. The present study evaluates the relationships between blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability assessed as erythrocyte fluidity (EF), coronary risk and endothelial vasodilatory function. In the population-based PIVUS study (1016 subjects aged 70); endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) was evaluated by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine given in the brachial artery and the brachial artery ultrasound technique with measurement of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). WBV, plasma viscosity (PV) and EF were measured in a random sample of 573 subjects. WBV and PV were positively and EF negatively related to Framingham risk score. EDV was inversely related to both whole blood and plasma viscosity. FMD was not related to any rheologic variable. In multiple regression analyses WBV and EF were significantly related to EDV independently of gender, hypertension, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, obesity and diabetes. Acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in the forearm, but not FMD, was negatively related to whole blood viscosity and positively related to EF independently of traditional risk factors in elderly subjects, indicating a pathophysiological link between impaired hemorheology and coronary risk.

  12. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids and Endothelium-Dependent Responses

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, William B.; Fleming, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid that are produced by the vascular endothelium in response to agonists such as bradykinin and acetylcholine or physical stimuli such as shear stress or cyclic stretch. In the vasculature, the EETs have biological actions that are involved in the regulation of vascular tone, hemostasis and inflammation. In pre-constricted arteries in vitro, EETs activate calcium-activated potassium channels on vascular smooth muscle and the endothelium causing membrane hyperpolarization and relaxation. These effects are observed in a variety of arteries from experimental animals and humans; however, this is not a universal finding in all arteries. The mechanism of EET action may vary. In some arteries, EETs are released from the endothelium and are transferred to the smooth muscle where they cause potassium channel activation, hyperpolarization and relaxation through a G-protein coupled mechanism or transient receptor potential (TRP) channel activation. In other arteries, EETs activate TRP channels on the endothelium to causes endothelial hyperpolarization that is transferred to the smooth muscle by gap junctions or potassium ion. Some arteries use a combination of mechanisms. Acetylcholine and bradykinin increase blood flow in dogs and humans that is inhibited by potassium channel blockers and cytochrome P450 inhibitors. Thus, the EETs are endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors mediating a portion of the relaxations to acetylcholine, bradykinin, shear stress and cyclic stretch and regulate vascular tone in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20224870

  13. Elevated levels of the serum endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase and metabolic control in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Fu, Yun-feng; Fu, Si-hai; Zhou, Hong-hao

    2003-08-01

    This study was designed to determine the relationship between elevated levels of the endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and metabolic control in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Serum levels of ADMA were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography at 8 weeks after diabetes was induced. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was tested in aortic rings from nondiabetic age-matched control, untreated diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic rats to evaluate endothelial function. Serum concentrations of glucose, glycosylated serum protein, and malondialdehyde were examined to estimate metabolic control. Serum levels of ADMA increased dramatically in untreated diabetic rats compared with control rats. This elevation in ADMA levels was accompanied by impairment of the endothelium-dependent relaxation response to acetylcholine in aortic rings. Long-term insulin treatment not only prevented the elevation of serum ADMA levels, but also improved the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation in diabetic rats. Serum levels of glucose, glycosylated serum protein, and malondialdehyde were significantly increased in parallel with the elevation of ADMA in untreated diabetic rats compared with control rats. These parameters were normalized after diabetic rats received insulin treatment for 8 weeks. These results provide the first evidence that an elevation in the concentration of ADMA in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes is closely related to metabolic control of the disease.

  14. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide production stimulated by the bioflavonoid chrysin in rat isolated aorta.

    PubMed

    Villar, Inmaculada Concepción; Vera, Rocío; Galisteo, Milagros; O'Valle, Francisco; Romero, Miguel; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Duarte, Juan

    2005-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of the bioflavonoid chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) were analysed on nitric oxide (NO) production from vascular endothelium. In aortic rings, incubation with chrysin or acetylcholine (both at 10 microM) increased L-NAME-sensitive endothelial NO release as measured using the fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2 DA). Moreover, chrysin increased cGMP accumulation only in aortic rings with endothelium. However, at this concentration, chrysin had no effect either on basal or on NADPH-stimulated vascular superoxide production. Moreover, at this low concentration, chrysin, similar to acetylcholine, induced aortic relaxation, which was abolished by both endothelial deprivation and NO synthase inhibition. Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by chrysin was unaltered by removal of extracellular calcium and incubation with the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA, while the phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin suppressed the endothelial dependence. In conclusion, chrysin stimulated NO release from endothelial cells leading to vascular cGMP accumulation and subsequent endothelium dependent aortic relaxation. Chrysin-stimulated NO release is calcium independent and possibly mediated via PI3-kinase.

  16. Role of superoxide anion on basal and stimulated nitric oxide activity in neonatal piglet pulmonary vessels.

    PubMed

    Villamor, Eduardo; Kessels, Carolina G A; Fischer, Marc A J; Bast, Aalt; de Mey, Jo G R; Blanco, Carlos E

    2003-09-01

    The superoxide anion (O2*-) appears to be an important modulator of nitric oxide bioavailability. Enzymatic scavenging of O2*- is carried out by superoxide dismutase (SOD). The present study was designed to characterize the developmental changes on pulmonary vascular reactivity induced by 1) exogenous Cu/Zn SOD, 2) several putative SOD mimetics, and 3) endogenous SOD inhibition. We also analyzed age-related changes on pulmonary SOD activity and vascular O2*- levels. SOD (1-300 U/mL) produced endothelium-dependent relaxation of U46619-contracted intrapulmonary arteries (fourth branch) and veins from 12- to 24-h-old and 2-wk-old piglets. SOD-induced relaxation was greater in pulmonary arteries and was abolished by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. SOD induced a greater pulmonary artery relaxation in the 2-wk-old than in the 12- to 24-h-old piglet. SOD (100 U/mL) did not modify acetylcholine-induced relaxation in pulmonary arteries. In contrast, endogenous SOD inhibition by diethyldithiocarbamate (3 mM) impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation in pulmonary arteries from newborn but not from 2-wk-old piglets. Total SOD activity in lung tissue did not change with postnatal age. With the use of dihydroethidium, an oxidant-sensitive fluorescent probe, we did not find significant age- or vessel-related differences in O2*- presence. From the putative SOD mimetics tested, only the metal salts MnCl2 and CuSO4 reproduced the vascular effects of SOD. In summary, SOD produces endothelium-dependent pulmonary vascular relaxation by protecting nitric oxide from destruction by O2*-. This effect was less marked in newborns than in 2-wk-old piglets. In contrast, pulmonary arteries from newborn piglets are more sensitive to the inhibition of endogenous SOD.

  17. Relation of improvement in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation after rosiglitazone to changes in asymmetric dimethylarginine, endothelin-1, and C-reactive protein in nondiabetic patients with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Wen-Jone; Cheng, Wern-Cherng; Lin, Jong-Wei; Chen, Ming-Fong; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2006-10-15

    The mechanisms by which thiazolidinediones exert beneficial effects on the endothelium are still not clear. We examined the effects of rosiglitazone on the plasma markers of metabolic control (glucose, insulin, adiponectin, resistin, and lipid profiles), markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6, soluble CD40 ligand, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), and markers of vasoreactivity (asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMA] and endothelin-1) and analyzed the relations between changes in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery and changes in these markers to elucidate their roles in mediating the vascular protective effects of rosiglitazone. Of 70 nondiabetic patients who met a modified National Cholesterol Education Program definition of the metabolic syndrome, 35 were randomized to receive rosiglitazone (4 mg/day) and 35 to receive placebo for 8 weeks. At study end, treatment with rosiglitazone had significantly reduced plasma insulin (-25%, p = 0.004) and resistin (-16%, p <0.001), increased adiponectin (164%, p <0.001), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (16%, p = 0.005), and apolipoprotein-B (14%, p = 0.003), and decreased CRP (-30%, p = 0.005), soluble CD40 ligand (-20%, p = 0.014), ADMA (-16%, p <0.001), and endothelin-1 (-11%, p <0.001) concentrations and systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Rosiglitazone treatment significantly improved flow-mediated dilation (p <0.001) and nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation (p = 0.001) of the right brachial artery. On multivariate analysis, changes in ADMA, endothelin-1, and CRP were independent predictors of improved endothelial reactivity with rosiglitazone. In conclusion, we have, for the first time, demonstrated the independent associations between the improvement in flow-mediated dilation and reductions in ADMA, endothelin-1, and CRP after 8 weeks of treatment with rosiglitazone in nondiabetic patients with the

  18. Nitric oxide is a mediator of tachykinin NK3 receptor-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, A.; Takano, Y.; Honda, K.; Saito, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Kamiya, H.

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanism of vasodilatation induced by tachykinin peptides was studied in isolated mesenteric arteries of rats. 2. Senktide, a selective NK3 agonist, elicited potent endothelium-dependent relaxation of arteries precontracted with phenylephrine (10(-5) M), but an NK1 agonist did not. 3. A non-peptide NK3 antagonist, SR 142801, inhibited senktide-induced relaxation. However, a non-peptide NK1 antagonist, CP-96,345, and a peptide-based NK2 antagonist, L-659,877, had no effect on senktide-induced relaxation. 4. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), a nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor, markedly attenuated the relaxant response to senktide. 5. These results suggest that the endothelium of rat mesenteric arteries possesses tachykinin NK3 receptors, and that NK3 agonist-induced vasodilatation is mediated by release of nitric oxide (NO) from the endothelium. PMID:8680725

  19. Nitric oxide-dependent hypotensive effects of wax gourd juice.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Miki; Shigekuni, Yukiko; Obi, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Mitsuya; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Hideo; Etoh, Takeomi; Iwai, Sumio

    2011-11-18

    The wax gourd (Benincasa hispida (Thunb) Cong.) is a long-season vegetable that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat high blood pressure. However, precise details of its effect and the mechanism of action involved are still lacking. Ten-fold-condensed wax gourd juice was used for the experiments. We measured (1) blood pressure of anesthetized normal Wistar rats in vivo, (2) isolated rat aortic contraction and relaxation, and (3) nitric oxide production from cultured porcine endothelial cells. The rats mentioned had not been treated with the investigational medicine. Intravenous injection of the juice produced a dose-dependent decrease in blood pressure. Treatment with the juice induced concentration-dependent relaxation of isolated rat aortic rings that had been precontracted with noradrenaline. The relaxation induced by the juice was strongly inhibited by treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) or endothelial denudation. Treatment with the juice produced NO from cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells. This NO production was significantly inhibited by l-NAME. The present findings suggest that wax gourd juice exerts a hypotensive effect via endothelium-dependent vasodilation. The main endothelium-derived relaxing factor involved might be NO. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Silicic acid in drinking water prevents age-related alterations in the endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation modulating eNOS and AQP1 expression in experimental mice: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Buffoli, Barbara; Foglio, Eleonora; Borsani, Elisa; Exley, Christopher; Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio

