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Sample records for energetics ketone bodies

  1. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Significant increased metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]acetate and [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate was observed for hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Furthermore, brain mitochondria of db/db mice exhibited elevated oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis rate. This study provides evidence of several changes in brain energy metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism.

  2. The inverse problem of brain energetics: ketone bodies as alternative substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvetti, D.; Occhipinti, R.; Somersalo, E.

    2008-07-01

    Little is known about brain energy metabolism under ketosis, although there is evidence that ketone bodies have a neuroprotective role in several neurological disorders. We investigate the inverse problem of estimating reaction fluxes and transport rates in the different cellular compartments of the brain, when the data amounts to a few measured arterial venous concentration differences. By using a recently developed methodology to perform Bayesian Flux Balance Analysis and a new five compartment model of the astrocyte-glutamatergic neuron cellular complex, we are able to identify the preferred biochemical pathways during shortage of glucose and in the presence of ketone bodies in the arterial blood. The analysis is performed in a minimally biased way, therefore revealing the potential of this methodology for hypothesis testing.

  3. Ketone bodies as signaling metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John C.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) has been looked upon as a carrier of energy from liver to peripheral tissues during fasting or exercise. However, βOHB also signals via extracellular receptors and acts as an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). These recent findings support a model in which βOHB functions to link the environment, in this case the diet, and gene expression via chromatin modifications. Here, we review the regulation and functions of ketone bodies, the relationship between ketone bodies and calorie restriction, and the implications of HDAC inhibition by the ketone body βOHB in the modulation of metabolism, and diseases of aging. PMID:24140022

  4. Ketone body metabolism and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Schugar, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Ketone bodies are metabolized through evolutionarily conserved pathways that support bioenergetic homeostasis, particularly in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle when carbohydrates are in short supply. The metabolism of ketone bodies interfaces with the tricarboxylic acid cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, de novo lipogenesis, sterol biosynthesis, glucose metabolism, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, hormonal signaling, intracellular signal transduction pathways, and the microbiome. Here we review the mechanisms through which ketone bodies are metabolized and how their signals are transmitted. We focus on the roles this metabolic pathway may play in cardiovascular disease states, the bioenergetic benefits of myocardial ketone body oxidation, and prospective interactions among ketone body metabolism, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Ketone body metabolism is noninvasively quantifiable in humans and is responsive to nutritional interventions. Therefore, further investigation of this pathway in disease models and in humans may ultimately yield tailored diagnostic strategies and therapies for specific pathological states. PMID:23396451

  5. Ketone body metabolism and its defects.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Toshiyuki; Mitchell, Grant; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Hori, Tomohiro; Orii, Kenji; Aoyama, Yuka

    2014-07-01

    Acetoacetate (AcAc) and 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), the two main ketone bodies of humans, are important vectors of energy transport from the liver to extrahepatic tissues, especially during fasting, when glucose supply is low. Blood total ketone body (TKB) levels should be evaluated in the context of clinical history, such as fasting time and ketogenic stresses. Blood TKB should also be evaluated in parallel with blood glucose and free fatty acids (FFA). The FFA/TKB ratio is especially useful for evaluation of ketone body metabolism. Defects in ketogenesis include mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase (mHS) deficiency and HMG-CoA lyase (HL) deficiency. mHS deficiency should be considered in non-ketotic hypoglycemia if a fatty acid beta-oxidation defect is suspected, but cannot be confirmed. Patients with HL deficiency can develop hypoglycemic crises and neurological symptoms even in adolescents and adults. Succinyl-CoA-3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency and beta-ketothiolase (T2) deficiency are two defects in ketolysis. Permanent ketosis is pathognomonic for SCOT deficiency. However, patients with "mild" SCOT mutations may have nonketotic periods. T2-deficient patients with "mild" mutations may have normal blood acylcarnitine profiles even in ketoacidotic crises. T2 deficient patients cannot be detected in a reliable manner by newborn screening using acylcarnitines. We review recent data on clinical presentation, metabolite profiles and the course of these diseases in adults, including in pregnancy.

  6. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  7. Renal conservation of ketone bodies during starvation.

    PubMed

    Sapir, D G; Owen, O E

    1975-01-01

    Renal handling of acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate was studied in 12 obese subjects undergoing total starvation. Simultaneously, the acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and inulin clearance rates were measured, and acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rates were calculated. Renal clearance of blood acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate remained constant. In contrast, acetoacetate reabsorption rate increased significantly from 47 plus or minus 10 mumoles/min on day 3 to 106 plus or minus 15, 89 plus or minus 10, and 96 plus or minus 10 mumoles/min on days 10, 17, and 24, respectively. Similarly, beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rate increased significantly from 154 plus or minus 27 mumoles/min on day 3 to 419 plus or minus 53, 399 plus or minus 25, and 436 plus or minus 53 mumoles/min on days 10, 17, and 24, respectively. Both acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rates increased linearly when plotted against their filtered loads. Thus, no tubular maximal transport rate exists for acetoacetate or beta-hydroxybutyrate during physiologic ketonemia. Conservation 450-500 mmoles of ketone bodies/day prevents large urinary losses of cations during prolonged starvation. Since ammonium becomes the major cation excreted during prolonged fasting, the increased renal reabsorption of ketone bodies minimizes body protein loss and aids in maintaining high circulating acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations.

  8. Successful adaptation to ketosis by mice with tissue-specific deficiency of ketone body oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cotter, David G; Schugar, Rebecca C; Wentz, Anna E; d'Avignon, D André; Crawford, Peter A

    2013-02-15

    During states of low carbohydrate intake, mammalian ketone body metabolism transfers energy substrates originally derived from fatty acyl chains within the liver to extrahepatic organs. We previously demonstrated that the mitochondrial enzyme coenzyme A (CoA) transferase [succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT), encoded by nuclear Oxct1] is required for oxidation of ketone bodies and that germline SCOT-knockout (KO) mice die within 48 h of birth because of hyperketonemic hypoglycemia. Here, we use novel transgenic and tissue-specific SCOT-KO mice to demonstrate that ketone bodies do not serve an obligate energetic role within highly ketolytic tissues during the ketogenic neonatal period or during starvation in the adult. Although transgene-mediated restoration of myocardial CoA transferase in germline SCOT-KO mice is insufficient to prevent lethal hyperketonemic hypoglycemia in the neonatal period, mice lacking CoA transferase selectively within neurons, cardiomyocytes, or skeletal myocytes are all viable as neonates. Like germline SCOT-KO neonatal mice, neonatal mice with neuronal CoA transferase deficiency exhibit increased cerebral glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and, while these neonatal mice exhibit modest hyperketonemia, they do not develop hypoglycemia. As adults, tissue-specific SCOT-KO mice tolerate starvation, exhibiting only modestly increased hyperketonemia. Finally, metabolic analysis of adult germline Oxct1(+/-) mice demonstrates that global diminution of ketone body oxidation yields hyperketonemia, but hypoglycemia emerges only during a protracted state of low carbohydrate intake. Together, these data suggest that, at the tissue level, ketone bodies are not a required energy substrate in the newborn period or during starvation, but rather that integrated ketone body metabolism mediates adaptation to ketogenic nutrient states.

  9. Enzymatic method for determining ketone body ratio in arterial blood.

    PubMed

    Uno, S; Takehiro, O; Tabata, R; Ozawa, K

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a new, sensitive, and rapid method for measuring the ketone body concentration in arterial blood and determining the arterial blood ketone body ratio. The procedure involves the sequential use of the enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (3-HBDH; EC 1.1.1.30) and NADH oxidase, followed by a color-generating reaction with the hydrogen peroxide produced by the oxidase reaction. The amount of oxidized chromogen produced is proportional to the 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HBA) concentration. The acetoacetate (AcAc) concentration is obtained after complete conversion of the AcAc to 3-HBA, in the presence of 3-HBDH. The total 3-HBA concentration is measured and then subtracted from the total ketone body concentration to give the AcAc concentration. This procedure may be applied to plasma samples and the absorbance change measured with an automated chemistry analyzer. Ketone body concentration may be determined over the range 0 to 400 mumol/L. The analysis takes approximately 12 min and requires only 30 microL of plasma.

  10. Ketone Body Metabolic Enzyme OXCT1 Regulates Prostate Cancer Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    and cellular energy homeostasis . Analysis of patient data indicated that higher OXCT1 levels are associated with docetaxel chemotherapy resistance...knock down induced metabolic inefficiency upon docetaxel treatment Since OXCT1 is a metabolic enzyme involved in energy homeostasis , next, to...ketone body metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis . Analysis of our previous data from patient needle biopsy samples indicated that higher

  11. Ketone body metabolism and sleep homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Séi, Hiroyoshi

    2014-04-01

    A link has been established between energy metabolism and sleep homeostasis. The ketone bodies acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, generated from the breakdown of fatty acids, are major metabolic fuels for the brain under conditions of low glucose availability. Ketogenesis is modulated by the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and treatment with a PPAR activator has been shown to induce a marked increase in plasma acetoacetate and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate in mice, accompanied by increased slow-wave activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The present study investigated the role of ketone bodies in sleep regulation. Six-hour sleep deprivation increased plasma ketone bodies and their ratio (acetoacetate/β-hydroxybutyrate) in 10-week-old male mice. Moreover, sleep deprivation increased mRNA expression of ketogenic genes such as PPARα and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarate-CoA synthase 2 in the brain and decreased ketolytic enzymes such as succinyl-CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase. In addition, central injection of acetoacetate, but not β-hydroxybutyrate, markedly increased slow-wave activity during NREM sleep and suppressed glutamate release. Central metabolism of ketone bodies, especially acetoacetate, appears to play a role in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  12. Cardiomyocyte-specific deficiency of ketone body metabolism promotes accelerated pathological remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Schugar, Rebecca C.; Moll, Ashley R.; André d’Avignon, D.; Weinheimer, Carla J.; Kovacs, Attila; Crawford, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Exploitation of protective metabolic pathways within injured myocardium still remains an unclarified therapeutic target in heart disease. Moreover, while the roles of altered fatty acid and glucose metabolism in the failing heart have been explored, the influence of highly dynamic and nutritionally modifiable ketone body metabolism in the regulation of myocardial substrate utilization, mitochondrial bioenergetics, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and hemodynamic response to injury remains undefined. Methods Here we use mice that lack the enzyme required for terminal oxidation of ketone bodies, succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) to determine the role of ketone body oxidation in the myocardial injury response. Tracer delivery in ex vivo perfused hearts coupled to NMR spectroscopy, in vivo high-resolution echocardiographic quantification of cardiac hemodynamics in nutritionally and surgically modified mice, and cellular and molecular measurements of energetic and oxidative stress responses are performed. Results While germline SCOT-knockout (KO) mice die in the early postnatal period, adult mice with cardiomyocyte-specific loss of SCOT (SCOT-Heart-KO) remarkably exhibit no overt metabolic abnormalities, and no differences in left ventricular mass or impairments of systolic function during periods of ketosis, including fasting and adherence to a ketogenic diet. Myocardial fatty acid oxidation is increased when ketones are delivered but cannot be oxidized. To determine the role of ketone body oxidation in the remodeling ventricle, we induced pressure overload injury by performing transverse aortic constriction (TAC) surgery in SCOT-Heart-KO and αMHC-Cre control mice. While TAC increased left ventricular mass equally in both groups, at four weeks post-TAC, myocardial ROS abundance was increased in myocardium of SCOT-Heart-KO mice, and mitochondria and myofilaments were ultrastructurally disordered. Eight weeks post-TAC, left ventricular

  13. Metabolic reprogramming induced by ketone bodies diminishes pancreatic cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. To fulfill the increased energy requirements, tumor cells secrete cytokines/factors inducing muscle and fat degradation in cancer patients, a condition known as cancer cachexia. It accounts for nearly 20% of all cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanistic basis of cancer cachexia and therapies targeting cancer cachexia thus far remain elusive. A ketogenic diet, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that elevates circulating levels of ketone bodies (i.e., acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone), serves as an alternative energy source. It has also been proposed that a ketogenic diet leads to systemic metabolic changes. Keeping in view the significant role of metabolic alterations in cancer, we hypothesized that a ketogenic diet may diminish glycolytic flux in tumor cells to alleviate cachexia syndrome and, hence, may provide an efficient therapeutic strategy. Results We observed reduced glycolytic flux in tumor cells upon treatment with ketone bodies. Ketone bodies also diminished glutamine uptake, overall ATP content, and survival in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines, while inducing apoptosis. A decrease in levels of c-Myc, a metabolic master regulator, and its recruitment on glycolytic gene promoters, was in part responsible for the metabolic phenotype in tumor cells. Ketone body-induced intracellular metabolomic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells also leads to a significantly diminished cachexia in cell line models. Our mouse orthotopic xenograft models further confirmed the effect of a ketogenic diet in diminishing tumor growth and cachexia. Conclusions Thus, our studies demonstrate that the cachectic phenotype is in part due to metabolic alterations in tumor cells, which can be reverted by a ketogenic diet, causing reduced tumor growth and inhibition of muscle and body weight loss. PMID:25228990

  14. Ketone Body Metabolic Enzyme OXCT1 Regulates Prostate Cancer Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    was upregulated in a subset of patients and the upregulation was associated with chemotherapy resistance. In vitro analysis showed that OXCT1 was...hypothesis that OXCT1 plays important role prostate cancer chemotherapy sensitivity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS chemosensitivity, OXCT1, docetaxel...prostate cancer resistance to docetaxel-based chemotherapy has never been tested. OXCT1 encodes the rate limiting enzyme converting ketone bodies to

  15. A focused review of the role of ketone bodies in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad

    2013-11-01

    Ketone bodies are produced in the liver and are utilized in other tissues in the body as an energy source when hypoglycemia occurs in the body. There are three ketone bodies: acetoacetate, beta hydroxy butyrate, and acetone. Ketone bodies are usually present in the blood, and their level increases during fasting and starvation. They are also found in the blood of neonates and pregnant women. In diabetic ketoacidosis, high levels of ketone bodies are produced in response to low insulin levels and high levels of counter-regulatory hormones.

  16. Advanced selective non-invasive ketone body detection sensors based on new ionophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyapalan, A.; Sarswat, P. K.; Zhu, Y.; Free, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    New molecules and methods were examined that can be used to detect trace level ketone bodies. Diseases such as type 1 diabetes, childhood hypo-glycaemia-growth hormone deficiency, toxic inhalation, and body metabolism changes are linked with ketone bodies concentration. Here we introduce, selective ketone body detection sensors based on small, environmentally friendly organic molecules with Lewis acid additives. Density functional theory (DFT) simulation of the sensor molecules (Bromo-acetonaphthone tungstate (BANT) and acetonaphthophenyl ether propiono hydroxyl tungstate (APPHT)), indicated a fully relaxed geometry without symmetry attributes and specific coordination which enhances ketone bodies sensitivity. A portable sensing unit was made in which detection media containing ketone bodies at low concentration and new molecules show color change in visible light as well as unique irradiance during UV illumination. RGB analysis, electrochemical tests, SEM characterization, FTIR, absorbance and emission spectroscopy were also performed in order to validate the ketone sensitivity of these new molecules.

  17. Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production in Melanoma and Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja M.; Wilk, Anna; Antonczyk, Anna; Banks, Paula; Walczyk-Tytko, Emilia; Dean, Matthew; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies [beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) and acetoacetate] are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly, its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of non-transformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and downregulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic) therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma. PMID:26869992

  18. Ketones urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  19. Ketone body therapy: from the ketogenic diet to the oral administration of ketone ester

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Sami A.; VanItallie, Theodore B.

    2014-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), were considered harmful metabolic by-products when discovered in the mid-19th century in the urine of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. It took physicians many years to realize that KBs are normal metabolites synthesized by the liver and exported into the systemic circulation to serve as an energy source for most extrahepatic tissues. Studies have shown that the brain (which normally uses glucose for energy) can readily utilize KBs as an alternative fuel. Even when there is diminished glucose utilization in cognition-critical brain areas, as may occur early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is preliminary evidence that these same areas remain capable of metabolizing KBs. Because the ketogenic diet (KD) is difficult to prepare and follow, and effectiveness of KB treatment in certain patients may be enhanced by raising plasma KB levels to ≥2 mM, KB esters, such as 1,3-butanediol monoester of βHB and glyceryl-tris-3-hydroxybutyrate, have been devised. When administered orally in controlled dosages, these esters can produce plasma KB levels comparable to those achieved by the most rigorous KD, thus providing a safe, convenient, and versatile new approach to the study and potential treatment of a variety of diseases, including epilepsy, AD, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24598140

  20. Ketone body therapy: from the ketogenic diet to the oral administration of ketone ester.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Sami A; VanItallie, Theodore B

    2014-09-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), were considered harmful metabolic by-products when discovered in the mid-19th century in the urine of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. It took physicians many years to realize that KBs are normal metabolites synthesized by the liver and exported into the systemic circulation to serve as an energy source for most extrahepatic tissues. Studies have shown that the brain (which normally uses glucose for energy) can readily utilize KBs as an alternative fuel. Even when there is diminished glucose utilization in cognition-critical brain areas, as may occur early in Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is preliminary evidence that these same areas remain capable of metabolizing KBs. Because the ketogenic diet (KD) is difficult to prepare and follow, and effectiveness of KB treatment in certain patients may be enhanced by raising plasma KB levels to ≥2 mM, KB esters, such as 1,3-butanediol monoester of βHB and glyceryl-tris-3-hydroxybutyrate, have been devised. When administered orally in controlled dosages, these esters can produce plasma KB levels comparable to those achieved by the most rigorous KD, thus providing a safe, convenient, and versatile new approach to the study and potential treatment of a variety of diseases, including epilepsy, AD, and Parkinson's disease.

  1. Regulation of Ketone Body Metabolism and the Role of PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Dean, Matthew; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketogenesis and ketolysis are central metabolic processes activated during the response to fasting. Ketogenesis is regulated in multiple stages, and a nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) is one of the key transcription factors taking part in this regulation. PPARα is an important element in the metabolic network, where it participates in signaling driven by the main nutrient sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) and induces hormonal mediators, such as fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). This work describes the regulation of ketogenesis and ketolysis in normal and malignant cells and briefly summarizes the positive effects of ketone bodies in various neuropathologic conditions. PMID:27983603

  2. Regulation of Ketone Body Metabolism and the Role of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Dean, Matthew; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-12-13

    Ketogenesis and ketolysis are central metabolic processes activated during the response to fasting. Ketogenesis is regulated in multiple stages, and a nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) is one of the key transcription factors taking part in this regulation. PPARα is an important element in the metabolic network, where it participates in signaling driven by the main nutrient sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) and induces hormonal mediators, such as fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). This work describes the regulation of ketogenesis and ketolysis in normal and malignant cells and briefly summarizes the positive effects of ketone bodies in various neuropathologic conditions.

  3. Biomarkers, ketone bodies, and the prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    VanItallie, Theodore B

    2015-03-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (spAD) has three successive phases: preclinical, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia. Individuals in the preclinical phase are cognitively normal. Diagnosis of preclinical spAD requires evidence of pathologic brain changes provided by established biomarkers. Histopathologic features of spAD include (i) extra-cellular cerebral amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles that embody hyperphosphorylated tau; and (ii) neuronal and synaptic loss. Amyloid-PET brain scans conducted during spAD's preclinical phase have disclosed abnormal accumulations of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in cognitively normal, high-risk individuals. However, this measure correlates poorly with changes in cognitive status. In contrast, MRI measures of brain atrophy consistently parallel cognitive deterioration. By the time dementia appears, amyloid deposition has already slowed or ceased. When a new treatment offers promise of arresting or delaying progression of preclinical spAD, its effectiveness must be inferred from intervention-correlated changes in biomarkers. Herein, differing tenets of the amyloid cascade hypothesis (ACH) and the mitochondrial cascade hypothesis (MCH) are compared. Adoption of the ACH suggests therapeutic research continue to focus on aspects of the amyloid pathways. Adoption of the MCH suggests research emphasis be placed on restoration and stabilization of mitochondrial function. Ketone ester (KE)-induced elevation of plasma ketone body (KB) levels improves mitochondrial metabolism and prevents or delays progression of AD-like pathologic changes in several AD animal models. Thus, as a first step, it is imperative to determine whether KE-caused hyperketonemia can bring about favorable changes in biomarkers of AD pathology in individuals who are in an early stage of AD's preclinical phase.

  4. Multi-dimensional Roles of Ketone Bodies in Fuel Metabolism, Signaling, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Patrycja; Crawford, Peter A

    2017-02-07

    Ketone body metabolism is a central node in physiological homeostasis. In this review, we discuss how ketones serve discrete fine-tuning metabolic roles that optimize organ and organism performance in varying nutrient states and protect from inflammation and injury in multiple organ systems. Traditionally viewed as metabolic substrates enlisted only in carbohydrate restriction, observations underscore the importance of ketone bodies as vital metabolic and signaling mediators when carbohydrates are abundant. Complementing a repertoire of known therapeutic options for diseases of the nervous system, prospective roles for ketone bodies in cancer have arisen, as have intriguing protective roles in heart and liver, opening therapeutic options in obesity-related and cardiovascular disease. Controversies in ketone metabolism and signaling are discussed to reconcile classical dogma with contemporary observations.

  5. Hypothalamic sensing of ketone bodies after prolonged cerebral exposure leads to metabolic control dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Lionel; Geller, Sarah; Hébert, Audrey; Repond, Cendrine; Fioramonti, Xavier; Leloup, Corinne; Pellerin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies have been shown to transiently stimulate food intake and modify energy homeostasis regulatory systems following cerebral infusion for a moderate period of time (<6 hours). As ketone bodies are usually enhanced during episodes of fasting, this effect might correspond to a physiological regulation. In contrast, ketone bodies levels remain elevated for prolonged periods during obesity, and thus could play an important role in the development of this pathology. In order to understand this transition, ketone bodies were infused through a catheter inserted in the carotid to directly stimulate the brain for a period of 24 hours. Food ingested and blood circulating parameters involved in metabolic control as well as glucose homeostasis were determined. Results show that ketone bodies infusion for 24 hours increased food intake associated with a stimulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides. Moreover, insulinemia was increased and caused a decrease in glucose production despite an increased resistance to insulin. The present study confirms that ketone bodies reaching the brain stimulates food intake. Moreover, we provide evidence that a prolonged hyperketonemia leads to a dysregulation of energy homeostasis control mechanisms. Finally, this study shows that brain exposure to ketone bodies alters insulin signaling and consequently glucose homeostasis. PMID:27708432

  6. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α modulates systemic ketone body homeostasis and ameliorates diabetic hyperketonemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Kristoffer; Albert, Verena; Cardel, Bettina; Salatino, Silvia; Handschin, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies are crucial energy substrates during states of low carbohydrate availability. However, an aberrant regulation of ketone body homeostasis can lead to complications such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Exercise and diabetes affect systemic ketone body homeostasis, but the regulation of ketone body metabolism is still enigmatic. Using mice with either a knockout or overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in skeletal muscle, we show that PGC-1α regulates ketolytic gene transcription in muscle. Furthermore, ketone body homeostasis of these mice was investigated during fasting, exercise, ketogenic diet feeding and after streptozotocin injection. In response to these ketogenic stimuli, we show that modulation of PGC-1α levels in muscle affects systemic ketone body homeostasis. Moreover, our data demonstrate that skeletal muscle PGC-1α is necessary for the enhanced ketolytic capacity in response to exercise training and overexpression of PGC-1α in muscle enhances systemic ketolytic capacity and is sufficient to ameliorate diabetic hyperketonemia in mice. Using cultured myotubes, we also show that the transcription factor estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) is a partner of PGC-1α in the regulation of ketolytic gene transcription. Collectively, these results demonstrate a central role of skeletal muscle PGC-1α in the transcriptional regulation of systemic ketolytic capacity. PMID:26849960

  7. Altered ketone body metabolism during gram-negative sepsis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lanza-Jacoby, S; Rosato, E; Braccia, G; Tabares, A

    1990-11-01

    To investigate why blood ketone bodies are depressed during sepsis, the production and utilization of ketone bodies was studied in fasted control, fasted, Escherichia coli-treated, fed control, and fed E coli-treated rats. Gram-negative sepsis was induced by intravenous (IV) injection of 8 x 10(7) live colonies of E coli per 100 g body weight. Food was removed from the fasted rats after E coli injection. Fed rats were infused intragastrically with a nutritionally adequate diet for 5 days before inducing sepsis. Twenty-four hours after E coli injection, blood ketone bodies were reduced in fasted septic rats and fed septic rats compared with their respective control rats. Ketogenesis and oxidation of labeled palmitate was not altered in hepatocytes from fasted E coli-treated rats. Yet, ketogenesis declined significantly in hepatocytes from fed E coli-treated rats. Oxidation of labeled palmitate was also significantly reduced in hepatocytes from fed E coli-treated rats. Utilization of ketone bodies as measured by the incorporation of [3-14C]beta-hydroxybutyrate into CO2, increased over threefold in the diaphragm, 12% in the heart, and 19% in the kidneys from the fasted E coli-treated rats. In the fed state, incorporation of [3-14C]beta-hydroxybutyrate into CO2 was elevated fivefold in the heart, fourfold in the diaphragm, and over threefold in the kidneys from the septic rats. These results suggest that in the fasted state, plasma ketone bodies remain low during gram-negative sepsis because peripheral tissues use more ketone bodies and because liver ketogenesis is not increased to compensate for the increased utilization. In the fed state, the reduction in blood ketone bodies appears to be attributed to both impaired ketogenic capacity and increased peripheral utilization.

  8. THE NEUROPROTECTIVE PROPERTIES OF CALORIE RESTRICTION, THE KETOGENIC DIET, AND KETONE BODIES

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Marwan A.; Rho, Jong M.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet have been repeatedly demonstrated in clinical settings and in various animal models of neurological disease. The underlying mechanisms involve an improvement in mitochondrial function, a decrease in the expression of apoptotic factors and an increase in the activity of neurotrophic factors. Clinical applications of ketogenic diets have been significantly hampered however by poor tolerability and potentially serious side-effects. Recent research aimed at identifying a mediator that can reproduce the neuroprotective effects of calorie restriction with less demanding changes to dietary intake suggests that ketone bodies might represent an appropriate candidate. Ketone bodies protect neurons against multiple types of neuronal injury and the underlying mechanisms are similar to those of calorie restriction and of the ketogenic diet. The present review describes the neuroprotective effects of calorie restriction, the ketogenic diet and ketone bodies and compare the molecular mechanisms of action of these interventions. PMID:18845187

  9. Ketones blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight ... there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  10. Regulation of hypothalamic neuronal sensing and food intake by ketone bodies and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Miziorko, Henri M; Levin, Barry E

    2014-04-01

    Metabolic sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) alter their activity when ambient levels of metabolic substrates, such as glucose and fatty acids (FA), change. To assess the relationship between a high-fat diet (HFD; 60%) intake on feeding and serum and VMH FA levels, rats were trained to eat a low-fat diet (LFD; 13.5%) or an HFD in 3 h/day and were monitored with VMH FA microdialysis. Despite having higher serum levels, HFD rats had lower VMH FA levels but ate less from 3 to 6 h of refeeding than did LFD rats. However, VMH β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) and VMH-to-serum β-OHB ratio levels were higher in HFD rats during the first 1 h of refeeding, suggesting that VMH astrocyte ketone production mediated their reduced intake. In fact, using calcium imaging in dissociated VMH neurons showed that ketone bodies overrode normal FA sensing, primarily by exciting neurons that were activated or inhibited by oleic acid. Importantly, bilateral inhibition of VMH ketone production with a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase inhibitor reversed the 3- to 6-h HFD-induced inhibition of intake but had no effect in LFD-fed rats. These data suggest that a restricted HFD intake regimen inhibits caloric intake as a consequence of FA-induced VMH ketone body production by astrocytes.

