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Sample records for energetic atoms ions

  1. Characteristics of flows of energetic atoms reflected from metal targets during ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, A.; Perevertaylo, V.; Tsybulsky, L.; Volpian, O.

    2016-07-01

    Particle number and energy reflection coefficients for energetic neutralized gas ions (Ar and O atoms) backscattered from metal targets during ion bombardment have been calculated using TRIM code. The energy distributions of reflected atoms are computed, too, and their dependence on the primary ion energy and the angle of ion incidence is determined. The obtained data confirm the possibility of employing energetic atoms reflection for generation of high energy neutral beams and point out to take this phenomenon into account under analysis of the ion technology for coating deposition.

  2. Energetic neutral atoms emitted from ice by ion bombardment under Ganymede surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Magnetospheric or solar wind ions directly interacting with a planetary surface result in backscattering or sputtering of energetic neutral atoms. One example is the solar wind interaction with the surface of the Moon, where the produced energetic neutral atoms were observed by the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer instrument (SARA) on Chandrayaan-1. At Jupiter, magnetospheric plasma interacts in a similar way with the surface of the Galilean moons. However, the emission of energetic neutral atoms from "dirty" ices as found e.g. on Ganymede's surface is poorly understood. We set up an experiment to study the ion to surface interaction under Ganymede surface environment conditions using the unique capabilities of the MEFISTO test facility at University of Bern. Ions of various species and energies up to 33 keV/q were impacted on a block of ice made from a mixture of water, NaCl and dry ice. The energetic neutral atoms produced by the interaction were detected with the prototype of the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer instrument (JNA.) JNA is proposed as part of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for ESA's JUICE mission to Jupiter and instrument is based on the Energetic Energetic Neutral Atom instrument (ENA) built for the BepiColombo Magnetospheric Orbiter. We present energy spectra for different ion beam species and energetic neutral atom species combinations. The data show high yields for energetic neutral atoms up to the upper end of the instrument energy range of 3.3 keV. The energy spectra of the neutral atom flux emitted from the ice could only partially be fitted by the Sigmund-Thompson formula. In some cases, but not all, a Maxwellian distribution provides a reasonable description of the data.

  3. Low-Altitude Emission of Energetic Neutral Atoms: A New Diagnostic of the Energetics of Ion Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Nair, H.

    2010-12-01

    We describe a new theoretical understanding of the emission of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) generated by the precipitation of energetic magnetospheric ions into the Earth’s monatomic oxygen (O) exosphere (200-800 km). This low altitude emission (LAE) is the brightest ENA source in images obtained from Astrid-1/PIPPI, IMAGE/MENA/HENA, and TWINS1/2. The upward ENA “albedo” from the precipitating protons in the energy range 1-100 keV can approach 50% of the incident proton intensity. Unlike FUV imaging, ENA imaging of the LAE allows us to extract the detailed (not integrated) energy spectrum of the precipitating protons. We have verified this claim by comparing ENA images from TWINS 1/2 with in situ ion spectra measured by DMSP spacecraft (~825 km altitude) flying simultaneously under the ENA LAE regions (Bazell et al., J. Geophys. Res., in press 2010, and also this Conference). Quantitative extraction of proton spectra from the ENA images requires a “thick-target” theory that treats properly the multiple atomic collisions (charge exchange of protons, stripping ENA H-atoms) and associated energy losses (including ionization and excitation). Analytic solutions to the coupled proton/H-atom transport equations have been obtained, and they provide quantitative insight into the strong dependence of the ENA LAE upon the pitch angle and the energy of the precipitating protons. Since global ENA images of LAE can be obtained with exposure times of a minute or so during large geomagnetic storms, the distribution in magnetic latitude and local time of their evolving spectra contain critical diagnostics of the physics of not only the precipitation process, but also of the acceleration of the energetic ions themselves. Simulated 24 keV ENA low altitude emission viewed from TWINS-2 generated by precipitating protons below a DMSP pass (Bazell et al., JGR, in press, 2010).

  4. Hyperfine structure measurement of 87Rb atoms injected into superfluid helium as highly energetic ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Kei; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Wakui, Takashi; Mitsuya, Yousuke; Hayasaka, Miki; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Odashima, Hitoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Orochi Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new nuclear laser spectroscopy technique that is called OROCHI (Optical RI-atoms Observation in Condensed Helium as Ioncatcher). In OROCHI, highly energetic ion beam is injected into superfluid helium (He II) and is trapped as atoms. Hyperfine structure (HFS) and Zeeman splitting of trapped atoms is measured using laser-microwave (MW)/radiofrequency (RF) double resonance method. We deduce nuclear moments and spin values from the measured splittings, respectively So far, we measured Zeeman splitting of 84-87Rb atoms To evaluate the validity of the OROCHI method, it is necessary to investigate the following two points not only for Zeeman but also for HFS splitings. (i) What is the accuracy in frequency in our measurement? (ii) How high beam intensity is necessary to observe resonance spectra? For this purpose we conducted online experiment using 87Rb beam and measured the HFS splitting of injected 87Rb atoms in He II.

  5. Diagnosing Pickup Ion Distributions beyond the Termination Shock through Ener-getic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Wu, X.

    2008-12-01

    The solar wind accumulates interstellar pickup ions throughout the heliosphere, which can be described with an isotropic velocity distribution in the plasma frame with a cut-off at the solar wind speed. This distribution is then transported across the termination shock where it is slowed down and heated, thus producing a distribution with a significant portion of ions that show velocity components towards the Sun. In the interaction with the interstellar gas flow through the heliosphere a fraction of these pickup ions is turned into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), the sunward pointing portion of which can then be observed by ENA sensors in the inner heliosphere, such as instruments on Mars Express, STEREO, and IBEX. In this contribution we generate a simplified analytical model of the pickup ions and their ENA counterparts for a hydrodynamic flow pattern in the heliosheath. The energy distribution of the ENAs is sensitive to the radial component of the heliosheath flow. The attempt is made to predict spatial patterns of the ENA spectra based on the heliosheath flow pattern for comparison with future IBEX maps. These patterns will also be compared with angular variations and temporal changes in the recently published ENA observations with STEREO STE (Wang, L., R.P. Lin, D.E. Larson, J. Luhman, Nature, 454, 81-83, 2008).

  6. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, M.; Taguchi, S.; Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere. We examined the occurrence of the LENA cusp signal during positive IMF B(sub z) in terms of the arrival direction and the IMF clock angle theta(sub CA). Results of statistical analyses show that the occurrence frequency is high on the postnoon side when theta(sub CA) is between approximately 20 degrees and approximately 50 degrees. This is ascribed to ion injection caused by cusp reconnection typical of positive IMF B(sub z). Our results also show that there is another situation of high occurrence frequency, which can be identified with theta(sub CA) of approximately 30 degrees to approximately 80 degrees. When theta(sub CA) is relatively large (60 degrees - 80 degrees), occurrence frequencies are high at relatively low latitudes over a wide extent spanning both prenoon and postnoon sectors. This feature suggests that the ion injection is caused by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Its postnoon side boundary shifts toward the prenoon as theta(sub CA) decreases. When theta(sub CA) is less than approximately 50 degrees, the high occurrence frequency exists well inside the prenoon sector, which is azimuthally separated from the postnoon region ascribed to cusp reconnection. The prenoon region, which is thought due to ion injection caused by dayside reconnection, may explain the recent report that proton aurora brightening occurs in the unanticipated prenoon sector of the northern high-latitude ionosphere for IMF B(sub y) greater than 0 and B(sub z) greater than 0.

  7. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, M.; Taguchi, S.; Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere. We examined the occurrence of the LENA cusp signal during positive IMF B(sub z) in terms of the arrival direction and the IMF clock angle theta(sub CA). Results of statistical analyses show that the occurrence frequency is high on the postnoon side when theta(sub CA) is between approximately 20 degrees and approximately 50 degrees. This is ascribed to ion injection caused by cusp reconnection typical of positive IMF B(sub z). Our results also show that there is another situation of high occurrence frequency, which can be identified with theta(sub CA) of approximately 30 degrees to approximately 80 degrees. When theta(sub CA) is relatively large (60 degrees - 80 degrees), occurrence frequencies are high at relatively low latitudes over a wide extent spanning both prenoon and postnoon sectors. This feature suggests that the ion injection is caused by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Its postnoon side boundary shifts toward the prenoon as theta(sub CA) decreases. When theta(sub CA) is less than approximately 50 degrees, the high occurrence frequency exists well inside the prenoon sector, which is azimuthally separated from the postnoon region ascribed to cusp reconnection. The prenoon region, which is thought due to ion injection caused by dayside reconnection, may explain the recent report that proton aurora brightening occurs in the unanticipated prenoon sector of the northern high-latitude ionosphere for IMF B(sub y) greater than 0 and B(sub z) greater than 0.

  8. Energetic negative ion and neutral atom beam generation at passage of laser accelerated high energy positive ions through a liquid spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abicht, F.; Prasad, R.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J.; Ehrentraut, L.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Schnürer, M.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis

    2013-05-01

    Beams of energetic negative ions and neutral atoms are obtained from water and ethanol spray targets irradiated by high intensity (5×1019 W/cm2) and ultrashort (50 fs) laser pulses. The resulting spectra were measured with the Thomson parabola spectrometer, which enabled absolute measurements of both: positive and negative ions. The generation of a beam of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms was confirmed with CR-39 track detectors and their spectral characteristics have been measured using time of flight technique. Generation is ascribed to electron-capture and -loss processes in the collisions of laser-accelerated high-energy protons with spray of droplets. The same method can be applied to generate energetic negative ions and neutral atoms of different species.

  9. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  10. Optical radiation from the interaction of energetic atoms, ions, electrons, and photons with surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolk, N. H.; Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.; Mendenhall, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy particle, electron, and UV photon bombardment of solid surfaces has been recently observed to result in the emission of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation. This effect occurs over a wide range of incident projectile energies. Line radiation arising from transitions between discrete atomic or molecular levels may be attributed to the decay of excited particles which have been sputtered or electronically/chemically desorbed from the surface. Broadband continuum radiation, which is also observed, is believed to arise either from fluorescence of the near surface bulk or from the radiative decay of desorbed excited clusters. Spacecraft, in the ambient near Earth environment, are subject to such bombardment. The dynamics of energetic particle and photon beam interactions with surfaces which lead to surface erosion and glow phenomena will be treated. In addition, projected experimental and theoretical studies of oxygen and nitrogen beam surface interactions on materials characteristic of spacecraft surfaces will be discussed.

  11. Pickup Ion Production in the Global Heliosphere and Heliosheath and Their Diagnostics by Fluxes of Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    An anisotropic particle transport model, based on an expansion of a focused transport equation in Legendre polynomials, is used here as a tool to analyze the distributions of pickup ions (PUIs) in the heliosphere and heliosheath. A three-dimensional, MHD-kinetic model for flows of a thermal plasma, neutral atoms and PUIs has been developed. The preliminary results from our model are in qualitative agreement with observations made by New Horizons, Ulysses, Voyager 1 and 2. All-sky maps of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) fluxes with energies of about 0.2-6 keV based on our current PUI model are qualitatively similar to IBEX-Hi distributed ENA maps. Also, simulated spectra of ENA fluxes nearly match IBEX-Hi spectra of distributed ENA fluxes. It is demonstrated that preserving some pitch-angle information of the PUI distribution is important for correctly interpreting the data.

  12. Energetic neutral atoms: Imaging the magnetospheric ring current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, Edmond C.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetospheric imaging is a new discipline whose goal is to make pictures of the energetic particle populations trapped in the magnetic field of Earth (or any other planet). This project demonstrated the technical feasibility and scientific validity of magnetospheric imaging using energetic neutral atoms (ENA) with the publication and quantitative analysis of the first ENA images ever obtained from space. ENA's are produced when singly-charged energetic (approximately 100 keV) trapped ions make an atomic collision with the neutral hydrogen atoms which boil of the top of the Earth's atmosphere. These hydrogen atoms suffuse the entire trapping volume of the magnetosphere. The energetic ion steals the electron from the atmospheric hydrogen, so the energetic ion is transformed into an energetic neutral atom with a velocity of several thousands of kilometers/second. Moreover, the new-born ENA preserves the velocity that the trapped ion had at the time of the collision. Consequently, any population of energetic ions emits ENA's.

  13. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging at Low Altitudes from the Swedish Microsatellite Astrid: Extraction of the Equatorial Ion Distribution. Paper 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Pontus C:son; Barabash, Stas; Roelof, Edmond C.; Chase, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) images obtained by the ENA imager on- board the Astrid satellite in the polar cap at 1000 km during a moderate magnetic storm (Dst greater than or equal to 80 nT) on 8 February 1995 are simulated using a parameterized model of the equatorial ion distribution and a six-component Chamberlain exo-sphere with parameters from the MSISE-90 model. By changing the ion parameters until a matching ENA image is obtained one can extract the equatorial ion distribution. Four consecutive images from different view points several of minutes apart are simulated assuming H(+) and O(+), respectively, as parent ions. The optimal set of parameters is extracted by minimizing the chi(exp 2) difference between simulated and observed ENA image using Powell's minimization algorithm. The optimal equatorial model ion distribution consists of O(+) peaked in around dusk. The lower intensity of fluxes obtained from vantage points closer to the pole is an effect of the loss cone of the parent ion distribution being empty.

  14. Modeling the near-Earth interaction between ring current ions and exospheric neutrals: escape through energetic neutral atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LLera, K.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    The two major loss processes for ring current decay are precipitation and energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). Since the exospheric neutral density increases with decreasing altitudes, precipitating ring current ions (reaching down to 200 - 800 km in altitude) also produce low-altitude ENA signatures that can be stronger than the ring current emission at equatorial distances ( 2 - 9 Re). The higher density results in multiple collisions between the ring current ions and exospheric oxygen. The affect on hydrogen ions is the focus of this study. Since the H particle sustains energy loss ( 36 eV) at each neutralizing or re-ionizing interaction, the escaped ENAs do not directly reflect the ring current properties. We model the energy loss due to multiple charge exchange and electron stripping interactions of 1 - 100 keV precipitating ring current ions undergo before emerging as low-altitude ENAs. The H particle is either an ion or an ENA throughout the simulation. Their lifetime is analytically determined by the length of one mean free path. We track the ion state with Lorentz motion while the ENA travels ballistically across the geomagnetic field. Our simulations show the energy loss is greater than 20% for hydrogen ring current ions below 30 keV (60 keV for the simulations that wander equatorward). This is the first quantification of the energy loss associated with the creation of low-altitude ENAs. Our model (currently constrained in the meridional plane) has revealed characteristics on how precipitation is affected by the near-Earth neutral exosphere. This ion-neutral interaction removes particles from the loss cone but promotes loss through ENA generation. These findings should be implemented in models predicting the ring current decay and used as an analysis tool to reconstruct the ring current population from observed low-altitude ENAs.

  15. Viewing perspective in energetic neutral atom intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2008-09-01

    Through interspacecraft comparison of energetic neutral oxygen (ENO) intensity from two different vantage points provided by IMAGE and Geotail, Lui et al. (2005) showed that viewing perspective plays a very important role in the observed ENO intensity level during a magnetic storm period. Motivated by the findings of Lui et al. (2005), we investigate how viewing perspective influences energetic neutral atom emissions from a modeling perspective. The main results of this paper are that (1) our simulation results, based upon O+ ion fluxes from the Comprehensive Ring Current Model and the subsequent ENO calculation, reproduce the total differential ENO intensity obtained from two spacecraft to a reasonable degree and (2) further analysis of our results indicates that pitch angle anisotropy in ring current ion flux, a crucial physical quantity in ring current dynamics, is one major contributor to the difference in energetic neutral atom intensity from different viewing perspectives.

  16. Investigating Pickup Ions with New Horizons, Ulysses and Voyager and Their Diagnostics By Fluxes of Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Florinski, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Pickup ions (PUIs) play a major role in the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local inter-stellar medium (LISM). An understanding of the transport of PUIs in the heliosphere is important.Here, we solve the transport equation to examine the detailed spatial evolution of the PUI distri-bution in supersonic solar wind. The effects of second-order Fermi process, i.e. velocity diffusion,convection with the solar wind, adiabatic cooling and continual injection of newly born PUIs areall included. We analyze the transition of PUIs at the heliospheric termination shock (TS) anddescribe the heliosheath PUI distribution taking into account ongoing velocity diffusion. A three-dimensional, MHD-kinetic model for flows of a thermal plasma, neutral atoms and PUIs has beendeveloped. The flow of the plasma is modeled using solutions to MHD equations. The PUI transportmodule analyzes the spatial variation of the PUI distribution function as a separate component, ona kinetic level. We perform a comparison of our numerical results with observations made by NewHorizons, Ulysses and Voyager. Fluxes of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) with energies of about0.2-6 keV originating through charge exchange of H atoms with the compressed solar wind andwith PUIs behind the TS and arriving at 1 AU are calculated. Our results are directly comparablewith the actual IBEX distributed ENA sky maps. A comparison of our numerical results withmeasurements performed by IBEX will allow us to answer the challenging question: how the PUIdistribution affects the ENA fluxes from the heliosheath?

  17. Probing the heliosphere with energetic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Shih, K. L.; Jokipii, J. R.; Grzedzielski, S.

    1992-01-01

    The idea of using energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced by charge exchange between energetic ions and ambient neutral atoms, as a diagnostic tool to investigate planetary magnetospheres from a distance has been extended to the investigation of the heliosphere. The paper explores what one can reasonably expect of the heliospheric ENA (HSENA) and what criteria would be imposed on HSENA instruments by concentrating on 10-10 exp 3 keV protons in quiet-time interplanetary space, solar-flare events, corotating interaction regions, and populations have distinctive signatures and that the detection of these particles can reveal energy spatial and propagation of ions in 3D interplanetary space, including the solar-wind termination shock. Such breadth of information could not be gained by in situ means.

  18. Effect of energetic oxygen atoms on neutral density models.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The dissociative recombination of O2(+) and NO(+) in the F region results in the production of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen with substantially greater kinetic energy than the ambient atoms. In the exosphere these energetic atoms have long free paths. They can ascend to altitudes of several thousand kilometers and can travel horizontally to distances of the order of the earth's radius. The distribution of energetic oxygen atoms is derived by means of models of the ion and neutral densities for quiet and disturbed solar conditions. A distribution technique is used to study the motion of the atoms in the collision-dominated region. Ballistic trajectories are calculated in the spherical gravitational field of the earth. The present calculations show that the number densities of energetic oxygen atoms predominate over the ambient atomic oxygen densities above 1000 km under quiet solar conditions and above 1600 km under disturbed solar conditions.

  19. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  20. Hybrid simulations of the hydrogen energetic neutral atoms at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Janhunen, P.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract An energetic neutral atom (ENA) is produced when a charge exchange reaction happens between an energetic ion and a neutral atom. At Mars, the energetic ions are typically solar wind protons and the neutrals are hydrogen atoms of the planetary exosphere. The ASPERA-3 experiment on Mars Express has provided the first measurements of ENAs at Mars. These measurements give a unique global view of the solar wind interaction with Mars. In the present study, the properties of hydrogen ENAs at Mars are investigated using a 3-D quasi-neutral hybrid model, which has been successfully applied to the study of solar wind-planet interactions at different planets, such as Mercury, Venus, and Mars. Our preliminary simulation results give ENA intensity images similar to the ones obtained from ASPERA- 3/NPD observations, although there are still discrepancies due to uncertainties in the current exospheric models.

  1. Energetic Ion Interactions with the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2000-01-01

    The principal research tasks of this investigation are: (1) specification of the energetic (keV to MeV) ion environments upstream of the four Galilean satellites and (2) data analysis and numerical modeling of observed ion interactions with the satellites. Differential flux spectra are being compiled for the most abundant ions (protons, oxygen, and sulfur) from measurements at 20 keV to 100 MeV total energy by the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) experiment and at higher ion energies by the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) experiment. Runge-Kutta and other numerical techniques are used to propagate test particles sampled from the measured upstream spectra to the satellite surface or spacecraft through the local magnetic and corotational electric field environment of each satellite. Modeling of spatial variations in directional flux anisotropies measured during each close flyby provides limits on atomic charge states for heavy (O, S) magnetospheric ions and on internal or induced magnetic fields of the satellites. Validation of models for magnetic and electric field configurations then allows computation of rates for ion implantation, sputtering, and energy deposition into the satellite surfaces for further modeling of observable chemical changes induced by irradiation. Our ongoing work on production of oxidants and other secondary species by ice irradiation on Europa's surface has significant applications, already acknowledged in current literature, to astrobiological evolution. Finally, the work will improve understanding of energetic ion sources and sinks at the satellite orbits for improved modeling of magnetospheric transport processes. The scope of the research effort mainly includes data from the primary Galileo mission (1995-1997) but may also include some later data where directly relevant (e.g., comparison of J0 and I27 data for Io) to the primary mission objectives. Funding for this contract also includes partial support for our related education and public

  2. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) Pitch Angle Distribution as a Function of Storm Phase - Precursor to Future Work in Mapping ENA/Ion Albedo with Storm Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackler, D. A.; Jahn, J.; Mukherjee, J.; Pollock, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Charge exchange between ring current ions spiraling into the upper atmosphere and terrestrial neutral constituents produces a non-isotropic distribution of escaping Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA). These ENA’s are no longer tied to the magnetic field, and can therefore be observed remotely from orbiting platforms. In this study we build on previous work described in Pollock et al., 2009 in which IMAGE/MENA data was used to compute the pitch angle distribution of ENA’s observed in the 29 October 2003 storm. The algorithm used in Pollock et al., 2009 is used to compute the pitch angle distribution for additional storms at different phases of the solar cycle. The pitch angles are then used to characterize the velocity-space distribution of ENA’s emanating from the source point as well as the configuration-space distribution of ENA fluxes from a point in the upper atmosphere. This work is the foundation for a further study to model the ENA/ion precipitation albedo over storm phase. The albedo maps will be used in conjunction with in-situ ion precipitation data to study the energy input as a function of storm phase.

  3. Energetic neutral atom imaging at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, S.; Holmström, M.

    In magnetospheric research, Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) are atoms with energy much greater than the escape energy at the planet in question. They propagate unaffected by gravitational and electromagnetic forces and can be used to image the regions of generation. ENAs at planets are produced by (1) charge-exchang of energetic ions in the near-planet environment with the planetary exosphere and (2) by sputtering of, or backscattering from, the planetary surface and atmosphere. Mercury has a tenuous exosphere, but yet it is sufficiently dense to convert ions of solar wind and planetary origin into ENAs. The ENA fluxes reach 102 - 103 (cm2 sr s keV)-1 and up to 104 - 105 (cm2 sr s keV)-1 in the energy range 10-50 keV. That is very similar to the Earth's ring current conditions. What is unique for Mercury is the high variability of the Mercury magnetosphere giving rise to pulsating ENA emissions (ENA "flashes") with a period of a minute. Due to the small size of the magnetosphere, the particles injected from the tail can fill up the entire dayside magnetosphere, making possible ENA imaging of the magnetosphere shape. Both the ions coming directly from the solar wind and those accelerated in the tail, as well as energized planetary ions, precipitate on the Mercury surface resulting in extensive sputtering. The integrated energy spectrum of the sputtered products falls off as E -2 (the Thompson-Siegmund formula) and results in high fluxes at energies greater than 10-100 eV. For example, the direct impact of the solar wind on the surface results in ENA fluxes of 105 - 107 (cm2 sr s)-1 for E > 100eV . ENAs originated from sputtering can be used to visualize the precipitation regions in a similar way as the terrestrial aurora displays magnetospheric dynamics (ENA "aurora" at Mercury). Moreover, measurements of these ENAs are crucial for understanding the contribution of sputtering to the formation of the Mercury exosphere. Surface sputtering at Mercury resembles in some

  4. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  5. Pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    A large area, high flux beam of energetic oxygen atoms, E about 5 eV, has been developed to study the interaction of atomic oxygen with materials appropriate for spacecraft in low earth orbit. A description of the operating conditions and characteristics of the beam along with typical sample irradiation results are provided.

  6. Pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    A large area, high flux beam of energetic oxygen atoms, E about 5 eV, has been developed to study the interaction of atomic oxygen with materials appropriate for spacecraft in low earth orbit. A description of the operating conditions and characteristics of the beam along with typical sample irradiation results are provided.

  7. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    DOE PAGES

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films withmore » (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.« less

  8. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films with (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.

  9. Heliospheric energetic neutral atoms observed with SOHO/CELIAS/HSTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Czechowski, A.; Hsieh, K. C.; Kallenbach, R.

    Energetic hydrogen and helium atoms ENAs have been identified and their fluxes are monitored by the High-Energy Suprathermal Time-of-Flight sensor HSTOF of the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System CELIAS on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory SOHO near the Lagrangian point L1 Potential sources of ENAs in the heliosphere are CIRs solar energetic particle events pre-accelerated pickup ions as well as low-energy up to few hundred keV anomalous cosmic ray ACR ions in the outer heliosphere close to and beyond the solar wind termination shock ENAs neutralized via charge transfer reactions can penetrate into the inner solar system unaffected by the interplanetary magnetic field The observed ENA fluxes set limits on potential theories of the dominant sources of the energetic neutral atoms and has implications on modeling of the heliosphere

  10. Global distribution of the Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) / precipitating ion particulate albedo from Low Altitude Emission (LAE) source regions over the last solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackler, D. A.; Jahn, J.; Mukherjee, J.; Pollock, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Charge exchange between ring current ions spiraling into the upper atmosphere and terrestrial neutral constituents produces a non-isotropic distribution of escaping Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA). These ENA's are no longer tied to the magnetic field, and can therefore be observed remotely from orbiting platforms. Particularly of interest is Low Altitude Emissions (LAE) of ENA's. These ENA emissions occur near the oxygen exobase and constitute the brightest ENA signatures during geomagnetic storms. In this study we build on previous work described in Pollock et al. [2009] in which IMAGE/MENA data was used to compute the Invariant Latitude (IL) and Magnetic Local Time (MLT) distributions of ENA's observed in the 29 October 2003 storm. The algorithms developed in Pollock et al. [2009] are used to compute the IL and MLT of LAE source regions for 76 identified storms at different phases of solar cycle 23. The ENA flux from the source regions are divided by in-situ ion precipitation obtained by DMSP-SSJ4 and NOAA-TED to give a global mapping of the particulate albedo during storm times.

  11. Energetic oxygen atom material degradation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a study designed to test potential Shuttle surface materials for the extents of degradation and mass loss expected to be suffered in space from the velocity impacts of ambient oxygen atoms, a novel technique was developed for generation of a high flux of energetic oxygen atoms. The generation technique involves laser-induced breakdown of molecular oxygen followed by a rapid expansion of energetic oxygen atoms. The high-velocity streams developed in an evacuated hypersonic nozzle have average O-atom velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s, with an estimated total production of 10 to the 18th atoms per pulse over pulse durations of several microseconds. Results on preliminary material degradation tests conducted with this test facility have been reported by Caledonia et al. (1987). Diagrams of the experimental setup are included.

  12. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  13. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-01

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  14. Fraunhofer-type diffraction patterns of matter-wave scattering of projectiles: Electron transfer in energetic ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueny, Hicham

    2015-07-01

    We present results for single and double electron captures in intermediate energies H+ and 2H+ projectiles colliding with a helium target. The processes under investigations are treated using a nonperturbative semiclassical approach in combination with Eikonal approximation to calculate the scattering differential cross sections. The latter reveals pronounced minima and maxima in the scattering angles, in excellent agreement with the recent experimental data. It turns out that the present structure depends strongly on the projectile energy and shows only slight variations with different capture channels. The observed structure demonstrates the analogy of atomic de Broglie's matter-wave scattering with λd B=1.3 -3.2 ×10-3 a.u. and Fraunhofer-type diffraction of light waves.

  15. Energetic Nitrogen Ions within the Inner Magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; Richardson, J. D.; Jurac, S.; Moore, M.; Cooper, J. F.; Mauk, B. H.; Smith, H. T.; Michael, M.; Paranicus, C.; Armstrong, T. P.; Tsurutani, B.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    2003-05-01

    Titan's interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere will result in the energetic ejection of atomic nitrogen atoms into Saturn's magnetosphere due to dissociation of N2 by electrons, ions, and UV photons. The ejection of N atoms into Saturn's magnetosphere will form a nitrogen torus around Saturn with mean density of about 4 atoms/cm3 with source strength of 4.5x1025 atoms/sec. These nitrogen atoms are ionized by photoionization, electron impact ionization and charge exchange reactions producing an N+ torus of 1-4 keV suprathermal ions centered on Titan's orbital position. We will show Voyager plasma observations that demonstrate presence of a suprathermal ion component within Saturn's outer magnetosphere. The Voyager LECP data also reported the presence of inward diffusing energetic ions from the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, which could have an N+ contribution. If so, when one conserves the first and second adiabatic invariant the N+ ions will have energies in excess of 100 keV at Dione's L shell and greater than 400 keV at Enceladus' L shell. Energetic charged particle radial diffusion coefficients are also used to constrain the model results. But, one must also consider the solar wind as another important source of keV ions, in the form of protons and alpha particles, for Saturn's outer magnetosphere. Initial estimates indicate that a solar wind source could dominate in the outer magnetosphere, but various required parameters for this estimate are highly uncertain and will have to await Cassini results for confirmation. We show that satellite sweeping and charged particle precipitation within the middle and outer magnetosphere will tend to enrich N+ ions relative to protons within Saturn's inner magnetosphere as they diffuse radially inward for radial diffusion coefficients that do not violate observations. Charge exchange reactions within the inner magnetosphere can be an important loss mechanism for O+ ions, but to a lesser degree for N+ ions. Initial LECP

  16. SIMULATION OF ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS FROM SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Li, Gang; Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-10-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) provide the only way to observe the acceleration site of coronal-mass-ejection-driven (CME-driven) shock-accelerated solar energetic particles (SEPs). In gradual SEP events, energetic protons can charge exchange with the ambient solar wind or interstellar neutrals to become ENAs. Assuming a CME-driven shock with a constant speed of 1800 km s{sup –1} and compression ratio of 3.5, propagating from 1.5 to 40 R{sub S} , we calculate the accelerated SEPs at 5-5000 keV and the resulting ENAs via various charge-exchange interactions. Taking into account the ENA losses in the interplanetary medium, we obtain the flux-time profiles of these solar ENAs reaching 1 AU. We find that the arriving ENAs at energies above ∼100 keV show a sharply peaked flux-time profile, mainly originating from the shock source below 5 R{sub S} , whereas the ENAs below ∼20 keV have a flat-top time profile, mostly originating from the source beyond 10 R{sub S} . Assuming the accelerated protons are effectively trapped downstream of the shock, we can reproduce the STEREO ENA fluence observations at ∼2-5 MeV/nucleon. We also estimate the flux of ENAs coming from the charge exchange of energetic storm protons, accelerated by the fast CME-driven shock near 1 AU, with interstellar hydrogen and helium. Our results suggest that appropriate instrumentation would be able to detect ENAs from SEPs and to even make ENA images of SEPs at energies above ∼10-20 keV.

  17. Energetic neutral atom emissions from Titan interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D G; Brandt, P C; Roelof, E C; Dandouras, J; Krimigis, S M; Mauk, B H

    2005-05-13

    The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) observed the interaction of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, with Saturn's magnetosphere during two close flybys of Titan on 26 October and 13 December 2004. The MIMI Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) continuously imaged the energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) generated by charge exchange reactions between the energetic, singly ionized trapped magnetospheric ions and the outer atmosphere, or exosphere, of Titan. The images reveal a halo of variable ENA emission about Titan's nearly collisionless outer atmosphere that fades at larger distances as the exospheric density decays exponentially. The altitude of the emissions varies, and they are not symmetrical about the moon, reflecting the complexity of the interactions between Titan's upper atmosphere and Saturn's space environment.

  18. Satellite observations and instrumentation for measuring energetic neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, H.D.; Mobilia, J.; Collin, H.L.; Imhof, W.L. . Space Sciences Lab.)

    1993-12-01

    Direct measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) and ions have been obtained with the cooled solid state detectors on the low-altitude (220 km) three-axis stabilized S81-1/ stimulated emissions of energetic particles (SEEP) satellite and on the spinning 400 km [times] 5.5 R[sub e] (where R[sub e] is Earth radii) Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). During magnetic storms ENA and ion precipitation (E > 10 keV) are evident over the low-altitude equatorial region based on data from the SEEP (ONR 804) spectrometers and CRRES ion mass spectrometer (IMS-HI) (ONR 307-8-3) ion composition and ENA instrument. The IMS-HI neutral atom spectrometer covers the energy range from 20 to 1,500 keV with a geometrical factor of 10[sub [minus]3] cm[sup 2] sr and uses a 7-kG magnetic field to screen out protons less than about 50 MeV. During the strong magnetic storm of 24 March 1991 the first ENA and ion mass composition measurements were obtained of ring current particles below the inner belt and these fluxes are compared to the IMS-HI flux measurements in the ring current. Recently, an advanced spectrometer, the Source/Loss-cone Energetic Particle Spectrometer (SEPS), has been developed to image electrons, ions, and neutrals on the despun platform of the POLAR satellite ([approximately]1.8 [times] 9 R[sub e]) for launch in the mid 1990s as part of NASA's International Solar Terrestrial Physics/Global Geospace Science (ISTP/GGS) program.

  19. Energetic hydrogen atoms in wave driven discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Felizardo, E.; Tatarova, E.; Henriques, J.; Dias, F. M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Gordiets, B.

    2011-07-25

    Doppler broadened H{sub {gamma}} emission was detected in high frequency (350 and 500 MHz) hydrogen surface wave sustained discharges, revealing the presence of fast excited H atoms with kinetic energies in the range 4-9 eV. Spatially resolved measurements of the Doppler-broadened emission indicate that these fast atoms are predominantly formed near the wall, which suggests that their generation may result from acceleration of H{sup +} ions in the radial dc space charge field followed by recombination at the wall and the return of the neutral atom to the gas phase.

  20. Search for Heliospheric Energetic Neutral Atoms Using IMAGE/HENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Brandt, P. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Demajistre, R.

    2002-05-01

    The HENA instrument on the IMAGE spacecraft measures energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) using time-of-flight over the energy range 10-200 keV/nuc. Whenever there are neither magnetospheric ENAs nor energetic ions in sufficient numbers to penetrate the electrostatic deflection system, HENA will respond to ENAs from the heliosphere. These may either be ENAs produced within the solar wind by shock-accelerated ions that charge exchange with interstellar H-atoms [Roelof, 1992], or ENA H-atoms produced by protons accelerated in the vicinity of the heliospheric termination shock and transported beyond it into the sub-sonic heliosheath [Gruntman et al., 2001]. During ~2 hr of every appropriate apogee pass of IMAGE, we select a region of the anti-Earthward sky approximately 60° x60° and accumulate counts in 6° x6° instrument pixels and in ~5 energy channels. The energy spectrum and angular distribution accumulated during each apogee pass (usually containing >30 counts) are both examined for possible contamination. Acceptable counts are mapped into absolute intensities (cm2 sr s keV)-1 over the celestial sphere using the calibrated response function of the instrument. This allows counts from separate apogee passes to be properly concatenated. Any resulting intensity then gives an upper bound on ENAs from either within the heliosphere or from the termination shock. The portion of the celestial sphere covered so far is predominantly in the northern hemisphere. Preliminary results give an upper bound on the spectrum in the range 16-60 keV that is below the ENA intensity recently predicted for pickup protons accelerated at a strong heliospheric termination shock [Fahr and Lay, 2000]. However, this upper bound is well above the intensity we calculate for ENAs that would be produced by the recently reported ubiquitous high energy tails on long-term-averaged energetic ion spectra measured on the ACE spacecraft [Mewaldt et al., 2001].

  1. Pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    A pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen was designed, built, and successfully demonstrated. Molecular oxygen at several atmospheres pressure is introduced into an evacuated supersonic expansion nozzle through a pulsed molecular beam valve. An 18 J pulsed CO2 TEA laser is focused to intensities greater than 10(9) W/sq cm in the nozzle throat to generate a laser-induced breakdown. The resulting plasma is heated in excess of 20,000 K by a laser supported detonation wave, and then rapidly expands and cools. Nozzle geometry confines the expansion to provide rapid electron-ion recombination into atomic oxygen. Average O atom beam velocities from 5 to 13 km/s were measured at estimated fluxes to 10(18) atoms per pulse. Preliminary materials testing has produced the same surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples as obtained on the STS-8 mission. Scanning electron microscope examinations of irradiated polymer surfaces reveal an erosion morphology similar to that obtained in low Earth orbit, with an estimated mass removal rate of approx. 10(-24) cu cm/atom. The characteristics of the O atom source and the results of some preliminary materials testing studies are reviewed.

  2. Energetic ions in dipolarization events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Runov, A.; Hesse, M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate ion acceleration in dipolarization events in the magnetotail, using the electromagnetic fields of an MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection and flow bursts as basis for test particle tracing. The simulation results are compared with "Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms" observations. We provide quantitative answers to the relative importance of source regions and source energies. Flux decreases at proton energies up to 10-20 keV are found to be due to sources of lobe or plasma sheet boundary layer particles that enter the near tail via reconnection. Flux increases result from both thermal and suprathermal ion sources. Comparable numbers of accelerated protons enter the acceleration region via cross-tail drift from the dawn flanks of the near-tail plasma sheet and via reconnection of field lines extending into the more distant tail. We also demonstrate the presence of earthward plasma flow and accelerated suprathermal ions ahead of a dipolarization front. The flow acceleration stems from a net Lorentz force, resulting from reduced pressure gradients within a pressure pile-up region ahead of the front. Suprathermal precursor ions result from, typically multiple reflections at the front. Low-energy ions also become accelerated due to inertial drift in the direction of the small precursor electric field.

  3. Spatial distribution of Ion Precipitation into the High Latitude Inner Magnetosphere using Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) images over the Declining Phase of Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackler, D. A.; Jahn, J.; Pollock, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Plamasheet particles transported Earthward during times of active magnetic convection can interact with thermospheric neutrals through charge exchange. The resulting ENAs are free to leave the influence of the magnetosphere and can be remotely detected. ENAs associated with low altitude (300-800 km) ion precipitation in the high latitude inner mangetosphere are termed Low Altitude Emissions (LAEs). LAEs are highly non-isotropic in velocity space such that the pitch angle distribution at the time of charge exchange is near 90 degrees. The observed Geomagnetic Emission Cone (GEC) of LAEs can be mapped spatially, showing where energy is deposited during storm/sub-storm times. In this study we present a statistical look at the particulate albedo of LAEs over the declining phase of solar cycle 23. The particulate albedo is defined as the ratio of the emitting energetic neutrals to the precipitating ions. The precipitating ion differential directional flux maps are built up from combining NOAA 14/15/16 TED and DMSP 13/14/15 SSJ4 data. Low altitude ENA signatures are identified manually using IMAGE/MENA images and selected out. The geomagnetic location of each pixel representing a LAE source region in the neutral images is computed assuming an altitude of 650 km. Before taking the ratio of the resulting flux of neutrals and ions, the Magnetic Local Time (MLT) and Invariant Latitude (IL) bin sizes are changed such that each has less than 20% error in counting statistics. The particulate albedo maps are then evaluated over changes in geomagnetic storm activity.

  4. Origins and variation of terrestrial energetic neutral atoms outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2005-02-01

    Analysis of ENA data from the LENA instrument on the IMAGE spacecraft shows that the terrestrial atmosphere is a copious emitter of energetic neutral atoms (<300 eV) under all conditions. When activity is low, the observed emissions are concentrated close to the Earth and are presumed to be the high-energy tail of the warm oxygen geocorona, with energies <2 eV. When activity increases, the relative abundance of the higher-energy neutrals increases, and the emissions can be seen farther from the Earth. Because of the close correlation between the postperigee ENA flux (fluxes seen 1-2 hours after spacecraft perigee) and Ap and the fact that the postperigee fluxes are seen when no magnetic storm is in progress we conclude that many of the emitted ENA come from the auroral zone and are produced by energized ionospheric ions rather than by precipitating energetic ions. In more spectacular events, such as the Bastille Day storm event (14-16 July 2000), oxygen neutral emissions produced by precipitation of keV ring current oxygen ions can also make an important contribution to the total neutral emission. We conclude that diurnal variation in ENA emissions is a winter hemisphere feature that is absent in the summer hemisphere. As activity increases, the altitude range of the auroral oval ENA emission region increases.

  5. Energetic ion composition of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.K.; Sharp, R.D.; Shelley, E.G.; Johnson, R.G.; Balsiger, H.

    1981-02-01

    Data obtained from the energetic ion mass spectrometer experiment on Isee 1 in the distant plasma sheet are presented. These data show that (1) the plasma sheet has a significant and variable ionospheric component (H/sup +/ and O/sup +/) representing from 10% to more than 50% of the total number density and (2) there is more than one process responsible for the energization of solar wind plasma (H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/) to plasma sheet energies.

  6. Energetic ion composition of the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Sharp, R. D.; Shelley, E. G.; Johnson, R. G.; Balsiger, H.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained from the energetic ion mass spectrometer experiment on Isee 1 in the distant plasma sheet are presented. These data show that (1) the plasma sheet has a significant and variable ionospheric component (H(+) and O(+)) representing from 10% to more than 50% of the total number density and (2) there is more than one process responsible for the energization of solar wind plasma (H(+) and He(++)) to plasma sheet energies.

  7. Energetic Ion Loss Diagnostic for the Wendelstein 7-AS Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Darrow; A. Werner; A. Weller

    2000-12-07

    A diagnostic to measure the loss of energetic ions from the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator has been built. It is capable of measuring losses of both neutral beam ions and energetic ions arising from ion cyclotron resonant heating. The probe can measure losses of both clockwise and counterclockwise-going energetic ions simultaneously, and accepts a wide range of pitch angles in both directions. Initial measurements by the diagnostic are reported.

  8. Studying the Heliosphere in Energetic Neutral H and He Atoms above 30 keV/amu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Kóta, J.; Czechowski, A.; Hilchenbach, M.; Shaw, A.

    2004-09-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENA) are energetic ions neutralized by charge exchange with atoms in an ambient gas. The dynamics of charge exchange and the neutrality of ENA allow their sue to sample the mass and energy distributions of the ion population in regions of ENA production far away across magnetic fields. For ENA of energies > 30 keV/amu in the heliosphere, the energetic ions include anomalous cosmic rays in the heliosheath and pickup ions accelerated in interplanetary shocks; and the ambient gas is the neutral component of the local interstellar medium that permeates the heliosphere. ENA provide unique access to all regions of the heliosphere. We review some aspects of using ENA of energies > 30 keV/amu to study the heliosphere and suggest what can be done to fully utilize ENA in gaining a global view of the different particle populations linked by the acceleration and transport processes in the heliosphere.

  9. Association of Energetic Neutral Atom Bursts and Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Kepko, L.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Frank, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present evidence that short-lived bursts of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed with the Comprehensive Energetic Particle and Pitch Angle Distribution/Imaging Proton Spectrometer (CEPPAD/IPS) instrument on the Polar spacecraft are signatures of substorms. The IPS was designed primarily to measure ions in situ, with energies between 17.5 and 1500 keV. However, it has also proven to be a very capable ENA imager in the range 17.5 keV to a couple hundred keV. It was expected that some ENA signatures of the storm time ring current would be observed. Interestingly, IPS also routinely measures weaker, shorter-lived, and more spatially confined bursts of ENAs with duration from a few tens of minutes to a few hours and appearing once or twice a day. One of these bursts was quickly associated with magnetospheric and auroral substorm activity and has been reported in the literature [Henderson et al., 19971. In this paper we characterize ENA bursts observed from Polar and establish statistically their association with classic substorm signatures (global auroral onsets, electron and ion injections, AL drops, and Pi2 onsets). We conclude that -90% of the observed ENA bursts are associated with classic substorms and thus represent a new type of substorm signature.

  10. Association of Energetic Neutral Atom Bursts and Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Kepko, L.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Frank, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present evidence that short-lived bursts of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed with the Comprehensive Energetic Particle and Pitch Angle Distribution/Imaging Proton Spectrometer (CEPPAD/IPS) instrument on the Polar spacecraft are signatures of substorms. The IPS was designed primarily to measure ions in situ, with energies between 17.5 and 1500 keV. However, it has also proven to be a very capable ENA imager in the range 17.5 keV to a couple hundred keV. It was expected that some ENA signatures of the storm time ring current would be observed. Interestingly, IPS also routinely measures weaker, shorter-lived, and more spatially confined bursts of ENAs with duration from a few tens of minutes to a few hours and appearing once or twice a day. One of these bursts was quickly associated with magnetospheric and auroral substorm activity and has been reported in the literature [Henderson et al., 19971. In this paper we characterize ENA bursts observed from Polar and establish statistically their association with classic substorm signatures (global auroral onsets, electron and ion injections, AL drops, and Pi2 onsets). We conclude that -90% of the observed ENA bursts are associated with classic substorms and thus represent a new type of substorm signature.

  11. Ion energetics in the Venus nightside ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, W. C.; Miller, K. L.; Spenner, K.; Whitten, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration is given to the energetics of the ion gas flowing across the terminator into the Venus nightside ionosphere. Expressions are derived for the transport time of the ion gas (through 1 radian in solar zenith angle), the heat transfer time from the hot electron gas to the ions of an amount equal to the ion thermal energy), and the time required for vertical heat conduction to remove the internal energy of the ion column above a reference altitude, and it is shown that the time constant for transport is an order of magnitude smaller than the electron heat transfer time and comparable to the conduction time, and thus the ion gas is not a vertical conductive steady state. The conversion of bulk flow ion kinetic energy into heat is suggested as the mechanism responsible for the maintenance of the nightside ion temperatures at their observed values. It is thus concluded that the flow of the ion gas is quasi-adiabatic, and that steady-state, vertical, one dimensional energy balance models must be used with caution in the Venus ionosphere.

  12. Thin Film Deposition Using Energetic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Manova, Darina; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Mändl, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    One important recent trend in deposition technology is the continuous expansion of available processes towards higher ion assistance with the subsequent beneficial effects to film properties. Nowadays, a multitude of processes, including laser ablation and deposition, vacuum arc deposition, ion assisted deposition, high power impulse magnetron sputtering and plasma immersion ion implantation, are available. However, there are obstacles to overcome in all technologies, including line-of-sight processes, particle contaminations and low growth rates, which lead to ongoing process refinements and development of new methods. Concerning the deposited thin films, control of energetic ion bombardment leads to improved adhesion, reduced substrate temperatures, control of intrinsic stress within the films as well as adjustment of surface texture, phase formation and nanotopography. This review illustrates recent trends for both areas; plasma process and solid state surface processes. PMID:28883323

  13. Energetic ion bombarded Fe/Al multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Busaidy, M.S.; Crapper, M.D.

    2006-05-15

    The utility of ion-assisted deposition is investigated to explore the possibility of counteracting the deficiency of back-reflected current of Ar neutrals in the case of lighter elements such as Al. A range of energetically ion bombarded Fe/Al multilayers sputtered with applied surface bias of 0, -200, or -400 V were deposited onto Si(111) substrates in an argon atmosphere of 4 mTorr using a computer controlled dc magnetron sputtering system. Grazing incidence reflectivity and rocking curve scans by synchrotron x rays of wavelength of 1.38 A were used to investigate the structures of the interfaces produced. Substantial evidence has been gathered to suggest the gradual suppression of interfacial mixing and reduction in interfacial roughness with increases of applied bias. The densification of the Al microstructure was noticeable and may be a consequence of resputtering attributable to the induced ion bombardment. The average interfacial roughnesses were calculated for the 0, -200, and -400 V samples to be 7{+-}0.5, 6{+-}0.5, and 5{+-}0.5 A respectfully demonstrating a 30% improvement in interface quality. Data from rocking curve scans point to improved long-range correlated roughness in energetically deposited samples. The computational code based on the recursive algorithm developed by Parratt [Phys. Rev. 95, 359 (1954)] was successful in the simulation of the specular reflectivity curves.

  14. Modeling Emission of Heavy Energetic Neutral Atoms from the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaczyna, Paweł; Bzowski, Maciej

    2017-09-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) are a fruitful tool for remote diagnosis of the plasma in the heliosphere and its vicinity. So far, instruments detecting ENAs from the heliosphere were configured for observations of hydrogen atoms. Here, we estimate emissions of ENAs of the heavy chemical elements helium, oxygen, nitrogen, and neon. A large portion of the heliospheric ENAs is created in the inner heliosheath from neutralized interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs). We modeled this process and calculated full-sky intensities of ENAs for energies 0.2–130 keV/nuc. We found that the largest fluxes among considered species are expected for helium, smaller for oxygen and nitrogen, and smallest for neon. The obtained intensities are 50–106 times smaller than the hydrogen ENA intensities observed by IBEX. The detection of heavy ENAs will be possible if a future ENA detector is equipped with the capability to measure the masses of observed atoms. Because of different reaction cross-sections among the different species, observations of heavy ENAs can allow for a better understanding of global structure of the heliosphere as well as the transport and energization of PUIs in the heliosphere.

  15. Magnetospherically trapped ions as a source of magnetosheath energetic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, T. W.; Williams, D. J.; Garcia, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested that energetic ions observed in the magnetosheath may be due to the direct leakage of trapped magnetospheric ions. To test this hypothesis, three-dimensional ion spectra from the energetic particle experiment on ISEE 1 for a magnetopause crossing on Nov. 10, 1977 are utilized to construct three-dimensional distribution functions in the magnetosphere and in the sheath. Using the observed magnetic field, a simple one-dimensional model of the magnetopause is developed. Ions are then followed in the model, starting in the magnetosphere, through the magnetopause and ending up in the sheath. Using Liouville's Theorem a model sheath distribution function is then built up by following the magnetospheric distribution function through the model fields. The model distribution is then compared with the observed sheath distribution. For this case it is found that the main features of the observed ions in the sheath are consistent with direct leakage and with no energization or de-energization processes, and an inward-pointing normal component is required. The energetic particles mapped in this case apparently follow a flux tube which does not penetrate the magnetopause where local tangential electric fields have been reported.

  16. Energetic ions trapped in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Taherion, S.; Manweiler, J.; Krimigis, S.; Paranicas, Chris; Mitchell, Don; Krupp, N.

    2009-12-01

    The low-energy magnetospheric measurement system (LEMMS) of the magnetosphere imaging instrument (MIMI) aboard the Cassini orbiter observed energetic ions and electrons during Saturn orbit insertion (SOI) of July 1, 2004. Salient features of the trapped ion fluxes observed in the L=2-4 RS region include the occurrence of two distinct components of the energy spectrum of energetic protons. We shall refer to protons below 10 MeV as the low-energy component and above 10 MeV as the high-energy component. The low-energy component has a power law energy spectrum that falls at approximately E -2.5. At about 1 MeV/nucleon, the ion pitch angle distributions tend to peak along and opposite to the magnetic field. The high-energy component has a separate peak in energy at about 20 MeV/nucleon and a pitch angle distribution that peaks at 90° to the magnetic field direction. The pitch angle distributions intermediate in energy evolve systematically from peaking along the field at low energies through isotropy to peaking perpendicular to the field at high energies. Ion species heavier than protons are present at energies from several MeV/nucleon up to 25 MeV/nucleon. Oxygen is separately observed to be present. Molecular hydrogen, H 2 and H 3 and helium are also present although the LEMMS instrumentation is not capable of unambiguously separating these species at multi-MeV energies. These species are measured separately in the outer magnetosphere ( L=6.3-11 RS) with the MIMI CHEMS instrument at energies from 1 to 100 keV/nucleon. This paper will report details of the observations and the results of modeling the abundances of the inner magnetosphere ions to determine constraints on source material and acceleration processes.

  17. Trapped energetic ion dynamics affected by localized electric field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Trapped energetic ion orbits in helical systems are numerically simulated using the Lorentz model. Simulation results of precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions are benchmarked by those of analytic solutions. The effects of the electric field perturbation localized at the rational surface on trapped energetic ions are examined, where the perturbation has an arbitrary rotation frequency and an amplitude fixed in time. It is found that the trapped energetic ions resonantly interact with the perturbation, when the rotation frequency of the perturbation is comparable to the precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions. The simulation results are suggestive to a mechanism of the energetic-ion-induced interchange mode, which might be associated with the fishbone mode observed in helical systems.

  18. Pulsed Source Of Energetic Oxygen Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George; Krech, Robert; Green, David; Pirri, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus developed that generates high-flux pulses of oxygen atoms to bombard specimens in experiments on aging and degradation of materials in low Earth-orbit environment. Preliminary studies of specimens irradiated with atomic oxygen provided spectral evidence of erosion, in addition to measurable mass loss. Intense atomic oxygen pulses also useful in studies of microfabrication techniques.

  19. Photoabsorption by Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, Steven T.

    2004-12-01

    Recent progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of photoabsorption by atoms and ions is presented. Specifically, examples of near-chaotic behavior in photoionization of positive ions, low-energy manifestations of nondipole effects, high-energy breakdown of the single particle picture and new phenomenology uncovered in the inner-shell photoabsorption by negative ions are discussed.