    2013-06-01

    The maintenance of endothelial integrity is of great importance in coping with age-related vascular alterations. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide is one of the various vasoactive substances able to regulate vascular tone and homeostasis, and whose decrease is known to be related with senescence in endothelial cells. There are reports on the efficacy of silicon, especially as silicic acid, in protecting vascular integrity during age-related vascular diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of supplementation of silicic acid in drinking water in the maintenance of vascular health in a mouse model of early physiological aging. In particular, we evaluated the relationship between Si supplementation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, taking into account also the aquaporin-1 (AQP-1) isoform that, as recently reported, seems to be involved in nitric oxide transport across cell membranes. Our results showed that silicic acid supplementation increased both eNOS and AQP-1 expression, suggesting that silicic acid modulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and aquaporin-1 could represent a potential strategy against age-related vascular senescence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea leads to enhanced pulmonary vascular nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Lattimore, Jo-Dee L; Wilcox, Ian; Adams, Mark R; Kilian, Jens G; Celermajer, David S

    2008-05-23

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with pulmonary hypertension, however neither the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disease nor the effect of successful treatment of OSA on pulmonary vascular physiology has been characterised. Seven subjects aged 52 (range 36-63) years with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea (apnoea-hypopnoea index>15/h) had detailed pulmonary vascular reactivity studies, before and after 3 months of successful treatment with nasal continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP). On both occasions, we measured pulmonary pressure, flow velocity, flow and resistance, at baseline and in response to acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent dilator), sodium nitroprusside (an endothelium-independent dilator), l-NMMA (an antagonist of nitric oxide synthesis) and l-Arginine (the substrate of nitric oxide). At baseline, pulmonary flow increased in response to acetylcholine and nitroprusside and fell in response to l-NMMA. Following CPAP treatment, the decrease in flow to l-NMMA was significantly greater (to 62+/-6% of control value vs 85+/-6% of pre-treatment; p=0.01), consistent with enhanced basal release of nitric oxide. The acetylcholine response tended to be greater after treatment (174+/-26% of control vs 147+/-12% of pre-CPAP, p=0.22), however the nitroprusside response was unchanged. Successful treatment of obstructive sleep apnoeic episodes in sleep results in enhanced nitric oxide release by the pulmonary microvascular circulation.

  2. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors do not alter functional hyperemia in canine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Barclay, J K; Woodley, N E

    1994-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that endothelium-derived products contribute to functional hyperemia in skeletal muscle, we infused nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, either 200 microM N omega-nitro-L-arginine (NNA) (N = 4) or 1 mM N gamma-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA) (N = 4), before and during 6 min of 4 Hz stimulation of canine gastrocnemius in situ. We infused saline (N = 4) as a control. NNA significantly decreased steady-level resting flow by 3.8 +/- 0.4 mL.kg-1.s-1. The increase in flow from rest to 5 min of stimulation was not changed by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. We also stimulated muscles for 60 min either with saline infusion (N = 4) or with the infusion of saline during the first 15 min and NNA for the remaining 45 min (n = 4). There was no difference in the flow during contractions. To clarify the effect of these inhibitors on canine vessels, we challenged rings of canine femoral artery with and without endothelium with acetylcholine and bradykinin (both 1 microM) before and after the addition of NNA and NMMA (both 10 microM). The nitric oxide synthase inhibitors decreased the relaxation accompanying acetylcholine. Both inhibitors caused only endothelium-intact rings to contract. Thus, the presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor identified an endothelium-dependent contribution to the regulation of blood flow to skeletal muscle at rest but had no effect on functional hyperemia.

  3. Involvement of nitric oxide-mediated alternative pathway in tolerance of wheat to drought stress by optimizing photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huahua; Huang, Junjun; Li, Yan; Li, Changan; Hou, Junjie; Liang, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    NO-mediated alternative pathway plays an important role in protecting wheat seedlings against drought stress through dissipating excessive reducing equivalents generated by photosynthesis. Alternative pathway (AP) has been proven to be involved in responses to various stresses. However, the mechanisms of AP in defense response to drought stress are still lacking. The aims of this work are to investigate the role of AP in drought tolerance and how AP is induced under drought stress using two wheat cultivars with different drought tolerance. Our results showed that Longchun22 cultivar is more tolerant to drought than 98SN146 cultivar. Seedlings exposed to drought led to a significant increase in AP, and it increased more in Longchun22. Furthermore, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, qP) decreased significantly in drought-treated seedlings, especially in 98SN146, indicating that photoinhibition occurred under drought stress. Pretreatment with SHAM, the malate-oxaloacetate shuttle activity and photosynthetic efficiency were further inhibited in drought-treated seedlings, resulting in more serious oxidative damage as indicated by higher levels of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, NO modulated AP under drought stress by increasing AOX1a expression and pyruvate content. Taken together, these results indicate that NO-mediated AP is involved in optimizing photosynthesis under drought stress by avoiding the over-reduction of photosynthetic electron transport chain, thus reducing reactive oxygen species production and oxidative damage in wheat leaves.

  4. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  5. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  6. Vascular estrogen receptors and endothelium-derived nitric oxide production in the mouse aorta. Gender difference and effect of estrogen receptor gene disruption.

    PubMed Central

    Rubanyi, G M; Freay, A D; Kauser, K; Sukovich, D; Burton, G; Lubahn, D B; Couse, J F; Curtis, S W; Korach, K S

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that estrogen receptors (ER) in the blood vessel wall play a role in the modulation of the release of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO). Both basal and stimulated release of EDNO were determined in aortic rings isolated from female and male wild-type and male homozygous estrogen receptor knock-out (ERKO) mice. 125I-17beta-estradiol binding in aortic tissue showed significantly more high affinity cytosolic- nuclear-binding sites in male compared with female wildtype mice. Estrogen receptor transcripts were present in the aorta of male wild-type mice, but they were absent in male ERKO animals. Basal release of EDNO (determined by endothelium-dependent contraction caused by NG-nitro-arginine) was significantly higher in aorta of wild-type male mice compared with wild-type female mice, and significantly lower in the aorta of male ERKO compared with male wild-type mice. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was similar in all groups studied. No difference was observed in the activity of calcium-dependent nitric oxide synthase in homogenates of lungs and brain taken from male wild-type and ERKO mice. These studies show a significant association between the number of estrogen receptors and basal release of EDNO in the aorta of mice, and suggest that decreased vascular estrogen receptor number may represent a novel risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:9153286

  7. Multifaceted role of nitric oxide in an in vitro mouse neuronal injury model: transcriptomic profiling defines the temporal recruitment of death signalling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Shui, Guanghou; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Philip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neuropathologies characterized by oxidative stress. Although nitric oxide has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of oxidative stress observed in several neuropathologies, existent data fail to provide a holistic description of how nitrergic pathobiology elicits neuronal injury. Here we provide a comprehensive description of mechanisms contributing to nitric oxide induced neuronal injury by global transcriptomic profiling. Microarray analyses were undertaken on RNA from murine primary cortical neurons treated with the nitric oxide generator DETA-NONOate (NOC-18, 0.5 mM) for 8–24 hrs. Biological pathway analysis focused upon 3672 gene probes which demonstrated at least a ±1.5-fold expression in a minimum of one out of three time-points and passed statistical analysis (one-way anova, P < 0.05). Numerous enriched processes potentially determining nitric oxide mediated neuronal injury were identified from the transcriptomic profile: cell death, developmental growth and survival, cell cycle, calcium ion homeostasis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial homeostasis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and GSH and nitric oxide metabolism. Our detailed time-course study of nitric oxide induced neuronal injury allowed us to provide the first time a holistic description of the temporal sequence of cellular events contributing to nitrergic injury. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in nitric oxide neuropathologies where nitric oxide mediated injury is causative. PMID:21352476

  8. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-07

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension.

  9. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26739766

  10. Endothelium-driven myocardial growth or nitric oxide at the crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Tirziu, Daniela; Simons, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Endothelium lining the coronary vasculature and the heart chambers is a dynamic sensor that serves a variety of functions including bi-directional communications with cardiac myocytes. Among endothelium-released factors nitric oxide exerts multifactorial effects on various cell types in the heart and may play a role in growth of the vasculature and myocardial hypertrophy. This review summarizes new data regarding the endothelium-to-myocyte signaling focusing on its role in regulation of cardiac hypertrophy through a nitric oxide mediated paracrine signal. PMID:19345317

  11. Role of nitric oxide in coronary vasomotion during handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Y; Kanki, H; Ogawa, S

    1997-11-01

    Endothelium-dependent modulation of coronary vasomotion during increased sympathetic tone remains unclear in normal and atherosclerotic human coronory arteries. We evaluated the role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide in vasomotion during isometric exercise in normal subjects (n = 7) and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) (n = 10). Coronary blood flow and epicardial coronary artery diameter to the handgrip test were measured before and after intracoronary administration of 100 micromol/min of N(G)-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA). Heart rate and aortic blood pressure increased during handgrip test. Handgrip test caused a significant dilation in the diameter of the epicardial coronary artery in normal subjects (9.9% +/- 3.9%, mean +/- SD) and in the diameter of smooth segments of patients with CAD (5% +/- 3.7%, p < 0.05 vs normal subjects). In contrast, the diameter of irregular segments in patients with CAD decreased during handgrip test (-9.8 +/- 3.9%). After L-NMMA, the epicardial coronary artery significantly increased during handgrip test compared with before L-NMMA in normal subjects. L-NMMA did not have any effect on handgrip test induced vasodilation in the smooth segments and vasoconstriction in the irregular segments in the patients with CAD. Handgrip test-induced increases in coronary blood flow did not change after L-NMMA in both groups. Nitric oxide does not play a major role in HNG-induced vasodilation in epicardial and microcirculatory vessels in normal human coronary circulation. Although the decreased release in nitric oxide may modulate the abnormal response of the epicardial coronary artery to handgrip test, this does not explain the paradoxic constrictive response from the depressed but still dilatory response in the patients with CAD.

  12. Nitric oxide: considerations for the treatment of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Terpolilli, Nicole A; Moskowitz, Michael A; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Some 40 years ago it was recognized by Furchgott and colleagues that the endothelium releases a vasodilator, endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Later on, several groups identified EDRF to be a gas, nitric oxide (NO). Since then, NO was identified as one of the most versatile and unique molecules in animal and human biology. Nitric oxide mediates a plethora of physiological functions, for example, maintenance of vascular tone and inflammation. Apart from these physiological functions, NO is also involved in the pathophysiology of various disorders, specifically those in which regulation of blood flow and inflammation has a key role. The aim of the current review is to summarize the role of NO in cerebral ischemia, the most common cause of stroke. PMID:22333622

  13. Influence of nitric oxide on the intracellular reduced glutathione pool: different cellular capacities and strategies to encounter nitric oxide-mediated stress.