  11. A monocarboxylate transporter required for hepatocyte secretion of ketone bodies during fasting.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Sarah E; Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Karanth, Santhosh; Anderson, Ryan M; Stainier, Didier Y R; Schlegel, Amnon

    2012-02-01

    To find new genes that influence liver lipid mass, we performed a genetic screen for zebrafish mutants with hepatic steatosis, a pathological accumulation of fat. The red moon (rmn) mutant develops hepatic steatosis as maternally deposited yolk is depleted. Conversely, hepatic steatosis is suppressed in rmn mutants by adequate nutrition. Adult rmn mutants show increased liver neutral lipids and induction of hepatic lipid biosynthetic genes when fasted. Positional cloning of the rmn locus reveals a loss-of-function mutation in slc16a6a (solute carrier family 16a, member 6a), a gene that we show encodes a transporter of the major ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate. Restoring wild-type zebrafish slc16a6a expression or introducing human SLC16A6 in rmn mutant livers rescues the mutant phenotype. Radiotracer analysis confirms that loss of Slc16a6a function causes diversion of liver-trapped ketogenic precursors into triacylglycerol. Underscoring the importance of Slc16a6a to normal fasting physiology, previously fed rmn mutants are more sensitive to death by starvation than are wild-type larvae. Our unbiased, forward genetic approach has found a heretofore unrecognized critical step in fasting energy metabolism: hepatic ketone body transport. Since β-hydroxybutyrate is both a major fuel and a signaling molecule in fasting, the discovery of this transporter provides a new direction for modulating circulating levels of ketone bodies in metabolic diseases.

  12. Ketone bodies and islet function: sup 45 Ca handling, insulin synthesis, and release

    SciTech Connect

    Malaisse, W.J.; Lebrun, P.; Yaylali, B.; Camara, J.; Valverde, I.; Sener, A. )

    1990-07-01

    D-(-)-beta-Hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate cause a rapid, sustained, and rapidly reversible stimulation of insulin release from rat pancreatic islets incubated in the presence, but not absence, of D-glucose. This coincides with stimulation of both proinsulin biosynthesis and {sup 45}Ca net uptake. The ketone bodies also decrease {sup 45}Ca outflow from prelabeled islets perifused in the absence of Ca{sup 2+} and, in contrast, enhance effluent radioactivity in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. In the presence of D-glucose, the secretory response to D-(-)-beta-hydroxybutyrate is concentration related in the 2.5-20 mM range, abolished in the absence of Ca{sup 2+} or presence of KCN, and enhanced by theophylline and forskolin. It corresponds grossly to a shift to the left of the sigmoidal curve relating insulin output to the ambient concentration of D-glucose. The secretory, biosynthetic, and cationic response to acetoacetate is less marked than that evoked by an equimolar concentration of D-(-)-beta-hydroxybutyrate. These features are compatible with the view that the insulinotropic action of ketone bodies would be causally linked to their metabolism in islet cells.

  13. Caloric restriction increases ketone bodies metabolism and preserves blood flow in aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Xiaoli; Watts, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase the life span and health span of a broad range of species. However, CR effects on in vivo brain functions are far from explored. In this study, we used multimetric neuroimaging methods to characterize the CR-induced changes of brain metabolic and vascular functions in aging rats. We found that old rats (24 months of age) with CR diet had reduced glucose uptake and lactate concentration, but increased ketone bodies level, compared with the age-matched and young (5 months of age) controls. The shifted metabolism was associated with preserved vascular function: old CR rats also had maintained cerebral blood flow relative to the age-matched controls. When investigating the metabolites in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, we found that citrate and α-ketoglutarate were preserved in the old CR rats. We suggest that CR is neuroprotective; ketone bodies, cerebral blood flow, and α-ketoglutarate may play important roles in preserving brain physiology in aging. PMID:25896951

  14. Regulation of myocardial ketone body metabolism by the gut microbiota during nutrient deprivation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Peter A; Crowley, Jan R; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Muegge, Brian D; Costello, Elizabeth K; Hamady, Micah; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2009-07-07

    Studies in mice indicate that the gut microbiota promotes energy harvest and storage from components of the diet when these components are plentiful. Here we examine how the microbiota shapes host metabolic and physiologic adaptations to periods of nutrient deprivation. Germ-free (GF) mice and mice who had received a gut microbiota transplant from conventionally raised donors were compared in the fed and fasted states by using functional genomic, biochemical, and physiologic assays. A 24-h fast produces a marked change in gut microbial ecology. Short-chain fatty acids generated from microbial fermentation of available glycans are maintained at higher levels compared with GF controls. During fasting, a microbiota-dependent, Ppar alpha-regulated increase in hepatic ketogenesis occurs, and myocardial metabolism is directed to ketone body utilization. Analyses of heart rate, hydraulic work, and output, mitochondrial morphology, number, and respiration, plus ketone body, fatty acid, and glucose oxidation in isolated perfused working hearts from GF and colonized animals (combined with in vivo assessments of myocardial physiology) revealed that the fasted GF heart is able to sustain its performance by increasing glucose utilization, but heart weight, measured echocardiographically or as wet mass and normalized to tibial length or lean body weight, is significantly reduced in both fasted and fed mice. This myocardial-mass phenotype is completely reversed in GF mice by consumption of a ketogenic diet. Together, these results illustrate benefits provided by the gut microbiota during periods of nutrient deprivation, and emphasize the importance of further exploring the relationship between gut microbes and cardiovascular health.

  15. Ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate blocks the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Nguyen, Kim Y.; Grant, Ryan W.; Goldberg, Emily L.; Bodogai, Monica; Kim, Dongin; D'Agostino, Dominic; Planavsky, Noah; Lupfer, Christopher; Kanneganti, Thirumala D.; Kang, Seokwon; Horvath, Tamas L.; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Crawford, Peter A.; Biragyn, Arya; Alnemri, Emad; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2015-01-01

    Ketone bodies , β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate support mammalian survival during states of energy deficit by serving as alternative source of ATP1. BHB levels are elevated during starvation, high-intensity exercise or by the low carbohydrate ketogenic diet2. Prolonged caloric restriction or fasting reduces inflammation as immune system adapts to low glucose supply and energy metabolism switches towards mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis and ketolysis2-6. However, role of ketones bodies in regulation of innate immune response is unknown. We report that BHB, but neither acetoacetate nor structurally-related short chain fatty acids, butyrate and acetate, suppresses activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to several structurally unrelated NLRP3 activators, without impacting NLRC4, AIM2 or non-canonical caspase-11 inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, BHB inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome by preventing K+ efflux and reducing ASC oligomerization and speck formation. The inhibitory effects of BHB on NLRP3 were not dependent on chirality or classical starvation regulated mechanisms like AMPK, reactive oxygen species (ROS), autophagy or glycolytic inhibition. BHB blocked NLRP3 inflammasome without undergoing oxidation in TCA cycle, independently of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2), Sirt2, receptor Gpr109a and inhibition of NLRP3 did not correlate with magnitude of histone acetylation in macrophages. BHB reduced the NLRP3 inflammasome mediated IL-1β and IL-18 production in human monocytes. In vivo, BHB attenuates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in mouse models of NLRP3-mediated diseases like Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), Familial Cold Autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and urate crystal induce body cavity inflammation. Taken together, these findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of caloric restriction or ketogenic diets may be mechanistically linked to BHB-mediated inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome, and point to the potential

  16. Differential utilization of ketone bodies by neurons and glioma cell lines: a rationale for ketogenic diet as experimental glioma therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Even in the presence of oxygen, malignant cells often highly depend on glycolysis for energy generation, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. One strategy targeting this metabolic phenotype is glucose restriction by administration of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet. Under these conditions, ketone bodies are generated serving as an important energy source at least for non-transformed cells. Methods To investigate whether a ketogenic diet might selectively impair energy metabolism in tumor cells, we characterized in vitro effects of the principle ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate in rat hippocampal neurons and five glioma cell lines. In vivo, a non-calorie-restricted ketogenic diet was examined in an orthotopic xenograft glioma mouse model. Results The ketone body metabolizing enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and 2), 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase 1 (OXCT1) and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) were expressed at the mRNA and protein level in all glioma cell lines. However, no activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway was observed in glioma cells, consistent with the absence of substantial 3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism and subsequent accumulation of succinate. Further, 3-hydroxybutyrate rescued hippocampal neurons from glucose withdrawal-induced cell death but did not protect glioma cell lines. In hypoxia, mRNA expression of OXCT1, ACAT1, BDH1 and 2 was downregulated. In vivo, the ketogenic diet led to a robust increase of blood 3-hydroxybutyrate, but did not alter blood glucose levels or improve survival. Conclusion In summary, glioma cells are incapable of compensating for glucose restriction by metabolizing ketone bodies in vitro, suggesting a potential disadvantage of tumor cells compared to normal cells under a carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diet. Further investigations are necessary to identify co-treatment modalities, e.g. glycolysis inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents that efficiently

  17. Depolarizing actions of GABA in immature neurons depend neither on ketone bodies nor on pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Tyzio, Roman; Allene, Camille; Nardou, Romain; Picardo, Michel A; Yamamoto, Sumii; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Caiati, Maddalena D; Rheims, Sylvain; Minlebaev, Marat; Milh, Mathieu; Ferré, Pascal; Khazipov, Rustem; Romette, Jean-Louis; Lorquin, Jean; Cossart, Rosa; Khalilov, Ilgam; Nehlig, Astrid; Cherubini, Enrico; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2011-01-05

    GABA depolarizes immature neurons because of a high [Cl(-)](i) and orchestrates giant depolarizing potential (GDP) generation. Zilberter and coworkers (Rheims et al., 2009; Holmgren et al., 2010) showed recently that the ketone body metabolite DL-3-hydroxybutyrate (DL-BHB) (4 mM), lactate (4 mM), or pyruvate (5 mM) shifted GABA actions to hyperpolarizing, suggesting that the depolarizing effects of GABA are attributable to inadequate energy supply when glucose is the sole energy source. We now report that, in rat pups (postnatal days 4-7), plasma D-BHB, lactate, and pyruvate levels are 0.9, 1.5, and 0.12 mM, respectively. Then, we show that DL-BHB (4 mM) and pyruvate (200 μM) do not affect (i) the driving force for GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents (DF(GABA)) in cell-attached single-channel recordings, (2) the resting membrane potential and reversal potential of synaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in perforated patch recordings, (3) the action potentials triggered by focal GABA applications, or (4) the GDPs determined with electrophysiological recordings and dynamic two-photon calcium imaging. Only very high nonphysiological concentrations of pyruvate (5 mM) reduced DF(GABA) and blocked GDPs. Therefore, DL-BHB does not alter GABA signals even at the high concentrations used by Zilberter and colleagues, whereas pyruvate requires exceedingly high nonphysiological concentrations to exert an effect. There is no need to alter conventional glucose enriched artificial CSF to investigate GABA signals in the developing brain.

  18. Ketone Bodies Mediate Anti-Seizure Effects Through Mitochondrial Permeability Transition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Young; Simeone, Kristina A.; Simeone, Timothy A.; Pandya, Jignesh D.; Wilke, Julianne C.; Ahn, Younghee; Geddes, James W.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Rho, Jong M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ketone bodies (KB) are products of fatty acid oxidation and serve as essential fuels during fasting or treatment with the high-fat anti-seizure ketogenic diet (KD). Despite growing evidence that KB exert broad neuroprotective effects, their role in seizure control has not been firmly demonstrated. The major goal of this study was to demonstrate the direct anti-seizure effects of KB and to identify an underlying target mechanism. Methods We studied the effects of both the KD and KB in spontaneously epileptic Kcna1-null mice using a combination of behavioral, planar multi-electrode, and standard cellular electophysiological techniques. Thresholds for mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) were determined in acutely isolated brain mitochondria. Results KB alone were sufficient to: (1) exert anti-seizure effects in Kcna1-null mice; (2) restore intrinsic impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and spatial learning-memory defects in Kcna1-null mutants; and (3) raise the threshold for calcium-induced mPT in acutely prepared mitochondria from hippocampi of Kcna1-null animals. Targeted deletion of the cyclophilin D (CypD) subunit of the mPT complex abrogated the effects of KB on mPT, and in vivo pharmacological inhibition and activation of mPT were found to mirror and reverse, respectively, the anti-seizure effects of the KD in Kcna1-null mice. Interpretation The present data reveal the first direct link between mPT and seizure control, and provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the KD. Given that mPT is increasingly being implicated in diverse neurological disorders, our results suggest that metabolism-based treatments and/or metabolic substrates might represent a worthy paradigm for therapeutic development. PMID:25899847

  19. [Development and analytical validation according COFRAC recommendations of pyruvate and ketone body assay on open automated analyser].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Lysiane; Van Noolen, Laetitia; Bosson, Caroline; Faure, Patrice; Corne, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of pyruvate and ketones bodies (acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate) are essential to the investigation of intermediary metabolism. Indeed, their blood levels reflect energy balance influenced by nutritional status. This balance can be disturbed in certain diseases such as diabetes and some inherited metabolic disorders. We have developed methods for assays on open automated biochemistry analyser, Konelab 20 XT (ThermoFischer, Whaltham USA), using kits marketed by Sobioda (Montbonnot, France) for pyruvate and Wako Chemicals GmbH (Neuss, Germany) for ketones, on deproteinised blood sample. We have validated the performance of these three quantitative methods using NF EN ISO 15189 (range B) standard criteria. We obtain satisfactory results concerning fidelity (precision measured as within and between batch CVs are respectively less than 7% and less than 6%), measuring ranges (from 7.7 to 228 μmol/L for pyruvate and from 22.6 to 650 μM for total ketone bodies), accuracy (10.4 μmol/L in physiological range for pyruvate and 7.1 μmol/L for 3-hydroxybutyrate) and comparing methods (versus manual assay with spectrophotometry on Uvikon XL). Establishment of reference ranges (35 to 74 μmol/L for pyruvate, less than 100 μM for 3-hydroxybutyrate and less than 44 μmol/L for acetoacetate) and reagents stability study (up to 12 weeks if frozen) have enabled us to finalize method validation and to add these assays to our routine laboratory repertoire.

  20. Induction of the apolipoprotein AI gene by fasting: a relationship with ketosis but not with ketone bodies.

    PubMed

    Haas, M J; Reinacher, D; Pun, K; Wong, N C; Mooradian, A D

    2000-12-01

    Apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) expression is inversely related to the incidence of atherosclerosis. ApoAI expression is also influenced by the nutritional state and diabetes. We used both cell culture and animal models to examine the effect of fasting and ketoacidosis on apoAI gene expression. Two days of food deprivation in rats increased hepatic and intestinal apoAI mRNA by 2.6- and 2.3-fold, respectively (P < .05). The absolute concentration of plasma apoAI did not change. However, the plasma apoAI concentration relative to the plasma concentration of serum proteins was increased 23% (P < .05). In fasting rats, there was a significant positive correlation between the serum beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration and hepatic or intestinal apoAI mRNA level. Despite this correlation, changes in apoAI mRNA are probably not mediated by ketone bodies, since neither hepatic nor intestinal apoAI mRNA levels were altered in rats maintained on a ketogenic diet for 10 days or treated with isobutyramide, an orally active ketone analog. In addition, the activity of the rat apoAI promoter was not altered in Hep G2 cells treated with isobutyramide or fatty acids or exposed to hypoglycemic conditions, while dexamethasone increased promoter activity 1.9-fold (P < .05). These data indicate that metabolic changes other than ketone bodies, such as an increase in plasma glucocorticoids, may account for starvation-induced expression of apoAI.

  1. Transition states and energetics of nucleophilic additions of thiols to substituted α,β-unsaturated ketones: substituent effects involve enone stabilization, product branching, and solvation.

    PubMed

    Krenske, Elizabeth H; Petter, Russell C; Zhu, Zhendong; Houk, K N

    2011-06-17

    CBS-QB3 enthalpies of reaction have been computed for the conjugate additions of MeSH to six α,β-unsaturated ketones. Compared with addition to methyl vinyl ketone, the reaction becomes 1-3 kcal mol(-1) less exothermic when an α-Me, β-Me, or β-Ph substituent is present on the C=C bond. The lower exothermicity for the substituted enones occurs because the substituted reactant is stabilized more by hyperconjugation or conjugation than the product is stabilized by branching. Substituent effects on the activation energies for the rate-determining step of the thiol addition (reaction of the enone with MeS(-)) were also computed. Loss of reactant stabilization, and not steric hindrance, is the main factor responsible for controlling the relative activation energies in the gas phase. The substituent effects are further magnified in solution; in water (simulated by CPCM calculations), the addition of MeS(-) to an enone is disfavored by 2-6 kcal mol(-1) when one or two methyl groups are present on the C=C bond (ΔΔG(‡)). The use of CBS-QB3 gas-phase energies in conjunction with CPCM solvation corrections provides kinetic data in good agreement with experimental substituent effects. When the energetics of the thiol additions were calculated with several popular density functional theory and ab initio methods (B3LYP, MPW1PW91, B1B95, PBE0, B2PLYP, and MP2), some substantial inaccuracies were noted. However, M06-2X (with a large basis set), B2PLYP-D, and SCS-MP2 gave results within 1 kcal mol(-1) of the CBS-QB3 benchmark values.

  2. Ketone bodies alter dinitrophenol-induced glucose uptake through AMPK inhibition and oxidative stress generation in adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Amélie; Coderre, Lise

    2007-05-01

    In aerobic conditions, the heart preferentially oxidizes fatty acids. However, during metabolic stress, glucose becomes the major energy source, and enhanced glucose uptake has a protective effect on heart function and cardiomyocyte survival. Thus abnormal regulation of glucose uptake may contribute to the development of cardiac disease in diabetics. Ketone bodies are often elevated in poorly controlled diabetics and are associated with increased cellular oxidative stress. Thus we sought to determine the effect of the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate (OHB) on cardiac glucose uptake during metabolic stress. We used 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), an uncoupler of the mitochondrial oxidative chain, to mimic hypoxia in cardiomyocytes. Our data demonstrated that chronic exposure to OHB provoked a concentration-dependent decrease of DNP action, resulting in 56% inhibition of DNP-mediated glucose uptake at 5 mM OHB. This was paralleled by a diminution of DNP-mediated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Chronic exposure to OHB also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by 1.9-fold compared with control cells. To further understand the role of ROS in OHB action, cardiomyocytes were incubated with H(2)O(2). Our results demonstrated that this treatment diminished DNP-induced glucose uptake without altering activation of the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Incubation with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially restored DNP-mediated glucose but not AMPK/p38 MAPK activation. In conclusion, these results suggest that ketone bodies, through inhibition of the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway and ROS overproduction, regulate DNP action and thus cardiac glucose uptake. Altered glucose uptake in hyperketonemic states during metabolic stress may contribute to diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  3. Raspberry Ketone

    MedlinePlus

    Raspberry ketone is a chemical from red raspberries, as well as kiwifruit, peaches, grapes, apples, other berries, vegetables such as rhubarb, and the bark of yew, maple, and pine trees. People take raspberry ketone by mouth for ...

  4. Lipid, ketone body and oxidative metabolism in the African lungfish, Protopterus dolloi following 60 days of fasting and aestivation.

    PubMed

    Frick, Natasha Therese; Bystriansky, Jason Scott; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Chew, Shit Fun; Ballantyne, James Stuart

    2008-09-01

    The potential importance of lipids and ketone bodies as fuels in the African lungfish, Protopterus dolloi, and the role of oxidative metabolism, were examined under control, fasted and aestivated conditions. In aestivating but not fasting lungfish, the activities of citrate synthase (CS) and cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) (enzymes of oxidative metabolism) showed tissue-specific changes. Significant reductions in CS activity occurred in the kidney, heart, gill and muscle, and in CCO in the liver and kidney tissues. Aestivation, but not fasting, also had a tissue-specific effect on mitochondrial state 3 respiration rates (using succinate as a substrate), with a >50% reduction in the liver, yet no change within muscle mitochondria. There is no indication that enzymes involved in lipid catabolism are up-regulated during periods of fasting or aestivation; however, both 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) and carnitine palmitoyl CoA transferase (CPT) activities were sustained in the liver despite the approximately 42% reduction in CCO activity, potentially indicating lipid metabolism is of importance during aestivation. Lungfish are able to utilize both the d- and l-stereoisomers of the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-HB); however, beta-HB does not appear to be an important fuel source during aestivation or fasting as no changes were observed in beta-HB tissue levels. This study demonstrates that an important aspect of metabolic depression during aestivation in lungfish is the tissue-specific down regulation of enzymes of aerobic metabolism while maintaining the activities of enzymes in pathways that supply substrates for aerobic metabolism.

  5. Medium-chain fatty acids inhibit mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes promoting astrocyte-neuron lactate and ketone body shuttle systems.

    PubMed

    Thevenet, Jonathan; De Marchi, Umberto; Domingo, Jaime Santo; Christinat, Nicolas; Bultot, Laurent; Lefebvre, Gregory; Sakamoto, Kei; Descombes, Patrick; Masoodi, Mojgan; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides have been used as part of a ketogenic diet effective in reducing epileptic episodes. The health benefits of the derived medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are thought to result from the stimulation of liver ketogenesis providing fuel for the brain. We tested whether MCFAs have direct effects on energy metabolism in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human astrocytes and neurons. Using single-cell imaging, we observed an acute pronounced reduction of the mitochondrial electrical potential and a concomitant drop of the NAD(P)H signal in astrocytes, but not in neurons. Despite the observed effects on mitochondrial function, MCFAs did not lower intracellular ATP levels or activate the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase. ATP concentrations in astrocytes were unaltered, even when blocking the respiratory chain, suggesting compensation through accelerated glycolysis. The MCFA decanoic acid (300 μM) promoted glycolysis and augmented lactate formation by 49.6%. The shorter fatty acid octanoic acid (300 μM) did not affect glycolysis but increased the rates of astrocyte ketogenesis 2.17-fold compared with that of control cells. MCFAs may have brain health benefits through the modulation of astrocyte metabolism leading to activation of shuttle systems that provide fuel to neighboring neurons in the form of lactate and ketone bodies.-Thevenet, J., De Marchi, U., Santo Domingo, J., Christinat, N., Bultot, L., Lefebvre, G., Sakamoto, K., Descombes, P., Masoodi, M., Wiederkehr, A. Medium-chain fatty acids inhibit mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes promoting astrocyte-neuron lactate and ketone body shuttle systems.

  6. Cerebral Ketone Body Oxidation Is Facilitated by a High Fat Diet Enriched with Advanced Glycation End Products in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Adriano M.; da Silva, Jussemara S.; Rech, Anderson; Longoni, Aline; Nonose, Yasmine; Repond, Cendrine; de Bittencourt Pasquali, Matheus A.; Moreira, José C. F.; Souza, Diogo O.; Pellerin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) causes important modifications in the availability and use of different energy substrates in various organs and tissues. Similarly, dietary manipulations such as high fat diets also affect systemic energy metabolism. However, how the brain adapts to these situations remains unclear. To investigate these issues, control and alloxan-induced type I diabetic rats were fed either a standard or a high fat diet enriched with advanced glycation end products (AGEs) (HAGE diet). The HAGE diet increased their levels of blood ketone bodies, and this effect was exacerbated by DM induction. To determine the effects of diet and/or DM induction on key cerebral bioenergetic parameters, both ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyric acid) and lactate oxidation were measured. In parallel, the expression of Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 (MCT1) and 2 (MCT2) isoforms in hippocampal and cortical slices from rats submitted to these diets was assessed. Ketone body oxidation increased while lactate oxidation decreased in hippocampal and cortical slices in both control and diabetic rats fed a HAGE diet. In parallel, the expression of both MCT1 and MCT2 increased only in the cerebral cortex in diabetic rats fed a HAGE diet. These results suggest a shift in the preferential cerebral energy substrate utilization in favor of ketone bodies in animals fed a HAGE diet, an effect that, in DM animals, is accompanied by the enhanced expression of the related transporters. PMID:27877108

  7. Early Energetic Particle Irradiation of the HED Parent Body Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Rao, M. N.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that many individual grains within the dark phase of the Kapoeta howardite were irradiated with energetic particles while residing on the surface of the early HED regolith. Particle tracks in these grains vary in density by more than an order of magnitude and undoubtedly were formed by energetic heavy (Fe) ions associated with early solar flares. Early Irradiation of HED Regolith: Concentrations of excess Ne alone are not sufficient to decide between competing galactic and solar irradiation models. However, from recent studies of depth samples of oriented lunar rocks, we have shown that the cosmogenic 21-Ne/22-Ne ratio produced in feldspar differs substantially between Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar protons, and that this difference is exactly that predicted from cross-section data. Using Ne literature data and new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from both the light and dark phases of Kapoeta, we derive 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.80 for the recent GCR irradiation and 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.68 for the early regolith irradiation. This derived ratio indicates that the early Ne production in the regolith occurred by both galactic and solar protons. If we adopt a likely one-component regolith model in which all grains were exposed to galactic protons but individual grains had variable exposure to solar protons, we estimate that this early GCR irradiation lasted for about 3-6 m.y. More complex two-component regolith models involving separate solar and galactic irradiation would permit this GCR age to be longer. Higher-energy solar protons would permit the GCR to be longer. Higher-energy solar protons would permit the GCR age to be shorter. Further, cosmogenic 126(Xe) in Kapoeta dark is no more than a factor of about 2 higher than that observed in Kapoeta light. Because 126(Xe) can only be formed by galactic protons and not solar protons, these data support a short GCR irradiation for the HED regolith. This would also be

  8. Early Energetic Particle Irradiation of the HED Parent Body Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Rao, M. N.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that many individual grains within the dark phase of the Kapoeta howardite were irradiated with energetic particles while residing on the surface of the early HED regolith. Particle tracks in these grains vary in density by more than an order of magnitude and undoubtedly were formed by energetic heavy (Fe) ions associated with early solar flares. Early Irradiation of HED Regolith: Concentrations of excess Ne alone are not sufficient to decide between competing galactic and solar irradiation models. However, from recent studies of depth samples of oriented lunar rocks, we have shown that the cosmogenic 21-Ne/22-Ne ratio produced in feldspar differs substantially between Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar protons, and that this difference is exactly that predicted from cross-section data. Using Ne literature data and new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from both the light and dark phases of Kapoeta, we derive 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.80 for the recent GCR irradiation and 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.68 for the early regolith irradiation. This derived ratio indicates that the early Ne production in the regolith occurred by both galactic and solar protons. If we adopt a likely one-component regolith model in which all grains were exposed to galactic protons but individual grains had variable exposure to solar protons, we estimate that this early GCR irradiation lasted for about 3-6 m.y. More complex two-component regolith models involving separate solar and galactic irradiation would permit this GCR age to be longer. Higher-energy solar protons would permit the GCR to be longer. Higher-energy solar protons would permit the GCR age to be shorter. Further, cosmogenic 126(Xe) in Kapoeta dark is no more than a factor of about 2 higher than that observed in Kapoeta light. Because 126(Xe) can only be formed by galactic protons and not solar protons, these data support a short GCR irradiation for the HED regolith. This would also be

  9. BDNF Mediates Adaptive Brain and Body Responses to Energetic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Marosi, Krisztina; Mattson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging findings suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serves widespread roles in regulating energy homeostasis by controlling patterns of feeding and physical activity, and by modulating glucose metabolism in peripheral tissues. BDNF mediates beneficial effects of energetic challenges such as vigorous exercise and fasting on cognition, mood, cardiovascular function and peripheral metabolism. By stimulating glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis BDNF bolsters cellular bioenergetics and protects neurons against injury and disease. By acting in the brain and periphery, BDNF increases insulin sensitivity and parasympathetic tone. Genetic factors, a ‘couch potato’ lifestyle and chronic stress impair BDNF signaling, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Novel BDNF-focused interventions are being developed for obesity, diabetes and neurological disorders. PMID:24361004

  10. Effect of the Ketone Body Beta-Hydroxybutyrate on the Innate Defense Capability of Primary Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flinspach, Claudia; Pfaffl, Michael W.; Kliem, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Negative energy balance and ketosis are thought to cause impaired immune function and to increase the risk of clinical mastitis in dairy cows. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the effect of elevated levels of the predominant ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate on the innate defense capability of primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (pbMEC) challenged with the mastitis pathogen Escherichia coli (E. coli). Therefore, pbMEC of healthy dairy cows in mid- lactation were isolated from milk and challenged in culture with 3 mM BHBA and E. coli. pbMEC stimulated with E. coli for 6 h or 30 h showed an up-regulation of several innate immune genes, whereas co-stimulation of pbMEC with 3 mM BHBA and E. coli resulted in the down-regulation of CCL2, SAA3, LF and C3 gene expression compared to the challenge with solely the bacterial stimulus. These results indicated that increased BHBA concentrations may be partially responsible for the higher mastitis susceptibility of dairy cows in early lactation. Elevated levels of BHBA in blood and milk during negative energy balance and ketosis are likely to impair innate immune function in the bovine mammary gland by attenuating the expression of a broad range of innate immune genes. PMID:27310007

  11. Tor-Sch9 deficiency activates catabolism of the ketone body-like acetic acid to promote trehalose accumulation and longevity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Wei, Min; Mirzaei, Hamed; Madia, Federica; Mirisola, Mario; Amparo, Camille; Chagoury, Shawna; Kennedy, Brian; Longo, Valter D

    2014-06-01

    In mammals, extended periods of fasting leads to the accumulation of blood ketone bodies including acetoacetate. Here we show that similar to the conversion of leucine to acetoacetate in fasting mammals, starvation conditions induced ketone body-like acetic acid generation from leucine in S. cerevisiae. Whereas wild-type and ras2Δ cells accumulated acetic acid, long-lived tor1Δ and sch9Δ mutants rapidly depleted it through a mitochondrial acetate CoA transferase-dependent mechanism, which was essential for lifespan extension. The sch9Δ-dependent utilization of acetic acid also required coenzyme Q biosynthetic genes and promoted the accumulation of intracellular trehalose. These results indicate that Tor-Sch9 deficiency extends longevity by switching cells to an alternative metabolic mode, in which acetic acid can be utilized for the storage of stress resistance carbon sources. These effects are reminiscent of those described for ketone bodies in fasting mammals and raise the possibility that the lifespan extension caused by Tor-S6K inhibition may also involve analogous metabolic changes in higher eukaryotes.