  20. Energetic ion production in high current hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John; Kovach, Yao; Arthur, Neil; Viges, Eric; Davis, Chris

    2015-09-01

    High power Hall and gridded ion thrusters are being considered as a propulsion option supporting human operations (cargo or tug) to Mars. These engines utilize hollow cathodes for plasma production and beam neutralization. It has now been well documented that these cathodes produce energetic ions when operated at high current densities. Such ions are observed with peak energies approaching 100 eV. Because these ions can drive erosion of the cathode assembly, they represent a credible failure mode. An understanding of energetic ion production and approaches to mitigation is therefore desired. Presented here are data documenting the presence of energetic ions for both a barium oxide and a lanthanum hexaboride cathode as measured using a retarding potential analyzer. Also presented are energetic ion mitigation approaches, which are designed to eliminate the ion energy transfer mechanism. NASA SBIR Contract NNX15CP62P.

  1. Effect of Sawtooth Oscillations on Energetic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. White; V.V. Lutsenko; Ya. I. Kolesnichenko; Yu. V. Yakovenko

    1999-12-10

    The work summarizes results of the authors' studies on the energetic ion transport induced by sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. The main attention is paid to description of physical mechanisms responsible for the transport. In addition to overview, the work contains new material. The new results concern the resonant interaction of the particles and the electromagnetic field of the sawtooth crash. In particular, it is discovered that the dominant harmonic of the crash (m = n = 1) can lead to stochastic motion of particles having large orbit width (potatoes). Regular motion of potatoes and quasi-stagnation particles in the presence of an n = 1 mode is studied, and their characteristic displacements associated with quick switching on/off the mode are found.

  2. Energetics of atomic scale structure changes in graphene.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Stephen T; Lebedeva, Irina V; Popov, Andrey M; Bichoutskaia, Elena

    2015-05-21

    The presence of defects in graphene has an essential influence on its physical and chemical properties. The formation, behaviour and healing of defects are determined by energetic characteristics of atomic scale structure changes. In this article, we review recent studies devoted to atomic scale reactions during thermally activated and irradiation-induced processes in graphene. The formation energies of vacancies, adatoms and topological defects are discussed. Defect formation, healing and migration are quantified in terms of activation energies (barriers) for thermally activated processes and by threshold energies for processes occurring under electron irradiation. The energetics of defects in the graphene interior and at the edge is analysed. The effects of applied strain and a close proximity of the edge on the energetics of atomic scale reactions are overviewed. Particular attention is given to problems where further studies are required.

  3. SRAM As An Array Of Energetic-Ion Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Blaes, Brent R.; Lieneweg, Udo; Nixon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Static random-access memory (SRAM) designed for use as array of energetic-ion detectors. Exploits well-known tendency of incident energetic ions to cause bit flips in cells of electronic memories. Design of ion-detector SRAM involves modifications of standard SRAM design to increase sensitivity to ions. Device fabricated by use of conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Potential uses include gas densimetry, position sensing, and measurement of cosmic-ray spectrum.

  4. Novel Theory of Energetic-Ion-Induced Interchange Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of a kinetic energy principle, it is shown that the interchange mode in helical systems is excited by trapped energetic ions, where the ideal interchange mode is stable. The mode has a rotation frequency comparable to precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions. The theory explains how to apply the fishbone mode theory originally developed in tokamaks to helical systems.

  5. Energetic neutral atom response to solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.-Y.; Ohtani, S.; Brandt, P. C.; Lyons, L. R.

    2007-09-01

    We have investigated the response of the ring current to solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdyn) enhancement impacts on the magnetosphere by using energetic neutral atom (ENA) images obtained by the High-Energy Neutral Atom (HENA) imager on board the IMAGE spacecraft. In this work we present several events by distinguishing between pressure events where only the pure compression effects exist (without substorm effects) and those where the substorm is triggered by the Pdyn enhancement, and we find notable differences between these two types of events. First, for the pure compression events, we present four events where the Pdyn increases by ~100% to ~450% under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The Pdyn enhancement results in weak-to-modest ENA emission increases in both the hydrogen and oxygen channels: The total ENA emission rate increases by ~25% to ~40% relative to averages over the 1-hour period prior to the Pdyn enhancement impact. This ENA enhancement is due to ions adiabatically energized by the compression. The increased ENA emission rate drops as Pdyn decreases, implying that the ENA responses are directly caused by the adiabatic compression and decompression process. Also, the pure compression events lead to overall global, quasi-simultaneous increases of ENA in contrast to pure substorm-induced ENA enhancements that are initially localized in the nightside region followed by the drift effect. Next we present two events where the Pdyn enhancement was ~100% and >300%, respectively, under strongly southward IMF conditions, IMF Bz <= -10 nT, and a substorm was triggered. For both events the hydrogen and oxygen ENA emission increase is far more significant than that for the pure compression events, more than 100% even when the low-altitude contribution was excluded. This is primarily owing to energetic ions generated by the triggered substorm, although the compression effect itself occurs as well. Also, the ENA enhancement appears to be not

  6. Anisotropy of the energetic neutral atom flux in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the energetic neutral atoms born at the heliospheric interface are considered for plasma flow structure resulting from a two-shock model of the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. The energy distributions of heliospheric energetic neutral atoms (HELENAs) are calculated and it is shown that the HELENA flux is highly anisotropic at the earth's orbit. The characteristics of the HELENA flux are highly sensitive to the size of the heliosphere. This supports the conclusion that measurements of HELENAs from the earth's orbit would provide an efficient tool to remotely study the heliosphere.

  7. Energetic neutral atom observations and their implications on modeling the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Kallenbach, R.; Czechowski, A.; Hsieh, K.C.

    Since 1996, energetic hydrogen and helium atoms (ENAs) have been identified and their fluxes are monitored by the High-Energy Suprathermal Time-of-Flight sensor (HSTOF) of the Charge, Element, and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) near the Lagrangian point L1. ENAs, neutralized via charge transfer reactions, move along ballistic trajectories unaffected by the interplanetary magnetic field. ENAs originate in the heliosphere from CIRs, solar energetic particle events, pre-accelerated pickup ions and low-energy (up to few hundred keV) anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) ions in the outer heliosphere, in the vicinity and beyond the solar wind termination shock. The observed ENA fluxes set upper limits on the fluxes of energetic particles in the outer heliosphere and on the modelling parameters of the heliospheric plasma simulations.

  8. Stability of AN Axisymmetric Mirror with AN Energetic Ion Component.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, Jonathan Francis

    We examine the stability of an axisymmetric mirror with an energetic ion component to finite azimuthal mode number (m) interchange modes, using a dispersion functional in which the energetic ions are described by the Vlasov equation and the background plasma is described by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. A separate analysis is presented for the Vlasov- fluid case Freidberg, 1972 , where the background consists of fluid electrons. Stability is addressed first for an elongated equilibrium with a specific class of energetic ion orbits in the Vlasov-MHD case and then for both cases with more general equilibria and orbits. With the elongated mirror, we suppose that the axis-encircling ions have orbits that reside on flux surfaces, obtaining a sufficient condition for stability on each flux surface. Numerical evaluation of the stability condition indicates that the energetic ion component is highly stabilizing in regions where the energetic ion density increases outward and highly destabilizing where the density decreases outward. The more general problem is considered by representing the displacement in terms of a complete set of global basis functions, giving a necessary and sufficient condition for stability for each case. In each of the two cases, kinetic effects enter into the analysis through phase-space autocorrelation functions Lewis et al., 1985 . We find that in the Vlasov-MHD case, where we use a rigid-rotor distribution for the energetic ions, the net rotation of the energetic ions is destabilizing and dominates the stabilizing influence of the energetic ion current. In the Vlasov-fluid case, finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects were recovered, with growth rates reduced when ((rho)(,i)/L)('2) >(, )(gamma)(,MHD)/(OMEGA)(,i), where (rho)(,i) is the Larmor radius of the Vlasov ions, L is the plasma radius, (gamma)(,MHD) is the growth rate with FLR effects excluded and (OMEGA)(,i) is the ion gyrofrequency. These effects are discussed in terms of phase

  9. Energetic ion losses caused by magnetohydrodynamic activity resonant and non-resonant with energetic ions in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kunihiro; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Spong, Donald A.; Osakabe, Masaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; the LHD Experiment Group

    2014-09-01

    Experiments to reveal energetic ion dynamics associated with magnetohydrodynamic activity are ongoing in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Interactions between beam-driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) and energetic ions have been investigated. Energetic ion losses induced by beam-driven burst TAEs have been observed using a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in neutral beam-heated high β plasmas. The loss flux of co-going beam ions increases as the TAE amplitude increases. In addition to this, the expulsion of beam ions associated with edge-localized modes (ELMs) has been also recognized in LHD. The SLIP has indicated that beam ions having co-going and barely co-going orbits are affected by ELMs. The relation between ELM amplitude and ELM-induced loss has a dispersed structure. To understand the energetic ion loss process, a numerical simulation based on an orbit-following model, DELTA5D, that incorporates magnetic fluctuations is performed. The calculation result shows that energetic ions confined in the interior region are lost due to TAE instability, with a diffusive process characterizing their loss. For the ELM, energetic ions existing near the confinement/loss boundary are lost through a convective process. We found that the ELM-induced loss flux measured by SLIP changes with the ELM phase. This relation between the ELM amplitude and measured ELM-induced loss results in a more dispersed loss structure.

  10. Atomic negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brage, T.

    1991-01-01

    We review some of the recent progress in the studies of alkaline-earth, negative ions. Computations of autodetachment rates, electron affinities and transition wavelengths are discussed and some new and improved results are given.

  11. Atomic negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brage, T.

    1991-12-31

    We review some of the recent progress in the studies of alkaline-earth, negative ions. Computations of autodetachment rates, electron affinities and transition wavelengths are discussed and some new and improved results are given.

  12. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  13. Observations of energetic neutral atoms and their implications on modeling the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Czechowski, A.; Hsieh, K. C.; Kallenbach, R.

    2006-09-01

    Energetic hydrogen and helium atoms have been identified and their fluxes monitored by the High-Energy Suprathermal Time-of-Flight sensor (HSTOF) of the Charge, Element, and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) near the Lagrangian point L1 since 1996. The potential sources of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in the heliosphere are co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), solar energetic particle events, pre-accelerated pickup ions as well as low-energy (up to few hundred keV) anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) ions in the outer heliosphere, close to and beyond the solar wind termination shock. The ENAs, neutralized via charge transfer reactions, can penetrate into the inner solar system, unaffected by the interplanetary magnetic field. The observed ENA fluxes in the apex direction of the heliosphere set limits on potential theories of the dominant sources of the energetic neutral atoms and we discuss implications of these ENA observations on modeling of the heliosheath.

  14. The kinetics of energetic O‑ ions in oxygen discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. A.; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2017-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulation was used to study the translational relaxation of energetic O‑ ions produced by dissociative electron attachment to O2 molecules in oxygen plasmas in a strong electric field. Initial O‑ ions have rather high energies and are more reactive than the ions reaching equilibrium with the electric field. Therefore, there is a noticeable probability that the energetic O‑ ions participate in endothermic reactions prior to energy relaxation of these ions. The probabilities of charge exchange, electron detachment and ion impact vibrational excitation of O2 molecules were calculated versus the reduced electric field. It was shown that up to 6% of energetic O‑ ions produced in oxygen by dissociative electron attachment to O2 molecules are rapidly transformed to {{{{O}}}2}- ions due to charge exchange collisions. The probability of electron detachment from energetic O‑ ions and the probability of vibrational excitation were smaller that the probability of charge exchange. Estimates showed that the increase in the effective rates of the ion–molecule reactions due to high reactivity of energetic O‑ ions can be important in oxygen plasmas for reduced electric fields of 50–100 Td.

  15. Precipitation of energetic neutral atoms and induced non-thermal escape fluxes from the Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V.

    2014-08-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms, produced through charge exchange collisions between solar wind ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated for the Martian atmosphere. Connections between parameters of precipitating fast ions and resulting escape fluxes, altitude-dependent energy distributions of fast atoms and their coefficients of reflection from the Mars atmosphere, are established using accurate cross sections in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Distributions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules, induced by precipitating particles, have been obtained and applied for computations of the non-thermal escape fluxes. A new collisional database on accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections, required for description of the energy-momentum transfer in collisions of precipitating particles and production of non-thermal atmospheric atoms and molecules, is reported with analytic fitting equations. Three-dimensional MC simulations with accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections have been carried out to track large ensembles of energetic atoms in a time-dependent manner as they propagate into the Martian atmosphere and transfer their energy to the ambient atoms and molecules. Results of the MC simulations on the energy-deposition altitude profiles, reflection coefficients, and time-dependent atmospheric heating, obtained for the isotropic hard sphere and anisotropic quantum cross sections, are compared. Atmospheric heating rates, thermalization depths, altitude profiles of production rates, energy distributions of SH atoms and molecules, and induced escape fluxes have been determined.

  16. Energetic Metastable Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili; Dalgarno, A.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes our research performed under NASA Grant NAG5-11857. The three-year grant have been supported by the Geospace Sciences SR&T program. We have investigated the energetic metastable oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the terrestrial stratosphere, mesosphere and thermosphere. Hot atoms in the atmosphere are produced by solar radiation, the solar wind and various ionic reactions. Nascent hot atoms arise in ground and excited electronic states, and their translational energies are larger by two - three orders of magnitude than the thermal energies of the ambient gas. The relaxation kinetics of hot atoms determines the rate of atmospheric heating, the intensities of aeronomic reactions, and the rate of atom escape from the planet. Modeling of the non-Maxwellian energy distributions of metastable oxygen and nitrogen atoms have been focused on the determination of their impact on the energetics and chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere between 25 and 250 km . At this altitudes, we have calculated the energy distribution functions of metastable O and N atoms and computed non-equilibrium rates of important aeronomic reactions, such as destruction of the water molecules by O(1D) atoms and production of highly excited nitric oxide molecules. In the upper atmosphere, the metastable O(lD) and N(2D) play important role in formation of the upward atomic fluxes. We have computed the upward fluxes of the metastable and ground state oxygen atoms in the upper atmosphere above 250 km. The accurate distributions of the metastable atoms have been evaluated for the day and night-time conditions.

  17. Energetic ion production and electrode erosion in hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the discharge voltage have been reported in high current hollow cathode discharges. Models of DC potential hills downstream of the cathode and ion acoustic instabilities in a double layer postulated in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain these energetic ions, but have not been substantiated in experiments.

  18. Inverse Energy Dispersion of Energetic Ions Observed in the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hwang, K.-J.; Wang, Y.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Fok, M.-C.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Kitamura, N.; Burch, J. L.; Giles, B. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Lester, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case study of energetic ions observed by the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft in the magnetosheath just outside the subsolar magnetopause that occurred at 1000 UT on 8 December 2015. As the magnetopause receded inward, the EPD observed a burst of energetic (approximately 50-1000 keV) proton, helium, and oxygen ions that exhibited an inverse dispersion, with the lowest energy ions appearing first. The prolonged interval of fast antisunward flow observed in the magnetosheath and transient increases in the H components of global ground magnetograms demonstrate that the burst appeared at a time when the magnetosphere was rapidly compressed. We attribute the inverse energy dispersion to the leakage along reconnected magnetic field lines of betatron-accelerated energetic ions in the magnetosheath, and a burst of reconnection has an extent of about 1.5 R(sub E) using combined Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar and EPD observations.

  19. Inverse Energy Dispersion of Energetic Ions Observed in the Magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hwang, K. J.; Wang, Y.; Silveira, M. D.; Fok, M. C. H.; Mauk, B.; Cohen, I. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Kitamura, N.; Burch, J. L.; Giles, B. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Lester, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a case study of energetic ions observed by the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft in the magnetosheath just outside the subsolar magnetopause that occurred at 1000 UT on December 8, 2015. As the magnetopause receded inward, the EPD observed a burst of energetic ( 50-1000 keV) proton, helium, and oxygen ions that exhibited an inverse dispersion, with the lowest energy ions appearing first. The prolonged interval of fast antisunward flow observed in the magnetosheath and transient increases in the H components of global ground magnetograms demonstrate that the burst appeared at a time when the magnetosphere was rapidly compressed. We attribute the inverse energy dispersion to the leakage along reconnected magnetic field lines of betatron-accelerated energetic ions in the magnetosheath and a burst of reconnection has an extent of about 1.5 RE using combined Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar and EPD observations.

  20. Use of energetic ion beams in materials synthesis and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, B R

    1991-01-01

    A brief review of the use energetic ion beams and related techniques for the synthesis, processing, and characterization of materials is presented. Selected opportunity areas are emphasized with examples, and references are provided for more extensive coverage.

  1. Inverse Energy Dispersion of Energetic Ions Observed in the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hwang, K.-J.; Wang, Y.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Fok, M.-C.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Kitamura, N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a case study of energetic ions observed by the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft in the magnetosheath just outside the subsolar magnetopause that occurred at 1000 UT on 8 December 2015. As the magnetopause receded inward, the EPD observed a burst of energetic (approximately 50-1000 keV) proton, helium, and oxygen ions that exhibited an inverse dispersion, with the lowest energy ions appearing first. The prolonged interval of fast antisunward flow observed in the magnetosheath and transient increases in the H components of global ground magnetograms demonstrate that the burst appeared at a time when the magnetosphere was rapidly compressed. We attribute the inverse energy dispersion to the leakage along reconnected magnetic field lines of betatron-accelerated energetic ions in the magnetosheath, and a burst of reconnection has an extent of about 1.5 R(sub E) using combined Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar and EPD observations.

  2. Energetic ion transport by microturbulence is insignificant in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Staebler, G. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Waltz, R. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bass, E. M.; Budny, R. V.; Gorelenkova, M.; Grierson, B. A.; McCune, D. C.; Yuan, X.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Holcomb, C. T.; McKee, G. R.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Energetic ion transport due to microturbulence is investigated in magnetohydrodynamic-quiescent plasmas by way of neutral beam injection in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)]. A range of on-axis and off-axis beam injection scenarios are employed to vary relevant parameters such as the character of the background microturbulence and the value of E{sub b}/T{sub e}, where E{sub b} is the energetic ion energy and T{sub e} the electron temperature. In all cases, it is found that any transport enhancement due to microturbulence is too small to observe experimentally. These transport effects are modeled using numerical and analytic expectations that calculate the energetic ion diffusivity due to microturbulence. It is determined that energetic ion transport due to coherent fluctuations (e.g., Alfvén eigenmodes) is a considerably larger effect and should therefore be considered more important for ITER.

  3. Helium Energetic Neutral Atoms from the Heliosphere: Perspectives for Future Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaczyna, Paweł; Grzedzielski, Stan; Bzowski, Maciej

    2017-05-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) allow for remote sensing of plasma properties in distant regions of the heliosphere. So far, most of the observations have concerned only hydrogen atoms. In this paper, we present perspectives for observations of helium energetic neutral atoms (He ENAs). We calculated the expected intensities of He ENAs created by the neutralization of helium ions in the inner heliosheath and through the secondary ENA mechanism in the outer heliosheath. We found that the dominant source region for He ENAs is the inner heliosheath. The obtained magnitudes of intensity spectra suggest that He ENAs can be observed with future ENA detectors, as those planned on Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe. Observing He ENAs is most likely for energies from a few to a few tens of keV/nuc. Estimates of the expected count rates show that the ratio of helium to hydrogen atoms registered in the detectors can be as low as 1:104. Consequently, the detectors need to be equipped with an appropriate mass spectrometer capability, allowing for recognition of chemical elements. Due to the long mean free paths of helium ions in the inner heliosheath, He ENAs are produced also in the distant heliospheric tail. This implies that observations of He ENAs can resolve its structure, which seems challenging from observations of hydrogen ENAs since energetic protons are neutralized before they progress deeper in the heliospheric tail.

  4. Effect of Energetic Ion on Spatial Distribution of Recombining Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, A.; Daibo, A.; Kitajima, S.; Kumagai, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tsubota, S.

    Spatial distribution of electron density is considered. By using a one-dimensional recombining plasma model, effects of transient energetic ion flux are investigated. The time response of the system against the transient flux is dominated by the recombination frequency. The magnitude of modification of the spatial distribution is determined by the ratio between the ionization due to the energetic ion and the recombination of the bulk plasma.

  5. Compact acceleration of energetic neutral atoms using high intensity laser-solid interaction.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Malay; Trivikram, T Madhu; Colgan, James; Pasley, John; Krishnamurthy, M

    2017-06-20

    Recent advances in high-intensity laser-produced plasmas have demonstrated their potential as compact charge particle accelerators. Unlike conventional accelerators, transient quasi-static charge separation acceleration fields in laser produced plasmas are highly localized and orders of magnitude larger. Manipulating these ion accelerators, to convert the fast ions to neutral atoms with little change in momentum, transform these to a bright source of MeV atoms. The emittance of the neutral atom beam would be similar to that expected for an ion beam. Since intense laser-produced plasmas have been demonstrated to produce high-brightness-low-emittance beams, it is possible to envisage generation of high-flux, low-emittance, high energy neutral atom beams in length scales of less than a millimeter. Here, we show a scheme where more than 80% of the fast ions are reduced to energetic neutral atoms and demonstrate the feasibility of a high energy neutral atom accelerator that could significantly impact applications in neutral atom lithography and diagnostics.

  6. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    K.L. Wong; W.W. Heidbrink; E. Ruskov; C.C. Petty; C.M. Greenfield; R. Nazikian; R. Budny

    2004-11-12

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed.

  7. Trapping ions and atoms optically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetz, Tobias

    2017-05-01

    Isolating neutral and charged particles from the environment is essential in precision experiments. For decades, this has been achieved by trapping ions with radio-frequency (RF) fields and neutral particles with optical fields. Recently, the trapping of ions by interaction with light has been demonstrated. This might permit the advantages of optical trapping and ions to be combined. For example, we would benefit from superimposing optical traps to investigate ensembles of ions and atoms in the absence of any RF fields and from the versatile and scalable trapping geometries featured by optical lattices. In particular, ions provide individual addressability, and electronic and motional degrees of freedom that can be coherently controlled and detected via high-fidelity, state-dependent operations. Their long-range Coulomb interaction is significantly larger compared to those of neutral atoms and molecules. This enables ultra-cold interaction and the chemistry of trapped ions and atoms to be studied, as well as providing a novel platform for higher-dimensional experimental quantum simulations. The aim of this topical review is to present the current state of the art and to discuss the current challenges and prospects of the emerging field.

  8. Analysis of energetic materials by ion chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion chromatography is a rapid, sensitive, and selective method for ion analysis in a variety of matrices. Ion chromatography was used to determine levels on chloride and chlorate in potassium perchlorate. Comparisons were made with the specific ion electrons method presently being used for these analyses. Also to be discussed are ion chromatographic methods for determining ammonium in boron potassium nitrate, and chloride and ammonium in CP.

  9. Energetic heavy ion dominance in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ian; Mitchell, Don; Mauk, Barry; Anderson, Brian; Ohtani, Shin; Kistler, Lynn; Hamilton, Doug; Turner, Drew; Blake, Bern; Fennell, Joe; Jaynes, Allison; Leonard, Trevor; Gerrard, Andy; Lanzerotti, Lou; Burch, Jim

    2017-04-01

    Despite the extensive study of ring current ion composition, little exists in the literature regarding the nature of energetic ions with energies >200 keV, especially in the outer magnetosphere (r > 9 RE). In particular, information on the relative fluxes and spectral shapes of the different ion species over these energy ranges is lacking. However, new observations from the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) instruments on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft have revealed the dominance of heavy ion species (specifically oxygen and helium) at these energies in the outer magnetosphere. This result is supported by prior but previously unreported observations obtained by the Geotail spacecraft, which also show that these heavy ion species are primarily dominated by multiply-charged populations from the solar wind. Using additional observations from the inner magnetosphere obtained by the RBSPICE instrument on the Van Allen Probes suggest, we will investigate whether this effect is due to a preferential loss of protons in the outer magnetosphere.

  10. Voyager 1: energetic ions and electrons in the jovian magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Vogt, R E; Cook, W R; Cummings, A C; Garrard, T L; Gehrels, N; Stone, E C; Trainor, J H; Schardt, A W; Conlon, T; Lal, N; McDonald, F B

    1979-06-01

    The observations of the cosmic-ray subsystem have added significantly to our knowledge of Jupiter's magnetosphere. The most surprising result is the existence of energetic sulfur, sodium, and oxygen nuclei with energies above 7 megaelectron volts per nucleon which were found inside of Io's orbit. Also, significant fluxes of similarly energetic ions reflecting solar cosmic-ray composition were observed throughout the magnetosphere beyond 11 times the radius of Jupiter. It was also found that energetic protons are enhanced by 30 to 70 percent in the active hemisphere. Finally, the first observations were made of the magnetospheric tail in the dawn direction out to 160 Jupiter radii.

  11. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging with the POLAR CEPPAD/ IPS Instrument : Initial Forward Modeling Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Moore, K. R.; Spence, H. E.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Roelof, E. C.

    1999-01-01

    Although the primary function of the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current. detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper. we present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies.

  12. Energetic neutral atom imaging with the Polar CEPPAD/IPS instrument: Initial forward modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Moore, K.R.; Spence, H.E.; Jorgensen, A.M.; Fennell, J.F.; Blake, J.B.; Roelof, E.C.

    1997-12-31

    Although the primary function of the CEP-PAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current, detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper, the authors present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies.

  13. Energetic Atomic Oxygen in the Region of the Terrestrial Exobase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, B.; Sospedra-Alfonso, R.

    2012-12-01

    Translationally energetic atoms in the terrestrial exosphere with energies considerably above thermal energies are responsible for nonthermal emissions and enhanced nonthermal escape of atmospheric species. These escape mechanisms play an important role in the evolution of Earth's atmosphere. The existence of an extended coronae of translationally energetic oxygen atoms O* has been firmly established [1]. One mechanism to produce energetic oxygen atoms is the dissociative recombination reaction, O2+ + e- -> O* + O*. There is a continued interest in a better understanding of the physics of this process for the terrestrial exosphere. The terrestrial atmosphere can be divided into three main regions characterized by their relaxation properties [1]. The lower thermosphere (200-250 km), the upper exosphere (700-800 km) and the transition region (300-700). The lower thermosphere has a predominance of elastic collisions and therefore the particles are essentially in local equilibrium. In contrast, the thermalization in the upper exosphere is less predominant, although the production rate of nonthermal particles is also low. In the transition region, the production rate of nonthermal particles is significant and there is a decrease in the thermalization rate. This region is the main source of the nonthermal geocorona [1]. The relaxation properties of this region implies that the particle distribution can deviate from statistical equilibrium, and the distribution of nonthermal particles can be described with kinetic theory. In [2], we modeled the energetic oxygen distribution with a linear Boltzmann equation that included a source term for the production of hot oxygen owing to dissociative recombination. The distribution function was assumed to be isotropic and the objective was to determine the departure of the distribution function from Maxwellian and the departure of the density profile from barometric. In the present work, we consider a two component system of

  14. Observations of energetic ions near the Venus ionopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasprzak, W. T.; Taylor, H. A.; Brace, L. H.; Niemann, H. B.; Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Ions (primarily O/+/) with spacecraft rest frame energies greater than 40 eV have been observed by the Pioneer Venus Neutral Mass Spectrometer. The signature occurs in about 13% of the 700 orbits examined, primarily near the ionopause and at all solar zenith angles. The energetic ions coincide in location with superthermal ions observed by the Ion Mass Spectrometer and more rarely occur in some of the plasma clouds observed by the Electron Temperature Probe. These observations in conjunction with measurements by the Plasma Wave Instrument near the ionopause suggest that the ions are accelerated out of ionospheric plasma by the shocked solar wind through plasma wave-particle interactions.

  15. Properties of energetic-particle continuum modes destabilized by energetic ions with beam-like velocity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Todo, Y.

    2006-08-15

    Properties of energetic-particle continuum modes (EPMs) destabilized by energetic ions in tokamak plasmas were investigated using a hybrid simulation code for magnetohydrodynamics and energetic particles. The energetic ions are assumed to have beam-like velocity distributions for the purpose of clarifying the dependence on energetic ion velocity. It was found that for beam velocities lower than the Alfven velocity, the unstable modes are EPMs while the toroidal Alfven eigenmodes are unstable for the beam velocities well above the Alfven velocity. The EPMs destabilized by the copassing energetic ions and those destabilized by the counterpassing energetic ions differ in primary poloidal harmonics and spatial locations. The frequencies of the EPMs are located close to the shear Alfven continuous spectrum when they are compared at the spatial peak locations of the primary poloidal harmonic or compared at the spatial tails if the primary poloidal harmonic is m=1. The frequencies of the EPMs were carefully compared with the energetic-ion orbital frequencies. It was found that the frequencies of the EPMs are in good agreement with the energetic-ion orbital frequencies with a correction for the toroidal circulation frequency. This demonstrates that the energetic-ion orbital frequency determines the EPM frequency.

  16. Ion energetics at Saturn's magnetosphere using Cassini/MIMI measurements: A simple model for the energetic ion integral moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dialynas, K.; Paranicas, C.; Roussos, E.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present a composite analysis (H+ and O+) of energetic ion spectra and kappa distribution fits, using combined ion measurements from Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS, 3 to 236 keV/e), Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurements System (LEMMS, 0.024 < E < 18 MeV), and the Ion Neutral Camera (INCA, ~5.2 to >220 keV for H+). The modeled expressions of these energetic ion distributions are then used to obtain the four integral particle moments (from zeroth to 3rd moment: n, In, P, IE, i.e. Density, Integral number intensity, Pressure, Integral energy intensity) as well as the characteristic energy (EC=IE/In) of these ions as a function of Local Time and L-Shell. We find that a) protons dominate the energetic ion (>30 keV) integral number and energy intensity at all radial distances (L>5 Rs) and local times, while the H+ and O+ partial pressures and densities are comparable; b) the 12ion energetics (compared to the contribution of charge exchange with the Saturnian neutral cloud); c) energetic ion bundles in the 12energetic particle blobs shown in previous studies, produce durable signatures (enhancements) in the H+ and O+ pressure, density and temperature; d) energetic ions are depleted inside the orbit of Rhea (~8 Rs), i.e. the energetic ion lifetimes due to charge exchange decrease significantly with decreasing distance in the innermost parts of Saturn's magnetosphere, so that pressure and density drop to minimum inside ~8 Rs. We then utilize a technique to retrieve the equatorial H+ and O+ pressure, density and temperature in Saturn's magnetosphere, using a modified version of the Roelof and Skinner [2000] model in both local time and L-shell. Roelof, E. C., and A. J. Skinner (2000), Space Sci. Rev., 91, 437-459.

  17. Microirradiation of cells with energetic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollinger, G.; Hable, V.; Hauptner, A.; Krücken, R.; Reichart, P.; Friedl, A. A.; Drexler, G.; Cremer, T.; Dietzel, S.

    2005-04-01

    The ion microprobe SNAKE (superconducting nanoscope for applied nuclear (Kern) physics experiments) at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator achieves beam focusing by a superconducting quadrupole doublet and can make use of a broad range of ions and ion energies, from 20 MeV protons to 200 MeV gold ions. This allows to adjust the number of DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) and double strand breaks (DSBs) per ion and per cell nucleus from about 0.1 DSBs per ion to several 100 DSBs per ion. When irradiating with single 100 MeV 16O ions, the adapted setup permits a fwhm irradiation accuracy of 0.55 μm in x-direction and 0.4 μm in y-direction, as demonstrated by retrospective track etching of polycarbonate foils. The experiments point to investigate protein dynamics after targeted irradiation. As an example for such experiments we show a kind of three dimensional representation of foci of γ-H2AX which are visible 0.5 h after the irradiation with 100 MeV 16O ions took place. It shows the gross correlation with the irradiation pattern but also distinct deviations which are attributed to protein dynamics in the cell.

  18. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  19. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-06-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  20. Energetic neutral atoms from a trans-Europa gas torus at Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Mauk, B H; Mitchell, D G; Krimigis, S M; Roelof, E C; Paranicas, C P

    2003-02-27

    The space environments--or magnetospheres--of magnetized planets emit copious quantities of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) at energies between tens of electron volts to hundreds of kiloelectron volts (keV). These energetic atoms result from charge exchange between magnetically trapped energetic ions and cold neutral atoms, and they carry significant amounts of energy and mass from the magnetospheres. Imaging their distribution allows us to investigate the structure of planetary magnetospheres. Here we report the analysis of 50-80 keV ENA images of Jupiter's magnetosphere, where two distinct emission regions dominate: the upper atmosphere of Jupiter itself, and a torus of emission residing just outside the orbit of Jupiter's satellite Europa. The trans-Europa component shows that, unexpectedly, Europa generates a gas cloud comparable in gas content to that associated with the volcanic moon Io. The quantity of gas found indicates that Europa has a much greater impact than hitherto believed on the structure of, and the energy flow within, Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of silicon oxidation enhanced by energetic hydrogen ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizotani, Kohei; Isobe, Michiro; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics numerical simulations have been performed to clarify the mechanism of enhanced oxidation in Si during silicon gate etching by HBr/O2 plasmas. Such enhanced oxidation sometimes manifests itself as Si recess during gate etching processes. When a Si substrate is subject to energetic ion bombardment together with a flux of radical species, our study has identified the cause of such enhanced oxidation in Si as enhanced O diffusion arising from the momentum transfer from energetic H atoms to O atoms on the surface or in the subsurface of the Si substrate. No chemical effect such as hydrogenation of Si plays a role for the enhanced oxidation. Simulation results are found to be in good agreement with earlier experimental observations of ion-irradiation-enhanced oxidation obtained by beam experiments.

  2. Energetic neutral atoms (E approximately 50 keV) from the ring current - IMP 7/8 and ISEE 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENA), emitted from the magnetosphere with energies of about 50 keV, have been measured with solid state detectors on the IMP 7/8 and ISEE 1 spacecraft; they are produced when singly charged trapped ions collide with the exosphere neutral hydrogen geocorona and the energetic ions are neutralized by charge exchange. ENA observations during the recovery phase of two moderate geomagnetic storms are analyzed: November 22-23, 1973, from IMP 8 at 33 earth radii and December 17, 1977, from ISEE 1 at 20 earth radii.

  3. Investigation of Energetic Ions in a 100-A Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    The role of ion acoustic turbulence in the formation of high-energy ion tails in the plume of a 100-A LaB6 hollow cathode is experimentally and theoretically examined. At fixed flow rate and varying discharge current, single-point measurements of fluctuation intensity in the cathode plume are taken and compared to ion energy measurements. It is shown that for high discharge current the formation of energetic ions is correlated with the amplitude of the ion acoustic turbulence. Two-dimensional maps of background plasma parameters and wave turbulence are made at the highest discharge current investigated, 140 A. A simple, one-dimensional quasilinear model for the interaction of the ion energy distribution with the ion acoustic turbulence is employed, and it is shown that the energy in the measured wave turbulence is sufficiently large to explain the formation of ion tails in the cathode plume. Mitigation techniques for minimizing the amplitude of the turbulence are discussed.

  4. JEDI observations of energetic ions in the Jovian polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, D. K.; Mauk, B.; Paranicas, C.; Clark, G. B.; Kollmann, P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S.

    2016-12-01

    After a successful orbit insertion, the Juno spacecraft completed its first 53.5 day orbit and entered perijove with the full scientific payload operational for the first time. The Jupiter Energetic particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) measures energetic ions and electrons with a combination of energy deposition in a set of solid state detectors (SSD) and a time-of-flight (TOF) system using thin foils and micro-channel plates. The combination of TOF and energy are combined to determine the velocity, mass, and species of the ions. The incident energy of the electrons is determined with the SSD energy measurement alone. Of the three JEDI units, one measures nearly 4 pi sr once each spin, while the other two JEDI instruments are arranged in a fan, that while over the Jovian poles, samples a plane nearly parallel with the magnetic field at a very high cadence. The JEDI instruments measure ions beginning from a few keV through approximately 20 MeV. The instruments can resolve the major ion species beginning 30 keV/n, with coarser mass resolution below that. This report focuses on the energetic ions observed over the poles and through closest approach. Of particular interest are the ions that precipitate from the magnetosphere onto the polar atmosphere, and ions that are accelerated locally by Jupiter's powerful auroral processes. We report preliminary findings on the spatial variations, species, spectra, and pitch angle distribution throughout the prime science region of the Juno mission.

  5. Double-kink Fishbone Instability Caused by Circulating Energetic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.V. Lutsenko; V.S. Marchenko; R.B. White

    2004-01-12

    The destabilization of double kink modes by the circulating energetic ions in tokamaks with the plasma current having an off-axis maximum is studied. It is shown that the high-frequency fishbone instability [Energetic Particle Mode (EPM)] and the low-frequency (diamagnetic) fishbones are possible for such an equilibrium, their poloidal and toroidal mode numbers being not necessarily equal to unity. A new kind of the EPM instability, ''doublet fishbones,'' is predicted. This instability is characterized by two frequencies; it can occur in a plasma with a non-monotonic radial profile of the energetic ions when the particle orbit width is less than the width of the region where the mode is localized. It is found that the diamagnetic fishbone branch exists even when the orbit width exceeds the mode width; in this case, however, the instability growth rate is relatively small.

  6. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  7. The Pulse Response of Electrets to Energetic Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    of alpha particles) is: 17 A = N - 0.603 (2-17) where N is the number of source atoms and H is the half life of the isotope . For neutron induced...states of the product, resulting in different kinetic energies of the alpha particles. Table 2-1: Characteristics of Alpha Emitters Isotope Half Life...are energetic atomic nuclei resulting from the nuclear decomposition of a fissionable isotope , e.g. 235Uranium. When the nucleus of a 235U atom absorbs

  8. The Modeling of Pickup Ion or Energetic Particle Mediated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Mostafavi, P.; Hunana, P.

    2016-05-01

    Suprathermal energetic particles, such as solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere and pickup ions (PUIs) in the outer heliosphere and the very local interstellar medium, often form a thermodynamically dominant component in their various environments. In the supersonic solar wind beyond > 10 AU, in the inner heliosheath (IHS), and in the very local interstellar medium (VLISM), PUIs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background plasma. Similarly, SEPs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background solar wind in the inner heliosphere. In the absence of equilibration between plasma components, a separate coupled plasma description for the energetic particles is necessary. Using a collisionless Chapman-Enskog expansion, we derive a closed system of multi-component equations for a plasma comprised of thermal protons and electrons, and suprathermal particles (SEPs, PUIs). The energetic particles contribute an isotropic scalar pressure to leading order, a collisionless heat flux at the next order, and a collisionless stress tensor at the second-order. The collisionless heat conduction and viscosity in the multi-fluid description results from a nonisotropic energetic particle distribution. A simpler single-fluid MHD-like system of equations with distinct equations of state for both the background plasma and the suprathermal particles is derived. We note briefly potential pitfalls that can emerge in the numerical modeling of collisionless plasma flows that contain a dynamically important energetic particle component.

  9. VISIONS: Remote Observations of a Spatially-Structured Filamentary Source of Energetic Neutral Atoms near the Polar Cap Boundary During an Auroral Substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, D.; Clemmons, J.; Keller, J. W.; Klenzing, J.; Kujawski, J.; McLain, J.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Zettergren, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report initial results from the VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm (VISIONS) rocket that flew through and near several regions of enhanced auroral activity and also sensed regions of ion outflow both remotely and directly. The observed neutral atom fluxes were largest at the lower energies and generally higher in the auroral zone than in the polar cap. In this paper, we focus on data from the latter half of the VISIONS trajectory when the rocket traversed the polar cap region. During this period, many of the energetic neutral atom spectra show a peak at 100 electronvolts. Spectra with peaks around 100 electronvolts are also observed in the Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA) data consistent with these ions comprising the source population for the energetic neutral atoms. The EIA observations of this low energy population extend only over a few tens of kilometers. Furthermore, the directionality of the arriving energetic neutral atoms is consistent with either this spatially localized source of energetic ions extending from as low as about 300 kilometers up to above 600 kilometers or a larger source of energetic ions to the southwest.

  10. VISIONS: Remote Observations of a Spatially-Structured Filamentary Source of Energetic Neutral Atoms near the Polar Cap Boundary During an Auroral Substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, D.; Clemmons, J.; Keller, J. W.; Klenzing, J.; Kujawski, J.; McLain, J.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Zettergren, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report initial results from the VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm (VISIONS) rocket that flew through and near several regions of enhanced auroral activity and also sensed regions of ion outflow both remotely and directly. The observed neutral atom fluxes were largest at the lower energies and generally higher in the auroral zone than in the polar cap. In this paper, we focus on data from the latter half of the VISIONS trajectory when the rocket traversed the polar cap region. During this period, many of the energetic neutral atom spectra show a peak at 100 electronvolts. Spectra with peaks around 100 electronvolts are also observed in the Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA) data consistent with these ions comprising the source population for the energetic neutral atoms. The EIA observations of this low energy population extend only over a few tens of kilometers. Furthermore, the directionality of the arriving energetic neutral atoms is consistent with either this spatially localized source of energetic ions extending from as low as about 300 kilometers up to above 600 kilometers or a larger source of energetic ions to the southwest.

  11. Mapping energetics of atom probe evaporation events through first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Joaquín; Broderick, Scott R; Rajan, Krishna

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to use atomistic modeling to determine accurate inputs into the atom probe tomography (APT) reconstruction process. One of these inputs is evaporation field; however, a challenge occurs because single ions and dimers have different evaporation fields. We have calculated the evaporation field of Al and Sc ions and Al-Al and Al-Sc dimers from an L1₂-Al₃Sc surface using ab initio calculations and with a high electric field applied to the surface. The evaporation field is defined as the electric field at which the energy barrier size is calculated as zero, corresponding to the minimum field that atoms from the surface can break their bonds and evaporate from the surface. The evaporation field of the surface atoms are ranked from least to greatest as: Al-Al dimer, Al ion, Sc ion, and Al-Sc dimer. The first principles results were compared with experimental data in the form of an ion evaporation map, which maps multi-ion evaporations. From the ion evaporation map of L1₂-Al₃Sc, we extract relative evaporation fields and identify that an Al-Al dimer has a lower evaporation field than an Al-Sc dimer. Additionally, comparatively an Al-Al surface dimer is more likely to evaporate as a dimer, while an Al-Sc surface dimer is more likely to evaporate as single ions. These conclusions from the experiment agree with the ab initio calculations, validating the use of this approach for modeling APT energetics.

  12. STEREO Observations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms during the 5 December 2006 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms emitted during the X9 solar event of December 5, 2006. Beginning 1 hour following the onset of this E79 flare, the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on both the STEREO A and B spacecraft observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons beginning hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within 10 of the Sun, consistent with the measurement resolution. The derived emission profile at the Sun had onset and peak times remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile and continued for more than an hour. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events less than 5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs). To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. Possible origins for the production of ENAs in a large solar event are considered. We conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona and that charge-transfer reactions between accelerated protons and partially-stripped coronal ions are an important source of ENAs in solar events.

  13. Statistical analysis of the energetic ion and ENA data for the Titan environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Dandouras, I.; Toublanc, D.; Roelof, E. C.; Brandt, P. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.; Hamilton, D. C.; Wahlund, J.-E.

    2010-12-01

    The MIMI experiment (Magnetosphere Imaging Instrument) onboard Cassini is dedicated to the study of energetic particles, with in particular LEMMS analyzing charged particles, or the INCA detector which can image the Energetic Neutral Atoms produced by charge exchange collisions between cold neutrals and energetic ions. The MIMI experiment is thus well adapted to the study of the interaction between the Titan nitrogen rich atmosphere and the energetic Saturnian magnetospheric plasma. We analyze here the energetic protons at the Titan orbit crossings before January 2008 (MIMI-LEMMS data; 27-255 keV), which are very dynamic, with tri-modal flux spectra and probably quasi-isotropic pitch angle distributions. We provide statistical parameters for the proton fluxes, leading to estimates of the average energy deposition into Titan's atmosphere, before we discuss the possible influence of Titan on the magnetopause. We then analyze the H ENA images (24-55 keV) during the Titan flybys before June 2006 to obtain a better diagnostic of the Titan interaction: the ENAs variability is mostly related to the magnetospheric variability (the exosphere being roughly stable) or the distance from the moon, the ENAs halo around Titan is very stable (corresponding to a lower limit for ENAs emission at the exobase), and strong asymmetries are observed, due to finite gyroradii effects for the parent ions.

  14. Energetics of lithium ion battery failure.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard E; Walters, Richard N

    2016-11-15

    The energy released by failure of rechargeable 18-mm diameter by 65-mm long cylindrical (18650) lithium ion cells/batteries was measured in a bomb calorimeter for 4 different commercial cathode chemistries over the full range of charge using a method developed for this purpose. Thermal runaway was induced by electrical resistance (Joule) heating of the cell in the nitrogen-filled pressure vessel (bomb) to preclude combustion. The total energy released by cell failure, ΔHf, was assumed to be comprised of the stored electrical energy E (cell potential×charge) and the chemical energy of mixing, reaction and thermal decomposition of the cell components, ΔUrxn. The contribution of E and ΔUrxn to ΔHf was determined and the mass of volatile, combustible thermal decomposition products was measured in an effort to characterize the fire safety hazard of rechargeable lithium ion cells.

  15. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuselter, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Klumpar, D. M.

    1992-06-01

    The analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the Active Mesospheric Particle Tracer Experiment (AMPTE) Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft are discussed. These combined data sets have and will be used to survey the energetic ion environment in the Earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there. A computer code was developed to analyze and interpret the data sets. The focus of the first year was on the determination of the contribution of leaked magnetospheric protons to the total energetic proton population. Emphasis was placed on intervals when the AMPTE spacecraft was in the plasma depletion layer because it was argued that in this region, only the leaked population contributes to the energetic ion population. Manipulation of the CHEM data and comparison of the CHEM and HPCE data over their common energy range near the magnetopause also contributed directly to a second study of that region.

  16. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselter, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Klumpar, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the Active Mesospheric Particle Tracer Experiment (AMPTE) Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft are discussed. These combined data sets have and will be used to survey the energetic ion environment in the Earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there. A computer code was developed to analyze and interpret the data sets. The focus of the first year was on the determination of the contribution of leaked magnetospheric protons to the total energetic proton population. Emphasis was placed on intervals when the AMPTE spacecraft was in the plasma depletion layer because it was argued that in this region, only the leaked population contributes to the energetic ion population. Manipulation of the CHEM data and comparison of the CHEM and HPCE data over their common energy range near the magnetopause also contributed directly to a second study of that region.

  17. The Production of Energetic Atomic Beams via Charge Exchange for the Simulation of the Low-Earth Orbit Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketsdever, Andrew David

    The interactions of energetic atoms with solid materials and other gases are important to a wide range of engineering disciplines. The interactions between low -Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen and spacecraft surfaces, outgassed molecules, rocket exhaust plume species and other atmospheric gases are of great interest to the aerospace engineering community. The approach taken in this study was to design a facility which can be used to understand the physics of energetic gas-gas and gas-surface collisions. The type of facility needed to accomplish this requires a continuous, high energy (5-100eV) atomic beam with a low energy spread and a moderate flux. The flux of atoms from this facility, although estimated to be several orders of magnitude lower than LEO conditions, is sufficient to gain qualitative and quantitative insight into LEO environmental interactions. In the pilot scale true energy atmospheric simulator (TEAS) developed in this research, ion engine technology is incorporated to produce a beam of energetic ions. Because the ion source discharges can be operated on several gases, simulation of any atmospheric species can be achieved; however, atomic oxygen is the species of interest in this study. The ions are accelerated to the desired energy range and undergo a charge exchange process in molecular hydrogen to produce the energetic atomic beam Molecular hydrogen is chosen as the charge exchange gas because of the relatively large cross section for the reaction and the small scattering angle per collision. An electrostatic energy analyzer, a mass spectrometer and thin silver reaction films are used to diagnose the beams produced by the TEAS.

  18. Global energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements and their association with the Dst index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Spence, H. E.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Sugiura, M.; Kamei, T.

    We present a new global magnetospheric index that measures the intensity of the Earth's ring current through energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). We have named it the Global Energetic Neutral Index (GENI), and it is derived from ENA measurements obtained by the Imaging Proton Spectrometer (IPS), part of the Comprehensive Energetic Particle and Pitch Angle Distribution (CEPPAD) experiment on the POLAR satellite. GENI provides a simple orbit-independent global sum of ENAs measured with IPS. Actual ENA measurements for the same magnetospheric state look different when seen from different points in the POLAR orbit. In addition, the instrument is sensitive to weak ion populations in the polar cap, as well as cosmic rays. We have devised a method for removing the effects of cosmic rays and weak ion fluxes, in order to produce an image of “pure” ENA counts. We then devised a method of normalizing the ENA measurements to remove the orbital bias effect. The normalized data were then used to produce the GENI. We show, both experimentally and theoretically the approximate proportionality between the GENI and the Dst index. In addition we discuss possible implications of this relation. Owing to the high sensitivity of IPS to ENAs, we can use these data to explore the ENA/Dst relationship not only during all phases of moderate geomagnetic storms, but also during quiescent ring current periods.

  19. Exospheres and Energetic Neutral Atoms of Mars, Venus and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Smith, H. Todd; Garnier, Philippe; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Delva, Magda; Gröller, Hannes; Mura, Alessandro

    Our understanding of the upper atmosphere of unmagnetized bodies such as Mars, Venus and Titan has improved significantly in this decade. Recent observations by in situ and remote sensing instruments on board Mars Express, Venus Express and Cassini have revealed characteristics of the neutral upper atmospheres (exospheres) and of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). The ENA environment in the vicinity of the bodies is by itself a significant study field, but ENAs are also used as a diagnostic tool for the exosphere and the interaction with the upstream plasmas. Synergy between theoretical and modeling work has also improved considerably. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of our understanding of the neutral environment in the vicinity of unmagnetized planets.

  20. Exospheres and Energetic Neutral Atoms of Mars, Venus and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Smith, H. Todd; Garnier, Philippe; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Delva, Magda; Gröller, Hannes; Mura, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    Our understanding of the upper atmosphere of unmagnetized bodies such as Mars, Venus and Titan has improved significantly in this decade. Recent observations by in situ and remote sensing instruments on board Mars Express, Venus Express and Cassini have revealed characteristics of the neutral upper atmospheres (exospheres) and of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). The ENA environment in the vicinity of the bodies is by itself a significant study field, but ENAs are also used as a diagnostic tool for the exosphere and the interaction with the upstream plasmas. Synergy between theoretical and modeling work has also improved considerably. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of our understanding of the neutral environment in the vicinity of unmagnetized planets.

  1. A search for energetic ion directivity in large solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1993-01-01

    One of the key observational questions for solar flare physics is: What is the number, the energy spectrum, and the angular distribution of flare accelerated ions? The standard method for deriving ion spectral shape employs the ratio of influences observed on the 4-7 MeV band to the narrow neutron capture line at 2.223 MeV. The 4-7 MeV band is dominated by the principal nuclear de-excitation lines from C-12 and O-16 which are generated in the low chromosphere by the direct excitation or spallation of nuclei by energetic ions. In contrast, the narrow 2.223 MeV line is produced by the capture of thermal neutrons on protons in the photosphere. These capture neutrons are generated by energetic ion interactions and thermalized by scattering in the solar atmosphere. In a series of papers, Ramaty, Lingenfelter, and their collaborators have calculated the expected ratio of fluence in the 4-7 MeV band to the 2.223 MeV line for a wide range of energetic ion spectral shapes (see, e.g. Hua and Lingenfelter 1987). Another technique for deriving ion spectral shapes and angular distributions uses the relative strength of the Compton tail associated with the 2.223 MeV neutron capture line (Vestrand 1988, 1990). This technique can independently constrain both the angular and the energy distribution of the energetic parent ions. The combination of this tail/line strength diagnostic with the line/(4-7) MeV fluence ratio can allow one to constrain both properties of the energetic ion distributions. The primary objective of our Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigator program was to study measurements of neutron capture line emission and prompt nuclear de-excitation for large flares detected by the Solar Maximum Mission/ Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SMM/GRS) and to use these established line diagnostics to study the properties of flare accelerated ions.

  2. Atomic absorption spectroscopy in ion channel screening.

    PubMed

    Stankovich, Larisa; Wicks, David; Despotovski, Sasko; Liang, Dong

    2004-10-01

    This article examines the utility of atomic absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with cold flux assays, to ion channel screening. The multiplicity of ion channels that can be interrogated using cold flux assays and atomic absorption spectroscopy is summarized. The importance of atomic absorption spectroscopy as a screening tool is further elaborated upon by providing examples of the relevance of ion channels to various physiological processes and targeted diseases.

  3. Energetic ion acceleration at collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    An example is presented from a test particle simulation designed to study ion acceleration at oblique turbulent shocks. For conditions appropriate at interplanetary shocks near 1 AU, it is found that a shock with theta sub B n = 60 deg is capable of producing an energy spectrum extending from 10 keV to approx. 1 MeV in approx 1 hour. In this case total energy gains result primarily from several separate episodes of shock drift acceleration, each of which occurs when particles are scattered back to the shock by magnetic fluctuations in the shock vicinity.