    PubMed

    Berendji, D; Kolb-Bachofen, V; Meyer, K L; Kröncke, K D

    1999-10-01

    Different cell types exhibit huge differences towards the cytotoxic action of NO. In search for an explanation, we used subtoxic concentrations of the NO-donors S-nitrosocysteine (SNOC) for short-term challenge and of (Z)-1-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1- ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO) for longer periods of exposure, respectively, and subtoxic concentrations of the oxidant H2O2 to determine the impact on intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations. We find that GSH concentrations are always decreased, but that different cell types show different responses. Incubation of the relatively NO-sensitive murine lymphocytes with both NO-donors, but not with H2O2, resulted in a nearly complete loss of intracellular GSH. Short-term NO-treatment of P815 mastocytoma cells, also sensitive to NO-mediated cell death, decreased GSH to a similar extent only if either glutathione reductase (GSHR) activity or y-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gammaGCS) activity were inhibited concomitantly by specific inhibitors. Long-term NO-treatment of P815 cells, however, resulted in a significant decrease of GSH that could be further enhanced by inhibiting gammaGCS activity. In contrast, neither short-term nor long-term NO-exposure nor H2O2-treatment affected intracellular GSH levels of L929 fibroblasts, which were previously shown to be extremely resistant towards NO, whereas concomitant gammaGCS inhibition, but not GSHR inhibition, completely decreased GSH concentrations. These results show that different cell types use different pathways trying to maintain glutathione concentrations to cope with nitrosative stress, and the overall capability to maintain a critical amount of GSH correlates with susceptibility to NO-induced cell death.

  14. Involvement of large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels in both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type relaxation in human penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Király, István; Pataricza, János; Bajory, Zoltán; Simonsen, Ulf; Varro, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pajor, Lászlo; Kun, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels (BKC a ), located on the vascular smooth muscle, play an important role in regulation of vascular tone. In penile corpus cavernosum tissue, opening of BKC a channels leads to relaxation of corporal smooth muscle, which is essential during erection; however, there is little information on the role of BKC a channels located in penile vascular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of BKC a channels in endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of human intracavernous penile arteries. In human intracavernous arteries obtained in connection with transsexual operations, change in isometric force was recorded in microvascular myographs, and endothelium-dependent [nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type] and endothelium-independent (NO-donor) relaxations were measured in contracted arteries. In penile small arteries contracted with phenylephrine, acetylcholine evoked NO- and EDH-type relaxations, which were sensitive to iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of BKC a channels. Iberiotoxin also inhibited relaxations induced by a NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside. NS11021, a selective opener of BKC a channels, evoked pronounced relaxations that were inhibited in the presence of IbTX. NS13558, a BKC a -inactive analogue of NS11021, failed to relax human penile small arteries. Our results show that BKC a channels are involved in both NO- and EDH-type relaxation of intracavernous penile arteries obtained from healthy men. The effect of a selective opener of BKC a channels also suggests that direct activation of the channel may be an advantageous approach for treatment of impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation often associated with erectile dysfunction.

  15. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel-2 Interaction with Nitric Oxide Synthase Enhances Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M.; Umesh, Anita; Husted, Cristiana; Ying, Lihua; Hou, Yanli; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Nowak, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Increased pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) endothelium-dependent nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity mediates perinatal pulmonary vasodilation. Compromised eNOS activity is central to the pathogenesis of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Voltage-derived anion channel (VDAC)-1 was recently demonstrated to bind eNOS in the systemic circulation. We hypothesized that VDAC isoforms modulate eNOS activity in the pulmonary circulation, and that decreased VDAC expression contributes to PPHN. In PAECs derived from an ovine model of PPHN: (1) there is eNOS activity, but not expression; and (2) VDAC1 and -2 proteins are decreased. Immunocytochemistry, coimmunoprecipitation, and in situ proximity ligation assays in human PAECs (hPAECs) demonstrate binding between eNOS and both VDAC1 and -2, which increased upon stimulation with NO agonists. The ability of agonists to increase the eNOS/VDAC interaction was significantly blunted in hypertensive, compared with normotensive, ovine PAECs. Depletion of VDAC2, but not VDAC1, blocked the agonist-induced increase in eNOS activity in hPAECs. Overexpression of VDAC2 in hypertensive PAECs increased eNOS activity. Binding of VDAC2 enhances eNOS activity in the pulmonary circulation, and diminished VDAC2 constrains eNOS in PAECs derived from fetal lambs with chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension. We speculate that decreases in VDAC2 may contribute to the limited eNOS activity that characterizes pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22842492

  16. Voltage-dependent anion channel-2 interaction with nitric oxide synthase enhances pulmonary artery endothelial cell nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Cristina M; Umesh, Anita; Husted, Cristiana; Ying, Lihua; Hou, Yanli; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Nowak, Jeffrey; Cornfield, David N

    2012-11-01

    Increased pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) endothelium-dependent nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity mediates perinatal pulmonary vasodilation. Compromised eNOS activity is central to the pathogenesis of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Voltage-derived anion channel (VDAC)-1 was recently demonstrated to bind eNOS in the systemic circulation. We hypothesized that VDAC isoforms modulate eNOS activity in the pulmonary circulation, and that decreased VDAC expression contributes to PPHN. In PAECs derived from an ovine model of PPHN: (1) there is eNOS activity, but not expression; and (2) VDAC1 and -2 proteins are decreased. Immunocytochemistry, coimmunoprecipitation, and in situ proximity ligation assays in human PAECs (hPAECs) demonstrate binding between eNOS and both VDAC1 and -2, which increased upon stimulation with NO agonists. The ability of agonists to increase the eNOS/VDAC interaction was significantly blunted in hypertensive, compared with normotensive, ovine PAECs. Depletion of VDAC2, but not VDAC1, blocked the agonist-induced increase in eNOS activity in hPAECs. Overexpression of VDAC2 in hypertensive PAECs increased eNOS activity. Binding of VDAC2 enhances eNOS activity in the pulmonary circulation, and diminished VDAC2 constrains eNOS in PAECs derived from fetal lambs with chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension. We speculate that decreases in VDAC2 may contribute to the limited eNOS activity that characterizes pulmonary hypertension.

  17. Changes in nitric oxide release in vivo in response to vasoactive substances.

    PubMed Central

    Nava, E.; Wiklund, N. P.; Salazar, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Changes in the release of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo were studied in rats following the administration of endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilators as well as the NO synthesis inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). NO production was assessed by measuring variations of nitrate in plasma by capillary ion analysis. 2. Intravenous administration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilators, bradykinin (2 and 10 micrograms kg-1 min-1) or substance P (0.3-3 micrograms kg-1 min-1) caused a transient dose-dependent hypotension followed by an increase in plasma nitrate concentration (maximal increments: 33 +/- 5% and 38 +/- 6%, for bradykinin and substance P, respectively). Prior administration of L-NAME (10 mg kg-1 min-1) inhibited the hypotension and increase in plasma nitrate caused by these substances. Intravenous administration of sodium nitrate (200 micrograms kg-1) also produced a transitory elevation in plasma nitrate which was similar in magnitude as that caused by the vasodilators. A rapid and transitory increment in plasma nitrate was observed after i.v. administration of authentic NO (400 micrograms kg-1). 3. Rats receiving the endothelium-dependent vasodilators, prostacyclin (0.6 micrograms kg-1 min-1) or adenosine (3 mg kg-1 min-1) intravenously showed a drop in blood pressure paralleled by a decrease in plasma nitrate (maximal decreases: 34 +/- 5% and 24 +/- 4%, for prostacyclin and adenosine, respectively). A similar effect on the plasmatic concentration of nitrate was observed when L-NAME (10 mg kg-1 min-1, i.v.) was administered to the animals. 4. This study demonstrates that (i) changes in plasma nitrate can be detected in vivo after stimulation or inhibition of NO synthase, (ii) an increased production of NO, measured as plasma nitrate, is related to the hypotension caused by bradykinin and substance P and (iii) a diminished concentration of plasmatic nitrate is associated to the hypotension induced by adenosine or prostacyclin

  18. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Bowen, T Scott; Eisenkolb, Sophia; Drobner, Juliane; Fischer, Tina; Werner, Sarah; Linke, Axel; Mangner, Norman; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a key risk factor for heart failure, with the latter characterized by diaphragm muscle weakness that is mediated in part by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we used a deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model to determine whether hypertension could independently induce diaphragm dysfunction and further investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sham-treated (n = 11), DOCA-salt-treated (n = 11), and DOCA-salt+HIIT-treated (n = 15) mice were studied over 4 wk. Diaphragm contractile function, protein expression, enzyme activity, and fiber cross-sectional area and type were subsequently determined. Elevated blood pressure confirmed hypertension in DOCA-salt mice independent of HIIT (P < 0.05). Diaphragm forces were impaired by ∼15-20% in DOCA-salt vs. sham-treated mice (P < 0.05), but this effect was prevented after HIIT. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression tended to decrease (∼30%; P = 0.06) in DOCA-salt vs. sham- and DOCA-salt+HIIT mice, whereas oxidative stress increased (P < 0.05). Enzyme activity of NADPH oxidase was higher, but superoxide dismutase was lower, with MyHC oxidation elevated by ∼50%. HIIT further prevented direct oxidant-mediated diaphragm contractile dysfunction (P < 0.05) after a 30 min exposure to H2O-2 (1 mM). Our data suggest that hypertension induces diaphragm contractile dysfunction via an oxidant-mediated mechanism that is prevented by HIIT.-Bowen, T. S., Eisenkolb, S., Drobner, J., Fischer, T., Werner, S., Linke, A., Mangner, N., Schuler, G., Adams, V. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

  19. Endothelial dysfunction in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Grazielle C; Silva, Josiane F; Diniz, Thiago F; Lemos, Virginia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common problem associated with hypertension and is considered a precursor to the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. The present study investigated the involvement of nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) in the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the mesenteric arteries of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt-hypertensive mice. Myograph studies were used to investigate the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of ACh (acetylcholine). The expression and phosphorylation of nNOS and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) were studied by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence was used to examine the localization of nNOS and eNOS in the endothelial layer of the mesenteric artery. The vasodilator effect of ACh is strongly impaired in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Non-selective inhibition of NOS sharply reduced the effect of ACh in both DOCA-salt-hypertensive and sham mice. Selective inhibition of nNOS and catalase led to a higher reduction in the effect of ACh in sham than in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Production of H2O2 induced by ACh was significantly reduced in vessels from DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, and it was blunted after nNOS inhibition. The expression of both eNOS and nNOS was considerably lower in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, whereas phosphorylation of their inhibitory sites was increased. The presence of nNOS was confirmed in the endothelial layer of mesenteric arteries from both sham and DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. These results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice is associated with reduced expression and functioning of nNOS and impaired production of nNOS-derived H2O2 Such findings offer a new perspective for the understanding of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension.