  12. Impact of feeding and post prandial time on plasma ketone bodies in sows during transition and lactation.

    PubMed

    Theil, P K; Olesen, A K; Flummer, C; Sørensen, G; Kristensen, N B

    2013-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted with the aim of studying how dietary fat source, reproductive stage (Exp. 1), and diurnal variation (Exp. 2) affect plasma ketone bodies in sows. In Exp. 1, 40 second-parity sows were fed 1 of 5 lactation diets from 7 d prepartum until 28 d postpartum, with low or high levels (3% or 8%) of dietary fats with different proportions of medium- and long-chain fatty acids. Blood was obtained by jugular venipuncture on d 3 and 7 prepartum, and d 1, 10, 17, and 28 postpartum, and concentrations of plasma beta-hydroxy butyric acid (BHBA), acetoacetate + acetone (AcAc+Ac), glucose, NEFA, lactate, acetate, and butyrate were determined. For 4 out of 5 treatments, plasma BHBA decreased slightly, whereas plasma AcAc+Ac remained stable. However, plasma BHBA (P < 0.01) and AcAc+Ac (P < 0.001) doubled after d 10 of lactation in sows fed 4% octanoic acid and 4% fish oil diet (4+4% FO; P < 0.001), compared with earlier in lactation (P < 0.001). Plasma AcAc+Ac was positively related to BHBA (P < 0.01), glucose (P < 0.05), and butyrate (P < 0.001), and negatively related to the acetate:butyrate ratio (P < 0.001). In addition, plasma BHBA was positively related to lactate (P < 0.01), acetate, and butyrate (P < 0.05). In Exp. 2, diurnal variations of plasma metabolites were studied in 5 sows sampled every second hour from a jugular catheter throughout a 24-h period on d 5 and 17 of lactation and analyzed as in Exp. 1. In addition, milk and urine samples were collected and analyzed for BHBA and AcAc+Ac. No diurnal variations in plasma BHBA or AcAc+Ac were observed and plasma AcAc+Ac was unchanged from d 5 to 17 of lactation (3.7 μM), whereas BHBA declined from 58 μM on d 5 of lactation to 52 μM on d 17 of lactation (P < 0.05). Minor amounts of AcAc+Ac were found in urine (8.6 μM) and this was not affected by days in milk, whereas the content of AcAc+Ac in milk and BHBA in milk and urine were less than the detection limit in 4 of 5 sows. In conclusion

  13. Excitatory action of GABA on immature neurons is not due to absence of ketone bodies metabolites or other energy substrates.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Tyzio, Roman; Nehlig, Astrid

    2011-09-01

    Brain slices incubated with glucose have provided most of our knowledge on cellular, synaptic, and network driven mechanisms. It has been recently suggested that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) excites neonatal neurons in conventional glucose-perfused slices but not when ketone bodies metabolites, pyruvate, and/or lactate are added, suggesting that the excitatory actions of GABA are due to energy deprivation when glucose is the sole energy source. In this article, we review the vast number of studies that show that slices are not energy deprived in glucose-containing medium, and that addition of other energy substrates at physiologic concentrations does not alter the excitatory actions of GABA on neonatal neurons. In contrast, lactate, like other weak acids, can produce an intracellular acidification that will cause a reduction of intracellular chloride and a shift of GABA actions. The effects of high concentrations of lactate, and particularly of pyruvate (4-5 mm), as used are relevant primarily to pathologic conditions; these concentrations not being found in the brain in normal "control" conditions. Slices in glucose-containing medium may not be ideal, but additional energy substrates neither correspond to physiologic conditions nor alter GABA actions. In keeping with extensive observations in a wide range of animal species and brain structures, GABA depolarizes immature neurons and the reduction of the intracellular concentration of chloride ([Cl(-)](i)) is a basic property of brain maturation that has been preserved throughout evolution. In addition, this developmental sequence has important clinical implications, notably concerning the higher incidence of seizures early in life and their long-lasting deleterious sequels. Immature neurons have difficulties exporting chloride that accumulates during seizures, leading to permanent increase of [Cl(-)](i) that converts the inhibitory actions of GABA to excitatory and hampers the efficacy of GABA-acting antiepileptic

  14. Effect of phenylalanine metabolites on the activities of enzymes of ketone-body utilization in brain of suckling rats.

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, J; Gimenez, C; Valdivieso, F; Mayor, F

    1976-01-01

    1. The effects of phenylalanine and its metabolites (phenylacetate, phenethylamine, phenyl-lactate, o-hydroxyphenylacetate and phenylpyruvate) on the activity of 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.30) 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase (EC 2.8.3.5) and acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (EC 2.3.1.9) in brain of suckling rats were investigated. 2. The 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from the brain of suckling rats had a Km for 3-hydroxybutyrate of 1.2 mM. Phenylpyruvate, phenylacetate and o-hydroxyphenylacetate inhibited the enzyme activity with Ki values of 0.5, 1.3 and 4.7 mM respectively. 3. The suckling-rat brain 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase activity had a Km for acetoacetate of 0.665 mM and for succinyl (3-carboxypropionyl)-CoA of 0.038 mM. The enzyme was inhibited with respect to acetoacetate by phenylpyruvate (Ki equals 1.3 mM) and o-hydroxyphenylacetate (Ki equals 4.5 mM). The reaction in the direction of acetoacetate was also inhibited by phenylpyruvate (Ki equals 1.6 mM) and o-hydroxyphenylacetate (Ki equals 4.5 mM). 4. Phenylpyruvate inhibited with respect to acetoacetyl-CoA both the mitochondrial (Ki equals 3.2 mM) and cytoplasmic (Ki equals 5.2 mM) acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase activities. 5. The results suggest that inhibition of 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase activities may impair ketone-body utilization and hence lipid synthesis in the developing brain. This suggestion is discussed with reference to the pathogenesis of mental retardation in phenylketonuria. PMID:12750

  15. The addition of ketone bodies alleviates mitochondrial dysfunction by restoring complex I assembly in a MELAS cellular model.

    PubMed

    Frey, Samuel; Geffroy, Guillaume; Desquiret-Dumas, Valerie; Gueguen, Naig; Bris, Celine; Belal, Sophie; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Barth, Magalie; Henrion, Daniel; Lenaers, Guy; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Ketogenic Diet used to treat refractory epilepsy for almost a century may represent a treatment option for mitochondrial disorders for which effective treatments are still lacking. Mitochondrial complex I deficiencies are involved in a broad spectrum of inherited diseases including Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes syndrome leading to recurrent cerebral insults resembling strokes and associated with a severe complex I deficiency caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. The analysis of MELAS neuronal cybrid cells carrying the almost homoplasmic m.3243A>G mutation revealed a metabolic switch towards glycolysis with the production of lactic acid, severe defects in respiratory chain activity and complex I disassembly with an accumulation of assembly intermediates. Metabolites, NADH/NAD(+) ratio, mitochondrial enzyme activities, oxygen consumption and BN-PAGE analysis were evaluated in mutant compared to control cells. A severe complex I enzymatic deficiency was identified associated with a major complex I disassembly with an accumulation of assembly intermediates of 400kDa. We showed that Ketone Bodies (KB) exposure for 4weeks associated with glucose deprivation significantly restored complex I stability and activity, increased ATP synthesis and reduced the NADH/NAD+ ratio, a key component of mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, without changing the mutant load, mtDNA copy number was significantly increased with KB, indicating that the absolute amount of wild type mtDNA copy number was higher in treated mutant cells. Therefore KB may constitute an alternative and promising therapy for MELAS syndrome, and could be beneficial for other mitochondrial diseases caused by complex I deficiency.

  16. Activities of enzymes of fat and ketone-body metabolism and effects of starvation on blood concentrations of glucose and fat fuels in teleost and elasmobranch fish

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, Victor A.; Newsholme, Eric A.

    1979-01-01

    1. Activities of 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase together with tri- and di-acylglycerol lipase were present in red and heart muscles of the teleost fish. However, d-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity was not detectable. These results suggest that the heart and red muscles of the teleosts should be able to utilize the fat fuels triacylglycerol, fatty acids or acetoacetate, but not hydroxybutyrate. The muscles from the elasmobranchs differed in that d-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase activities were present, but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was not detectable. This suggests that ketone bodies are the most important fat fuels in elasmobranchs. 2. The concentrations of acetoacetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids and triacylglycerols were measured in blood or plasma of several species of fish (teleosts and elasmobranchs) in the fed state. Teleosts have a 10-fold higher concentration of plasma non-esterified fatty acids, but a lower blood concentration of ketone bodies; both acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate are present in blood of elasmobranchs, whereas 3-hydroxybutyrate is absent from that of the teleosts. 3. The effects of starvation (up to 150 days) on the concentrations of blood metabolites were studied in a teleost (bass) and an elasmobranch (dogfish). In the bass there was a 60% decrease in blood glucose after 100 and 150 days starvation. In dogfish there was a large increase in the concentration of ketone bodies, whereas in bass the concentration of acetoacetate (the only ketone body present) remained low (<0.04mm) throughout the period of starvation. The concentration of plasma non-esterified fatty acids increased in bass, but decreased in dogfish. These changes are consistent with the predictions based on the enzyme-activity data. 4. Starvation did not change the activities of ketone-body-utilizing enzymes or that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in heart

  17. Hyperinsulinemia shifted energy supply from glucose to ketone bodies in early nonalcoholic steatohepatitis from high-fat high-sucrose diet induced Bama minipigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-lin; Xia, Ji-han; Zhang, Yuan-yuan; Fan, Jian-gao; Wang, Hua; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Zhan-zhao; Pan, Qin; Mu, Yu-lian; Xin, Lei-lei; Chen, Yao-xing; Li, Kui

    2015-09-11

    The minipig can serve as a good pharmacological model for human subjects. However, the long-term pathogenesis of high-calorie diet-induced metabolic syndromes, including NASH, has not been well described in minipigs. We examined the development of metabolic syndromes in Bama minipigs that were fed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet (HFHSD) for 23 months, by using histology and serum biochemistry and by profiling the gene expression patterns in the livers of HFHSD pigs compared to controls. The pathology findings revealed microvesicular steatosis, iron overload, arachidonic acid synthesis, lipid peroxidation, reduced antioxidant capacity, increased cellular damage, and inflammation in the liver. RNA-seq analysis revealed that 164 genes were differentially expressed between the livers of the HFHSD and control groups. The pathogenesis of early-stage NASH was characterized by hyperinsulinemia and by de novo synthesis of fatty acids and nascent triglycerides, which were deposited as lipid droplets in hepatocytes. Hyperinsulinemia shifted the energy supply from glucose to ketone bodies, and the high ketone body concentration induced the overexpression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1). The iron overload, CYP2E1 and alcohol dehydrogenase 4 overexpression promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which resulted in arachidonic and linoleic acid peroxidation and, in turn, led to malondialdehyde production and a cellular response to ROS-mediated DNA damage.

  18. Activation of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase is associated with elevated ketone body levels in the elasmobranch Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Treberg, Jason R; Crockett, Elizabeth L; Driedzic, William R

    2006-01-01

    Elasmobranch fishes are an ancient group of vertebrates that have unusual lipid metabolism whereby storage lipids are mobilized from the liver for peripheral oxidation largely as ketone bodies rather than as nonesterified fatty acids under normal conditions. This reliance on ketones, even when feeding, implies that elasmobranchs are chronically ketogenic. Compared to specimens sampled within 2 d of capture (recently captured), spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias that were held for 16-33 d without apparent feeding displayed a 4.5-fold increase in plasma concentration of d- beta -hydroxybutyrate (from 0.71 to 3.2 mM) and were considered ketotic. Overt activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 in liver mitochondria from ketotic dogfish was characterized by an increased apparent maximal activity, a trend of increasing affinity (reduced apparent K(m); P=0.09) for l-carnitine, and desensitization to the inhibitor malonyl-CoA relative to recently captured animals. Acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (ACoAT) activity in isolated liver mitochondria was also markedly increased in the ketotic dogfish compared to recently captured fish, whereas no difference in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase activity was found between these groups, suggesting that ACoAT plays a more important role in the activation of ketogenesis in spiny dogfish than in mammals and birds.

  19. First-principles energetics of water clusters and ice: a many-body analysis.

    PubMed

    Gillan, M J; Alfè, D; Bartók, A P; Csányi, G

    2013-12-28

    Standard forms of density-functional theory (DFT) have good predictive power for many materials, but are not yet fully satisfactory for cluster, solid, and liquid forms of water. Recent work has stressed the importance of DFT errors in describing dispersion, but we note that errors in other parts of the energy may also contribute. We obtain information about the nature of DFT errors by using a many-body separation of the total energy into its 1-body, 2-body, and beyond-2-body components to analyze the deficiencies of the popular PBE and BLYP approximations for the energetics of water clusters and ice structures. The errors of these approximations are computed by using accurate benchmark energies from the coupled-cluster technique of molecular quantum chemistry and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The systems studied are isomers of the water hexamer cluster, the crystal structures Ih, II, XV, and VIII of ice, and two clusters extracted from ice VIII. For the binding energies of these systems, we use the machine-learning technique of Gaussian Approximation Potentials to correct successively for 1-body and 2-body errors of the DFT approximations. We find that even after correction for these errors, substantial beyond-2-body errors remain. The characteristics of the 2-body and beyond-2-body errors of PBE are completely different from those of BLYP, but the errors of both approximations disfavor the close approach of non-hydrogen-bonded monomers. We note the possible relevance of our findings to the understanding of liquid water.

  20. First-principles energetics of water clusters and ice: A many-body analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillan, M. J.; Alfè, D.; Bartók, A. P.; Csányi, G.

    2013-12-01

    Standard forms of density-functional theory (DFT) have good predictive power for many materials, but are not yet fully satisfactory for cluster, solid, and liquid forms of water. Recent work has stressed the importance of DFT errors in describing dispersion, but we note that errors in other parts of the energy may also contribute. We obtain information about the nature of DFT errors by using a many-body separation of the total energy into its 1-body, 2-body, and beyond-2-body components to analyze the deficiencies of the popular PBE and BLYP approximations for the energetics of water clusters and ice structures. The errors of these approximations are computed by using accurate benchmark energies from the coupled-cluster technique of molecular quantum chemistry and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The systems studied are isomers of the water hexamer cluster, the crystal structures Ih, II, XV, and VIII of ice, and two clusters extracted from ice VIII. For the binding energies of these systems, we use the machine-learning technique of Gaussian Approximation Potentials to correct successively for 1-body and 2-body errors of the DFT approximations. We find that even after correction for these errors, substantial beyond-2-body errors remain. The characteristics of the 2-body and beyond-2-body errors of PBE are completely different from those of BLYP, but the errors of both approximations disfavor the close approach of non-hydrogen-bonded monomers. We note the possible relevance of our findings to the understanding of liquid water.

  1. First-principles energetics of water clusters and ice: A many-body analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillan, M. J.; Alfè, D.; Bartók, A. P.; Csányi, G.

    2013-12-28

    Standard forms of density-functional theory (DFT) have good predictive power for many materials, but are not yet fully satisfactory for cluster, solid, and liquid forms of water. Recent work has stressed the importance of DFT errors in describing dispersion, but we note that errors in other parts of the energy may also contribute. We obtain information about the nature of DFT errors by using a many-body separation of the total energy into its 1-body, 2-body, and beyond-2-body components to analyze the deficiencies of the popular PBE and BLYP approximations for the energetics of water clusters and ice structures. The errors of these approximations are computed by using accurate benchmark energies from the coupled-cluster technique of molecular quantum chemistry and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The systems studied are isomers of the water hexamer cluster, the crystal structures Ih, II, XV, and VIII of ice, and two clusters extracted from ice VIII. For the binding energies of these systems, we use the machine-learning technique of Gaussian Approximation Potentials to correct successively for 1-body and 2-body errors of the DFT approximations. We find that even after correction for these errors, substantial beyond-2-body errors remain. The characteristics of the 2-body and beyond-2-body errors of PBE are completely different from those of BLYP, but the errors of both approximations disfavor the close approach of non-hydrogen-bonded monomers. We note the possible relevance of our findings to the understanding of liquid water.

  2. Fueling Performance: Ketones Enter the Mix.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brendan; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2016-09-13

    Ketone body metabolites serve as alternative energy substrates during prolonged fasting, calorie restriction, or reduced carbohydrate (CHO) availability. Using a ketone ester supplement, Cox et al. (2016) demonstrate that acute nutritional ketosis alters substrate utilization patterns during exercise, reduces lactate production, and improves time-trial performance in elite cyclists.

  3. A review on effects of conjugated linoleic fatty acid (CLA) upon body composition and energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, Tatiana Ederich; da Silva, Marcondes Ramos; Camacho, Augusto; Marcadenti, Aline; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is highly found in fats from ruminants and it appears to favorably modify the body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors. The capacity of CLA to reduce the body fat levels as well as its benefic actions on glycemic profile, atherosclerosis and cancer has already been proved in experimental models. Furthermore, CLA supplementation may modulate the immune function, help re-synthetize of glycogen and potentiate the bone mineralization. CLA supplementation also could increase the lipolysis and reduce the accumulation of fatty acids on the adipose tissue; the putative mechanisms involved may be its action in reducing the lipase lipoprotein activity and to increase the carnitine-palmitoil-transferase-1 (CAT-1) activity, its interaction with PPARγ, and to raise the expression of UCP-1. Although studies made in human have shown some benefits of CLA supplementation as the weight loss, the results are still discordant. Moreover, some have shown adverse effects, such as negative effects on glucose metabolism and lipid profile. The purpose of this article is to review the available data regarding the benefits of CLA on the energetic metabolism and body composition, emphasizing action mechanisms.

  4. Impact of Universal Plasma and Energetic Particle Processes on Icy Bodies of the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Richardson, J. D.; Hill, M. E.; Sturner, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Modeling of space plasma and energetic particle interactions with icy bodies of the outer solar system is simplified when there is commonality of the underlying source, acceleration, and transport processes in spatially distinct regions from the supersonic heliosphere through the heliosheath into the local interstellar medium (LISM). Current trends in the Voyager heliosheath measurements suggest strong commonality to processes in the LISM. The Fisk-Gloeckler "universal" spectrum at suprathermal energies apparently plays a strong role in coupling the plasma and high energy particle regimes in the spatial and energetic transitions from the outer heliosphere to the LISM. Dominant processes in consecutive energy regimes project to varying effects versus irradiation depth on exposed upper surfaces of airless small icy bodies and to upper atmospheres of larger bodies such as Titan and Pluto. Relative absence of the universal suprathermal spectrum in the mid-heliospheric region of the classical Kuiper Belt may profoundly affect surface color diversity of icy bodies in this region.

  5. Energetic proton irradiation history of the HED parent body regolith and implications for ancient solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Palma, R. L.; Bogard, D. D.

    1997-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Kapoeta howardite, as well as several other meteorites, contain excess concentrations of cosmogenic neon in the darkened, solar-irradiated phase compared to the light, non-irradiated phase. The two explanations offered for the nuclear production of these Ne excesses in the parent body regolith are either from galactic particle (GCR) irradiation or from a greatly enhanced flux of energetic solar protons (SCR), as compared to the recent solar flux. Combining new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from Kapoeta light and dark phases with literature data, we show that the cosmogenic 21Ne /22Ne ratio of light phase feldspar (0.80) is consistent with only GCR irradiation in space for ~3 Myr. However, the 21Ne/22Ne ratio (0.68) derived for irradiation of dark phase feldspar in the Kapoeta regolith indicates that cosmogenic Ne was produced in roughly equal proportions from galactic and solar protons. Considering a simple model of an immature Kapoeta parent body regolith, the duration of this early galactic exposure was only ~3-6 Myr, which would be an upper limit to the solar exposure time of individual grains. Concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne in pyroxene separates and of cosmogenic 126Xe in both feldspar and pyroxene are consistent with this interpretation. The near-surface irradiation time of individual grains in the Kapoeta regolith probably varied considerably due to regolith mixing to an average GCR irradiation depth of ~10 cm. Because of the very different depth scales for production of solar ~Fe tracks, SCR Ne, and GCR Ne, the actual regolith exposure times for average grains probably differed correspondingly. However, both the SCR 21Ne and solar track ages appear to be longer because of enhanced production by early solar activity. The SCR/GCR production ratio of 21Ne inferred from the Kapoeta data is larger by a at least a factor of 10 and possibly as much as a factor of ~50 compared to recent solar

  6. Management of multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy in EL mice with caloric restriction and the ketogenic diet: role of glucose and ketone bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mantis, John G; Centeno, Nicole A; Todorova, Mariana T; McGowan, Richard; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2004-01-01

    Background The high fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) was developed as an alternative to fasting for seizure management. While the mechanisms by which fasting and the KD inhibit seizures remain speculative, alterations in brain energy metabolism are likely involved. We previously showed that caloric restriction (CR) inhibits seizure susceptibility by reducing blood glucose in the epileptic EL mouse, a natural model for human multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy. In this study, we compared the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant efficacy of the KD with that of CR in adult EL mice with active epilepsy. EL mice that experienced at least 15 recurrent complex partial seizures were fed either a standard diet unrestricted (SD-UR) or restricted (SD-R), and either a KD unrestricted (KD-UR) or restricted (KD-R). All mice were fasted for 14 hrs prior to diet initiation. A new experimental design was used where each mouse in the diet-restricted groups served as its own control to achieve a 20–23% body weight reduction. Seizure susceptibility, body weights, and the levels of plasma glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured once/week over a nine-week treatment period. Results Body weights and blood glucose levels remained high over the testing period in the SD-UR and the KD-UR groups, but were significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in the SD-R and KD-R groups. Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate levels were significantly (p < 0.001) increased in the SD-R and KD-R groups compared to their respective UR groups. Seizure susceptibility remained high in both UR-fed groups throughout the study, but was significantly reduced after three weeks in both R-fed groups. Conclusions The results indicate that seizure susceptibility in EL mice is dependent on plasma glucose levels and that seizure control is more associated with the amount than with the origin of dietary calories. Also, CR underlies the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant action of the KD in EL mice. A transition from glucose to ketone

  7. "Body-In-The-Loop": Optimizing Device Parameters Using Measures of Instantaneous Energetic Cost

    PubMed Central

    Felt, Wyatt; Selinger, Jessica C.; Donelan, J. Maxwell; Remy, C. David

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates methods for the online optimization of assistive robotic devices such as powered prostheses, orthoses and exoskeletons. Our algorithms estimate the value of a physiological objective in real-time (with a body “in-the-loop”) and use this information to identify optimal device parameters. To handle sensor data that are noisy and dynamically delayed, we rely on a combination of dynamic estimation and response surface identification. We evaluated three algorithms (Steady-State Cost Mapping, Instantaneous Cost Mapping, and Instantaneous Cost Gradient Search) with eight healthy human subjects. Steady-State Cost Mapping is an established technique that fits a cubic polynomial to averages of steady-state measures at different parameter settings. The optimal parameter value is determined from the polynomial fit. Using a continuous sweep over a range of parameters and taking into account measurement dynamics, Instantaneous Cost Mapping identifies a cubic polynomial more quickly. Instantaneous Cost Gradient Search uses a similar technique to iteratively approach the optimal parameter value using estimates of the local gradient. To evaluate these methods in a simple and repeatable way, we prescribed step frequency via a metronome and optimized this frequency to minimize metabolic energetic cost. This use of step frequency allows a comparison of our results to established techniques and enables others to replicate our methods. Our results show that all three methods achieve similar accuracy in estimating optimal step frequency. For all methods, the average error between the predicted minima and the subjects’ preferred step frequencies was less than 1% with a standard deviation between 4% and 5%. Using Instantaneous Cost Mapping, we were able to reduce subject walking-time from over an hour to less than 10 minutes. While, for a single parameter, the Instantaneous Cost Gradient Search is not much faster than Steady-State Cost Mapping, the

  8. Oxidative Impairment of Hippocampal Long-term Potentiation Involves Activation of Protein Phosphatase 2A and Is Prevented by Ketone Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Marwan; Rho, Jong M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ketone bodies (KB) exert antioxidant effects in experimental models of neurological disease. In the present study, we explored the effects of the KB acetoacetate (ACA) and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) on impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in rats by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using electrophysiological, fluorescence imaging and enzyme assay techniques. We found that: (1) a combination of ACA and BHB (1 mM each) prevented impairment of LTP by H2O2 (200 μM); (2) KB significantly lowered intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) — measured with the fluorescent indicator carboxy-H2DCFDA — in CA1 pyramidal neurons exposed to H2O2; (3) the effect of KB on LTP was replicated by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor fostriecin; (4) KB prevented impairment of LTP by the PP2A activator C6 ceramide; (5) fostriecin did not prevent the increase in ROS levels in CA1 pyramidal neurons exposed to H2O2, and C6 ceramide did not increase ROS levels; (6) PP2A activity was enhanced by both H2O2and rotenone – a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor that increases endogenous superoxide production; and (7) KB inhibited PP2A activity in protein extracts from brain tissue treated with either H2O2 or ceramide. We propose that oxidative impairment of hippocampal LTP is associated with PP2A activation, and that KB prevent this impairment in part by inducing PP2A inhibition through an antioxidant mechanism. PMID:18646208

  9. Multi-body forces and the energetics of transition metals, alloys, and semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Progress over the past year is divided into 3 areas: potential-energy functions for transition-metal aluminides; electronic structure and energetics of complex structures and quasicrystals; and ceramic materials (PdO, PtO).

  10. Ketone ester effects on metabolism and transcription.

    PubMed

    Veech, Richard L

    2014-10-01

    Ketosis induced by starvation or feeding a ketogenic diet has widespread and often contradictory effects due to the simultaneous elevation of both ketone bodies and free fatty acids. The elevation of ketone bodies increases the energy of ATP hydrolysis by reducing the mitochondrial NAD couple and oxidizing the coenzyme Q couple, thus increasing the redox span between site I and site II. In contrast, metabolism of fatty acids leads to a reduction of both mitochondrial NAD and mitochondrial coenzyme Q causing a decrease in the ΔG of ATP hydrolysis. In contrast, feeding ketone body esters leads to pure ketosis, unaccompanied by elevation of free fatty acids, producing a physiological state not previously seen in nature. The effects of pure ketosis on transcription and upon certain neurodegenerative diseases make approach not only interesting, but of potential therapeutic value.