  4. Energetic Ions and Magnetic Fields Upstream From the Kronian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Sarris, E.; Sergis, N.; Dialynas, K.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Dougherty, M.

    2008-12-01

    The existence of energetic particle events to ~200 Rs upstream and ~1300 Rs downstream of Saturn was established during the Voyager 1, 2 flybys in 1980 and 1981, respectively. The origin of the events could not be determined with certainty because of lack of particle charge state and species measurements at lower (<300 keV) energies, which dominate the spectra. High sensitivity observations of energetic ion directional intensities, energy spectra, and ion composition were obtained by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) of the MIMI instrument complement with a geometry factor of ~2.5 cm2 sr and some capability of separating light (H, He) and heavier (C, N, O) ion groups (henceforth referred to as "hydrogen" and "oxygen" respectively). Charge state information was provided where possible by the Charge-Energy-Mass-Spectrometer (CHEMS) over the range ~3 to 220 keV per charge, and magnetic field (IMF) data by the MAG instrument on Cassini. The observations revealed the presence of distinct upstream bursts of energetic hydrogen and oxygen ions whenever the IMF connected the spacecraft to the planetary bow shock, up to distances of 135 RS. The events exhibited the following characteristics: (1) Hydrogen ion bursts are observed in the energy range 3 to 220 keV (and occasionally to E > 220 keV) and oxygen ion bursts in the energy range 32 to -300 keV. (2) Particle onsets are nearly field-aligned, but the distribution tends to isotropize as the event progresses in time. (3) The duration of the ion bursts is several minutes up to 4 hrs. (4) The events are of varying composition, with some exhibiting significant fluxes of oxygen. (5) The bursts have a filamentary structure with some exhibiting distinct signatures of "velocity- filtering effects" at the edges of convecting IMF filaments. (6) Some ion bursts are accompanied by distinct diamagnetic field depressions and exhibit wave structures consistent with ion cyclotron waves for H+, and O+. Given the repeated magnetic field

  5. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kenneth R.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Vittorini, Grahame D.

    2015-01-22

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca{sup +} [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed.

  6. A model for the spatial and energy distributions of energetic neutral atoms produced within the Saturn/Titan plasma system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Curtis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the production of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in the Saturn/Titan system, that takes into account existing data on the spatial distribution of the background neutral density, the energy and spatial distributions of the energetic ions, and the energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross sections, is presented. Hydrogen production via H(+), H is presented in detail. The extended Saturn/Titan system is 'imaged' in energetic neutral H at 66 R(s) and 25-deg latitude. From this vantage point, the energetic H flux is 6 + or - 1 H/sq cm per sec between 10 and 100 keV. Comparing the predicted H spectrum with that observed by Kirsch et al. (1981), the production of neutral O is estimated, and it is concluded that O(+), H charge exchange in the inner magnetosphere is sufficient to account for all the ENA O production.

  7. Li-Ion Localization and Energetics as a Function of Anode Structure.

    PubMed

    McNutt, Nicholas W; McDonnell, Marshall; Rios, Orlando; Keffer, David J

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we study the effect of carbon composite anode structure on the localization and energetics of Li-ions. A computational molecular dynamics study is combined with experimental results from neutron scattering experiments to understand the effect of composite density, crystallite size, volume fraction of crystalline carbon, and ion loading on the nature of ion storage in novel, lignin-derived composite materials. In a recent work, we demonstrated that these carbon composites display a fundamentally different mechanism for Li-ion storage than traditional graphitic anodes. The edges of the crystalline and amorphous fragments of aromatic carbon that exist in these composites are terminated by hydrogen atoms, which play a crucial role in adsorption. In this work, we demonstrate how differences in composite structure due to changes in the processing conditions alter the type and extent of the interface between the amorphous and crystalline domains, thus impacting the nature of Li-ion storage. The effects of structural properties are evaluated using a suite of pair distribution functions as well as an original technique to extract archetypal structures, in the form of three-dimensional atomic density distributions, from highly disordered systems. The energetics of Li-ion binding are understood by relating changes in the energy and charge distributions to changes in structural properties. The distribution of Li-ion energies reveals that some structures lead to greater chemisorption, while others have greater physisorption. Carbon composites with a high volume fraction of small crystallites demonstrate the highest ion storage capacity because of the high interfacial area between the crystalline and amorphous domains. At these interfaces, stable H atoms, terminating the graphitic crystallites, provide favorable sites for reversible Li adsorption.

  8. Identification of the Energetic Plume Ion Escape Channel at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fraenz, M.; Barabash, S.

    2013-12-01

    Mars lacks a global dipole magnetic field. The resulting induced magnetosphere arising from Mars' atmosphere's direct interaction with the solar wind differs significantly from that of Venus. The weak gravitational field of Mars creates scale heights so large that the exosphere extends out beyond the Induced Magnetosphere Boundary (IMB), where newly ionized exospheric oxygen is exposed to high speed shocked solar wind flow and the associated strong convective electric field (E). The weaker Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) at Mars, combined with this strong electric field, should be expected to result in heavy pickup ions with gyroradii much larger than the radius of Mars. Test particle models and hybrid models have predicted that these pickup ions create an energetic plume of escaping planetary ions that may have a flux on the same order of magnitude as the flow of planetary ions down the central tail loss channel. This study presents an analysis of data from the Ion Mass Analyzer aboard European Space Agency's Mars Express (MEX) to identify the presence of this energetic ion plume. We searched through the time period when Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) was operating simultaneously with MEX, and selected hundreds of time intervals when IMF proxies from MGS show the convective electric field to be aligned with the orbit of MEX. We then examined plots of the MEX orbit during these intervals and selected times when MEX was positioned on the +E side of Mars and outside the nominal IMB. Finally, from these intervals we identified the cases in which oxygen ions were detected with energies above 2 keV. The result is a set of several direct measurements of the energetic plume.

  9. Spectra of secondary electrons generated in water by energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scifoni, Emanuele; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Surdutovich, Eugene

    2010-02-15

    The energy distributions of secondary electrons produced by energetic carbon ions (in the energy range used, e.g., in hadron therapy), incident on liquid water, are discussed. For low-energy ions, a parametrization of the singly differential ionization cross sections is introduced, based on tuning the position of the Bragg peak. The resulting parametrization allows a fast calculation of the energy spectra of secondary electrons at different depths along the ion's trajectory, especially near the Bragg peak. At the same time, this parametrization provides penetration depths for a broad range of initial-ion energies within the therapeutically accepted error. For high-energy ions, the energy distribution is obtained with a use of the dielectric-response function approach. Different models are compared and discussed.

  10. High-charge energetic ions generated by intersecting laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Deng, Z. G.; Yu, M. Y.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-08-15

    Ion acceleration from the interaction of two intersecting intense laser pulses with an overdense plasma is investigated using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that, comparing with the single-pulse case, the charge of the resulting energetic ion bunch can be increased by more than an order of magnitude without much loss of quality. Dependence of the ion charge on the interaction parameters, including separation distance and incidence angles of the lasers, is considered. It is shown that the charge of the accelerated ion bunch can be optimized by controlling the degree of laser overlapping. The improved performance can be attributed to the enhanced laser intensity as well as stochastic heating of the accelerated electrons. Since at present the intensity of readily available lasers is limited, the two pulse scheme should be useful for realizing higher laser intensity in order to achieve higher-energy target normal sheath acceleration ions.

  11. Energetic Ion Losses in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, D. C.; Granetz, R. S.; Bader, A.; Parker, R. R.; Vieira, R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Darrow, D. S.; Zweben, S. J.

    2011-10-01

    A scintillator-based fast ion loss detector (FILD) is presently being commissioned on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to resolve the energy and pitch angle of energetic ions that are lost from the plasma due to interactions with MHD modes, edge localized modes, and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) injection. Energetic ion populations are generated by applying ICRH in the minority heating regime, producing tail energies up to 2 MeV and driving a variety of Alfvén eigenmodes. The 2 MHz sampling rate of the detector allows for the identification of convective losses across the range of encountered Alfvénic frequencies. A comprehensive design study optimized the FILD to overlap its observed ion phase space with that of the compact neutral particle analyzer array that measures radial energy and density profiles of confined ICRH tail ions. Initial results from this diagnostic system will be presented in the context of the extensive C-Mod ICRH experiment and simulation/modeling effort. Work supported by US DOE through an appointment in the Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Research Program and under DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Mechanisms of Stochastic Diffusion of Energetic Ions in Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; R.B. White; Yu.V. Yakovenko

    2001-01-18

    Stochastic diffusion of the energetic ions in spherical tori is considered. The following issues are addressed: (I) Goldston-White-Boozer diffusion in a rippled field; (ii) cyclotron-resonance-induced diffusion caused by the ripple; (iii) effects of non-conservation of the magnetic moment in an axisymmetric field. It is found that the stochastic diffusion in spherical tori with a weak magnetic field has a number of peculiarities in comparison with conventional tokamaks; in particular, it is characterized by an increased role of mechanisms associated with non-conservation of the particle magnetic moment. It is concluded that in current experiments on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) the stochastic diffusion does not have a considerable influence on the confinement of energetic ions.

  13. Foreshock waves as observed in energetic ion flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrukovich, A. A.; Chugunova, O. M.; Inamori, T.; Kudela, K.; Stetiarova, J.

    2017-05-01

    Oscillations of energetic ion fluxes with periods 10-100 s are often present in the Earth's foreshock. Detailed analysis of wave properties with Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms data and comparisons with other data sets confirm that these oscillations are the previously unnoticed part of well-known "30 s" waves but are observed mainly for higher-speed solar wind. Simultaneous magnetic oscillations have similar periods, large amplitudes, and nonharmonic unstable waveforms or shocklet-type appearance, suggesting their nonlinearity, also typical for high solar wind speed. Analysis of the general foreshock data set of Interball project shows that the average flux of the backstreaming energetic ions increases more than 1 order of magnitude, when solar wind speed increases from 400 to 500 km/s.

  14. Plasma wave interactions with energetic ions near the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    An intense band of electromagnetic noise is frequently observed near the magnetic equatorial plane at radial distance from about 2 to 9 earth radii. Recent wide band wave form measurements with the Imp 6 and Hawkeye 1 satellites have shown that the equatorial noise consists of a complex superposition of many harmonically spaced lines. Several distinctly different frequency spacings are often evident in the same spectrum. The frequency spacing typically ranges from a few hertz to a few tens of hertz. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that these waves are interacting with energetic protons, alpha particles, and other heavy ions trapped near the magnetic equator. The possible role that these waves play in controlling the distribution of the energetic ions is considered.

  15. Plasma wave interactions with energetic ions near the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An intense band of electromagnetic noise is frequently observed near the magnetic equatorial plane at radial distance from about 2 to 5 Re. Recent wideband wave-form measurements with the IMP-6 and Hawkeye-1 satellites have shown that the equatorial noise consists of a complex superposition of many harmonically spaced lines. Several distinctly different frequency spacings are often evident in the same spectrum. The frequency spacing typically ranges from a few Hz to a few tens of Hz. It is suggested that these waves are interacting with energetic protons, alpha particles, and other heavy ions trapped near the magnetic equator. The possible role these waves play in controlling the distribution of the energetic ions is considered.

  16. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-06-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1‑x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology.

  17. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1−x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  18. Dynamics Explorer 1: Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer (EICS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Peterson, W. K.; Collin, H. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer (EICS) experiment was selected as part of the Dynamics Explorer (DE) Program. One of the primary goals of the DE program was to investigate in detail the plasma physics processes responsible for energizing thermal (approximately 1 eV) ionospheric ions and transporting them to the earth's plasma sheet and distant polar cap. The results of the EICS data analysis (including support of other investigators) and of the archiving efforts supported by this contract are summarized in this document. Also reported are some aspects of our operational support activities.

  19. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal.

  20. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal.

  1. Spectra of secondary electrons generated in water by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scifoni, Emanuele; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'Yov, Andrey V.

    2010-02-01

    The energy distributions of secondary electrons produced by energetic carbon ions (in the energy range used, e.g., in hadron therapy), incident on liquid water, are discussed. For low-energy ions, a parametrization of the singly differential ionization cross sections is introduced, based on tuning the position of the Bragg peak. The resulting parametrization allows a fast calculation of the energy spectra of secondary electrons at different depths along the ion’s trajectory, especially near the Bragg peak. At the same time, this parametrization provides penetration depths for a broad range of initial-ion energies within the therapeutically accepted error. For high-energy ions, the energy distribution is obtained with a use of the dielectric-response function approach. Different models are compared and discussed.

  2. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  3. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  4. Energy Release, Acceleration, and Escape of Solar Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Ireland, J.; Ryan, J. M.; Young, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are prodigious producers of energetic particles, and thus a rich laboratory for studying particle acceleration. The acceleration occurs through the release of magnetic energy, a significant fraction of which can go into the acceleration of particles. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) certainly produce shocks that both accelerate particles and provide a mechanism for escape into the interplanetary medium (IP). What is less well understood is whether accelerated particles produced from the flare reconnection process escape, and if so, how these same particles are related to solar energetic particles (SEPs) detected in-situ. Energetic electron SEPs have been shown to be correlated with Type III radio bursts, hard X-ray emission, and EUV jets, making a very strong case for the connection between acceleration at the flare and escape along open magnetic field lines. Because there has not been a clear signature of ion escape, as is the case with the Type III radio emission for electrons, sorting out the avenues of escape for accelerated flare ions and the possible origin of the impulsive SEPs continues to be a major challenge. The key to building a clear picture of particle escape relies on the ability to map signatures of escape such as EUV jets at the Sun and to follow the progression of these escape signatures as they evolve in time. Furthermore, nuclear γ-ray emissions provide critical context relating ion acceleration to that of escape. With the advent observations from Fermi as well as RHESSI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the challenge of ion escape from the Sun can now be addressed. We present a preliminary study of the relationship of EUV jets with nuclear γ-ray emission and Type III radio observations and discuss the implications for possible magnetic topologies that allow for ion escape from deep inside the corona to the interplanetary medium.

  5. Effects of Neutral Density on Energetic Ions Produced Near High-Current Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kameyama, Ikuya

    1997-01-01

    Energy distributions of ion current from high-current, xenon hollow cathodes, which are essential information to understand erosion phenomena observed in high-power ion thrusters, were obtained using an electrostatic energy analyzer (ESA). The effects of ambient pressure and external flow rate introduced immediately downstream of hollow cathode on ion currents with energies greater than that associated with the cathode-to-anode potential difference were investigated. The results were analyzed to determine the changes in the magnitudes of ion currents to the ESA at various energies. Either increasing the ambient pressure or adding external flow induces an increase in the distribution of ion currents with moderate energies (epsilon less than 25 to 35 eV) and a decrease in the distribution for high energies (epsilon greater than 25 to 35 eV). The magnitude of the current distribution increase in the moderate energy range is greater for a cathode equipped with a toroidal keeper than for one without a keeper, but the distribution in the high energy range does not seem to be affected by a keeper. An MHD model, which has been proposed to describe energetic-ion production mechanism in hollow cathode at high discharge currents, was developed to describe these effects. The results show, however, that this model involves no mechanism by which a significant increase of ion current could occur at any energy. It was found, on the other hand, that the potential-hill model of energetic ion production, which assumes existence of a local maximum of plasma potential, could explain combined increases in the currents of ions with moderate energies and decreases in high energy ions due to increased neutral atom density using a charge-exchange mechanism. The existing, simplified version of the potential-hill model, however, shows poor quantitative agreement with measured ion-current-energy-distribution changes induced by neutral density changes.

  6. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  7. The composition of heavy ions in solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in determining the elemental, charge state, and isotopic composition of or approximate to 1 to or approximate to 20 MeV per nucleon ions in solar energetic particle (SEP) events and outline our current understanding of the nature of solar and interplanetary processes which may explain the observations. Average values of relative abundances measured in a large number of SEP events were found to be roughly energy independent in the approx. 1 to approx. 20 MeV per nucleon range, and showed a systematic deviation from photospheric abundances which seems to be organized in terms of the first ionization potential of the ion. Direct measurements of the charge states of SEPs revealed the surprisingly common presence of energetic He(+) along with heavy ion with typically coronal ionization states. High resolution measurements of isotopic abundance ratios in a small number of SEP events showed these to be consistent with the universal composition except for the puzzling overabundance of the SEP(22)Ne/(20)Ne relative to this isotopes ratio in the solar wind. The broad spectrum of observed elemental abundance variations, which in their extreme result in composition anomalies characteristic of (3)He rich, heavy ion rich and carbon poor SEP events, along with direct measurements of the ionization states of SEPs provided essential information on the physical characteristics of, and conditions in the source regions, as well as important constraints to possible models for SEP production.

  8. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Earth's Magnetosphere: NASA/POLAR Spacecraft Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Harlan; Blake, J. Bernard; Henderson, Michael; Jorgensen, Anders; Reeves, Geoff

    1998-11-01

    The NASA POLAR spacecraft has been routinely measuring energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) on a global scale from its high apogee (9 R_E), polar orbit. POLAR can identify ENAs when it is in a region of low ion flux. This occurs during large portions of its orbit when it dwells in the high latitude magnetospheric lobes. We find that significant ENA signals from the inner magnetosphere are recorded even during periods of magnetic quiesence when the main source of ENAs, the ring current, is nearly in a resting state. While the ENA data stream is not strictly continuous (it is interrupted when POLAR passes through hot ion populations), we have compiled a comprehensive data base from which long term trends may be tracked. We show that the recently-described ENA metric (Jorgensen et al., 1997), the Global Energetic Neutral Index (GENI), can be used to gauge storm activity over extended periods. We shall present the GENI index and associated ENA images for several events and demonstrate both the temporal and spatial information provided by this novel magnetospheric imaging technique

  9. Effect of Energetic-Ion-Driven MHD Instabilities on Energetic-Ion-Transport in Compact Helical System and Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Shimizu, A.; Spong, Donald A; Okumura, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes 1) representative results on excitation of energetic-particle mode (EPM) and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and consequent beam-ion losses in CHS, and 2) recent results on beam-ion transport and/or losses while EPMs are destabilized in LHD. Bursting EPMs and TAEs are often excited by co-injected beam ions in the high-beam ion pressure environment and give a significant effect on co-going beam ions in both experiments. It seems that in CHS, resonant beam ions are lost within a relatively short-time scale once they are anomalously transported due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes, whereas unlike CHS, redistribution of beam ions due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes is seen in LHD, suggesting that not all anomalously transported beam ions escape from the plasma.

  10. Role of Alfven instabilities in energetic ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, S.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Budny, R.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Hosea, J. C.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Wilson, J. R.

    1999-09-20

    Experiments with plasma heating by waves at the ion cyclotron resonance of a minority species have shown that the heating efficiency degrades above a certain power threshold. It is found that this threshold is due to the destabilization of shear Alfven waves, which causes loss of fast ions. There are two distinct regimes characterized by low q{sub a} and high q{sub a}. In the first case, the fast ion distribution created by ICRF, lies entirely inside r{sub q=1}, away from the location of global TAE. This situation leads to the formation of a very strong fast ion population which stabilizes the sawteeth, but also excites Energetic Particle Modes (EPM), which transport fast ions outside r{sub q=1} causing the giant crash. At higher q{sub a}, the widening of the Alfven gap due to the steeper q profile, brings the global TAE ''in contact'' with the fast ion distribution. This results in an immediate and continuous depletion of fast ions from the core, which prevents the formation of the monster sawtooth and the excitation of EPM. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Controlled nanopatterning & modifications of materials by energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, O. P.

    2016-05-23

    Compound semiconductors (InP, InAs and GaSb) has been exposed to energetic 3 keV Ar{sup +} ions for a varying fluence range of 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Morphological modifications of the irradiated surfaces have been investigated by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) in UHV conditions. It is observed that InP and GaSb have fluence dependent nanopattering e.g. nanoneedle, aligned nanodots, superimposed nanodots ripple like structures while InAs has little fluence dependent behaviour indicating materials dependent growth of features on irradiated surfaces. Moreover, surface roughness and wavelength of the features are also depending on the materials and fluences. The RMS surface roughness has been found to be increased rapidly in the early stage of irradiation followed by slower escalate rate and later tends to saturate indicating influence of the nonlinear processes.

  12. On the Energetics of Ions in Carbon and Gold Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Leila; Goduljan, Aleksej; Juarez, Fernanda; Quaino, Paola; Santos, Elizabeth; Schmickler, Wolfgang

    2016-01-04

    We investigate the insertion of halide and alkali atoms into narrow single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters <9 Å by density functional theory; both chiral and non-chiral tubes are considered. The atoms are stored in the form of ions; the concomitant charge transfer affects the band structure and makes originally semiconducting tubes conducting. The electrostatic interaction between a charge and the walls of the tube is explicitly calculated. The insertion energies and the positions of the ions are determined by a competition between electrostatic energy and Pauli repulsion. For comparison, we consider ions in gold nanotubes. Alkali ions follow the same principles in gold as in carbon tubes, but chloride is specifically adsorbed inside gold tubes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva

    2016-06-02

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. Furthermore, the partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.

  14. Energetic ion bombardment of Ag surfaces by C60+ and Ga+ projectiles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shixin; Szakal, Christopher; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    The ion bombardment-induced release of particles from a metal surface is investigated using energetic fullerene cluster ions as projectiles. The total sputter yield as well as partial yields of neutral and charged monomers and clusters leaving the surface are measured and compared with corresponding data obtained with atomic projectile ions of similar impact kinetic energy. It is found that all yields are enhanced by about one order of magnitude under bombardment with the C60+ cluster projectiles compared with Ga+ ions. In contrast, the electronic excitation processes determining the secondary ion formation probability are unaffected. The kinetic energy spectra of sputtered particles exhibit characteristic differences which reflect the largely different nature of the sputtering process for both types of projectiles. In particular, it is found that under C60+ impact (1) the energy spectrum of sputtered atoms peaks at significantly lower kinetic energies than for Ga+ bombardment and (2) the velocity spectra of monomers and dimers are virtually identical, a finding which is in pronounced contrast to all published data obtained for atomic projectiles. The experimental findings are in reasonable agreement with recent molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    DOE PAGES

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; ...

    2016-06-02

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be asmore » large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. Furthermore, the partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.« less

  16. Energetic Ion and Electron Irradiation of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Johnson, Robert E.; Mauk, Barry H.; Garrett, Henry B.; Gehrels, Neil

    2001-01-01

    Galileo Orbiter measurements of energetic ions (20 keV to 100 MeV) and electrons (20-700 keV) in Jupiter's magnetosphere are used, in conjunction with the JPL electron model (less than 40 MeV), to compute irradiation effects in the surface layers of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Significant elemental modifications are produced on unshielded surfaces to approximately centimeter depths in times of less than or equal to 10(exp 6) years, whereas micrometer depths on Europa are fully processed in approximately 10 years. Most observations of surface composition are limited to optical depths of approximately 1 mm, which are indirect contact with the space environment. Incident flux modeling includes Stormer deflection by the Ganymede dipole magnetic field, likely variable over that satellite's irradiation history. Delivered energy flux of approximately 8 x 10(exp 10) keV/square cm-s at Europa is comparable to total internal heat flux in the same units from tidal and radiogenic sources, while exceeding that for solar UV energies (greater than 6 eV) relevant to ice chemistry. Particle energy fluxes to Ganymede's equator and Callisto are similar at approximately 2-3 x 10(exp 8) keV/square cm-s with 5 x 10(exp 9) at Ganymede's polar cap, the latter being comparable to radiogenic energy input. Rates of change in optical reflectance and molecular composition on Europa, and on Ganymede's polar cap, are strongly driven by energy from irradiation, even in relatively young regions. Irradiation of nonice materials can produce SO2 and CO2, detected on Callisto and Europa, and simple to complex hydrocarbons. Iogenic neutral atoms and meteoroids deliver negligible energy approximately 10(exp 4-5) keV/square cm-s but impacts of the latter are important for burial or removal of irradiation products. Downward transport of radiation produced oxidants and hydrocarbons could deliver significant chemical energy into the satellite interiors for astrobiological evolution in putative sub

  17. Energetic Ion and Electron Irradiation of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Johnson, Robert E.; Mauk, Barry H.; Garrett, Henry B.; Gehrels, Neil

    2001-01-01

    Galileo Orbiter measurements of energetic ions (20 keV to 100 MeV) and electrons (20-700 keV) in Jupiter's magnetosphere are used, in conjunction with the JPL electron model (less than 40 MeV), to compute irradiation effects in the surface layers of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Significant elemental modifications are produced on unshielded surfaces to approximately centimeter depths in times of less than or equal to 10(exp 6) years, whereas micrometer depths on Europa are fully processed in approximately 10 years. Most observations of surface composition are limited to optical depths of approximately 1 mm, which are indirect contact with the space environment. Incident flux modeling includes Stormer deflection by the Ganymede dipole magnetic field, likely variable over that satellite's irradiation history. Delivered energy flux of approximately 8 x 10(exp 10) keV/square cm-s at Europa is comparable to total internal heat flux in the same units from tidal and radiogenic sources, while exceeding that for solar UV energies (greater than 6 eV) relevant to ice chemistry. Particle energy fluxes to Ganymede's equator and Callisto are similar at approximately 2-3 x 10(exp 8) keV/square cm-s with 5 x 10(exp 9) at Ganymede's polar cap, the latter being comparable to radiogenic energy input. Rates of change in optical reflectance and molecular composition on Europa, and on Ganymede's polar cap, are strongly driven by energy from irradiation, even in relatively young regions. Irradiation of nonice materials can produce SO2 and CO2, detected on Callisto and Europa, and simple to complex hydrocarbons. Iogenic neutral atoms and meteoroids deliver negligible energy approximately 10(exp 4-5) keV/square cm-s but impacts of the latter are important for burial or removal of irradiation products. Downward transport of radiation produced oxidants and hydrocarbons could deliver significant chemical energy into the satellite interiors for astrobiological evolution in putative sub

  18. On the origins of energetic ions in the earth's dayside magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    Energetic ion events in the earth's dayside subsolar magnetosheath (0900 - 1300 Local Time) are surveyed using data from the AMPTE/CCE Hot Plasma Composition Experiment. Ion species carrying the signature of their origin O(+) and energetic He(2+) are used to distinguish between magnetospheric and solar wind origins for the energetic ion events. The results of this survey indicate that the majority of energetic (10-17 keV/e) H(+) and He(2+) ions observed in the dayside magnetosheath are accelerated from the solar wind population. The energetic He(2+) to H(+) density ratio in the magnetosheath is consistent with that predicted from first-order Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions in the turbulent regions upstream and downstream from the earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. The simultaneous occurrence of both energetic He(2+) and magnetospheric O(+) indicates that, on occasion, both Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions and leakage of magnetospheric ions occurs in the dayside magnetosheath.

  19. On the origins of energetic ions in the earth's dayside magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    Energetic ion events in the earth's dayside subsolar magnetosheath (0900 - 1300 Local Time) are surveyed using data from the AMPTE/CCE Hot Plasma Composition Experiment. Ion species carrying the signature of their origin O(+) and energetic He(2+) are used to distinguish between magnetospheric and solar wind origins for the energetic ion events. The results of this survey indicate that the majority of energetic (10-17 keV/e) H(+) and He(2+) ions observed in the dayside magnetosheath are accelerated from the solar wind population. The energetic He(2+) to H(+) density ratio in the magnetosheath is consistent with that predicted from first-order Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions in the turbulent regions upstream and downstream from the earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. The simultaneous occurrence of both energetic He(2+) and magnetospheric O(+) indicates that, on occasion, both Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions and leakage of magnetospheric ions occurs in the dayside magnetosheath.

  20. Single atom devices by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Jessica; Yang, C; Alves, A D C; McCallum, J C; Hougaard, C; Johnson, B C; Hudson, F E; Dzurak, A S; Morello, A; Spemann, D; Jamieson, D N

    2015-04-22

    To expand the capabilities of semiconductor devices for new functions exploiting the quantum states of single donors or other impurity atoms requires a deterministic fabrication method. Ion implantation is a standard tool of the semiconductor industry and we have developed pathways to deterministic ion implantation to address this challenge. Although ion straggling limits the precision with which atoms can be positioned, for single atom devices it is possible to use post-implantation techniques to locate favourably placed atoms in devices for control and readout. However, large-scale devices will require improved precision. We examine here how the method of ion beam induced charge, already demonstrated for the deterministic ion implantation of 14 keV P donor atoms in silicon, can be used to implant a non-Poisson distribution of ions in silicon. Further, we demonstrate the method can be developed to higher precision by the incorporation of new deterministic ion implantation strategies that employ on-chip detectors with internal charge gain. In a silicon device we show a pulse height spectrum for 14 keV P ion impact that shows an internal gain of 3 that has the potential of allowing deterministic implantation of sub-14 keV P ions with reduced straggling.

  1. Raman measurements in silica glasses irradiated with energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, R. Martin, P.; Vila, R.; León, M.; Jiménez-Rey, D.; Girard, S.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.

    2014-10-21

    Ion irradiation with energetic He{sup +} (2.5 MeV), O{sup 4+} (13.5 MeV), Si{sup 4+} (24.4 MeV) and Cu{sup 7+} (32.6 MeV) species at several fluences (from 5 × 10{sup 12} to 1.65 × 10{sup 15} ion/cm{sup 2}) were performed in three types of SiO{sub 2} glasses with different OH content (KU1, KS-4V and Infrasil 301). After ion implantation the Raman spectra were measured and compared with the spectra of unirradiated samples. Irradiated samples of the three fused silica grades exhibit changes in the broad and asymmetric R-band (ω{sub 1} around 445 cm{sup −1}), in D{sub 1} (490 cm−1) and D{sub 2} (605 cm{sup −1}) bands associated to small-membered rings. The D{sub 2} band shows an increase with increasing fluences for different ions, indicating structural changes. Raman spectra of ion-irradiated samples were compared with the spectra of neutron irradiated samples at fluences 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2} and 1018 n/cm{sup 2}. Macroscopic surface cracking was detected, mainly at fluences corresponding to deposited energies between 10{sup 23} eV/cm{sup 3} and 10{sup 24} eV/cm{sup 3} (after ion beam shutdown)

  2. Studies of energetic ion confinement during fishbone events in PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Grek, B.; Heidbrink, W.; Johnson, D.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; McGuire, K.

    1984-11-01

    The 2.5-MeV neutron emission from the beam-target d(d,n,)/sup 3/He fusion reaction has been examined for all PDX deuterium plasmas which were heated by deuterium neutral beams. The magnitude of the emission was found to scale classically and increase with T/sub e//sup 3/2/ as expected when electron drag is the primary energy degradation mechanism. The time evolution of the neutron emission through fishbone events was measured and used to determine the confinement properties of the energetic beam ions. Many of the experimental results are predicted by the Mode Particle Pumping theory.

  3. Energetic neutral atom image of a storm-time ring current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, Edmond C.

    1987-01-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of a storm-time ring current produced from direct measurements and model simulations are presented and analyzed. An ENA image of the storm-time ring current was obtained with the Medium Energy Particles Instrument (MEPI) mounted on ISEE 1 on September 29, 1978, and a zero-order model of the ring current ion was employed to simulate the ENA image. The simulated instrument response is compared with actual ENA measurements. It is observed that the spatial distribution of singly charged ions detected from the ENA images displays equatorial midnight/noon asymmetry in differential ion intensity with a midnight/noon ratio of greater than or equal to 20:1; peak ion fluxs, H(+) and O(+), in the midnight sector are greater than 10 to the 6th/(sq cm s sr keV); and ENA fluxes from the brighter areas of the image exceed greater than 1000/(sq cm s sr keV). It is noted that the ENA image from MEPI data correlates with the morphology of the simulated response of MEPI calculated from the model.

  4. Energetic Ion Events Associated with Travelling Compression Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Chris J.; Slavin, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from the first extended study of energetic ion enhancements associated with the signatures of Traveling Compression Regions (TCR's) in the deep tail, using data from the ISEE 3 satellite, are presented. It is found that 46% of TCR signatures can be associated with an ion enhancement, indicating that the spacecraft entered the plasma sheet boundary layer as a result of a plasmoid passage down the tail. Events with ion enhancements are found to be on average a factor of approximately 2 larger in amplitude than those without, but there is no clear difference in the event duration. Almost all ion associated TCR's tailward of 100 Re show strong tailward streaming, indicating that the plasmoids are completely disconnected from the Earth. Most events Earthward of -80 Re show Earthward streaming, or no clear anisotropy, suggesting that the plasmoids may not be completely disconnected at the distances. A curious aspect of the data set, that a significant number of TCR's are associated with a turning off, or on, of the ion enhancement, is reported.

  5. Effect of Trapped Energetic Ions on MHD Activity in Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. White; Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.V. Lutsenko; V.S. Marchenko

    2002-05-30

    It is shown that the increase of beta (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure) may change the character of the influence of trapped energetic ions on MHD stability in spherical tori. Namely, the energetic ions, which stabilize MHD modes (such as the ideal-kink mode, collisionless tearing mode, and semi-collisional tearing mode) at low beta, have a destabilizing influence at high beta unless the radial distribution of the energetic ions is very peaked.

  6. Energetic ion and cosmic ray characteristics of a magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Beeck, J.; Marsden, R. G.; Tranquille, C.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Mckibben, R. B.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    The large interplanetary shock event of February 11, 1982, has yielded ISEE-3 energetic ion and magnetic field data as well as ground-based neutron-monitor cosmic-ray data. The timing and the onset of the Forbush decrease associated with this shock event coincide with the arrival at the earth of its magnetic cloud component; the duration of the decrease, similarly, corresponds to that of the cloud's passage past the earth. The large scattering mean free path readings suggest that while magnetic cloud ions can easily travel along magnetic field lines, they cannot travel across them, so that they cannot escape the cloud after entering it. Similarly, the cloud field lines prevented cosmic ray entrance, and could have prevented their reaching the earth. The cloud is therefore a major basis for the Forbush decrease.

  7. The circularity and stability of the IBEX energetic neutral atom (ENA) ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, Herbert O

    2010-09-07

    The first sky map of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the outer heliosphere measured from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer revealed the ribbon, a remarkable circular arc of enhanced ENA emission [McComas, et all, 2009] narrow in width [Fuselier, et all, 2009] and centered at ecliptic coordinate ({lambda},{beta}) = (221{sup o},39{sup o}) [Funsten et al., 2009]. The ribbon is a key signature for understanding the interaction of the heliosphere and the interstellar cloud through which we are moving [McComas, et al., 2009; Schwadron et al., 2010]. At each energy passband of the IBEX-Hi neutral atom imager, we compare the circular metrics of the ribbon in the different ENA sky maps, including the ribbon center, opening angle from the ribbon center to the ribbon, and ribbon circularity. The values of these parameters do not systematically change between maps within statistical uncertainty, suggesting that the dynamics that govern the ribbon structure do not vary on a global scale over the time frame of the maps. Assuming the ribbon ENAs of all energies originate from the same source, the time of travel of lower energy ENAs is nearly twice that of higher energy ENAs measured by IBEX. Thus, because the lower energy ions are characteristic of the ribbon structure earlier in time than the higher energy ions, we infer that this stability extends over a longer time period than that used to acquire the maps.

  8. Energetic particle imaging: The evolution of techniques in imaging high-energy neutral atom emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.; Westlake, J. H.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Andrews, G. B.; Nelson, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Energetic neutral atom imaging instruments have been flown on a variety of space missions to satisfy a variety of science requirements. In this paper we discuss the most recent developments that lead to improvements in energy range, angular resolution, and background rejection for the high-energy range, as represented in the past by the Cassini magnetosphere imaging instrument Ion and Neutral Camera, the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission High-Energy Neutral Atom instrument, and to some degree the IMAGE mission Medium-Energy Neutral Atom instrument. The new approaches discussed here rely on the use of ultrathin foils without UV filters and on very high speed coincidence logic to reduce accidentals from intense background sources. We present laboratory results demonstrating an electrostatic design that meets the coincidence timing requirements, position, and scattering performance consistent with angular resolution (full width at half maximum) of 2° for hydrogen above 10 keV and a hydrogen energy threshold ≤1 keV.

  9. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-15

    The deposition of films under normal and off-normal angle of incidence has been investigated to show the relevance of non-sticking of and self-sputtering by energetic ions, leading to the formation of neutral atoms. The flow of energetic ions was obtained using a filtered cathodic arc system in high vacuum and therefore the ion flux had a broad energy distribution of typically 50-100 eV per ion. The range of materials included Cu, Ag, Au, Ti, and Ni. Consistent with molecular dynamics simulations published in the literature, the experiments show, for all materials, that the combined effects of non-sticking and self-sputtering are very significant, especially for large off-normal angles. Modest heating and intentional introduction of oxygen background affect the results.

  10. Energetic neutral atoms measured by the interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): evidence for multiple heliosheath populations

    DOE PAGES

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Bzowski, M.; ...

    2013-12-13

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our resultsmore » show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ~0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ~0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. Here we discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. In conclusion, these results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.« less

  11. Energetic neutral atoms measured by the interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): evidence for multiple heliosheath populations

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Bzowski, M.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Schwadron, N. A.; Sokół, J. M.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2013-12-13

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our results show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ~0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ~0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. Here we discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. In conclusion, these results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.

  12. Potential fluctuations and energetic ion production in hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2007-10-15

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the applied discharge voltage have been reported for many years in hollow cathode discharges. Models of dc potential hills downstream of the cathode and instabilities in postulated double layers in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain this, but have not been substantiated. Measurements of the dc and rf plasma density and potential profiles near the exit of hollow cathodes by miniature fast-scanning probes suggests that turbulent ion acoustic fluctuations and ionization instabilities in the cathode plume significantly increase the energy of the ions that flow from this region. Increases in the discharge current and/or decreases in the cathode gas flow enhance the amplitude of the fluctuations and increase the number and energy of the energetic ions, which increases the erosion rate of the cathode electrodes. The transition from the quiescent 'spot mode' to the noisy 'plume mode' characteristic of these discharges is found to be a gradual transition of increasing fluctuation amplitudes.

  13. Potential Fluctuations and Energetic Ion Production in Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2007-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the applied discharge voltage have been reported for many years in hollow cathode discharges. Models of dc potential hills downstream of the cathode and instabilities in postulated double layers in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain this, but have not been substantiated. Measurements of the dc and rf plasma density and potential profiles near the exit of hollow cathodes by miniature fast-scanning probes suggests that turbulent ion acoustic fluctuations and ionization instabilities in the cathode plume significantly increase the energy of the ions that flow from this region. Increases in the discharge current and/or decreases in the cathode gas flow enhance the amplitude of the fluctuations and increase the number and energy of the energetic ions, which increases the erosion rate of the cathode electrodes. The transition from the quiescent 'spot mode' to the noisy 'plume mode' characteristic of these discharges is found to be a gradual transition of increasing fluctuation amplitudes.

  14. Potential Fluctuations and Energetic Ion Production in Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2007-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the applied discharge voltage have been reported for many years in hollow cathode discharges. Models of dc potential hills downstream of the cathode and instabilities in postulated double layers in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain this, but have not been substantiated. Measurements of the dc and rf plasma density and potential profiles near the exit of hollow cathodes by miniature fast-scanning probes suggests that turbulent ion acoustic fluctuations and ionization instabilities in the cathode plume significantly increase the energy of the ions that flow from this region. Increases in the discharge current and/or decreases in the cathode gas flow enhance the amplitude of the fluctuations and increase the number and energy of the energetic ions, which increases the erosion rate of the cathode electrodes. The transition from the quiescent 'spot mode' to the noisy 'plume mode' characteristic of these discharges is found to be a gradual transition of increasing fluctuation amplitudes.

  15. Energetics of Multiple-Ion Species Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P; Berger, R; Callahan, D; Divol, L; Froula, D; London, R; MacGowan, B J; Meezan, N; Michel, P; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-11-05

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes in multiple-ion species plasmas has been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with densities of xe22/cc are heated to Te=3keV and backscattered laser light is measured by a suite of absolutely calibrated backscatter diagnostics. Ion Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to the CO2/CF4 gas fill. We find that the backscatter from stimulated Brillouin scattering is reduced is monotonically reduced with increasing damping, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in ICF relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. The reduction in backscatter is accompanied by a comparable increase in both transmission of a probe beam and an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics/performance. Comparison of the experimental data to linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale 3D laser-plasma interaction simulations show quantitative agreement. Our findings confirm the importance of Landau damping in controlling backscatter from high-electron temperature hohlraum plasmas and have lead to the inclusion of multi-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  16. Fragmentation of protonated oligonucleotides by energetic photons and Cq+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Magaña, O.; Tiemens, M.; Reitsma, G.; Boschman, L.; Door, M.; Bari, S.; Lahaie, P. O.; Wagner, J. R.; Huels, M. A.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2013-03-01

    The ionization and fragmentation of trapped protonated dGCAT oligonucleotides upon interaction with energetic photons (hν= 10-570 eV) and keV Cq+ ions was investigated by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The observed fragmentation patterns are dominated by protonated and nonprotonated nucleobase ions and fragments of the deoxyribose moiety. Fragments exceeding the size of nucleosides are almost completely absent. Absorption of VUV photons as well as interaction with keV ions predominantly involves ionization or excitation of molecular valence electrons and accordingly the observed fragmentation patterns exhibit qualitatively similar features. Soft-x-ray-induced ionization of core level electrons accompanied by subsequent emission of an Auger electron shifts the fragment distributions towards smaller masses. This systematic study allows for insights into differences and similarities between ion- and photon-induced excitation and fragmentation mechanisms. In particular, the crucial role of the deoxyribose moiety for radiation-induced DNA damage that was predicted on the basis of gas-phase experiments using isolated deoxyribose molecules is confirmed.

  17. Formation of H2+ and H3+ in energetic highly-charged-ion collisions with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Pragya; Sairam, T.; Kumar, Ajit; Kumar, Herendra; Safvan, C. P.

    2017-08-01

    The dissociation of NH3 is studied using energetic H + and Arq + (q =1 ,8 ) ions. The multi-ion coincidence technique along with the time- and position-sensitive measurements of the recoil ions allows us to distinguish different dissociation channels involving the rearrangement of hydrogen atoms. It is observed that the bond dissociation of NH3x + (x =3 -5 ) occurs in a concerted manner and nonplanar dissociation exists. Our results indicate a competition between the bond-rearrangement and Coulomb repulsion processes in NH3x + . Ab initio intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations are performed to understand the bond-rearrangement process in NH32 + .

  18. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  19. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

    2013-07-01

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  20. Quantification of Lithium-ion Cell Thermal Runaway Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Orendorff, Christopher J.; Lamb, Joshua; Steele, Leigh Anna Marie; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Langendorf, Jill Louise

    2016-01-01

    Much of what is known about lithium-ion cell thermal runaway energetics has been measured and extrapolated from data acquired on relatively small cells (< 3 Ah). This work is aimed at understanding the effects of cell size on thermal runaway energetics on cells from 3 to 50 Ah of both LiFePO4 (LFP) and LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) chemistries. Results show that for both LFP and NCA cells, the normalized heating rate (W/Ah) increases roughly linearly for cells from 3-38 Ah while the normalized total heat released (kJ/Ah) is relatively constant over that cell size range. The magnitude of the normalized heating rate is on the order of 2x greater for NCA relative to LFP chemistries for 2-3 Ah cells, while that difference is on the order of 10x for 30-40 Ah cells. The total normalized heat release is ~ 15-20% greater for NCA relative to LFP cells across the entire size range studied 3-38 Ah.

  1. Model studies of the ionosphere of Venus: Ion composition, energetics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jhoon

    A number of existing models are expanded and new ones developed in order to improve our understanding of the ionosphere of Venus. The hot oxygen and hydrogen models of Nagy et al. (1981), and Cravens et al. (1980) are used to study the hot atom corona around Venus and Mars, and to investigate the O(+) ion heating by hot oxygen, in conjunction with a multispecies energy model. A photochemical model is used to calculate the electron densities for both solar cycle maximum and minimum daytime conditions; the results of this model are compared with the radio occultation measurements. A multispecies temperature model is developed and used to study the energetics of different ion species. The temperature differences between the ions is found to be small. The O(+) ion heating mechanism from charge exchange between the O(+) ions and hot oxygens is also studied with the multi-temperture model. A comprehensive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, which solves the coupled continuity, momentum, energy, and Maxwell's equations, is presented and used to study the interaction between the MHD and energetics components of the model. The typical high altitude ion velocities, directed toward the nightside, are supersonic, according to the PV measurements. The results from a two-dimensional ionospheric model are presented which solve the coupled continuity, momentum, and energy equations, using a second-order form of the shock-capturing Godunov scheme, with heat conduction. These results elucidate the importance of these high speed flows and address in a quantitative way, the issue of shock formation in the nightside ionosphere of Venus.

  2. On the acceleration of energetic ions in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1984-06-01

    Several aspects of the problem of high-energy ions in the Jovian magnetosphere are addressed. Voyager observations pertaining to the problem of high-energy ions in the magnetosphere are summarized, and the charge exchange emission of fast neutral sulfur and oxygen atoms and their subsequent recapture by electron impact, charge exchange, and photoionization is considered. Solutions are given to the diffusion equation assuming a source of ions injected with a gyroenergy corresponding to pickup in the middle and outer magnetosphere. It is concluded that no reasonable model parameters exist to produce the required steep spectra of the particle observations with only pickup and adiabatic radial diffusion included. A local acceleration mechanism based on nonadiabatic wave-particle interactions is needed. The assumptions and model predictions of stochastic acceleration by MHD turbulence for the Jovian magnetosphere are described. The model makes a specific correspondence between MHD wave spectrum properties and particle spectrum properties at energies above the Alfven energy.

  3. Effects of energetic heavy ions on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave generation in the plasmapause region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Fontheim, E. G.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rates is derived. The derivation of the dispersion relation and convective growth rates in the presence of a multicomponent energetic and cold plasma is presented. The effects that multiple heavy ions in the ring current and cold plasma produce in the growth and propagation characteristics of ion cyclotron waves are explored. Results of growth rate calculations using parameters consistent with conditions in the plasmapause region during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms are presented and compared with ground-based and satellite observations of waves in this region. The geophysical implications of the results are discussed.

  4. Effects of energetic heavy ions on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave generation in the plasmapause region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Fontheim, E. G.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rates is derived. The derivation of the dispersion relation and convective growth rates in the presence of a multicomponent energetic and cold plasma is presented. The effects that multiple heavy ions in the ring current and cold plasma produce in the growth and propagation characteristics of ion cyclotron waves are explored. Results of growth rate calculations using parameters consistent with conditions in the plasmapause region during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms are presented and compared with ground-based and satellite observations of waves in this region. The geophysical implications of the results are discussed.

  5. Targeted and non-targeted effects from combinations of low doses of energetic protons and iron ions in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongying; Magpayo, Nicole; Held, Kathryn D

    2011-03-01

    In space, astronauts are exposed to mixed radiation fields consisting of energetic protons and high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles at low dose rates. Therefore, it is critical to understand effects of combinations of low doses of different radiation types at the cellular level. AG01522 normal human skin fibroblasts and a transwell insert co-culture system were used. Irradiations used were 1 GeV/amu (gigaelectron volt/atomic mass unit) protons and 1 GeV/amu iron (Fe) ions. DNA damage was measured as micronucleus (MN) formation and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) foci induction. The same magnitude of DNA damage was induced in cells sequentially exposed to 1 cGy protons and 1 cGy Fe ions as in cells irradiated with either protons or Fe ions alone. The same magnitude of DNA damage was also observed in non-irradiated bystander cells sharing medium with cells irradiated with either 1 cGy protons or iron ions or protons plus iron ions. However, when the 'bystander' cells were exposed to 1 cGy protons up to 3 h before co-culture with Fe ion-irradiated cells, no DNA damage in the 'bystander' cells was observed. These data provide the first evidence of interactions between targeted and non-targeted DNA damage caused by dual exposure to low doses of energetic protons and iron ions.

  6. MICROSTRUCTURE OF THE HELIOSPHERIC TERMINATION SHOCK: IMPLICATIONS FOR ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burrows, R.; McComas, D.

    2010-01-10

    The Voyager 2 plasma observations of the proton distribution function downstream of the quasi-perpendicular heliospheric termination shock (TS) showed that upstream thermal solar wind ions played little role in the shock dissipation mechanism, being essentially transmitted directly through the shock. Instead, the hot supra-thermal pickup ion (PUI) component is most likely responsible for the dissipation at the TS. Consequently, the downstream proton distribution function will be a complicated superposition of relatively cool thermal solar wind protons and hot PUIs that have experienced either direct transmission or reflection at the TS cross-shock potential. We develop a simple model for the TS microstructure that allows us to construct approximate proton distribution functions for the inner heliosheath. The distribution function models are compared to kappa-distributions, showing the correspondence between the two. Since the interpretation of energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes measured at 1 AU by IBEX will depend sensitively on the form of the underlying proton distribution function, we use a three-dimensional MHD-kinetic global model to model ENA spectra at 1 AU and ENA skymaps across the IBEX energy range. We consider both solar minimum and solar maximum-like global models, showing how ENA skymap structure can be related to global heliospheric structure. We suggest that the ENA spectra may allow us to probe the directly the microphysics of the TS, while the ENA skymaps reveal heliospheric structure and, at certain energies, are distinctly different during solar minimum and maximum.

  7. Radioactive Ions and Atoms in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.; ńystö, J.; Takahashi, N.; Huang, W. X.

    2006-04-01

    We are investigating the use of superfluid helium as a medium to handle and manipulate radioactive ions and atoms. Preliminary results on the extraction of positive ions from superfluid helium at temperatures close to 1 K are described. Increasing the electric field up to 1.2 kV/cm did not improve the extraction. Evaporating a thin surface layer of the liquid using second-sound pulses gave an extraction efficiency of 7.2 %.

  8. Energetic Metastable Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the energy distributions of the metastable oxygen atoms in the terrestrial thermosphere. Nascent O(lD) atoms play a fundamental role in the energy balance and chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere, because they are produced by photo-chemical reactions in the excited electronic states and carry significant translational energies.

  9. Energetic Ion Effects on Tearing Mode Stability in Tokamak Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmoon, Michael; Brennan, Dylan

    2014-10-01

    The 2/1 tearing mode is found to be damped or stabilized by energetic ions in a slowing down distribution, where the interaction between the ions and the mode is similar to their interaction in ideal MHD, which has been extensively studied. This damping effect is mainly due to trapped particle precession resonance and causes the tearing mode to have a finite real frequency. This study focuses on the pressure-driven, slow growing tearing modes; which are the first modes to be driven unstable as pressure increases. The layer physics modifies the mode interaction, and affects the frequency of the mode. In these simulations, a series of equilibria with fixed safety factor and varying pressure are analyzed using a δf hybrid-kinetic MHD code in NIMROD. Our equilibrium consists of a D-shaped poloidal cross section, a peaked pressure profile, and safety factor with finite shear to the magnetic axis. Also, a high aspect ratio toroidal model based on Hu & Betti's work is investigated analytically to gain insight to the physics of mode-particle interactions. We combine our computational and analytic tools in an effort to explain this damping and stabilizing effect.

  10. Destabilization of Internal Kink Modes at High Frequency by Energetic Circulating Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaojie

    2001-06-04

    A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the high-frequency fishbone instability observed in tangential neutral-beam-injection discharges in a tokamak. It is shown that, when the beam ion beta exceeds a critical value, energetic circulating ions can indeed destabilize the internal kink mode through circulation resonance at a high frequency comparable to the circulation frequency of the energetic ions. The critical beta value of the energetic ions, the real frequency, and the growth rate of the mode are in general agreement with the high-frequency fishbone instability observed in experiments.

  11. Energetic O+ and H+ Ions in the Plasma Sheet: Implications for the Transport of Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Nose, M.; Christon, S. P.; Lui, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The present study statistically examines the characteristics of energetic ions in the plasma sheet using the Geotail/Energetic Particle and Ion Composition data. An emphasis is placed on the O+ ions, and the characteristics of the H+ ions are used as references. The following is a summary of the results. (1) The average O+ energy is lower during solar maximum and higher during solar minimum. A similar tendency is also found for the average H+ energy, but only for geomagnetically active times; (2) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities are several times higher during solar maximum than during solar minimum; (3) The average H+ and O+ energies and the O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities all increase with geomagnetic activity. The differences among different solar phases not only persist but also increase with increasing geomagnetic activity; (4) Whereas the average H+ energy increases toward Earth, the average O+ energy decreases toward Earth. The average energy increases toward dusk for both the H+ and O+ ions; (5) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities increase toward Earth during all solar phases, but most clearly during solar maximum. These results suggest that the solar illumination enhances the ionospheric outflow more effectively with increasing geomagnetic activity and that a significant portion of the O+ ions is transported directly from the ionosphere to the near ]Earth region rather than through the distant tail.