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and microvascular dysfunction in the mesentery of mice deficient in α-galactosidase A

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Justin J.; Shu, Liming; Park, James L.; Bodary, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    A defect in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A (Gla) results in globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) accumulation in Fabry disease and leads to premature death from cardiac and cerebrovascular events. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are often first observed during childhood in these patients and are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate an age-dependent microvasculopathy of the mesenteric artery (MA) in a murine model of Fabry disease (Gla-knockout mice) resulting from dysregulation of the vascular homeostatic enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The progressive accumulation of Gb3 in the MA was confirmed by thin-layer chromatographic analysis. A total absence of endothelium-dependent dilation was observed in MAs from mice at 8 mo of age, while suppression of ACh-mediated vasodilation was evident from 2 mo of age. Endothelium-independent dilation with sodium nitroprusside was normal compared with age-matched wild-type mice. The microvascular defect in MAs from Fabry mice was endothelium-dependent and associated with suppression of the active homodimer of eNOS. Phosphorylation of eNOS at the major activation site (Ser1179) was significantly downregulated, while phosphorylation at the major inhibitory site (Thr495) was remarkably enhanced in MAs from aged Fabry mice. These profound alterations in eNOS bioavailability at 8 mo of age were observed in parallel with high levels of 3-nitrotyrosine, suggesting increased reactive oxygen species along with eNOS uncoupling in this vascular bed. Overall, the mesenteric microvessels in the setting of Fabry disease were observed to have an early and profound endothelial dysfunction associated with elevated reactive nitrogen species and decreased nitric oxide bioavailability. PMID:24232002

  1. 25-Hydroxycholesterol impairs endothelial function and vasodilation by uncoupling and inhibiting endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhi-Jun; Chen, Jing; Dai, Wei-Ping; Liu, Xiang; Yang, Yin-Ke; Li, Yan; Lin, Ze-Bang; Wang, Tian-Tian; Wu, Ying-Ying; Su, Dan-Hong; Cheng, Tian-Pu; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Tao, Jun; Ou, Jing-Song

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a key early step in atherosclerosis. 25-Hydroxycholesterol (25-OHC) is found in atherosclerotic lesions. However, whether 25-OHC promotes atherosclerosis is unclear. Here, we hypothesized that 25-OHC, a proinflammatory lipid, can impair endothelial function, which may play an important role in atherosclerosis. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were incubated with 25-OHC. Endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation were measured. Nitric oxide (NO) production and superoxide anion generation were determined. The expression and phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and Akt as well as the association of eNOS and heat shock protein (HSP)90 were detected by immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation. Endothelial cell apoptosis was monitored by TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity, and expression of Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3 were detected by immunoblot analysis. Finally, aortic rings from Sprague-Dawley rats were isolated and treated with 25-OHC, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation was evaluated. 25-OHC significantly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation. 25-OHC markedly decreased NO production and increased superoxide anion generation. 25-OHC reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS and the association of eNOS and HSP90. 25-OHC also enhanced endothelial cell apoptosis by decreasing Bcl-2 expression and increasing cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3 expressions as well as caspase-3 activity. 25-OHC impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation. These data demonstrated that 25-OHC could impair endothelial function by uncoupling and inhibiting eNOS activity as well as by inducing endothelial cell apoptosis. Our findings indicate that 25-OHC may play an important role in regulating atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. The protective effect of cilostazol on isolated rabbit femoral arteries under conditions of ischemia and reperfusion: the role of the nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana R.G.A.; Celotto, Andréa C; Capellini, Verena K; Evora, Paulo R B; Piccinato, Carlos E; Joviliano, Edwaldo E

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The clinical significance of ischemia/reperfusion of the lower extremities demands further investigation to enable the development of more effective therapeutic alternatives. This study investigated the changes in the vascular reactivity of the rabbit femoral artery and nitric oxide metabolites under partial ischemia/reperfusion conditions following cilostazol administration. METHODS: Ischemia was induced using infrarenal aortic clamping. The animals were randomly divided into seven groups: Control 90 minutes, Ischemia/Reperfusion 90/60 minutes, Control 120 minutes, Ischemia/Reperfusion 120/90 minutes, Cilostazol, Cilostazol before Ischemia/Reperfusion 120/90 minutes, and Ischemia 120 minutes/Cilostazol/Reperfusion 90 minutes. Dose-response curves for sodium nitroprusside, acetylcholine, and the calcium ionophore A23187 were obtained in isolated femoral arteries. The levels of nitrites and nitrates in the plasma and skeletal muscle were determined using chemiluminescence. RESULTS: Acetylcholine- and A23187-induced relaxation was reduced in the Ischemia/Reperfusion 120/90 group, and treatment with cilostazol partially prevented this ischemia/reperfusion-induced endothelium impairment. Only cilostazol treatment increased plasma levels of nitrites and nitrates. An elevation in the levels of nitrites and nitrates was observed in muscle tissues in the Ischemia/Reperfusion 120/90, Cilostazol/Ischemia/Reperfusion, and Ischemia/Cilostazol/Reperfusion groups. CONCLUSION: Hind limb ischemia/reperfusion yielded an impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of the femoral artery. Furthermore, cilostazol administration prior to ischemia exerted a protective effect on endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity under ischemia/reperfusion conditions. PMID:22358243

  3. Evidence that NO/cGMP/PKG signalling cascade mediates endothelium dependent inhibition of IP₃R mediated Ca²⁺ oscillations in myocytes and pericytes of ureteric microvascular network in situ.

    PubMed

    Borysova, Lyudmyla; Burdyga, Theodor

    2015-12-01

    In ureteric microvessels the antagonistic relationship between Ca(2+) signalling in endothelium and Ca(2+) oscillations in myocytes and pericytes of arterioles and venules involves nitric oxide (NO), but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of carbachol and NO donor SNAP on Ca(2+) signalling and vasomotor responses of arterioles and venules in intact urteric microvascular network in situ using confocal microscopy. Vasomotor responses of arterioles and venules induced by AVP correlated with the occurrence of Ca(2+) oscillations in the myocytes and pericytes and were not abolished by the removal of Ca(2+) from extracellular fluid. Carbachol-induced rise of intracellular Ca(2+) in endothelium was accompanied by the termination of the Ca(2+) oscillations in myocytes and pericytes. This carbachol-induced inhibitory effect on Ca(2+) oscillations in myocytes and pericytes was reversed by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and by Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Ca(2+) oscillations in myocytes and pericytes were also effectively blocked by NO donor SNAP. An Inhibitory effect of SNAP was markedly enhanced by zaprinast, a selective inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase-5, and reversed by sGC inhibitor, ODQ and PKG inhibitor, Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS. The cGMP analogue and selective PKG activator 8pCPT-cGMP also induced inhibition of the AVP-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in myocytes and pericytes. SNAP had no effects on Ca(2+) oscillations induced by caffeine in distributing arcade arterioles. Consequently, we conclude that NO- mediated inhibition of Ca(2+) oscillations in myocytes and pericytes predominantly recruits the cGMP/PKG dependent pathway. The inhibitory effect of NO/cGMP/PKG cascade is associated with suppressed Ca(2+) release from the SR of myocytes and pericytes selectively via the inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) channels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors

  4. Iron(II) porphyrins induced conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting Ting; Liu, Yong Dong; Zhong, Ru Gang

    2015-09-01

    Nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by heme proteins was reported as a protective mechanism to hypoxic injury in mammalian physiology. In this study, the pathways of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrin (P) complexes, which were generally recognized as models for heme proteins, were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). In view of two type isomers of combination of nitrite and Fe(II)(P), N-nitro- and O-nitrito-Fe(II)-porphyrin complexes, and two binding sites of proton to the different O atoms of nitrite moiety, four main pathways for the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrins were proposed. The results indicate that the pathway of N-bound Fe(II)(P)(NO2) isomer into Fe(III)(P)(NO) and water is similar to that of O-bound isomer into nitric oxide and Fe(III)(P)(OH) in both thermodynamical and dynamical aspects. Based on the initial computational studies of five-coordinate nitrite complexes, the conversion of nitrite into NO mediated by Fe(II)(P)(L) complexes with 14 kinds of proximal ligands was also investigated. Generally, the same conclusion that the pathways of N-bound isomers are similar to those of O-bound isomer was obtained for iron(II) porphyrin with ligands. Different effects of ligands on the reduction reactions were also found. It is notable that the negative proximal ligands can improve reactive abilities of N-nitro-iron(II) porphyrins in the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide compared to neutral ligands. The findings will be helpful to expand our understanding of the mechanism of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by iron(II) porphyrins.

  5. Nitric oxide inhibits isoproterenol-stimulated adipocyte lipolysis through oxidative inactivation of the beta-agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, P; Cacho, J; Crespo, M D; Herrera, E; Ramos, P

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in the inhibition of catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis in adipose tissue by as yet unknown mechanisms. In the present study, it is shown that the nitric oxide donor, 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine, antagonized isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-induced lipolysis in rat adipocytes, freshly isolated from white adipose tissue, by decreasing the potency of the beta-agonist without affecting its efficacy. These data suggest that nitric oxide did not act downstream of the beta-adrenoceptor but reduced the effective concentration of isoproterenol. In support of the latter hypothesis, we found that pre-treatment of isoproterenol with nitric oxide abolished the lipolytic activity of the catecholamine. Spectroscopic data and HPLC analysis confirmed that the nitric oxide-mediated inactivation of isoproterenol was in fact because of the modification of the catecholamine through a sequence of oxidation reactions, which apparently involved the generation of an aminochrome. Similarly, aminochrome was found to be the primary product of isoproterenol oxidation by 3-morpholinosydnonimine and peroxynitrite. Finally, it was shown that nitric oxide released from cytokine-stimulated adipocytes attenuated the lipolytic effect of isoproterenol by inactivating the catecholamine. In contrast with very recent findings, which suggest that nitric oxide impairs the beta-adrenergic action of isoproterenol through intracellular mechanisms and not through a chemical reaction between NO and the catecholamine, we showed that nitric oxide was able to attenuate the pharmacological activity of isoproterenol in vitro as well as in a nitric oxide-generating cellular system through oxidation of the beta-agonist. These findings should be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies used to investigate the role of nitric oxide as a modulator of isoproterenol-stimulated signal transduction pathways. PMID:11023835

  6. Nitric oxide inhibits isoproterenol-stimulated adipocyte lipolysis through oxidative inactivation of the beta-agonist.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Cacho, J; Crespo, M D; Herrera, E; Ramos, P

    2000-10-15

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in the inhibition of catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis in adipose tissue by as yet unknown mechanisms. In the present study, it is shown that the nitric oxide donor, 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine, antagonized isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-induced lipolysis in rat adipocytes, freshly isolated from white adipose tissue, by decreasing the potency of the beta-agonist without affecting its efficacy. These data suggest that nitric oxide did not act downstream of the beta-adrenoceptor but reduced the effective concentration of isoproterenol. In support of the latter hypothesis, we found that pre-treatment of isoproterenol with nitric oxide abolished the lipolytic activity of the catecholamine. Spectroscopic data and HPLC analysis confirmed that the nitric oxide-mediated inactivation of isoproterenol was in fact because of the modification of the catecholamine through a sequence of oxidation reactions, which apparently involved the generation of an aminochrome. Similarly, aminochrome was found to be the primary product of isoproterenol oxidation by 3-morpholinosydnonimine and peroxynitrite. Finally, it was shown that nitric oxide released from cytokine-stimulated adipocytes attenuated the lipolytic effect of isoproterenol by inactivating the catecholamine. In contrast with very recent findings, which suggest that nitric oxide impairs the beta-adrenergic action of isoproterenol through intracellular mechanisms and not through a chemical reaction between NO and the catecholamine, we showed that nitric oxide was able to attenuate the pharmacological activity of isoproterenol in vitro as well as in a nitric oxide-generating cellular system through oxidation of the beta-agonist. These findings should be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies used to investigate the role of nitric oxide as a modulator of isoproterenol-stimulated signal transduction pathways.