  11. Ketone ester effects on metabolism and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Veech, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Ketosis induced by starvation or feeding a ketogenic diet has widespread and often contradictory effects due to the simultaneous elevation of both ketone bodies and free fatty acids. The elevation of ketone bodies increases the energy of ATP hydrolysis by reducing the mitochondrial NAD couple and oxidizing the coenzyme Q couple, thus increasing the redox span between site I and site II. In contrast, metabolism of fatty acids leads to a reduction of both mitochondrial NAD and mitochondrial coenzyme Q causing a decrease in the ΔG of ATP hydrolysis. In contrast, feeding ketone body esters leads to pure ketosis, unaccompanied by elevation of free fatty acids, producing a physiological state not previously seen in nature. The effects of pure ketosis on transcription and upon certain neurodegenerative diseases make approach not only interesting, but of potential therapeutic value. PMID:24714648

  12. Checking for Ketones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy ...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  17. Oxidative metabolism: glucose versus ketones.

    PubMed

    Prince, Allison; Zhang, Yifan; Croniger, Colleen; Puchowicz, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of upstream oxidative processes (glycolysis, beta-oxidation, CAC turnover) to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) under the driving conditions of energy demand by the cell results in the liberation of free energy as ATP. Perturbations in glycolytic CAC or OXPHOS can result in pathology or cell death. To better understand whole body energy expenditure during chronic ketosis, we used a diet-induced rat model of ketosis to determine if high-fat-carbohydrate-restricted "ketogenic" diet results in changes in total energy expenditure (TEE). Consistent with previous reports of increased energy expenditure in mice, we hypothesized that rats fed ketogenic diet for 3 weeks would result in increased resting energy expenditure due to alterations in metabolism associated with a "switch" in energy substrate from glucose to ketone bodies. The rationale is ketone bodies are a more efficient fuel than glucose. Indirect calorimetric analysis revealed a moderate increase in VO2 and decreased VCO2 and heat with ketosis. These results suggest ketosis induces a moderate uncoupling state and less oxidative efficiency compared to glucose oxidation.

  18. Scaling of free-ranging primate energetics with body mass predicts low energy expenditure in humans.

    PubMed

    Simmen, Bruno; Darlu, Pierre; Hladik, Claude Marcel; Pasquet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Studies of how a mammal's daily energy expenditure scales with its body mass suggest that humans, whether Westerners, agro-pastoralists, or hunter-gatherers, all have much lower energy expenditures for their body mass than other mammals. However, non-human primates also differ from other mammals in several life history traits suggestive of low energy use. Judging by field metabolic rates of free-ranging strepsirhine and haplorhine primates with different lifestyle and body mass, estimated using doubly labeled water, primates have lower energy expenditure than other similar-sized eutherian mammals. Daily energy expenditure in humans fell along the regression line of non-human primates. The results suggest that thrifty energy use could be an ancient strategy of primates. Although physical activity is a major component of energy balance, our results suggest a need to revise the basis for establishing norms of energy expenditure in modern humans.

  19. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 002 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE ( CAS No . 108 - 10 - 1 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) March 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordan

  20. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / R - 03 / 009 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ETHYL KETONE ( CAS No . 78 - 93 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been r

  1. Ketones suppress brain glucose consumption.

    PubMed

    LaManna, Joseph C; Salem, Nicolas; Puchowicz, Michelle; Erokwu, Bernadette; Koppaka, Smruta; Flask, Chris; Lee, Zhenghong

    2009-01-01

    The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta HB) and acetoacetate (AcAc), as occurs with fasting, prolonged starvation or chronic feeding of a high fat/low carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet). In this study, the local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose consumption (CMRglu; microM/min/100g) was calculated in the cortex and cerebellum of control and ketotic rats using Patlak analysis. Rats were imaged on a rodent PET scanner and MRI was performed on a 7-Tesla Bruker scanner for registration with the PET images. Plasma glucose and beta HB concentrations were measured and 90-minute dynamic PET scans were started simultaneously with bolus injection of 2-Deoxy-2[18F]Fluoro-D-Glucose (FDG). The blood radioactivity concentration was automatically sampled from the tail vein for 3 min following injection and manual periodic blood samples were taken. The calculated local CMRGlu decreased with increasing plasma BHB concentration in the cerebellum (CMRGlu = -4.07*[BHB] + 61.4, r2 = 0.3) and in the frontal cortex (CMRGlu = -3.93*[BHB] + 42.7, r2 = 0.5). These data indicate that, under conditions of ketosis, glucose consumption is decreased in the cortex and cerebellum by about 10% per each mM of plasma ketone bodies.

  2. Sirtuin 3 mediates neuroprotection of ketones against ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yin, Junxiang; Han, Pengcheng; Tang, Zhiwei; Liu, Qingwei; Shi, Jiong

    2015-11-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death. Growing evidence indicates that ketone bodies have beneficial effects in treating stroke, but their underlying mechanism remains unclear. Our previous study showed ketone bodies reduced reactive oxygen species by using NADH as an electron donor, thus increasing the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. In this study, we investigated whether mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) could mediate the neuroprotective effects of ketone bodies after ischemic stroke. We injected mice with either normal saline or ketones (beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) at 30 minutes after ischemia induced by transient middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. We found that ketone treatment enhanced mitochondria function, reduced oxidative stress, and therefore reduced infarct volume. This led to improved neurologic function after ischemia, including the neurologic score and the performance in Rotarod and open field tests. We further showed that ketones' effects were achieved by upregulating NAD(+)-dependent SIRT3 and its downstream substrates forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the penumbra region since knocking down SIRT3 in vitro diminished ketones' beneficial effects. These results provide us a foundation to develop novel therapeutics targeting this SIRT3-FoxO3a-SOD2 pathway.

  3. Dislocation kink-pair energetics and pencil glide in body-centered-cubic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ngan, A H; Wen, M

    2001-08-13

    When body-centered-cubic crystals undergo plastic deformation, the slip planes are often noncrystallographic. By performing atomistic simulation on the activation pathway of dislocation jumps in bcc iron, we show that the main reason for bcc crystals to exhibit this phenomenon is that one type of kink pair has significantly lower energy than all the other types on the same slip plane. Dislocation motion therefore cannot continue on the same slip plane, and the dislocation has to cross slip onto an intersecting slip plane after each atomic jump. Thus in the long run, the average slip plane would be zigzag and noncrystallographic.

  4. Ketones: metabolism's ugly duckling.

    PubMed

    VanItallie, Theodore B; Nufert, Thomas H

    2003-10-01

    Ketones were first discovered in the urine of diabetic patients in the mid-19th century; for almost 50 years thereafter, they were thought to be abnormal and undesirable by-products of incomplete fat oxidation. In the early 20th century, however, they were recognized as normal circulating metabolites produced by liver and readily utilized by extrahepatic tissues. In the 1920s, a drastic "hyperketogenic" diet was found remarkably effective for treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy in children. In 1967, circulating ketones were discovered to replace glucose as the brain's major fuel during the marked hyperketonemia of prolonged fasting. Until then, the adult human brain was thought to be entirely dependent upon glucose. During the 1990s, diet-induced hyperketonemia was found therapeutically effective for treatment of several rare genetic disorders involving impaired neuronal utilization of glucose or its metabolic products. Finally, growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced bioenergetic efficiency occur in brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because ketones are efficiently used by mitochondria for ATP generation and may also help protect vulnerable neurons from free radical damage, hyperketogenic diets should be evaluated for ability to benefit patients with PD, AD, and certain other neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Thermal conductivity and energetic recoils in UO2 using a many-body potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M. J.; Cooper, M. W. D.; Kuo, E. Y.; Rushton, M. J. D.; Grimes, R. W.; Lumpkin, G. R.; Middleburgh, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on uranium dioxide (UO2) employing a recently developed many-body potential model. Thermal conductivities are computed for a defect free UO2 lattice and a radiation-damaged, defect containing lattice at 300 K, 1000 K and 1500 K. Defects significantly degrade the thermal conductivity of UO2 as does the presence of amorphous UO2, which has a largely temperature independent thermal conductivity of ˜1.4 Wm-1 K-1. The model yields a pre-melting superionic transition temperature at 2600 K, very close to the experimental value and the mechanical melting temperature of 3600 K, slightly lower than those generated with other empirical potentials. The average threshold displacement energy was calculated to be 37 eV. Although the spatial extent of a 1 keV U cascade is very similar to those generated with other empirical potentials and the number of Frenkel pairs generated is close to that from the Basak potential, the vacancy and interstitial cluster distribution is different.

  6. Renormalization of myoglobin–ligand binding energetics by quantum many-body effects

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Cédric; Cole, Daniel J.; O’Regan, David D.; Payne, Mike C.

    2014-01-01

    We carry out a first-principles atomistic study of the electronic mechanisms of ligand binding and discrimination in the myoglobin protein. Electronic correlation effects are taken into account using one of the most advanced methods currently available, namely a linear-scaling density functional theory (DFT) approach wherein the treatment of localized iron 3d electrons is further refined using dynamical mean-field theory. This combination of methods explicitly accounts for dynamical and multireference quantum physics, such as valence and spin fluctuations, of the 3d electrons, while treating a significant proportion of the protein (more than 1,000 atoms) with DFT. The computed electronic structure of the myoglobin complexes and the nature of the Fe–O2 bonding are validated against experimental spectroscopic observables. We elucidate and solve a long-standing problem related to the quantum-mechanical description of the respiration process, namely that DFT calculations predict a strong imbalance between O2 and CO binding, favoring the latter to an unphysically large extent. We show that the explicit inclusion of the many-body effects induced by the Hund’s coupling mechanism results in the correct prediction of similar binding energies for oxy- and carbonmonoxymyoglobin. PMID:24717844

  7. Utility of ketone measurement in the prevention, diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Misra, S; Oliver, N S

    2015-01-01

    Ketone measurement is advocated for the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis and assessment of its severity. Assessing the evidence base for ketone measurement in clinical practice is challenging because multiple methods are available but there is a lack of consensus about which is preferable. Evaluating the utility of ketone measurement is additionally problematic because of variability in the biochemical definition of ketoacidosis internationally and in the proposed thresholds for ketone measures. This has led to conflicting guidance from expert bodies on how ketone measurement should be used in the management of ketoacidosis. The development of point-of-care devices that can reliably measure the capillary blood ketone β-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) has widened the spectrum of applications of ketone measurement, but whether the evidence base supporting these applications is robust enough to warrant their incorporation into routine clinical practice remains unclear. The imprecision of capillary blood ketone measures at higher values, the lack of availability of routine laboratory-based assays for BOHB and the continued cost-effectiveness of urine ketone assessment prompt further discussion on the role of capillary blood ketone assessment in ketoacidosis. In the present article, we review the various existing methods of ketone measurement, the precision of capillary blood ketone as compared with other measures, its diagnostic accuracy in predicting ketoacidosis and other clinical applications including prevention, assessment of severity and resolution of ketoacidosis.

  8. Space Weathering of airless bodies in the Solar System - Combining hypervelocity dust impacts with energetic irradiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, K.; Bennett, C.; Guglielmino, M.; Orlando, T. M.; Trieloff, M.; Srama, R.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical and mineralogical characterization of meteorites and their parent asteroids provides us with information about the processes and conditions during the formation of the inner Solar System. However, linking meteorites to their parent bodies is problematic. Astronomical observations aim to reconstruct the surface properties of these bodies primarily by visible and infrared spectra, but space weathering severely modifies the optical, compositional and physical properties of thin surface layers and thus precludes proper identification of chemistry and mineralogy. The effects of space weathering have been experimentally studied mainly with respect to ion bombardment and sputtering. Other studies aimed to simulate the influence of micrometeoroid bombardment by using laser ablation techniques. However, there is sufficient evidence that laser ablation does not realistically lead to the same effects as produced during real micrometeorite impacts. We performed micrometeorite bombardment using a 2MV dust accelerator at the Institute for Space Systems at University of Stuttgart, Germany, capable of generating impact speeds up to 100 km s-1. These results are combined with energetic irradiation experiments at the Electron and Photon Induced Chemistry on Surfaces (EPICS) laboratory at Georgia Institute of Technology, USA. By simulating highly realistic irradiation conditions, we are able to investigate the processes of particle and solar wind irradiation on solid planetary surfaces and study the formation of e.g., nanophase iron in minerals, the effects on hydrous minerals regarding their volatile budgets, or possible OH-formation in nominally anhydrous minerals and relate these to their optical properties. Using a variety of minerals, this work aims to contribute to a better understanding of the general alteration mechanisms in space environments in dependence of weathering agent and available material. We here present the results of initial comparison analysis and

  9. Novel ketone body therapy for managing Alzheimer's disease: An Editorial Highlight for Effects of a dietary ketone ester on hippocampal glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids in a 3xTgAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Puchowicz, Michelle A; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2017-03-15

    Read the highlighted article 'Effects of a dietary ketone ester on hippocampal glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids in a 3xTgAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease' on doi: 10.1111/jnc.13958.

  10. Energetics of median and paired fin swimming, body and caudal fin swimming, and gait transition in parrotfish (Scarus schlegeli) and triggerfish (Rhinecanthus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Korsmeyer, Keith E; Steffensen, John Fleng; Herskin, Jannik

    2002-05-01

    To determine the energetic costs of rigid-body, median or paired-fin (MPF) swimming versus undulatory, body-caudal fin (BCF) swimming, we measured oxygen consumption as a function of swimming speed in two MPF swimming specialists, Schlegel's parrotfish and Picasso triggerfish. The parrotfish swam exclusively with the pectoral fins at prolonged swimming speeds up to 3.2 total lengths per second (L s(-1); 30 min critical swimming speed, U(crit)). At higher speeds, gait transferred to a burst-and-coast BCF swimming mode that resulted in rapid fatigue. The triggerfish swam using undulations of the soft dorsal and anal fins up to 1.5 L s(-1), beyond which BCF undulations were recruited intermittently. BCF swimming was used continuously above 3.5 L s(-1), and was accompanied by synchronous undulations of the dorsal and anal fins. The triggerfish were capable of high, prolonged swimming speeds of up to 4.1 L s(-1) (30 min U(crit)). In both species, the rates of increase in oxygen consumption with swimming speed were higher during BCF swimming than during rigid-body MPF swimming. Our results indicate that, for these species, undulatory swimming is energetically more costly than rigid-body swimming, and therefore support the hypothesis that MPF swimming is more efficient. In addition, use of the BCF gait at higher swimming speed increased the cost of transport in both species beyond that predicted for MPF swimming at the same speeds. This suggests that, unlike for terrestrial locomotion, gait transition in fishes does not occur to reduce energetic costs, but to increase recruitable muscle mass and propulsive surfaces. The appropriate use of the power and exponential functions to model swimming energetics is also discussed.

  11. Multi-body forces and the energetics of transition metals, alloys, and semiconductors. Annual progress report, (1991--1992)

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-11-01

    Progress over the past year is divided into 3 areas: potential-energy functions for transition-metal aluminides; electronic structure and energetics of complex structures and quasicrystals; and ceramic materials (PdO, PtO).

  12. Novel ketone diet enhances physical and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Andrew J.; Knight, Nicholas S.; Cole, Mark A.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; Carter, Emma; Tchabanenko, Kirill; Pichulik, Tica; Gulston, Melanie K.; Atherton, Helen J.; Schroeder, Marie A.; Deacon, Robert M. J.; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M. Todd; Pawlosky, Robert; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Tyler, Damian J.; Griffin, Julian L.; Robertson, Jeremy; Veech, Richard L.; Clarke, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies are the most energy-efficient fuel and yield more ATP per mole of substrate than pyruvate and increase the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis. Elevation of circulating ketones via high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets has been used for the treatment of drug-refractory epilepsy and for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease. Ketones may also be beneficial for muscle and brain in times of stress, such as endurance exercise. The challenge has been to raise circulating ketone levels by using a palatable diet without altering lipid levels. We found that blood ketone levels can be increased and cholesterol and triglycerides decreased by feeding rats a novel ketone ester diet: chow that is supplemented with (R)-3-hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate as 30% of calories. For 5 d, rats on the ketone diet ran 32% further on a treadmill than did control rats that ate an isocaloric diet that was supplemented with either corn starch or palm oil (P < 0.05). Ketone-fed rats completed an 8-arm radial maze test 38% faster than did those on the other diets, making more correct decisions before making a mistake (P < 0.05). Isolated, perfused hearts from rats that were fed the ketone diet had greater free energy available from ATP hydrolysis during increased work than did hearts from rats on the other diets as shown by using [31P]-NMR spectroscopy. The novel ketone diet, therefore, improved physical performance and cognitive function in rats, and its energy-sparing properties suggest that it may help to treat a range of human conditions with metabolic abnormalities.—Murray, A. J., Knight, N. S., Cole, M. A., Cochlin, L. E., Carter, E., Tchabanenko, K., Pichulik, T., Gulston, M. K., Atherton, H. J., Schroeder, M. A., Deacon, R. M. J., Kashiwaya, Y., King, M. T., Pawlosky, R., Rawlins, J. N. P., Tyler, D. J., Griffin, J. L., Robertson, J., Veech, R. L., Clarke, K. Novel ketone diet enhances physical and cognitive performance. PMID:27528626

  13. Novel ketone diet enhances physical and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J; Knight, Nicholas S; Cole, Mark A; Cochlin, Lowri E; Carter, Emma; Tchabanenko, Kirill; Pichulik, Tica; Gulston, Melanie K; Atherton, Helen J; Schroeder, Marie A; Deacon, Robert M J; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M Todd; Pawlosky, Robert; Rawlins, J Nicholas P; Tyler, Damian J; Griffin, Julian L; Robertson, Jeremy; Veech, Richard L; Clarke, Kieran

    2016-12-01

    Ketone bodies are the most energy-efficient fuel and yield more ATP per mole of substrate than pyruvate and increase the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis. Elevation of circulating ketones via high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets has been used for the treatment of drug-refractory epilepsy and for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. Ketones may also be beneficial for muscle and brain in times of stress, such as endurance exercise. The challenge has been to raise circulating ketone levels by using a palatable diet without altering lipid levels. We found that blood ketone levels can be increased and cholesterol and triglycerides decreased by feeding rats a novel ketone ester diet: chow that is supplemented with (R)-3-hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate as 30% of calories. For 5 d, rats on the ketone diet ran 32% further on a treadmill than did control rats that ate an isocaloric diet that was supplemented with either corn starch or palm oil (P < 0.05). Ketone-fed rats completed an 8-arm radial maze test 38% faster than did those on the other diets, making more correct decisions before making a mistake (P < 0.05). Isolated, perfused hearts from rats that were fed the ketone diet had greater free energy available from ATP hydrolysis during increased work than did hearts from rats on the other diets as shown by using [(31)P]-NMR spectroscopy. The novel ketone diet, therefore, improved physical performance and cognitive function in rats, and its energy-sparing properties suggest that it may help to treat a range of human conditions with metabolic abnormalities.-Murray, A. J., Knight, N. S., Cole, M. A., Cochlin, L. E., Carter, E., Tchabanenko, K., Pichulik, T., Gulston, M. K., Atherton, H. J., Schroeder, M. A., Deacon, R. M. J., Kashiwaya, Y., King, M. T., Pawlosky, R., Rawlins, J. N. P., Tyler, D. J., Griffin, J. L., Robertson, J., Veech, R. L., Clarke, K. Novel ketone diet enhances physical and cognitive performance.

  14. Preliminary study to compare body residues and sublethal energetic responses in benthic invertebrates exposed to sediment-bound 2,4,5-trichlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, O.P.; Kukkonen, J.; Pellinen, J.

    1996-02-01

    Relationships between concentration of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP) in sediment, body residues of the chemical, and sublethal biological effects in three benthic invertebrates were studied. Uncontaminated lake sediment was spiked with four concentrations (23--85 {micro}g/g dry sediment) of TCP. Chironomid larvae (Chironomus riparius), oligochaete worms (Lumbriculus variegatus), and sphaeriid bivalves (Sphaerium corneum) were exposed to the sediment. The effect of chlorophenol on the rate of heat dissipation of animals was monitored by direct microcalorimetry. It appeared that both the behavior of the animals and their body residues explained the energetic response. Valve closure behavior of S. corneum reduced the accumulation of toxicant (< 0.3 {micro}mol/g) but was observed as a complex energetic response. Heat dissipation of L. variegatus was at the same level in control animals and those with high body residues of TCP (> 1.5 {micro}mol/g). Regardless of the amount of TCP accumulated to C. riparius (0.1--0.6 {micro}mol/g), the rate of heat dissipation was almost two times higher than that of the control animals, probably reflecting uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, which is the primary mode of toxic action of chlorophenols. However, when a threshold concentration was exceeded there was no concentration-response dependence until acute toxicity appears.

  15. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2008-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the 'post-weaned/adult' brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain's capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation.

  16. Volatilization of ketones from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The overall mass-transfer coefficients for the volatilization from water of acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 3-pentanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-octanone were measured simultaneously with the oxygen-absorption coefficient in a laboratory stirred water bath. The liquid-film and gas-film coefficients of the two-film model were determined for the ketones from the overall coefficients, and both film resistances were important for volatilization of the ketones.The liquid-film coefficients for the ketones varied with the 0.719 power of the molecular-diffusion coefficient, in agreement with the literature. The liquid-film coefficients showed a variable dependence on molecular weight, with the dependence ranging from the −0.263 power for acetone to the −0.378 power for 2-octanone. This is in contrast with the literature where a constant −0.500 power dependence on the molecular weight is assumed.The gas-film coefficients for the ketones showed no dependence on molecular weight, in contrast with the literature where a −0.500 power is assumed.

  17. Stereoselective titanium-mediated aldol reactions of a chiral lactate-derived ethyl ketone with ketones.

    PubMed

    Alcoberro, Sandra; Gómez-Palomino, Alejandro; Solà, Ricard; Romea, Pedro; Urpí, Fèlix; Font-Bardia, Mercè

    2014-01-17

    Aldol reactions of titanium enolates of lactate-derived ethyl ketone 1 with other ketones proceed in a very efficient and stereocontrolled manner provided that a further equivalent of TiCl4 is added to the reacting mixture. The scope of these reactions encompasses simple ketones such as acetone or cyclohexanone as well as other ketones that contain potential chelating groups such as pyruvate esters or α- and β-hydroxy ketones.

  18. Effects of independently altering body weight and mass on the energetic cost of a human running model.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Jeffrey; Seipel, Justin

    2016-03-21

    The mechanisms underlying the metabolic cost of running, and legged locomotion in general, remain to be well understood. Prior experimental studies show that the metabolic cost of human running correlates well with the vertical force generated to support body weight, the mechanical work done, and changes in the effective leg stiffness. Further, previous work shows that the metabolic cost of running decreases with decreasing body weight, increases with increasing body weight and mass, and does not significantly change with changing body mass alone. In the present study, we seek to uncover the basic mechanism underlying this existing experimental data. We find that an actuated spring-mass mechanism representing the effective mechanics of human running provides a mechanistic explanation for the previously reported changes in the metabolic cost of human running if the dimensionless relative leg stiffness (effective stiffness normalized by body weight and leg length) is regulated to be constant. The model presented in this paper provides a mechanical explanation for the changes in metabolic cost due to changing body weight and mass which have been previously measured experimentally and highlights the importance of active leg stiffness regulation during human running.

  19. A mathematical high bar-human body model for analysing and interpreting mechanical-energetic processes on the high bar.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, A; Brüggemann, G P

    1998-12-01

    The aims of this study were: 1. To study the transfer of energy between the high bar and the gymnast. 2. To develop criteria from the utilisation of high bar elasticity and the utilisation of muscle capacity to assess the effectiveness of a movement solution. 3. To study the influence of varying segment movement upon release parameters. For these purposes a model of the human body attached to the high bar (high bar-human body model) was developed. The human body was modelled using a 15-segment body system. The joint-beam element method (superelement) was employed for modelling the high bar. A superelement consists of four rigid segments connected by joints (two Cardan joints and one rotational-translational joint) and springs (seven rotation springs and one tension-compression spring). The high bar was modelled using three superelements. The input data required for the high bar human body model were collected with video-kinematographic (50 Hz) and dynamometric (500 Hz) techniques. Masses and moments of inertia of the 15 segments were calculated using the data from the Zatsiorsky et al. (1984) model. There are two major phases characteristic of the giant swing prior to dismounts from the high bar. In the first phase the gymnast attempts to supply energy to the high bar-humanbody system through muscle activity and to store this energy in the high bar. The difference between the energy transferred to the high bar and the reduction in the total energy of the body could be adopted as a criterion for the utilisation of high bar elasticity. The energy previously transferred into the high bar is returned to the body during the second phase. An advantageous increase in total body energy at the end of the exercise could only be obtained through muscle energy supply. An index characterising the utilisation of muscle capacity was developed out of the difference between the increase in total body energy and the energy returned from the high bar. A delayed and initially slow but

  20. Evidence for Intramyocardial Disruption of Lipid Metabolism and Increased Myocardial Ketone Utilization in Advanced Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Kenneth C.; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Aziz, Moez; Mesaros, Clementina; Worth, Andrew J.; Wang, Linda L.; Javaheri, Ali; Blair, Ian A.; Margulies, Kenneth; Rame, J. Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The failing human heart is characterized by metabolic abnormalities, but these defects remains incompletely understood. In animal models of HF there is a switch from a predominance of fatty acid utilization to the more oxygen-sparing carbohydrate metabolism. Recent studies have reported decreases in myocardial lipid content, but inclusion of diabetics and nondiabetics obscures the distinction of adapations to metabolic derangements from adaptations to heart failure per se. Methods and Results We performed both unbiased and targeted myocardial lipid surveys using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy in non-diabetic, lean, predominantly non-ischemic advanced HF patients at the time of heart transplantation or LVAD implantation. We identified significantly decreased concentrations of the majority of myocardial lipid intermediates, including long-chain acylcarnitines, the primary subset of energetic lipid substrate for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We report for the first time significantly reduced levels of intermediate and anaplerotic acyl-CoA species incorporated into Krebs cycle, while the myocardial concentration of acetyl-CoA was significantly increased in end-stage heart failure. In contrast, we observed an increased abundance of ketogenic β-hydroxybutyryl CoA, in association with increased myocardial utilization of β-hydroxybutyrate. We observed a significant increase in the expression of the gene encoding succinyl-CoA: 3oxoacid-CoA transferase (SCOT), the rate limiting enzyme for myocardial oxidation of βOHB and acetoacetate. Conclusions These findings indicate increased ketone utilization in the severely failing human heart independent of diabetes, support the role of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel and myocardial ketone oxidation as a key metabolic adaptation in the failing human heart. PMID:26819374

  1. The water hexamer: three-body interactions, structures, energetics, and OH-stretch spectroscopy at finite temperature.

    PubMed

    Tainter, C J; Skinner, J L

    2012-09-14

    Using a newly developed and recently parameterized classical empirical simulation model for water that involves explicit three-body interactions, we determine the eleven most stable isomers of the water hexamer. We find that the lowest energy isomer is one of the cage structures, in agreement with far-IR and microwave experiments. The energy ordering for the binding energies is cage > glove > book > bag > chair > boat > chaise, and energies relative to the cage are in good agreement with CCSD(T) calculations. The three-body contributions to the cage, book, and chair are also in reasonable agreement with CCSD(T) results. The energy of each isomer results from a delicate balance involving the number of hydrogen bonds, the strain of these hydrogen bonds, and cooperative and anti-cooperative three-body interactions, whose contribution we can understand simply from the form of the three-body interactions in the simulation model. Oxygen-oxygen distances in the cage and book isomers are in good agreement with microwave experiments. Hydrogen-bond distances depend on both donor and acceptor, which can again be understood from the three-body model. Fully anharmonic OH-stretch spectra are calculated for these low-energy structures, and compared with shifted harmonic results from ab initio and density functional theory calculations. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were performed from 40 to 194 K, which show that the cage isomer has the lowest free energy from 0 to 70 K, and the book isomer has the lowest free energy from 70 to 194 K. OH-stretch spectra were calculated between 40 and 194 K, and results at 40, 63, and 79 K were compared to recent experiments, leading to re-assignment of the peaks in the experimental spectra. We calculate local OH-stretch cumulative spectral densities for different donor-acceptor types and compare to analogous results for liquid water.

  2. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Poff, A M; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, T N; D'Agostino, D P

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use.