  12. Energetic O+ and H+ Ions in the Plasma Sheet: Implications for the Transport of Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Nose, M.; Christon, S. P.; Lui, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The present study statistically examines the characteristics of energetic ions in the plasma sheet using the Geotail/Energetic Particle and Ion Composition data. An emphasis is placed on the O+ ions, and the characteristics of the H+ ions are used as references. The following is a summary of the results. (1) The average O+ energy is lower during solar maximum and higher during solar minimum. A similar tendency is also found for the average H+ energy, but only for geomagnetically active times; (2) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities are several times higher during solar maximum than during solar minimum; (3) The average H+ and O+ energies and the O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities all increase with geomagnetic activity. The differences among different solar phases not only persist but also increase with increasing geomagnetic activity; (4) Whereas the average H+ energy increases toward Earth, the average O+ energy decreases toward Earth. The average energy increases toward dusk for both the H+ and O+ ions; (5) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities increase toward Earth during all solar phases, but most clearly during solar maximum. These results suggest that the solar illumination enhances the ionospheric outflow more effectively with increasing geomagnetic activity and that a significant portion of the O+ ions is transported directly from the ionosphere to the near ]Earth region rather than through the distant tail.

  13. Entangled states of trapped atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Rainer; Wineland, David

    2008-06-19

    To process information using quantum-mechanical principles, the states of individual particles need to be entangled and manipulated. One way to do this is to use trapped, laser-cooled atomic ions. Attaining a general-purpose quantum computer is, however, a distant goal, but recent experiments show that just a few entangled trapped ions can be used to improve the precision of measurements. If the entanglement in such systems can be scaled up to larger numbers of ions, simulations that are intractable on a classical computer might become possible.

  14. Synergism between low-energy neutral particles and energetic ions in the pulsed glow discharge deposition of diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I. V.; Nastasi, M.

    2004-08-01

    Diamond-like carbon films were deposited using pulsed glow discharge deposition at 4kV. The duty factor was varied and all other parameters were kept constant. It was shown that the contribution of neutral particles to the total number of deposition atoms is much larger than that of energetic ions. At the same time, there is a relationship between the deposition of neutral particles and ion bombardment. The sticking coefficient of the neutral particles in proportional to the flux of energetic ions and does not exceed 5×10-4 for the deposition parameters used in our experiment.

  15. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Kronberg, E. A.; Nykyri, K.; Trattner, K. J.; Daly, P. W.; Chen, G. X.; Du, A. M.; Ge, Y. S.

    2017-05-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 274 keV) from Cluster/Research with Adaptive Particle Imaging Detectors were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. The enhancement of ion intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. The results imply that substorm-related acceleration processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth magnetosphere. Energetic ions delivered through reconnection at the magnetopause significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  16. CAN IBEX IDENTIFY VARIATIONS IN THE GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT OF THE SUN USING ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Priscilla C.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Zank, Gary Paul E-mail: nikolaip@ucr.ed

    2010-08-20

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft is providing the first all-sky maps of the energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced by charge exchange between interstellar neutral H{sup o} atoms and heliospheric solar wind and pickup ions in the heliosphere boundary regions. The 'edge' of the interstellar cloud presently surrounding the heliosphere extends less than 0.1 pc in the upwind direction, terminating at an unknown distance, indicating that the outer boundary conditions of the heliosphere could change during the lifetime of the IBEX satellite. Using reasonable values for future outer heliosphere boundary conditions, ENA fluxes are predicted for one possible source of ENAs coming from outside of the heliopause. The ENA-production simulations use three-dimensional MHD plasma models of the heliosphere that include a kinetic description of neutrals and a Lorentzian distribution for ions. Based on this ENA-production model, it is then shown that the sensitivities of the IBEX 1.1 keV skymaps are sufficient to detect the variations in ENA fluxes that are expected to accompany the solar transition into the next upwind cloud. Approximately 20% of the IBEX 1.1 keV pixels appear capable of detecting the predicted model differences at the 3{sigma} level, with these pixels concentrated in the Ribbon region. Regardless of the detailed ENA production model, the success of the modeled B {center_dot} R {approx} 0 directions in reproducing the Ribbon locus, together with our results, indicates that the Ribbon phenomenon traces the variations in the heliosphere distortion caused by the relative pressures of the interstellar magnetic and gaseous components.

  17. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, Ronald A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  18. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  19. Average energetic ion flux variations associated with geomagnetic activity from EPIC/STICS on Geotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Gloeckler, G.; Eastman, T. E.; McEntire, R. W.; Roelef, E. C.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kokubun, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Mukai, T.; Saito, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetotail ion flux measurements from the Geotail spacecraft are analyzed both with and without the application of selection criteria that identify the plasma regime in which an observation is obtained. The different results are compared with each other. The initial results on the changes of energetic ion flux and composition correlated to average substorm activity in different magnetotail plasma regimes are discussed. The energetic ions are measured using the energetic particles and ion composition (EPIC) experiment and the suprathermal ion composition spectrometer (STICS). The plasma, wave and field instruments of the Geotail satellite were used to identify the principle magnetotail plasma regimes of plasma sheet, lobe, and magnetospheric boundary layer, as well as the magnetosheath and solar wind. Energetic O and H ions were observed in all the plasma regimes.

  20. Apparatus and method for extracting power from energetic ions produced in nuclear fusion

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

    1994-12-20

    An apparatus and method of extracting power from energetic ions produced by nuclear fusion in a toroidal plasma to enhance respectively the toroidal plasma current and fusion reactivity. By injecting waves of predetermined frequency and phase traveling substantially in a selected poloidal direction within the plasma, the energetic ions become diffused in energy and space such that the energetic ions lose energy and amplify the waves. The amplified waves are further adapted to travel substantially in a selected toroidal direction to increase preferentially the energy of electrons traveling in one toroidal direction which, in turn, enhances or generates a toroidal plasma current. In an further adaptation, the amplified waves can be made to preferentially increase the energy of fuel ions within the plasma to enhance the fusion reactivity of the fuel ions. The described direct, or in situ, conversion of the energetic ion energy provides an efficient and economical means of delivering power to a fusion reactor. 4 figures.

  1. Apparatus and method for extracting power from energetic ions produced in nuclear fusion

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Rax, Jean M.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method of extracting power from energetic ions produced by nuclear fusion in a toroidal plasma to enhance respectively the toroidal plasma current and fusion reactivity. By injecting waves of predetermined frequency and phase traveling substantially in a selected poloidal direction within the plasma, the energetic ions become diffused in energy and space such that the energetic ions lose energy and amplify the waves. The amplified waves are further adapted to travel substantially in a selected toroidal direction to increase preferentially the energy of electrons traveling in one toroidal direction which, in turn, enhances or generates a toroidal plasma current. In an further adaptation, the amplified waves can be made to preferentially increase the energy of fuel ions within the plasma to enhance the fusion reactivity of the fuel ions. The described direct, or in situ, conversion of the energetic ion energy provides an efficient and economical means of delivering power to a fusion reactor.

  2. Alfven waves and associated energetic ions downstream from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Belcher, J.W.; Richardson, J.D. ); Smith, C.W. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors report the observation of low-frequency waves in the solar wind downstream from Uranus. These waves are observed by the Voyager spacecraft for more than 2 weeks after the encounter with Uranus and are present during this period whenever the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented such that the field lines intersect the Uranian bow shock. The magnetic field and velocity components transverse to the background field are strongly correlated, consistent with the interpretation that these waves are Alfvenic and/or fast-mode waves. The waves have a spacecraft frame frequency of about 10{sup {minus}3} Hz, and when first observed near the bow shock have an amplitude comparable to the background field. As the spacecraft moves farther from Uranus, the amplitude decays. The waves appear to propagate along the magnetic field lines outward from Uranus and are right-hand polarized. Theory suggests that these waves are generated in the upstream region by a resonant instability with a proton beam streaming along the magnetic field lines. The solar wind subsequently carries these waves downstream to the spacecraft location. These waves are associated with the presence of energetic (> 28 keV) ions observed by the low-energy charged particle instrument. These ions appear two days after the start of the wave activity and occur thereafter whenever the Alfven waves occur, increasing in intensity away from Uranus. The ions are argued to originate in the Uranian magnetosphere, but pitch-angle scattering in the upstream region is required to bring them downstream to the spacecraft location.

  3. Quantum-classical electron distributions in atoms and atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    A quantum-classical approach is used to obtain the velocity distributions in atoms and positive and negative ions in both ground and excited states. In the analysis, Hartree-Fock electronic wavefunctions are used to determine the radial electron distributions, and the central-field approximation is used to study the the dynamic properties of the localized electrons. The distributions for the outer and inner shells are found to agree well with exact results obtained by numerical calculations.

  4. Quantum-classical electron distributions in atoms and atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    A quantum-classical approach is used to obtain the velocity distributions in atoms and positive and negative ions in both ground and excited states. In the analysis, Hartree-Fock electronic wavefunctions are used to determine the radial electron distributions, and the central-field approximation is used to study the the dynamic properties of the localized electrons. The distributions for the outer and inner shells are found to agree well with exact results obtained by numerical calculations.

  5. Energetic Metastable Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the impact of hot metastable oxygen atoms on the product yields and rate coefficients of atmospheric reactions involving O( (sup 1)D). The contribution of the metastable oxygen atoms to the thermal balance of the terrestrial atmosphere between 50 and 200 km has been determined. We found that the presence of hot O((sup l)D) atoms in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere significantly increases the production rate of the rotationally-vibrationally excited NO molecules. The computed yield of the NO molecules in N2O+ O((sup 1)D) atmospheric collisions, involving non-Maxwellian distributions of the metastable oxygen atoms, is more than two times larger than the NO-yield at a thermal equilibrium. The calculated non-equilibrium rate and yield functions are important for ozone and nitrous oxide modeling in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  6. Energetics of a Li Atom adsorbed on B/N doped graphene with monovacancy

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Babita; Jindal, V.K.; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-08-15

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to study the adsorption properties and diffusion of Li atom across B/N-pyridinic graphene. Regardless of the dopant type, B atoms of B-pyridinic graphene lose electron density. On the other hand, N atoms (p-type dopants) have tendency to gain electron density in N-pyridinic graphene. Higher chemical reactivity and electronic conductivity of B/N-pyridinic graphene are responsible for stronger binding of Li with the substrates as compared to pristine graphene. The binding energy of Li with B/N-pyridinic graphene exceeds the cohesive energy of bulk Li, making it energetically unfavourable for Li to form clusters on these substrates. Li atom gets better adsorbed on N-pyridinic graphene due to an additional p-p hybridization of the orbitals while Li on B-pyridinic prefers the ionic bonding. Also, significant distortion of N-pyridinic graphene upon Li adsorption is a consequence of the change in bonding mechanism between Li atom and the substrate. Our results show that bonding character and hence binding energies between Li and graphene can be tuned with the help of B/N doping of monovacancy defects. Further, the sites for most stable adsorption are different for the two types of doped and defective graphene, leading to greater Li uptake capacity of B-pyridinic graphene near the defect. In addition, B-pyridinic graphene offering lower diffusion barrier, ensures better Li kinetics. Thus, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for LIBs as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. - Graphical abstract: Adsorption and diffusion of Li atom across the B/N doped monovacancy graphene is studied using ab-initio DFT calculations. Our results show that bonding mechanism and binding of Li with graphene can be tuned with the help of N/B doping of defects. Also, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for lithium ion batteries as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Density

  7. Simulation study of Alfven eigenmode induced energetic-ion transport in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya; Todo, Yasushi; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Spong, Donald A.; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-10-01

    For the achievement of magnetic confinement fusion, the interaction between Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) and energetic ions is an important issue to be resolved. In the Large Helical Device(LHD), the AE bursts and the energetic-ion transport and losses have been observed during the neutral beam injection. However, it has not been clarified yet how the 3-dimensional magnetic field affects the AE induced energetic-ion transport. It is worth investigating this problem since the particle dynamics in the 3-dimensional configuration such as the helical trapping might enhance the transport. In this study, we perform the reduced simulation, where the AE spatial profile calculated with AE3D code is assumed to be constant in time and the evolution of the amplitude and the frequency is computed in a way consistent with the interaction between the energetic ions and AE. The energetic-ion dynamics is followed in the electromagnetic field that is the sum of the equilibrium field by HINT code and the AE perturbation. It is found that the AE amplitude continues to increase gradually after the exponential growth for the isotropic energetic-ion velocity distribution, whereas the saturation takes place for the beam-type distribution. We will report on the detailed analysis of the energetic-ion dynamics.

  8. Uniformity model for energetic ion processes using a Kaufman ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Warner, J.A.; LeBarron, N.

    1998-12-01

    Processes that use energetic ions for large substrates require that the time-averaged erosion effects from the ion flux be uniform across the surface. A numerical model has been developed to determine this flux and its effects on surface etching of a silica/photoresist combination. The geometry of the source and substrate is very similar to a typical deposition geometry with single or planetary substrate rotation. The model was used to tune an inert ion-etching process that used single or multiple Kaufman sources to less than 3% uniformity over a 30-cm aperture after etching 8 {micro}m of material. The same model can be used to predict uniformity for ion-assisted deposition (IAD).

  9. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Lunar Poles and Night-Side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, Audrey; Wurz, Peter; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Bhardwaj, Anil; Dhanya, Mb; Asamura, Kazushi

    2016-04-01

    So far all reported scientific results derived from measurements of the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer (CENA) on board the Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 focused on the sun-lit part of the Moon. Here, for the first time, we present the analysis of the Moon - solar wind interaction in Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) from measurements over the poles and the night-side of the Moon. The Moon, not being protected by a global magnetic field or an atmosphere, is constantly bombarded by solar wind ions. Until recently, it was tacitly assumed that the solar wind ions that impinge onto the lunar surface are almost completely absorbed ( < 1% reflection) by the lunar surface (e.g. Crider and Vondrak [Adv. Space Res., 2002]; Feldman et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2000]). However, recent observations conducted by the two ENA sensors of NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer and by Chandrayaan-1/CENA showed an average global energetic neutral atom (ENA) albedo of 10% - 20% (e.g. McComas et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2009], Wieser et al. [Planet. Space Sci., 2009], Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2013]). In the past 6 years, several studies have closely investigated this solar wind - lunar surface interaction from various viewpoints. The main findings of these studies include (1) the dependency of the hydrogen reflection ratio on the local crustal magnetic fields (e.g., Wieser et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. ,2010] and Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]), (2) the determination of the energy spectra of backscattered neutralized solar wind protons (Futaana et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]) (3) the use of the spectra shape to remotely define an electric potential above a lunar magnetic anomaly (Futaana et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2012]), (4) the favouring of backscattering over forward-scattering of impinging solar wind hydrogen particles (Vorburger et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2011]), (5) the first-ever measurements of sputtered lunar oxygen (Vorburger et al. [J

  10. Middle- and low-latitude emissions from energetic neutral atom precipitation seen from ATLAS 1 under quiet magnetic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.; Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Ishimoto, M.; Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    During the ATLAS 1 mission spectral observations were made at middle and low latitudes of features expected from the precipitation of energetic neutral atoms. The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory was used at night in the UV and visible with maximum gain. The tangent ray heights of the look directions ranged from near 100 km to near 200 km, and the geomagnetic conditions were quiet during the observations, which were made March 28 to April 3, 1992. The N2(+) 1N 391.4-nm and O I 130.4 and 135.6-nm emissions were observed at all latitudes, with lower emission rates at lower magnetic dip latitudes, except that enhancements in the O I lines were seen within 30 deg of the dip equator to radiative recombination of ionospheric plasma. The latitude profile observed for the N2(+) 1N emission did not show an equatorial or midlatitude peak. This implies that the source of energetic neutrals is more consistent with prompt charge exchange loss of freshly injected trapped ions with relatively low mirror heights (i.e., ions on higher L shells with equatorial pitch angle distributions nearly isotropic to the loss cone) than loss of highly eroded populations of particles with high mirror heights (i.e., ions on lower L shells with pancake equatorial pitch angle distributions). The N2(+) 1N emission rates have been compared with models of atmospheric emission due to fluxes of O/O(+) and H/H(+) in the thermosphere, as produced by energetic neutral oxygen or hydrogen atom precipitation. Energy deposition rates are inferred.

  11. Early results on energetic particle dynamics and structure from the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B.; Westlake, J. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Pollock, C. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Blake, J. B.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The cluster of four, formation-flying spacecraft, comprising the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, launched on 13 March 2015 into near equatorial 1.2 x 12 RE orbits, provides an important new asset for assessing the transport of energy and matter from the distant regions of Earth's magnetosphere into the inner regions. Here we report on early results from the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) instrument on each of the MMS Spacecraft. EIS provides nearly all-sky energetic ion energy, angle and elemental compositional distributions for < 20 keV for protons and 45 keV for oxygen ions, up to > 1 MeV. It also measures energetic electrons from 25 keV to > 0.5 MeV in support and coordination with the electron-focused Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS). During the early phase of the MMS mission, while the full complement of instruments was being commissioned prior to the prime mission phase beginning 1 September 2015, EIS observed dynamic energetic particle injections at the root of the magnetotail between the post-midnight regions and dawn in association with numerous dipolarization fronts and related processes. Here we report on coordinated measurements between MMS's EIS instrument and EIS's sister instrument on the Van Allen Probes, RBSPICE, to further address the relationship between dynamic injections and depolarization fronts in the magnetotail and injections observed deep within the magnetosphere's ring current regions. We also report preliminary result on using energetic particle gradients and anistotropies to diagnose magnetopause structures near mission-identified reconnection sites.

  12. SYMMETRY OF THE IBEX RIBBON OF ENHANCED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM (ENA) FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H. O.; Cai, D. M.; Higdon, D. M.; Larsen, B. A. E-mail: dmc@lanl.gov E-mail: balarsen@lanl.gov; and others

    2015-01-20

    The circular ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission remains a critical signature for understanding the interaction between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. We study the symmetry of the ribbon flux and find strong, spectrally dependent reflection symmetry throughout the energy range 0.7-4.3 keV. The distribution of ENA flux around the ribbon is predominantly unimodal at 0.7 and 1.1 keV, distinctly bimodal at 2.7 and 4.3 keV, and a mixture of both at 1.7 keV. The bimodal flux distribution consists of partially opposing bilateral flux lobes, located at highest and lowest heliographic latitude extents of the ribbon. The vector between the ribbon center and heliospheric nose (which defines the so-called BV plane) appears to play an organizing role in the spectral dependence of the symmetry axis locations as well as asymmetric contributions to the ribbon flux. The symmetry planes at 2.7 and 4.3 keV, derived by projecting the symmetry axes to a great circle in the sky, are equivalent to tilting the heliographic equatorial plane to the ribbon center, suggesting a global heliospheric ordering. The presence and energy dependence of symmetric unilateral and bilateral flux distributions suggest strong spectral filtration from processes encountered by an ion along its journey from the source plasma to its eventual detection at IBEX.

  13. IBEX observations of heliospheric energetic neutral atoms: Current understanding and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Lewis, W. S.; Möbius, E.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2011-09-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has provided the first energy-resolved all-sky maps of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the heliosphere's boundary with the local interstellar medium (LISM). The IBEX maps reveal, superposed on a global ENA background, an enigmatic “ribbon” of enhanced ENA emission, a feature unpredicted by theory and numerical simulations and requiring a new paradigm for the heliosphere/LISM interaction. The ribbon appears to be ordered by the interstellar magnetic field; it is up to ˜3 times brighter than the background emission and spectrally distinct from it. The ribbon's origin, whether inside or outside the heliopause or at more exotic locations in the LISM, is unknown. Here, we review the various hypotheses that have been proposed to explain the ribbon as well as what we have learned from the IBEX sky maps about the ENAs' parent ion populations and about the structure, dynamics, and properties of the outer heliosphere and nearby interstellar medium. We conclude with a brief mention of new IBEX results on lunar and magnetospheric ENAs and a preview of a possible future mission that builds on the successes of IBEX as we continue to explore our home in the galaxy.

  14. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) Movies and Other Cool Data from Cassini's Magnetosphere Imaging Instrument (MIMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusterer, M. B.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Vandegriff, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Having been at Saturn for over a decade, the MIMI instrument on Cassini has created a rich dataset containing many details about Saturn's magnetosphere. In particular, the images of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) taken by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) offer a global perspective on Saturn's plasma environment. The MIMI team is now regularly making movies (in MP4 format) consisting of consecutive ENA images. The movies correct for spacecraft attitude changes by projecting the images (whose viewing angles can substantially vary from one image to the next) into a fixed inertial frame that makes it easy to view spatial features evolving in time. These movies are now being delivered to the PDS and are also available at the MIMI team web site. Several other higher order products are now also available, including 20-day energy-time spectrograms for the Charge-Energy-Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) sensor, and daily energy-time spectrograms for the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurements system (LEMMS) sensor. All spectrograms are available as plots or digital data in ASCII format. For all MIMI sensors, a Data User Guide is also available. This paper presents details and examples covering the specifics of MIMI higher order data products. URL: http://cassini-mimi.jhuapl.edu/

  15. Charge Exchange Contribution to the Decay of the Ring Current, Measured by Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Henderson, M. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the contribution of charge exchange to the decay of the ring current. Past works have suggested that charge exchange of ring current protons is primarily responsible for the decay of the ring current during the late recovery phase, but there is still much debate about the fast decay of the early recovery phase. We use energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from Polar to calculate the total ENA energy escape. To get the total ENA escape we apply a forward modeling technique, and to estimate the total ring current energy escape we use the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relationship. We find that during the late recovery phase of the March 10, 1998 storm ENAs with energies greater than 17.5 keV can account for 75% of the estimated energy loss from the ring current. During the fast recovery the measured ENAs can only account for a small portion of the total energy loss. We also find that the lifetime of the trapped ions is significantly shorter during the fast recovery phase than during the late recovery phase, suggesting that different processes are operating during the two phases.

  16. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  17. Charge Exchange Contribution to the Decay of the Ring Current, Measured by Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Henderson, M. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the contribution of charge exchange to the decay of the ring current. Past works have suggested that charge exchange of ring current protons is primarily responsible for the decay of the ring current during the late recovery phase, but there is still much debate about the fast decay of the early recovery phase. We use energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from Polar to calculate the total ENA energy escape. To get the total ENA escape we apply a forward modeling technique, and to estimate the total ring current energy escape we use the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relationship. We find that during the late recovery phase of the March 10, 1998 storm ENAs with energies greater than 17.5 keV can account for 75% of the estimated energy loss from the ring current. During the fast recovery the measured ENAs can only account for a small portion of the total energy loss. We also find that the lifetime of the trapped ions is significantly shorter during the fast recovery phase than during the late recovery phase, suggesting that different processes are operating during the two phases.

  18. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Investigation and the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Clemmons, J. H.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Schlemm, C. E.; Brown, L. E.; Cooper, S. A.; Craft, J. V.; Fennell, J. F.; Gurnee, R. S.; Hammock, C. M.; Hayes, J. R.; Hill, P. A.; Ho, G. C.; Hutcheson, J. C.; Jacques, A. D.; Kerem, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paschalidis, N. P.; Rossano, E.; Stokes, M. R.; Westlake, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Investigation is one of 5 fields-and-particles investigations on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. MMS comprises 4 spacecraft flying in close formation in highly elliptical, near-Earth-equatorial orbits targeting understanding of the fundamental physics of the important physical process called magnetic reconnection using Earth's magnetosphere as a plasma laboratory. EPD comprises two sensor types, the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) with one instrument on each of the 4 spacecraft, and the Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS) with 2 instruments on each of the 4 spacecraft. EIS measures energetic ion energy, angle and elemental compositional distributions from a required low energy limit of 20 keV for protons and 45 keV for oxygen ions, up to >0.5 MeV (with capabilities to measure up to >1 MeV). FEEPS measures instantaneous all sky images of energetic electrons from 25 keV to >0.5 MeV, and also measures total ion energy distributions from 45 keV to >0.5 MeV to be used in conjunction with EIS to measure all sky ion distributions. In this report we describe the EPD investigation and the details of the EIS sensor. Specifically we describe EPD-level science objectives, the science and measurement requirements, and the challenges that the EPD team had in meeting these requirements. Here we also describe the design and operation of the EIS instruments, their calibrated performances, and the EIS in-flight and ground operations. Blake et al. (The Flys Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS) contribution to the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) investigation of the Magnetospheric Magnetoscale (MMS) Mission, this issue) describe the design and operation of the FEEPS instruments, their calibrated performances, and the FEEPS in-flight and ground operations. The MMS spacecraft will launch in early 2015, and over its 2-year mission will provide comprehensive measurements of magnetic reconnection at Earth

  19. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  20. Fully variational average atom model with ion-ion correlations.

    PubMed

    Starrett, C E; Saumon, D

    2012-02-01

    An average atom model for dense ionized fluids that includes ion correlations is presented. The model assumes spherical symmetry and is based on density functional theory, the integral equations for uniform fluids, and a variational principle applied to the grand potential. Starting from density functional theory for a mixture of classical ions and quantum mechanical electrons, an approximate grand potential is developed, with an external field being created by a central nucleus fixed at the origin. Minimization of this grand potential with respect to electron and ion densities is carried out, resulting in equations for effective interaction potentials. A third condition resulting from minimizing the grand potential with respect to the average ion charge determines the noninteracting electron chemical potential. This system is coupled to a system of point ions and electrons with an ion fixed at the origin, and a closed set of equations is obtained. Solution of these equations results in a self-consistent electronic and ionic structure for the plasma as well as the average ionization, which is continuous as a function of temperature and density. Other average atom models are recovered by application of simplifying assumptions.

  1. Quantitative bond energetics in atomic-scale junctions.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Nielsen, Aileen; Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-07-22

    A direct measurement of the potential energy surface that characterizes individual chemical bonds in complex materials has fundamental significance for many disciplines. Here, we demonstrate that the energy profile for metallic single-atom contacts and single-molecule junctions can be mapped by fitting ambient atomic force microscope measurements carried out in the near-equilibrium regime to a physical, but simple, functional form. We extract bond energies for junctions formed through metallic bonds as well as metal-molecule link bonds from atomic force microscope data and find that our results are in excellent quantitative agreement with density functional theory based calculations for exemplary junction structures. Furthermore, measurements from a large number of junctions can be collapsed to a single, universal force-extension curve, thus revealing a surprising degree of similarity in the overall shape of the potential surface that governs these chemical bonds. Compared to previous studies under ambient conditions where analysis was confined to trends in rupture force, our approach significantly expands the quantitative information extracted from these measurements, particularly allowing analysis of the trends in bond energy directly.

  2. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1 and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  3. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  4. Juno/JEDI observations of energetic particles near closest approach to Jupiter - Evidence for heavy ion precipitation in the Jovian auroral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, Dennis; Mauk, Barry; Paranicas, Chris; Clark, George; Kollmann, Peter; Rymer, Abigail; Bolton, Scott; Connerney, Jack; Levin, Steve

    2017-04-01

    The Juno spacecraft's polar orbit provides an exceptional opportunity to study auroral processes in the largest and most dynamic auroral region in the solar system. The Jupiter Energetic particle Detector Instruments (JEDI) have SSD telescopes with multiple look directions and additional time-of-flight capabilities to measure ions and electrons from 6 keV to 20 MeV. These instruments resolve major ion species beginning at 30 keV/n, with coarser mass resolution for lower energy ions. JEDI instruments observed energetic heavy ions up to 20 MeV precipitating into the auroral regions during the first few Juno perijoves that have occurred to date. The observed heavy ion intensity was lower than expected, but composition of the precipitating ions included the predicted species oxygen and sulfur. During the first perijove pass, an unexpected element was observed with an atomic mass between oxygen and sulfur with intensity comparable to the other heavy ions. Preliminary analysis of the JEDI composition data indicates magnesium, with an unexpected energy spectrum beginning around 500 keV and extending up through 20 MeV. During the third perijove pass no significant intensity of energetic magnesium was observed, which suggests that the source of this element is intermittent. We report on the new findings of energetic heavy ions from the first few Juno orbits including the auroral regions, observations through closest approach, and discuss possible source mechanisms for the unexpected and transient observation of heavy ions.

  5. Assessment of energetic neutral He atom intensities expected from the IBEX Ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Swaczyna, P.; Grzedzielski, S.; Bzowski, M.

    2014-02-20

    Full sky maps of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) obtained with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer revealed a bright, arc-like Ribbon. We compare possible, though as yet undetected, He ENA emission in two models of the Ribbon origin. The models were originally developed for hydrogen ENA. In the first one, ENA are produced outside the heliopause from the ionized neutral solar wind in the direction where the local interstellar magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight. The second model proposes production at the contact layer between the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) and the Local Bubble (LB). The models are redesigned to helium using relevant interactions between atoms and ions. Resulting intensities are compared with possible emission of helium ENA from the heliosheath. In the first model, the expected intensity is ∼0.014 (cm{sup 2} s sr keV){sup –1}, i.e., of the order of the He emission from the heliosheath, whereas in the second, the LIC/LB contact layer model, the intensity is ∼(2-7) (cm{sup 2} s sr keV){sup –1}, i.e., a few hundred times larger. If the IBEX Ribbon needs a source population of He ENA leaving the heliosphere, it should not be visible in He ENA fluxes mainly because of the insufficient supply of the parent He ENA originating from the neutralized solar wind α-particles. We conclude that full-sky measurements of He ENA could give promising prospects for probing the Local Interstellar Medium at the distance of a few thousand AU and create the possibility of distinction between the above mentioned models of Ribbon origin.

  6. Assessment of Energetic Neutral He Atom Intensities Expected from the IBEX Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaczyna, P.; Grzedzielski, S.; Bzowski, M.

    2014-02-01

    Full sky maps of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) obtained with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer revealed a bright, arc-like Ribbon. We compare possible, though as yet undetected, He ENA emission in two models of the Ribbon origin. The models were originally developed for hydrogen ENA. In the first one, ENA are produced outside the heliopause from the ionized neutral solar wind in the direction where the local interstellar magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight. The second model proposes production at the contact layer between the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) and the Local Bubble (LB). The models are redesigned to helium using relevant interactions between atoms and ions. Resulting intensities are compared with possible emission of helium ENA from the heliosheath. In the first model, the expected intensity is ~0.014 (cm2 s sr keV)-1, i.e., of the order of the He emission from the heliosheath, whereas in the second, the LIC/LB contact layer model, the intensity is ~(2-7) (cm2 s sr keV)-1, i.e., a few hundred times larger. If the IBEX Ribbon needs a source population of He ENA leaving the heliosphere, it should not be visible in He ENA fluxes mainly because of the insufficient supply of the parent He ENA originating from the neutralized solar wind α-particles. We conclude that full-sky measurements of He ENA could give promising prospects for probing the Local Interstellar Medium at the distance of a few thousand AU and create the possibility of distinction between the above mentioned models of Ribbon origin.

  7. Energetic ions upstream of the earth's bow shock during an energetic storm particle event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of low-energy protons and alpha particles from ISEE 3 far upstream and from ISEE 1 close to the earth's bow shock during the passage of an interplanetary shock wave with its associated energetic storm particles are presented. Intensities, spectra, and anisotropies of the energetic storm particles are modified due to the interaction of these particles with the earth's bow shock. An intensity spike observed at ISEE 1 during the passage of the interplanetary shock is interpreted as being due to postacceleration of energetic storm particles at the bow shock by the first-order Fermi mechanism. The spikes observed at ISEE 1 after the passage of the interplanetary shock are most probably due to reflection of the energetic storm particles at the bow shock.

  8. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period.

  9. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K.

    2014-03-15

    We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

  10. A facility to produce an energetic, ground state atomic oxygen beam for the simulation of the Low-Earth Orbit environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Weaver, David P.; Muntz, E. P.

    1994-01-01

    Because of the continuing commitment to activity in low-Earth orbit (LEO), a facility is under development to produce energetic atmospheric species, particularly atomic oxygen, with energies ranging from 5 to 80 eV. This relatively high flux facility incorporates an ion engine to produce the corresponding specie ion which is charge exchanged to produce a neutral atomic beam. Ion fluxes of around 10(exp 15) sec(exp -1) with energies of 20-70 eV have been achieved. A geometrically augmented inertially tethered charge exchanger (GAITCE) was designed to provide a large column depth of charge exchange gas while reducing the gas load to the low pressure portion of the atomic beam facility. This is accomplished using opposed containment jets which act as collisional barriers to the escape of the dense gas region formed between the jets. Leak rate gains to the pumping system on the order of 10 were achieved for moderate jet mass flows. This system provides an attractive means for the charge exchange of atomic ions with a variety of gases to produce energetic atomic beams.

  11. Collisional Cooling of Light Ions by Cotrapped Heavy Atoms.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-03-17

    We experimentally demonstrate cooling of trapped ions by collisions with cotrapped, higher-mass neutral atoms. It is shown that the lighter ^{39}K^{+} ions, created by ionizing ^{39}K atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), when trapped in an ion trap and subsequently allowed to cool by collisions with ultracold, heavier ^{85}Rb atoms in a MOT, exhibit a longer trap lifetime than without the localized ^{85}Rb MOT atoms. A similar cooling of trapped ^{85}Rb^{+} ions by ultracold ^{133}Cs atoms in a MOT is also demonstrated in a different experimental configuration to validate this mechanism of ion cooling by localized and centered ultracold neutral atoms. Our results suggest that the cooling of ions by localized cold atoms holds for any mass ratio, thereby enabling studies on a wider class of atom-ion systems irrespective of their masses.

  12. Energetic and structural analysis of 102-atom Pd-Pt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Contreras, Rafael; Arteaga-Guerrero, Alvaro; Borbon-Gonzalez, Dora Julia; Posada-Amarillas, Alvaro; Schoen, J. Christian; Johnston, Roy L.

    2009-03-01

    We present an extensive study of the structural and energetic changes of 102-atom PdmPt102-m nanoparticles as a function of composition m, where the interatomic interactions are modeled with the many-body Gupta potential. The minimum energy structures are obtained through a genetic algorithm. The excess energy is calculated, as well as the pair distribution function g(r). The radial distribution of the atoms is computed for each composition; the result indicates a multi-layer segregation for some compositions, with a shell growth sequence as follows: a core with a small number of Pd atoms is followed by an intermediate shell of Pt atoms and the external shell consists of Pd atoms. A region where Pd and Pt atoms are mixed is observed between the outermost and intermediate shells. Furthermore, the pure Pd102 and Pt102 nanoparticles have the same structure, while a variety of different structures are observed for the bimetallic clusters.

  13. Precipitation of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms at Arecibo during a magnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsely, B.A.; Burnside, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The production of ionization at upper E region levels at Arecibo and other low latitude sites during magnetic storms had been previously found to be associated with a few rayleighs of N/sub 2/ /sup +/4278A emission, but it had not been possible to decide between energetic electrons, ions or neutrals as the primary particles involved.

  14. Characteristics of Solar Energetic Ions as a Function of Longitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C. M. S.; Mason, G. M.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2017-07-01

    Since the 2006 launch of STEREO, multi-spacecraft studies have yielded several surprising results regarding the spread of solar energetic particles (SEPs) within the inner heliosphere. We have investigated the role of energy and ridigity, using ACE and STEREO 10 MeV n-1 oxygen data to identify 41 large SEP events observed by two or three spacecraft. We calculated fluence spectra from ˜0.1 to >10 MeV n-1 for H, He, O, and Fe for each event at the observing spacecraft (including SOHO and GOES). The particle fluences at 0.3, 1, and 10 MeV n-1 were examined as a function of the distance between the associated solar flare longitude and the spacecraft magnetic footpoints at the Sun to determine the longitudinal spread of particles and study how the distribution centers and widths depend on energy and charge-to-mass (Q/M) for the first time. On average, the three-spacecraft event distributions were centered at 22 ± 4° west of the flare site and were 43 ± 1° wide, though there was substantial variability, while the fit to the aggregate of the two-spacecraft event fluences yielded significantly wider distributions at 0.3 and 1 MeV n-1. The widths derived from both the three- and two-spacecraft events show an energy dependence with distributions narrowing with increasing energy, consistent with lower energy ions experiencing more field line co-rotation, or being accelerated over a larger portion of the CME-driven shock or for longer times as the shock expands. Surprisingly, no clear evidence was found for a Q/M dependence to the widths or centers suggesting that rigidity-related processes are not the dominant means of spreading particles in longitude.

  15. Solar Cycle dependence of 5-55 keV Cassini/INCA energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the Heliosheath and in situ Voyager/LECP ion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Dialynas, K.; Mitchell, D. G.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    The heliosheath has been identified as the most probable source of ENAs that INCA detects but its variability due to solar activity throughout the solar cycle (SC) has not been resolved to date. We show all-sky, 5-55 keV ENA H maps from the year 2003 to 2014 and compare the solar cycle variation of the ENAs in both the heliospheric nose (upstream) and anti-nose (downstream) directions with the > 30 keV ions measured within the heliosheath by the Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) detector on Voyagers 1, 2 (V1, V2) where we measure protons in overlapping energy bands ~30-55 keV. We find that a) Toward the anti-nose direction the ENA-H intensities decline during SC23, i.e. after 2003 ENA intensities decreased by ~ x2 at all energies by the end of year 2011, ~1 year after the observed minimum in solar activity; b) This ENA decrease (5.2-55 keV) during 2009-2011 is consistent with the concurrent intensity decrease of the > 30 keV ions (by a factor of 2-3) observed in situ by V1 and V2 in the heliosheath; c) Toward the nose direction, minimum intensities in both INCA ENAs and the V2 ions at E > 28 keV occur during the year 2013, with a subsequent recovery from 2014 to date (by a factor of ~2 in the > 35 keV ENA data). These quantitative correlations between the decreases of INCA ENAs (in both the heliospheric nose and anti-nose directions) and the in situ V1 and V2 ion measurements (separated by > 130 AU) during the declining phase of SC23, along with their concurrent jointly shared recoveries at the onset of SC24, imply that: 1) the 5-55 keV ENAs are produced in the heliosheath (because their transit times over 100 AU are less than a few months at energies > 40 keV), thus proving that our ENA observations can provide the ground truth for constructing comprehensive global heliosphere models; 2) the global heliosheath responds promptly (within ~1-1.5 yrs) to outward-propagating solar wind changes throughout the solar cycle.

  16. Low Altitude Emission (LAE) of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) Observed by TWINS and its Relation to the CINEMA CubeSat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazell, D.; Sotirelis, T.; Nair, H.; Roelof, E. C.; Brandt, P. C.

    2009-12-01

    The brightest source of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) at energies >1keV is low altitude emission (LAE) from ~200-400km near auroral latitudes where precipitating energetic ions undergo multiple atomic collisions with the monatomic (O) exosphere. This emission is many times brighter than that from the high-altitude ring current region where the energetic ions interact only weakly with the much less dense monatomic (H) hydrogen geocorona. The recently selected NSF CubeSat mission CINEMA [Lin et al., this special session] has, as part of its science payload (STEIN), an ENA imager covering energies 4-100keV. From a high-inclination ~800km orbit, STEIN will view the LAE four times during every 90 minutes. The NASA TWINS stereo ENA imagers (2-40keV) will also view the LAE from their Molniya orbits (apogee radius~7Re). We have been analyzing the TWINS ENA images of LAE and comparing them with in situ ion measurements (1-40keV) from DMSP spacecraft when their tracks take them under the ion precipitation regions imaged by TWINS. We have developed an ENA emissivity function that relates the directionally-dependent emergent ENA spectrum to that of the precipitating ions. The TWINS/DMSP direct comparisons show good agreement. We offer suggestions on joint observing strategies for CINEMA, TWINS and DMSP after the CINEMA launch in the second half of 2011.

  17. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Kronberg, Elena; Nykyri, Katariina; Daly, Patrick; Chen, Gengxiong; Du, Aimin; Ge, Yasong

    2017-04-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere, and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 100 keV) from Cluster/RAPID were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in northern and southern hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk IMF direction. The enhancement of intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and the consequent formation of a diamagnetic cavity in the same quadrant of the magnetosphere. The results imply that substorm-related processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth plasma sheet. We propose that large-scale cusp diamagnetic cavities can be an additional source and can thus significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  18. Effects of energetic electrons on ion acceleration in a quasi-static model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahache, Abdelkadrer; Bennaceur-Doumaz, Djamila; Djebli, Mourad

    2017-08-01

    Based on the Passoni-Lontano model [M. Lontano and M. Passoni, Phys. Plasmas 13(4), 042102 (2006)], the expansion of an intense laser produced plasma into vacuum is analyzed, assuming that hot and energetic electrons responsible for ion acceleration, in the framework of a TNSA mechanism, are nonthermal and modelled by the Cairns distribution function. Due to the presence of energetic nonthermal electron population, the electric potential, electrical field, ion maximum energy, and ion spectrum energy are enhanced during the ion acceleration process.

  19. Angular distributions of sputtered atoms for low-energy heavy ions, medium ions and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Yasunori; Mizuno, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Hidetoshi

    1986-03-01

    The angular distributions of sputtered atoms for the near-threshold sputtering of heavy ions, medium ions, and light ions have been investigated by a few-collision model and the ACAT computer simulation code. For heavy-ion sputtering the preferential angle of sputtered atoms is about 50° which is measured from the surface normal, while in the case of the near-threshold light-ion sputtering the preferential angles are nearly equal to the surface normal and do not depend on angle of incidence. It is found that the agreement between the ACAT preferential angles and theoretical values due to a few-collision model is very good.

  20. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  1. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  2. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  3. LEEM investigations of clean surfaces driven by energetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Abbamonte, Peter M.

    2013-04-24

    The original purpose of this award was to use low‐energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to explore the dynamics of surfaces of clean single crystal surfaces when driven by a beam of energetic ions. The goal was to understand the nanoscience of hyperthermal growth, surface erosion by sublimation and irradiation, operation of surface sinks in irradiated materials, diffusion on driven surfaces, and the creation of structural patterns. This project was based on a novel LEEM system constructed by C. P. Flynn, which provided real‐time imaging of surface dynamics by scattering low energy electrons. With the passing of Prof. Flynn in late 2011, this project was completed under a slightly different scope by constructing a low‐energy, inelastic electron scattering (EELS) instrument. Consistent with Flynn's original objectives for his LEEM system, this device probes the dynamics of crystal surfaces. However the measurements are not carried out in real time, but instead are done in the frequency domain, through the energy lost from the probe electrons. The purpose of this device is to study the collective bosonic excitations in a variety of materials, including high temperature superconductors, topological insulators, carbon allotropes including (but not limited to) graphene, etc. The ultimate goal here is to identify the bosons that mediate interactions in these and other materials, with hopes of shedding light on the origin of many exotic phenomena including high temperature superconductivity. We completed the construction of a low‐energy EELS system that operates with an electron kinetic energy of 7 - 10 eV. With this instrument now running, we hope to identify, among other things, the bosons that mediate pairing in high temperature superconductors. Using this instrument, we have already made our first discovery. Studying freshly cleaved single crystals of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, which is a topological insulator, we have observed a surface excitation at an energy loss of

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamic and energetic properties of alkali and halide ions using water-model-specific ion parameters.

    PubMed

    Joung, In Suk; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2009-10-08

    The dynamic and energetic properties of the alkali and halide ions were calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations with various different water and ion force fields including our recently developed water-model-specific ion parameters. The properties calculated were activity coefficients, diffusion coefficients, residence times of atomic pairs, association constants, and solubility. Through calculation of these properties, we can assess the validity and range of applicability of the simple pair potential models and better understand their limitations. Due to extreme computational demands, the activity coefficients were only calculated for a subset of the models. The results qualitatively agree with experiment. Calculated diffusion coefficients and residence times between cation-anion, water-cation, and water-anion showed differences depending on the choice of water and ion force field used. The calculated solubilities of the alkali-halide salts were generally lower than the true solubility of the salts. However, for both the TIP4P(EW) and SPC/E water-model-specific ion parameters, solubility was reasonably well-reproduced. Finally, the correlations among the various properties led to the following conclusions: (1) The reliability of the ion force fields is significantly affected by the specific choice of water model. (2) Ion-ion interactions are very important to accurately simulate the properties, especially solubility. (3) The SPC/E and TIP4P(EW) water-model-specific ion force fields are preferred for simulation in high salt environments compared to the other ion force fields.

  5. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  6. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, M.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.; Wesenberg, J. H.

    2006-11-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schrödinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  7. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  8. DFT study of the structures and energetics of 98-atom AuPd clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruma, Alina; Ismail, Ramli; Oliver Paz-Borbón, L.; Arslan, Haydar; Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Li, Z. Y.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2012-12-01

    The energetics, structures and segregation of 98-atom AuPd nanoclusters are investigated using a genetic algorithm global optimization technique with the Gupta empirical potential (comparing three different potential parameterisations) followed by local minimizations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. A shell optimization program algorithm is employed in order to study the energetics of the highly symmetric Leary Tetrahedron (LT) structure and optimization of the chemical ordering of a number of structural motifs is carried out using the Basin Hopping Monte Carlo approach. Although one of the empirical potentials is found to favour the LT structure, it is shown that Marks Decahedral and mixed FCC-HCP motifs are lowest in energy at the DFT level.The energetics, structures and segregation of 98-atom AuPd nanoclusters are investigated using a genetic algorithm global optimization technique with the Gupta empirical potential (comparing three different potential parameterisations) followed by local minimizations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. A shell optimization program algorithm is employed in order to study the energetics of the highly symmetric Leary Tetrahedron (LT) structure and optimization of the chemical ordering of a number of structural motifs is carried out using the Basin Hopping Monte Carlo approach. Although one of the empirical potentials is found to favour the LT structure, it is shown that Marks Decahedral and mixed FCC-HCP motifs are lowest in energy at the DFT level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32517a

  9. Multi-Spacecraft Analysis of Energetic Heavy Ions and Interplanetary Shock Properties in Energetic Storm Particle Events at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R. W.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Li, G.; Mason, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic storm particle (ESP) events are believed to occur as a result of diffusive shock acceleration at coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks. In situ observations of ESPs provide an excellent tool to study the physics of shock acceleration and the mechanisms that energize particles in events where the IP shock is remote (e.g. solar energetic particles - SEPs - that are accelerated in the solar corona). In this study, we use 1 AU observations during solar cycle 24 from ACE, STEREO-A, and STEREO-B during several ESP events observed at two or more spacecraft to examine the relationship between IP shocks and their associated energetic particles. Specifically, we examine the connection between variations in the properties of ~0.1 - 5 MeV/nucleon heavy ions (e.g. peak intensities, energy spectra, abundances) and IP shock parameters (e.g. shock obliquity, compression ratio, Mach number) that are observed at different points along the same CME-driven shock front. These results will be compared with theoretical predictions for heavy ion energy spectra and abundances in ESP events and could provide important additional constraints for particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere.

  10. Reactions of atomic oxygen with the chlorate ion and the perchlorate ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail; Kriger, Ludmila

    2014-06-01

    The reactions of the chlorate ion with atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium chlorate crystal by co-crystallization were studied by optical and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The perchlorate ion was found to form in solids as product of addition reaction of singlet atomic oxygen, formed under dissociation of the peroxynitrite ion - the product of isomerization of the excited nitrate ion. Triplet atomic oxygen does not react with the chlorate ion. The atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium perchlorate crystal by co-crystallization does not react with the perchlorate ion.

  11. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  12. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-15

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  13. Energetic-ion acceleration and transport in the upstream region of Jupiter: Voyager 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Long-lived upstream energetic ion events at Jupiter appear to be very similar in nearly all respects to upstream ion events at Earth. A notable difference between the two planetary systems is the enhanced heavy ion compositional signature reported for the Jovian events. This compositional feature has suggested that ions escaping from the Jovian magnetosphere play an important role in forming upstream ion populations at Jupiter. In contrast, models of energetic upstream ions at Earth emphasize in situ acceleration of reflected solar wind ions within the upstream region itself. Using Voyager 1 and 2 energetic ( approximately 30 keV) ion measurements near the magnetopause, in the magnetosheath, and immediately upstream of the bow shock, the compositional patterns are examined together with typical energy spectra in each of these regions. A model involving upstream Fermi acceleration early in events and emphasizing energetic particle escape in the prenoon part of the Jovian magnetosphere late in events is presented to explain many of the features in the upstream region of Jupiter.

  14. Destabilization of the internal kink by energetic-circulating ions

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R. ); Freidberg, J.P. )

    1993-05-31

    A stability analysis is carried out for the [ital m]=1 internal kink mode, in the presence of energetic circulating particles. It is found that, including the effect of finite radial particle-orbit excursion, the [ital m]=1 internal kink mode is strongly destabilized by the resonance interaction with the energetic passing particles. Such an instability could explain the experimental observations of the fishbone'' oscillations during tangential neutral beam injection [W. W. Heidbrink [ital et] [ital al]., Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 835 (1986)].

  15. Scintillator Based Energetic Ion Loss Diagnostic for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow

    2007-07-02

    A scintillator based energetic ion loss detector has been built and installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to measure the loss of neutral beam ions. The detector is able to resolve the pitch angle and gyroradius of the lost energetic ions. It has a wide acceptance range in pitch angle and energy, and is able to resolve the full, one-half, and one-third energy components of the 80 keV D neutral beams up to the maximum toroidal magnetic field of NSTX. Multiple Faraday cups have been embedded behind the scintillator to allow easy absolute calibration of the diagnostic and to measure the energetic ion loss to several ranges of pitch angle with good time resolution. Several small, vacuum compatible lamps allow simple calibration of the scintillator position within the field of view of the diagnostic's video camera.

  16. Theory for charge states of energetic oxygen ions in the earth's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxes of geomagnetically trapped energetic oxygen ions have been studied in detail. Ion distributions in radial locations below the geostationary orbit, energy spectra between 1 keV and 100 MeV, and the distribution over charge states have been computed for equatorially mirroring ions. Both ionospheric and solar wind oxygen ion sources have been considered, and it is found that the charge state distributions in the interior of the radiation belts are largely independent of the charge state characteristics of the sources. In the MeV range, oxygen ions prove to be a more sensitive probe for radiation belt dynamics than helium ions and protons.

  17. Theory for charge states of energetic oxygen ions in the earth's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxes of geomagnetically trapped energetic oxygen ions have been studied in detail. Ion distributions in radial locations below the geostationary orbit, energy spectra between 1 keV and 100 MeV, and the distribution over charge states have been computed for equatorially mirroring ions. Both ionospheric and solar wind oxygen ion sources have been considered, and it is found that the charge state distributions in the interior of the radiation belts are largely independent of the charge state characteristics of the sources. In the MeV range, oxygen ions prove to be a more sensitive probe for radiation belt dynamics than helium ions and protons.

  18. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    Two many-electron ion-atom collision systems are used to investigate atomic and molecular structure and collisional interactions. Electrons emitted from MeV/u C^{3+} projectile target -atom collisions were measured with a high-resolution position -sensitive electron spectrometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The electrons are predominantly ionized by direct projectile -target interactions or autoionizing (AI) from doubly excited AI levels of the ion which were excited in the collision. The energy dependence of directly scattered target electrons, binary-encounter electrons (BEE), is investigated and compared with theory. AI levels of the projectile 1s to nl single electron excited series, (1s2snl) n = 2,3,4,....infty, including the series limit are identified uniquely using energy level calculations. Original Auger yield calculations using a code by Cowan were used to discover a 1/{n^3} scaling in intensities of Auger peaks in the aforementioned series. This is explained using scattering theory. A nonstatistical population of the terms in the (1s2s2l) configuration was identified and investigated as a function of the beam energy and for four different target atoms. Two electron excited configurations are identified and investigated. The angular distribution of a correlated transfer and excitation AI state is measured and compared to theory. The final scattered charge state distributions of Kr^ {n+}, n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, projectiles are measured following collisions with Kr targets in the Van de Graaff Laboratory here at The University of Connecticut. Average scattered charge states as high as 12 are observed. It appears that these electrons are ionized during the lifetime of the quasimolecular state but a complete picture of the ionization mechanism(s) is not known. Calculations using a statistical model of ionization, modified in several ways, are compared with the experimental results to see if it is possible to isolate whether or not the electrons originate

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Dynamic and Energetic Properties of Alkali and Halide Ions Using Water-Model-Specific Ion Parameters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic and energetic properties of the alkali and halide ions were calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations with various different water and ion force fields including our recently developed water-model-specific ion parameters. The properties calculated were activity coefficients, diffusion coefficients, residence times of atomic pairs, association constants, and solubility. Through calculation of these properties, we can assess the validity and range of applicability of the simple pair potential models and better understand their limitations. Due to extreme computational demands, the activity coefficients were only calculated for a subset of the models. The results qualitatively agree with experiment. Calculated diffusion coefficients and residence times between cation−anion, water−cation, and water−anion showed differences depending on the choice of water and ion force field used. The calculated solubilities of the alkali−halide salts were generally lower than the true solubility of the salts. However, for both the TIP4PEW and SPC/E water-model-specific ion parameters, solubility was reasonably well-reproduced. Finally, the correlations among the various properties led to the following conclusions: (1) The reliability of the ion force fields is significantly affected by the specific choice of water model. (2) Ion−ion interactions are very important to accurately simulate the properties, especially solubility. (3) The SPC/E and TIP4PEW water-model-specific ion force fields are preferred for simulation in high salt environments compared to the other ion force fields. PMID:19757835

  20. Energetic-ion-driven global instabilities in stellarator/helical plasmas and comparison with tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Toi, K.; Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Osakabe, M.; Spong, Donald A; Todo, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of energetic-ion-driven global instabilities such as Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) and their impact on energetic ions and bulk plasma is crucially important for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas and in the future for deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma experiments. Various types of global modes and their associated enhanced energetic ion transport are commonly observed in toroidal plasmas. Toroidicity-induced AEs and ellipticity-induced AEs, whose gaps are generated through poloidal mode coupling, are observed in both tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas. Global AEs and reversed shear AEs, where toroidal couplings are not as dominant were also observed in those plasmas. Helicity induced AEs that exist only in 3D plasmas are observed in the large helical device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7 Advanced Stellarator plasmas. In addition, the geodesic acoustic mode that comes from plasma compressibility is destabilized by energetic ions in both tokamak and LHD plasmas. Nonlinear interaction of these modes and their influence on the confinement of the bulk plasma as well as energetic ions are observed in both plasmas. In this paper, the similarities and differences in these instabilities and their consequences for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas are summarized through comparison with the data sets obtained in LHD. In particular, this paper focuses on the differences caused by the rotational transform profile and the 2D or 3D geometrical structure of the plasma equilibrium. Important issues left for future study are listed.