  7. Prevention of in vitro oxidant-mediated alveolar macrophage injury by cellular glutathione and precursors.

    PubMed

    Voisin, C; Aerts, C; Wallaert, B

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the toxic effects of various oxidants on alveolar macrophages (O2, NO2, tobacco smoke and silica), we used an original method of cell culture in aerobiosis, which permitted direct contact between the atmosphere and the target cells. Our results demonstrated that the variations of cell sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of oxidants were associated with various levels in cellular antioxidant equipment. A significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and/or cellular glutathione. Addition of N-acetylcysteine, a polypeptide known to have an antioxidant activity and to be a precursor of glutathione, was responsible for a decrease of oxidant-mediated cytotoxicity. Whether this protective effect was due to an increase in glutathione cell content or to a scavenger effect of N-acetylcysteine still needs to be elucidated.

  8. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation mediated by Mn-oxides: from sediment to strain level.

    PubMed

    Javanaud, Cedric; Michotey, Valerie; Guasco, Sophie; Garcia, Nicole; Anschutz, Pierre; Canton, Mathieu; Bonin, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Nitrite and (29)N(2) productions in slurry incubations of anaerobically sediment after (15)NO(3) or (15)NH(4) labelling in the presence of Mn-oxides suggested that anaerobic Mn-oxides mediated nitrification coupled with denitrification in muddy intertidal sediments of Arcachon Bay (SW Atlantic French coast). From this sediment, bacterial strains were isolated and physiologically characterized in terms of Mn-oxides and nitrate reduction as well as potential anaerobic nitrification. One of the isolated strain, identified as Marinobacter daepoensis strain M4AY14, was a denitrifier. Nitrous oxide production by this strain was demonstrated in the absence of nitrate and with Mn-oxides and NH(4) amendment, giving indirect proof of anaerobic nitrate or nitrite production. Anaerobic Mn-oxide-mediated nitrification was confirmed by (29)N(2) production in the presence of (15)NO(3) and (14)NH(4) under denitrifying conditions. Anaerobic nitrification by M4AY14 seemed to occur only in the absence of nitrate, or at nitrate levels lower than that of Mn-oxides. Most of the other isolates were affiliated with the Shewanella genus and were able to use both nitrate and Mn-oxides as electron acceptors. When both electron acceptors were present, whatever their concentrations, nitrate and Mn-oxide reduction co-occurred. These data indicate that bacterial Mn-oxide reduction could be an important process in marine sediments with low oxygen concentrations, and demonstrate for the first time the role of bacteria in anaerobic Mn-mediated nitrification.

  9. Nebivolol dilates human penile arteries and reverses erectile dysfunction in diabetic rats through enhancement of nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Javier; Wright, Harold M; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Begoña; La Fuente, José M; Gupta, Sandeep; Sáenz de Tejada, Iñigo

    2010-08-01

    Traditional beta-blockers have sometimes been associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). Nebivolol is a cardioselective β(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist that promotes vasodilation through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. We evaluated the effects of nebivolol on the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway, on erectile function and dysfunction, and in human penile vascular tissues. Erectile response to cavernosal nerve electrical stimulation in control and diabetes-induced ED rats were evaluated, along with serum nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentration and plasma/tissue cGMP levels. Endothelium-dependent and sildenafil-induced relaxation of isolated human corpus cavernosum (HCC) and human penile resistance arteries (HPRA) were also determined. The effects of nebivolol on erectile function and dysfunction and on NO/cGMP-mediated responses. Treatment with nebivolol significantly potentiated erectile response in control rats, regardless of its effects on blood pressure. Nebivolol increased NOx and plasma cGMP by 3-fold and 2.75-fold, respectively, and significantly augmented the elevation of plasma cGMP produced by sildenafil. Nebivolol enhanced endothelium-dependent and sildenafil-induced relaxations of HCC tissue, and produced endothelium-dependent vasodilation of HPRA. Nebivolol, but not atenolol, significantly improved erectile response in diabetic rats (51.6%, 53.2%, and 87.1% of response at 3 Hz in nondiabetic rats, for vehicle-treated, atenolol-treated, and nebivolol-treated diabetic rats, respectively); after sildenafil administration, ED was completely reversed in nebivolol-treated diabetic rats (69.6% and 112% for diabetic rats treated with sildenafil and nebivolol plus sildenafil, respectively). Accordingly, nebivolol restored systemic NOx levels and cGMP content in penile tissue from these animals. Nebivolol in vivo activated the NO/cGMP pathway, enhanced erectile response and reversed ED in diabetic rats. Moreover, nebivolol in vitro

  10. Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde-containing micelles induce relaxation of isolated porcine coronary arteries: role of nitric oxide and calcium

    PubMed Central

    Raffai, Gábor; Kim, Byungkuk; Park, Sanga; Khang, Gilson; Lee, Dongwon; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Cinnamaldehyde, a major component of cinnamon, induces the generation of reactive oxygen species and exerts vasodilator and anticancer effects, but its short half-life limits its clinical use. The present experiments were designed to compare the acute relaxing properties of cinnamaldehyde with those of self-assembling polymer micelles either loaded with cinnamaldehyde or consisting of a polymeric prodrug [poly(cinnamaldehyde)] that incorporates the compound in its backbone. Methods Rings of porcine coronary arteries were contracted with the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619 or 40 mM KCl, and changes in isometric tension were recorded. Results Cinnamaldehyde induced concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent, nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-independent, cyclooxygenase-independent, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)-independent, calcium-activated potassium-independent, and TRPA1 channel-independent relaxations. Cinnamaldehyde also inhibited the contractions induced by 40 mM KCl Ca2+ reintroduction in 40 mM KCl Ca2+-free solution or by the Ca2+ channel opener Bay K8644. Cinnamaldehyde-loaded control micelles induced complete, partly endothelium-dependent relaxations sensitive to catalase and inhibitors of NOS or sGC, but not cyclooxygenase or TRPA1, channels. Cinnamaldehyde-loaded micelles also inhibited contractions induced by 40 mM KCl Ca2+ reintroduction or Bay K8644. Poly(cinnamaldehyde) micelles induced only partial, endothelium-dependent relaxations that were reduced by inhibitors of NOS or sGC and by catalase and the antioxidant tiron, but not by indomethacin or TRPA1 channel blockers. Conclusion The present findings demonstrate that cinnamaldehyde-loaded and poly(cinnamaldehyde) micelles possess vasodilator properties, but that the mechanism underlying the relaxation that they cause differs from that of cinnamaldehyde, and thus could be used both to relieve coronary vasospasm and for therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:24904214

  11. Vascular oxidative stress and nitric oxide depletion in HIV-1 transgenic rats are reversed by glutathione restoration

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Kleinhenz, Dean J.; Liang, Bill; Dikalov, Sergey; Guidot, David M.; Hart, C. Michael; Jones, Dean P.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have a higher incidence of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiovascular disease than uninfected individuals. Recent reports have demonstrated that viral proteins upregulate reactive oxygen species, which may contribute to elevated cardiovascular risk in HIV-1 patients. In this study we employed an HIV-1 transgenic rat model to investigate the physiological effects of viral protein expression on the vasculature. Markers of oxidative stress in wild-type and HIV-1 transgenic rats were measured using electron spin resonance, fluorescence microscopy, and various molecular techniques. Relaxation studies were completed on isolated aortic rings, and mRNA and protein were collected to measure changes in expression of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide sources. HIV-1 transgenic rats displayed significantly less NO-hemoglobin, serum nitrite, serum S-nitrosothiols, aortic tissue NO, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation than wild-type rats. NO reduction was not attributed to differences in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein expression, eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation, or tetrahydrobiopterin availability. Aortas from HIV-1 transgenic rats had higher levels of superoxide and 3-nitrotyrosine but did not differ in expression of superoxide-generating sources NADPH oxidase or xanthine oxidase. However, transgenic aortas displayed decreased superoxide dismutase and glutathione. Administering the glutathione precursor procysteine decreased superoxide, restored aortic NO levels and NO-hemoglobin, and improved endothelium-dependent relaxation in HIV-1 transgenic rats. These results show that HIV-1 protein expression decreases NO and causes endothelial dysfunction. Diminished antioxidant capacity increases vascular superoxide levels, which reduce NO bioavailability and promote peroxynitrite generation. Restoring glutathione levels reverses HIV-1 protein-mediated effects on superoxide, NO, and vasorelaxation

  12. Reduced expression of prostacyclin synthase and nitric oxide synthase in subcutaneous arteries of type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Safiah Mokhtar, Siti; M Vanhoutte, Paul; W S Leung, Susan; Imran Yusof, Mohd; Wan Sulaiman, Wan Azman; Zaharil Mat Saad, Arman; Suppian, Rapeah; Ghulam Rasool, Aida Hanum

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic endothelial dysfunction is characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation. In this study, we measured the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostacyclin synthase (PGIS), and prostacyclin receptor (IP) in subcutaneous arteries of type-2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Subcutaneous arteries were dissected from tissues from seven diabetics (4 males and 3 females) and seven non-diabetics (5 males and 2 females) aged between 18 to 65 years, who underwent lower limb surgical procedures. Diabetics had higher fasting blood glucose compared to non-diabetics, but there were no differences in blood pressure, body mass index and age. Patients were excluded if they had uncontrolled hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, renal or hepatic failure and tumor. The relative expression levels of eNOS, COX-1, COX-2, PGIS and IP receptor were determined by Western blotting analysis, normalized with the β-actin level. Increased expression of COX-2 was observed in subcutaneous arteries of diabetics compared to non-diabetics, whereas the expression levels of eNOS and PGIS were significantly lower in diabetics. There were no significant differences in expression levels of COX-1 and IP receptor between the two groups. Immunohistochemical study of subcutaneous arteries showed that the intensities of eNOS and PGIS staining were lower in diabetics, with higher COX-2 staining. In conclusion, type-2 diabetes is associated with higher COX-2 expression, but lower eNOS and PGIS expression in subcutaneous arteries. These alterations may lead to impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and thus these proteins may be potential targets for protection against the microvascular complications of diabetes.