  3. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, AM; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, TN; D’Agostino, DP

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use. PMID:24615175

  4. Thermoregulation and energetics in hibernating black bears: metabolic rate and the mystery of multi-day body temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Tøien, Øivind; Blake, John; Barnes, Brian M

    2015-05-01

    Black bears overwintering in outdoor hibernacula in Alaska decrease metabolism to as low as 25 % basal rates, while core body temperature (T(b)) decreases from 37 to 38 °C to a mid-hibernation average of 33 °C. T b develops cycles of 1.6-7.3 days length within a 30-36 °C range, with no circadian component. We do not know the mechanism or function underlying behind the T(b) cycles, although bears avoid T(b) of <30 °C and shorter cycles are predicted from higher rates of heat loss in colder conditions. To test this we manipulated den temperatures (T(den)) of 12 hibernating bears with body mass (BM) from 35.5 to 116.5 kg while recording T(b), metabolic rate (M), and shivering. T b cycle length (0.8-11.2 days) shortened as T den decreased (partial R(2) = 0.490, p < 0.001). Large bears with low thermal conductance (TC) showed more variation in T b cycle length with changes in T(den) than did smaller bears with high TC. Minimum T b across cycles was not consistent. At low T(den) bears shivered both during rising and decreasing phases of T(b) cycles, with minimum shivering during the fastest drop in T(b). At higher T den the T b pattern was more irregular. Mean M through T(b) cycles was negatively correlated to T den below lower critical temperatures (1.4-10.4 °C). Minimum M (0.3509 W/kg ± 0.0121 SE) during mid-hibernation scaled to BM [M (W) = 1.217 × BM (kg)(0.6979), R(2) = 0.855, p < 0.001]. Hibernating thermal conductance (TC) was negatively correlated to BM (R(2) = 0.721, p < 0.001); bears with high TC had the same T(b) cycle length as bears with low TC except at high T(den), thus not supporting the hypothesis that cooling rate alone determines T(b) cycle length. We conclude that T(b) cycling is effected by control of thermoregulatory heat production, and T(b) cycling may not be present when hibernating bears use passive thermoregulation. More intense shivering in the rising phase of cycles may contribute to the prevention of muscle disuse atrophy. Bears

  5. Storage stability of ketones on carbon adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Prado, C; Alcaraz, M J; Fuentes, A; Garrido, J; Periago, J F

    2006-09-29

    Activated coconut carbon constitutes the more widely used sorbent for preconcentration of volatile organic compounds in sampling workplace air. Water vapour is always present in the air and its adsorption on the activated carbon surface is a serious drawback, mainly when sampling polar organic compounds, such as ketones. In this case, the recovery of the compounds diminishes; moreover, ketones can be decomposed during storage. Synthetic carbons contain less inorganic impurities and have a lower capacity for water adsorption than coconut charcoal. The aim of this work was to evaluate the storage stability of various ketones (acetone, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and cyclohexanone) on different activated carbons and to study the effect of adsorbed water vapour under different storage conditions. The effect of storage temperature on extraction efficiencies was significant for each ketone in all the studied sorbents. Recovery was higher when samples were stored at 4 degrees C. The results obtained for storage stability of the studied ketones showed that the performance of synthetic carbons was better than for the coconut charcoals. The water adsorption and the ash content of the carbons can be a measure of the reactive sites that may chemisorb ketones or catalize their decomposition. Anasorb 747 showed good ketone stability at least for 7 days, except for cyclohexanone. After 30-days storage, the stability of the studied ketones was excellent on Carboxen 564. This sorbent had a nearly negligible ash content and the adsorbed water was much lower than for the other sorbents tested.

  6. Energetic composites

    DOEpatents

    Danen, Wayne C.; Martin, Joe A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application.

  7. Energetic composites

    DOEpatents

    Danen, W.C.; Martin, J.A.

    1993-11-30

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application. 3 figures.

  8. Energetics of tropical hibernation.

    PubMed

    Dausmann, K H; Glos, J; Heldmaier, G

    2009-04-01

    In this field study, the energetic properties of tropical hibernation were investigated by measuring oxygen consumption and body temperature of the Malagasy primate Cheirogaleus medius in their natural hibernacula. These lemurs use tree holes with extremely varying insulation capacities as hibernacula. In poorly insulated tree holes, tree hole temperature and body temperature fluctuated strongly each day (between 12.8 and 34.4 degrees C). The metabolic rate under these conditions also showed large daily fluctuations between about 29.0 ml O(2)/h and 97.9 ml O(2)/h in parallel with changes in body temperature. In well insulated tree holes in very large trees on the other hand, tree hole temperature and body temperature remained relatively constant at about 25 degrees C. Lemurs hibernating in these tree holes showed a more constant metabolic rate at an intermediate level, but hibernation was interrupted by repeated arousals with peak metabolic rates up to 350 ml O(2)/h. The occurrence of these spontaneous arousals proved that the ability for thermoregulation persists during hibernation. Arousals were energetically costly, but much less so than in temperate and arctic hibernators. Despite the decisive influence of tree hole properties on the pattern of body temperature and metabolic rate during hibernation, the choice of the hibernaculum does not seem to be of energetic importance. The overall energetic savings by tropical hibernation amounted to about 70% as compared to the active season (31.5 vs. 114.3 kJ/d). Therefore, tropical hibernation in C. medius is an effective, well-regulated adaptive response to survive unfavourable seasons.

  9. Flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dejager, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Simnett, G. M.; Strong, K. T.; Bentley, R. D.; Bornmann, P. L.; Bruner, M. E.; Cargill, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of flare energetics, researchers sought to establish a comprehensive and self-consistent picture of the sources and transport of energy within a flare. To achieve this goal, they chose five flares in 1980 that were well observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission, and with other space-borne and ground-based instruments. The events were chosen to represent various types of flares. Details of the observations available for them and the corresponding physical parameters derived from these data are presented. The flares were studied from two perspectives, the impulsive and gradual phases, and then the results were compared to obtain the overall picture of the energics of these flares. The role that modeling can play in estimating the total energy of a flare when the observationally determined parameters are used as the input to a numerical model is discussed. Finally, a critique of the current understanding of flare energetics and the methods used to determine various energetics terms is outlined, and possible future directions of research in this area are suggested.

  10. Energetic powder

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Danen, Wayne C.

    2003-12-23

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles. The particles have a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer. The particles may be prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  11. Microbial production of natural raspberry ketone.

    PubMed

    Beekwilder, Jules; van der Meer, Ingrid M; Sibbesen, Ole; Broekgaarden, Mans; Qvist, Ingmar; Mikkelsen, Joern D; Hall, Robert D

    2007-10-01

    Raspberry ketone is an important compound for the flavour industry. It is frequently used in products such as soft drinks, sweets, puddings and ice creams. The compound can be produced by organic synthesis. Demand for "natural" raspberry ketone is growing considerably. However, this product is extremely expensive. Consequently, there is a remaining desire to better understand how raspberry ketone is synthesized in vivo, and which genes and enzymes are involved. With this information we will then be in a better position to design alternative production strategies such as microbial fermentation. This article focuses on the identification and application of genes potentially linked to raspberry ketone synthesis. We have isolated candidate genes from both raspberry and other plants, and these have been introduced into bacterial and yeast expression systems. Conditions have been determined that result in significant levels of raspberry ketone, up to 5 mg/L. These results therefore lay a strong foundation for a potentially renewable source of "natural" flavour compounds making use of plant genes.

  12. Safety assessment of MIBK (methyl isobutyl ketone).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wilbur

    2004-01-01

    MIBK (Methyl Isobutyl Ketone) is an aliphatic ketone that functions as both a denaturant and solvent in cosmetic products. Current use in cosmetic products is very limited, but MIBK is reported to be used in one nail correction pen (volume = 3 ml) at a concentration of 21%. The maximum percutaneous absorption rate in guinea pigs is 1.1 micromol/min/cm2 at 10 to 45 min. Metabolites include 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone (oxidation product) and 4-methyl-2-pentanol (4-MPOL) (reduction product). Values for the serum half-life and total clearance time of MIBK in animals were 66 min and 6 h, respectively. In clinical tests, most of the absorbed MIBK had been eliminated from the body 90 min post exposure. MIBK was not toxic via the oral or dermal route of exposure in acute, short-term, or subchronic animal studies, except that nephrotoxicity was observed in rats dosed with 1 g/kg in a short-term study. MIBK was an ocular and skin irritant in animal tests. Ocular irritation was noted in 12 volunteers exposed to 200 ppm MIBK for 15 min in a clinical test. A depression of the vestibulo-oculomotor reflex was seen with intravenous infusion of MIBK (in an emulsion) at 30 microM/kg/min in female rats. The no-observed-effect level in rats exposed orally to MIBK was 50 mg/kg. Both gross and microscopic evidence of lung damage were reported in acute inhalation toxicity studies in animals. Short-term and subchronic inhalation exposures (as low as 100 ppm) produced effects in the kidney and liver that were species and sex dependent. Dermal doses of 300 or 600 mg/kg for 4 months in rats produced reduced mitotic activity in hair follicles, increased thickness of horny and granular cell layers of the epidermis, a decrease in the number of reactive centers in follicles (spleen), an increase in the number of iron-containing pigments in the area of the red pulp (spleen), and a reduction in the lipid content of the cortical layer of the adrenal glands. Neuropathological changes in the most

  13. Highly Concentrated Catalytic Asymmetric Allylation of Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Alfred J.; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    We report the catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones under highly concentrated reaction conditions with a catalyst generated from titanium tetraisopropoxide and BINOL (1:2 ratio) in the presence of isopropanol. This catalyst promotes the addition of tetraallylstannane to a variety of ketones to produce tertiary homoallylic alcohols in excellent yield (80–99%) with high enantioselectivities (79–95%). The resulting homoallylic alcohols can also be epoxidized in situ using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to afford cyclic epoxy alcohols in high yield (84–87%). PMID:17249767

  14. Highly concentrated catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Alfred J; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J

    2007-02-01

    [reaction: see text] We report the catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones under highly concentrated reaction conditions with a catalyst generated from titanium tetraisopropoxide and BINOL (1:2 ratio) in the presence of isopropanol. This catalyst promotes the addition of tetraallylstannane to a variety of ketones to produce tertiary homoallylic alcohols in excellent yield (80-99%) with high enantioselectivities (79-95%). The resulting homoallylic alcohols can also be epoxidized in situ using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to afford cyclic epoxy alcohols in high yield (84-87%).

  15. Aromatic ketones with terminal vinyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Uvarova, L.R.; Burykina, L.K.; Zubareva, M.M.; Polyanskii, I.D.

    1988-12-20

    The Friedel-Crafts acylation of a hydrocarbon by an acylating agent containing bromoalkyl substituents gave a series of new ketones. Their subsequent dehydrobromination with potassium tert-butoxide gave high yields of aromatic ketones containing terminal vinyl groups. The reaction was conducted both with /beta/-bromoethylbenzene and with 4-(/beta/-bromoethyl)-benzoyl chloride and also with both compounds simultaneously. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed by the PMR, IR, UV, and mass spectra and also by the data from elemental analysis.

  16. Stereoselective Formation of Fully Substituted Ketone Enolates.

    PubMed

    Haimov, Elvira; Nairoukh, Zackaria; Shterenberg, Alexander; Berkovitz, Tiran; Jamison, Timothy F; Marek, Ilan

    2016-04-25

    The application of stereochemically defined acyclic fully substituted enolates of ketones to the enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocenters would be highly valuable. Herein, we describe an approach leading to the formation of several new stereogenic centers through a combined metalation-addition of a carbonyl-carbamoyl transfer to reveal in situ stereodefined α,α-disubstituted enolates of ketone as a single stereoisomer. This approach could produce a series of aldol and Mannich products from enol carbamate with excellent diastereomeric ratios.

  17. The Conversion of Carboxylic Acids to Ketones: A Repeated Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Wilson, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones is a useful chemical transformation with a long history. Several chemists have claimed that they discovered the conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones yet in fact the reaction is actually known for centuries.

  18. Asymmetric Michael addition of ketones to nitroolefins: pyrrolidinyl-oxazole-carboxamides as new efficient organocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Sathish, Manda; Srinivasulu, Vunnam; Chetna, Jadala; Chandra Shekar, Kunta; Nekkanti, Shalini; Tangella, Yellaiah; Shankaraiah, Nagula

    2014-10-28

    Chiral pyrrolidinyl-oxazole-carboxamides were synthesized and used as efficient new organocatalysts for the asymmetric Michael addition of ketones with nitroalkenes under solvent-free conditions. Gratifyingly, the corresponding Michael adducts were obtained in higher yields (up to 99%) and excellent stereoselectivities (up to >99/1 dr and 99% ee). Transition state models have been proposed to account for the high enantio- and diastereoselectivity of these Michael addition reactions and also the energetics have been investigated using density functional methods. These results support the preferential formation of syn-products by the approach of trans-β-nitrostyrene through the re-face of anti-enamine.

  19. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  3. Vapor pressures and gas-film coefficients for ketones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of handbook vapor pressures for seven ketones with more recent literature data showed large differences for four of the ketones. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of these ketones from water determined by two different methods were in reasonable agreement. ?? 1987.

  4. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  5. Thiourea-Catalyzed Enantioselective Cyanosilylation of Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Douglas E.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2011-01-01

    The new chiral amino thiourea catalyst 3d promotes the highly enantioselective cyanosilylation of a wide variety of ketones. The hindered tertiary amine substituent plays a crucial role both with regard to stereoinduction and reactivity, suggesting a cooperative mechanism involving electrophile activation by thiourea and nucleophile activation by the amine. PMID:15969569

  6. Thermochemistry and bond dissociation energies of ketones.

    PubMed

    Hudzik, Jason M; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2012-06-14

    Ketones are a major class of organic chemicals and solvents, which contribute to hydrocarbon sources in the atmosphere, and are important intermediates in the oxidation and combustion of hydrocarbons and biofuels. Their stability, thermochemical properties, and chemical kinetics are important to understanding their reaction paths and their role as intermediates in combustion processes and in atmospheric chemistry. In this study, enthalpies (ΔH°(f 298)), entropies (S°(T)), heat capacities (C(p)°(T)), and internal rotor potentials are reported for 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, 2-pentanone, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and 2-methyl-3-pentanone, and their radicals corresponding to loss of hydrogen atoms. A detailed evaluation of the carbon-hydrogen bond dissociation energies (C-H BDEs) is also performed for the parent ketones for the first time. Standard enthalpies of formation and bond energies are calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p), CBS-QB3, and G3MP2B3 levels of theory using isodesmic reactions to minimize calculation errors. Structures, moments of inertia, vibrational frequencies, and internal rotor potentials are calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) density functional level and are used to determine the entropies and heat capacities. The recommended ideal gas-phase ΔH°(f 298), from the average of the CBS-QB3 and G3MP2B3 levels of theory, as well as the calculated values for entropy and heat capacity are shown to compare well with the available experimental data for the parent ketones. Bond energies for primary, secondary, and tertiary radicals are determined; here, we find the C-H BDEs on carbons in the α position to the ketone group decrease significantly with increasing substitution on these α carbons. Group additivity and hydrogen-bond increment values for these ketone radicals are also determined.

  7. A ketone ester diet increases brain malonyl-CoA and Uncoupling proteins 4 and 5 while decreasing food intake in the normal Wistar Rat.

    PubMed

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Pawlosky, Robert; Markis, William; King, M Todd; Bergman, Christian; Srivastava, Shireesh; Murray, Andrew; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L

    2010-08-20

    Three groups of male Wistar rats were pair fed NIH-31 diets for 14 days to which were added 30% of calories as corn starch, palm oil, or R-3-hydroxybutyrate-R-1,3-butanediol monoester (3HB-BD ester). On the 14th day, animal brains were removed by freeze-blowing, and brain metabolites measured. Animals fed the ketone ester diet had elevated mean blood ketone bodies of 3.5 mm and lowered plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin. Despite the decreased plasma leptin, feeding the ketone ester diet ad lib decreased voluntary food intake 2-fold for 6 days while brain malonyl-CoA was increased by about 25% in ketone-fed group but not in the palm oil fed group. Unlike the acute effects of ketone body metabolism in the perfused working heart, there was no increased reduction in brain free mitochondrial [NAD(+)]/[NADH] ratio nor in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis, which was compatible with the observed 1.5-fold increase in brain uncoupling proteins 4 and 5. Feeding ketone ester or palm oil supplemented diets decreased brain L-glutamate by 15-20% and GABA by about 34% supporting the view that fatty acids as well as ketone bodies can be metabolized by the brain.

  8. Understanding the energetic costs of living in saline environments: effects of salinity on basal metabolic rate, body mass and daily energy consumption of a long-distance migratory shorebird.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jorge S; Masero, José A; Abad-Gómez, José M; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M

    2011-03-01

    Many migratory vertebrates typically move between habitats with varying salinities during the annual cycle. These organisms clearly exhibit a remarkable phenotypic flexibility in their 'osmoregulatory machinery', but the metabolic consequences of salinity acclimatization are still not well understood. We investigated the effects of salinity on basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass and daily energy consumption of a long-distance migratory shorebird, the dunlin (Calidris alpina), outside the breeding season. Mass-corrected BMR and daily energy consumption increased significantly by 17 and 20% between freshwater (0.3‰ NaCl) and saltwater (33.0-35.0‰ NaCl), respectively. Body mass in both captive and wild dunlins was lower (9-16%) in saline than in freshwater environments. These changes on BMR and body mass were quickly reversed by returning the birds to freshwater, suggesting that metabolic adjustment to saltwater and metabolic readjustment to freshwater are both processes that occur in a few days. Our findings support empirically that the processes of developing and maintaining an active osmoregulatory machinery are energetically expensive, and they could help to explain diet and/or habitat selection patterns along the flyway. Finally, we discuss whether body mass loss in saltwater may be a strategy to reduce maintenance cost in osmotically stressful conditions such as overwintering in marine habitats, and raise some methodological implications for studies of BMR-related outcomes using captive birds captured in saline environments.

  9. Ketone esters increase brown fat in mice and overcome insulin resistance in other tissues in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Veech, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is classically activated by sympathetic nervous stimulation resulting from exposure to cold. Feeding a high-fat diet also induces development of brown fat, but is decreased by caloric restriction. Blood ketone bodies, which function as alternative energy substrates to glucose, are increased during caloric restriction. Here we discuss the unexpected observation that feeding an ester of ketone bodies to the mouse, which increases blood ketone body concentrations, results in an activation of brown fat. The mechanism of this activation of brown fat is similar to that occurring from cold exposure in that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) levels are increased as are levels of the transcription factor cyclic AMP–responsive element–binding protein, which is also increased by ketone ester feeding. Other effects of feeding ketone esters, in addition to their ability to induce brown fat, are discussed such as their ability to overcome certain aspects of insulin resistance and to ameliorate the accumulation of amyloid and phosphorylated tau protein in brain, and improve cognitive function, in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23909803

  10. Ketone esters increase brown fat in mice and overcome insulin resistance in other tissues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Veech, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is classically activated by sympathetic nervous stimulation resulting from exposure to cold. Feeding a high-fat diet also induces development of brown fat, but is decreased by caloric restriction. Blood ketone bodies, which function as alternative energy substrates to glucose, are increased during caloric restriction. Here we discuss the unexpected observation that feeding an ester of ketone bodies to the mouse, which increases blood ketone body concentrations, results in an activation of brown fat. The mechanism of this activation of brown fat is similar to that occurring from cold exposure in that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) levels are increased as are levels of the transcription factor cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein, which is also increased by ketone ester feeding. Other effects of feeding ketone esters, in addition to their ability to induce brown fat, are discussed such as their ability to overcome certain aspects of insulin resistance and to ameliorate the accumulation of amyloid and phosphorylated tau protein in brain, and improve cognitive function, in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    SciTech Connect

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA; Wackett, LP

    2011-06-28

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high

  12. Energetic and nutritional constraints on infant brain development: implications for brain expansion during human evolution.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Crawford, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    The human brain confronts two major challenges during its development: (i) meeting a very high energy requirement, and (ii) reliably accessing an adequate dietary source of specific brain selective nutrients needed for its structure and function. Implicitly, these energetic and nutritional constraints to normal brain development today would also have been constraints on human brain evolution. The energetic constraint was solved in large measure by the evolution in hominins of a unique and significant layer of body fat on the fetus starting during the third trimester of gestation. By providing fatty acids for ketone production that are needed as brain fuel, this fat layer supports the brain's high energy needs well into childhood. This fat layer also contains an important reserve of the brain selective omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), not available in other primates. Foremost amongst the brain selective minerals are iodine and iron, with zinc, copper and selenium also being important. A shore-based diet, i.e., fish, molluscs, crustaceans, frogs, bird's eggs and aquatic plants, provides the richest known dietary sources of brain selective nutrients. Regular access to these foods by the early hominin lineage that evolved into humans would therefore have helped free the nutritional constraint on primate brain development and function. Inadequate dietary supply of brain selective nutrients still has a deleterious impact on human brain development on a global scale today, demonstrating the brain's ongoing vulnerability. The core of the shore-based paradigm of human brain evolution proposes that sustained access by certain groups of early Homo to freshwater and marine food resources would have helped surmount both the nutritional as well as the energetic constraints on mammalian brain development.

  13. Liver-derived ketone bodies are necessary for food anticipation.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Rohit; Feillet, Céline; Costa, Sara S Fonseca; Delorme, James E; Okabe, Takashi; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs

    2016-02-03

    The circadian system has endowed animals with the ability to anticipate recurring food availability at particular times of day. As daily food anticipation (FA) is independent of the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the central pacemaker of the circadian system, questions arise of where FA signals originate and what role components of the circadian clock might play. Here we show that liver-specific deletion of Per2 in mice abolishes FA, an effect that is rescued by viral overexpression of Per2 in the liver. RNA sequencing indicates that Per2 regulates β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) production to induce FA leading to the conclusion that liver Per2 is important for this process. Unexpectedly, we show that FA originates in the liver and not in the brain. However, manifestation of FA involves processing of the liver-derived βOHB signal in the brain, indicating that the food-entrainable oscillator is not located in a single tissue but is of systemic nature.

  14. Rhodium-catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of α-Dehydroamino Ketones: A General Approach to Chiral α-amino Ketones.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenchao; Wang, Qingli; Xie, Yun; Lv, Hui; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-01-01

    Rhodium/DuanPhos-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of aliphatic α-dehydroamino ketones has been achieved and afforded chiral α-amino ketones in high yields and excellent enantioselectives (up to 99 % ee), which could be reduced further to chiral β-amino alcohols by LiAlH(tBuO)3 with good yields. This protocol provides a readily accessible route for the synthesis of chiral α-amino ketones and chiral β-amino alcohols.

  15. Analysis of the energetic metabolism in cyclic Bedouin goats (Capra hircus): Nychthemeral and seasonal variations of some haematochemical parameters in relation with body and ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Malek, Mouna; Amirat, Zaina; Khammar, Farida; Khaldoun, Mounira

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have examined changes in some haematochemical parameters as a function of the different physiological status (cyclic, pregnant and lactating) of goats, but no relevant literature has exhaustively investigated these variations from anestrous to estrous stages in cyclic goats. In this paper, we report nychthemeral and seasonal variations in ambient and body temperatures, and in some haematochemical parameters (glycemia, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, creatininemia and uremia) measured during summer, winter and spring, in seven (7) experimental cyclic female Bedouin goats (Capra hircus) living in the Béni-Abbès region (Algerian Sahara desert). Cosinor rhythmometry procedure was used to determine the rhythmic parameters of ambient temperature and haematochemical parameters. To determine the effect of time of day on the rhythmicity of the studied parameters, as well as their seasonality, repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. The results showed that in spite of the nychthemeral profile presented by the ambient temperature for each season, the body temperature remained in a narrow range, thus indicating a successful thermoregulation. The rhythmometry analysis showed a circadian rhythmicity of ambient temperature and haematochemical parameters with diurnal acrophases. A statistically significant effect of the time of day was shown on all studied haematochemical parameters, except on creatininemia. It was also found that only uremia, cholesterolemia and triglyceridemia followed the seasonal sexual activity of the studied ruminant. This study demonstrated the good physiological adaptation developed by this breed in response to the harsh climatic conditions of its natural environment.

  16. 27 CFR 21.118 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 21.118 Section 21.118 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....118 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Acidity (as acetic acid). 0.02 percent by weight, maximum. (b)...

  17. One-Step Conversion of Methyl Ketones to Acyl Chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Florencio

    2015-10-16

    Treatment of aromatic and heteroaromatic methyl ketones with sulfur monochloride and catalytic amounts of pyridine in refluxing chlorobenzene leads to the formation of acyl chlorides. Both electron-rich and electron-poor aryl methyl ketones can be used as starting materials. The resulting C1-byproduct depends on the precise reaction conditions chosen.

  18. Deaminative and decarboxylative catalytic alkylation of amino acids with ketones.

    PubMed

    Kalutharage, Nishantha; Yi, Chae S

    2013-12-16

    It cuts two ways: The cationic [Ru-H] complex catalyzes selective coupling of α- and β-amino acids with ketones to form α-alkylated ketone products. The reaction involves CC and CN bond cleavage which result in regio- and stereoselective alkylation using amino acids. A broad substrate scope and high functional-group tolerance is demonstrated.

  19. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ETHYL KETONE (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, "Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)". The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Database....

  1. Production of methyl-vinyl ketone from levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A.; West; Ryan M.

    2011-06-14

    A method for converting levulinic acid to methyl vinyl ketone is described. The method includes the steps of reacting an aqueous solution of levulinic acid, over an acid catalyst, at a temperature of from room temperature to about 1100 K. Methyl vinyl ketone is thereby formed.

  2. 27 CFR 21.118 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 21.118 Section 21.118 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....118 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Acidity (as acetic acid). 0.02 percent by weight, maximum. (b)...

  3. Anticonvulsant properties of an oral ketone ester in a pentylenetetrazole-model of seizure.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Andrea; Pilla, Raffaele; Arnold, Patrick; Monda, Marcellino; D'Agostino, Dominic; Coppola, Giangennaro

    2015-08-27

    The ketogenic diet is known to have an anti-epileptic effect; in fact it is currently used to treat drug resistant epilepsies. The efficacy of this diet is thought to be correlated to the elevation of blood ketone bodies. Because of problems with compliance to this diet, there is an interest in evaluating alternative pharmacological treatments that can have anti-seizure effects by elevating ketone bodies. In the present experiment, an orally administered synthetic ketone ester (R,S - 1,3-butanediol acetoacetate diester, or BD-AcAc2) was evaluated for its anti-seizure efficacy in a rat model. The threshold for seizure induction with progressive intravenous infusion of pentylenetrazole (PTZ) was evaluated in anesthetized Wistar rats two hours after a single 1 ml intragastric administration of BD-AcAc2 (i.e. 4 g/kg b.w., treated group) or water (control group). After correction for the dose of anesthetic, the results showed that the administration of BD-AcAc2 induced an elevation of the PTZ threshold (140 ± 11 mg/kg for the treated group, 122 ± 6 mg/kg for the control group), along with an increased level of blood β-hydroxybutyrate (2.7 ± 0.3mM for the treated group, 1.4 ± 0.1mM for the control group). This result suggests that ketone esters may pave the road towards the establishment of a "ketogenic diet in a pill".

  4. A sulfonated poly (aryl ether ether ketone ketone) isomer: synthesis and DMFC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Liu, Baijun; Hu, Wei; Jiang, Zhenhua; Robertson, Gilles; Guiver, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A sulfonated poly(aryl ether ether ketone ketone) (PEEKK) having a well-defined rigid homopolymer-like chemical structure was synthesized from a readily-prepared PEEKK post-sulfonation with concentrated sulfuric acid at room temperature within several hours. The polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) cast from the resulting polymer exhibited an excellent combination of thermal resistance, oxidative and dimensional stability, low methanol fuel permeability and high proton conductivity. Furthermore, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were successfully fabricated and good direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance was observed. At 2 M MeOH feed, the current density at 0.5 V reached 165 mA/cm, which outperformed our reported analogues and eveluated Nafion membranes.