  1. Energetic-ion-driven global instabilities in stellarator/helical plasmas and comparison with tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toi, K.; Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Osakabe, M.; Spong, D. A.; Todo, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Comprehensive understanding of energetic-ion-driven global instabilities such as Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) and their impact on energetic ions and bulk plasma is crucially important for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas and in the future for deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma experiments. Various types of global modes and their associated enhanced energetic ion transport are commonly observed in toroidal plasmas. Toroidicity-induced AEs and ellipticity-induced AEs, whose gaps are generated through poloidal mode coupling, are observed in both tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas. Global AEs and reversed shear AEs, where toroidal couplings are not as dominant were also observed in those plasmas. Helicity induced AEs that exist only in 3D plasmas are observed in the large helical device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7 Advanced Stellarator plasmas. In addition, the geodesic acoustic mode that comes from plasma compressibility is destabilized by energetic ions in both tokamak and LHD plasmas. Nonlinear interaction of these modes and their influence on the confinement of the bulk plasma as well as energetic ions are observed in both plasmas. In this paper, the similarities and differences in these instabilities and their consequences for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas are summarized through comparison with the data sets obtained in LHD. In particular, this paper focuses on the differences caused by the rotational transform profile and the 2D or 3D geometrical structure of the plasma equilibrium. Important issues left for future study are listed.

  2. Runaway of energetic test ions in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Eilerman, S. Anderson, J. K.; Sarff, J. S.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Nornberg, M. D.; Kim, J.

    2015-02-15

    Ion runaway in the presence of a large-scale, reconnection-driven electric field has been conclusively measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch (RFP). Measurements of the acceleration of a beam of fast ions agree well with test particle and Fokker-Planck modeling of the runaway process. However, the runaway mechanism does not explain all measured ion heating in the RFP, particularly previous measurements of strong perpendicular heating. It is likely that multiple energization mechanisms occur simultaneously and with differing significance for magnetically coupled thermal ions and magnetically decoupled tail and beam ions.

  3. Energy Deposition and Escape Fluxes Induced by Energetic Solar Wind Ions and ENAs Precipitating into Mars Atmosphere: Accurate Consideration of Energy Transfer Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, V. A.; Lewkow, N.; Gacesa, M.

    2014-12-01

    Formation and evolution of neutral fluxes of atoms and molecules escaping from the Mars atmosphere have been investigated for the sputtering and photo-chemical mechanisms. Energy and momentum transfer in collisions between the atmospheric gas and fast atoms and molecules have been considered using our recently obtained angular and energy dependent cross sections[1]. We have showed that accurate angular dependent collision cross sections are critical for the description of the energy relaxation of precipitating keV energetic ions/ENAs and for computations of altitude profiles of the fast atom and molecule production rates in recoil collisions. Upward and escape fluxes of the secondary energetic He and O atoms and H2, N2, CO and CO2 molecules, induced by precipitating ENAs, have been determined and their non-thermal energy distribution functions have been computed at different altitudes for different solar conditions. Precipitation and energy deposition of the energetic H2O molecules and products of their dissociations into the Mars atmosphere in the Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) - Mars interaction have been modeled using accurate cross sections. Reflection of precipitating ENAs by the Mars atmosphere has been analyzed in detail. [1] N. Lewkow and V. Kharchenko, "Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Escape Fluxes induced from the Mars Atmosphere, ApJ, v.790, p.98 (2014).

  4. Low-frequency global Alfven eigenmodes in low-shear tokamaks with trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, V. S.; Kolesnichenko, Ya. I.; Reznik, S. N.

    2009-09-15

    It is shown that, in the tokamak plasmas with broad low-shear central core and safety factor q{sub 0} > or approx. 1, there exists a low-frequency global Alfven eigenmode capable of resonating with precession of the trapped energetic ions. This mode has the dominant numbers m=n=1, but the coupling with the upper toroidal sideband is crucial both for the eigenmode formation and its excitation by energetic ions. The properties of this mode are consistent with observations of the low-frequency n=1 mode driven by energetic ions in the ''hybrid'' discharges with perpendicular injection on the JT-60U tokamak [N. Oyama, A. Isayama, G. Matsunaga et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 065026 (2009)].

  5. Excitation of internal kink modes by trapped energetic beam ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1983-10-01

    Energetic trapped particles are shown to have a destabilizing effect on the internal kink mode in tokamaks. The plasma pressure threshold for the mode is lowered by the particles. The growth rate is near the ideal magnetohydrodynamic value, but the frequency is comparable to the trapped particle precission frequency. A model for the instability cycle gives stability properties, associated particle losses, and neutron emissivity consistent with the fishbone events observed in PDX.

  6. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the <5 MeV particles were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  7. Observations and Interpretations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. f.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. c.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss recently reported observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from an X9 solar flare/coronal mass ejection event on 5 December 2006, located at E79. The observations were made by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. Taking into account ENA losses, we find that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances > or equal to 2 solar radii. Although there are no CME images from this event, it is shown that CME-shock-accelerated protons can, in principle, produce a time-history consistent with the observations.

  8. Understanding Molecular Ion-Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-06

    chamber is the...system. Molecular and/or atomic ions that have been produced by laser ablation of a solid target are trapped in the middle chamber of... clouds of Ba+ ions and Ca atoms. Due to the strong Coulomb interaction, the Ba+ ions quickly cool the molecular ion translation motion, while

  9. Storage rings for investigation of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-08-01

    In this survey, we give a brief description of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, and examples for their use in ion-atom collision physics. The compression of the phase space distribution of the ions by electron cooling, and the gain factors of in-ring experiments compared to single-pass experiments are explained. Some examples of a new generation of ion-atom collision experiments which may become feasible with storage rings are given. These include the studies of angular differential single- and double-electron capture cross sections, the production of slow highly charged recoil ions, and atomic collision processes using decelerated and crossed beam. 30 refs.

  10. Atomic and molecular effects on spherically convergent ion flow. I. Single atomic species

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, G. A.; Santarius, J. F.

    2010-01-15

    A formalism for analyzing the effect of ion-neutral gas interactions on the flow of ions between nearly transparent electrodes in spherical geometry has been developed for atomic ions in a weakly ionized plasma, so that the important atomic effects are charge exchange and ion impact ionization. The formalism is applied to spherical, gridded, inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices. The formalism yields detailed information about the energy spectra of the ions and fast neutral atoms, and the resulting fusion rate for {sup 3}He ions in a background {sup 3}He gas. The results are illustrated with an example calculation for the Wisconsin IEC device operating on {sup 3}He.

  11. A two-dimensional model of the nightside ionosphere of Venus Ion energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    The energetics of the nightside ionosphere of Venus are still not well understood. Large ion temperatures have been observed on the nightside. A two-dimensional theoretical model of the energetics of the nightside ionosphere is constructed which takes into account the effects of horizontal and vertical bulk transport of heat. It is demonstrated that the observed maintenance of the ion temperature can be explained in terms of these transport terms for solar zenith angles less than 150 deg. Simple heat transport cannot explain the observed high temperatures for angles greater than 150 deg.

  12. Enhancements of energetic ions associated with travelling compression regions in the deep geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, N.; Slavin, J. A.; Baker, D. N.; Hughes, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a representative example of an enhancement in energetic ion flux associated with the International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) spacecraft's encounter with a traveling compression region (TCR). Data from the energetic particle anisotropy spectrometer (EPAS) instrument on ISEE 3 are studied, along with magnetic field data from the vector helium magnetometer. It is concluded that the ion enhancements seen are spatial in nature, thus supporting the idea that TCRs are the lobe signatures of plasmoids moving along the magnetotail, away from earth.

  13. The precipitation of energetic heavy ions into the upper atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Cravens, T. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for auroral particle precipitation at Jupiter was provided by the ultraviolet spectrometers onboard the Voyagers 1 and 2 spacecraft and by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Magnetospheric measurements made by instruments onboard the Voyager spacecraft show that energetic sulfur and oxygen ions are precipitating into the upper atmosphere of Jupiter. A theoretical model has been constructed describing the interaction of precipitating oxygen with the Jovian atmosphere. The auroral energy is deposited in the atmosphere by means of ionization, excitation, and dissociation and heating of the atmospheric gas. Energetic ion and electron precipitation are shown to have similar effects on the atmosphere and ionosphere of Jupiter.

  14. DFT study of the structures and energetics of 98-atom AuPd clusters.

    PubMed

    Bruma, Alina; Ismail, Ramli; Paz-Borbón, L Oliver; Arslan, Haydar; Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Li, Z Y; Johnston, Roy L

    2013-01-21

    The energetics, structures and segregation of 98-atom AuPd nanoclusters are investigated using a genetic algorithm global optimization technique with the Gupta empirical potential (comparing three different potential parameterisations) followed by local minimizations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. A shell optimization program algorithm is employed in order to study the energetics of the highly symmetric Leary Tetrahedron (LT) structure and optimization of the chemical ordering of a number of structural motifs is carried out using the Basin Hopping Monte Carlo approach. Although one of the empirical potentials is found to favour the LT structure, it is shown that Marks Decahedral and mixed FCC-HCP motifs are lowest in energy at the DFT level.

  15. Dynamics of the sputtering of water from ice films by collisions with energetic xenon atoms.

    PubMed

    Killelea, Daniel R; Gibson, K D; Yuan, Hanqiu; Becker, James S; Sibener, S J

    2012-04-14

    The flow of energy from the impact site of a heavy, translationally energetic xenon atom on an ice surface leads to several non-equilibrium events. The central focus of this paper is on the collision-induced desorption (sputtering) of water molecules into the gas-phase from the ice surface. Sputtering is strongly activated with respect to xenon translational energy, and a threshold for desorption was observed. To best understand these results, we discuss our findings in the context of other sputtering studies of molecular solids. The sputtering yield is quite small; differential measurements of the energy of xenon scattered from ice surfaces show that the ice efficiently accommodates the collisional energy. These results are important as they quantitatively elucidate the dynamics of such sputtering events, with implications for energetic non-equilibrium processes at interfaces.

  16. Relative stopping powers for atomic and molecular ions in carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuer, Malcolm F.

    1986-03-01

    Electronic stopping powers of carbon for atomic and molecular nitrogen ions have been calculated using semi-classical free electron scattering from Herman-Skillman potentials, parametrized to include an adjustable exponential screening factor F( tv, Z), representing atomic ions. For molecular ions, aligned along the beam direction and having velocity 1.2 a.u., the stopping powers for individual atomic components were calculated as a function of internuclear separation. Screening factors for the two centers of force were assumed to decrease linearly from the value at zero internuclear separation, equivalent to that of a silicon ion, to that for nitrogen ions at large separations. Results are consistent with the diminishment of average stopping power per atomic ion which has been observed for beam-aligned nitrogen molecular ions. Similar calculations for molecular hydrogen in carbon agree with the enhancement of stopping power which has been observed. Evidence of nonlinear effects is indicated.

  17. High frequency fishbone driven by passing energetic ions in tokamak plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Feng; Yu, L. M.; Fu, G. Y.; ...

    2017-03-22

    High frequency fishbone instability driven by passing energetic ions was first reported in the Princeton beta experiment with tangential neutral-beam-injection (Heidbrink et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 57 835–8). It could play an important role for ITER-like burning plasmas, where α particles are mostly passing particles. In this work, a generalized energetic ion distribution function and finite drift orbit width effect are considered to improve the theoretical model for passing particle driving fishbone instability. For purely passing energetic ions with zero drift orbit width, the kinetic energymore » $$\\delta {{W}_{k}}$$ is derived analytically. The derived analytic expression is more accurate as compared to the result of previous work. For a generalized energetic ion distribution function, the fishbone dispersion relation is derived and is solved numerically. As a result, numerical results show that broad and off-axis beam density profiles can significantly increase the beam ion beta threshold $${{\\beta}_{c}}$$ for instability and decrease mode frequency.« less

  18. Linear dispersion relation of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in presence of anisotropic energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ruirui; Chavdarovski, Ilija; Ye, Gaoxiang; Wang, Xin

    2014-06-15

    Using the theoretical framework of the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation, the linear properties of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) and energetic particle continuum modes (EPMs) excited by anisotropic slowing-down energetic ions are investigated analytically and numerically. The resonant contribution of energetic ions to the potential energy perturbation as well as fluid-like term describing the background plasma and adiabatic contribution of energetic ions are derived. For high-mode numbers, numerical results show smooth transition between the EP continuous spectrum and BAEs in the gap. EPMs and/or BAEs are destabilized by energetic ions, with real frequencies and growth rates strongly dependent on the energetic particle density and resonant frequency.

  19. Linear dispersion relation of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in presence of anisotropic energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruirui; Chavdarovski, Ilija; Ye, Gaoxiang; Wang, Xin

    2014-06-01

    Using the theoretical framework of the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation, the linear properties of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) and energetic particle continuum modes (EPMs) excited by anisotropic slowing-down energetic ions are investigated analytically and numerically. The resonant contribution of energetic ions to the potential energy perturbation as well as fluid-like term describing the background plasma and adiabatic contribution of energetic ions are derived. For high-mode numbers, numerical results show smooth transition between the EP continuous spectrum and BAEs in the gap. EPMs and/or BAEs are destabilized by energetic ions, with real frequencies and growth rates strongly dependent on the energetic particle density and resonant frequency.

  20. Simulation of the effect of energetic ion radiation on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrah, D.B.; Keeton, S.C. ); Williamson, W. Jr. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-10-01

    A three dimensional computer simulation of the interaction of various heavy ion cosmic rays with silicon is presented in this paper. The initial ion strike is modeled by the Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo algorithm. Primary electrons produced by the CTMC code, along with their position and momenta, are entered into a non-relativistic Monte Carlo electron transport program. Both elastic and inelastic scattering events are considered in the simulation of the secondary electron cascade. Inelastic collisions include ionization of all shells. A prediction is made of the quantity and distribution of charge generated within silicon due to the cosmic ray ion strike.

  1. Pre-equilibrium decay processes in energetic heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1986-04-15

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is defined for application to precompound decay in heavy ion reactions in the 10 100 MeV/nucleon regime. Predicted neutron spectra are compared with measured results for central collisions of /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C with /sup 165/Ho target nuclei. Comparisons are made with subthreshold ..pi../sup 0/ yields in heavy ion reactions between 35 and 84 MeV/nucleon, and with the ..pi../sup 0/ spectra. The BME is found to be an excellent tool for investigating these experimentally observed aspects of non-equilibrium heavy ion reactions. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  3. Characterizing the Energetic Heavy Ion Environment Inside 4 Jovian Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C. M.; Stone, E. C.

    2004-05-01

    On 21 September 2003 Galileo impacted Jupiter to end its 8-year tour of the Jovian magentosphere. During this last phase data was collected in the very inner part of the magnetosphere at distances < 4 Rj. The region from 2 to 4 Rj was previously explored by Galileo during its 34th orbit around Jupiter. We present the combined data from these two passes obtained by the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) for heavy ions at energies above 2 MeV/nucleon. In particular we discuss the significant ion absorption near the moons Thebe and Amalthea, the anisotropic pitch angle distribution and the dramatic increase in heavy ion intensity with decreasing radius seen in this region

  4. Energetic Ion Beam Production by a Low-Pressure Plasma Focus Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L. K.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2011-03-30

    Energetic ion beam emissions in a 3 kJ Mather type plasma focus operating at low-pressure regime are investigated. Deuterium gas is used and the discharge is operated in a low-pressure regime of below 1 mbar. Formation of the current sheath during the breakdown phase at the back wall is assisted by a set delayed trigger pulse. Energetic and intense ion beams with good reproducibility have been obtained for the operating pressure ranging from 0.05 mbar to 0.5 mbar. Deuteron beam is determined by time resolved measurement by making use of three biased ion collectors placed at the end on direction. The average energies of deuteron beams are resolved by using time-of flight method. Correlation between the ion emissions and the current sheath dynamics is also discussed.

  5. Transport of energetic ions due to sawteeth, Alfven eigenmodes and microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D C; Fisher, R K; Garcia-Munoz, M; Murakami, Masanori; Park, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing an array of new diagnostics and simulation/modelling techniques, recent DIII-D experiments have elucidated a variety of energetic ion transport behaviour in the presence of instabilities ranging from large-scale sawteeth to fine spatial scale microturbulence. Important new insights include sawteeth, such as those of the ITER baseline scenario, causing major redistribution of the energetic ion population; high levels of transport induced by low-amplitude Alfven eigenmodes can be caused by the integrated effect of a large number of simultaneous modes; and microturbulence can contribute to the removal of alpha ash while having little effect on fusion alphas. This paper provides an overview of recent and upcoming results from the DIII-D Energetic Particles research programme.

  6. Stream interfaces and energetic ions closer than expected: Analyses of Pioneers 10 and 11 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Siscoe, George L.

    1994-01-01

    An empirical study of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) observed between 3.9 AU and 5.9 AU on Pioneers 10 and 11 shows that the main corotation energetic ion population (CEIP), which is associated with the trailing reverse shock, terminates within the CIR at a definite, structural boundary, which we show here is the stream interface. This new result has significant implications for solar wind and energetic particle modeling. In particular it implies either that the reverse shock forms closer to the stream interface than models suggest or that the theories that treat the generation and transport of these energetic ions, such as preshock Fermi acceleration and cross-field diffusion must be combined or extended. We test these scenarios by comparing the CEIP intensity profiles on the two sides of the stream interface. We find that while each automatically accounts for one or two aspects of the results none of them alone can account for all of our empirical results.

  7. Fluxes of energetic neutral helium atoms from the heliosheath and the IBEX Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaczyna, Pawel; Grzedzielski, Stan; Bzowski, Maciej

    2014-05-01

    Full sky maps of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (H ENA) obtained with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer revealed a bright, arc-like Ribbon, which dominates over the heliosheath emission on large swaths of the sky. We simulate the emission of helium ENA from the heliosheath and the IBEX Ribbon. To estimate the heliosheath signal, we use a set of simple models of the heliosphere, where we take the newest results from the Voyagers spacecraft into account. We simulate the evolution of energy spectra of α-particles and He+ ions using a number of binary interactions of He ions with plasma and neutral background in the heliosheath. The suprathermal ions from this distribution are a source of emerging He ENA flux, which we calculate. The fluxes in the observer frame are corrected for the Compton-Getting effect and the re-ionization losses on the path to detector. We conclude that the highest intensities should be expected from the heliospheric tail. For 1 keV He ENA, they are ~ 0.5 - 10 (cm2 ssrkeV )-1, depending on the employed model, whereas the expected intensities in the forward and flank sectors of the heliosphere in models with the heliosheath thickness ~ 25 AU do not exceed 0.02 (cm2 ssrkeV )-1 and 0.2 (cm2 ssrkeV )-1, respectively. For assessment of the IBEX Ribbon emission we compare the He ENA emissions from two models of the Ribbon origin previously developed to explain the hydrogen emission. In the first one, the Ribbon ENAs are produced outside the heliopause from the ionized neutral solar wind in the direction where the local interstellar magnetic field is perpendicular to the line-of-sight. The second model proposes the ENA production at the interface between the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) and the Local Bubble (LB). In the first model, the expected intensity is ~ 0.014 (cm2 ssrkeV )-1, i.e., of the order of the emission from the forward sector of the heliosphere, whereas in the second model, the intensity is ~ 2 - 7 (cm2 ssrkeV )-1. If the IBEX

  8. Measurement of energetic-particle-driven core magnetic fluctuations and induced fast-ion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Koliner, J. J.; Eilerman, S.; Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Liu, D.

    2013-03-01

    Internal fluctuations arising from energetic-particle-driven instabilities, including both density and radial magnetic field, are measured in a reversed-field-pinch plasma. The fluctuations peak near the core where fast ions reside and shift outward along the major radius as the instability transits from the n = 5 to n = 4 mode. During this transition, strong nonlinear three-wave interaction among multiple modes accompanied by enhanced fast-ion transport is observed.

  9. Stream interfaces and energetic ions in corotating interaction regions: Ulysses test of Pioneer results

    SciTech Connect

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Siscoe, George L.; Wibberenz, Gerd; Kunow, Horst; Gosling, John T.

    1996-07-20

    Ulysses measurements of energetic solar wind ions (5-23 MeV) associated with the trailing reverse shock found to be consistent with an earlier result obtained by Pioneers. The observations cover the middle latitude region 20-30 deg.of south heliosphere.

  10. Stream interfaces and energetic ions in corotating interaction regions: Ulysses test of Pioneer results

    SciTech Connect

    Intriligator, D.S.; Siscoe, G.L. |; Wibberenz, G.; Kunow, H.; Gosling, J.T.

    1996-07-01

    Ulysses measurements of energetic solar wind ions (5-23 MeV) associated with the trailing reverse shock found to be consistent with an earlier result obtained by Pioneers. The observations cover the middle latitude region 20-30 deg.of south heliosphere. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Elevated CO2 increases energetic cost and ion movement in the marine fish intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heuer, Rachael M.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Energetic costs associated with ion and acid-base regulation in response to ocean acidification have been predicted to decrease the energy available to fish for basic life processes. However, the low cost of ion regulation (6–15% of standard metabolic rate) and inherent variation associated with whole-animal metabolic rate measurements have made it difficult to consistently demonstrate such a cost. Here we aimed to gain resolution in assessing the energetic demand associated with acid-base regulation by examining ion movement and O2 consumption rates of isolated intestinal tissue from Gulf toadfish acclimated to control or 1900 μatm CO2 (projected for year 2300). The active marine fish intestine absorbs ions from ingested seawater in exchange for HCO3− to maintain water balance. We demonstrate that CO2 exposure causes a 13% increase of intestinal HCO3− secretion that the animal does not appear to regulate. Isolated tissue from CO2-exposed toadfish also exhibited an 8% higher O2 consumption rate than tissue from controls. These findings show that compensation for CO2 leads to a seemingly maladaptive persistent base (HCO3−) loss that incurs an energetic expense at the tissue level. Sustained increases to baseline metabolic rate could lead to energetic reallocations away from other life processes at the whole-animal level. PMID:27682149

  12. Elevated CO2 increases energetic cost and ion movement in the marine fish intestine.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Rachael M; Grosell, Martin

    2016-09-29

    Energetic costs associated with ion and acid-base regulation in response to ocean acidification have been predicted to decrease the energy available to fish for basic life processes. However, the low cost of ion regulation (6-15% of standard metabolic rate) and inherent variation associated with whole-animal metabolic rate measurements have made it difficult to consistently demonstrate such a cost. Here we aimed to gain resolution in assessing the energetic demand associated with acid-base regulation by examining ion movement and O2 consumption rates of isolated intestinal tissue from Gulf toadfish acclimated to control or 1900 μatm CO2 (projected for year 2300). The active marine fish intestine absorbs ions from ingested seawater in exchange for HCO3(-) to maintain water balance. We demonstrate that CO2 exposure causes a 13% increase of intestinal HCO3(-) secretion that the animal does not appear to regulate. Isolated tissue from CO2-exposed toadfish also exhibited an 8% higher O2 consumption rate than tissue from controls. These findings show that compensation for CO2 leads to a seemingly maladaptive persistent base (HCO3(-)) loss that incurs an energetic expense at the tissue level. Sustained increases to baseline metabolic rate could lead to energetic reallocations away from other life processes at the whole-animal level.

  13. Energetic ions at Comet Grigg-Skjellerup measured from the Giotto spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.; Daly, P. W.; Kirsch, E.; O'Sullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Afonin, V.

    1993-05-01

    The detection is reported by the EPONA instrument on Giotto of charged energetic particles deep within the inner coma of Comet Grigg-Skjellerup. Well-defined periodic intensity variation recorded in the particle fluxes suggest that the ions close to the nucleus were strongly coupled to the ambient magnetic field. The present data indicate that Giotto flew on the nightside of the nucleus.

  14. Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers and Interstellar Boundary Explorer energetic neutral atom imaging of the 5 April 2010 substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Buzulukova, N.; Connors, M. G.; Dayeh, M. A.; Goldstein, J.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S.; Schwadron, N. A.; Valek, P.

    2012-03-01

    This study is the first to combine energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) and Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Here we examine the arrival of an interplanetary shock and the subsequent geomagnetically effective substorm on 5 April 2010, which was associated with the Galaxy 15 communications satellite anomaly. IBEX shows sharply enhanced ENA emissions immediately upon compression of the dayside magnetosphere at 08:26:17+/-9 s UT. The compression drove a markedly different spectral shape for the dayside emissions, with a strong enhancement at energies >1 keV, which persisted for hours after the shock arrival, consistent with the higher solar wind speed, density, and dynamic pressure (˜10 nPa) after the shock. TWINS ENA observations indicate a slower response of the ring current and precipitation of ring current ions as low-altitude emissions ˜15 min later, with the >50 keV ion precipitation leading the <10 keV precipitation by ˜20 min. These observations suggest internal magnetospheric processes are occurring after compression of the magnetosphere and before the ring current ions end up in the loss cone and precipitate into the ionosphere. We also compare MHD simulation results with both the TWINS and IBEX ENA observations; while the overall fluxes and distributions of emissions were generally similar, there were significant quantitative differences. Such differences emphasize the complexity of the magnetospheric system and importance of the global perspective for macroscopic magnetospheric studies. Finally, Appendix A documents important details of the TWINS data processing, including improved binning procedures, smoothing of images to a given level of statistical accuracy, and differential background subtraction.

  15. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Heavy Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Andreev, O. V.; Bondarev, A. I.; Glazov, D. A.; Kozhedub, Y. S.; Maiorova, A. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.; Volotka, A. V.

    2011-05-11

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of heavy ions and atoms is considered. The current status of calculations of the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting and g factor values in heavy few-electron ions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental data. A special attention is focused on tests of quantum electrodynamics in strong electromagnetic fields and on determination of the fundamental constants. Recent progress in calculations of the parity nonconservation effects with heavy atoms and ions is also reported.

  16. Controlled long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secker, T.; Gerritsma, R.; Glaetzle, A. W.; Negretti, A.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate trapped ions interacting with atoms that are coupled to Rydberg states. The strong polarizabilities of the Rydberg levels increase the interaction strength between atoms and ions by many orders of magnitude, as compared to the case of ground-state atoms, and may be mediated over micrometers. We calculate that such interactions can be used to generate entanglement between an atom and the motion or internal state of an ion. Furthermore, the ion could be used as a bus for mediating spin-spin interactions between atomic spins in analogy to much employed techniques in ion-trap quantum simulation. The proposed scheme comes with attractive features as it maps the benefits of the trapped-ion quantum system onto the atomic one without obviously impeding its intrinsic scalability. No ground-state cooling of the ion or atom is required and the setup allows for full dynamical control. Moreover, the scheme is to a large extent immune to the micromotion of the ion. Our findings are of interest for developing hybrid quantum information platforms and for implementing quantum simulations of solid-state physics.

  17. Laboratory simulations of energetic atom interactions occurring in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle flights provided the first significant data base on the environment experienced by a large space structure operating in LEO. A number of interesting and unanticipated effects were observed, including material erosion induced by ambient oxygen atoms, the visible Shuttle glow occurring above surfaces exposed to the ram flow, and large near-field perturbations and variability in the gaseous neutral and plasma environment about the Shuttle. This paper provides a brief overview of these observations and their phenomenological interpretation, and then discusses laboratory approaches to their investigation. The emphasis is on the state of the art in the development of energetic oxygen atoms sources and the variety of experiments presently being performed with such devices.

  18. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  19. System And Method Of Applying Energetic Ions For Sterlization

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, John A.

    2002-06-11

    A method of sterilization of a container is provided whereby a cold plasma is caused to be disposed near a surface to be sterilized, and the cold plasma is then subjected to a pulsed voltage differential for producing energized ions in the plasma. Those energized ions then operate to achieve spore destruction on the surface to be sterilized. Further, a system for sterilization of a container which includes a conductive or non-conductive container, a cold plasma in proximity to the container, and a high voltage source for delivering a pulsed voltage differential between an electrode and the container and across the cold plasma, is provided.

  20. System and method of applying energetic ions for sterilization

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, John A.

    2003-12-23

    A method of sterilization of a container is provided whereby a cold plasma is caused to be disposed near a surface to be sterilized, and the cold plasma is then subjected to a pulsed voltage differential for producing energized ions in the plasma. Those energized ions then operate to achieve spore destruction on the surface to be sterilized. Further, a system for sterilization of a container which includes a conductive or non-conductive container, a cold plasma in proximity to the container, and a high voltage source for delivering a pulsed voltage differential between an electrode and the container and across the cold plasma, is provided.

  1. Gas-phase energetics of thorium fluorides and their ions.

    PubMed

    Irikura, Karl K

    2013-02-14

    Gas-phase thermochemistry for neutral ThF(n) and cations ThF(n)(+) (n = 1-4) is obtained from large-basis CCSD(T) calculations, with a small-core pseudopotential on thorium. Electronic partition functions are computed with the help of relativistic MRCI calculations. Geometries, vibrational spectra, electronic fine structure, and ion appearance energies are tabulated. These results support the experimental results by Lau, Brittain, and Hildenbrand for the neutral species, except for ThF. The ion thermochemistry is presented here for the first time.

  2. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  3. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  4. A model of energetic ion effects on pressure driven tearing modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmoon, M. R.; Brennan, D. P.

    2017-06-01

    The effects that energetic trapped ions have on linear resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities are studied in a reduced model that captures the essential physics driving or damping the modes through variations in the magnetic shear. The drift-kinetic orbital interaction of a slowing down distribution of trapped energetic ions with a resistive MHD instability is integrated to a scalar contribution to the perturbed pressure, and entered into an asymptotic matching formalism for the resistive MHD dispersion relation. Toroidal magnetic field line curvature is included to model trapping in the particle distribution, in an otherwise cylindrical model. The focus is on a configuration that is driven unstable to the m/n = 2/1 mode by increasing pressure, where m is the poloidal mode number and n is the toroidal. The particles and pressure can affect the mode both in the core region where there can be low and reversed shear and outside the resonant surface in significant positive shear. The results show that the energetic ions damp and stabilize the mode when orbiting in significant positive shear, increasing the marginal stability boundary. However, the inner core region contribution with low and reversed shear can drive the mode unstable. This effect of shear on the energetic ion pressure contribution is found to be consistent with the literature. These results explain the observation that the 2/1 mode was found to be damped and stabilized by energetic ions in δf-MHD simulations of tokamak experiments with positive shear throughout, while the 2/1 mode was found to be driven unstable in simulations of experiments with weakly reversed shear in the core. This is also found to be consistent with related experimental observations of the stability of the 2/1 mode changing significantly with core shear.

  5. Enabling High Fidelity Measurements of Energy and Pitch Angle for Escaping Energetic Ions with a Fast Ion Loss Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, R.; Pace, D. C.; Marcy, G. R.; Taussig, D.

    2016-10-01

    Energetic ion losses must be minimized in burning plasmas to maintain fusion power, and existing tokamaks provide access to energetic ion parameter regimes that are relevant to burning machines. A new Fast Ion Loss Detector (FILD) probe on the DIII-D tokamak has been optimized to resolve beam ion losses across a range of 30 - 90 keV in energy and 40° to 80° in pitch angle, thereby providing valuable measurements during many different experiments. The FILD is a magnetic spectrometer; once inserted into the tokamak, the magnetic field allows energetic ions to pass through a collimating aperture and strike a scintillator plate that is imaged by a wide view camera and narrow view photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The design involves calculating scintillator strike patterns while varying probe geometry. Calculated scintillator patterns are then used to design an optical system that allows adjustment of the focus regions for the 1 MS/s resolved PMTs. A synthetic diagnostic will be used to determine the energy and pitch angle resolution that can be attained in DIII-D experiments. Work supported in part by US DOE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program and under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  6. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Shih, A. Y.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event. The observations were made during the December 5, 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on the STEREO A and B spacecraft. Within 1-2 hours of the flare onset, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons arriving hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within +-10 degrees of the Sun. The derived emission profile at the Sun lasted for more than an hour and had a profile remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events <5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms that were stripped of their electrons upon entering the LET sensor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. We discuss possible origins for the production of ENAs in solar events, including charge-transfer reactions involving both flare and shock-accelerated protons. Assuming isotropic emission, we find that 2 x 10E28 ENAs escaped from the Sun in the upper hemisphere. Based on the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray emission observed by RHESSI in this event, and using measured and theoretical cross sections, we estimate that 3 x 10E31 ENAs with 1.8 - 5 MeV could be produced by protons accelerated in the flare. CME-driven shock acceleration is also a possible ENA source, but unfortunately there were no CME observations available from this event. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances 1.6 solar radii.

  7. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Shih, A. Y.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event. The observations were made during the December 5, 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on the STEREO A and B spacecraft. Within 1-2 hours of the flare onset, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons arriving hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within +-10 degrees of the Sun. The derived emission profile at the Sun lasted for more than an hour and had a profile remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events <5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms that were stripped of their electrons upon entering the LET sensor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. We discuss possible origins for the production of ENAs in solar events, including charge-transfer reactions involving both flare and shock-accelerated protons. Assuming isotropic emission, we find that 2 x 10E28 ENAs escaped from the Sun in the upper hemisphere. Based on the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray emission observed by RHESSI in this event, and using measured and theoretical cross sections, we estimate that 3 x 10E31 ENAs with 1.8 - 5 MeV could be produced by protons accelerated in the flare. CME-driven shock acceleration is also a possible ENA source, but unfortunately there were no CME observations available from this event. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances 1.6 solar radii.

  8. A dense gas of laser-cooled atoms for hybrid atom-ion trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höltkemeier, Bastian; Glässel, Julian; López-Carrera, Henry; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We describe the realization of a dark spontaneous-force trap of rubidium atoms. The atoms are loaded from a beam provided by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap yielding a capture efficiency of 75%. The dense and cold atomic sample is characterized by saturated absorption imaging. Up to 10^9 atoms are captured with a loading rate of 3× 10^9 atoms/s into a cloud at a temperature of 250 μK with the density exceeding 10^{11} atoms/cm^3. Under steady-state conditions, more than 90% of the atoms can be prepared into the absolute atomic ground state, which provides favorable conditions for the investigation of sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

  9. The Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS) for GOES-R: Accelerator Calibrations of Flight Unit 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS) instruments for GOES-R will provide high resolution measurement of energetic ions (Solar energetic particles and cosmic rays) from hydrogen (H) through nickel (Ni) for space weather monitoring and scientific research. Measurements are taken in five approximately logarithmically spaced energy intervals from 10-200 MeV/u for hydrogen and helium (He) and comparable penetrations for heavier elements. The Angle Detecting Inclined Sensors (ADIS) technique is used to provide single element resolution by determining the angle of incidence with a very simple telescope design using Si solid state detectors. The ADIS system also facilitates on-board event identification of ion species. During high flux conditions, EHIS can identify the elemental composition of ~2000 events per seconds. Elemental charge histograms are compiled on-board and reported via telemetry once per minute providing an unprecedented combination of statistical resolution and high cadence. The first of four flight instruments (FM1) has been completed. FM1 underwent heavy ion accelerator calibration at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's (NSCL) Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF) at Michigan State University in February 2013, and proton calibration at the Massachusetts General Hospital's (MGH) Burr Proton Therapy Center in April 2013. The heavy ion calibration included both Ni primary and secondary fragments runs down to H. Results of these calibration runs will be presented.

  10. The Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS) for GOES-R: Accelerator Calibrations of Flight Unit 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS) instruments for GOES-R will provide high resolution measurement of energetic ions (Solar energetic particles and cosmic rays) from hydrogen (H) through nickel (Ni) for space weather monitoring and scientific research. Measurements are taken in five approximately logarithmically spaced energy intervals from 10-200 MeV/u for hydrogen and helium (He) and comparable penetrations for heavier elements. The Angle Detecting Inclined Sensors (ADIS) technique is used to provide single element resolution by determining the angle of incidence with a very simple telescope design using Si solid state detectors. The ADIS system also facilitates on-board event identification of ion species. During high flux conditions, EHIS can identify the elemental composition of ~2000 events per seconds. Elemental charge histograms are compiled on-board and reported via telemetry once per minute providing an unprecedented combination of statistical resolution and high cadence. The first of four flight instruments (FM1) has been completed. FM1 underwent heavy ion accelerator calibration at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's (NSCL) Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF) at Michigan State University in February 2013 and proton calibration at the Massachusetts General Hospital's (MGH) Burr Proton Therapy Center in April 2013. The heavy ion calibration included both Ni primary and secondary fragments runs down to H. Results of these calibration runs will be presented. This work is supported by NASA under the contract NNG06HX01C.

  11. Evidence for solar wind origin of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of data from our energetic ion composition experiment on ISEE-1 has revealed the presence of substantial fluxes of carbon, oxygen, and heavier ions above 400 keV/nucleon at L values between approximately 2.5 and 4 earth radii. The measured C/O ratio varies systematically from 1.3 at 450 keV/nucleon to 4.1 at 1.3 MeV/nucleon, and no iron is observed above 200 keV/nucleon. These results provide strong evidence for a solar wind origin for energetic ions in the outer radiation belt. The absence of iron and the increase of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio with energy suggest that the condition for the validity of the first adiabatic invariant may have a strong influence on the trapping of these particles.

  12. Evidence for solar wind origin of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of data from our energetic ion composition experiment on ISEE-1 has revealed the presence of substantial fluxes of carbon, oxygen, and heavier ions above 400 keV/nucleon at L values between approximately 2.5 and 4 earth radii. The measured C/O ratio varies systematically from 1.3 at 450 keV/nucleon to 4.1 at 1.3 MeV/nucleon, and no iron is observed above 200 keV/nucleon. These results provide strong evidence for a solar wind origin for energetic ions in the outer radiation belt. The absence of iron and the increase of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio with energy suggest that the condition for the validity of the first adiabatic invariant may have a strong influence on the trapping of these particles.

  13. Pyrolytic effects induced by energetic ions in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckenreiter, T.; Balanzat, E.; Fuess, H.; Trautmann, C.

    1999-05-01

    Degradation processes in various polymers (polycarbonate, poly(ethyleneterephthalate), polyimide, and polysulfone) induced by krypton and molybdenum ions of several hundred MeV were studied by infrared and mass spectroscopy. A wide spectrum of degradation products well known from low ionizing radiation were found, which are strongly enhanced if the irradiation takes place in oxygen atmosphere. Most notables are the formation of triple bonded species such as alkynes, cyanates and acetylene. They are created within a radius of about 3-4 nm around the ion trajectory. The complementing observation of degradation products in the bulk polymer and as volatile fragments allows a detailed description of the underlying decomposition mechanisms. The observation of degradation products in close analogy to pyrolysis and the thermal stability of acetylene, strongly suggest that transient temperatures above 1500 K are involved in the track formation process.

  14. A Model of Energetic Ion Effects on Pressure Driven Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmoon, M. R.; Brennan, D. P.

    2016-10-01

    Previous analysis of toroidal confinement experiments has shown that energetic ions interact with and affect MHD mode stability, which has been modeled and simulated for ideal MHD instabilities and resistive wall modes. In addition, the 2/1 tearing mode was found to be damped or stabilized by energetic ions, with significant effects on the slow growing resistive mode. This study focuses on the mode-particle interactions between energetic ions and pressure-driven, slow growing tearing modes which have been shown to be driven unstable in experiments as pressure increases. Using a reduced analytic description of a high aspect ratio tokamak equilibrium with a fixed total current and variable magnetic shear; we add in the effects of high energy particles as a modification to the perturbed pressure. We find the importance of global magnetic shear (s =1/q dq/dr) on the particle precession drift frequency, which determines whether or not the energetic particle population resonates with the mode. We find that for s>scrit at the radial position of the pressure jump, particles have a stabilizing effect on the 2/1 tearing mode. However, we find that for s

  15. Global theory of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode excited by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruirui; Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2015-09-01

    The two-dimensional global stability and mode structures of high-n beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes excited by energetic ions in tokamaks are examined both analytically and numerically, employing the WKB-ballooning mode representation along with the generalized fishbone like dispersion relation. Here, n ≫ 1 is the toroidal mode number. Our results indicate that (i) the lowest radial bound state corresponds to the most unstable eigenmode, and (ii) the anti-Hermitian contributions due to wave-energetic particle resonance give rise to the twisting radial mode structures.

  16. Quasi-mono-energetic ion acceleration from a homogeneous composite target by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Brantov, A. V.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Klimo, O.; Romanov, D. V.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Sokollik, T.; Nickles, P. V.

    2006-12-15

    The paper presents an analytical model and particle-in-cell simulations of the quasi-mono-energetic ion acceleration by an intense laser pulse in a multispecies target and the corresponding experimental observations. Homogeneous and heterogeneous targets are considered, and it is shown that the formation of the energy spectrum proceeds in three stages: (1) the initial light ion acceleration in the sheath electric field, (2) the ion species separation followed by the electrostatic shock formation, and (3) the interaction of spatially separated ion bunches accompanied by electron cooling. The field ionization of heavy ions and interaction between the heavy and light species play an important role in the formation and preservation of the energy spectrum of light ions. The simulation results are compared with the theoretical predictions and the experiments.

  17. Mechanism of ion permeation through a model channel: roles of energetic and entropic contributions.

    PubMed

    Sumikama, Takashi; Saito, Shinji; Ohmine, Iwao

    2013-10-28

    Mechanism of ion permeation through an anion-doped carbon nanotube (ANT), a model of ion channel, is investigated. Using this model system, many trajectory calculations are performed to obtain the potential energy profile, in addition to the free energy profile, that enables to separate the energy and the entropic contributions, along the ion permeation. It is found that the mechanism of the transport is governed by the interplay between the energetic and the entropic forces. The rate of the ion permeation can be controlled by changing the balance between these contributions with altering, for example, the charge and/or the length of ANT, which increases the rate of the ion permeation by nearly two orders of magnitude. The dominant free energy barrier at the entrance of ANT is found to be caused by the entropy bottleneck due to the narrow phase space for the exchange of a water molecule and an incoming ion.

  18. Comment on - 'Upstream energetic ions under radial IMF - A critical test of the Fermi model'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    A criticism is offered by Fusilier of the conclusion by Sarris and Krimigis (SK, 1988) that the failure to observe energetic ions continuously under near radial interplanetary magnetic field conditions contradicts a fundamental prediction of the Fermi mechanism for the origin of the upstream ions. It is argued that both events reported by SK fall short of critical tests of the Fermi mechanism because the magnetic turbulence required by the Fermi process is not guaranteed to be present. Sarris replies that the ad hoc limit on the local angle between the magnetic field and the shock normal imposed by Fusilier is not a relevant consideration to upstream ion activity.

  19. Role of Alfvén Instabilities in Energetic Ion Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; Bernabei, S.; Budny, R.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.D.; et al.

    1998-11-01

    Experiments of plasma heating at the ion cyclotron resonance of a minority specie have shown that the heating efficiency degrades above a certain power threshold. It is found that this threshold is due to the destabilization of a branch of shear Alfvén waves which causes a diffusive loss of fast ions, the Energetic Particle Modes. These modes not only play a fundamental role in the transport of the fast ions, but appear closely related to the formation of the giant sawteeth.

  20. Analysis of a sequence of energetic ion and magnetic field events upstream from the Saturnian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Sergis, N.; Dialynas, K.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Krupp, N.; Dougherty, M.; Sarris, E. T.

    2009-12-01

    The existence of energetic particle events to ˜200 RS upstream and ˜1300 RS downstream of Saturn was established during the Voyager 1, 2 flybys in 1980 and 1981, respectively. The origin of the events could not be determined with certainty because of lack of particle charge state and species measurements at lower (<300 keV) energies, which dominate the spectra. High sensitivity observations of energetic ion directional intensities, energy spectra, and ion composition were obtained by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) of the Magnetospheric IMaging Instrument (MIMI) complement, with a geometry factor of ˜2.5 cm 2 sr and some capability of separating light (H, He) and heavier (C, N, O) ion groups (henceforth referred to as 'hydrogen' and 'oxygen', respectively). Charge state information was provided where possible by the Charge-Energy-Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) over the range ˜3-235 keV per charge, and magnetic field (IMF) data by the MAG instrument on Cassini. The observations revealed the presence of distinct upstream bursts of energetic hydrogen and oxygen ions whenever the IMF connected the spacecraft to the planetary bow shock to distances >80 RS. The events exhibited the following characteristics: (1) hydrogen ion bursts are observed in the energy range 3-220 keV (and occasionally to E>220 keV) and oxygen ion bursts in the energy range 32 to ˜700 keV. (2) Pitch angle distributions are initially anisotropic with ions moving away from the bow shock along the IMF, but tend to isotropize as the event progresses in time. (3) The duration of the ion bursts is several minutes up to 4 h. (4) The event examined in this study contains significant fluxes of singly charged oxygen. (5) Ion bursts are accompanied by distinct diamagnetic field depressions with β>10, and exhibit wave structures consistent with ion cyclotron waves for O + and O ++. Given the magnetic field configuration during the detection of the events and that energetic ions trapped within the

  1. Chemical stability of positronic complexes with atoms and atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.W.; Nakanishi, H.; Schrader, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    A simple theory for establishing the stability or instability of positron-atomic systems against dissociation is presented. The theory consists of assuming that Morse-potential parameters for protonic diatoms are transferrable to the corresponding positronic molecules, and making appropriate reduced-mass modifications in the calculation of binding energies. The surprisingly good reliability of the method is established by appealing to the well-known positronium affinities of atomic hydrogen and fluorine. Positronium (Ps) binding is found for about half of the 42 atoms tested. In addition, instability is indicated for all nine positron-atom systems tested, and stability is indicated for seven of eight negatively charged systems tested; e.g., PsO/sup -/.

  2. Comparative investigation of the energetic ion spectra comprising the magnetospheric ring currents of the solar system.

    PubMed

    Mauk, B H

    2014-12-01

    Investigated here are factors that control the intensities and shapes of energetic ion spectra that make up the ring current populations of the strongly magnetized planets of the solar system, specifically those of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Following a previous and similar comparative investigation of radiation belt electrons, we here turn our attention to ions. Specifically, we examine the possible role of the differential ion Kennel-Petschek limit, as moderated by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, as a standard for comparing the most intense ion spectra within the strongly magnetized planetary magnetospheres. In carrying out this investigation, the substantial complexities engendered by the very different ion composition distributions of these diverse magnetospheres must be addressed, given that the dispersion properties of the EMIC waves are strongly determined by the ion composition of the plasmas within which the waves propagate. Chosen for comparison are the ion spectra within these systems that are the most intense observed, specifically at 100 keV and 1 MeV. We find that Earth and Jupiter are unique in having their most intense ion spectra likely limited and sculpted by the Kennel-Petschek process. The ion spectra of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune reside far below their respective limits and are likely limited by interactions with gas and dust (Saturn) and by the absence of robust ion acceleration processes (Uranus and Neptune). Suggestions are provided for further testing the efficacy of the differential Kennel-Petschek limit for ions using the Van Allen Probes.

  3. Energetic Particles and Ion Composition Experiment for CRRES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    designed to survive the even more extreme radiation effects from nuclear weapon bursts in space. Radiation shielding creates significant weight and...E.G., Battel, S.J., Hertzberg, E., Roselle, S., and Saunders, T.C. (1985) The Low EnergZ Ion Mass Spectrometer (ONR-307-8-l, ONR-307-8-2), AFGL-TR-85...defects due to nuclear collisions measured with thin window silicon surface barrier detec- tar, ILE Trans. Nucl. 5ci. (NS-15):475. C- 5 4-. FUNCTION BLOCK

  4. Energetic Ion Auroral Modeling for Jupiter and its Implications for Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Stephen; Ozak, Nataly; Cravens, Thomas; Schultz, David; Young, Jackson; Haggerty, Dennis; Mauk, Barry

    2017-04-01

    Auroral particle precipitation dominates the chemical and physical environment of the upper atmospheres and ionospheres of the outer planets. Precipitation of energetic electrons from the middle magnetosphere is responsible for the main auroral oval at Jupiter, but both energetic electron and ion precipitation take place in the polar caps. At least some of the ion precipitation is associated with soft x-ray emission with about 1 GW of power, as observed by the Roentgen satellite, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton. Theoretical modeling has demonstrated that the incident sulfur and oxygen ion energies must exceed about 0.5 MeV/nucleon in order to produce the measured x-ray emission, although lower energy ion precipitation cannot be excluded. The polar cap location of the emission and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling considerations both indicate the associated field-aligned currents must originate near the magnetopause or perhaps the distant tail. Secondary electrons produced in the upper atmosphere by ion precipitation could be accelerated upward to relativistic energies due to the same field-aligned potentials responsible for the downward ion acceleration. Recent Juno data indicates the presence of both upward and downward relativistic energy beams over the polar cap. Models of ion precipitation will be presented and put into the context of the recent Juno results.

  5. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging at Low Altitudes from the Swedish Microsatellite Astrid: Images and Spectral Analysis. Paper 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Pontus C:son; Barabash, Stas; Norberg, Olle; Lundin, Rickard; Roelof, Rdmond C.; Chase, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in the energy range 26- 52 keV are reported from four occasions during geomagnetically disturbed periods. The data were acquired by the ENA imager flown on the Swedish microsatellite Astrid in a 1000 km circular orbit with 83 deg inclination. The ENA imager separates charged particles from neutrals through an electrostatic deflection system in the energy range between 0.1 and 114 keV. ENA images obtained from vantage points in the polar cap and in the afternoon magnetic local time (MLT) hours looking into the antisunward hemisphere show intense ENA fluxes (approx. 10(exp 4)/sq cm sr s over 26-37 keV) coming from the dusk region and low altitudes (approx. 300 km). The morphology shows no relation to local magnetic field excluding the possibility of charged particle detection. It is concluded that the source of these ENAs are precipitating/mirroring ions from the ring current/trapped radiation interacting with the exobase on auroral L-shells and in the dusk region. The observed ENA fluxes show a relation with Kp and Dst geomagnetic indices. The observed ENA spectrum from a geomagnetic storm on February 8, 1995, is investigated in more detail and compared to the parent ion spectrum obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Project (DMSP) satellite, Fl2, during the same period on L = 6 +/- 2 around dusk. The observed ENA spectral slope is used to derive the parent ion spectral temperature. The derived ion temperatures range is 3.0 - 6.0 keV for H and 4.5 - 8.5 keV for O. The higher of these ion temperatures comes closest in agreement to the extrapolated DMSP spectrum leading us to favor O over H as the species of the detected ENAS. It is shown that the detected ENAs must have been produced at L greater than or equal to 6 to reach the detector without atmospheric attenuation and that the main energy dependence of the ENA spectrum, apart from the parent ion spectrum, is governed by the energy dependence of the charge

  6. Application of ECR ion source beams in atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of intense, high charge state ion beams from ECR ion sources has had significant impact not only on the upgrading of cyclotron and synchrotron facilities, but also on multicharged ion collision research, as evidenced by the increasing number of ECR source facilities used at least on a part time basis for atomic physics research. In this paper one such facility, located at the ORNL ECR source, and dedicated full time to the study of multicharged ion collisions, is described. Examples of applications of ECR ion source beams are given, based on multicharged ion collision physics studies performed at Oak Ridge over the last few years. 21 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Enhanced electron field emission from carbon nanotubes irradiated by energetic C ions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng-Cheng; Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Guo-An; Zheng, Rui-Ting; Ping, Zhao-Xia

    2012-08-01

    The field emission performance and structure of the vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays irradiated by energetic C ion with average energy of 40 keV have been investigated. During energetic C ion irradiation, the curves of emission current density versus the applied field of samples shift firstly to low applied fields when the irradiation doses are less than 9.6 x 10(16) cm(-2), and further increase of dose makes the curves reversing to a high applied field, which shows that high dose irradiation in carbon nanotube arrays makes their field emission performance worse. After energetic ion irradiation with a dose of 9.6 x 1016 cm(-2), the turn-on electric field and the threshold electric field of samples decreased from 0.80 and 1.13 V/microm to 0.67 and 0.98 V/microm respectively. Structural analysis of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the amorphous carbon nanowire/carbon nanotube hetero nano-structures have been fabricated in the C ion irradiated carbon nanotubes. The enhancement of electron field emission is due to the formation of amorphous carbon nanowires at the tip of carbon nanotube arrays, which is an electron emitting material with low work function.