  13. Interplay between connexin40 and nitric oxide signaling during hypertension.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Loïc; Alonso, Florian; Mazzolai, Lucia; Meda, Paolo; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Connexins (Cxs) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) contribute to the adaptation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells to hemodynamic changes. To decipher the in vivo interplay between these proteins, we studied Cx40-null mice, a model of renin-dependent hypertension which displays an altered endothelium-dependent relaxation of the aorta because of reduced eNOS levels. These mice, which were either untreated or subjected to the 1-kidney, 1-clip (1K1C) procedure, a model of volume-dependent hypertension, were compared with control mice submitted to either the 1K1C or the 2-kidney, 1-clip (2K1C) procedure, a model of renin-dependent hypertension. All operated mice became hypertensive and featured hypertrophy and altered Cx expression of the aorta. The combination of volume- and renin-dependent hypertension in Cx40-/- 1K1C mice raised blood pressure and cardiac weight index. Under these conditions, all aortas showed increased levels of Cx40 in endothelial cells and of both Cx37 and Cx45 in smooth muscle cells. In the wild-type 1K1C mice, the interactions between Cx40 and Cx37 with eNOS were enhanced, resulting in increased NO release. The Cx40-eNOS interaction could not be observed in mice lacking Cx40, which also featured decreased levels of eNOS. In these animals, the volume overload caused by the 1K1C procedure resulted in increased phosphorylation of eNOS and in a higher NO release. The findings provide evidence that Cx40 and Cx37 play an in vivo role in the regulation of eNOS. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Syringaresinol causes vasorelaxation by elevating nitric oxide production through the phosphorylation and dimerization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byung-Hee; Kim, Sookon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Lee, Jung Joon; Baek, Yi-Yong; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Choe, Jongseon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Won, Moo-Ho; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in vascular functions, including vasorelaxation. We here investigated the pharmacological effect of the natural product syringaresinol on vascular relaxation and eNOS-mediated NO production as well as its underlying biochemical mechanism in endothelial cells. Treatment of aortic rings from wild type, but not eNOS-/- mice, with syringaresinol induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was abolished by addition of the NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Treatment of human endothelial cells and mouse aortic rings with syringaresinol increased NO production, which was correlated with eNOS phosphorylation via the activation of Akt and AMP kinase (AMPK) as well as elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels. A phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor blocked the increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels, AMPK-dependent eNOS phosphorylation, and NO production, but not Akt activation, in syringaresinol-treated endothelial cells. Syringaresinol-induced AMPK activation was inhibited by co-treatment with PLC inhibitor, Ca2+ chelator, calmodulin antagonist, and CaMKKβ siRNA. This compound also increased eNOS dimerization, which was inhibited by a PLC inhibitor and a Ca2+-chelator. The chemicals that inhibit eNOS phosphorylation and dimerization attenuated vasorelaxation and cGMP production. These results suggest that syringaresinol induces vasorelaxation by enhancing NO production in endothelial cells via two distinct mechanisms, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt- and PLC/Ca2+/CaMKKβ-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and Ca2+-dependent eNOS dimerization. PMID:22170035

  15. Geranylgeranylacetone, heat shock protein 90/AMP-activated protein kinase/endothelial nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide pathway, and endothelial function in humans.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Noritaka; Jitsuiki, Daisuke; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Mikami, Shinsuke; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Kajikawa, Masato; Chayama, Kazuaki; Kihara, Yasuki; Noma, Kensuke; Goto, Chikara; Higashi, Yukihito

    2012-01-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) induces expression of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), an adaptor molecule for assembly of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation complex. The purpose of this study was to determine whether GGA enhances Hsp90 expression and augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation via upregulation of eNOS in humans. We evaluated the effects of GGA on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and on forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in 40 healthy young men. Hsp90, eNOS, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and Akt expression in HUVECs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells was detected by Western blot analysis. GGA increased Hsp90 expression and phosphorylation of eNOS and AMPK but not Akt in HUVECs and increased Hsp90 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Oral administration of GGA (600 mg) augmented the FBF response to acetylcholine. Infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished GGA-induced augmentation of the FBF response to acetylcholine. GGA also augmented the acetylcholine-stimulated NO release in smokers. These findings suggest that GGA-induced activation of Hsp90/AMPK significantly increased NO-mediated vasodilation in healthy subjects, as well as in smokers. The use of GGA may be a new therapeutic approach for improving endothelial dysfunction.

  16. Effects of FeS on Chromium Oxidation Mediated by Manganese Oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Youxian; Deng, Baolin

    2004-03-31

    Reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) has been widely explored as a cost-effective approach for Cr-contaminated site remediation. The long-term stability of the immobilized Cr(III), however, is a concern. Cr(III) is known to be oxidized by Mn oxides chemically and Mn-oxides could be produced through microbially mediated Mn(II) oxidation. This study examined the effect of FeS on Cr(III) oxidation mediated by Pseudomonas putida. The results showed that commercial granular FeS did not affect Cr(III) oxidation in the culture of P. putida with Mn(II), but freshly precipitated FeS slurry inhibited Cr(III) oxidation. A 10 mg/l of FeS did not inhibit the microbial growth, but delayed the production of Mn oxides, thus postponing potential Cr(III) oxidation. In the presence of excessive FeS slurry, both Cr(VI) and Mn oxides were reduced rapidly. The reduced Cr(III) could not be re-oxidized as long as freshly formed FeS was present, even in the presence of the manganese oxidizers.

  17. Contribution of Piezo2 to Endothelium-Dependent Pain.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luiz F; Bogen, Oliver; Green, Paul; Levine, Jon D

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the role of a mechanically-gated ion channel, Piezo2, in mechanical stimulation-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia produced by the pronociceptive vasoactive mediator endothelin-1, an innocuous mechanical stimulus-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia that is vascular endothelial cell dependent. We also evaluated its role in a preclinical model of a vascular endothelial cell dependent painful peripheral neuropathy. The local administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to Piezo2 mRNA, at the site of nociceptive testing in the rat's hind paw, but not intrathecally at the central terminal of the nociceptor, prevented innocuous stimulus-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia produced by endothelin-1 (100 ng). The mechanical hyperalgesia induced by oxaliplatin (2 mg/kg. i.v.), which was inhibited by impairing endothelial cell function, was similarly attenuated by local injection of the Piezo2 antisense. Polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated for the first time the presence of Piezo2 mRNA in endothelial cells. These results support the hypothesis that Piezo2 is a mechano-transducer in the endothelial cell where it contributes to stimulus-dependent hyperalgesia, and a model of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy. © 2015 Ferrari et al.

  18. Contribution of Piezo2 to endothelium-dependent pain.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luiz F; Bogen, Oliver; Green, Paul; Levine, Jon D

    2015-10-24

    We evaluated the role of a mechanically-gated ion channel, Piezo2, in mechanical stimulation-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia produced by the pronociceptive vasoactive mediator endothelin-1, an innocuous mechanical stimulus-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia that is vascular endothelial cell dependent. We also evaluated its role in a preclinical model of a vascular endothelial cell dependent painful peripheral neuropathy. The local administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to Piezo2 mRNA, at the site of nociceptive testing in the rat's hind paw, but not intrathecally at the central terminal of the nociceptor, prevented innocuous stimulus-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia produced by endothelin-1 (100 ng). The mechanical hyperalgesia induced by oxaliplatin (2 mg/kg. i.v.), which was inhibited by impairing endothelial cell function, was similarly attenuated by local injection of the Piezo2 antisense. Polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated for the first time the presence of Piezo2 mRNA in endothelial cells. These results support the hypothesis that Piezo2 is a mechano-transducer in the endothelial cell where it contributes to stimulus-dependent hyperalgesia, and a model of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Influences of prostanoids and nitric oxide on post-suspension hypotension in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eatman, D.; Listhrop, R. A.; Beasley, A. S.; Socci, R. R.; Abukhalaf, I.; Bayorh, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Impairment in cardiovascular functions sometimes manifested in astronauts during standing postflight, may be related to the diminished autonomic function and/or excessive production of endothelium-dependent relaxing factors. In the present study, using the 30 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) model, we compared the cardiovascular and biochemical effects of 7 days of suspension and a subsequent 6-h post-suspension period between suspended and non-suspended conscious female Sprague-Dawley rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were measured prior to suspension (basal), daily thereafter, and every 2h post-suspension. Following 7 days of suspension, MAP was not different from their basal values, however, upon release from suspension, MAP was significantly reduced compared to the non-suspended rats. Nitric oxide levels were elevated while thromboxane A(2) levels declined significantly in both plasma and tissue samples following post-suspension. The levels of prostacyclin following post-suspension remained unaltered in plasma and aortic rings but was significantly elevated in carotid arterial rings. Therefore, the post-suspension reduction in mean arterial pressure is due mostly to overproduction of nitric oxide and to a lesser extent prostacyclin.

  20. The sesame lignan sesamin attenuates vascular dysfunction in streptozotocin diabetic rats: involvement of nitric oxide and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad; Jalali Nadoushan, Mohammad-Reza; Vaez Mahdavi, Mohammad-Reza; Kalalian-Moghaddam, Hamid; Roghani-Dehkordi, Farshad; Dariani, Sharareh; Raoufi, Safoura

    2013-01-05

    The effect of chronic administration of sesamin was studied on aortic reactivity of streptozotocin diabetic rats. Male diabetic rats received sesamin for 7 weeks after diabetes induction. Contractile responses to KCl and phenylephrine and relaxation response to acetylcholine were obtained from aortic rings. Maximum contractile response of endothelium-intact rings to phenylephrine was significantly lower in sesamin-treated diabetic rats relative to untreated diabetics and endothelium removal abolished this difference. Meanwhile, endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly higher in sesamin-treated diabetic rats as compared to diabetic ones and pretreatment of rings with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester significantly attenuated the observed response. Two-month diabetes also resulted in an elevation of malondialdehyde and decreased superoxide dismutase activity and sesamin treatment significantly improved these changes. Therefore, chronic treatment of diabetic rats with sesamin could prevent some abnormal changes in vascular reactivity in diabetic rats through nitric oxide and via attenuation of oxidative stress and tissue integrity of endothelium is necessary for its beneficial effect.

  1. Influences of prostanoids and nitric oxide on post-suspension hypotension in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eatman, D.; Listhrop, R. A.; Beasley, A. S.; Socci, R. R.; Abukhalaf, I.; Bayorh, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Impairment in cardiovascular functions sometimes manifested in astronauts during standing postflight, may be related to the diminished autonomic function and/or excessive production of endothelium-dependent relaxing factors. In the present study, using the 30 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) model, we compared the cardiovascular and biochemical effects of 7 days of suspension and a subsequent 6-h post-suspension period between suspended and non-suspended conscious female Sprague-Dawley rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were measured prior to suspension (basal), daily thereafter, and every 2h post-suspension. Following 7 days of suspension, MAP was not different from their basal values, however, upon release from suspension, MAP was significantly reduced compared to the non-suspended rats. Nitric oxide levels were elevated while thromboxane A(2) levels declined significantly in both plasma and tissue samples following post-suspension. The levels of prostacyclin following post-suspension remained unaltered in plasma and aortic rings but was significantly elevated in carotid arterial rings. Therefore, the post-suspension reduction in mean arterial pressure is due mostly to overproduction of nitric oxide and to a lesser extent prostacyclin.

  2. Endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxing activities of gamma-butyrobetaine esters: possible link to the antiischemic activities of mildronate.