  5. Intermittent trickling bed filter for the removal of methyl ethyl ketone and methyl isobutyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Farnazo, Danvir Mark C; Nisola, Grace M; Han, Mideok; Yoo, Namjong; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2012-05-01

    Biodegradations of methyl ethyl ketone and methyl isobutyl ketone were performed in intermittent biotrickling filter beds (ITBF) operated at two different trickling periods: 12 h/day (ITBF-12) and 30 min/day (ITBF-0.5). Ralstonia sp. MG1 was able to degrade both ketones as evidenced by growth kinetic experiments. Results show that trickling period is an important parameter to achieve high removal performance and to maintain the robustness of Ralstonia sp. MG1. Overall, ITBF-12 outperformed ITBF-0.5 regardless of the target compound. ITBF-12 had high performance recovery at various inlet gas concentrations. The higher carbon dioxide production rates in ITBF-12 suggest higher microbial activity than in ITBF-0.5. Additionally, lower concentrations of absorbed volatile organic compound (VOC) in trickling solutions of ITBF-12 systems also indicate VOC removal through biodegradation. Pressure drop levels in ITBF-12 were relatively higher than in ITBF-0.5 systems, which can be attributed to the decrease in packed bed porosity as Ralstonia sp. MG1 grew well in ITBF-12. Nonetheless, the obtained pressure drop levels did not have any adverse effect on the performance of ITBF-12. Biokinetic constants were also obtained which indicated that ITBF-12 performed better than ITBF-0.5 and other conventional biotrickling filter systems.

  6. Engineering of Bacterial Methyl Ketone Synthesis for Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Ee-Been; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered Escherichia coli to overproduce saturated and monounsaturated aliphatic methyl ketones in the C11 to C15 (diesel) range; this group of methyl ketones includes 2-undecanone and 2-tridecanone, which are of importance to the flavor and fragrance industry and also have favorable cetane numbers (as we report here). We describe specific improvements that resulted in a 700-fold enhancement in methyl ketone titer relative to that of a fatty acid-overproducing E. coli strain, including the following: (i) overproduction of β-ketoacyl coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters achieved by modification of the β-oxidation pathway (specifically, overexpression of a heterologous acyl-CoA oxidase and native FadB and chromosomal deletion of fadA) and (ii) overexpression of a native thioesterase (FadM). FadM was previously associated with oleic acid degradation, not methyl ketone synthesis, but outperformed a recently identified methyl ketone synthase (Solanum habrochaites MKS2 [ShMKS2], a thioesterase from wild tomato) in β-ketoacyl-CoA-overproducing strains tested. Whole-genome transcriptional (microarray) studies led to the discovery that FadM is a valuable catalyst for enhancing methyl ketone production. The use of a two-phase system with decane enhanced methyl ketone production by 4- to 7-fold in addition to increases from genetic modifications. PMID:22038610

  7. Engineering of bacterial methyl ketone synthesis for biofuels.

    PubMed

    Goh, Ee-Been; Baidoo, Edward E K; Keasling, Jay D; Beller, Harry R

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered Escherichia coli to overproduce saturated and monounsaturated aliphatic methyl ketones in the C₁₁ to C₁₅ (diesel) range; this group of methyl ketones includes 2-undecanone and 2-tridecanone, which are of importance to the flavor and fragrance industry and also have favorable cetane numbers (as we report here). We describe specific improvements that resulted in a 700-fold enhancement in methyl ketone titer relative to that of a fatty acid-overproducing E. coli strain, including the following: (i) overproduction of β-ketoacyl coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters achieved by modification of the β-oxidation pathway (specifically, overexpression of a heterologous acyl-CoA oxidase and native FadB and chromosomal deletion of fadA) and (ii) overexpression of a native thioesterase (FadM). FadM was previously associated with oleic acid degradation, not methyl ketone synthesis, but outperformed a recently identified methyl ketone synthase (Solanum habrochaites MKS2 [ShMKS2], a thioesterase from wild tomato) in β-ketoacyl-CoA-overproducing strains tested. Whole-genome transcriptional (microarray) studies led to the discovery that FadM is a valuable catalyst for enhancing methyl ketone production. The use of a two-phase system with decane enhanced methyl ketone production by 4- to 7-fold in addition to increases from genetic modifications.

  8. Substrate-controlled Michael additions of chiral ketones to enones.

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, Mireia; Gómez-Palomino, Alejandro; Pellicena, Miquel; Reina, Daniel F; Romea, Pedro; Urpí, Fèlix; Font-Bardia, Mercè

    2014-12-05

    Substrate-controlled Michael additions of the titanium(IV) enolate of lactate-derived ketone 1 to acyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones in the presence of a Lewis acid (TiCl4 or SnCl4) provide the corresponding 2,4-anti-4,5-anti dicarbonyl compounds in good yields and excellent diastereomeric ratios. Likely, the nucleophilic species involved in such additions are bimetallic enolates that may add to enones through cyclic transition states. Finally, further studies indicate that a structurally related β-benzyloxy chiral ketone can also participate in such stereocontrolled conjugate additions.

  9. Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Péter

    Energetic particles recorded in the Earth environment and in interplanetary space have a multitude of origins, i.e. acceleration and propagation histories. At early days practically all sufficiently energetic particles were considered to have come either from solar flares or from interstellar space. Later on, co-rotating interplanetary shocks, the termination shock of the supersonic solar wind, planetary bow shocks and magnetospheres, and also coronal mass ejections (CME) were recognized as energetic particle sources. It was also recognized that less energetic (suprathermal) particles of solar origin and pick-up ions have also a vital role in giving rise to energetic particles in interplanetary disturbances. The meaning of the term "solar energetic particles" (SEP) is now somewhat vague, but essentially it refers to particles produced in disturbances fairly directly related to solar processes. Variation of intensity fluctuations with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to extremes of time variation, i.e. to very quiet periods and to large events. While quiet-time fluxes are expected to shed light on some basic coronal processes, large events dominate the fluctuation characteristics of cumulated fluence, and the change of that fluctuation with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle may also provide important clues. Mainly ISEE-3 and long-term IMP-8 data will be invoked. Energetic and suprathermal particles that may never escape into interplanetary space may play an important part in heating the corona of the sun.

  10. Chapter 4: Measuring Energetics of Biological Processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of the energetics of biological processes is the key component in understanding the thermodynamic responses of homoeothermic animals to the environment. For these animals to achieve body temperature control, they must adapt to thermal-environmental conditions and variations caused by wea...

  11. Estimating Instantaneous Energetic Cost During Gait Adaptation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-31

    Energetic cost, in this context, refers to the input energy required to 23   power the cellular processes underlying the body’s movement. This energy is...entering the body is allowed to reach equilibrium with the rate at which cellular 57   processes are consuming it. By averaging over minutes of data

  12. Enantioselective rhodium(I)-catalyzed hydrogenation of trifluoromethyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Y; Sakamaki, Y; Iseki, K

    2001-02-08

    [figure: see text] The asymmetric hydrogenation of trifluoromethyl ketones to yield chiral alpha-trifluoromethyl alcohols with enantiomeric excesses up to 98% was achieved in the presence of chiral rhodium-(amidephosphine-phosphinite) complexes.

  13. Bleaching of kraft plus using dioxiranes: Structural effect of ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Wearing, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    Recent developments in totally chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching of kraft pulps have led to a new finding showing that dimethyldioxirane (DMD), formed by reaction of peroxymonosulphate with acetone, is a very effective and selective bleaching agent. Because of the high volatility of acetone, careful design and special equipment are needed for the DMD bleaching process in order to meet operational safety, health and emission control requirements. Other ketones are considered as alternatives to acetone for dioxirane bleaching; however, the use of alternative ketones exhibits different responses in bleaching compared to acetone. This paper examines the bleaching performance of a number of selected ketones in light of different chemical structures and properties of the ketones as well as bleaching variables.

  14. Inhibition of serine proteases by peptidyl fluoromethyl ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Imperiali, B.; Abeles, R.H.

    1986-07-01

    Peptidyl fluoromethyl ketones that are specific inhibitors of the serine proteases ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin and porcine pancreatic elastase were synthesized. By analogy with the corresponding aldehydes it is assumed that the fluoromethyl ketones react with the ..gamma..-OH group of the active site serine to form a stable hemiacetal. /sup 19/F NMR studies of the chymotrypsin-bound trifluoromethyl ketone inhibitors Ac-Leu-ambo-Phe-CF/sub 3//sup 1/ and Ac-ambo-Phe-CF/sub 3/ clearly indicate that the carbonyl carbon is tetrahedral at the active site of the enzyme. The inhibitor is bound as either the stable hydrat or the hemiacetal, involving the active site serine. The effect of varying the number of amino acid residues in the peptidyl portion of the inhibitor and the number of fluorines in the fluoromethyl ketone moiety is examined. In the series of trifluoromethyl ketone elastase inhibitors, the lowering of K/sub i/ concomitant with the change from a dipeptide analogue to a tetrapeptide analogue correlates well with the variation in V/K for hydrolysis of the corresponding amide substrates. This trend is indicative of the inhibitors acting as transition-state analogues. In addition to chain length, the number of fluorine substituents also affects the K/sub i/. In the case of chymotrypsin, the K/sub i/ for Ac-Leu-ambo-Phe-CF/sub 3/ is 30-fold lower than that for Ac-Leu-ambo-Phe-CF/sub 2/H. With elastase this trend is not as profound. In all cases, however, the difluoro- and trifluoromethyl ketones are better inhibitors than the monofluoromethyl and nonfluorinated analogues. This improvement must be associated with both the degree of hydration of the fluoromethyl ketones and the significant effect that fluorine substitution has on lowering the first pK/sub a/ of the hemiacetal hydroxyl. The monofluoromethyl ketone inhibitor of chymotrypsin, Ac-Leu-ambo-Phe-CFH/sub 2/, is a weak competitive inhibitor.

  15. Rotational Spectroscopy of Methyl Vinyl Ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Motiyenko, R. A.; Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.

    2015-06-01

    Methyl vinyl ketone, MVK, along with previously studied by our team methacrolein, is a major oxidation product of isoprene, which is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. In this talk we present the analysis of the rotational spectrum of MVK recorded at room temperature in the 50 -- 650 GHz region using the Lille spectrometer. The spectroscopic characterization of MVK ground state will be useful in the detailed analysis of high resolution infrared spectra. Our study is supported by high level quantum chemical calculations to model the structure of the two stable s-trans and s-cis conformers and to obtain the harmonic force field parameters, internal rotation barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. In the Doppler-limited spectra the splittings due to the internal rotation of methyl group are resolved, therefore for analysis of this molecule we used the Rho-Axis-Method Hamiltonian and RAM36 code to fit the rotational transitions. At the present time the ground state of two conformers is analyzed. Also we intend to study some low lying excited states. The analysis is in progress and the latest results will be presented. Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged.

  16. Research in Energetic Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    2,2-dinitro-l,3- propanediol in base functioning as an in-situ source of dinitromethane, would give 3,3,5,5-tetrafluoro-4,4- dinitropimelic acid. The...3-chloro-3,3-difluoropropionate were also studied. However, 2,2-d initro- 1,3- propanediol (A-Diol) failed to give stable adducts, possibly because it...deformylated 2-fluoro-2-nitro- I ,3- propanediol reacted with 2-chloro-2,2-difluoroethyl isopropyl ketone to give the corresponding difunctional adduct 2,14

  17. The partitioning of ketones between the gas and aqueous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Eric A.

    Most ketones are not significantly hydrated; they therefore retain their chromophore and they could be photolytically degraded in solution yielding a variety of products including carboxylic acids, aldehydes and radicals. It is difficult to accurately model the partitioning of ketones between the gas phase and aqueous phase because of the lack suitable estimates of the Henry's Law constants; consequently the fate and environmental effects of ketones cannot be confidently predicted. Here we report the experimental determination of the Henry's Law constants of a series of ketones that has yielded a simple straight line equation to predict the Henry's Law constants of simple aliphatic ketones: log H ∗ =0.23Σσ ∗ + 1.51; where H ∗ is the effective Henry's Law constant (M atm -1, and Σσ ∗ is the Taft polar substituents constants. The results for 25°C are (M atm -1) CH 3COCH 3, 32; C 6H 5COCH 3, 110; CH 2ClCOCH 3, 59; CH 3COCOCH 3, 74; CF 3COCH 3, 138. Acetophenone appears to have an abnormally high H ∗. Most low molecular weight aliphatic ketones are predicted to characterized by H ∗⩾30 M atm -1 and therefore they are expected to be found in the aqueous phase at concentrations of ⩾5 - 0.5 μM (given a typical gas-phase concentration range of 1-10 ppbv). The expected rate of decomposition of ketones due to photolysis in hydrometers is briefly discussed.

  18. Cookoff of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.; Schmitt, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    An overview of cookoff modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented aimed at assessing the violence of reaction following cookoff of confined energetic materials. During cookoff, the response of energetic materials is known to involve coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical processes which induce thermal damage to the energetic material prior to the onset of ignition. These damaged states enhance shock sensitivity and lead to conditions favoring self-supported accelerated combustion. Thus, the level of violence depends on the competition between pressure buildup and stress release due to the loss of confinement. To model these complex processes, finite element-based analysis capabilities are being developed which can resolve coupled heat transfer with chemistry, quasi-static structural mechanics and dynamic response. Numerical simulations that assess the level of violence demonstrate the importance of determining material damage in pre- and post-ignition cookoff events.

  19. Stereoselective Reduction of Prochiral Ketones by Plant and Microbial Biocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Javidnia, K.; Faghih-Mirzaei, E.; Miri, R.; Attarroshan, M.; Zomorodian, K.

    2016-01-01

    Chiral alcohols are the key chiral building blocks to many enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals. The biocatalytic approach in asymmetric reduction of corresponding prochiral ketones to the preparation of these optically pure substances is one of the most promising routes. The stereoselective reduction of different kinds of prochiral ketones catalyzed by various plants and microorganisms was studied in this work. Benzyl acetoacetate, methyl 3-oxopentanoate, ethyl 3-oxopentanoate, and ethyl butyryl acetate were chosen as the model substrates for β-ketoesters. Benzoyl acetonitrile, 3-chloro propiophenone, and 1-acetyl naphthalene were chosen as aromatic aliphatic ketones. Finally, 2-methyl benzophenone and 4-chloro benzophenone were selected as diaryl ketones. Plant catalysis was conducted by Daucus carota, Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea, Pastinaca sativa, and Raphnus sativus. For microbial catalysis, Aspergillus foetidus, Penicillum citrinum, Saccharomyces carlbergensis, Pichia fermentans, and Rhodotrula glutinis were chosen. Chiral alcohols were obtained in high yields and with optical purity. A superiority in the microorganisms' performance in the bioreduction of prochiral ketones was detected. Among microorganisms, Rhodotrula glutinis showed remarkable results with nearly all substrates and is proposed for future studies. PMID:27168684

  20. INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-03-01

    A method and apparatus for initiating and sustaining an energetic gas arc discharge are described. A hollow cathode and a hollow anode are provided. By regulating the rate of gas flow into the interior of the cathode, the arc discharge is caused to run from the inner surface of the cathode with the result that adequate space-charge neutralization is provided inside the cathode but not in the main arc volume. Thus, the gas fed to the cathode is substantially completely ionized before it leaves the cathode, with the result that an energetic arc discharge can be maintained at lower operating pressures.

  1. Nanostructured Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    for the nanoenergetic composites prepared using mesoporous Fe2O3 gel, nanoparticles of WO3, MoO3, Bi2O3 , and CuO mixed with Al-nanoparticles and...used in the energetic composite. For example, in the energetic reactions of the composites containing Fe2O3, WO3, MoO3, Bi2O3 , and CuO, combined...MA), WO3 (Aldrich, WI), MoO3 and Bi2O3 (Accumet Materials, NY) and nanoparticles of Al (avg. size 80 nm with 2 nm passivation layer from

  2. A practical catalytic asymmetric addition of alkyl groups to ketones.

    PubMed

    García, Celina; LaRochelle, Lynne K; Walsh, Patrick J

    2002-09-18

    Many catalysts will promote the asymmetric addition of alkylzinc reagents to aldehydes. In contrast, there are no reports of additions to ketones that are both general and highly enantioselective. We describe herein a practical catalytic asymmetric addition of ethyl groups to ketones. The catalyst is derived from reaction of camphor sulfonyl chloride and trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane. The resulting diketone is reduced with NaBH4 to give the C2-symmetric exo diastereomer. Use of this ligand with titanium tetraisopropoxide and dialkylzinc at room temperature results in enantioselective addition of the alkyl group to the ketone. The resulting tertiary alcohols are isolated with high enantiomeric excess (all cases give greater than 87% ee, except one). The reaction has been run with 37 mmol (5 g) 3-methylacetophenone and 2 mol % catalyst to afford 73% yield of the resulting tertiary alcohol with 99% ee.

  3. Synthesis and Applications of iso-Hajos–Parrish Ketones**

    PubMed Central

    Eagan, James M.; Hori, Masahiro; Wu, Jianbin; Kanyiva, Kyalo Stephen; Snyder, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous natural products possess ring systems and functionality for which “iso-Hajos–Parrish” ketones would be of value, such building blocks have not been exploited to the same degree as the more typical Hajos–Parrish hydrindane. Herein we outline an efficient three-step synthesis of such materials fueled by a simple method for the rapid preparation of highly functionalized cyclopentenones, several of which are new chemical entities that would be challenging to access through other approaches. We then show how one iso-Hajos–Parrish ketone can be converted into two distinct natural product analogs as well as one natural product. As one indication of the value of these new building blocks, that latter target was obtained in 10 steps, having previously been accessed in 18 steps using the Hajos–Parrish ketone. PMID:25974879

  4. Catalytic Intramolecular Ketone Alkylation with Olefins by Dual Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee Nam; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-12-07

    Two complementary methods for catalytic intramolecular ketone alkylation reactions with unactivated olefins, resulting in Conia-ene-type reactions, are reported. The transformations are enabled by dual activation of both the ketone and the olefin and are atom-economical as stoichiometric oxidants or reductants are not required. Assisted by Kool's aniline catalyst, the reaction conditions can be both pH- and redox-neutral. A broad range of functional groups are thus tolerated. Whereas the rhodium catalysts are effective for the formation of five-membered rings, a ruthenium-based system that affords the six-membered ring products was also developed.

  5. Chromium(II)-catalyzed enantioselective arylation of ketones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Sun, Shutao; Mao, Ying; Xie, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    The chromium-catalyzed enantioselective addition of carbo halides to carbonyl compounds is an important transformation in organic synthesis. However, the corresponding catalytic enantioselective arylation of ketones has not been reported to date. Herein, we report the first Cr-catalyzed enantioselective addition of aryl halides to both arylaliphatic and aliphatic ketones with high enantioselectivity in an intramolecular version, providing facile access to enantiopure tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ols and 2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-ols containing a tertiary alcohol. PMID:28144349

  6. Induced axial chirality in biocatalytic asymmetric ketone reduction.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; Roiban, Gheorghe-Doru; Reetz, Manfred T

    2013-02-06

    Catalytic asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones of type 4-alkylidene cyclohexanone with formation of the corresponding axially chiral R-configurated alcohols (up to 99% ee) was achieved using alcohol dehydrogenases, whereas chiral transition-metal catalysts fail. Reversal of enantioselectivity proved to be possible by directed evolution based on saturation mutagenesis (up to 98% ee (S)). Utilization of ketone with a vinyl bromide moiety allows respective R- and S-alcohols to be exploited as key compounds in Pd-catalyzed cascade reactions.

  7. Benchtop Energetics Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario

    2011-06-01

    We have constructed an apparatus for investigating the reactive chemical dynamics of mg-scale energetic materials samples. We seek to advance the understanding of the reaction kinetics of energetic materials, and of the chemical influences on energetic materials sensitivity. We employ direct laser irradiation, and indirect laser-driven shock, techniques to initiate thin-film explosive samples contained in a high-vacuum chamber. Expansion of the reacting flow into vacuum quenches the chemistry and preserves reaction intermediates for interrogation via time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). By rastering the sample coupon through the fixed laser beam focus, we generate hundreds of repetitive energetic events in a few minutes. A detonation wave passing through an organic explosive, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN, C5H4N4O12) , is remarkably efficient in converting the solid explosive into final thermodynamically-stable gaseous products (e . g . N2, CO2, H2O...). Termination of a detonation at an explosive-to-vacuum interface produces an expanding pulse of hyperthermal molecular species, with leading-edge velocities ~10 km/s. In contrast, deflagration (subsonic combustion) of PETN in vacuum produces mostly reaction intermediates, such as NO and NO2, with much slower molecular velocities; consistent with expansion-quenched thermal decomposition of PETN. We propose to exploit these differences in product chemical identities and molecular species velocities to provide a chemically-based diagnostic for distinguishing between detonation and deflagration events. In this talk we also report recent progress towards the quantitative detection of hyperthermal neutral species produced by direct laser ablation of aluminum metal and of organic energetic materials, as a step towards demonstrating the ability to discriminate slow reaction intermediates from fast thermodynamically-stable final products. Work done in collaboration with Emily Fossum, Christopher Molek, and

  8. Mitochondrial Energetics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Fan, Weiwei; Procaccio, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a wide range of degenerative and metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. All these clinical manifestations arise from the central role of bioenergetics in cell biology. Although genetic therapies are maturing as the rules of bioenergetic genetics are clarified, metabolic therapies have been ineffectual. This failure results from our limited appreciation of the role of bioenergetics as the interface between the environment and the cell. A systems approach, which, ironically, was first successfully applied over 80 years ago with the introduction of the ketogenic diet, is required. Analysis of the many ways that a shift from carbohydrate glycolytic metabolism to fatty acid and ketone oxidative metabolism may modulate metabolism, signal transduction pathways, and the epigenome gives us an appreciation of the ketogenic diet and the potential for bioenergetic therapeutics. PMID:20078222

  9. Nano Engineered Energetic Materials (NEEM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-12

    REPORT Nano Engineered Energetic Materials (NEEM) 14 . ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The ARO Nano Engineered Energetic Materials (NEEM) MURI...PROPELLANTS EXPLOSIVES PYROTECHNICS 34, 5, 385-393, 2009. 14 . Sabourin, JL; Yetter, RA; Parimi, S, Exploring the Effects of High Surface Area Metal...Energetic Materials, Aberdeen, MD, June 2010, "Fundamental Processes and Properties of Insensitive Energetic Materials". 14 . UIUC group (Dlott

  10. A One-Pot Synthesis of 2-Aminopyrimidines from Ketones, Arylacetylenes, and Guanidine.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elena Yu; Tatarinova, Inna V; Protsuk, Nadezhda I; Ushakov, Igor' A; Trofimov, Boris A

    2017-01-06

    The three-component reaction of ketones, arylacetylenes, and guanidine catalyzed by the KOBu(t)/DMSO system leads to 2-aminopyrimidines in up to 80% yield. Depending on structure of the starting ketones, the aromatization of intermediate dihydropyrimidines occurs either with loss of hydrogen molecules or methylbenzenes. The latter process takes place in the ketones, in which one of the substituents is not a methyl group. The reaction conditions are tolerable for dialkyl-, aryl(hetaryl) alkyl-, and cycloalkyl ketones.

  11. Synthesis of Macrocyclic Ketones through Catalyst-Free Electrophilic Halogen-Mediated Semipinacol Rearrangement: Application to the Total Synthesis of (±)-Muscone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Yeung, Ying-Yeung

    2017-03-17

    A series of macrocycles were successfully prepared using electrophilic halogen-mediated semipinacol rearrangement under mild conditions. Although the expansion from small ring to medium ring is an energetically unfavorable process, the electrophilic halogenation was found to be powerful enough to override such an energy barrier. The rearranged products could further undergo Dowd-Beckwith rearrangement to give the corresponding one-carbon ring-expanded ketones. This approach has been applied to the total synthesis of the natural product (±)-muscone, which is widely used in modern perfumery and medicines, in a two-step sequence.

  12. Diversity-oriented synthesis of chromenes via metal-free domino reactions from ketones and phenols.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei-Jian; Li, Qi; Gao, Fang-fang; Zhu, Yan-ping; Wang, Jun-gang; Zhang, Wei; Wu, An-Xin

    2012-08-13

    Functionalized chromenes have been synthesized via highly selective metal-free domino reactions from ketones and phenols. 2H-Chromenes, 4H-chromenes, spiran and benzocyclopentane can be respectively prepared starting from the corresponding cyclic ketones, aryl methyl ketones, acetone, and 3-pentanone.

  13. Crystal morphology and phase identifications in poly(aryl ether ketones)s and their copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, R.M.; Cheng, S.Z.D.; Hsiao, B.S.

    1995-12-01

    A series of poly(aryl ether ketone ketone)s prepared from diphenyl ether (DPE) and terephthalic acid M or isophthalic acid (T) have been investigated. PEKK(T) has been reported to exhibit two polymorphism (form I and form II) based on wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and electron diffraction (ED) experiments.

  14. Organocatalytic enantioselective indole alkylations of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Du, Wei; Yue, Lei; Li, Rui; Wu, Yong; Ding, Li-Sheng; Chen, Ying-Chun

    2007-03-07

    The C3-selective enantioselective Michael-type Friedel-Crafts alkylations of indoles with nonchelating alpha,beta-unsaturated alkyl ketones, catalysed by a chiral primary amine derived from natural cinchonine, were investigated. The reactions, in the presence of 30 mol% catalyst, were smoothly conducted at 0 to -20 degrees C. Moderate to good ee (47-89%) has been achieved.

  15. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a) Acidity (as acetic acid). 0.02 percent by weight, maximum. (b) Color... should come over below 111 °C. and none above 117 °C. (d) Odor. Characteristic odor. (e) Specific...

  16. Photoreactivity of. cap alpha. -fluorinated phenyl alkyl ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, P.J.; Thomas, M.J.; Puchalski, A.E.

    1986-11-26

    The photoreactivities of the mono-, di-, and tri-..cap alpha..-fluorinated acetophenones have been compared to that of acetophenone itself. All four ketones have similar triplet excitation energies; the three fluorinated ketones have reduction potentials 0.5-0.7 eV lower than that of acetophenone. Triplet reactivity toward alkylbenzenes keeps increasing with fluorine substitution, since the rate-determining step becomes charge-transfer complexation as the ketone reduction potential decreases. The primary/tertiary C-H selectivity toward p-cymene increases with the number of fluorines. Triplet reactivity toward cyclopentane also is increased by fluorination but peaks at two fluorines, since the lowest triplet switches from n,..pi..* to ..pi..,..pi..* with two or three fluorines and ..pi..,..pi..* triplets are unreactive in simple hydrogen atom abstraction. In contrast, ..cap alpha..-fluorination of valerophenone does not significantly increase the rate of triplet ..gamma..-hydrogen abstraction. The inductive effect on reactivity apparently is offset by a conformational effect. The ..cap alpha..-fluorinated phenones give predominantly cyclobutanols instead of Norrish type II elimination. ..cap alpha..-Fluoroacetophenone forms predominantly acetophenone and HF when irradiated with 2-propanol, in what appears to be a short chain process involving electron transfer to ketone followed by fluoride ion loss. Finally, the radical coupling products in these reactions are formed in varying yields, depending on solvent and additives.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  18. Chiral Ketone and Iminium Catalysts for Olefin Epoxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, O. Andrea; Shi, Yian

    Organo-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation has received much attention in the past 30 years and significant progress has been made for various types of olefins. This review will cover the advancement made in the field of chiral ketone and chiral iminium salt-catalyzed epoxidations.

  19. Ketonization of Cuphea oil for the production of 2-undecanone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the viability of the cross ketonization reaction with the triacylglycerol from Cuphea sp. and acetic acid in a fixed-bed plug-flow reactor. The seed oil from Cuphea sp. contains up to 71% decanoic acid and the reaction of this fatty acid residue with ac...