  8. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1994-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project, ``Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions,`` speaks to these points. The experimental work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the tandem and LINAC accelerators and collisions at low velocity using the CRYEBIS facility. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x rays and Auger electrons. Brief research summaries are given for the following: (1) electron production in ion-atom collisions; (2) role of electron-electron interactions in two-electron processes; (3) multi-electron processes; (4) collisions with excited, aligned, Rydberg targets; (5) ion-ion collisions; (6) ion-molecule collisions; (7) ion-atom collision theory; and (8) ion-surface interactions.

  9. Energetics of a Li Atom adsorbed on B/N doped graphene with monovacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Babita; Jindal, V. K.; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-08-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to study the adsorption properties and diffusion of Li atom across B/N-pyridinic graphene. Regardless of the dopant type, B atoms of B-pyridinic graphene lose electron density. On the other hand, N atoms (p-type dopants) have tendency to gain electron density in N-pyridinic graphene. Higher chemical reactivity and electronic conductivity of B/N-pyridinic graphene are responsible for stronger binding of Li with the substrates as compared to pristine graphene. The binding energy of Li with B/N-pyridinic graphene exceeds the cohesive energy of bulk Li, making it energetically unfavourable for Li to form clusters on these substrates. Li atom gets better adsorbed on N-pyridinic graphene due to an additional p-p hybridization of the orbitals while Li on B-pyridinic prefers the ionic bonding. Also, significant distortion of N-pyridinic graphene upon Li adsorption is a consequence of the change in bonding mechanism between Li atom and the substrate. Our results show that bonding character and hence binding energies between Li and graphene can be tuned with the help of B/N doping of monovacancy defects. Further, the sites for most stable adsorption are different for the two types of doped and defective graphene, leading to greater Li uptake capacity of B-pyridinic graphene near the defect. In addition, B-pyridinic graphene offering lower diffusion barrier, ensures better Li kinetics. Thus, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for LIBs as compared to N-pyridinic graphene.

  10. Atomic transport in ion mixed Pd/Co bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. H.; Jang, H. G.; Song, J. H.; Woo, J. J.; Choi, B. S.; Jeong, K.; Whang, C. N.

    1993-06-01

    Isotropic and anisotropic atomic transport in an ion beam mixed Pd/Co bilayer have been studied from the shifts of a marker layer in Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. A thin layer of Au (1 nm) was embedded as a marker at the interface between Pd and Co layers. 80 keV Ar + was used to irradiate the marker sample at 90K. The Pd/Co system shows near isotropic atomic transport ( JPd/ JCo = 0.86) due to the thermal spike effect. We present a simple relationship between the ration of atomic fluxes induced by ion mixing and the activation energies for the normal impurity diffusion of constituents in a bilayer to describe quantitatively the isotropic and anisotropic atomic transport in thermal spike induced ion mixing. Thermal spike induced atomic transport is closely related with the activation energy for normal impurity diffusion.

  11. Spectroscopy of atomic and molecular ions using quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, P. O.; Rosenband, T.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Bergquist, J. C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-10-01

    Recently developed techniques for quantum computation using trapped ions allow precise coherent control of the internal and external states of single atoms. Here we report how these techniques can be employed to perform precision spectroscopy of atomic and molecular ions that lack accessible transitions for laser cooling and detection. Furthermore, we discuss how quantum logic can be used to laser-cool molecules to near their rotational and vibrational ground state by avoiding detrimental spontaneous emission of photons from the molecule.

  12. Energetic Neutral Atom Imager on the Swedish Microsatellite Astrid. Paper 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barabash, S.; Norberg, O.; Roelof, E. C.; Lundin, R.; Olsen, S.; Lundin, K.; Brandt, Pontus C:son; Chase, C. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Koskinen, H.; Ryno, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Swedish microsatellite ASTRID was launched by a Russian Cosmos rocket on January 24, 1995 into a 1000 km circular orbit with 83 deg inclination. Besides the main objective of technological demonstration, imaging of energetic neutral atoms (ENAS) was attempted. The imager detected ENA in the energy range 0.1 - 140 keV utilizing two different techniques. Neutrals of the energy 13 - 140 keV were recorded by 14 solid state detectors with the total field of view 5 deg x 322 deg. For half a spin (approx. 1.5 s) of the ASTRID spacecraft, almost all of space was covered with an angular resolution 2.5 deg x 25 deg. Less energetic neutrals of approx. 0.1 - 70 keV were converted on a graphite target into secondary particles which then were detected by a microchannel plate with 32 anodes. A fraction of primary neutrals was directly reflected towards the sensor. This technique provided the total ENA flux with an angular resolution 4.6 deg x 11.5 deg. The instrument weight is 3.13 kg. Successful operation of the instrument during the first 5 weeks of the mission provided the first ENA images of the ring current at low altitudes.

  13. Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

  14. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms.

    PubMed

    Viteau, M; Reveillard, M; Kime, L; Rasser, B; Sudraud, P; Bruneau, Y; Khalili, G; Pillet, P; Comparat, D; Guerri, I; Fioretti, A; Ciampini, D; Allegrini, M; Fuso, F

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1-5keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis.

  15. Equatorial distributions of energetic ion moments in Saturn's magnetosphere using Cassini/MIMI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dialynas, K.; Roussos, E.; Regoli, L.; Paranicas, C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    We use kappa distribution fits to combined Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS, 3 to 236 keV/e), Low Energy Magnetosphere Measurements System (LEMMS, 0.024 < E < 18 MeV), and Ion Neutral Camera (INCA, 5.2 to >220 keV for H+) proton and singly ionized energetic ion spectra to calculate the >20 keV energetic ion moments inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Using a realistic magnetic field model (Khurana et al. 2007) and data from the entire Cassini mission to date (2004-2016), we map the ion measurements to the equatorial plane and via the modeled kappa distribution spectra we produce the equatorial distributions of all ion integral moments, focusing on partial density, integral intensity, partial pressure, integral energy intensity; as well as the characteristic energy (EC=IE/In), Temperature and κ-index of these ions as a function of Local Time (00:00 to 24:00 hrs) and L-Shell (5-20). A modified version of the semi-empirical Roelof and Skinner [2000] model is then utilized to retrieve the equatorial H+ and O+ pressure, density and temperature in Saturn's magnetosphere in both local time and L-shell. We find that a) although the H+ and O+ partial pressures and densities are nearly comparable, the >20 keV protons have higher number and energy intensities at all radial distances (L>5) and local times; b) the 12

  16. Atomic physics and synchrotron radiation: The production and accumulation of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.; Agagu, A.; Jones, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation can be used to produce highly-charged ions, and to study photoexcitation and photoionization for ions of virtually any element in the periodic table. To date, with few exceptions, atomic physics studies have been limited to rare gases and a few metal vapors, and to photoexcitation energies in the VUV region of the electromagnetic spectrum. These limitations can now be overcome using photons produced by high-brightness synchrotron storage rings, such as the x-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven. Furthermore, calculations indicate that irradiation of an ion trap with an intense energetic photon beam will result in a viable source of highly-charged ions that can be given the name PHOBIS: the PHOton Beam Ion Source. Promising results, which encourage the wider systematic use of synchrotron radiation in atomic physics research, have been obtained in recent experiments on VUV photoemission and the production and storage of multiply-charged ions. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  18. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  19. Characterization of biaryl torsional energetics and its treatment in OPLS all-atom force fields.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Markus K; Schyman, Patric; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2013-05-24

    The frequency of biaryl substructures in a database of approved oral drugs has been analyzed. This led to designation of 20 prototypical biaryls plus 10 arylpyridinones for parametrization in the OPLS all-atom force fields. Bond stretching, angle-bending, and torsional parameters were developed to reproduce the MP2 geometries and torsional energy profiles. The transferability of the new parameters was tested through their application to three additional biaryls. The torsional energetics for the 33 biaryl molecules are analyzed and factors leading to preferences for planar and nonplanar geometries are identified. For liquid biphenyl, the computed density and heat of vaporization at the boiling point (255 °C) are also reported.

  20. Atomistic simulation of track formation by energetic ions in zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Pedro A.F.P.; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J

    2010-01-01

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations of fission track formation in zircon. We simulated the passage of a swift heavy ion through crystalline zircon using cylindrical thermal spikes with energy deposition (dE/dx) of 2.5-12.8 keV nm{sup -1} and a radius of 3 nm. At a low dE/dx of 2.55 keV nm{sup -1}, the structural damage recovered almost completely and a damage track was not produced. At higher values of dE/dx, tracks were observed and the radius of the track increased with increasing dE/dx. Our structural analysis shows amorphization in the core of the track and phase separation into Si-rich regions near the center of the track and Zr-rich regions near the periphery. These simulations establish a threshold dE/dx for fission track formation in zircon that is relevant to thermochronology and nuclear waste immobilization.

  1. Influence of energetic ions on tearing modes in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huishan; Lin, Liang; Ding, Weixing; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    Tearing mode stability analysis in the presence of circulating energetic ions (CEI) is studied in the reversed field pinch (RFP) magnetic configuration. In contrast to the minimal effect of precessional drift of CEI on tearing modes in tokamaks, the effect of precessional drift of CEI on tearing modes is important in the RFP. It is found that the effects of CEI on tearing modes in RFP depend on their toroidal circulating direction, and have a strong relation to the pressure gradient of CEI. For co-CEI, tearing modes can be stabilized if the pressure gradient of energetic ions is sufficiently large, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results in the Madison Symmetric Torus.

  2. Painting analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by energetic heavy ions in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation genetic mutations and cancer induction Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults Over the years we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell We will summarize the results of the investigations and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure

  3. Ulysses observations of energetic ions over the south pole of the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, T. R.; Bothmer, V.; Marsden, R. G.; Trattner, K. J.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1996-07-20

    We present here observations of energetic ions during the following phases of the Ulysses prime mission: the first south polar pass, the low-latitude pass and part of the first north polar pass. Peaks are observed in the energetic ion intensity which recur either once per solar rotation during the ascent to high southern latitudes, or twice per rotation during the low latitude pass. The intensity of the peaks also rises with each major solar event, decaying slowly thereafter over a period of several rotations. The peaks are observed up to {approx}70 deg. during the ascent to high southern latitudes, but not seen again until around 45 deg. during the descent, this asymmetry most likely being caused by a decrease in the number of solar events.

  4. A high flux pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen. [for spacecraft materials ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1986-01-01

    The design and demonstration of a pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen are reported. In the present test setup, molecular oxygen under several atmospheres of pressure is introduced into an evacuated supersonic expansion nozzle through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A 10J CO2 TEA laser is focused to intensities greater than 10 to the 9th W/sq cm in the nozzle throat, generating a laser-induced breakdown with a resulting 20,000-K plasma. Plasma expansion is confined by the nozzle geometry to promote rapid electron-ion recombination. Average O-atom beam velocities from 5-13 km/s at fluxes up to 10 to the 18th atoms/pulse are measured, and a similar surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples to that obtained on the STS-8 mission is found.

  5. Effects of absorption by Io on composition of energetic heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Garrard, T L; Stone, E C; Murphy, N

    1996-10-18

    The Galileo heavy ion counter is sensitive to ions with atomic numbers Z >/= 6 and energies greater than approximately 6 MeV per nucleon. During Galileo's passage through Jupiter's inner magnetosphere, the observed composition of these heavy ions was consistent with the presence of singly ionized iogenic O, Na, and S and highly ionized solar C, O, and Ne. The solar component is absorbed more strongly by Io because its gyroradius is smaller than Io's diameter.

  6. A compact source for bunches of singly charged atomic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murböck, T.; Schmidt, S.; Andelkovic, Z.; Birkl, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Vogel, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have built, operated, and characterized a compact ion source for low-energy bunches of singly charged atomic ions in a vacuum beam line. It is based on atomic evaporation from an electrically heated oven and ionization by electron impact from a heated filament inside a grid-based ionization volume. An adjacent electrode arrangement is used for ion extraction and focusing by applying positive high-voltage pulses to the grid. The method is particularly suited for experimental environments which require low electromagnetic noise. It has proven simple yet reliable and has been used to produce μs-bunches of up to 106 Mg+ ions at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. We present the concept, setup and characterizing measurements. The instrument has been operated in the framework of the SpecTrap experiment at the HITRAP facility at GSI/FAIR to provide Mg+ ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions by laser-cooled 24Mg+.

  7. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  9. Observation of Cold Collisions between Trapped Ions and Trapped Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew T.; Cetina, Marko; Oručević, Fedja; Vuletić, Vladan

    2009-06-01

    We study cold collisions between trapped ions and trapped atoms in the semiclassical (Langevin) regime. Using Yb+ ions confined in a Paul trap and Yb atoms in a magneto-optical trap, we investigate charge-exchange collisions of several isotopes over three decades of collision energies down to 3μeV (kB×35mK). The minimum measured rate coefficient of 6×10-10cm3s-1 is in good agreement with that derived from a Langevin model for an atomic polarizability of 143 a.u.

  10. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  11. Tracking the Solar Cycle through IBEX Observations of Energetic Neutral Atom Flux Variations at the Heliospheric Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Bzowski, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Janzen, P. H.; Karna, N.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Sokół, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    With seven years of Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations, from 2009 to 2015, we can now trace the time evolution of heliospheric energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) through over half a solar cycle. At the north and south ecliptic poles, the spacecraft attitude allows for continuous coverage of the ENA flux; thus, signal from these regions has much higher statistical accuracy and time resolution than anywhere else in the sky. By comparing the solar wind dynamic pressure measured at 1 au with the heliosheath plasma pressure derived from the observed ENA fluxes, we show that the heliosheath pressure measured at the poles correlates well with the solar cycle. The analysis requires time-shifting the ENA measurements to account for the travel time out and back from the heliosheath, which allows us to estimate the scale size of the heliosphere in the polar directions. We arrive at an estimated distance to the center of the ENA source region in the north of 220 au and in the south a distance of 190 au. We also find a good correlation between the solar cycle and the ENA energy spectra at the poles. In particular, the ENA flux for the highest IBEX energy channel (4.3 keV) is quite closely correlated with the areas of the polar coronal holes, in both the north and south, consistent with the notion that polar ENAs at this energy originate from pickup ions of the very high speed wind (˜700 km s-1) that emanates from polar coronal holes.

  12. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) intensity gradients in the heliotail during year 2003, using Cassini/INCA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dialynas, K.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we use all-sky energy-resolved (5-55 keV) energetic neutral atom (ENA) maps obtained by the Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) on board Cassini during the time period DOY 265/2003 to 268/2003, to investigate the properties of the peak-to-basin ENA emissions in the direction of the heliotail. Our conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) a relatively smooth boundary (called "transition region") between the very low (basin) and high (tail) ENA emissions from the heliosheath, with a spatial width of ~30° deg in ecl. longitude, that no theory had predicted to date, is identified in the energy range of 5-55 keV; (2) the ENA intensity gradient in this transition region is almost invariant as a function of both ecl. Latitude and energy, with an average value of ~2.4% per degree; (3) the deduced partial plasma pressure distributions in the 5-55 keV energy range are consistent with the ENA intensity distributions in the same energy range, while the ENA intensity gradient translates to a corresponding partial pressure gradient that occurs in the transition region; and (4) this partial pressure gradient is possibly not consistent with a tail magnetic field configuration that is similar to the measured magnetic fields by the Voyagers in the nose hemisphere.

  13. Shapes of Energetic Ion Spectra in Saturn's Magnetosphere Compared with those at Earth and Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's magnetosphere contains suprathermal and energetic ions that originate from a number of plasma sources including Enceladus, Titan, Saturn's atmosphere and ionosphere and the solar wind, with internal sources dominating. Although different species originate at different locations, transport processes and acceleration during or after transport distribute the energetic ions throughout the magnetosphere out to the magnetopause. In principle, the shapes of the energy spectra of these ions contain information on acceleration processes. However, because outside of about 9 RS long-term average spectra of all species are quite good power laws, it is difficult to pick one energy parameter (e.g., energy/charge or energy/nucleon) as better organizing the spectra by, for example, maintaining constant abundance ratios from low to high energies. Inside of 9 RS there are energy-dependent losses that alter the spectra but aren't directly related to acceleration. Here, using data from the Cassini/CHEMS sensor, we investigate ion spectra over the energy per charge range 3-220 keV/e in more detail with better resolution in both space and time, looking for evidence of spectral differences among species based on charge (e.g., O+ vs. O++) or plasma source (e.g., O+ (Enceladus) vs. He++ (solar wind)). We will compare Saturn's ion spectra with those from the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter and discuss implications for acceleration processes.

  14. Three dimensional approach to investigating biological effects along energetic ion beam pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinglin; Sun, Shuguang; Wang, Shanying; Li, Wenjian; Qu, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Sun, Tianren; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jufang; Zhou, Guangming; Man, Shuli; Chen, Yi; Lu, Fuping; Wei, Zengquan; Jin, Genming

    2017-01-01

    Heavy ion beams have many exciting applications, including radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors and simulation tests of space irradiation for astronauts. These beams often use a feature that concentrates the energy deposition largely along the end of the energy pathway, leading to different distributions of biological effects along the axial direction. Currently, there is relatively little information regarding the radial directional difference of biological effects along the heavy ion paths. This study utilized a filter membrane that was quantatively applied with cells to demonstrate a 3D distribution model of irradiation on biological effects in living organisms. Some results have indicated that there is excitatory effect on the non-irradiated regions with energetic ions, which may give new insights into the distribution of biological effects along the paths of heavy ion beams with mid-high energy. PMID:28294181

  15. Three dimensional approach to investigating biological effects along energetic ion beam pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinglin; Sun, Shuguang; Wang, Shanying; Li, Wenjian; Qu, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Sun, Tianren; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jufang; Zhou, Guangming; Man, Shuli; Chen, Yi; Lu, Fuping; Wei, Zengquan; Jin, Genming

    2017-03-01

    Heavy ion beams have many exciting applications, including radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors and simulation tests of space irradiation for astronauts. These beams often use a feature that concentrates the energy deposition largely along the end of the energy pathway, leading to different distributions of biological effects along the axial direction. Currently, there is relatively little information regarding the radial directional difference of biological effects along the heavy ion paths. This study utilized a filter membrane that was quantatively applied with cells to demonstrate a 3D distribution model of irradiation on biological effects in living organisms. Some results have indicated that there is excitatory effect on the non-irradiated regions with energetic ions, which may give new insights into the distribution of biological effects along the paths of heavy ion beams with mid-high energy.

  16. Magnetic states controlled by energetic ion irradiation in FeRh thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Nao.; Kosugi, S.; Matsui, T.; Iwase, A.; Saitoh, Y.; Kaneta, Y.; Kume, K.; Batchuluun, T.; Ishikawa, N.

    2010-05-15

    Changes in magnetic properties and lattice structure of FeRh films by 180 keV-10 MeV ion (H, He, and I) irradiation are studied. In spite of the irradiation with different ion species and wide range of energies, the changes in magnetization are dominated by solely a single parameter; the density of energy which is deposited through elastic collision between the ions and the samples. For the low deposition energy density, the magnetization increases with increasing the deposition energy density, while the lattice structure remains unchanged. When the deposition energy density becomes larger, however, the magnetization decreases after reaching the maximum value. The decrease in the magnetization accompanies the crystal structure change from B2 to A1. The present results imply that the magnetic state of FeRh films can be designedly controlled by the energetic ion irradiations.

  17. Observation of energetic-ion losses induced by various MHD instabilities in the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Toi, K.; Watanabe, F.; Spong, D. A.; Shimizu, A.; Osakabe, M.; Ohdachi, S.; Sakakibara, S.; LHD Experiment Group

    2010-08-01

    Energetic-ion losses induced by toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) and resistive interchange modes (RICs) were observed in neutral-beam heated plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) at a relatively low toroidal magnetic field level (<=0.75 T). The energy and pitch angle of the lost ions are detected using a scintillator-based lost-fast ion probe. Each instability increases the lost ions having a certain energy/pitch angle. TAE bursts preferentially induce energetic beam ions in co-passing orbits having energy from the injection energy E = 190 keV down to 130 keV, while RICs expel energetic ions of E = 190 keV down to ~130 keV in passing-toroidally trapped boundary orbits. Loss fluxes induced by these instabilities increase with different dependences on the magnetic fluctuation amplitude: nonlinear and linear dependences for TAEs and RICs, respectively.

  18. The Relative Deep Penetrations of Energetic Electrons and Ions into the Slot Region and Inner Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere are distributed into two regions: the inner radiation belt and the outer radiation belt, with the slot region in between separating the two belts. Though many studies have focused on the outer belt dynamics, the energetic electrons in the slot region and especially inner belt did not receive much attention until recently. A number of new features regarding electrons in the low L region have been reported lately, including the abundance of 10s-100s of keV electrons in the inner belt, the frequent deep injections of 100s of keV electrons, and 90°-minimum pitch angle distributions of 100s of keV electrons in the inner belt and slot region. In this presentation, we focus on the relative deep injections into the slot region and inner belt of energetic electrons and ions using observations from HOPE and MagEIS instruments on the Van Allen Probes. It is shown that while 10s - 100s of keV electrons penetrate commonly deep into the low L region and are persistent in the inner belt, the deep injections of ions with similar energies occur rarely, possibly due to the fast loss of ions in the low L region. The energy spectra and pitch angle distributions of electrons and ions during injections are also very different, indicating the existence of different physical mechanisms acting on them. In addition, some intriguing similarities between lower energy ions and higher energy electrons will also be discussed.

  19. Development of Spectral and Atomic Models for Diagnosing Energetic Particle Characteristics in Fast Ignition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, Joseph J

    2009-08-07

    This Final Report summarizes work performed under DOE STTR Phase II Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER86258 during the project period from August 2006 to August 2009. The project, “Development of Spectral and Atomic Models for Diagnosing Energetic Particle Characteristics in Fast Ignition Experiments,” was led by Prism Computational Sciences (Madison, WI), and involved collaboration with subcontractors University of Nevada-Reno and Voss Scientific (Albuquerque, NM). In this project, we have: Developed and implemented a multi-dimensional, multi-frequency radiation transport model in the LSP hybrid fluid-PIC (particle-in-cell) code [1,2]. Updated the LSP code to support the use of accurate equation-of-state (EOS) tables generated by Prism’s PROPACEOS [3] code to compute more accurate temperatures in high energy density physics (HEDP) plasmas. Updated LSP to support the use of Prism’s multi-frequency opacity tables. Generated equation of state and opacity data for LSP simulations for several materials being used in plasma jet experimental studies. Developed and implemented parallel processing techniques for the radiation physics algorithms in LSP. Benchmarked the new radiation transport and radiation physics algorithms in LSP and compared simulation results with analytic solutions and results from numerical radiation-hydrodynamics calculations. Performed simulations using Prism radiation physics codes to address issues related to radiative cooling and ionization dynamics in plasma jet experiments. Performed simulations to study the effects of radiation transport and radiation losses due to electrode contaminants in plasma jet experiments. Updated the LSP code to generate output using NetCDF to provide a better, more flexible interface to SPECT3D [4] in order to post-process LSP output. Updated the SPECT3D code to better support the post-processing of large-scale 2-D and 3-D datasets generated by simulation codes such as LSP. Updated atomic physics modeling to provide for

  20. Comparative investigation of the energetic ion spectra comprising the magnetospheric ring currents of the solar system

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, B H

    2014-01-01

    Investigated here are factors that control the intensities and shapes of energetic ion spectra that make up the ring current populations of the strongly magnetized planets of the solar system, specifically those of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Following a previous and similar comparative investigation of radiation belt electrons, we here turn our attention to ions. Specifically, we examine the possible role of the differential ion Kennel-Petschek limit, as moderated by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, as a standard for comparing the most intense ion spectra within the strongly magnetized planetary magnetospheres. In carrying out this investigation, the substantial complexities engendered by the very different ion composition distributions of these diverse magnetospheres must be addressed, given that the dispersion properties of the EMIC waves are strongly determined by the ion composition of the plasmas within which the waves propagate. Chosen for comparison are the ion spectra within these systems that are the most intense observed, specifically at 100 keV and 1 MeV. We find that Earth and Jupiter are unique in having their most intense ion spectra likely limited and sculpted by the Kennel-Petschek process. The ion spectra of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune reside far below their respective limits and are likely limited by interactions with gas and dust (Saturn) and by the absence of robust ion acceleration processes (Uranus and Neptune). Suggestions are provided for further testing the efficacy of the differential Kennel-Petschek limit for ions using the Van Allen Probes. PMID:26167438

  1. Energetic auroral and polar ion outflow at DE 1 altitudes Magnitude, composition, magnetic activity dependence, and long-term variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, A. W.; Lenchyshyn, L.; Shelley, E. G.; Peterson, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    Data acquired from the Dynamics Explorer I Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer in the period from September 1981 to May 1984 are used to determine the magnitude of the terrestrial ion outflow in the 0.01-17 keV/el range. The data are also employed to investigate the mass composition and topology (local time and invariant latitude distributions) of the ion outflow, as well as the outflow's magnetic activity dependence and long-term variation. The relative importance of auroral versus polar cap upflowing ions as a source of energetic plasma for various parts of the magnetosphere is examined.

  2. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  3. Observation and interpretation of energetic ion conics in Jupiter's polar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Mauk, B. H.; Paranicas, C.; Haggerty, D.; Kollmann, P.; Rymer, A.; Brown, L.; Jaskulek, S.; Schlemm, C.; Kim, C.; Peachey, J.; LaVallee, D.; Allegrini, F.; Bagenal, F.; Bolton, S.; Connerney, J.; Ebert, R. W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Levin, S.; Kurth, W. S.; McComas, D. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Ranquist, D.; Valek, P.

    2017-05-01

    NASA's Juno spacecraft successfully completed its first science polar pass over Jupiter's northern and southern aurora, with all the instruments powered, on 27 August 2016. Observations of conical energetic proton distributions at low altitudes (<6 RJ) over the northern polar region are interpreted as resulting from transversely (to the local magnetic field lines) accelerated H+ at a position planetward of the point of observation. The proton conics were observed within a broad region of upward beaming electrons and were accompanied by broadband low-frequency wave emissions as well as low-altitude trapped magnetospheric protons and heavy ions. The characteristic energies associated with these accelerated ion conics are 100 times more energetic than similar distributions observed in the Earth's auroral region and similar in energy to those found at Saturn. In addition, the ion conics also exhibited pitch angle dispersion with time that is interpreted as a consequence of the structure of the source location. Mapping these distributions along magnetic field lines connected from the spacecraft to the ionosphere suggests that the source region exists at altitudes between 3 and 5 RJ. These new and exciting observations of accelerated ions over the polar region of Jupiter open up new areas for comparative planetary auroral physics.

  4. Rapid oscillations of energetic ion flux near the Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Petrukovich, Anatoli

    This study investigated rapid oscillations of energetic ion flux near the Earth's Bow Shock that were found in the data obtained by MEP detectors in the Spektr-R/Plazma-F missions and Solid State Telescope (SST) in the THEMIS mission. In these data, we found several hundred oscillation events in the energy range from 50 to 200 keV in the periods of 10 - 30 seconds. SST data obtained in the SIF (Full Distributions) quick mode in the THEMIS mission provide energetic particle data with an energy range from 25 keV to 6 MeV, three seconds time resolution, and 360°x148° field-of-view with 64 separated observation fields, which allow detailed studies of the properties of the oscillations. In the poster presentation, we present some examples of the oscillations of energetic ion flux and results of the SST data analysis that shows relationships between the interplanetary magnetic field, parameters of the solar wind, and satellite positions in the oscillations.

  5. MHD-induced Energetic Ion Loss during H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Andre; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; A.L. Roquemore; and the NSTX Team

    2004-03-15

    MHD-induced energetic ion loss in neutral-beam-heated H-mode [high-confinement mode] discharges in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] is discussed. A rich variety of energetic ion behavior resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity is observed in the NSTX using a horizontally scanning Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) whose sightline views across the three co-injected neutral beams. For example, onset of an n = 2 mode leads to relatively slow decay of the energetic ion population (E {approx} 10-100 keV) and consequently the neutron yield. The effect of reconnection events, sawteeth, and bounce fishbones differs from that observed for low-n, low-frequency, tearing-type MHD modes. In this case, prompt loss of the energetic ion population occurs on a time scale of less than or equal to 1 ms and a precipitous drop in the neutron yield occurs. This paper focuses on MHD-induced ion loss during H-mode operation in NSTX. After H-mode onset, the NPA charge-exchange spectrum usually exhibits a significant loss of energetic ions only for E > E(sub)b/2 where E(sub)b is the beam injection energy. The magnitude of the energetic ion loss was observed to decrease with increasing tangency radius, R(sub)tan, of the NPA sightline, increasing toroidal field, B(sub)T, and increasing neutral-beam injection energy, E(sub)b. TRANSP modeling suggests that MHD-induced ion loss is enhanced during H-mode operation due to an evolution of the q and beam deposition profiles that feeds both passing and trapped ions into the region of low-n MHD activity. ORBIT code analysis of particle interaction with a model magnetic perturbation supported the energy selectivity of the MHD-induced loss observed in the NPA measurements. Transport analysis with the TRANSP code using a fast-ion diffusion tool to emulate the observed MHD-induced energetic ion loss showed significant modifications of the neutral- beam heating as well as the power balance, thermal diffusivities, energy confinement times

  6. Observation of collisions between cold Li atoms and Yb+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joger, J.; Fürst, H.; Ewald, N.; Feldker, T.; Tomza, M.; Gerritsma, R.

    2017-09-01

    We report on the observation of cold collisions between 6Li atoms and Yb+ ions. This combination of species has recently been proposed as the most suitable for reaching the quantum limit in hybrid atom-ion systems, due to its large mass ratio. For atoms and ions prepared in the 1/2 2S ground state, the charge-transfer and association rate is found to be at least 103 times smaller than the Langevin collision rate. These results confirm the excellent prospects of 6Li-Yb+ for sympathetic cooling and quantum information applications. For ions prepared in the excited electronic states 1/2 2P, 3/2 2D, and 7/2 2F, we find that the reaction rate is dominated by charge transfer and does not depend on the ionic isotope or the collision energy in the range ˜1 -120 mK . The low charge-transfer rate for ground-state collisions is corroborated by theory, but the 4 f shell in the Yb+ ion prevents an accurate prediction for the charge-transfer rate of the 1/2 2P, 3/2 2D, and 7/2 2F states. Using ab initio methods of quantum chemistry we calculate the atom-ion interaction potentials up to energies of 30 ×103cm-1 , and use these to give qualitative explanations of the observed rates.

  7. Energetic atomic and ionic oxygen textured optical surfaces for blood glucose monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and the resulting product thereof comprising a solid light-conducting fiber with a point of attachment and having a textured surface site consisting a textured distal end prepared by being placed in a vacuum and then subjected to directed hyperthermal beams comprising oxygen ions or atoms. The textured distal end comprises cones or pillars that are spaced upon from each other by less than 1 micron and are extremely suitable to prevent cellular components of blood from entering the valleys between the cones or pillars so as to effectively separate the cellular components in the blood from interfering with optical sensing of the glucose concentration for diabetic patients.

  8. Stream interfaces and energetic ions II: Ulysses test of Pioneer results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Siscoe, George L.; Wibberenz, Gerd; Kunow, Horst; Gosling, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Ulysses measurements of energetic and solar wind particles taken near 5 AU between 20 and 30 degrees south latitude during a well-developed recurring corotating interaction region (CIR) show that the CIR's corotating energetic ion population (CEIP) associated with the trailing reverse shock starts within the CIR at the stream interface. This is consistent with an earlier result obtained by Pioneers 10 and 11 in the ecliptic plane between 4 and 6 AU. The Ulysses/Pioneer finding is noteworthy since the stream interface is not magnetically connected to the reverse shock, but lies 12-17 corotation hours from it. Thus, the finding seems to be inconsistent with the basic model that generates CEIP particles at the reverse shock and propagates them along field lines. Eliminating the inconsistency probably entails an extension of the standard model such as cross-field diffusion or a non-shock energization process operating near the stream interface closer to the sun.

  9. Numerical simulations of toroidal Alfven instabilities excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Chen, Liu; Santoro, R. A.

    2000-06-01

    Extensive magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic hybrid simulations have been carried out to study the excitations of Alfven instabilities by trapped energetic ions in tokamak plasmas. Depending on the parameters, the most unstable mode can be either the toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) or the energetic-particle mode (EPM). In both cases, the dominant instability driving mechanism is the resonance with the trapped-particle magnetic precessional drifts. The mode frequencies of the most unstable modes, meanwhile, tend to be near the toroidal frequency gap in order to minimize the continuum damping. It is also demonstrated that the instabilities can be quenched by reversing the magnetic precessional drifts via either negative magnetic shear or locating the magnetic turning points in the inner (strong B) side of the torus. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Stabilization of energetic-ion-driven MHD modes by ECCD in Heliotron J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Nagae, Y.; Sugimoto, Y.; Nakamura, Y. I.; Weir, G.; Marushchenko, N.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohshima, S.; Konoshima, S.; Shi, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Lee, H. Y.; Zang, L.; Arai, S.; Watada, H.; Fukushima, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Kenmochi, N.; Motojima, G.; Yoshimura, Y.; Mukai, K.; Volpe, F.; Estrada, T.; Sano, F.

    2013-11-01

    Second harmonic electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been applied in the stellarator/heliotron (S/H) device, Heliotron J, to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. The energetic particle mode (EPM) of 60-90 kHz frequency, one of the energetic-ion-driven MHD modes, is excited in a plasma heated by co- and counter-neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The EPM has been stabilized by counter-ECCD which decreases the rotational transform. Localized EC current driven by a few kA at the central region modifies the rotational transform profile, ι/2π, leading to the formation of a high magnetic shear at the radius where the mode is excited. An experiment scanning the EC-driven current shows that there is a threshold in magnetic shear and/or rotational transform to stabilize the EPM.

  11. Observation of self-sputtering in energetic condensation of metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2004-06-16

    The condensation of energetic metal ions on a surface may cause self-sputtering even in the absence of substrate bias. Charge-state-averaged self-sputtering yields were determined for both zirconium and gold ions generated by a cathodic vacuum arc. Films were deposited on differently biased substrates exposed to streaming Zr and Au vacuum arc plasma. The self-sputtering yields for both metals were estimated to be about 0.05 in the absence of bias, and exceeding 0.5 when bias reached-50 V. These surprisingly high values can be reconciled with binary collision theory and molecular dynamics calculations taking high the kinetic and potential energy of vacuum arc ions into account.

  12. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-09-15

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  13. Evaluation of Surface Damage of Organic Films due to Irradiation with Energetic Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Masaki; Hontani, Yusaku; Ichiki, Kazuya; Seki, Toshio; Ibuki, Sachi; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Matsuo, Jiro; Aoki, Takaaki

    2011-01-07

    The surface of L-leucine films irradiated with an Ar{sub 5000} cluster ion beam (5 keV) was characterized by using the X-ray reflective (XRR) measurement method, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry. No significant damage was detected on the surface of the L-leucine films irradiated with the Ar cluster ion beam. Therefore, the large cluster-low-energy (about 1 eV/atom) beam would be suitable for low-damage etching of organic materials.

  14. Multi-spacecraft Analysis of Energetic Heavy Ion and Interplanetary Shock Properties in Energetic Storm Particle Events near 1 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R. W.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Jian, L. K.; Li, G.; Mason, G. M.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the longitude distribution of and relationship between interplanetary (IP) shock properties and ˜0.1-20 MeV nucleon-1 O and Fe ions during seven multi-spacecraft energetic storm particle (ESP) events at 1 au. These ESP events were observed at two spacecraft and were primarily associated with low Mach number, quasi-perpendicular shocks. Key observations include the following: (i) the Alfvén Mach number increased from east to west of the coronal mass ejection source longitude, while the shock speed, compression ratios, and obliquity showed no clear dependence; (ii) the O and Fe time intensity profiles and peak intensities varied significantly between longitudinally separated spacecraft observing the same event, the peak intensities being larger near the nose and smaller along the flank of the IP shock; (iii) the O and Fe peak intensities had weak to no correlations with the shock parameters; (iv) the Fe/O time profiles showed intra-event variations upstream of the shock that disappeared downstream of the shock, where values plateaued to those comparable to the mean Fe/O of solar cycle 23; (v) the O and Fe spectral index ranged from ˜1.0 to 3.4, the Fe spectra being softer in most events; and (vi) the observed spectral index was softer than the value predicted from the shock compression ratio in most events. We conclude that while the variations in IP shock properties may account for some variations in O and Fe properties within these multi-spacecraft events, detailed examination of the upstream seed population and IP turbulence, along with modeling, are required to fully characterize these observations.

  15. New Atomic Ion SIMS Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, K. S.; Fazel, K. C.; Fahey, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry of particulates and few micrometer regions of samples by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a very useful analytical tool. However, there are limitations caused by interferences from molecular species, such as hydrides, oxides, and carbides. Above mass 90 u, these interferences (> 104 M/ΔM) can exceed the resolving power of SIMS. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is capable of eliminating such molecular ion interferences, but lacks spatial information and generally requires use of negative ions. This requirement limits its sensitivity, since actinide and lanthanide elements preferentially generate positive atomic ions (~104 : 1). The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has installed a hybrid SIMS-AMS system, using a Single Stage AMS as a replacement for the normal Cameca IMS 4f SIMS electron multiplier detector. The NRL design enables analysis of either positive or negative ions. Thus, this system offers the potential to provide SIMS-like particle and micro-scale analysis without a forest of signals from molecular species, and is capable of measuring important positive atomic ions. This should improve measurement sensitivity and precision to determine isotopic distributions of actinides, lanthanides, and transition metals; and elemental abundances of trace species in particles or small features. Initial measurements show that molecule intensities can be reduced by seven orders of magnitude while atomic ion intensities are only diminished ~50%. We have chosen to call this instrument an atomic ion SIMS, or ai-SIMS, for short. The effect of basic operational parameters such as ion energy, charge state, molecule destruction gas and its pressure will be described, and examples of the benefits and capabilities of ai-SIMS will be presented.

  16. Ion-atom association reactions in the rare gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, A. S.; Roberts, R. E.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple resonance theory of three-body ion-atom association reactions is presented. The reaction is considered as proceeding through the formation of a long lived orbiting resonance complex between the atom and the ion. The population of these quasi-bound states is estimated assuming thermal equilibrium. A stable molecular ion may then be formed upon deactivation of the complex by collision with a third body. Various simplifying approximations to the potential curves and surfaces are employed. Furthermore, the deactivation cross sections for the relevant complexes are estimated from the corresponding atomic 'sizes.' A simple analytical formula for the three-body rate constant is thus derived. Reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained for He(+) in He and fair agreement for other light systems.

  17. Bremsstrahlung spectra from atoms and ions at low relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonina, N. B.; Pratt, R. H.

    1999-09-01

    Analytic expressions for bremsstrahlung spectra from neutral atoms and ions, including the polarizational bremsstrahlung contribution in a stripped atom approximation, are developed for electron scattering at energies of 10-2000 keV. A modified Elwert factor and a simple higher Born correction are used for the Coulomb spectrum, with ordinary bremsstrahlung screening effects in ions and atoms adequately characterized in the non-relativistic Born approximation. In parallel with the development of this analytic description, new numerical results are obtained for ordinary bremsstrahlung from ions and from bare nuclei, appreciably extending the available data set which can be used to study dependences on element, ionicity, energy and the fraction of incident energy radiated. The accuracy of predictions with the analytic expressions is then determined by comparison with the full numerical relativistic partial-wave results for ordinary bremsstrahlung and with non-relativistic numerical results in the Born approximation or in partial waves for the polarizational amplitude.

  18. Time-of-flight mass spectrographs—From ions to neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, E.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Kucharek, H.; Popecki, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    After their introduction to space physics in the mid 1980s time-of-flight (TOF) spectrographs have become a main staple in spaceborne mass spectrometry. They have largely replaced magnetic spectrometers, except when extremely high mass resolution is required to identify complex molecules, for example, in the vicinity of comets or in planetary atmospheres. In combination with electrostatic analyzers and often solid state detectors, TOF spectrographs have become key instruments to diagnose space plasma velocity distributions, mass, and ionic charge composition. With a variety of implementation schemes that also include isochronous electric field configurations, TOF spectrographs can respond to diverse science requirements. This includes a wide range in mass resolution to allow the separation of medium heavy isotopes or to simply provide distributions of the major species, such as H, He, and O, to obtain information on source tracers or mass fluxes. With a top-hat analyzer at the front end, or in combination with deflectors for three-axis stabilized spacecraft, the distribution function of ions can be obtained with good time resolution. Most recently, the reach of TOF ion mass spectrographs has been extended to include energetic neutral atoms. After selecting the arrival direction with mechanical collimation, followed by conversion to ions, adapted TOF sensors form a new branch of the spectrograph family tree. We review the requirements, challenges, and implementation schemes for ion and neutral atom spectrographs, including potential directions for the future, while largely avoiding overlap with complementary contributions in this special issue.

  19. Atomic physics experiments with stored cooled heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wide ranging interest in the development of heavy ion synchrotrons with electron beam cooling is evident from the number of projects presently under way. Although much of the initial motivation for these rings stemmed from nuclear and particle physics, a considerable amount of atomic physics experimentation is planned. This paper surveys some of the new opportunities in atomic physics which may be made available with storage ring systems. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Saturation Effect of Projectile Excitation in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukoyama, Takeshi; Lin, Chii-Dong

    Calculations of projectile K-shell electron excitation cross sections for He-like ions during ion-atom collisions have been performed in the distortion approximation by the use of Herman-Skillman wave functions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for several targets. The excitation cross sections deviate from the first-Born approximation and show the saturation effect as a function of target atomic number. This effect can be explained as the distortion of the projectile electronic states by the target nucleus.

  1. Atom probe field ion microscopy characterizations of VVER steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Othen, P.J.; Brauer, G.

    1993-07-01

    An atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) characterization of Soviet types 15Kh2MFA Cr-Mo-V (VVER 440) and 15Kh2NMFA Ni-Cr-Mo-V (VVER 1000) pressure vessel steels has been performed. Field ion microscopy has revealed that the lath boundaries in unirradiated VVER 440 and VVER 1000 steels are decorated with a thin film of brightly-imaging molybdenum carbonitride precipitates and some coarser vanadium carbides. Atom probe analysis has revealed significant enrichments of phosphorous at the lath boundaries.

  2. Atomic structure and defect energetics of LiCoO{sub 2} grain boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hak-Sung; Park, Chanbum; Oh, Chang-Seok; Lee, Hun-Seok; Seo, HyangIm; Hyun, Yong-Taek; Lee, Dong-Won

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • We model the sample grain boundary of LiCoO2, one of important Li cathode materials. • Rigid body translation was found the asymmetric GB is more stable than symmetric GB. • The vacancy formation energy of Li and O was estimated with first principles calculations. • This model boundary can help to find a new dopant to improve Li diffusions. - Abstract: An atomic structure of LiCoO{sub 2} model grain boundary, Σ2 [1120](1102), is introduced and grain boundary energies with rigid body translations are investigated systematically to find the most stable interface structures. It is found that the coordinated structures of Co and O in the vicinity of grain boundary are strongly related to grain boundary energy. Examining nonstoichiometry at grain boundary, the defect energetics of Li and O site at grain boundary are estimated. In addition, the effect of grain boundary on Li diffusion is investigated to calculate Li diffusion across grain boundary.

  3. Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the Heliosphere Measured with ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, André; Wurz, Peter; Kollmann, Peter; Brandt, Pontus C.; Bzowski, Maciej; Sokół, Justyna M.; Kubiak, Marzena A.; Grigoriev, Alexander; Barabash, Stas

    2013-04-01

    We re-analyze a residual signal of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) in the 0.4-5.0 keV range across the sky obtained from the Neutral Particle Detector of the ASPERA-3&4 experiments on board the Mars and Venus Express satellites. Due to improved knowledge of sensor characteristics and exclusion of datasets affected by instrument effects, the typical intensity of the ENA signal obtained by ASPERA-3 is an order of magnitude lower than in earlier reports. The discrepancy between ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 no longer exists. We now also correct the non-planetary signal for Compton-Getting and for ionization loss processes under the assumption of a heliospheric origin of the ENAs. We find spectral shapes and intensities (1×103 cm-2 sr-1 s-1) consistent with those measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). The principal advantage of ASPERA-3&4 with respect to the IBEX sensors is the higher spectral resolution. In this presentation we discuss the physical significance of the spectral shapes and their potential variation across the sky. At present, these observations are the only independent confirmation of the heliospheric ENAs measured with IBEX in this energy range. The ASPERA-3&4 measurements also allow to check for a temporal variation of the heliospheric signal as they were obtained between 2003 and 2007, whereas IBEX is operational since the end of 2008.

  4. Latitude, Energy, and Time Variations of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral indices Measured by IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; McComas, D. J.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H. O.; Schwadron, N.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Allegrini, F.; Pogorelov, N.; Zank, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the latitude, energy, and time variations of the globally distributed ~0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 5 years of the mission. Our previous results based on the first 3 years of IBEX observations showed that the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (~0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ~2.29 and ~3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. While these results confirmed the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere, we also showed that, unlike previous reports, the ~0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could not be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, and that they depend on energy and latitude. In this work we extend the above results to include years 4 and 5 of IBEX observations and investigate if the spectral indices vary as a function of time. Finally, we discuss implications of our results on models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  5. Physics-based all-atom modeling of RNA energetics and structure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Louis G; Zhao, Jianbo; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2017-09-01

    The database of RNA sequences is exploding, but knowledge of energetics, structures, and dynamics lags behind. All-atom computational methods, such as molecular dynamics, hold promise for closing this gap. New algorithms and faster computers have accelerated progress in improving the reliability and accuracy of predictions. Currently, the methods can facilitate refinement of experimentally determined nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray structures, but are 'unreliable' for predictions based only on sequence. Much remains to be discovered, however, about the many molecular interactions driving RNA folding and the best way to approximate them quantitatively. The large number of parameters required means that a wide variety of experimental results will be required to benchmark force fields and different approaches. As computational methods become more reliable and accessible, they will be used by an increasing number of biologists, much as x-ray crystallography has expanded. Thus, many fundamental physical principles underlying the computational methods are described. This review presents a summary of the current state of molecular dynamics as applied to RNA. It is designed to be helpful to students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty who are considering or starting computational studies of RNA. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1422. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1422. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Low-Energy Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of Io Plasma and Neutral Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wieser, Martin; Wieser, Gabriella S.; Wurz, Peter; Krupp, Norbert; Brandt, Pontus C.

    2014-05-01

    Io's plasma neutral tori play significant roles in the Jovian magnetosphere. We present a feasibility study of measuring low-energy energetic neutral atoms (LENAs) generated from the tori. We calculate the LENA flux between 10 eV and 3 keV, which covers the energy range of the corotational plasma flow. The differential flux is typically 103-105cm-2sr-1s-1eV -1 near the energy of the corotation measured from the Ganymede orbit. It is above the detection level of the planned LENA sensor that is to be flown to the Jupiter system with a time integral of 0.01-1 seconds. The flux is typically observed from the dawn side of Jupiter. The observed flux will exhibit periodicities though the assumed ENA generation is time independent, which can be attributed to the Jovian magnetosphere rotation and the rotation of Io around Jupiter. The energy spectra will exhibit dispersion signatures, because of the non-negligible flight time of the LENAs from Io to the satellite. In 2030, the Jupiter exploration mission JUICE will conduct a LENA measurement with a LENA instrument, the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). From the LENA observations collected by JNA, we will be able to derive characteristic quantities, such as the density, velocity, velocity distribution function, and composition of plasma-torus particles. We also discuss the possible physics to be explored by JNA in addition to the constraints for operating the sensor and analyzing the obtained dataset.

  7. Low-energy energetic neutral atom imaging of Io plasma and neutral tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wieser, Martin; Wieser, Gabriella S.; Wurz, Peter; Krupp, Norbert; Brandt, Pontus C.:son

    2015-04-01

    Io's plasma and neutral tori play significant roles in the Jovian magnetosphere. We present feasibility studies of measuring low-energy energetic neutral atoms (LENAs) generated from the Io tori. We calculate the LENA flux between 10 eV and 3 keV. The energy range includes the corotational plasma flow energy. The expected differential flux at Ganymede distance is typically 103-105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 eV-1 near the energy of the corotation. It is above the detection level of the planned LENA sensor that is to be flown to the Jupiter system with integration times of 0.01-1 s. The flux has strong asymmetry with respective to the Io phase. The observations will exhibit periodicities, which can be attributed to the Jovian magnetosphere rotation and the rotation of Io around Jupiter. The energy spectra will exhibit dispersion signatures, because of the non-negligible flight time of the LENAs from Io to the satellite. In 2030, the Jupiter exploration mission JUICE will conduct a LENA measurement with a LENA instrument, the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). From the LENA observations collected by JNA, we will be able to derive characteristic quantities, such as the density, velocity, velocity distribution function, and composition of plasma-torus particles. We also discuss the possible physics to be explored by JNA in addition to the constraints for operating the sensor and analyzing the obtained dataset.

  8. Latitude, Energy, and Time Variations of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral indices Measured by IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; McComas, David; Funsten, Herbert; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zank, Gary; Schwadron, Nathan; Fuselier, Stephen; Allegrini, Frederic; Dayeh, Maher A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the latitude, energy, and time variations of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 5 years of the mission. Our previous results based on the first 3 years of IBEX observations showed that the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ˜2.29 and ˜3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur within ±30° of the equator. While these results confirmed the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere, we also showed that, unlike previous reports, the ˜0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could not be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, and that they depend on energy and latitude. In this paper we extend the above results to include years 4 and 5 of IBEX observations and investigate if the spectral indices vary as a function of time. Finally, we discuss implications of our results on models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  9. Dense blocks of energetic ions driven by multi-petawatt lasers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, S. M.; Liu, M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.; Chen, M.; Yu, L. L.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ion accelerators have the advantages of compact size, high density, and short bunch duration over conventional accelerators. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to simultaneously enhance the yield and quality of laser-driven ion beams for practical applications. Here we propose a scheme to address this challenge via the use of emerging multi-petawatt lasers and a density-modulated target. The density-modulated target permits its ions to be uniformly accelerated as a dense block by laser radiation pressure. In addition, the beam quality of the accelerated ions is remarkably improved by embedding the target in a thick enough substrate, which suppresses hot electron refluxing and thus alleviates plasma heating. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that almost all ions in a solid-density plasma of a few microns can be uniformly accelerated to about 25% of the speed of light by a laser pulse at an intensity around 1022 W/cm2. The resulting dense block of energetic ions may drive fusion ignition and more generally create matter with unprecedented high energy density. PMID:26924793

  10. Dense blocks of energetic ions driven by multi-petawatt lasers.

    PubMed

    Weng, S M; Liu, M; Sheng, Z M; Murakami, M; Chen, M; Yu, L L; Zhang, J

    2016-02-29

    Laser-driven ion accelerators have the advantages of compact size, high density, and short bunch duration over conventional accelerators. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to simultaneously enhance the yield and quality of laser-driven ion beams for practical applications. Here we propose a scheme to address this challenge via the use of emerging multi-petawatt lasers and a density-modulated target. The density-modulated target permits its ions to be uniformly accelerated as a dense block by laser radiation pressure. In addition, the beam quality of the accelerated ions is remarkably improved by embedding the target in a thick enough substrate, which suppresses hot electron refluxing and thus alleviates plasma heating. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that almost all ions in a solid-density plasma of a few microns can be uniformly accelerated to about 25% of the speed of light by a laser pulse at an intensity around 10(22) W/cm(2). The resulting dense block of energetic ions may drive fusion ignition and more generally create matter with unprecedented high energy density.

  11. Electron–Ion Intensity Dropouts in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events during Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.

    2017-09-01

    Since the field-line mixing model of Giacalone et al. suggests that ion dropouts cannot happen in the “gradual” solar energetic particle (SEP) event because of the large size of the particle source region in the event, the observational evidence of ion dropouts in the gradual SEP event should challenge the model. We have searched for the presence of ion dropouts in the gradual SEP event during solar cycle 23. From 10 SEP events the synchronized occurrence of ion and electron dropouts is identified in 12 periods. Our main observational facts, including the mean width of electron–ion dropout periods being consistent with the solar wind correlation scale, during the dropout period the dominance of the slab turbulence component and the enhanced turbulence power parallel to the mean magnetic field, and the ion gyroradius dependence of the edge steepness in dropout periods, are all in support of the solar wind turbulence origin of dropout events. Also, our observation indicates that a wide longitude distribution of SEP events could be due to the increase of slab turbulence fraction with the increased longitude distance from the flare-associated active region.