    PubMed

    Sjakste, Nikolajs; Kleschyov, Andrei L; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Baumane, Larisa; Dzintare, Maija; Meirena, Dainuvite; Sjakste, Jelizaveta; Sydow, Karsten; Münzel, Thomas; Kalvinsh, Ivars

    2004-07-08

    Mildronate [3-(2,2,2-trimethylhydrazine) propionate (THP)] is an antiischemic drug acting mainly via inhibition of fatty acid beta-oxidation. Some effects of the drug cannot be explained by the latter mechanism. We tested the eventual nitric oxide (NO) dependence of the mildronate action. Mildronate, gamma-butyrobetaine (GBB) and GBB methyl ester induced transient increases in nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in rat blood and myocardium. In vitro, these compounds neither modified the activities of purified neuronal and endothelial recombinant nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) nor were able to interact with their active site. GBB induced vasodilatation at high concentrations only (EC50 = 5 x 10(-5) M) while mildronate alone displayed no vasodilating effect although it enhanced the GBB vasodilating activity. GBB methyl and ethyl esters were found more potent vasodilators (EC50 = 2.5 x 10(-6) M). Pretreatment of aortic rings with NOS inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) abolished vasodilating effects of the compounds. A hypothesis explaining NO and endothelium-dependent effects of mildronate and its analogues is proposed.

  3. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-07

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts.

  4. Ferric Oxide Mediated Formation of PCDD/Fs from 2-Monochlorophenol

    PubMed Central

    Nganai, Shadrack; Lomnicki, Slawo; Dellinger, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The copper oxide, surface-mediated formation of polychlorinated dibenzop-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) from precursors such as chlorinated phenols is considered to be a major source of PCDD/F emissions from combustion sources. In spite of being present at 2–50x higher concentrations than copper oxide, virtually no studies of the iron oxide-mediated formation of PCDD/F have been reported in the literature. We have performed packed bed, flow reactor studies of the reaction of 50 ppm gas phase 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP) over a surface of 5% iron oxide on silica over a temperature range of 200–500 °C. Dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD), 1-monochlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1-MCDD), 4,6-dichlorodibenzofuran (4,6-DCDF), and dibenzofuran (DF) were formed in maximum yields of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 %, respectively. The yield of PCDD/F over iron oxide peaked at temperatures 50–100 °C higher in temperature than over copper oxide. The maximum yields of DD, 1-MCDD and 4,6-DCDF were 2x and 5x higher over iron oxide, respectively, than over copper oxide, while DF was not observed at all for copper oxide. The resulting PCDD/PCDF ratio was 0.39 versus 1.2 observed for iron oxide and copper oxide, respectively, which is in agreement with PCDD to PCDF ratios in full-scale combustors that are typically ≪1. The combination of 2–50x higher concentrations of iron oxide than copper oxide in most full-scale combustors and 2.5x higher yields of PCDD/F observed in the laboratory, suggest that iron oxide may contribute as much as 5–125x more than copper oxide to the emissions of PCDD/F from full-scale combustors. PMID:19238966

  5. Prevention of ischemia-reperfusion lung injury by inhaled nitric oxide in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Barbotin-Larrieu, F; Mazmanian, M; Baudet, B; Détruit, H; Chapelier, A; Libert, J M; Dartevelle, P; Hervé, P

    1996-03-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion results in a decrease in the release of nitric oxide (NO) by the pulmonary endothelium. NO may have lung-protective effects by decreasing neutrophil accumulation in the lung. We tested whether NO inhalation would attenuate reperfusion-induced endothelial dysfunction and increases in microvascular permeability and total pulmonary vascular resistance (RT) by preventing neutrophil lung accumulation. After baseline determinations of RT, coefficient of filtration (Kfc), and circulating neutrophil counts, isolated neonatal piglet lungs were subjected to a 1-h period of ischemia followed by a 1-h period of blood reperfusion and reventilation with or without addition of NO (10 ppm). NO prevented reperfusion-induced increases in RT and Kfc, as well as the decrease in circulating neutrophils. After reperfusion, increases in Kfc were correlated with decreases in circulating neutrophils. NO prevented reperfusion-induced decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation in precontracted pulmonary arterial rings. This demonstrates that inhaled NO prevents microvascular injury, endothelial dysfunction, and pulmonary neutrophil accumulation in a neonatal piglet model of lung ischemia-reperfusion.

  6. Nitric Oxide Contributes to Vasomotor Tone in Hypertensive African Americans Treated With Nebivolol and Metoprolol.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Robert B; Hayek, Salim S; Poole, Joseph C; Rahman, Ayaz; Menon, Vivek; Kavtaradze, Nino; Polhemus, David; Veledar, Emir; Lefer, David J; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2016-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is more prevalent in African Americans (AAs) compared with whites. The authors hypothesized that nebivolol, a selective β1 -antagonist that stimulates nitric oxide (NO), will improve endothelial function in AAs with hypertension when compared with metoprolol. In a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, 19 AA hypertensive patients were randomized to a 12-week treatment period with either nebivolol 10 mg or metoprolol succinate 100 mg daily. Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured using plethysmography at rest and after intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside to estimate endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilation, respectively. Physiologic vasodilation was assessed during hand-grip exercise. Measurements were repeated after NO blockade with L-N(G) -monomethylarginine (L-NMMA) and after inhibition of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) with tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA). NO blockade with L-NMMA produced a trend toward greater vasoconstriction during nebivolol compared with metoprolol treatment (21% vs 12% reduction in FBF, P=.06, respectively). This difference was more significant after combined administration of L-NMMA and TEA (P<.001). Similarly, there was a contribution of NO to exercise-induced vasodilation during nebivolol but not during metoprolol treatment. There were significantly greater contributions of NO and EDHF to resting vasodilator tone and of NO to exercise-induced vasodilation with nebivolol compared with metoprolol in AAs with hypertension.

  7. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    PubMed

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments.

  8. Nitric oxide in the airways.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Glenis

    2007-08-01

    This review briefly explains the basic facts about nitric oxide, which is entering clinical practice as a measure of lower airways inflammation and is likely also to be employed in otorhinolaryngological practice. These include the validity of nasal nitric oxide in diagnosing primary ciliary dyskinesia and in monitoring the response to chronic rhinosinusitis therapy. The nasal nitric oxide value combined with a humming manoeuvre, which increases the passage of nitric oxide from the sinuses to the nose if the ostiomeatal complex is patent, could reduce the need for computed tomography scans. The link between nitric oxide production and ciliary beating requires further exploration. Therapeutic adjustments to nitric oxide production are under investigation. Nitric oxide is likely to prove highly relevant to airways defence, as well as being an inflammatory mediator. Nasal nitric oxide probably explains some of the benefit of nasal rather than mouth breathing.

  9. Monocyte-induced downregulation of nitric oxide synthase in cultured aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Marczin, N; Antonov, A; Papapetropoulos, A; Munn, D H; Virmani, R; Kolodgie, F D; Gerrity, R; Catravas, J D

    1996-09-01

    Since endothelium-dependent vasodilation is altered in atherosclerosis and enhanced monocyte/endothelial interactions are implicated in early atherosclerosis, we evaluated the effects of monocytes on the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) pathway by estimating release of biologically active NO from cultured endothelial cells and levels of constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS). NO release was estimated in a short-term bioassay using endothelial cell-induced cGMP accumulation in vascular smooth muscle (SM) cells. Exposure of SM cells to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAECs) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) produced large increases in SM cGMP content; this increase was prevented by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the inhibitor of endothelial NOS. Confluent monolayers of PAECs and HAECs cocultured with monocytes also stimulated SM cGMP formation; however, NO release from these cultures was attenuated in a coculture time (2 to 48 hours)- and monocyte concentration (20 to 200 x 10(3) per well)-dependent manner. This effect of monocyte adhesion appeared to be selective for NO release since other biochemical pathways, such as atriopeptin-and isoproterenol-induced cyclic nucleotide accumulation within the endothelial cells, were not altered by monocytes. The effects of adherent monocytes on NO release were mimicked by monocyte-derived cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1 alpha. Furthermore, the conditioned medium of monocytes contained significant quantities of these cytokines. Conditioned medium, as well as monocytes physically separated from the endothelial cells, attenuated NO release, suggesting that soluble factors may mediate the effects of monocytes. An IL-1 beta neutralizing antibody fully prevented the NO dysfunction in response to directly adherent monocytes. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid (Tiron), and exogenous L-arginine failed to improve NO release, suggesting that oxidant stress

  10. Mechanisms of ATP-mediated vasodilation in humans: modest role for nitric oxide and vasodilating prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R.; Kirby, Brett S.; Richards, Jennifer C.; Garcia, Leora J.; Voyles, Wyatt F.; Larson, Dennis G.; Luckasen, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    ATP is an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and findings regarding the underlying signaling mechanisms are equivocal. We sought to determine the independent and interactive roles of nitric oxide (NO) and vasodilating prostaglandins (PGs) in ATP-mediated vasodilation in young, healthy humans and determine whether any potential role was dependent on ATP dose or the timing of inhibition. In protocol 1 (n = 18), a dose-response curve to intrabrachial infusion of ATP was performed before and after both single and combined inhibition of NO synthase [NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA)] and cyclooxygenase (ketorolac). Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured via venous occlusion plethysmography and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated. In this protocol, neither individual nor combined NO/PG inhibition had any effect on the vasodilatory response (P = 0.22–0.99). In protocol 2 (n = 16), we determined whether any possible contribution of both NO and PGs to ATP vasodilation was greater at low vs. high doses of ATP and whether inhibition during steady-state infusion of the respective dose of ATP impacted the dilation. FBF in this protocol was measured via Doppler ultrasound. In protocol 2, infusion of low (n = 8)- and high-dose (n = 8) ATP for 5 min evoked a significant increase in FVC above baseline (low = 198 ± 24%; high = 706 ± 79%). Infusion of l-NMMA and ketorolac together reduced steady-state FVC during both low- and high-dose ATP (P < 0.05), and in a subsequent trial with continuous NO/PG blockade, the vasodilator response from baseline to 5 min of steady-state infusion was similarly reduced for both low (ΔFVC = −31 ± 11%)- and high-dose ATP (ΔFVC −25 ± 11%; P = 0.70 low vs. high dose). Collectively, our findings indicate a potential modest role for NO and PGs in the vasodilatory response to exogenous ATP in the human forearm that does not appear to be dose or timing dependent; however, this is dependent on the method for assessing forearm vascular

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  12. Heteromeric TRPV4/TRPC1 channels mediate calcium-sensing receptor-induced nitric oxide production and vasorelaxation in rabbit mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Harry Z E; Carlton-Carew, Simonette R E; Khan, Dhanak M; Zargaran, Alexander K; Jahan, Kazi S; Vanessa Ho, W-S; Albert, Anthony P

    2017-09-01

    Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) by increasing the external calcium concentration (Ca(2+)]o) induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation through nitric oxide (NO) production and activation of intermediate Ca(2+)-activated K(+) currents (IKCa) channels in rabbit mesenteric arteries. The present study investigates the potential role of heteromeric TRPV4-TRPC1 channels in mediating these CaSR-induced vascular responses. Immunocytochemical and proximity ligation assays showed that TRPV4 and TRPC1 proteins were expressed and co-localised at the plasma membrane of freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs). In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca(2+)]o between 1 and 6mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine (MO)-induced pre-contracted tone, which were inhibited by the TRPV4 antagonists RN1734 and HC067047, and the externally-acting TRPC1 blocking antibody T1E3. In addition, CaSR-evoked NO production in ECs measured using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM was reduced by RN1734 and T1E3. In contrast, [Ca(2+)]o-evoked perforated-patch IKCa currents in ECs were unaffected by RN1734 and T1E3. The TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A (GSK) induced endothelium-dependent relaxation of MO-evoked pre-contracted tone and increased NO production, which were inhibited by the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME, RN1734 and T1E3. GSK activated 6pS cation channel activity in cell-attached patches from ECs which was blocked by RN1734 and T1E3. These findings indicate that heteromeric TRPV4-TRPC1 channels mediate CaSR-induced vasorelaxation through NO production but not IKCa channel activation in rabbit mesenteric arteries. This further implicates CaSR-induced pathways and heteromeric TRPV4-TRPC1 channels in regulating vascular tone. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, explains the "L-arginine paradox" and acts as a novel cardiovascular risk factor.