  20. Polymorphism in Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    2008 NRL REVIEW 71 Polymorphism in Energetic Materials J.R. Deschamps,1 D.A. Parrish,1 and R.J. Butcher2 1Laboratory for Structure of Matter...can lead to substantial alterations in stability and performance. The authors recently reported on the crystal structures of five polymorphs of picryl...cally distinct forms. Since the properties of a solid sub- stance are determined by its composition and structure , polymorphs, although chemically

  1. Synthesis of Energetic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    1 ) ................... 2 2 GPC of Polyformal of Decafluorodiol ( 2 ) .......................... 4 3 GPC of Polyformal of...turn: ( 1 ) synthesis of energetic monomers and polymers, and ( 2 ) synthesis of polycyclic and adamantoid nitramines. Both tasks were continuations of...preparation of 2,2,3,3,4,4-hexafluoropentane-l,lidiol polyformal (FPF- 1 ) by the 2 step sequence shown below was reported. " HOCH2 (CF2 )3CH20H + (CH20) 3

  2. Mammalian energetics. Instantaneous energetics of puma kills reveal advantage of felid sneak attacks.

    PubMed

    Williams, Terrie M; Wolfe, Lisa; Davis, Tracy; Kendall, Traci; Richter, Beau; Wang, Yiwei; Bryce, Caleb; Elkaim, Gabriel Hugh; Wilmers, Christopher C

    2014-10-03

    Pumas (Puma concolor) live in diverse, often rugged, complex habitats. The energy they expend for hunting must account for this complexity but is difficult to measure for this and other large, cryptic carnivores. We developed and deployed a physiological SMART (species movement, acceleration, and radio tracking) collar that used accelerometry to continuously monitor energetics, movements, and behavior of free-ranging pumas. This felid species displayed marked individuality in predatory activities, ranging from low-cost sit-and-wait behaviors to constant movements with energetic costs averaging 2.3 times those predicted for running mammals. Pumas reduce these costs by remaining cryptic and precisely matching maximum pouncing force (overall dynamic body acceleration = 5.3 to 16.1g) to prey size. Such instantaneous energetics help to explain why most felids stalk and pounce, and their analysis represents a powerful approach for accurately forecasting resource demands required for survival by large, mobile predators.

  3. Energetic component treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Gildea, P.D.; Brandon, S.L.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-11-01

    The effectiveness of three environmentally sound processes for small energetic component disposal was examined experimentally in this study. The three destruction methods, batch reactor supercritical water oxidation, sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff were selected based on their potential for producing a clean solid residue and minimum release of toxic gases after component detonation. The explosive hazard was destroyed by all three processes. Batch supercritical water oxidation destroyed both the energetics and organics. Further development is desired to optimize process parameters. Sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff results indicated the potential for scrubbing gaseous detonation products. Further study and testing are needed to quantify the effectiveness of these later two processes for full-scale munition destruction. The preliminary experiments completed in this study have demonstrated the promise of these three processes as environmentally sound technologies for energetic component destruction. Continuation of these experimental programs is strongly recommended to optimize batch supercritical water oxidation processing, and to fully develop the sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff technologies.

  4. Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) are less sensitive to the odor of aliphatic ketones than to the odor of other classes of aliphatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Moa; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Aliphatic ketones are widely present in body-borne and food odors of primates. Therefore, we used an operant conditioning paradigm and determined olfactory detection thresholds in four spider monkeys for a homologous series of aliphatic 2-ketones (2-butanone to 2-nonanone) and two of their isomers (3- and 4-heptanone). We found that, with the exception of the two shortest-chained ketones, all animals detected concentrations <1 ppm (parts per million), and with five odorants individual animals even reached threshold values <0.1 ppm. Further, we found a significant correlation between olfactory sensitivity of the spider monkeys and carbon chain length of the 2-ketones which can best be described as a U-shaped function. In contrast, no significant correlation was found between olfactory sensitivity and position of the functional carbonyl group. Across-odorant and across-species comparisons revealed the following: spider monkeys are significantly less sensitive to the odors of aliphatic ketones than to the odor of other classes of aliphatic compounds (1-alcohols, n-aldehydes, n-acetic esters, and n-carboxylic acids) sharing the same carbon length. Spider monkeys do not differ significantly in their olfactory sensitivity for aliphatic ketones from squirrel monkeys and pigtail macaques, but are significantly less sensitive to these odorants compared to human subjects and mice. These findings support the notion that neuroanatomical and genetic properties do not allow for reliable predictions with regard to a species' olfactory sensitivity. Further, we conclude that the frequency of occurrence of a class of odorants in a species' chemical environment does not allow for reliable predictions of the species' olfactory sensitivity.

  5. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1989-02-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. The energetic basis of acoustic communication.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Ophir, Alexander G

    2010-05-07

    Animals produce a tremendous diversity of sounds for communication to perform life's basic functions, from courtship and parental care to defence and foraging. Explaining this diversity in sound production is important for understanding the ecology, evolution and behaviour of species. Here, we present a theory of acoustic communication that shows that much of the heterogeneity in animal vocal signals can be explained based on the energetic constraints of sound production. The models presented here yield quantitative predictions on key features of acoustic signals, including the frequency, power and duration of signals. Predictions are supported with data from nearly 500 diverse species (e.g. insects, fishes, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals). These results indicate that, for all species, acoustic communication is primarily controlled by individual metabolism such that call features vary predictably with body size and temperature. These results also provide insights regarding the common energetic and neuromuscular constraints on sound production, and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of producing these sounds.

  7. Low-temperature combustion chemistry of novel biofuels: resonance-stabilized QOOH in the oxidation of diethyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Adam M; Welz, Oliver; Zádor, Judit; Osborn, David L; Taatjes, Craig A

    2014-07-14

    The Cl˙ initiated oxidation reactions of diethyl ketone (DEK; 3-pentanone; (CH3CH2)2C=O), 2,2,4,4-d4-diethyl ketone (d4-DEK; (CH3CD2)2C=O) and 1,1,1,5,5,5-d6-diethyl ketone (d6-DEK; (CD3CH2)2C=O) are studied at 8 Torr and 550-650 K using Cl2 as a source for the pulsed-photolytic generation of Cl˙. Products are monitored as a function of reaction time, mass, and photoionization energy using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron radiation. Adding a large excess of O2 to the reacting flow allows determination of products resulting from oxidation of the initial primary (Rp) and secondary (Rs) radicals formed via the Cl˙ + DEK reaction. Because of resonance stabilization, the secondary DEK radical (3-oxopentan-2-yl) reaction with O2 has a shallow alkyl peroxy radical (RsO2) well and no energetically low-lying product channels. This leads to preferential back dissociation of RsO2 and a greater likelihood of consumption of Rs by competing radical-radical reactions. On the other hand, reaction of the primary DEK radical (3-oxopentan-1-yl) with O2 has several accessible bimolecular product channels. Vinyl ethyl ketone is observed from HO2-elimination from the DEK alkylperoxy radicals, and small-molecule products are identified from β-scission reactions and decomposition reactions of oxy radical secondary products. Although channels yielding OH + 3-, 4-, 5- and 6-membered ring cyclic ether products are possible in the oxidation of DEK, at the conditions of this study (8 Torr, 550-650 K) only the 5-membered ring, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran-3-one, is observed in significant quantities. Computation of relevant stationary points on the potential energy surfaces for the reactions of Rp and Rs with O2 indicates this cyclic ether is formed via a resonance-stabilized hydroperoxyalkyl radical (QOOH) intermediate, formed from isomerization of the RpO2 radical.

  8. Energetics of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandra Navrotsky; Brian Woodfield; Juliana Boerio-Goates; Frances Hellman

    2005-01-28

    This project, "Energetics of Nanomaterials," represents a three-year collaboration among Alexandra Navrotsky (UC Davis), Brian Woodfield and Juliana Boerio-Goates (BYU), and Frances Hellman (UC Berkeley). It's purpose has been to explore the differences between bulk materials, nanoparticles, and thin films in term of their thermodynamic properties, with an emphasis on heat capaacities and entropies, as well as enthalpies. the three groups have brought very different expertise and capabilities to the project. Navrotsky is a solid-state chemist and geochemist, with a unique Thermochemistry Facility emphasizing enthalpy of formation measurements by high temperature oxide melt and room temperatue acid solution calorimetry. Boerio-Goates and Woodfield are calorimetry. Hellman is a physicist with expertise in magnetism and heat capacity measurements using microscale "detector on a chip" calorimetric technology that she pioneered. The overarching question of our work is "How does the free energy play out in nanoparticles?", or "How do differences in free energy affect overall nanoparticle behavior?" Because the free energy represents the temperature-dependent balance between the enthalpy of a system and its entropy, there are two separate, but related, components to the experimental investigations: Solution calorimetric measurements provide the energetics and two types of heat capacity measurements the entropy. We use materials that are well characterized in other ways (structurally, magnetically, and chemically), and samples are shared across the collaboration.

  9. Photoreduction and ketone-sensitized reduction of alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Görner, Helmut; Miskolczy, Zsombor; Megyesi, Mónika; Biczók, László

    2011-01-01

    The photoprocesses of berberine, palmatine, coralyne, sanguinarine, flavopereirine and ellipticine were studied in several solvents. The quantum yields Φ(Δ) of singlet molecular oxygen formation of berberine, palmatine and sanguinarine are moderate in dichloromethane (0.2-0.6) and much smaller in acetonitrile or trifluoroethanol. For the other alkaloids examined, Φ(Δ) is rather independent of solvent polarity. The direct and ketone-sensitized photolysis, using steady-state irradiation at 313 nm or 248/308 nm laser pulses, was studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Thereby, radicals were observed yielding eventually dihydro derivatives as major products, which are thermally back-converted on admission of oxygen. The quantum yield of conversion of alkaloids to dihydroalkaloids is enhanced in the presence of triethylamine. The reaction in the presence of ketones and electron or H-atom donors has a quantum yield of close to unity.

  10. A constitutive model of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK).

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Ou, Hengan; Lu, Bin; Long, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A modified Johnson-Cook (JC) model was proposed to describe the flow behaviour of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) with the consideration of coupled effects of strain, strain rate and temperature. As compared to traditional JC model, the modified one has better ability to predict the flow behaviour at elevated temperature conditions. In particular, the yield stress was found to be inversely proportional to temperature from the predictions of the proposed model.

  11. Thiomethylation of ketones by sulphide-alkaline solutions and formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Ulendeyeva, A.D.; Samigullin, I.I.; Nasteka, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    An investigation has been made of the thiomethylation of ketones by formaldehyde with mercaptides, sodium sulphide and their mixture. It is possible to regenerate 78-100 rel.% of the sulphide-alkaline solutions under mild conditions (20-50{degrees}C, atmospheric pressure) without feeding a catalyst, with the simultaneous production of ketosulphide concentrate - a less toxic product with properties of practical benefit. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Chiral N-phosphonyl imine chemistry: asymmetric synthesis of alpha-alkyl beta-amino ketones by reacting phosphonyl imines with ketone-derived enolates.

    PubMed

    Ai, Teng; Han, Jianlin; Chen, Zhong-Xiu; Li, Guigen

    2009-02-01

    A series of new chiral syn-alpha-branched beta-amino ketones has been synthesized by reacting chiral phosphonyl imines with ketone-derived enolates. The N-protection group on imine auxiliary was found to be crucial to the asymmetric induction. The absolute stereochemistry has been unambiguously determined by converting a product to a known sample.

  13. Energetic consequences of being a Homo erectus female.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Leslie C; Key, Cathy

    2002-01-01

    Body size is one of the most important characteristics of any animal because it affects a range of behavioral, ecological, and physiological traits including energy requirements, choice of food, reproductive strategies, predation risk, range size, and locomotor style. This article focuses on the implications of being large bodied for Homo erectus females, estimated to have been over 50% heavier than average australopithecine females. The energy requirements of these hominins are modeled using data on activity patterns, body mass, and life history from living primates. Particular attention is given to the inferred energetic costs of reproduction for Homo erectus females based on chimpanzee and human reproductive scheduling. Daily energy requirements during gestation and lactation would have been significantly higher for Homo erectus females, as would total energetic cost per offspring if the australopithecines and Homo erectus had similar reproductive schedules (gestation and lactation lengths and interbirth intervals). Shortening the interbirth interval could considerably reduce the costs per offspring to Homo erectus and have the added advantage of increasing reproductive output. The mother would, however, incur additional daily costs of caring for the dependent offspring. If Homo erectus females adopted this reproductive strategy, it would necessarily imply a revolution in the way in which females obtained and utilized energy to support their increased energetic requirements. This transformation is likely to have occurred on several levels involving cooperative economic division of labor, locomotor energetics, menopause, organ size, and other physiological mechanisms for reducing the energetic load on females.

  14. New energetic epoxy binders

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S.R.; Amanulla, S.

    1996-07-01

    A new class of epoxy resins having N{single_bond}N bonds in the backbone has been synthesized with a view to explore their properties as energetic binders. The N-epoxidation of bis-dicarbonylhydrazones of adipic, azelaic and sebacic dihydrazides results in the formation of viscous resins having epoxide end groups. The resins have been characterized by the elemental and end group analyses, IR and NMR spectra. Relevant properties for their use as binders in solid propellants, such as thermal stability, heat of combustion, burn rate and performance parameters of AP-based propellant systems, have been evaluated. A significant increase in the burn rate of AP-based propellants noticed, is perhaps related to the exothermicity of the binder decomposition and the reactivity of N{single_bond}N bonds with perchloric acid formed during the combustion of AP.

  15. Energetics of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, Frances

    2004-12-13

    This project, ''Energetics of Nanomaterials'', represents a three-year collaboration among Alexandra Navrotsky (University of California at Davis), Brian Woodfield and Juliana Boerio-Goates (Brigham Young University) and Frances Hellman (University of California at San Diego). Its purpose has been to explore the differences between bulk materials, nanoparticles, and thin films in terms of their thermodynamic properties, with an emphasis on heat capacities and entropies, as well as enthalpies. We used our combined experimental techniques to address the following questions: How does energy and entropy depend on particle size and crystal structure? Do entropic differences have their origins in changes in vibrational densities of states or configurational (including surface configuration) effects? Do material preparation and sample geometry, i.e., nanoparticles versus thin films, change these quantities? How do the thermodynamics of magnetic and structural transitions change in nanoparticles and thin films? Are different crystal structures stabilized for a given composition at the nanoscale, and are the responsible factors energetic, entropic, or both? How do adsorption energies (for water and other gases) depend on particle size and crystal structure in the nanoregime? What are the energetics of formation and strain energies in artificially layered thin films? Do the differing structures of grain boundaries in films and nanocomposites alter the energetics of nanoscale materials? Of the several directions we first proposed, we initially concentrated on a few systems: TiO(sub 2), CoO, and CoO-MgO. In these systems, we were able to clearly identify particle size-dependent effects on energy and vibrational entropy, and to separate out the effect of particle size and water content on the enthalpy of formation of the various TiO(sub 2) polymorphs. With CoO, we were able to directly compare nanoparticle films and bulk materials; this comparison is important because films can

  16. Utilization of FEP energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Abbassi, P.; Afifi, F.; Khandhar, P. K.; Ono, D. Y.; Chen, W. E. W.

    1987-01-01

    The research and development work on Fountain Effect Pump Systems (FEP systems) has been of interest in the competition between mechanical pumps for He II and FEP units. The latter do not have moving parts. In the course of the work, the energetics have been addressed using one part of a simple four-changes-of-state cycle. One option is the FEP ideal change of state at constant chemical potential (mu). The other option is the two-state sequence mu-P with a d mu=0 state change followed by an isobar. Questions of pump behavior, of flow rate response to temperature difference at the hot end, and related questions of thermodynamic cycle completion and heat transfer have been addressed. Porous media data obtained elucidate differences between vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) and Zero Net Mass Transfer (ZNMF).

  17. Enantioselective Pd-catalyzed allylation of acyclic α-fluorinated ketones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wengui; Shen, Haiming; Wan, Xiao-Long; Chen, Qing-Yun; Guo, Yong

    2014-07-03

    Significant synthetic challenges remain for the asymmetric synthesis of tertiary α-fluoro ketones, which are potentially useful molecules for the development of drugs, agrochemicals, and functional materials. Herein, we describe the development of a method for the catalytic enantioselective synthesis of tertiary α-fluoro ketones via the Tsuji-Trost reaction of racemic acyclic α-fluorinated ketones. Enantioenriched acyclic α-cabonyl tertiary fluorides can be produced with the aid of a palladium/phosphinooxazoline catalyst.

  18. Regio- and Stereoselective Modification of Chiral α-Amino Ketones by Pd-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Huwig, Kai; Schultz, Katharina; Kazmaier, Uli

    2015-07-27

    Chiral α-amino ketones are excellent nucleophiles for stereoselective palladium-catalyzed allylic alkylations. Both chiral as well as achiral allylic substrates can be applied, while the stereochemical outcome of the reaction is controlled by the chiral ketone enolate. The substituted amino ketones formed can be reduced stereoselectively, and up to five consecutive stereogenic centers can be obtained. This approach can be used for the synthesis of highly substituted piperidine derivatives.

  19. Rhodium-Catalyzed Ketone Methylation Using Methanol Under Mild Conditions: Formation of α-Branched Products**

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Louis K M; Poole, Darren L; Shen, Di; Healy, Mark P; Donohoe, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed methylation of ketones has been accomplished using methanol as the methylating agent and the hydrogen-borrowing method. The sequence is notable for the relatively low temperatures that are required and for the ability of the reaction system to form α-branched products with ease. Doubly alkylated ketones can be prepared from methyl ketones and two different alcohols by using a sequential one-pot iridium- and rhodium-catalyzed process. PMID:24288297

  20. Electrical initiation of an energetic nanolaminate film

    DOEpatents

    Tringe, Joseph W.; Gash, Alexander E.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2010-03-30

    A heating apparatus comprising an energetic nanolaminate film that produces heat when initiated, a power source that provides an electric current, and a control that initiates the energetic nanolaminate film by directing the electric current to the energetic nanolaminate film and joule heating the energetic nanolaminate film to an initiation temperature. Also a method of heating comprising providing an energetic nanolaminate film that produces heat when initiated, and initiating the energetic nanolaminate film by directing an electric current to the energetic nanolaminate film and joule heating the energetic nanolaminate film to an initiation temperature.

  1. Palladium-catalysed mono-α-alkenylation of ketones with alkenyl tosylates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Fu, Wai Chung; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Choy, Pui Ying; Kwong, Fuk Yee; Lei, Aiwen

    2017-01-16

    The first example of palladium-catalysed selective mono-α-alkenylation of ketones with alkenyl tosylates is described. In the presence of a Pd/XPhos catalyst system (0.1-1.0 mol%), the reaction provides mono-α-alkenylated ketones in good yields and exhibits excellent substrate tolerance. Highly congested, tri- and tetra-substituted alkenyl tosylates react smoothly and even problematic heteroaryl and aliphatic ketones are applicable substrates. Notably, small β,γ-unsaturated ketones are successfully prepared using acetone as a simple three-carbon feedstock.

  2. [Pollution Characteristics of Aldehydes and Ketones Compounds in the Exhaust of Beijing Typical Restaurants].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-chen; Cui, Tong; He, Wan-qing; Nie, Lei; Wang, Jun-ling; Pan, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Aldehydes and ketones compounds, as one of the components in the exhaust of restaurants, are a class of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with strong chemical reactivity. However, there is no systematic study on aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of restaurants. To further clarify the food source emission levels of aldehydes and ketones compounds and controlling measures, to access city group catering VOCs emissions control decision-making basis, this study selected 8 Beijing restaurants with different types. The aldehydes and ketones compounds were sampled using DNPH-silica tube, and then ultra performance liquid chromatography was used for quantitative measurement. The aldehydes and ketones concentrations of reference volume condition from 8 restaurants in descending order were Roasted Duck restaurant, Chinese Style Barbecue, Home Dishes, Western Fast-food, School Canteen, Chinese Style Fast-food, Sichuan Cuisine, Huaiyang Cuisine. The results showed that the range of aldehydes and ketones compounds (C1-C9) concentrations of reference volume condition in the exhaust of restaurants was 115.47-1035.99 microg x m(-3). The composition of aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of sampled restaurants was obviously different. The percentages of C1-C3 were above 40% in the exhaust from Chinese style restaurants. Fast food might emit more C4-C9 aldehydes and ketones compounds. From the current situation of existing aldehydes and ketones compounds control, the removal efficiency of high voltage electrostatic purifiers widely used in Beijing is limited.

  3. Stereoselective synthesis of cyclohexanones via phase transfer catalyzed double addition of nucleophiles to divinyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Silvanus, Andrew C; Groombridge, Benjamin J; Andrews, Benjamin I; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Carbery, David R

    2010-11-05

    Functionalized cyclohexanones are formed in excellent yield and diastereoselectivity from a phase transfer catalyzed double addition of active methylene pronucleophiles to nonsymmetrical divinyl ketones.

  4. Stab Sensitivity of Energetic Nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A; Barbee, T; Cervantes, O

    2006-05-22

    This work details the stab ignition, small-scale safety, and energy release characteristics of bimetallic Al/Ni(V) and Al/Monel energetic nanolaminate freestanding thin films. The influence of the engineered nanostructural features of the energetic multilayers is correlated with both stab initiation and small-scale energetic materials testing results. Structural parameters of the energetic thin films found to be important include the bi-layer period, total thickness of the film, and presence or absence of aluminum coating layers. In general the most sensitive nanolaminates were those that were relatively thick, possessed fine bi-layer periods, and were not coated. Energetic nanolaminates were tested for their stab sensitivity as freestanding continuous parts and as coarse powders. The stab sensitivity of mock M55 detonators loaded with energetic nanolaminate was found to depend strongly upon both the particle size of the material and the configuration of nanolaminate material, in the detonator cup. In these instances stab ignition was observed with input energies as low as 5 mJ for a coarse powder with an average particle dimension of 400 {micro}m. Selected experiments indicate that the reacting nanolaminate can be used to ignite other energetic materials such as sol-gel nanostructured thermite, and conventional thermite that was either coated onto the multilayer substrate or pressed on it. These results demonstrate that energetic nanolaminates can be tuned to have precise and controlled ignition thresholds and can initiate other energetic materials and therefore are viable candidates as lead-free impact initiated igniters or detonators.

  5. ENERGETICS, EPIGENETICS, MITOCHONDRIAL GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Fan, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The epigenome has been hypothesized to provide the interface between the environment and the nuclear DNA (nDNA) genes. Key factors in the environment are the availability of calories and demands on the organism’s energetic capacity. Energy is funneled through glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the cellular bioenergetic systems. Since there are thousands of bioenergetic genes dispersed across the chromosomes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), both cis and trans regulation of the nDNA genes is required. The bioenergetic systems convert environmental calories into ATP, acetyl-Coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM), and reduced NAD+. When calories are abundant, ATP and acetyl-CoA phosphorylate and acetylate chromatin, opening the nDNA for transcription and replication. When calories are limiting, chromatin phosphorylation and acetylation are lost and gene expression is suppressed. DNA methylaton via SAM can also be modulated by mitochondrial function. Phosphorylation and acetylation are also pivotal to regulating cellular signal transduction pathways. Therefore, bioenergetics provides the interface between the environment and the epigenome. Consistent with this conclusion, the clinical phenotypes of bioenergetic diseases are strikingly similar to those observed in epigenetic diseases (Angelman, Rett, Fragile X Syndromes, the laminopathies, cancer, etc.), and an increasing number of epigenetic diseases are being associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. This bioenergetic-epigenomic hypothesis has broad implications for the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of a wide range of common diseases. PMID:19796712

  6. "Energetics of Nanomaterials"

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Alexandra Navrotsky

    2005-01-31

    This project represents a three-year collaboration among Alexandra Navrotsky, Brian Woodfield, Juliana Bocrio-Goates and Frances Hellman. It's purpose has been to explore the differences between bulk materials, nanoparticles, and thin films in terms of their thermodynamic properties, with an emphasis on heat capacities and entropies, as well as enthalpies. The three groups have brought very different expertise and capabilities to the project. Navrotsky is a solid-state chemist and geochemist, with a unique Thermochemistry Facility emphasizing enthalpy of formation measurements by high temperature oxide melt and room temperature acid solution calorimetry. Bocrio-Goates and Woodfield are physical chemists with unique capabilities in accurate cryogenic heat capacity measurements using adiabatic calorimetry. Hellman is a physicist with expertise in magnetism and heat capacity measurements using microscale ''detector on a chip'' calorimetric technology that she pioneered. The overarching question of the work is ''How does the free energy play out in nanoparticles''? or ''How do differences in free energy affect overall nanoparticle behavior''? Because the free energy represents the temperature-dependent balance between the enthalpy of a system and its entropy, there are two separate, but related, components to the experimental investigations: Solution calorimetric measurements provide the energetics and two types of heat capacity measurements the entropy. They use materials that are well characterized in other ways (structurally, magnetically, and chemically), and samples are shared across the collaboration.

  7. Effects of trifluoromethyl ketones on the motility of Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wolfart, Krisztina; Molnar, Annamaria; Kawase, Masami; Motohashi, Noboru; Molnar, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, we showed the inhibition of motility by trifluoromethyl ketone (TF) derivatives (1-8) in Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris) cultures. Among them, 1-(2-benzoxazoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanone (1) showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on the motility of P. vulgaris than other TF compounds at 10% MIC. Our results suggest the possibility of an inhibitory action of TF compounds on the proton motive forces by affecting the action of biological motor and proton efflux in the membranes, resulting in a reduction of the ratio of running and the increased number of tumbling and non-motile cells.

  8. Method for forming energetic nanopowders

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Kien-Yin; Asay, Blaine W.; Kennedy, James E.

    2013-10-15

    A method for the preparation of neat energetic powders, having nanometer dimensions, is described herein. For these neat powder, a solution of a chosen energetic material is prepared in an aprotic solvent and later combined with liquid hexane that is miscible with such solvent. The energetic material chosen is less soluble in the liquid hexane than in the aprotic solvent and the liquid hexane is cooled to a temperature that is below that of the solvent solution. In order to form a precipitate of said neat powders, the solvent solution is rapidly combined with the liquid hexane. When the resulting precipitate is collected, it may be dried and filtered to yield an energetic nanopowder material.

  9. Voyager 2 Observes Energetic Electrons

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Voyager 2 observations of energetic electrons. Voyager 2 detected a dramatic drop of the flux of electrons as it left the sector region. The intense flux came back as soon ...

  10. Photodecomposition of energetic nitro compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mialocq, J.C.

    1989-03-14

    The photodecomposition of energetic nitrocompounds depends on the excitation energy, the light intensity which determines the mono-, bi- or multiphotonic character of the initial process and their gaseous, liquid or solid state. The initial processes of the photodecomposition of nitromethane and nitroalcanes are reviewed and their relevance to the initiation of energetic nitrocompounds detonation is discussed. The case of nitramines (dimethylnitramine and tutorial) is also briefly introduced.

  11. Design of Energetic Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-12

    effectiveness of the FMO method in both providing accurate results and reducing computational requirements, timings were performed for the ionic liquid ...Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Design of Energetic Ionic Liquids 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Design of Energetic Ionic Liquids challenge project is to address several key technical issues and challenges associated with the characterization

  12. Solar Energetic Particle Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    2003-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic-particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In fact, the highest proton intensities directly measured near Earth at energies up to approximately 1 GeV occur at the time of passage of shocks, which arrive about a day after the CMEs leave the Sun. CME-driven shocks expanding across magnetic fields can fill over half of the heliosphere with SEPs. Proton-generated Alfven waves trap particles near the shock for efficient acceleration but also throttle the intensities at Earth to the streaming limit early in the events. At high energies, particles begin to leak from the shock and the spectrum rolls downward to form an energy-spectral 'knee' that can vary in energy from approximately 1 MeV to approximately 1 GeV in different events. All of these factors affect the radiation dose as a function of depth and latitude in the Earth's atmosphere and the risk to astronauts and equipment in space. SEP ionization of the polar atmosphere produces nitrates that precipitate to become trapped in the polar ice. Observations of nitrate deposits in ice cores reveal individual large SEP events and extend back approximately 400 years. Unlike sunspots, SEP events follow the approximately 80-100-year Gleissberg cycle rather faithfully and are now at a minimum in that cycle. The largest SEP event in the last 400 years appears to be related to the flare observed by Carrington in 1859, but the probability of SEP events with such large fluences falls off sharply because of the streaming limit.

  13. Synthesis, conformational parameters and packing considerations of methyl bispyridyl ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weck, Christian; Katzsch, Felix; Gruber, Tobias

    2015-10-01

    The crystal structures of two bispyridyl ketones featuring either two methyl residues or one methyl and one bromomethyl residue, respectively, are presented. In order to elucidate the influence of the substituents, a comprehensive comparison with the non-methylated mother compound has been performed. A special focus lies thereby on the relative position of the heteroatoms and their free electron pairs. The two methyl groups at the bispyridyl ketone result in two molecules in the asymmetric unit adopting rather different conformations. Due to the fast crystallization conditions and a melting point differing from the literature, a polymorph close to a local minimum in the energy hypersurface seems possible. After introducing a bromine atom to one of the two methyl groups, the molecular conformation is very similar to the unsubstituted molecule. The packing of both title compounds is dominated by weak contacts of the C-H⋯π and C-H⋯Y type (Y = O, N) and C-H⋯Br- and Br⋯π-contacts for the brominated molecule.