  12. A Modular Quantum System of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, David Alexander

    Scaling up controlled quantum systems to involve large numbers of qubits remains one of the outstanding challenges of quantum information science. One path toward scalability is the use of a modular architecture where adjacent qubits may be entangled with applied electromagnetic fields, and remote qubits may be entangled using photon interference. Trapped atomic ion qubits are one of the most promising platforms for scaling up quantum systems by combining long coherence times with high fidelity entangling operations between proximate and remote qubits. In this thesis, I present experimental progress on combining entanglement between remote atomic ions separated by 1 meter with near-field entanglement between atomic ions in the same ion trap. I describe the experimental improvements to increase the remote entanglement rate by orders of magnitude to nearly 5 per second. This is the first experimental demonstration where the remote entanglement rate exceeds the decoherence rate of the entangled qubits. The flexibility of creating remote entanglement through photon interference is demonstrated by using the interference of distinguishable photons without sacrificing remote entanglement rate or fidelity. Next I describe the use of master clock in combination with a frequency comb to lock the phases of all laser-induced interactions between remote ion traps while removing optical phase stability requirements. The combination of both types of entanglement gates to create a small quantum network are described. Finally, I present ways to mitigate cross talk between photonic and memory qubits by using different trapped ion species. I show preliminary work on performing state detection of nuclear spin 0 ions by using entanglement between atomic ion spin and photon polarization. These control techniques may be important for building a large-scale modular quantum system.

  13. Spectroscopic study of energetic helium-ion irradiation effects on nuclear graphite tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Wan; Lee, K. W.; Choi, D. M.; Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-02-01

    Helium ion-irradiation effects on the nuclear graphite tiles were studied in order to understand the structural modifications and damages that can be produced by fusion reaction in tokamaks. The surface morphological changes due to increasing dose of the irradiation were examined by the field-effect scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy elucidated the changes in the shallow surface bonding configurations caused by the energetic irradiation. Raman spectroscopy revealed the structural defects and diamond-like carbon sites that increased with increasing irradiation dose, and the average inter-defect distance was found from the Raman peak intensities as a function of the irradiation dose.

  14. Observations of Energetic Ions and Electrons in the Distant Heliosphere: 2001 - 2005.0

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Frank B.; Stone, Edward C.; Cummings, Alan C.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Heikkila, Bryant C.; Lal, Nand; Richardson, John D.; Webber, William R.

    2005-08-01

    As Voyager 1 (V1) moves closer to the heliospheric termination shock (TS), a new energetic particle population is observed: Termination Shock Particle events (TSP). Interplanetary disturbances in the form of merged interaction regions (MIRs) -- identified using Voyager 2 (V2) data -- have a major effect on the V1 TSP events from their onset to termination along with triggering episodic increases in higher energy ions (35 MeV H) and MeV electrons. The nature of these interactions appear to evolve as V1 moves closer to the TS.

  15. Transport of Energetic Ions in the Ring Current During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, Lynn M.; Kaufmann, Richard

    2001-01-01

    In the final year (plus no-cost extentions) of this grant, we have: Used the particle tracing code to perform a systematic study of the expected energy spectra over the full range of local times in the ring current using a variety of electric and magnetic field models. Shown that the Weimer electric field is superior to the Volland-Stern electric field in reproducing the observed energy spectra on the AMPTE CCE spacecraft. Redone our analysis of the pitch angle spectra of energetic ions during storms in the magnetosphere, using a larger data set, and a more reliable classification technique.

  16. Ab initio research of stopping power for energetic ions in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Meng, Xu-Jun; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    A new physical scenario is suggested to estimate the stopping power of energetic α particles in solid-density Be, Na, and Al at room temperature in an ab initio way based on the average atom model. In the scenario the stopping power is caused by the transition of free electrons to higher energy states and the ionization of bound electrons of the atom. Our results are found generally in good agreement with the recommended data in Al, Be and Na as well as the experimental data in Al. A comparison of energy loss with the recent experiment of protons in Be indicates that the scenario is more reasonable than the local density approximation in this case.

  17. Negative ion production in energetic O- and C- ions scattering on HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Pinyang; Xiao, Yunqing; Gao, Lei; Liu, Yuefeng; Qiu, Shunli; Xiong, Feifei; Lu, Jianjie; Guo, Yanling; Chen, Ximeng

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we present negative-ion fractions as a function of exit velocity and angle after keV-energy negative oxygen and carbon ions scattering on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, at a scattering angle of 38°. The negative-ion fractions increase monotonously with the increase of exit velocity for specular scattering, while negative-ion fractions present a bell-shaped dependence on exit angle. In order to gain further insight into the nature of charge transfer on HOPG, a modified charge transfer model involving the contribution of positive ions has been proposed and roughly reproduced the velocity and angle dependences of negative-ion fractions.

  18. On resonant destabilization of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes by circulating and trapped energetic ions/alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Zonca, F.; Chen, L.

    1991-10-01

    Toroidal Alfven eigenmodes are shown to be resonantly destabilized by both circulating and trapped energetic ions/alpha particles. In particular, the energetic circulating ions are shown to resonate with the mode not only at the Alfven speed ({upsilon}{sub A}), but also one-third of this speed, while resonances exist between trapped energetic ions and the wave when {upsilon} = {upsilon}{sub A}/21{epsilon}{sup {1/2}} (l=integer, {epsilon}=r/R is the local inverse aspect ratio), although the instability becomes weaker for resonances other than the fundamental. The oft-quoted criterion that instability requires super-Alfvenic ion velocities is thus sufficient but not necessary. 14 refs.

  19. The Moon observed in Energetic Neutral Atoms: Review of the Scientific Findings from SARA/CENA on board Chandrayaan-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, Audrey; Wurz, Peter; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Bhardwaj, Anil; Dhanya, Mb; Asamura, Kazushi

    2017-04-01

    The Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) instrument on board Chandrayaan-1 was exceptionally successful. The instrument not only achieved all its set science goals but also revealed several hitherto unknown and unexpected properties of the solar wind interaction with the lunar surface. SARA's scientific findings can be divided into two groups based on the nature of the particles detected: The first group contains findings gained from ion measurements (from SWIM, SARA's ion sensor) whereas the second group contains findings gained from energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements (from CENA, SARA's ENA sensor). Here, we present a review of all scientific findings based on ENA measurements. Since the Moon is constantly bombarded by solar wind ions. Until recently, it was tacitly assumed that the ions that impinge onto the lunar surface are almost completely absorbed, with less than 1% reflection, (e.g. Crider and Vondrak, Adv. Space Res., 2002; Feldman et al., JGR, 2000). However, recent observations conducted showed that on average 16% of the impinging solar wind ions are reflected as ENAs (e.g. McComas et al., GRL, 2009; Wieser et al., PSS, 2009; Vorburger et al., JGR, 2013). The energy spectrum of the reflected ENAs is broader than the spectrum of the incident solar wind protons (Futaana et al., JGR, 2012; Harada et al., JGR, 2014), and the characteristic energy is < 50% of the incident solar wind characteristic energy. This hints at multiple scattering processes taking place on the lunar surface. Determination of the ENA angular backscatter function showed that, contrary to expectations, as the solar zenith angle (SZA) increases, particles scatter more toward the sunward direction than in the anti-sunward direction (Vorburger et al., GRL, 2011; Lue et al., JGR, 2016). The ENA reflection ratio is rather featureless over the lunar surface (Vorburger et al., JGR., 2013), showing only strong variations at local crustal magnetic fields due to the interaction of the

  20. Loss of atomic oxygen in mass spectrometer ion sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, L. R.; Nier, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    A gas beam consisting of a mixture of atomic and molecular oxygen has been directed at the ion source of a mass spectrometer like those used in sounding rockets for determining the neutral composition of the lower thermosphere. The loss of atomic oxygen on mass spectrometer surfaces was evaluated by flagging the beam in several ways and comparing the experimental results with predicted values. The results obtained suggest that in rocket flights using similar instruments the atomic oxygen densities computed assuming no-loss conditions may be low by a factor of 2.5. Studies made using a beam containing tracer O-18 indicate that carbon dioxide observed when atomic oxygen enters the source is formed in a reaction involving atomic oxygen from the beam and carbon monoxide from the surfaces bombarded.

  1. Stream interfaces and energetic ions 2: Ulysses test of Pioneer results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Siscoe, George L.; Wibberez, Gerd; Kunow, Horst; Gosling, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Ulysses measurements of energetic and solar wind particles taken near 5 AU between 20 and 30 degrees south latitude during a well-developed recurring corotating interaction region (CIR) show that the CIR's corotating energetic ion population (CEIP) associated with the trailing reverse shock starts within the CIR at the stream interface. This is consistent with an earlier result obtained by Pioneers 10 and 11 in the ecliptic plane between 4 and 6 AU. The Ulysses/Pioneer finding noteworthy since the stream interface is not magnetically connected to the reverse shock but lies 12-17 corotation hours from it. Thus, the finding to be inconsistent with the basic model that generates CEIP particles at the reverse shock and propagates them along field lines Eliminating the inconsistency probably entails an extension of the standard model. We consider two possible extensions cross-field diffusion and energetic particles generation closer to the sun in the gap between the stream interface and the reverse shock.

  2. Effects of Low Energetic Neutral Atoms on Martian and Venusian Dayside Exospheric Temperature Estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenegger, Herbert I. M.; Lammer, Helmut; Kulikov, Yuri N.; Kazeminejad, Shahin; Molina-Cuberos, Gregorio H.; Rodrigo, Rafael; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2006-10-01

    conditions and that the response of the upper atmosphere temperature on Mars to solar activity near the ionization maximum is essentially the same as on Venus. The reason for this discrepancy between exospheric temperature determinations from topside plasma scale heights and electron distributions near the ionospheric maximum seems to lie in the fact that thermal and photochemical equilibrium applies only at altitudes below 170 km, whereas topside scale heights are derived for much higher altitudes where they are modified by transport processes and where local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions are violated. Moreover, from simulating the energy density distribution of photochemically produced moderately energetic H, C and O atoms, as well as CO molecules, we argue that exospheric temperatures inferred from Lyman-α dayglow and UV airglow observations result in too high values, because these particles, as well as energetic neutral atoms, transformed from solar wind protons into hydrogen atoms via charge exchange, may contribute to the observed planetary hot neutral gas coronae. Because the low exospheric temperatures inferred from neutral gas mass spectrometer and aerobraking data, as well as from CO+ 2 UV doublet emissions near 180 260 nm obtained from the Mars Express SPICAM UV spectrograph suggest rather low heating efficiencies, some hitherto unidentified additional IR-cooling mechanism in the thermospheres of both Venus and Mars is likely to exist.

  3. Effects of Low Energetic Neutral Atoms on Martian and Venusian Dayside Exospheric Temperature Estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenegger, Herbert I. M.; Lammer, Helmut; Kulikov, Yuri N.; Kazeminejad, Shahin; Molina-Cuberos, Gregorio H.; Rodrigo, Rafael; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    conditions and that the response of the Upper atmosphere temperature on Mars to solar activity near the ionization maximum is essentially the same as on Venus. The reason for this discrepancy between exospheric temperature determinations from topside plasma scale heights and electron distributions near the ionospheric maximum seems to lie in the fact that thermal and photochemical equilibrium applies only at altitudes below 170 km, whereas topside scale heights are derived for much higher altitudes where they are modified by transport processes and where local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions are violated. Moreover, from simulating the energy density distribution of photochemically produced moderately energetic H, C and O atoms, as well as CO molecules, we argue that exospheric temperatures inferred from Lyman-α dayglow and UV airglow observations result in too high values, because these particles, as well as energetic neutral atoms, transformed from solar wind protons into hydrogen atoms via Charge exchange, may contribute to the observed planetary hot neutral gas coronae. Because the low exospheric temperatures inferred from neutral gas mass spectrometer and aerobraking data, as well as from CO{2/+} UV doublet emissions near 180-260 nm obtained from the Mars Express SPICAM UV spectrograph suggest rather low heating efficiencies, some hitherto unidentified additional IR-cooling mechanism in the thermospheres of both Venus and Mars is likely to exist.

  4. Detection of singly ionized energetic lunar pick-up ions upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.

    1992-01-01

    Singly ionized suprathermal ions upstream of the earth's bow shock have been detected by using the time-of-flight spectrometer SULEICA on the AMPTE/IRM satellite. The data were collected between August and December 1985. The flux of the ions in the mass range between 23 and 37 amu is highly anisotropic towards the earth. The ions are observed with a period of about 29 days around new moon (+/- 3 days). The correlation of the energy of the ions with the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field orientation indicates the relation to the pick-up process. We conclude that the source of these pick-up ions is the moon. We argue that due to the impinging solar wind, atoms are sputtered off the lunar surface, ionized in the sputtering process or by ensuing photoionization and picked up by the solar wind.

  5. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Phonon-Mediated Detection of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, David; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David

    2008-03-01

    Both quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology require sensitive detection of quantum states. Using trapped atomic ions, we investigate quantum non-demolition measurements in a two-species ion chain composed of Al^+ and Be^+. By mapping information from Al^+ to a shared phonon-mode then to Be^+ and detecting repetitively we have experimentally demonstrated a fidelity for state initialization and detection of 0.9994. We have also shown an increase in measurement efficiency through an adaptive procedure. Here we apply these ideas to the detection of states of multiple Al^+ using a single Be^+ ion, and describe the preparation of entangled states through measurement.

  7. Energetics of Multi-Ion Conduction Pathways in Potassium Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Philip W; Abad, Enrique; Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark S P

    2013-11-12

    Potassium ion channels form pores in cell membranes, allowing potassium ions through while preventing the passage of sodium ions. Despite numerous high-resolution structures, it is not yet possible to relate their structure to their single molecule function other than at a qualitative level. Over the past decade, there has been a concerted effort using molecular dynamics to capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of conduction by calculating potentials of mean force (PMF). These can be used, in conjunction with the electro-diffusion theory, to predict the conductance of a specific ion channel. Here, we calculate seven independent PMFs, thereby studying the differences between two potassium ion channels, the effect of the CHARMM CMAP forcefield correction, and the sensitivity and reproducibility of the method. Thermodynamically stable ion-water configurations of the selectivity filter can be identified from all the free energy landscapes, but the heights of the kinetic barriers for potassium ions to move through the selectivity filter are, in nearly all cases, too high to predict conductances in line with experiment. This implies it is not currently feasible to predict the conductance of potassium ion channels, but other simpler channels may be more tractable.

  8. Using Ion Injections to Infer the Energetic Oxygen and Sulfur Charge States in Jupiter's Inner and Middle Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G. B.; Mauk, B.; Paranicas, C.; Kollmann, P.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Neutral gases can, through the charge exchange processes, shape the distributions of energetic ions trapped within a planetary magnetosphere, and also redistribute the energetic ion charge states. One region where the prevalence of such processes has been proposed is the orbital region of Jupiter's moon Europa, where the existence of a neutral gas torus has been inferred. Data from the Galileo Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) showed a depletion of protons with near equatorial pitch angles near Europa, while oxygen and sulfur maintained their trapped profile as they were transported inward. The contrast in these distributions was attributed by Lagg et al. (2003) to the multiple charge states of the oxygen and sulfur, dramatically increasing the charge exchange lifetimes of these species. It was proposed that as the ions diffuse inwards across Europa's orbit and into the Io torus regions, the distributed neutral gas interactions redistribute the charge states of the heavy ions until, close to Io, these ions may be heavily depleted. And so, the charge state of the heavy ions is a critical parameter in determining whether or not these processes are taking place. Limited evidence for the multiple charged states of heavy ions was provided by Mauk et al. [1999], who analyzed three ion injection events and found evidence of multiply charged energetic oxygen and sulfur ions in two of the events, but not in the third event. Injections introduce a transient disturbance to the ion distributions, and the drift rate of disturbed ions away from the injection region depends on the charge state of the ions. In this work we revisit the Galileo EPD data set and find additional ion dispersion events from which composition can be measured and charge state can be inferred. We aspire to develop a much clearer picture as to the ordering of charge state as a function of radial distance. Results and conclusions will be presented as well as the importance from new measurements from the

  9. Atomic layer etching of silicon dioxide using alternating C4F8 and energetic Ar+ plasma beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, Sanbir S.; Lou, Qiaowei; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2017-06-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) of SiO2 was studied by alternating exposure of a 5 nm-thick SiO2 film on Si substrate to (1) a plasma beam emanating from a c-C4F8 inductively coupled plasma (ICP), to grow a fluorocarbon (FC) film composed mainly of CF2, and (2) an energetic (130 eV) Ar+ ion beam extracted from a separate Ar ICP. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the chemical composition of the near-surface region, and to quantify the thickness of the FC and SiO2 films. A very thin (3-6 Å), near self-limiting thickness CF2-rich FC film was found to deposit on the SiO2 surface with exposure to continuous or pulsed power C4F8 plasma beams, under conditions that generated a large relative flux of CF2. Following this, a FC film of similar composition grew at ~10 times slower rate. Exposure of the thin film to the Ar+ beam led to removal of 1.9 Å SiO2. An estimated yield of 1.3 SiO2 molecules-per-Ar+ was found for a single ALE step. The rate of 1.9 Å/cycle persisted over multiple ALE cycles, but a carbon-rich residual film did build up. This film can be removed by a brief exposure to an O2-containing plasma beam.

  10. Total Born approximation cross sections for single electron loss by atoms and ions colliding with atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The first born approximation (FBA) is applied to the calculation of single electron loss cross sections for various ions and atoms containing from one to seven electrons. Screened hydrogenic wave functions were used for the states of the electron ejected from the projectile, and Hartree-Fock elastic and incoherent scattering factors were used to describe the target. The effect of the target atom on the scaling of projectile ionization cross sections with respect to the projectile nuclear charge was explored in the case of hydrogen-like ions. Scaling of the cross section with respect to the target nuclear charge for electron loss by Fe (+25) in collision with neutral atoms ranging from H to Fe is also examined. These results were compared to those of the binary encounter approximation and to the FBA for the case of ionization by completely stripped target ions.

  11. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pincha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Capecchi, W.; Ding, W. X.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Liu, D.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.

    2014-05-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n =5 to n =6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m =1. The transition occurs when the m =1, n =5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (qfi) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  12. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  13. Kinetic theory of radio frequency quadrupole ion traps. I. Trapping of atomic ions in a pure atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Larry A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.

    2004-05-01

    A kinetic theory based on the Boltzmann equation is developed for the trapping of atomic ions in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap containing enough neutral atoms that ion-neutral collisions cannot be ignored. The collisions are treated at the same level of sophistication and detail as is used to deal with the time- and space-dependent electric fields in the trap. As a result, microscopic definitions are obtained for the damping and stochastic forces that originate from such collisions. These definitions contrast with corresponding phenomenological terms added ad hoc in previous treatments to create damped Mathieu and Langevin equations, respectively. Furthermore, the theory indicates that either collisional cooling or heating of the ions is possible, depending upon details of the ion-neutral mass ratios and interaction potential. The kinetic theory is not dependent on any special assumptions about the electric field strengths, the ion-neutral interaction potentials, or the ion-neutral mass ratio. It also provides an ab initio way to describe the ion kinetic energies, temperatures, and other properties by a series of successive approximations.

  14. Calorimetric detection of neutral-atom content of ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Energy deposition technique deduces neutral-beam flux or dose from measured values of incremental resistance increases in platinum wire passed through beam. Steady-state heat balance analysis led to equivalent neutral-beam current. Method was used to detect neutral-atom content of 60-keV argon ion beam.

  15. The Helium Atom and Isoelectronic Ions in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    The energy levels of the helium atom and isoelectronic ions in two dimensions are considered. The difficulties encountered in the analytical evaluation of the perturbative and variational expressions for the ground state, promote an interesting factorization of the inter-electronic interaction, leading to simple expressions for the energy. This…

  16. The Helium Atom and Isoelectronic Ions in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    The energy levels of the helium atom and isoelectronic ions in two dimensions are considered. The difficulties encountered in the analytical evaluation of the perturbative and variational expressions for the ground state, promote an interesting factorization of the inter-electronic interaction, leading to simple expressions for the energy. This…

  17. Atom probe field ion microscopy of titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Titanium aluminides have a number of potential high temperature applications due to their good elevated-temperature mechanical properties, low density, and good creep and oxidation resistance. However, fabrication of commercial components of these materials has been impeded by their poor mechanical properties at ambient temperatures. Significant efforts with various degrees of success have been made to improve the mechanical properties of these TiAl alloys by doping them with a variety of different elements including B, C, Cr, Er, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Nb, P, Si, Ta, V and W. One of the optimum analytical tools for investigating the effects of these additions on the microstructure is the atom probe field ion micro scope. However, relatively few studies of titanium aluminides, compared to some other intermetallic compounds, have performed by atom probe field ion microscopy. This lack of attention can be attributed to the brittle nature of the material, in-situ transformations that occur during the field ion microscopy and preferential evaporation problems that were encountered in some of the early studies. The atom probe field ion microscope used for the current experiments has a low base pressure ({approximately} 2 {times} 10{sup 9} Pa) and careful attention was paid to optimizing the experimental parameters. All the examples shown were obtained from specimens prepared by standard electropolishing techniques. To demonstrate the suitability of the technique to these materials, several different titanium aluminides have been characterized in the atom probe.

  18. Dynamic Faraday cup signal analysis and the measurement of energetic ions emitted by plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadnejad, M.; Irani Mobaraki, S.

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical model is developed to study the signals from a typical dynamic Faraday cup, and using this model the output signals from this structure are obtained. A detailed discussion on the signal structure, using different experimental conditions, is also given. It is argued that there is a possibility of determining the total charge of the generated ion pulse, the maximum velocity of the ions, ion velocity distribution, and the number of ion species for mixed working gases, under certain conditions. In addition, the number of different ionization stages, the number of different pinches in one shot, and the number of different existing acceleration mechanisms can also be determined provided that the mentioned conditions being satisfied. An experiment is carried out on the Filippov type 90 kJ Sahand plasma focus using Ar as the working gas at the pressure of 0.25 Torr. The data from a typical shot are fitted to a signal from the model and the total charge of the related energetic ion pulse is deduced using the values of the obtained fit parameters. Good agreement between the obtained amount of the total charge and the values obtained during other experiments on the same plasma focus device is observed.

  19. Dynamic Faraday cup signal analysis and the measurement of energetic ions emitted by plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Pestehe, S. J. Mohammadnejad, M.; Irani Mobaraki, S.

    2014-03-15

    A theoretical model is developed to study the signals from a typical dynamic Faraday cup, and using this model the output signals from this structure are obtained. A detailed discussion on the signal structure, using different experimental conditions, is also given. It is argued that there is a possibility of determining the total charge of the generated ion pulse, the maximum velocity of the ions, ion velocity distribution, and the number of ion species for mixed working gases, under certain conditions. In addition, the number of different ionization stages, the number of different pinches in one shot, and the number of different existing acceleration mechanisms can also be determined provided that the mentioned conditions being satisfied. An experiment is carried out on the Filippov type 90 kJ Sahand plasma focus using Ar as the working gas at the pressure of 0.25 Torr. The data from a typical shot are fitted to a signal from the model and the total charge of the related energetic ion pulse is deduced using the values of the obtained fit parameters. Good agreement between the obtained amount of the total charge and the values obtained during other experiments on the same plasma focus device is observed.

  20. Drift-shell splitting of energetic ions injected at pseudo-substorm onsets

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K. |; Anderson, B.J.; Ohtani, S.; Reeves, G.D.; Takahashi, S.; Sarris, T.E. |; Mursula, K.

    1997-10-01

    One feature of a magnetospheric substorm is the injection of energetic particles into closed drift orbits. Injections are routinely observed by geosynchronous satellites and have been used to identify the occurrence of substorms and the local time of particle energization. In this study we examine pitch angle distributions of ion injections in the 50-to 300-keV energy range observed by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) satellite, hereinafter CCE. In a dipole field, all pitch angles follow the same drift shell, but the day{endash}night asymmetry of the magnetospheric magnetic field introduces a pitch angle dependence in particle drift orbits, so that particles with different pitch angles disperse radially as they drift. The effect is known as drift-shell splitting. For satellite observations near noon at a fixed geocentric distance, the guiding center orbits of ions detected at small pitch angles intersect the midnight meridian at larger geocentric distances than do ions with near-90{degree} pitch angles. The ion pitch angle distributions detected on the dayside therefore provide information about the radial distance of the nightside acceleration region. We apply this principle to study ion injection events observed on September 17{endash}18, 1984, in association with pseudo-substorm onsets. CCE was at 13 hours local time near its apogee (8.8R{sub E}) and observed a series of ion flux enhancements. Energy dispersion of the timing of the flux increases assures that they are due to injections on the nightside. The flux increases were observed only at pitch angles from 0{degree} to 60{degree}. We calculate drift orbits of protons using the Tsyganenko 89c magnetic field model and find that the drift orbits for 60{degree} pitch angle protons observed at the satellite pass through midnight at 9R{sub E}, well outside of geostationary orbit, indicating that the ion injections occurred tailward of 9R{sub E}. Energetic

  1. The energetic ion composition spectrometer /EICS/ for the Dynamics Explorer-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Simpson, D. A.; Sanders, T. C.; Hertzberg, E.; Balsiger, H.; Ghielmetti, A.

    1981-01-01

    The energetic ion composition spectrometer (EICS) on the DE-A spacecraft is a high sensitivity, high resolution (M/Delta M greater than 10 FWHM at focus) instrument. It covers the entire mass range from less than 1 amu/e to greater than 150 amu/e in 64 mass channels, at each of 32 energy per charge steps covering the range from 0 to approximately 17 keV/e. The measurements obtained from this instrument will be used primarily to investigate the coupling between the magnetosphere and the ionosphere via the auroral acceleration region. Additional uses of the data will be to investigate the ring current loss processes, the coupling of the dayside cusp particles to the magnetosheath, and the tracing of artificially injected ions.

  2. Neoplastic cell transformation by energetic heavy ions and its modification with chemical agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    One of the major deleterious late effects of ionizing radiation is related to the induction of neoplasms. In the present report recent experimental results on neoplastic cell transformation by heavy ions are presented, and possible means to circumvent the carcinogenic effect of space radiation are discussed. Biological effects observed in experiments involving the use of energetic heavy ions accelerated at the Bevalac suggest that many of the biological effects observed in earlier space flight experiments may be due to space radiation, particularly cosmic rays. It is found that the effect of radiation on cell transformation is dose-rate dependent. The frequency of neoplastic transformation for a given dose decreases with a decrease of dose rate of Co-60 gamma rays. It is found that various chemical agents give radiation protection, including DMSO.

  3. Diffusion coefficients of energetic water group ions near Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Richardson, I. G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1993-03-01

    Data from the ultralow-energy charge analyzer and energetic particle anisotropy spectrometer sensors, acquired when the ICE spacecraft flew past Comet Giacobini-Zinner on September 11, 1985, are combined, and a single, self-consistent analysis technique is applied to derive a single-particle spectrum from about 200 to 1600 km/s. This information, together with the deduced bulk flow speed of the ions, is used to calculate a parallel diffusion coefficient in the transition region downstream of the bow wave (2.3 +/- 0.5) x 10 exp 17 sq cm/s; the corresponding scattering mean free path is (6 +/- 1) x 10 exp 4 km. The parallel diffusion coefficient is found to depend on the collision frequency of water group ions with Alfven waves, which are assumed to be propagating parallel (antiparallel) to the magnetic field.

  4. Effects of energetic ions on double tearing modes in reversed shear plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Wang, Xiao-Gang

    2017-01-01

    The modified dispersion relation of q s  =  m/n double tearing modes (DTMs) with trapped energetic ions is derived by the matching procedure of mode structures in the ideal region and resistive layer. It is found that a mode transition between the DTM and the fishbone-like mode can be triggered, depending on fast ion driving, which provides a possible explanation for the observation of experiments (Günter et al 1999 Nucl. Fusion 39 1793; Maget et al 2006 Nucl. Fusion 46 797). The resistivity scaling of DTMs is changed significantly by on/off-axis heating beams. The effects of beam energy, electron inertia, magnetic shear and plasma resistivity on the stability of the mode and mode transition are discussed in detail.

  5. The Combined Effect of EPM and TAE Modes on Energetic Ion Confinement and Sawtooth Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bernabei; R. Budny; E.D. Fredrickson; N.N. Gorelenkov; J.C. Hosea; C.K. Phillips; R. White; J.R. Wilson; C.C. Petty; R.I. Pinsker; R.W. Harvey; P. Smirnov

    2000-11-15

    It is shown in this paper for the first time, that the chirping Alfven instabilities observed mostly during ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating have been positively identified as Energetic Particle Modes (EPM). This has been possible because of the detailed measurement of the q-profile with the MSE (motional Stark effect) diagnostic in DIII-D. The EPMs are shown to be the leading cause of the monster sawtooth crash. It is also shown that TAEs are excited either directly or indirectly by the EPMs and they cause fast ion losses. A scenario for the stabilization and the crash of the monster sawtooth and for the degradation of the ICRF heating efficiency at high power is presented.

  6. A high resolution ion microscope for cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecker, Markus; Schefzyk, Hannah; Fortágh, József; Günther, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We report on an ion-optical system that serves as a microscope for ultracold ground state and Rydberg atoms. The system is designed to achieve a magnification of up to 1000 and a spatial resolution in the 100 nm range, thereby surpassing many standard imaging techniques for cold atoms. The microscope consists of four electrostatic lenses and a microchannel plate in conjunction with a delay line detector in order to achieve single particle sensitivity with high temporal and spatial resolution. We describe the design process of the microscope including ion-optical simulations of the imaging system and characterize aberrations and the resolution limit. Furthermore, we present the experimental realization of the microscope in a cold atom setup and investigate its performance by patterned ionization with a structure size down to 2.7 μm. The microscope meets the requirements for studying various many-body effects, ranging from correlations in cold quantum gases up to Rydberg molecule formation.

  7. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  8. Correlated eikonal initial state in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ciappina, M.F.; Otranto, S.; Garibotti, C.R.

    2002-11-01

    An approximation is developed to deal with the ionization of atoms by bare charged ions. In this method the transition amplitude describing the three-body final state is evaluated using a continuum correlated wave and that for the initial state by an analytical continuation of the {phi}{sub 2} model to complex momenta. This procedure introduces in the atomic bound state a kinematical correlation with the projectile motion. Doubly differential cross sections (DDCS's) are computed for collisions of H{sup +} and F{sup 9+} ions with He atoms. Results for the DDCS's in the forward direction are compared with experimental data and other theoretical models. We find an enhancement of the distribution for low energy electrons and that the asymmetry of the electron capture to the continuum (ECC) peak is correctly described.

  9. Three-dimensional convective flows of energetic ions in Jupiter's equatorial magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, L. S.; Roelof, E. C.; Fritz, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    From 1995 to 2003, the Galileo Energetic Particles Detector (EPD) measured the three-dimensional distribution of protons, oxygen, and sulfur ions with total energies between 0.1 and 1 MeV throughout the equatorial Jovian magnetosphere. We perform a spherical harmonics expansion of the measured distributions through the second order and use the resulting anisotropy coefficients to identify purely convecting distributions and derive ion flow velocities via the Compton-Getting effect. We demonstrate that the second-order harmonic terms are an essential diagnostic in excluding spurious gradient anisotropies in the velocity derivation. This analysis unambiguously confirms that energetic ion flows in the azimuthal direction are significantly slower than rigid planetary corotation by an amount that is local time dependent, a phenomenon that is qualitatively consistent with expectations of plasma mass loading within an asymmetric magnetic field configuration. However, both the polar and radial components of the ion flows exhibit unexpected and poorly understood global morphology. Consistently northward and inward flows are observed near the dayside and predusk sectors of the equatorial inner magnetosphere, while southward and outward flows are observed within the plasma sheet in the predawn middle magnetosphere. The persistence of southward convection in this region, which is operative regardless of whether the spacecraft was transiting the plasma sheet from the northern magnetic lobe or from the southern lobe, is inconsistent with contemporary models of dynamical plasma sheet motion, while the distinctive local time asymmetries imply that the solar wind is a significant driver of plasma convection at radial distances as small as 15 RJ.

  10. Energetic metallic ion implantation in polymers via cost-effective laser-driven ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Muhammad Bilal; Rafique, M. Shahid; Ahmed, Rabia; Rafique, M.; Iqbal, Tahir; Hasan, Ali

    2017-07-01

    This research work reports the ions emission from the plasma generated by Nd:YAG laser having wavelength 1.064 μm, power 1.1 MW, pulse energy 10 mJ and intensity 1011 W/cm2 irradiated at 70° with respect to the target normal to the ions. These ions were accelerated through a home-made extraction assembly by means of a high voltage DC power supply. The energy of these ions were measured using Thomson parabola technique which utilizes Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (CR-39) and confirmed by Faraday cup as well that exploits a well-known technique known as time of flight. Interestingly, a significant increase in energy (from 490 to 730 keV) was observed with a discrete increase in acceleration potential from 0 to 18 kV. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polypropylene were exposed to this recently developed ion source facility, to authenticate the reliability of this facility. The surface of the polymer is affected when energy of the irradiated ion is increased, which is evident from the optical micrographs. An increase in electrical conductivity was also observed with the increase in ion energy.

  11. Induction of micronuclei in human fibroblasts across the Bragg curve of energetic heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Hada, M; Meador, J; Hu, X; Rusek, A; Cucinotta, F A

    2006-10-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LEpsilonTau gamma or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. The dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply as the particle approaches the end of its range, a position known as the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the "biological Bragg curve" is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Here we report measurements of the biological response across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. A quantitative biological response curve generated for micronuclei per binucleated cell across the Bragg curve did not reveal an increased yield of micronuclei at the location of the Bragg peak. However, the ratio of mono- to binucleated cells, which indicates inhibition of cell progression, increased at the Bragg peak location. These results confirm the hypothesis that severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death and not be evaluated for micronuclei.

  12. Second stable regime of internal kink modes excited by barely passing energetic ions in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    He, H. D.; Zheng, G. Y.; Long, Y. X.; He, Z. X.; Jiang, H. B.; Shen, Y.; Wang, L. F.; Dong, J. Q.; Fu, G. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2010-08-15

    The internal kink (fishbone) modes, driven by barely passing energetic ions (EIs), are numerically studied with the spatial distribution of the EIs taking into account. It is found that the modes with frequencies comparable to the toroidal precession frequencies are excited by resonant interaction with the EIs. Positive and negative density gradient dominating cases, corresponding to off- and near-axis depositions of neutral beam injection (NBI), respectively, are analyzed in detail. The most interesting and important feature of the modes is that there exists a second stable regime in higher {beta}{sub h} (=pressure of EIs/toroidal magnetic pressure) range, and the modes may only be excited by the barely passing EIs in a region of {beta}{sub th1}<{beta}{sub h}<{beta}{sub th2} ({beta}{sub th} is threshold or critical beta of EIs). Besides, the unstable modes require minimum density gradients and minimum radial positions of NBI deposition. The physics mechanism for the existence of the second stable regime is discussed. The results may provide a means of reducing or even preventing the loss of NBI energetic ions and increasing the heating efficiency by adjusting the pitch angle and driving the system into the second stable regime fast enough.

  13. Suppression of Trapped Energetic Ions Driven Resistive Interchange Modes with Electron Cyclotron Heating in a Helical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X. D.; Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Seki, R.; Nicolas, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Nagaoka, K.; Ogawa, K.; Tanaka, K.; Isobe, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kubo, S.; Sakakibara, S.; Bando, T.; Ido, T.; Ozaki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Takemura, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The resistive interchange mode destabilized by the resonant interaction with the trapped energetic ions is fully suppressed when the injected power of electron cyclotron heating exceeds a certain threshold. It is shown for the first time that the complete stabilization of the energetic-particle-driven mode without relaxing the energetic particle (EP) pressure gradient is possible by reducing the radial width of the eigenmodes δw , especially when δw narrows to a small enough value relative to the finite orbit width of EP.

  14. Energetic Atomic and Ionic Oxygen Textured Optical Surfaces for Blood Glucose Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and the resulting product thereof comprising a solid light-conducting fiber with a point of attachment and having a textured surface site consisting of a textured distal end prepared by being placed in a vacuum and then subjected to directed hyperthermal beams comprising oxygen ions or atoms. The textured distal end comprises cones or pillars that are spaced upon from each other by less than 1 micron and are extremely suitable to prevent cellular components of blood from entering the valleys between the cones or pillars so as to effectively separate the cellular components in the blood from interfering with optical sensing of the glucose concentration for diabetic patients.

  15. Scaling Cross Sections for Ion-atom Impact Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-06-06

    The values of ion-atom ionization cross sections are frequently needed for many applications that utilize the propagation of fast ions through matter. When experimental data and theoretical calculations are not available, approximate formulas are frequently used. This paper briefly summarizes the most important theoretical results and approaches to cross section calculations in order to place the discussion in historical perspective and offer a concise introduction to the topic. Based on experimental data and theoretical predictions, a new fit for ionization cross sections is proposed. The range of validity and accuracy of several frequently used approximations (classical trajectory, the Born approximation, and so forth) are discussed using, as examples, the ionization cross sections of hydrogen and helium atoms by various fully stripped ions.

  16. Estimates of Collisional Cooling and Quenching Rates for Atomic and Molecular Ion Collisions with Ultracold Atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Winthrop; Wells, James

    2009-05-01

    Translational cross sections and rate coefficients for cold ion-neutral elastic and charge-exchange collisions (either atomic or molecular) are >> larger (˜10^6 a.u.) than neutral-neutral collisions at the same CM energy. This is due to the long range polarization potential V(R) = -C4/R^4, where C4 is proportional to the polarizability of the neutral partner. Thus collisions between ultracold alkali atoms (trapped in a magneto-optic trap or MOT) and low-energy ions can be used for sympathetic cooling experiments. We are building a prototype hybrid-trap apparatus [1] that applies these principles to collisions of Ca^+ ions (which can be laser pre-cooled) with MOT-trapped ultracold Na atoms. Some calculations on this system and other related ion-neutral systems have been published [2] and some initial experiments on other ion-neutral species have begun [3]. Estimates of cooling and quenching rates in the low K-mK CM energy range for Ca+ on Na and other cases will be presented and possible experiments described. [1] Winthrop W. Smith, Oleg P. Makarov and Jian Lin, J. Modern Optics 52, 2253 (2005). [2] R. Côt'e and A. Dalgarno, Phys. Rev. A 62, 012709 (2000); R. Côt'e, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5316 (2000). [3] A. Grier, M. Cetina, F.Orucevic, and V. Vuletic, ArXiv atom-ph/0808.3620.

  17. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves.

  18. Superior Energetic Materials that Contain Carbocations and Anions. Energetic Materials Restricted in Composition to C, H, N, and O Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-30

    0 Atoms. III. 5-[4-Nitro-(1,2,5)oxa- diazolyll-5H-[f,2,3]triazolo[4,5-cl[1,2,5] oxadiazole : A. Gunasekaran and J. H. Boyer, Heteroatom Chem., 4, 1993...diaminoazofurazan 24 by treatment with sodium azide and underwent thermolysis to 5-[4-azido-(1,2,5)oxadiazolyl]-5H- [1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c][1,2,5] oxadiazole ...nitro-(1,2,5)oxadiazolyl]-5H-[ 1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c] [1,2,5] oxadiazole 28. The azide 25 was con- verted to a phosphinimine 29 in a reaction with

  19. SEPARATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E. E-mail: harald.kucharek@unh.edu

    2011-04-10

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon, which has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux over a narrow region {approx}20{sup 0} wide, a factor of 2-3 higher than the more globally distributed ENA flux. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the distributed flux by applying a transparency mask over the ribbon and regions of high emissions, and then solve for the distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum shows a knee between {approx}1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the distributed flux does not show a clear knee and more closely conforms to a power law over much of the sky. Consistent with previous analyses, the slope of the power law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. The knee in the energy spectrum of the ribbon suggests that its source plasma population is generated via a distinct physical process. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. The heliotail may be identified in maps of globally distributed flux as a broad region of low flux centered {approx}44{sup 0}W of the interstellar downwind direction, suggesting heliotail deflection by the interstellar magnetic field.

  20. Latitude, Energy, and Time Variations of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral indices Measured by IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; McComas, David; Dayeh, Maher; Funsten, Herbert; Schwadron, Nathan; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Fuselier, Stephen; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zank, Gary; Allegrini, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the latitude, energy, and time variations of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 5 years of the mission. Our previous results based on the first 3 years of IBEX observations showed that the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ˜2.29 and ˜3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. While these results confirmed the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere, we also showed that, unlike previous reports, the ˜0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could not be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, and that they depend on energy and latitude. In this work we extend the above results to include years 4 and 5 of IBEX observations and investigate if the spectral indices vary as a function of time. Finally, we discuss implications of our results on models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere. We also discuss the implications of these new results for observational requirements for upcoming missions like IMAP.

  1. Latitudinal and Energy Dependence of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral Indices Measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Pogorelov, N.; Schwadron, N. A.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the latitudinal and energy dependence of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 3 yrs of the mission. Our results are: (1) the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ˜2.29 and ˜3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. (2) The latitudinal dependence of the spectral indices at different energies can be represented by the cosine function γ ={{a}0}+{{a}1}cos ({{a}2}θ ) with unique offsets, amplitudes, and phase angles; the higher energy ENA indices transition to successively larger amplitudes within ±45° of the equator. Our results confirm the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere. While earlier studies showed that the ˜0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, our new results indicate that this is an over-simplification because the spectral indices have an energy and latitude dependence. This dependence is an important factor that must be taken into consideration by models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  2. Latittudinal and energy dependence of energetic neutral atom spectral indices measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    DOE PAGES

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; ...

    2015-03-30

    Here, we investigate the latitudinal and energy dependence of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 3 yrs of the mission. Our results are: (1) the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ~2.29 and ~3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. (2) The latitudinal dependence of the spectral indices at different energies can be represented bymore » the cosine function γ =a0 + a1 cos (a2θ) with unique offsets, amplitudes, and phase angles; the higher energy ENA indices transition to successively larger amplitudes within ±45° of the equator. The results confirm the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere. And while earlier studies showed that the ~0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, our new results indicate that this is an over-simplification because the spectral indices have an energy and latitude dependence. Furthermore, this dependence is an important factor that must be taken into consideration by models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.« less

  3. Energetic neutral atom and interstellar flow observations with IBEX: Implications for the global heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Christian, E. R.; Desai, M. I.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Moebius, E.; Reno, M.; Scherrer, J.; Zirnstein, E.

    2016-03-01

    Since launch in Oct. 2008, IBEX, with its two energetic neutral atom (ENA) cameras, has provided humankind with the first-ever global images of the complex boundary separating the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM). IBEX's energy-resolved all-sky maps, collected every six months, are yielding remarkable new insights into the heliospheres structure as it is shaped by the combined forces of the local interstellar flow, the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), and the evolving solar wind. IBEX has also acquired the first images of ENAs backscattered from the surface of the moon as well as global images of the magnetospheric response to solar wind disturbances. IBEX thus addresses all three Heliophysics science objectives set forth in the 2014 Science Plan for NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) as well as the goals in the recent Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey (NRC 2012). In addition, with the information it provides on the properties of the LISM and the LISMF, IBEX represents a unique bridge between heliophysics and astrophysics, and fills in critical knowledge for understanding the habitability of exoplanetary systems and the future habitability of Earth and the solar system. Because of the few-year time lag due to solar wind and ENA transport, IBEX observed the solar wind/ LISM interaction characteristic of declining phase/solar minimum conditions. In the continuing mission, IBEX captures the response of the interstellar boundaries to the changing structure of the solar wind in its transition toward the "mini" solar maximum and possibly the decline into the next solar minimum. The continuing IBEX mission affords never-to-be-repeated opportunities to coordinate global imaging of the heliospheric boundary with in-situ measurements by the Voyagers as they pass beyond the heliopause and start to directly sample the LISM.

  4. Energetic neutral atom and interstellar flow observations with IBEX: Implications for the global heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Desai, M. I.; Fuselier, S. A.; Christian, E. R.; Funsten, H. O.; Moebius, E.; Reno, M.; Scherrer, J.; Zirnstein, E.

    2016-03-25

    Since launch in Oct. 2008, IBEX, with its two energetic neutral atom (ENA) cameras, has provided humankind with the first-ever global images of the complex boundary separating the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM). IBEX’s energy-resolved all-sky maps, collected every six months, are yielding remarkable new insights into the heliospheres structure as it is shaped by the combined forces of the local interstellar flow, the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), and the evolving solar wind. IBEX has also acquired the first images of ENAs backscattered from the surface of the moon as well as global images of the magnetospheric response to solar wind disturbances. IBEX thus addresses all three Heliophysics science objectives set forth in the 2014 Science Plan for NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) as well as the goals in the recent Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey (NRC 2012). In addition, with the information it provides on the properties of the LISM and the LISMF, IBEX represents a unique bridge between heliophysics and astrophysics, and fills in critical knowledge for understanding the habitability of exoplanetary systems and the future habitability of Earth and the solar system. Because of the few-year time lag due to solar wind and ENA transport, IBEX observed the solar wind/ LISM interaction characteristic of declining phase/solar minimum conditions. In the continuing mission, IBEX captures the response of the interstellar boundaries to the changing structure of the solar wind in its transition toward the “mini” solar maximum and possibly the decline into the next solar minimum. The continuing IBEX mission affords never-to-be-repeated opportunities to coordinate global imaging of the heliospheric boundary with in-situ measurements by the Voyagers as they pass beyond the heliopause and start to directly sample the LISM.

  5. Latittudinal and energy dependence of energetic neutral atom spectral indices measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Pogorelov, N.; Schwadron, N. A.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2015-03-30

    Here, we investigate the latitudinal and energy dependence of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 3 yrs of the mission. Our results are: (1) the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ~2.29 and ~3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. (2) The latitudinal dependence of the spectral indices at different energies can be represented by the cosine function γ =a0 + a1 cos (a2θ) with unique offsets, amplitudes, and phase angles; the higher energy ENA indices transition to successively larger amplitudes within ±45° of the equator. The results confirm the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere. And while earlier studies showed that the ~0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, our new results indicate that this is an over-simplification because the spectral indices have an energy and latitude dependence. Furthermore, this dependence is an important factor that must be taken into consideration by models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  6. Origin of energetic ions observed in the terrestrial ion foreshock : 2D full-particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, Philippe; Lembege, bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks are well-known structures in astrophysical environments which dissipate bulk flow kinetic energy and accelerate large fraction of particle. Spacecrafts have firmly established the existence of the so-called terrestrial foreshock region magnetically connected to the shock and filled by two distinct populations in the quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45r{ } ≤ quad θ Bn quad ≤ 90r{ }, where θ Bn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field) : (i) the field-aligned ion beams or `` FAB '' characterized by a gyrotropic distributionsout{,} and (ii) the gyro-phase bunched ions or `` GPB '' characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution. The present work is based on the use of two dimensional PIC simulation of a curved shock and associated foreshock region where full curvature effects, time of flight effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described by a self consistent approach. Our previous analysis (Savoini et Lembège, 2015) has evidenced that these two types of backstreaming populations can originate from the shock front itself without invoking any local diffusion by ion beam instabilities. Present results are focussed on individual ion trajectories and evidence that "FAB" population is injected into the foreshock mainly along the shock front whereas the "GPB" population penetrates more deeply the shock front. Such differences explain why the "FAB" population loses their gyro-phase coherency and become gyrotropic which is not the case for the "GPB". The impact of these different injection features on the energy gain for each ion population will be presented in détails. Savoini, P. and B. Lembège (2015), `` Production of nongyrotropic and gyrotropic backstreaming ion distributions in the quasi-perpendicular ion foreshock région '', J. Geophys. Res., 120, pp 7154-7171, doi = 10.1002/2015JA021018.

  7. Observations of Energetic Particle Escape at the Magnetopause: Early Results from the MMS Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Westlake, J. H.; Sibeck, David Gary; Giles, Barbara L.; Pollock, C. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly, irrespective of conditions that engender reconnection and boundary-normal magnetic fields. A signature observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, simultaneous monohemispheric streaming of multiple species (electrons, H+, Hen+), is reported here as unexpectedly common in the dayside, dusk quadrant of the magnetosheath even though that region is thought to be drift-shadowed from energetic electrons. This signature is sometimes part of a pitch angle distribution evolving from symmetric in the magnetosphere, to asymmetric approaching the magnetopause, to monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath. While monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath may be possible without a boundary-normal magnetic field, the additional pitch angle depletion, particularly of electrons, on the magnetospheric side requires one. Observations of this signature in the dayside dusk sector imply that the static picture of magnetospheric drift-shadowing is inappropriate for energetic particle dynamics in the outer magnetosphere.

  8. Observations of energetic particle escape at the magnetopause: Early results from the MMS Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Westlake, J. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Craft, J. V.; Spence, H. E.; Niehof, J. T.; Reeves, G. D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly, irrespective of conditions that engender reconnection and boundary-normal magnetic fields. A signature observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, simultaneous monohemispheric streaming of multiple species (electrons, H+, Hen+), is reported here as unexpectedly common in the dayside, dusk quadrant of the magnetosheath even though that region is thought to be drift-shadowed from energetic electrons. This signature is sometimes part of a pitch angle distribution evolving from symmetric in the magnetosphere, to asymmetric approaching the magnetopause, to monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath. While monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath may be possible without a boundary-normal magnetic field, the additional pitch angle depletion, particularly of electrons, on the magnetospheric side requires one. Observations of this signature in the dayside dusk sector imply that the static picture of magnetospheric drift-shadowing is inappropriate for energetic particle dynamics in the outer magnetosphere.

  9. Radial Transport Characteristics of Fast Ions Due to Energetic-Particle Modes inside the Last Closed-Flux Surface in the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Kenichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Fujisawa, Akihide; Ohshima, Shunsuke; Nakano, Haruhisa; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Chihiro; Nishimura, Shin; Yoshimura, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Okamura, Shoichi; Nagashima, Yoshihiko

    2008-02-15

    The internal behavior of fast ions interacting with magnetohydrodynamic bursts excited by energetic ions has been experimentally investigated in the compact helical system. The resonant convective oscillation of fast ions was identified inside the last closed-flux surface during an energetic-particle mode (EPM) burst. The phase difference between the fast-ion oscillation and the EPM, indicating the coupling strength between them, remains a certain value during the EPM burst and drives an anomalous transport of fast ions.

  10. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang

    2013-10-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) modes with fishbone-like structures are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection into MST reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to large fast ion beta and stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of these instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport and interaction with global tearing modes. Internal magnetic field fluctuations associated with the EP modes are directly observed for the first time by Faraday-effect polarimetry (frequency ~ 90 kHz and amplitude ~ 2 G). Simultaneously measured density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving and asymmetric spatial structure that peaks near the core where fast ions reside and shifts outward as the instability evolves. Furthermore, the EP mode frequencies appear at ~k∥VA , consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growing phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop (~ 15 %) when the EP modes peak, indicating the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced (× 2) with the onset of multiple nonlinearly-interacting EP modes. The fast ions also impact global tearing modes, reducing their amplitudes by up to 65%. This mode reduction is lessened following the EP-bursts, further evidence for fast ion redistribution that weakens the suppression mechanism. Possible tearing mode suppression mechanisms will be discussed. Work supported by US DoE.

  11. Shaping and compositional modification of zinc oxide nanowires under energetic manganese ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Möller, Wolfhard; Johannes, Andreas; Ronning, Carsten

    2016-04-29

    For ZnO nanowires of 150 to 200 nm diameter standing on a flat substrate, the development of the surface contour/morphology and the local elemental composition under 175 keV Mn irradiation has been investigated both experimentally and by means of three-dimensional dynamic Monte Carlo computer simulation. The simulation results reveal a complex interplay of sputter erosion, implant incorporation, resputtering and atomic mixing, which is discussed in detail. The sputter-induced thinning of the wire is in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results obtained from pre- and post-irradiation scanning electron microscopy. The experiments also confirm the predicted sharpening of the tip, neck formation at the bottom interface, and ultimately the detachment of the nanowires from the substrate at high ion fluence. Additional good agreement with experimental results from nano-x-ray fluorescence is also obtained for the continuously increasing Mn/Zn atomic ratio within the nanowires as a function of ion fluence. The simulation yields a great deal of additional information that has not been accessible in the experiments. From this, preferential sputtering of O compared with Zn is deduced. A significant contamination of the wires with substrate material arises from ion mixing at the wire/substrate interface, rather than from redeposition of sputtered substrate atoms. Surprising hollow profiles are observed. Their formation is attributed to a special mechanism of collisional transport which is characteristic of the irradiation of nanowires at a suitable combination of wire diameter and ion energy.