    PubMed

    Böger, Rainer H

    2004-10-01

    There is abundant evidence that the endothelium plays a crucial role in the maintenance of vascular tone and structure. One of the major endothelium-derived vasoactive mediators is nitric oxide (NO). Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous competitive inhibitor of NO synthase. ADMA inhibits vascular NO production in concentrations found in pathophysiological conditions; ADMA also causes local vasoconstriction when it is infused intraarterially. Thus, elevated ADMA levels may explain the "L-arginine paradox," i.e., the observation that supplementation with exogenous L-arginine improves NO-mediated vascular functions in vivo, although its baseline plasma concentration is about 25-fold higher than the Michaelis-Menten constant K(m) of the isolated, purified endothelial NO synthase in vitro. The biochemical and physiological pathways related to ADMA are well understood: Dimethylarginines are the result of degradation of methylated proteins; the methyl group is derived from S-adenosylmethionine. Both ADMA and its regioisomer, symmetric dimethylarginine, are eliminated from the body by renal excretion, whereas only ADMA is metabolized via hydrolytic degradation to citrulline and dimethylamine by the enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH). DDAH activity and/or expression may therefore contribute to the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction in various diseases. Plasma ADMA levels are increased in humans with hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis, hypertension, chronic renal failure, and chronic heart failure. Increased ADMA levels are associated with reduced NO synthesis as assessed by impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In several prospective and cross-sectional studies, ADMA evolved as a marker of cardiovascular risk. With increasing knowledge of the role of ADMA in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, ADMA is becoming a goal for pharmacotherapeutic interventions. Among other potential strategies that are currently being

  14. The EGCg-induced redox-sensitive activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and relaxation are critically dependent on hydroxyl moieties.

    PubMed

    Auger, Cyril; Kim, Jong-Hun; Chabert, Philippe; Chaabi, Mehdi; Anselm, Eric; Lanciaux, Xavier; Lobstein, Annelise; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2010-02-26

    Several rich sources of polyphenols stimulate the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO), a potent vasoprotecting factor, via the redox-sensitive activation of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway leading to the phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). The present study examined the molecular mechanism underlying the stimulatory effect of epicatechins on eNOS. NO-mediated relaxation was assessed using porcine coronary artery rings in the presence of indomethacin, and charybdotoxin plus apamin, inhibitors of cyclooxygenases and EDHF-mediated responses, respectively. The phosphorylation level of Akt and eNOS was assessed in cultured coronary artery endothelial cells by Western blot, and ROS formation using dihydroethidine. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCg) caused endothelium-dependent relaxations in coronary artery rings and the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells. These responses were inhibited by membrane-permeant analogues of superoxide dismutase and catalase, whereas native superoxide dismutase, catalase and inhibitors of major enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species including NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, cytochrome P450 and the mitochondrial respiration chain were without effect. The EGCg derivative with all hydroxyl functions methylated induced neither relaxations nor the intracellular formation of ROS, whereas both responses were observed when the hydroxyl functions on the gallate moiety were present. In conclusion, EGCg causes endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxations of coronary artery rings through the Akt-dependent activation of eNOS in endothelial cells. This response is initiated by the intracellular formation of superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide, and is critically dependent on the gallate moiety and on the presence of hydroxyl functions possibly through intracellular auto-oxidation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Low Level Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Decrease Connexin36 Gap Junction Coupling in Mouse and Human Islets through Nitric Oxide-mediated Protein Kinase Cδ*

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Nikki L.; Walter, Rachelle L.; Hemmati, Alireza; Westacott, Matthew J.; Benninger, Richard K. P.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the decline in islet function during the development of diabetes. Cytokines can disrupt insulin secretion and calcium dynamics; however, the mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Connexin36 gap junctions coordinate glucose-induced calcium oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion across the islet. Loss of gap junction coupling disrupts these dynamics, similar to that observed during the development of diabetes. This study investigates the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines mediate gap junction coupling. Specifically, as cytokine-induced NO can activate PKCδ, we aimed to understand the role of PKCδ in modulating cytokine-induced changes in gap junction coupling. Isolated mouse and human islets were treated with varying levels of a cytokine mixture containing TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Islet dysfunction was measured by insulin secretion, calcium dynamics, and gap junction coupling. Modulators of PKCδ and NO were applied to determine their respective roles in modulating gap junction coupling. High levels of cytokines caused cell death and decreased insulin secretion. Low levels of cytokine treatment disrupted calcium dynamics and decreased gap junction coupling, in the absence of disruptions to insulin secretion. Decreases in gap junction coupling were dependent on NO-regulated PKCδ, and altered membrane organization of connexin36. This study defines several mechanisms underlying the disruption to gap junction coupling under conditions associated with the development of diabetes. These mechanisms will allow for greater understanding of islet dysfunction and suggest ways to ameliorate this dysfunction during the development of diabetes. PMID:26668311

  16. NMDA receptor stimulation induces temporary alpha-tubulin degradation signaled by nitric oxide-mediated tyrosine nitration in the nervous system of Sepia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Anna; Fiore, Gabriella; Di Cristo, Carlo; Di Cosmo, Anna; d'Ischia, Marco

    2002-05-24

    Biochemical and immunohistochemical evidence is reported, showing basal protein nitration in specific regions of the optic lobes of Sepia officinalis, mainly in the fiber layers of the plexiform zone. SDS-PAGE analysis of optic lobe extracts revealed an intense 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactive band identified as alpha-tubulin by immunoprecipitation and partial purification. Stimulation of NMDA receptors resulted in a selective decrease in alpha-tubulin levels within 30 min with partial recovery after 4 h. The effect was suppressed by the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-nitroarginine. Incubation of optic lobes with free 3-nitrotyrosine resulted likewise in a selective loss of alpha-tubulin, due apparently to incorporation of the amino acid into the C-terminus of detyrosinated alpha-tubulin to give the nitrated protein purportedly more susceptible to degradation. Overall, these results point to a novel potential physiologic role of NO and free 3-nitrotyrosine in the control of the alpha-tubulin tyrosination/detyrosination cycle and turnover in Sepia nervous tissue.

  17. Acidic polysaccharide isolated from Phellinus linteus induces nitric oxide-mediated tumoricidal activity of macrophages through protein tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gi-Young; Oh, Yang-Hyo; Park, Yeong-Min

    2003-09-19

    Mushroom polysaccharides are increasingly being utilized to treat a wide variety of diseases. Aqueous extracts from the Phellinus linteus have been reported to have anti-tumor and immunomodulatory properties. In particular, acidic polysaccharide (PL) isolated from P. linteus induced a secretory and cellular macrophage response. However, the exact mechanism by which PL regulates the macrophage functions remains unclear. PL-treated murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo dramatically induced the production of NO. PL enhanced the lytic death of B16 cells through the production of NO. The present study examined signal molecules that may participate in PL-elicited responses by macrophages. The data demonstrated that a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine, and a protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor, genistein, inhibited the tumoricidal activity of macrophages induced by PL. In addition, these inhibitors blocked the production of NO and the expression of surface molecules in PL-stimulated macrophages. Furthermore, CD11b/CD18 possibly mediates PL-induced cell activation. These results suggest that PL stimulates NO production for tumoricidal activity and induces cell-mediated immunity by increasing surface molecules, and the process may be a mechanism by which PL produces its therapeutic effects.

  18. Endothelium/Nitric Oxide Mediates the Vasorelaxant and Antihypertensive Effects of the Aqueous Extract from the Stem Bark of Mammea africana Sabine (Guttiferae)

    PubMed Central

    Nguelefack-Mbuyo, Elvine Pami; Dongmo, Alain Bertrand; Nguelefack, Télesphore Benoît; Kamanyi, Albert; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Dimo, Théophile

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects of the aqueous extract from the stem bark of M. africana (AEMA). AEMA was tested in vitro on intact or endothelium-denuded rats' aorta rings precontracted with KCl or norepinephrine in absence or in presence of L-NAME or glibenclamide. The effect of a single concentration (300 μg/mL) of AEMA was also examined on the concentration-response curve of KCl. In vivo, the antihypertensive effects of AEMA (200 mg/kg/day) were evaluated in male Wistar rats treated with L-NAME (40 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. AEMA relaxed aorta rings precontracted with NE or KCl with respective EC50 values of 0.36 μg/mL and 197.60 μg/mL. The destruction of endothelium or pretreatment of aorta rings with L-NAME shifted the EC50 of AEMA from 0.36 μg/mL to 40.65 μg/mL and 20.20 μg/mL, respectively. The vasorelaxant activity of M. africana was significantly inhibited in presence of glibenclamide. AEMA also significantly inhibited the concentration-response curve of KCl. Administered orally, AEMA induced acute and chronic antihypertensive effects and normalized renal NO level. These results show that the vasorelaxant activity of AEMA might be mediated by the activation of the NO-cGMP-ATP-dependent potassium channels pathway and might predominantly account for its antihypertensive effect. PMID:23008745

  19. Endothelium/Nitric Oxide Mediates the Vasorelaxant and Antihypertensive Effects of the Aqueous Extract from the Stem Bark of Mammea africana Sabine (Guttiferae).

    PubMed

    Nguelefack-Mbuyo, Elvine Pami; Dongmo, Alain Bertrand; Nguelefack, Télesphore Benoît; Kamanyi, Albert; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Dimo, Théophile

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects of the aqueous extract from the stem bark of M. africana (AEMA). AEMA was tested in vitro on intact or endothelium-denuded rats' aorta rings precontracted with KCl or norepinephrine in absence or in presence of L-NAME or glibenclamide. The effect of a single concentration (300 μg/mL) of AEMA was also examined on the concentration-response curve of KCl. In vivo, the antihypertensive effects of AEMA (200 mg/kg/day) were evaluated in male Wistar rats treated with L-NAME (40 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. AEMA relaxed aorta rings precontracted with NE or KCl with respective EC50 values of 0.36 μg/mL and 197.60 μg/mL. The destruction of endothelium or pretreatment of aorta rings with L-NAME shifted the EC50 of AEMA from 0.36 μg/mL to 40.65 μg/mL and 20.20 μg/mL, respectively. The vasorelaxant activi