  12. Shaping and compositional modification of zinc oxide nanowires under energetic manganese ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Wolfhard; Johannes, Andreas; Ronning, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    For ZnO nanowires of 150 to 200 nm diameter standing on a flat substrate, the development of the surface contour/morphology and the local elemental composition under 175 keV Mn irradiation has been investigated both experimentally and by means of three-dimensional dynamic Monte Carlo computer simulation. The simulation results reveal a complex interplay of sputter erosion, implant incorporation, resputtering and atomic mixing, which is discussed in detail. The sputter-induced thinning of the wire is in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results obtained from pre- and post-irradiation scanning electron microscopy. The experiments also confirm the predicted sharpening of the tip, neck formation at the bottom interface, and ultimately the detachment of the nanowires from the substrate at high ion fluence. Additional good agreement with experimental results from nano-x-ray fluorescence is also obtained for the continuously increasing Mn/Zn atomic ratio within the nanowires as a function of ion fluence. The simulation yields a great deal of additional information that has not been accessible in the experiments. From this, preferential sputtering of O compared with Zn is deduced. A significant contamination of the wires with substrate material arises from ion mixing at the wire/substrate interface, rather than from redeposition of sputtered substrate atoms. Surprising hollow profiles are observed. Their formation is attributed to a special mechanism of collisional transport which is characteristic of the irradiation of nanowires at a suitable combination of wire diameter and ion energy.

  13. Low-frequency global Alfvén eigenmodes in low-shear tokamaks with trapped energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, V. S.; Kolesnichenko, Ya. I.; Reznik, S. N.

    2009-09-01

    It is shown that, in the tokamak plasmas with broad low-shear central core and safety factor q0≳1, there exists a low-frequency global Alfvén eigenmode capable of resonating with precession of the trapped energetic ions. This mode has the dominant numbers m =n=1, but the coupling with the upper toroidal sideband is crucial both for the eigenmode formation and its excitation by energetic ions. The properties of this mode are consistent with observations of the low-frequency n =1 mode driven by energetic ions in the "hybrid" discharges with perpendicular injection on the JT-60U tokamak [N. Oyama, A. Isayama, G. Matsunaga et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 065026 (2009)].

  14. A compact source for bunches of singly charged atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Murböck, T.; Birkl, G.; Schmidt, S.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Andelkovic, Z.; Vogel, M.

    2016-04-15

    We have built, operated, and characterized a compact ion source for low-energy bunches of singly charged atomic ions in a vacuum beam line. It is based on atomic evaporation from an electrically heated oven and ionization by electron impact from a heated filament inside a grid-based ionization volume. An adjacent electrode arrangement is used for ion extraction and focusing by applying positive high-voltage pulses to the grid. The method is particularly suited for experimental environments which require low electromagnetic noise. It has proven simple yet reliable and has been used to produce μs-bunches of up to 10{sup 6} Mg{sup +} ions at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. We present the concept, setup and characterizing measurements. The instrument has been operated in the framework of the SpecTrap experiment at the HITRAP facility at GSI/FAIR to provide Mg{sup +} ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions by laser-cooled {sup 24}Mg{sup +}.

  15. A compact source for bunches of singly charged atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Murböck, T; Schmidt, S; Andelkovic, Z; Birkl, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Vogel, M

    2016-04-01

    We have built, operated, and characterized a compact ion source for low-energy bunches of singly charged atomic ions in a vacuum beam line. It is based on atomic evaporation from an electrically heated oven and ionization by electron impact from a heated filament inside a grid-based ionization volume. An adjacent electrode arrangement is used for ion extraction and focusing by applying positive high-voltage pulses to the grid. The method is particularly suited for experimental environments which require low electromagnetic noise. It has proven simple yet reliable and has been used to produce μs-bunches of up to 10(6) Mg(+) ions at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. We present the concept, setup and characterizing measurements. The instrument has been operated in the framework of the SpecTrap experiment at the HITRAP facility at GSI/FAIR to provide Mg(+) ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions by laser-cooled (24)Mg(+).

  16. Impact Collision Ion Scattering Spectroscopy Applied to the Determination of Atomic Surface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Richard Stephen

    1990-08-01

    The technique of impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) was used to investigate the atomic structure and low energy ion scattering dynamics from various surfaces. A new formalism for calculating the three-dimensional cross section for an ion to scatter sequentially and classically from two atoms has been developed. This method can be used to assist in the interpretation of ICISS data in terms of quantitative surface-structure models. Shadowing and blocking effects for energetic ions scattering from more than one atom are shown to be special cases of rainbow scattering. Even at keV energies and above, the cross section at the critical angle for scattering must be evaluated by quantum or semi-classical means to avoid the singularity in the classically calculated cross sections. In an ICISS investigation of the Ag(110) surface, a surface flux peak analysis demonstrated that the surface was not a complete monolayer, but rather contained 10-15% random vacancies. Subsurface Li^+ scattering results confirmed the oscillatory relaxation of the first two atomic layers of the surface, with Delta_{12} = -7.5% and Delta_{23} = 4.0%. Modeling of the neutralization mechanism for the He^+ scattering gave a best fit time-dependent Auger neutralization time constant of 0.84 +/- 0.08 fs. A neutralization study of 5 keV He^+ ions scattered from Au adatoms on the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt {3}-Au surface showed the He^+ ICISS data contained false shadowing features that were actually the result of local neutralization effects. Good agreement was obtained for a radially dependent ion-atom neutralization theory with rate R = Aexp (-ar) , where A and a are 15.5 fs^{ -1} and 1.94 A^{-1} , respectively. A detailed examination of the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt{3 })-Ag surface was also made. The 5 keV Li ^+ ICISS data gave evidence for Ag island formation at single monolayer coverages of silver, while the LEED, AES and LEIS data showed that at relatively high coverages of Ag (35 ML

  17. Automated Atom-By-Atom Three-Dimensional (3D) Reconstruction of Field Ion Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Michal; Gault, Baptiste; Smith, George D W; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-03-20

    An automated procedure has been developed for the reconstruction of field ion microscopy (FIM) data that maintains its atomistic nature. FIM characterizes individual atoms on the specimen's surface, evolving subject to field evaporation, in a series of two-dimensional (2D) images. Its unique spatial resolution enables direct imaging of crystal defects as small as single vacancies. To fully exploit FIM's potential, automated analysis tools are required. The reconstruction algorithm developed here relies on minimal assumptions and is sensitive to atomic coordinates of all imaged atoms. It tracks the atoms across a sequence of images, allocating each to its respective crystallographic plane. The result is a highly accurate 3D lattice-resolved reconstruction. The procedure is applied to over 2000 tungsten atoms, including ion-implanted planes. The approach is further adapted to analyze carbides in a steel matrix, demonstrating its applicability to a range of materials. A vast amount of information is collected during the experiment that can underpin advanced analyses such as automated detection of "out of sequence" events, subangstrom surface displacements and defects effects on neighboring atoms. These analyses have the potential to reveal new insights into the field evaporation process and contribute to improving accuracy and scope of 3D FIM and atom probe characterization.

  18. Rapid enhancement of energetic oxygen ions in the inner magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations show that energetic (>100 keV) O+ ions are rapidly increased in the inner magnetosphere during substorms. The ultimate source of O+ ions is the Earth's ionosphere, so that O+ ions must be accelerated from ~eV to 100s keV somewhere in the magnetosphere. A fundamental question still arise regarding why O+ ions are accelerated and transported to the inner magnetosphere. We simulated substorms under two different solar wind conditions by using the global MHD simulation developed by Tanaka et al. (2010, JGR). The solar wind speed is set to be 372 km/s for Case I, and 500 km/s for Case II. In both cases, the MHD simulation result shows that the dawn to dusk electric field is enhanced in the night side tail region at >7 Re just after the substorm onset. In particular, the electric field in the inner region (~7 Re) is highly enhanced by the tension force because of relatively strong magnetic field together with curved field lines. The strongest electric field takes place near the region where the plasma pressure is high. We performed test particle simulation under the electric and magnetic fields for Cases I and II. O+ ions are released from two planes located at ±2 Re in the Z direction in the tail region. O+ ions released at the two planes represent outflowing stream of O+ ions escaping from the Earth. The distribution function at the planes is assumed to be drifting Kappa distribution with temperature of 10 eV, the density of 105 m-3, and the parallel velocity given by the MHD simulation. In total, around a billion of particles are traced. Each test particle carries the real number of particles in accordance with the Liouville theorem. After tracing particles, we reconstructed 6-dimensional phase space density of O+ ions. We obtained the following results. (1) Just after substorm onset, the differential flux of O+ ions is almost simultaneously enhanced in the region where the electric field is strong. (2) The kinetic energy increases rapidly to

  19. Electron Impact Ionization/Dissociation of Molecules: Production of Energetic Radical Ions and Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feil, S.; Sulzer, P.; Mauracher, A.; Beikircher, M.; Wendt, N.; Aleem, A.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matt-Leubner, S.; Bacher, A.; Matejcik, S.; Probst, M.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2007-10-01

    In order to provide quantitative information on electron collision processes involving various plasma constituents (in particular hydrocarbons) and to elucidate the properties of cations and anions produced we have carried out the past years a series of studies with a variety of techniques in our laboratory in Innsbruck. In the present review we will present some recent results on electron impact ionization and attachment in order to illustrate recent progress in this field in particular concerning the production of energetic fragment cations for hydrocarbons and differences in the attachment of isomers for nitro-organics. Using a Nier type electron impact ion source in combination with a double focusing two sector field mass spectrometer, partial cross sections for electron impact ionization of acetylene, propene and other hydrocarbons have been measured for electron energies up to 1000 eV. Discrimination factors for ions have been determined using the deflection field method in combination with a three-dimensional ion trajectory simulation of ions produced in the ion source. Analysis of the ion yield curves obtained by scanning the deflectors allows the assignment of ions with the same mass-to-charge ratio to specific production channels on the basis of their different kinetic energy distributions. This analysis also allows to determine, besides kinetic energy distributions of fragment ions, partial cross sections differential in kinetic energy. Moreover charge separation reactions (for instance in case of acetylene the Coulomb explosion of the doubly-charged parent ions C2H2++ into the fragment ions C2H+ and H+) are investigated by means of a number of metastable mass spectrometry methods and the associated mean kinetic energy release is deduced. Free electron attachment to the three different isomers of mono-nitrotoluene molecules in the gas phase is studied using two different crossed electron-molecule beams technique. In contrast to previous studies for a

  20. Atomic switch: atom/ion movement controlled devices for beyond von-neumann computers.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-01-10

    An atomic switch is a nanoionic device that controls the diffusion of metal ions/atoms and their reduction/oxidation processes in the switching operation to form/annihilate a conductive path. Since metal atoms can provide a highly conductive channel even if their cluster size is in the nanometer scale, atomic switches may enable downscaling to smaller than the 11 nm technology node, which is a great challenge for semiconductor devices. Atomic switches also possess novel characteristics, such as high on/off ratios, very low power consumption and non-volatility. The unique operating mechanisms of these devices have enabled the development of various types of atomic switch, such as gap-type and gapless-type two-terminal atomic switches and three-terminal atomic switches. Novel functions, such as selective volatile/nonvolatile, synaptic, memristive, and photo-assisted operations have been demonstrated. Such atomic switch characteristics can not only improve the performance of present-day electronic systems, but also enable development of new types of electronic systems, such as beyond von- Neumann computers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Observations of energetic helium ions in the earth's radiation belts during a sequence of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of energetic (MeV) helium ions made with Explorer 45 during a sequence of magnetic storms during June through December of 1972 are presented. It is noted that the first of these storms started on June 17 and had a Dst index excursion to -190 gamma and that the MeV helium ions were perturbed primarily beyond 3 earth radii in the equatorial radiation belts with a typical flux increase of an order of magnitude at L equal to 4. The second storm period was in August and was associated with very major solar flare activity. While the Dst extremum was at best 35 gamma less than the June storm, this period can be characterized as irregular (or multi-storm) with strong compression of the magnetosphere and very large (order of magnitude) MeV helium ion flux enhancements down to L approximately equal to 2. After this injection, the trapped helium ion fluxes showed positive spherical slope with the peak beyond 3.15 MeV at L equal to 2.5; at the lowest observable L shells, little flux decay was seen during the remainder of the year.

  2. Fluid electron, gyrokinetic ion simulations of linear internal kink and energetic particle modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael; Mishchenko, Alexey; Könies, Axel; Kleiber, Ralf; Borchardt, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    The internal kink mode is an important plasma instability responsible for a broad class of undesirable phenomena in tokamaks, including the sawtooth cycle and fishbones. To predict and discover ways to mitigate this behaviour in current and future devices, numerical simulations are necessary. The internal kink mode can be modelled by reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Fishbone modes are an inherently kinetic and non-linear phenomenon based on the n = 1 Energetic Particle Mode (EPM), and have been studied using hybrid codes that combine a reduced MHD bulk plasma model with a kinetic treatment of fast ions. In this work, linear simulations are presented using a hybrid model which couples a fluid treatment of electrons with a gyrokinetic treatment of both bulk and fast ions. Studies of the internal kink mode in geometry relevant to large tokamak experiments are presented and the effect of gyrokinetic ions is considered. Interaction of the kink with gyrokinetic fast ions is also considered, including the destabilisation of the linear n = 1 EPM underlying the fishbone.

  3. Fluid electron, gyrokinetic ion simulations of linear internal kink and energetic particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Michael Mishchenko, Alexey; Könies, Axel; Kleiber, Ralf; Borchardt, Matthias

    2014-07-15

    The internal kink mode is an important plasma instability responsible for a broad class of undesirable phenomena in tokamaks, including the sawtooth cycle and fishbones. To predict and discover ways to mitigate this behaviour in current and future devices, numerical simulations are necessary. The internal kink mode can be modelled by reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Fishbone modes are an inherently kinetic and non-linear phenomenon based on the n = 1 Energetic Particle Mode (EPM), and have been studied using hybrid codes that combine a reduced MHD bulk plasma model with a kinetic treatment of fast ions. In this work, linear simulations are presented using a hybrid model which couples a fluid treatment of electrons with a gyrokinetic treatment of both bulk and fast ions. Studies of the internal kink mode in geometry relevant to large tokamak experiments are presented and the effect of gyrokinetic ions is considered. Interaction of the kink with gyrokinetic fast ions is also considered, including the destabilisation of the linear n = 1 EPM underlying the fishbone.

  4. Growth mechanism and composition of ultrasmooth a-C:H:Si films grown from energetic ions for superlubricity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xinchun Kato, Takahisa

    2014-01-28

    Growth mechanism and ion energy dependence of composition of ultrasmooth a-C:H:Si films grown from ionization of tetramethylsilane (TMS) and toluene mixture at a fixed gas ratio have been investigated by varying the applied bias voltage. The dynamic scaling theory is employed to evaluate the roughness evolution of a-C:H:Si films, and to extract roughness and growth exponents of α ∼ 0.51 and β ∼ 0, respectively. The atomically smooth surface of a-C:H:Si films with Ra ∼ 0.1 nm is thermally activated by the energetic ion-impact induced subsurface “polishing” process for ion dominated deposition. The ion energy (bias voltage) plays a paramount role in determining the hydrogen incorporation, bonding structure and final stoichiometry of a-C:H:Si films. The hydrogen content in the films measured by ERDA gradually decreases from 36.7 to 17.3 at. % with increasing the bias voltage from 0.25 to 3.5 kV, while the carbon content in the films increases correspondingly from 52.5 to 70.1 at. %. The Si content is kept almost constant at ∼9–10 at. %. Depending on the ion-surface interactions, the bonding structure of a-C:H:Si films grown in different ion energy regions evolves from chain-developed polymer-like to cross-linked diamond-like to sp{sup 2}-bonded a–C as revealed by XPS, Raman, and FTIR analysis. Such a structural evolution is reflected in their measured nanomechanical properties such as hardness, modulus, and compressive stress. An enhanced viscoplastic behavior (i.e., viscoplastic exponent of ∼0.06) is observed for polymeric a-C:H:Si films. A hydrogen content threshold (H > 20 at. %) exists for the as-grown a-C:H:Si films to exhibit superlow friction in dry N{sub 2} atmosphere. An extremely low friction coefficient of ∼0.001 can be obtained for polymer-like a-C:H:Si film. These near-frictionless a-C:H:Si films are strongly promising for applications in industrial lubricating systems.

  5. Growth mechanism and composition of ultrasmooth a-C:H:Si films grown from energetic ions for superlubricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinchun; Kato, Takahisa

    2014-01-01

    Growth mechanism and ion energy dependence of composition of ultrasmooth a-C:H:Si films grown from ionization of tetramethylsilane (TMS) and toluene mixture at a fixed gas ratio have been investigated by varying the applied bias voltage. The dynamic scaling theory is employed to evaluate the roughness evolution of a-C:H:Si films, and to extract roughness and growth exponents of α ˜ 0.51 and β ˜ 0, respectively. The atomically smooth surface of a-C:H:Si films with Ra ˜ 0.1 nm is thermally activated by the energetic ion-impact induced subsurface "polishing" process for ion dominated deposition. The ion energy (bias voltage) plays a paramount role in determining the hydrogen incorporation, bonding structure and final stoichiometry of a-C:H:Si films. The hydrogen content in the films measured by ERDA gradually decreases from 36.7 to 17.3 at. % with increasing the bias voltage from 0.25 to 3.5 kV, while the carbon content in the films increases correspondingly from 52.5 to 70.1 at. %. The Si content is kept almost constant at ˜9-10 at. %. Depending on the ion-surface interactions, the bonding structure of a-C:H:Si films grown in different ion energy regions evolves from chain-developed polymer-like to cross-linked diamond-like to sp2-bonded a-C as revealed by XPS, Raman, and FTIR analysis. Such a structural evolution is reflected in their measured nanomechanical properties such as hardness, modulus, and compressive stress. An enhanced viscoplastic behavior (i.e., viscoplastic exponent of ˜0.06) is observed for polymeric a-C:H:Si films. A hydrogen content threshold (H > 20 at. %) exists for the as-grown a-C:H:Si films to exhibit superlow friction in dry N2 atmosphere. An extremely low friction coefficient of ˜0.001 can be obtained for polymer-like a-C:H:Si film. These near-frictionless a-C:H:Si films are strongly promising for applications in industrial lubricating systems.

  6. Clustering of ions at atomic dimensions in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Padma K.; Eliasson, Bengt; Eliasson

    2013-08-01

    By means of particle simulations of the equations of motion for ions interacting among themselves under the influence of newly discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive force (SEAF) in a dense quantum plasma, we demonstrate that the SEAF can bring ions closer at atomic dimensions. We present simulation results of the dynamics of an ensemble of ions in the presence of the SEAF without and with confining external potentials and collisions between ions and degenerate electrons. Our particle simulations reveal that under the SEAF, ions attract each other, come closer, and form ionic clusters in the bath of degenerate electrons that shield ions. Furthermore, an external confining potential produces robust ion clusters that can have cigar- and ball-like shapes, which remain stable when the confining potential is removed. The stability of ion clusters is discussed. Our results may have applications to solid density plasmas (density exceeding 1023 per cm3), where the electrons will be degenerate and quantum forces due to the electron recoil effect caused by the overlapping of electron wave functions and electron tunneling through the Bohm potential, electron-exchange and electron-exchange and electron correlations associated with electron-1/2 spin effect, and the quantum statistical pressure of the degenerate electrons play a decisive role.

  7. Observation of Reversed-Shear Alfvén Eigenmodes Excited by Energetic Ions in a Helical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toi, K.; Watanabe, F.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ida, K.; Morita, S.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Spong, D. A.; Todo, Y.; Watari, T.; Ohdachi, S.; Sakakibara, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Inagaki, S.; Narihara, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Narushima, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Funaba, H.; Goto, M.; Ikeda, K.; Ito, T.; Kaneko, O.; Kubo, S.; Murakami, S.; Minami, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Nagayama, Y.; Nishiura, M.; Oka, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Shimozuma, T.; Takeiri, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tsumori, K.; Yamada, I.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kawahata, K.; Komori, A.

    2010-10-01

    Reversed-shear Alfvén eigenmodes were observed for the first time in a helical plasma having negative q0'' (the curvature of the safety factor q at the zero shear layer). The frequency is swept downward and upward sequentially via the time variation in the maximum of q. The eigenmodes calculated by ideal MHD theory are consistent with the experimental data. The frequency sweeping is mainly determined by the effects of energetic ions and the bulk pressure gradient. Coupling of reversed-shear Alfvén eigenmodes with energetic ion driven geodesic acoustic modes generates a multitude of frequency-sweeping modes.

  8. Suppressing Loss of Ions in an Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2010-01-01

    An improvement has been made in the design of a compact, highly stable mercury- ion clock to suppress a loss of ions as they are transferred between the quadrupole and higher multipole ion traps. Such clocks are being developed for use aboard spacecraft for navigation and planetary radio science. The modification is also applicable to ion clocks operating on Earth: indeed, the success of the modification has been demonstrated in construction and operation of a terrestrial breadboard prototype of the compact, highly stable mercury-ion clock. Selected aspects of the breadboard prototype at different stages of development were described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The following background information is reviewed from previous articles: In this clock as in some prior ion clocks, mercury ions are shuttled between two ion traps, one a 16- pole linear radio-frequency trap, while the other is a quadrupole radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a 202Hg lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at approximately 40.507 GHz. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling that would otherwise be caused by collisions between clock atoms and the wall of a gas cell. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave-resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. This is similar to the operation of an atomic beam clock, except that with ions the beam can be halted and reversed as ions are shuttled back and forth between the two traps. When the two traps are driven at the same radio frequency, the strength of confinement can be reduced near the junction between the two traps, depending upon the relative phase of the RF voltage used to operate each of the two traps, and

  9. Local correlation energies of atoms, ions and model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umrigar, Cyrus; Huang, Chien-Jung

    1997-03-01

    We present nearly local definitions of the correlation energy density, and its potential and kinetic components, and evaluate them for several atoms, ions and model systems. This information provides valuable guidance in constructing better correlation functionals than those in common use, such as the local density approximation (LDA) and the various generalized gradient approximations (GGAs). The true local correlation energy per electron has oscillations, reflecting the shell-structure, whereas the LDA approximation to it is monotonic. In addition we demonstrate that, for two-electron systems, the quantum chemistry and the density functional definitions of the correlation energy approach each other with increasing atomic number as 1/Z^3.

  10. Experimental study of H atom recombination on different surfaces in relation to H- negative ion production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleiferis, S.; Bentounes, J.; Béchu, S.; Svarnas, P.; Bés, A.; Lacoste, A.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2017-08-01

    Volume production of H- negative ions is mostly attributed to the dissociative attachment of electrons to ro-vibrationally excited molecules. Apart from the main formation path for enriching the plasma with these molecules (i.e. radiative decay of singlet states excited by collisions with energetic electrons, EV excitation), an additional formation process refers to recombination of hydrogen atoms on the surface of materials which face the plasma. In this work, the importance of the later process is evaluated by considering various materials. Pyrex, Stainless Steel, Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), and Yttrium, are sequentially tested in the ECR-driven H- negative ion source ROSAE III. This source is specially designed to promote as much as possible surface recombination only on the surface of the specimen under test. Optical emission spectroscopy does prove a high degree of dissociation in this source. Furthermore, electron and negative ion densities are measured by means of electrostatic probe and laser photodetachment, respectively. The effectiveness of the above materials for the production of ro-vibrational states is thus evaluated indirectly, i.e. by comparing the values of the produced negative ion densities, assuming H- production through DA mainly. The results suggest that, under the present conditions, the formation of ro-vibrational states is apparently dominated by process other than surface recombination.

  11. Young-type interference in projectile-electron loss in energetic ion-molecule collisions.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B; Najjari, B; Fischer, D; Artemyev, A N; Surzhykov, A

    2011-06-10

    Under certain conditions an electron bound in a fast projectile ion, colliding with a molecule, interacts mainly with the nuclei and inner shell electrons of atoms forming the molecule. Because of their compact localization in space and distinct separation from each other, these molecular centers play in such collisions a role similar to that of optical slits in light scattering leading to pronounced interference in the spectra of the electron emitted from the projectile.

  12. Friction. Tuning friction atom-by-atom in an ion-crystal simulator.

    PubMed

    Bylinskii, Alexei; Gangloff, Dorian; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-06-05

    Friction between ordered, atomically smooth surfaces at the nanoscale (nanofriction) is often governed by stick-slip processes. To test long-standing atomistic models of such processes, we implemented a synthetic nanofriction interface between a laser-cooled Coulomb crystal of individually addressable ions as the moving object and a periodic light-field potential as the substrate. We show that stick-slip friction can be tuned from maximal to nearly frictionless via arrangement of the ions relative to the substrate. By varying the ion number, we also show that this strong dependence of friction on the structural mismatch, as predicted by many-particle models, already emerges at the level of two or three atoms. This model system enables a microscopic and systematic investigation of friction, potentially even into the quantum many-body regime.

  13. Manipulating ion-atom collisions with coherent electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Tom

    2002-08-26

    Laser-assisted ion-atom collisions are considered in terms of a nonperturbative quantum mechanical description of the electronic motion. It is shown for the system He(2+) - H at 2 keV/amu that the collision dynamics depend strongly on the initial phase of the laser field and the applied wavelength. Whereas electronic transitions are caused by the concurrent action of the field and the projectile ion at relatively low frequencies, they can be separated into modified collisional capture and field ionization events in the region above the one-photon ionization threshold.

  14. Measurement of femtosecond atomic lifetimes using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träbert, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Two types of experiment are described that both employ an electron beam ion trap for the production of highly charged ion species with the aim of then measuring atomic level lifetimes in the femtosecond range. In one experiment (done by Beiersdorfer et al. some time ago), the lifetime measurement depends on the associated line broadening. In a recent string of experiments at Linac Coherent Light Source Stanford, the HI-LIGHT collaboration employed pump-probe excitation using the FEL as a short-pulse X-ray laser.

  15. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasajima, Y.; Osada, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Iwase, A.

    2013-11-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210-216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius Ra was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gSe, i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (Se: electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between Ra and gSe follows the relation Ra2=aln(gS)+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms.

  16. Energetic driving force for preferential binding of self-interstitial atoms to Fe grain boundaries over vacancies

    SciTech Connect

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Horstemeyer, Mark; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations of 50 Fe grain boundaries were used to understand their interaction with vacancies and self-interstitial atoms at all atomic positions within 20 °A of the boundary, which is important for designing radiation-resistant polycrystalline materials. Site-to-site variation within the boundary of both vacancy and self-interstitial formation energies is substantial, with the majority of sites having lower formation energies than in the bulk. Comparing the vacancy and self-interstitial atom binding energies for each site shows that there is an energetic driving force for interstitials to preferentially bind to grain boundary sites over vacancies. Furthermore, these results provide a valuable dataset for quantifying uncertainty bounds for various grain boundary types at the nanoscale, which can be propagated to higher scale simulations of microstructure evolution.

  17. Temperature Dependence and Energetics of Single Ions at the Aqueous Liquid-Vapor Interface

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    We investigate temperature-dependence of free energetics with two single halide anions, I− and Cl−, crossing the aqueous liquid-vapor interface through molecular dynamics simulations. The result shows that I− has a modest surface stability of 0.5 kcal/mol at 300 K and the stability decreases as the temperature increases, indicating the surface adsorption process for the anion is entropically disfavored. In contrast, Cl− shows no such surface state at all temperatures. Decomposition of free energetics reveals that water-water interactions provide a favorable enthalpic contribution, while the desolvation of ion induces an increase in free energy. Calculations of surface fluctuations demonstrate that I− generates significantly greater interfacial fluctuations compared to Cl−. The fluctuation is attributed to the malleability of the solvation shells, which allows for more long-ranged perturbations and solvent density redistribution induced by I− as the anion approaches the liquid-vapor interface. The increase in temperature of the solvent enhances the inherent thermally-excited fluctuations and consequently reduces the relative contribution from anion to surface fluctuations, which is consistent with the decrease in surface-stability of I−. Our results indicate a strong correlation with induced interfacial fluctuations and anion surface stability; moreover, resulting temperature dependent behavior of induced fluctuations suggests the possibility of a critical level of induced fluctuations associated with surface stability. PMID:23537166

  18. Local density probing of atomic gas via cold Li-Ca+ inelastic collisions in an atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Haze, Shinsuke; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Kyuno, Kazuki; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in a harmonic trap inevitably has an inhomogeneous density distribution, which makes an atomic gas an ensemble of atoms in different physical phases. Recent technical advances in the determination of local physical quantities in an atomic gas overcome this complexity and make it possible to directly compare experimental results with many-body theories of a homogeneous atomic gas. A laser-cooled ion can be used as a high-spatial resolution probe of physical quantities of an atomic gas. The spatial spread of an ion can be reduced to sub-microns, which is even small enough for the application of the local probe of atoms in optical lattices. In our experiment, we constructed Li and Ca+ ultracold hybrid system and observed inelastic collisions as a loss of ions. The inelastic collision is confirmed to be a charge-exchange process, whose rate depends linearly on the local atomic density. From the measurement of the rate of the charge-exchange, we can reproduce an atomic density profile. This is an important step toward a local probe of physical quantities of atoms with cold ions. In this presentation, we report on the observation of charge-exchange collisions between Li atom and Ca+ ions, and discuss the feasibility of the ions as a probe of the atoms.

  19. Origin of the different energetic ion populations in the quasi-perpendicular Ion Foreshock: 2D Full-particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, P.; Lembege, B.; Stienlet, J.

    2012-04-01

    The foreshock region is located upstream of the terrestrial bow shock and is characterized by energetic backstreaming particles (electrons and ions) issued from the shock and by an important wave activity as observed by many space missions. In order to analyse the foreshock region, a curved shock is simulated with the help of a 2 - D full particle (PIC) code, where full curvature and time of flight effects, and where both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described by a self consistent approach. The analysis is presently restricted to the quasi-perpendicular angular range defined by 45°≤ θBn ≤ 90°, where θBn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field, and we focus only on the ion foreshock. In a good agreement with experimental data, present preliminary results evidence two distinct ion populations collimated along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF): (i) the Field-Aligned Beam population (hereafter named "FAB") and (ii) the gyro-phase bunch population (hereafter named "GPB") which differ from each other by their gyrotropic or non-gyrotropic behavior, respectively. Additionally, the "FAB" population is observed at the edge of the ion foreshock and near the curved shock front, while the "'GPB" population is observed deeper in the foreshock and further from the shock front. The analysis shows that no pitch angle scattering mechanism needs to be invoked to account for the generation of the "GPB", but rather additional criteria are necessary namely: the interaction time Δtint of backstreaming ions with the shock front and their downstream penetration depth. These criteria allow to evidence that (i) the "FAB" population corresponds to particles which move back and forth between the upstream edge of the front and the overshoot, and are characterized by a quite large Δtint (covering several local gyro-periods, 4 ≤ τci ≤ 12). In contrast, (ii) the "GPB" ions have suffered a very short interaction time (i.e. Δtint < 1

  20. Subauroral polarization stream on the outer boundary of the ring current during an energetic ion injection event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhigang; Qiao, Zheng; Li, Haimeng; Huang, Shiyong; Wang, Dedong; Yu, Xiongdong; Yu, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) electric field can play an important role in the coupling between the inner magnetosphere and ionosphere; however, the production mechanism of SAPS has not been yet solved. During an energetic ion injection event on 26 March 2004, at latitudes lower than the equatorward boundaries of precipitating plasma sheet electrons and ions, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F13 satellite simultaneously observed a strong SAPS with the peak velocity of 1294 m/s and downward flowing field-aligned currents (FACs). Conjugate observations of DMSP F13 and NOAA 15 satellites have shown that FACs flowing into the ionosphere just lie in the outer boundary of the ring current (RC). The downward flowing FACs were observed in a region of positive latitudinal gradients of the ion energy density, implying that the downward flowing FACs are more likely linked to the azimuthal gradient than the radial gradient of the RC ion pressure. Our result demonstrates that RC ion pressure gradients on the outer boundary of the RC in the evening sector during energetic ion injection events can lead to downward flowing FACs so as to cause strong SAPS in condition of low ionospheric conductivities.Plain Language SummaryThis paper provides a good case that the SAPS and FAC occurred in the outer boundary of the ring current during an <span class="hlt">energetic</span> <span class="hlt">ion</span> injection event. Our result demonstrates that RC <span class="hlt">ion</span> pressure gradients on the outer boundary of the RC in the evening sector during <span class="hlt">energetic</span> <span class="hlt">ion</span> injection events can lead to downward flowing FACs so as to cause strong SAPS in condition of low ionospheric conductivities.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1324571','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1324571"><span><span class="hlt">Energetics</span> of alkali and alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng; Navrotsky, Alexandra</p> <p>2016-06-30</p> <p>Alkali and alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration <span class="hlt">energetics</span> and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (<i>Z/r</i>) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO<sub>2</sub> (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02 ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO<sub>2</sub> (Li-A) for hydrated alkali <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO<sub>2</sub> (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as <i>Z/r</i> increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1324571-energetics-alkali-alkaline-earth-ion-exchanged-zeolite','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1324571-energetics-alkali-alkaline-earth-ion-exchanged-zeolite"><span><span class="hlt">Energetics</span> of alkali and alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; ...</p> <p>2016-06-30</p> <p>Alkali and alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration <span class="hlt">energetics</span> and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02more » ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810025589','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810025589"><span><span class="hlt">Energetic</span> oxygen and sulfur <span class="hlt">ions</span> in the Jovian magnetosphere. Ph.D. Thesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gehrels, N.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Observations of 1 to 20 MeV/nuc oxygen, sodium, and sulfur <span class="hlt">ions</span> in the Jovian magnetosphere are reported. Measurements made by the cosmic ray subsystem on Voyager 1 and 2 were used to calculate abundances and energy spectra in the region from 5 to 20 Jovian radii. The phase space density of the oxygen <span class="hlt">ions</span> calculated from the spectra has a positive radial gradient between 6 and 17 Jovian radii, indicating an inward diffusive flow. The diffusion coefficient upper limit at 9 Jovian radii is approximately 10 to the -5 power/s. This limit, combined with the analysis of Voyager plasma observations by Siscoe et al.1981, implies an upper limit to the mass loading rate near Io of approximately 10 to the 28th power <span class="hlt">ions</span>/s. The <span class="hlt">energetic</span> oxygen lifetime is within an order of magnitude of the strong pitch-angle diffusion lifetime in this region, with the largest total number of particles lost between 7.5 and 12.5 Jovian radii. It is shown that the losses are not due to geometric absorption by Io, absorption by dust grains, or energy loss in the plasma of the inner magnetosphere, and it is therefore postulated that the primary loss mechanism is pitch-angle scattering into the loss cone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1324571','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1324571"><span><span class="hlt">Energetics</span> of alkali and alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng; Navrotsky, Alexandra</p> <p>2016-06-30</p> <p>Alkali and alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration <span class="hlt">energetics</span> and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (<i>Z/r</i>) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO<sub>2</sub> (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02 ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO<sub>2</sub> (Li-A) for hydrated alkali <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO<sub>2</sub> (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth <span class="hlt">ion</span>-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as <i>Z/r</i> increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820032928&hterms=ion+exchange&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dion%2Bexchange','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820032928&hterms=ion+exchange&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dion%2Bexchange"><span>Transport, charge exchange and loss of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> heavy <span class="hlt">ions</span> in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Spjeldvik, W. N.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of <span class="hlt">ions</span> in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating <span class="hlt">ion</span> detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between <span class="hlt">ions</span> and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> <span class="hlt">ion</span> fluxes of equatorially mirroring <span class="hlt">ions</span> under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen <span class="hlt">ion</span> distributions. Comparisons are made with <span class="hlt">ion</span> flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt <span class="hlt">ion</span> charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820032928&hterms=mobility+theory&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dmobility%2Btheory','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820032928&hterms=mobility+theory&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dmobility%2Btheory"><span>Transport, charge exchange and loss of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> heavy <span class="hlt">ions</span> in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Spjeldvik, W. N.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of <span class="hlt">ions</span> in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating <span class="hlt">ion</span> detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between <span class="hlt">ions</span> and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> <span class="hlt">ion</span> fluxes of equatorially mirroring <span class="hlt">ions</span> under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen <span class="hlt">ion</span> distributions. Comparisons are made with <span class="hlt">ion</span> flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt <span class="hlt">ion</span> charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21647477','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21647477"><span>Radiolysis of astrophysical ice analogs by <span class="hlt">energetic</span> <span class="hlt">ions</span>: the effect of projectile mass and ice temperature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pilling, Sergio; Duarte, Eduardo Seperuelo; Domaracka, Alicja; Rothard, Hermann; Boduch, Philippe; da Silveira, Enio F</p> <p>2011-09-21</p> <p>An experimental study of the interaction of highly charged, <span class="hlt">energetic</span> <span class="hlt">ions</span> (52 MeV (58)Ni(13+) and 15.7 MeV (16)O(5+)) with mixed H(2)O : C(18)O(2) astrophysical ice analogs at two different temperatures is presented. This analysis aims to simulate the chemical and the physicochemical interactions induced by cosmic rays inside dense, cold astrophysical environments, such as molecular clouds or protostellar clouds as well at the surface of outer solar system bodies. The measurements were performed at the heavy <span class="hlt">ion</span> accelerator GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'<span class="hlt">Ions</span> Lourds) in Caen, France. The gas samples were deposited onto a CsI substrate at 13 K and 80 K. In situ analysis was performed by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at different fluences. Radiolysis yields of the produced species were quantified. The dissociation cross section at 13 K of both H(2)O and CO(2) is about 3-4 times smaller when O <span class="hlt">ions</span> are employed. The ice temperature seems to affect differently each species when the same projectile was employed. The formation cross section at 13 K of molecules such as C(18)O, CO (with oxygen from water), and H(2)O(2) increases when Ni <span class="hlt">ions</span> are employed. The formation of organic compounds seems to be enhanced by the oxygen projectiles and at lower temperatures. In addition, because the organic production at 13 K is at least 4 times higher than the value at 80 K, we also expect that interstellar ices are more organic-rich than the surfaces of outer solar system bodies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NIMPB.365..123Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NIMPB.365..123Z"><span>Micro-Raman spectroscopy characterization of silicon with different structures irradiated with <span class="hlt">energetic</span> Bi-<span class="hlt">ions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, Yabin; Yao, Cunfeng; Wang, Ji; Zhu, Huiping; Shen, Tielong; Gao, Xing; Sun, Jianrong; Wei, Kongfang; Wang, Dong; Sheng, Yanbin; Wang, Zhiguang</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Researches of irradiation effects on silicon possess not only fundamental interests but also potential application prospects. Comparison studies about structural modification of silicon materials with different structures under identical irradiation conditions can reveal the irradiation mechanisms for amorphous and crystalline phases of silicon. For this purpose, amorphous silicon (a-Si) and nano-crystalline silicon (nc-Si) films as well as mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) samples were irradiated with 6.0 MeV Bi-<span class="hlt">ions</span> at room temperature. The <span class="hlt">ion</span> fluences are 1.0 × 1013, 5.0 × 1013 and 1.0 × 1014 <span class="hlt">ions</span>/cm2. All samples were analyzed by using a Raman spectrometer. The obtained results show that the crystalline fraction of c-Si and nc-Si decrease with increasing fluence, which indicates that the irradiation induces the amorphization of nc-Si and c-Si samples. In addition, the variation in Raman frequency of crystalline peak after irradiation reveals that the irradiation also results in the increased stress in crystalline phase of c-Si and nc-Si samples. As the fluence increases, the bond angle deviation and the ratio of TA to TO mode of amorphous network of a-Si and nc-Si films initially increase and then decrease by a diminishing degree, while the bond angle deviation and the ratio of TA to TO mode of amorphous network of c-Si samples increase continuously. This gives the dependence of short-range structural order of amorphous network of a-Si, nc-Si and c-Si samples on the <span class="hlt">ion</span> fluence, which is related with the irradiation induced variation of local free energy. It is considered that the irradiation induced structural modification of silicon samples is mainly attributed to the nuclear energy loss. The irradiation effects of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> heavy-<span class="hlt">ions</span> on crystalline and amorphous phases of silicon have been discussed, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860029661&hterms=materials+flow&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmaterials%2Bflow','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860029661&hterms=materials+flow&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmaterials%2Bflow"><span>Development of a high flow source of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> oxygen <span class="hlt">atoms</span> for material degradation studies. [of Space Shuttles in low earth orbit environments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A technique for the generation, in the laboratory, of thermally 'cold', high flux of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> oxygen <span class="hlt">atoms</span> is presented. The flux of nearly mono-<span class="hlt">energetic</span> oxygen <span class="hlt">atoms</span> is obtained after a laser-induced breakdown of oxygen molecules followed by a rapid expansion of the recombining plasma. The experimental apparatus, the optical and spectral measurements, the O-<span class="hlt">atom</span> source characterization, and the material degradation studies are discussed. Average oxygen <span class="hlt">atom</span> velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s are measured with an estimated flux of 10 to the 18th per pulse, over pulse durations of several microseconds. The flow of the O2 gas for about 200 microseconds before applying the laser pulse is found to give best results. It is also found that the <span class="hlt">energetic</span> O-<span class="hlt">atom</span> irradiation of sample targets such as Al, Fe, and polyethylene, induces mass removal. In addition, spectral scans of the radiation reveals the existence of two main spectral subsets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860029661&hterms=material+flow&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmaterial%2Bflow','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860029661&hterms=material+flow&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmaterial%2Bflow"><span>Development of a high flow source of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> oxygen <span class="hlt">atoms</span> for material degradation studies. [of Space Shuttles in low earth orbit environments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A technique for the generation, in the laboratory, of thermally 'cold', high flux of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> oxygen <span class="hlt">atoms</span> is presented. The flux of nearly mono-<span class="hlt">energetic</span> oxygen <span class="hlt">atoms</span> is obtained after a laser-induced breakdown of oxygen molecules followed by a rapid expansion of the recombining plasma. The experimental apparatus, the optical and spectral measurements, the O-<span class="hlt">atom</span> source characterization, and the material degradation studies are discussed. Average oxygen <span class="hlt">atom</span> velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s are measured with an estimated flux of 10 to the 18th per pulse, over pulse durations of several microseconds. The flow of the O2 gas for about 200 microseconds before applying the laser pulse is found to give best results. It is also found that the <span class="hlt">energetic</span> O-<span class="hlt">atom</span> irradiation of sample targets such as Al, Fe, and polyethylene, induces mass removal. In addition, spectral scans of the radiation reveals the existence of two main spectral subsets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810047792&hterms=Radiation+Belts&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DRadiation%2BBelts','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810047792&hterms=Radiation+Belts&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DRadiation%2BBelts"><span><span class="hlt">Energetic</span> heavy <span class="hlt">ions</span> with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 4 in the equatorial radiation belts of the earth - Magnetic storms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Direct in situ observations of trapped <span class="hlt">energetic</span> heavy <span class="hlt">ions</span> with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 4 at energies in the lower MeV range made with Explorer 45 during the period June-December 1972 are presented. It is noted that all measurements were carried out in the vicinity of the geomagnetic equatorial plane and that the data show the varying effects of four major magnetic storm periods. Orders of magnitude increases in the trapped heavy <span class="hlt">ion</span> population are seen deep within the radiation belts following the August 1972 solar flare and magnetic storm events. Fluxes of the Z greater than or equal to 4 <span class="hlt">ions</span> are found to decay faster than those of helium <span class="hlt">ions</span> of comparable energies; typical decay times for these <span class="hlt">ions</span> are found to be 24-40 days at L less than or equal to 4 and shorter at higher L shells. The observations are compared with the expected post-injection long-term behavior of <span class="hlt">atomic</span> oxygen <span class="hlt">ions</span> deduced from charge exhange, radial diffusive transport, and Coulomb collisions. Good agreement is found between theory and observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JChPh.147a3942S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JChPh.147a3942S"><span>A compact design for velocity-map imaging of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> electrons and <span class="hlt">ions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schomas, D.; Rendler, N.; Krull, J.; Richter, R.; Mudrich, M.</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>We present a compact design for a velocity-map imaging spectrometer for <span class="hlt">energetic</span> electrons and <span class="hlt">ions</span>. The standard geometry by Eppink and Parker [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68, 3477 (1997)] is augmented by just two extended electrodes so as to realize an additional einzel lens. In this way, for a maximum electrode voltage of 7 kV, we experimentally demonstrate imaging of electrons with energies up to 65 eV. Simulations show that energy acceptances ≲270 and ≲1200 eV with an energy resolution Δ E /E ≲5 % are achievable for electrode voltages ≤20 kV when using diameters of the position-sensitive detector of 42 and 78 mm, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910068914&hterms=embedded+type&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dembedded%2Btype','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910068914&hterms=embedded+type&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dembedded%2Btype"><span>The <span class="hlt">energetic</span> <span class="hlt">ion</span> signature of an O-type neutral line in the geomagnetic tail</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Martin, R. F., Jr.; Johnson, D. F.; Speiser, T. W.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">energetic</span> <span class="hlt">ion</span> signature is presented which has the potential for remote sensing of an O-type neutral line embedded in a current sheet. A source plasma with a tailward flowing Kappa distribution yields a strongly non-Kappa distribution after interacting with the neutral line: sharp jumps, or ridges, occur in the velocity space distribution function f(nu-perpendicular, nu-parallel) associated with both increases and decreases in f. The jumps occur when orbits are reversed in the x-direction: a reversal causing initially earthward particles (low probability in the source distribution) to be observed results in a decrease in f, while a reversal causing initially tailward particles to be observed produces an increase in f. The reversals, and hence the jumps, occur at approximately constant values of perpendicular velocity in both the positive nu parallel and negative nu parallel half planes. The results were obtained using single particle simulations in a fixed magnetic field model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JPhB...40.4077H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JPhB...40.4077H"><span>Some properties of Stark states of hydrogenic <span class="hlt">atoms</span> and <span class="hlt">ions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hey, J. D.</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>The motivation for this work is the problem of providing accurate values of the <span class="hlt">atomic</span> transition matrix elements for the Stark components of Rydberg Rydberg transitions in <span class="hlt">atomic</span> hydrogen and hydrogenic <span class="hlt">ions</span>, for use in spectral line broadening calculations applicable to cool, low-density plasmas, such as those found in H II regions. Since conventional methods of calculating these transition matrix elements cannot be used for the high principal quantum numbers now easily attained in radio astronomical spectra, we attempt to show that the recurrence relation (ladder operator) method recently employed by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889 97) and Hey (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641 64) can be taken over into the parabolic coordinate system used to describe the Stark states of the <span class="hlt">atomic</span> (ionic) radiators. The present method is therefore suggested as potentially useful for extending the work of Griem (1967 Astrophys. J. 148 547 58, 2005 Astrophys. J. 620 L133 4), Watson (2006), Stambulchik et al (2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 016401(9 pp) on Stark broadening in transitions between states of high principal quantum number, to physical conditions where the binary, impact approximation is no longer strictly applicable to both electron and <span class="hlt">ion</span> perturbers. Another possible field of application is the study of Stark mixing transitions in 'ultracold' Rydberg <span class="hlt">atoms</span> perturbed by long-range interactions with slow <span class="hlt">atoms</span> and <span class="hlt">ions</span>. Preparatory to the derivation of recurrence relations for states of different principal quantum number, a number of properties and recurrence relations are also found for states of identical principal quantum number, including the analogue in parabolic coordinates to the relations of Pasternack (1937 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 23 91 4, 250) in spherical polar coordinates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15006512','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15006512"><span>EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, <span class="hlt">Atomic</span> Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged <span class="hlt">Atomic</span> <span class="hlt">Ions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E</p> <p>2001-07-10</p> <p>Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam <span class="hlt">ion</span> trap (EBIT) works as an <span class="hlt">ion</span> trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of <span class="hlt">ion</span> confinement, charge exchange processes, <span class="hlt">atomic</span> lifetime and <span class="hlt">ion</span> mass measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMSH11B1630C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMSH11B1630C"><span>Accelerator Tests of the Prototype <span class="hlt">Energetic</span> Heavy <span class="hlt">Ion</span> Sensor (EHIS) for GOES-R</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; McKibben, R. B.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Energetic</span> Heavy <span class="hlt">Ion</span> Sensor (EHIS) is part of the Space Environmental In-Situ Suite (SEISS) for the Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite series R (GOES-R) program. It will measure <span class="hlt">energetic</span> protons from 10-200 MeV and <span class="hlt">ions</span> through nickel (Z=28) with similar penetrating power. By use of an Angle Detecting Inclined Sensor (ADIS) system, EHIS achieves single element resolution with extensive on-board event processing. A prototype or "brass-board" instrument, fully functional but not intended for environmental testing, has been completed. In November of 2009, we exposed the prototype to protons at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and in March of 2010, we exposed it to Ni primary and fragment beams at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's (NSCL) Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF). In both cases, the instrument was rotated over a range of angles and a moving degrader spread the energy from full beam energy to zero energy. We will present results of these tests. These show an angular resolution for the prototype which results in a one sigma charge resolution of ~0.25 e at Ni. The prototype also demonstrated the capability for calculating the charge of 2500 events per second with its internal processor, accumulating those events in on-board charge histograms, and thus providing unprecedented statistics in high flux conditions. The EHIS represents a major advance in capabilities for operational space weather instruments while also providing data quality suitable for scientific research. The EHIS instrument development project was funded by NASA under contract NNG06HX01C.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21528872','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21528872"><span>Hyperfine-mediated static polarizabilities of monovalent <span class="hlt">atoms</span> and <span class="hlt">ions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Beloy, K.; Derevianko, A.</p> <p>2010-12-15</p> <p>We apply relativistic many-body methods to compute static differential polarizabilities for transitions inside the ground-state hyperfine manifolds of monovalent <span class="hlt">atoms</span> and <span class="hlt">ions</span>. Knowledge of this transition polarizability is required in a number of high-precision experiments, such as microwave <span class="hlt">atomic</span> clocks and searches for CP-violating permanent electric dipole moments. While the traditional polarizability arises in the second order of interaction with the externally applied electric field, the differential polarizability involves an additional contribution from the hyperfine interaction of <span class="hlt">atomic</span> electrons with nuclear moments. We derive formulas for the scalar and tensor polarizabilities including contributions from magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine interactions. Numerical results are presented for Al, Rb, Cs, Yb{sup +}, Hg{sup +}, and Fr.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22391897','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22391897"><span>Characterization of <span class="hlt">energetic</span> and thermalized sputtered <span class="hlt">atoms</span> in pulsed plasma using time-resolved tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Desecures, M.; Poucques, L. de; Easwarakhanthan, T.; Bougdira, J.</p> <p>2014-11-03</p> <p>In this work, a time-resolved tunable diode-laser (DL) induced fluorescence (TR-TDLIF) method calibrated by absorption spectroscopy has been developed in order to determine <span class="hlt">atom</span> and flux velocity distribution functions (AVDF and FVDF) of the <span class="hlt">energetic</span> and the thermalized <span class="hlt">atoms</span> in pulsed plasmas. The experimental set-up includes a low-frequency (∼3 Hz) and high spectral-resolution DL (∼0.005 pm), a fast rise-time pulse generator, and a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system. The induced TR-TDLIF signal is recorded every 0.5 μs with a digital oscilloscope of a second-long trace. The technique is illustrated with determining the AVDF and the FVDF of a metastable state of the sputtered neutral tungsten <span class="hlt">atoms</span> in the HiPIMS post-discharge. Gaussian functions describing the population of the four W isotopes were used to fit the measured TR-TDLIF signal. These distribution functions provide insight into transition from the <span class="hlt">energetic</span> to thermalized regimes from the discharge onset. This technique may be extended with appropriate DLs to probe any species with rapidly changing AVDF and FVDF in pulsed and strongly oscillating plasmas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/595658','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/595658"><span>Improved method for the production of <span class="hlt">atomic</span> <span class="hlt">ion</span> species from plasma <span class="hlt">ion</span> sources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Spence, D.; Lykke, K.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>A technique to enhance the yield of neutral <span class="hlt">atomic</span> and ionic species (H{sup +}, D{sup +}, O{sup +}, N{sup +}, etc.) from plasmas. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the <span class="hlt">ion</span> discharge. Effective catalysts include H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}, among others, with the most effective being water (H{sub 2}O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave produced beams consisting essentially of 100% <span class="hlt">atomic</span> neutral species (H) have been generated, and <span class="hlt">ion</span> beams of close to 100% purity have been generated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PhyS...41..495Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PhyS...41..495Z"><span>Calculation of anomalous scattering for <span class="hlt">ions</span> and <span class="hlt">atoms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Bin; Pratt, R. H.; Roy, S. C.; Kissel, Lynn</p> <p>1990-04-01</p> <p>The anomalous scattering factors g', g" for forward scattering are generated for neutral Ne and for Ne 2+, 4+, 6+ and 7+ <span class="hlt">ions</span>, utilizing a dispersion relation integration method, for photon energies from 1 to 70 keV. Photoionization cross sections (i.e., g") above threshold are calculated in the relativistic Hartree-Slater potential; the code of Cromer and Liberman [1] is used to obtained the corresponding bound-free contribution to g' from g". However it is found that the contribution from bound-bound transitions to g' is much more important for <span class="hlt">ions</span> than for the neutral <span class="hlt">atom</span>. The primary reason is that in <span class="hlt">ions</span> there are more inner-shell vacancies for which bound-bound transitions are allowed. Near the K threshold the major bound-bound transition for the neutral neon <span class="hlt">atom</span> is 1s → 3p, whose oscillator strength is about ten times less than that of 1s → 2p transition which is allowed in neon <span class="hlt">ions</span>. With the contribution from the major bound-bound transitions included in g', the Rayleigh scattering cross sections obtained in this way agree well with results of direct S-matrix calculations [2].</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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