  14. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions.

  15. Characterization of synthetic routes to 'Bromo-DragonFLY' and benzodifuranyl isopropylamine homologues utilizing ketone intermediates. Part 1: synthesis of ketone precursors.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Richard E; Keating, John J

    2014-01-01

    Bromo-DragonFLY (BDF) and many of its analogues are misused as recreational drugs due to their potency as psychoactive substances. To date, none of the published routes to these designer amphetamines have exploited a ketone intermediate. It is well known that benzyl methyl ketone (BMK) can be employed as a precursor in the synthesis of amphetamine. Similarly, it is reasonable to assume that ketone precursors may potentially be utilized in the clandestine synthesis of BDF and its homologues. This paper describes the multifaceted synthesis of novel precursor ketones structurally related to BDF, namely benzodifuranyl propanone 16, its tetrahydrobenzodifuranyl homologue 8, and their brominated analogues 12 and 20. Their characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13) C-NMR), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS) is also described.

  16. Enantioselective Reduction of Ketones and Imines Catalyzed by (CN-Box)Re(V)-Oxo Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nolin, Kristine A.; Ahn, Richard W.; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    The development and application of chiral, non-racemic Re(V)-oxo complexes to the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones is described. In addition to the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones, we report the application of these complexes to (1) a tandem Meyer-Schuster rearrangement/reduction to access enantioenriched allylic alcohols and (2) the enantioselective reduction of imines. PMID:20623567

  17. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. Organocatalytic C3-selective Friedel-Crafts alkylations of indoles with alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Ping; Guo, Ying-Cen; Ding, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2006-02-21

    The use of an equimolar amount of pyrrolidine and HClO4 (30 mol%) was found to be effective in promoting the conjugate addition of indoles to (E)-alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones, affording the corresponding beta-indolyl ketones in excellent yields.

  4. Beyond ketonization: selective conversion of carboxylic acids to olefins over balanced Lewis acid-base pairs.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Rebecca A L; Sun, Junming; Martin, Kevin J; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-04-11

    We report the direct conversion of mixed carboxylic acids to C-C olefins with up to 60 mol% carbon yield through cascade (cross) ketonization, (cross) aldolization and self-deoxygenation reactions. Co-feeding hydrogen provides an additional ketone hydrogenation/dehydration pathway to a wider range of olefins.

  5. Ketones Prevent Oxidative Impairment of Hippocampal Synaptic Integrity through KATP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Young; Abdelwahab, Mohammed G.; Lee, Soo Han; O’Neill, Derek; Thompson, Roger J.; Duff, Henry J.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Rho, Jong M.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and metabolic therapies are increasingly being considered for a variety of neurological disorders, based in part on growing evidence for the neuroprotective properties of the ketogenic diet (KD) and ketones. Earlier, we demonstrated that ketones afford hippocampal synaptic protection against exogenous oxidative stress, but the mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that ketones may modulate neuronal firing through interactions with ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Here, we used a combination of electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical assays to determine whether hippocampal synaptic protection by ketones is a consequence of KATP channel activation. Ketones dose-dependently reversed oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity, neuronal viability, and bioenergetic capacity, and this action was mirrored by the KATP channel activator diazoxide. Inhibition of KATP channels reversed ketone-evoked hippocampal protection, and genetic ablation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel subunit Kir6.2, a critical component of KATP channels, partially negated the synaptic protection afforded by ketones. This partial protection was completely reversed by co-application of the KATP blocker, 5-hydoxydecanoate (5HD). We conclude that, under conditions of oxidative injury, ketones induce synaptic protection in part through activation of KATP channels. PMID:25848768

  6. Ketones prevent oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity through KATP channels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Young; Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Lee, Soo Han; O'Neill, Derek; Thompson, Roger J; Duff, Henry J; Sullivan, Patrick G; Rho, Jong M

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and metabolic therapies are increasingly being considered for a variety of neurological disorders, based in part on growing evidence for the neuroprotective properties of the ketogenic diet (KD) and ketones. Earlier, we demonstrated that ketones afford hippocampal synaptic protection against exogenous oxidative stress, but the mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that ketones may modulate neuronal firing through interactions with ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Here, we used a combination of electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical assays to determine whether hippocampal synaptic protection by ketones is a consequence of KATP channel activation. Ketones dose-dependently reversed oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity, neuronal viability, and bioenergetic capacity, and this action was mirrored by the KATP channel activator diazoxide. Inhibition of KATP channels reversed ketone-evoked hippocampal protection, and genetic ablation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel subunit Kir6.2, a critical component of KATP channels, partially negated the synaptic protection afforded by ketones. This partial protection was completely reversed by co-application of the KATP blocker, 5-hydoxydecanoate (5HD). We conclude that, under conditions of oxidative injury, ketones induce synaptic protection in part through activation of KATP channels.

  7. Further research on the biological activities and the safety of raspberry ketone are needed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry ketone supplements have grabbed consumer attention with the possibility they might help burn fat and aid weight loss. While raspberry ketone occurs naturally, and is found in raspberry fruit, most is synthetically produced for use in commercial products as flavorings, fragrances, or dietar...

  8. Raspberry Ketone Trifluoroacetate, a new attractant for the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt))

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni, Q-fly) is a major agricultural pest in eastern Australia. The deployment of male lures comprises an important component of several control and detection strategies for this pest. A novel fluorinated analog of raspberry ketone, raspberry ketone trifluoroac...

  9. The Energetics of Gravity Driven Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, L.

    2007-12-01

    Faulting can result from either of two different mechanisms. These involve fundamentally different energetics. In displacement-bounded faulting, locked-in elastic strain energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone. Elastic rebound is an example of displacement-bounded faulting. In force-driven faulting, the forces that create the stress on the fault supply work or energy to the faulting process. Half of this energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and half goes into an increase in locked-in elastic strain. In displacement-bounded faulting the locked-in elastic strain drives slip on the fault. In force-driven faulting it stops slip on the fault. Tectonic stress is reasonably attributed to gravity acting on topography and the Earth's lateral density variations. This includes the thermal convection that ultimately drives plate tectonics. The gravity collapse seismic mechanism assumes the fault fails and slips in direct response to the gravitational tectonic stress. Gravity collapse is an example of force-driven faulting. In the simplest case, energy that is released from the gravitational potential of the topography and internal stress-causing density variations is equally split between the seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and the increase in locked-in elastic strain. The release of gravitational potential energy requires a change in the Earth's density distribution. Gravitational body forces are solely dependent on density so a change in the density distribution requires a change in the body forces. This implies the existence of volumetric body-force displacements. The volumetric body-force displacements are in addition to displacements generated by slip on the fault. They must exist if gravity participates in the energetics of the faulting process. From the perspective of gravitational tectonics, the gravity collapse mechanism is direct and simple. The related mechanics are a little more

  10. Ketones and lactate "fuel" tumor growth and metastasis: Evidence that epithelial cancer cells use oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pavlides, Stephanos; Pestell, Richard G; Chiavarina, Barbara; Frank, Philippe G; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Previously, we proposed a new model for understanding the "Warburg effect" in tumor metabolism. In this scheme, cancer-associated fibroblasts undergo aerobic glycolysis and the resulting energy-rich metabolites are then transferred to epithelial cancer cells, where they enter the TCA cycle, resulting in high ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation. We have termed this new paradigm "The Reverse Warburg Effect." Here, we directly evaluate whether the end-products of aerobic glycolysis (3-hydroxy-butyrate and L-lactate) can stimulate tumor growth and metastasis, using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts as a model system. More specifically, we show that administration of 3-hydroxy-butyrate (a ketone body) increases tumor growth by ∼2.5-fold, without any measurable increases in tumor vascularization/angiogenesis. Both 3-hydroxy-butyrate and L-lactate functioned as chemo-attractants, stimulating the migration of epithelial cancer cells. Although L-lactate did not increase primary tumor growth, it stimulated the formation of lung metastases by ∼10-fold. Thus, we conclude that ketones and lactate fuel tumor growth and metastasis, providing functional evidence to support the "Reverse Warburg Effect". Moreover, we discuss the possibility that it may be unwise to use lactate-containing i.v. solutions (such as Lactated Ringer's or Hartmann's solution) in cancer patients, given the dramatic metastasis-promoting properties of L-lactate. Also, we provide evidence for the up-regulation of oxidative mitochondrial metabolism and the TCA cycle in human breast cancer cells in vivo, via an informatics analysis of the existing raw transcriptional profiles of epithelial breast cancer cells and adjacent stromal cells. Lastly, our findings may explain why diabetic patients have an increased incidence of cancer, due to increased ketone production, and a tendency towards autophagy/mitophagy in their adipose tissue.

  11. Degradation characteristics of methyl ethyl ketone by Pseudomonas sp. KT-3 in liquid culture and biofilter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Jaisoo; Kim, Min-Joo; Ryu, Hee Wook; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2006-04-01

    With ketone pollution forming an ever-growing problem, it is important to identify a ketone-degrading microorganism and establish its effect. Here, a methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. KT-3, was isolated and its MEK degradation characteristics were examined in liquid cultures and a polyurethane-packed biofilter. In liquid cultures, strain KT-3 could degrade other ketone solvents, including diethyl ketone (DK), methyl propyl ketone (MPK), methyl isopropyl ketone (MIPK), methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), methyl butyl ketone (MBK) and methyl isoamyl ketone (MIAK). The maximum specific growth rate (mumax) of the isolate was 0.136 h(-1) in MEK medium supplemented with MEK as a sole carbon source, and kinetically, the maximum removal rate (Vm) and saturation constant (Km) for MEK were 12.28 mM g(-1)DCW h(-1) (DCW: dry cell weight) and 1.64 mM, respectively. MEK biodegradation by KT-3 was suppressed by the addition of MIBK or acetone, but not by toluene. In the tested biofilter, KT-3 exhibited a>90% removal efficiency for MEK inlet concentrations of around 500 ppmv at a space velocity (SV) of 150 h(-1). The elimination capacity of MEK was more influenced by SV than by the inlet concentration. Kinetic analysis showed that the maximum MEK removal rate (Vm) was 690 g m(-3) h(-1) and the saturation constant (Km) was 490 ppmv. Collectively, these results indicate the polyurethane sequencing batch biofilter with Pseudomonas sp. KT-3 will provide an excellent performance in the removal of gaseous MEK.

  12. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from γ-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and γ-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/γ-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona.

  13. DMF Dimethyl Acetal as Carbon Source for α-Methylation of Ketones: A Hydrogenation-Hydrogenolysis Strategy of Enaminones.

    PubMed

    Borah, Ashwini; Goswami, Limi; Neog, Kashmiri; Gogoi, Pranjal

    2015-05-01

    A novel heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation-hydrogenolysis strategy has been developed for the α-methylation of ketones via enaminones using DMF dimethyl acetal as carbon source. This strategy provides a very convenient route to α-methylated ketones using a variety of ketones without any base or oxidant.

  14. Thionation of some alpha,beta-unsaturated steroidal ketones.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Natalija M; Bjelaković, Mira S; Dabović, Milan M; Pavlović, Vladimir D

    2010-05-12

    The reactions of selected alpha,beta-unsaturated steroidal ketones with Lawesson's reagent (LR) in CH(2)Cl(2) and toluene under the standard reaction conditions and with a combination of phosphorus pentasulfide with hexamethyldisiloxane (P(4)S(10)/HMDO) in 1,2-dichlorobenzene (ODCB) under microwave irradiation were investigated and for this purpose several cholestane, androstane and pregnane carbonyl derivatives were chosen. Depending on the reagent and the solvent, 19 new sulfur containing compounds, including dithiones 4c and 4d, alpha,beta-unsaturated 3-thiones 3a-e, dimer-sulfides 2a-e, 1,2,4-trithiolanes 5a-e and phosphonotrithioates 6b-e were synthesized. All newly prepared compounds were characterized by IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis.

  15. Synthesis of ketones from biomass-derived feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Hou, Minqiang; Liu, Huizhen; Song, Jinliang; Han, Buxing

    2017-01-01

    Cyclohexanone and its derivatives are very important chemicals, which are currently produced mainly by oxidation of cyclohexane or alkylcyclohexane, hydrogenation of phenols, and alkylation of cyclohexanone. Here we report that bromide salt-modified Pd/C in H2O/CH2Cl2 can efficiently catalyse the transformation of aromatic ethers, which can be derived from biomass, to cyclohexanone and its derivatives via hydrogenation and hydrolysis processes. The yield of cyclohexanone from anisole can reach 96%, and the yields of cyclohexanone derivatives produced from the aromatic ethers, which can be extracted from plants or derived from lignin, are also satisfactory. Detailed study shows that the Pd, bromide salt and H2O/CH2Cl2 work cooperatively to promote the desired reaction and inhibit the side reaction. Thus high yields of desired products can be obtained. This work opens the way for production of ketones from aromatic ethers that can be derived from biomass.

  16. Synthesis of ketones from biomass-derived feedstock

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinglei; Hou, Minqiang; Liu, Huizhen; Song, Jinliang; Han, Buxing

    2017-01-01

    Cyclohexanone and its derivatives are very important chemicals, which are currently produced mainly by oxidation of cyclohexane or alkylcyclohexane, hydrogenation of phenols, and alkylation of cyclohexanone. Here we report that bromide salt-modified Pd/C in H2O/CH2Cl2 can efficiently catalyse the transformation of aromatic ethers, which can be derived from biomass, to cyclohexanone and its derivatives via hydrogenation and hydrolysis processes. The yield of cyclohexanone from anisole can reach 96%, and the yields of cyclohexanone derivatives produced from the aromatic ethers, which can be extracted from plants or derived from lignin, are also satisfactory. Detailed study shows that the Pd, bromide salt and H2O/CH2Cl2 work cooperatively to promote the desired reaction and inhibit the side reaction. Thus high yields of desired products can be obtained. This work opens the way for production of ketones from aromatic ethers that can be derived from biomass. PMID:28139709

  17. The rotational spectrum of Roesky’s ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blockhuys, Frank; Tersago, Karla; Shlykov, Sergey A.; Konrad, Alexander; Christen, Dines

    2010-08-01

    The experimental rotational spectrum of 5-oxo-1,3,2,4-dithiadiazole (Roesky's ketone) has been recorded and the experimental rotational constants have been determined. The latter have been used to evaluate the performance of a large number of quantum chemical methods combined with different basis sets, by comparing the calculated with the experimental values. The results of this comparison indicate that, in general, the wave-function-based methods perform better than those from Density Functional Theory. Four of the 42 investigated method/basis set combinations prove to be the most valuable, i.e., MP4(SDQ)/(aug-)cc-pVTZ, B3PW91/cc-pV(T+d)Z and MPW1PW91/aug-cc-pVTZ, as they produce rotational constants with a root-mean-square deviation from the experimental values of only about 5 MHz.

  18. [Synthesis and immunosuppressive effects of novel phthalazine ketone derivatives].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Li; Wang, Qing-He; Yang, Hong-Guang; Hao, Bo-Jun; Liang, Guo-Dong; Jiang, Chong-Guo; Cheng, Mao-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    A series of phthalazine ketone compounds were synthesized and the structures were confirmed by H NMR and HR-MS spectrum. All target compounds were obtained through 7 steps, including selective reduction, nitration, bromination, ring enlargement, reduction, Knoevenagel and acylated reaction. The compounds were evaluated for their immunosuppressive effects of T-cell proliferation and inhibitory activity of IMPDH type II in vitro, as well as their structure-activity relationship were assessed. Several compounds exhibited strong immunosuppressive properties, especially compounds 7f and 7h, with IC50 values of 0.093 micromol x L(-1) and 0.14 micromol x L(-1) respectively, which were superior to mycophenolic acid. The information obtained from the studies may be useful for further research on the immunosuppressive agents.

  19. Chain-extended poly(aryl ether ketones)

    SciTech Connect

    Robeson, L.M.; Winslow, P.A.; Matzner, M.; Harris, J.E.; Maresca, L.M.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a process for preparing a poly(aryl ether ketone) polymer. It comprises reacting (n) moles of HAr H with (n + 1) moles of YCOAr{sub 1}COY under Friedel-Crafts polymerization conditions; reacting the product obtained with 2XAR{sub 2}H under Friedel-Crafts polymerization conditions; reacting the product obtained with HOAr{sub 3}OH in the presence of a base and an aprotic solvent; wherein Ar and Ar{sub 1} are divalent aromatic groups, Ar{sub 2} is a divalent aromatic group wherein the substituents X and CO are in para or ortho position relative to each other, Ar{sub 3} is a residue of a dihydric phenol, X and Y are halogen, n is an integer of 1 to 50 and X is one or greater.

  20. Electron impact ionization of cycloalkanes, aldehydes, and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby

    2014-08-07

    The theoretical calculations of electron impact total ionization cross section for cycloalkane, aldehyde, and ketone group molecules are undertaken from ionization threshold to 2 keV. The present calculations are based on the spherical complex optical potential formalism and complex scattering potential ionization contribution method. The results of most of the targets studied compare fairly well with the recent measurements, wherever available and the cross sections for many targets are predicted for the first time. The correlation between the peak of ionization cross sections with number of target electrons and target parameters is also reported. It was found that the cross sections at their maximum depend linearly with the number of target electrons and with other target parameters, confirming the consistency of the values reported here.

  1. Biofiltration of ketone compounds by a composite bead biofilter.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wu-Chung; Peng, Kang-Hong

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the biochemical kinetic behaviors of ketone compounds in a composite bead biofilter were investigated. Both microbial growth rate kg and biochemical reaction rate kd would be inhibited at higher average inlet concentration. For the microbial growth process, the inhibitive effect was the least pronounced for acetone and the order of kg value was MEK>MIPK>acetone in the average inlet concentration range of 100-150 ppm. The degree of inhibitive effect was almost the same for three ketone compounds and the order of kg value was acetone>MEK>MIPK in the average inlet concentration range of 200-300 ppm. The values of half-saturation constant Ks for acetone, MEK and MIPK were 26.80, 21.56 and 22.96 ppm, respectively. The values of maximum reaction rate Vm for acetone, MEK and MIPK were 8.55, 9.06 and 7.55 g-C/h-kg packed material, respectively. The zero-order kinetic with the diffusion rate limitation could be regarded as the most adequate biochemical reaction model. For the biochemical reaction process, the inhibitive effect was the most pronounced for MEK and the order of kd value was MEK>acetone>MIPK in the average inlet concentration range of 100-150 ppm. The degree of inhibitive effect was MIPK>MEK>acetone and the order of kd value was acetone>MEK>MIPK in the average inlet concentration range of 200-300 ppm. The maximum elimination capacity of acetone, MEK and MIPK were 0.157, 0.127 and 0.101 g-C/h-kg packed material.

  2. Computational rationalization of the selective C-H and C-F activations of fluoroaromatic imines and ketones by cobalt complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Dongju; Sun, Hongjian; Li, Xiaoyan

    2014-03-28

    While selective C-H and C-F activations of fluoroaromatic imines and ketones with transition metal complexes supported by PMe3 have been successfully achieved in recent publications, insight into the molecular mechanism and energetics of those reactions is still lacking. Focusing on three typical substrates, 2,6-difluorobenzophenone imine (A) and 2,6-difluorobenzophenone (B), and 2,4'-difluorobenzophenone (C), the present work theoretically studied their C-H and C-F cyclometalation reactions promoted by the activator Co(PMe3)4 or CoMe(PMe3)4. It is found that reaction A + Co(PMe3)4 favors the C-F activation, reaction A + CoMe(PMe3)4 prefers the C-H activation, whereas both the C-H and C-F activation pathways may be viable for reactions B + CoMe(PMe3)4 and C + CoMe(PMe3)4. The experimentally observed C-H and C-F cyclometalation products have been rationalized by analyzing the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of two activation pathways. From calculated results combined with the experimental observations, we believe that three factors, i.e. the oxidation state of the metal center in the activators, the anchoring group of substrates, and substituted fluoroatom counts of the aromatic ring in substrates, affect the selectivity of C-H and C-F activations of fluoroaromatic ketones and imines. Calculated results are enlightening about the rational design of activators and substrates of fluoroaromatic imines and ketones to obtain the exclusive C-H or C-F bond activation product.

  3. Low temperature (550-700 K) oxidation pathways of cyclic ketones: Dominance of HO2-elimination channels yielding conjugated cyclic coproducts

    DOE PAGES

    Scheer, Adam M.; Welz, Oliver; Vasu, Subith S.; ...

    2015-04-13

    The low-temperature oxidation of three cyclic ketones, cyclopentanone (CPO; C5H8O), cyclohexanone (CHO; C6H10 O), and 2-methyl-cyclopentanone (2-Me-CPO; CH3–C5H7 O), is studied between 550 and 700 K and at 4 or 8 Torr total pressure. Initial fuel radicals R are formedvia fast H-abstraction from the ketones by laser-photolytically generated chlorine atoms. Intermediates and products from the subsequent reactions of these radicals in the presence of excess O2 are probed with time and isomeric resolution using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron ionizing radiation. For CPO and CHO the dominant product channel in the R + O2 reactions is chain-terminating HO2-eliminationmore » yielding the conjugated cyclic coproducts 2-cyclopentenone and 2-cyclohexenone, respectively. Results on oxidation of 2-Me-CPO also show a dominant contribution from HO2-elimination. Moreover, the photoionization spectrum of the co-product suggests formation of 2-methyl-2-cyclopentenone and/or 2-cyclohexenone, resulting from a rapid Dowd–Beckwith rearrangement, preceding addition to O2, of the initial (2-oxocyclopentyl)methyl radical to 3-oxocyclohexyl. Cyclic ethers, markers for hydroperoxyalkyl radicals (QOOH), key intermediates in chain-propagating and chain-branching low-temperature combustion pathways, are only minor products. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by stationary point calculations on the potential energy surfaces of the associated R + O2 reactions at the CBS-QB3 level. Furthermore, the calculations indicate that HO2-elimination channels are energetically favored and product formation via QOOH is disfavored. Lastly, the prominence of chain-terminating pathways linked with HO2 formation in low-temperature oxidation of cyclic ketones suggests little low-temperature reactivity of these species as fuels in internal combustion engines.« less

  4. [The energetics of obesity].

    PubMed

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Blanc, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    Although there is little argument about the state of energy imbalance that produces weight gain, there is considerable argument about the respective role of genetics, diet and physical activity in achieving obesity. In the USA, obesity has increased in the last decades despite a concomitant decrease in total energy and fat intake suggesting that there has been a dramatic drop in total energy expenditure. In this review, we investigated the respective role of resting metabolic rate, post-prandial thermogenesis, and activity energy expenditure in this lower energy output, and provided evidence that physical inactivity is the major contributor. Based on Jean Mayer original observation (Mayer et al., 1954), we hypothesize that there is a level of physical activity below which mechanisms of body mass regulation are impaired. The increasing prevalence of obesity may reflect the fact the majority of the population has fallen below such a level of physical activity. However, a causal relation between physical inactivity and obesity is still difficult to prove, probably because of the lack of longitudinal models to investigate the physiological consequences of inactivity and because the deleterious consequences of sedentary behaviors are essentially deduced from the benefits of exercise training. By using long term strict bed rest as a unique model of inactivity, we provide evidence that inactivity per se indeed disrupts fuel homeostasis and partitions post-absorptive and post-prandial fat use towards storage, thus promoting weight gain in the long term. More research is needed to investigate mechanisms and to determine the minimal physical activity our body has been engineered for by evolution.

  5. Homogenization and lipase treatment of milk and resulting methyl ketone generation in blue cheese.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingkai; Fonseca, Leorges M; Schoenfuss, Tonya C; Rankin, Scott A

    2014-06-25

    A specific range of methyl ketones contribute to the distinctive flavor of traditional blue cheeses. These ketones are metabolites of lipid metabolism by Penicillium mold added to cheese for this purpose. Two processes, namely, the homogenization of milk fat and the addition of exogenous lipase enzymes, are traditionally applied measures to control the formation of methyl ketones in blue cheese. There exists little scientific validation of the actual effects of these treatments on methyl ketone development. The present study evaluated the effects of milk fat homogenization and lipase treatments on methyl ketone and free fatty acid development using sensory methods and the comparison of selected volatile quantities using gas chromatography. Initial work was conducted using a blue cheese system model; subsequent work was conducted with manufactured blue cheese. In general, there were modest effects of homogenization and lipase treatments on free fatty acid (FFA) and methyl ketone concentrations in blue cheese. Blue cheese treatments involving Penicillium roqueforti lipase with homogenized milk yielded higher FFA and methyl ketone levels, for example, a ∼20-fold increase for hexanoic acid and a 3-fold increase in 2-pentanone.

  6. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective.

  7. Heliospheric Observations of Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summerlin, Errol J.

    2011-01-01

    Heliospheric observations of energetic particles have shown that, on long time averages, a consistent v^-5 power-law index arises even in the absence of transient events. This implies an ubiquitous acceleration process present in the solar wind that is required to generate these power-law tails and maintain them against adiabatic losses and coulomb-collisions which will cool and thermalize the plasma respectively. Though the details of this acceleration process are being debated within the community, most agree that the energy required for these tails comes from fluctuations in the magnetic field which are damped as the energy is transferred to particles. Given this source for the tail, is it then reasonable to assume that the turbulent LISM should give rise to such a power-law tail as well? IBEX observations clearly show a power-law tail of index approximately -5 in energetic neutral atoms. The simplest explanation for the origins of these ENAs are that they are energetic ions which have charge-exchanged with a neutral atom. However, this would imply that energetic ions possess a v^-5 power-law distribution at keV energies at the source of these ENAs. If the source is presumed to be the LISM, it provides additional options for explaining the, so called, IBEX ribbon. This presentation will discuss some of these options as well as potential mechanisms for the generation of a power-law spectrum in the LISM.

  8. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  9. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. We disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease. PMID:25423286

  10. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, David A.; Kung, Daniel W.; Esler, William P.; Amor, Paul A.; Bagley, Scott W.; Beysen, Carine; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Santos; Doran, Shawn D.; Limberakis, Chris; Mathiowetz, Alan M.; McPherson, Kirk; Price, David A.; Ravussin, Eric; Sonnenberg, Gabriele E.; Southers, James A.; Sweet, Laurel J.; Turner, Scott M.; Vajdos, Felix F.

    2014-12-26

    We found that Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. Here, we disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease.

  11. A ketone ester diet exhibits anxiolytic and cognition-sparing properties, and lessens amyloid and tau pathologies in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Bergman, Christian; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Wan, Ruiqian; King, M Todd; Mughal, Mohamed R; Okun, Eitan; Clarke, Kieran; Mattson, Mark P; Veech, Richard L

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves progressive accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary pathologies, and glucose hypometabolism in brain regions critical for memory. The 3xTgAD mouse model was used to test the hypothesis that a ketone ester-based diet can ameliorate AD pathogenesis. Beginning at a presymptomatic age, 2 groups of male 3xTgAD mice were fed a diet containing a physiological enantiomeric precursor of ketone bodies (KET) or an isocaloric carbohydrate diet. The results of behavioral tests performed at 4 and 7 months after diet initiation revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited significantly less anxiety in 2 different tests. 3xTgAD mice on the KET diet also exhibited significant, albeit relatively subtle, improvements in performance on learning and memory tests. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited decreased Aβ deposition in the subiculum, CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, and the amygdala. KET-fed mice exhibited reduced levels of hyperphosphorylated tau deposition in the same regions of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortex. Thus, a novel ketone ester can ameliorate proteopathic and behavioral deficits in a mouse AD model.

  12. A ketone ester diet exhibits anxiolytic and cognition-sparing properties, and lessens amyloid and tau pathologies in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Bergman, Christian; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Wan, Ruiqian; King, M. Todd; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Okun, Eitan; Clarke, Kieran; Mattson, Mark P.; Veech, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves progressive accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary pathologies, and glucose hypometabolism in brain regions critical for memory. The 3xTgAD mouse model was used to test the hypothesis that a ketone ester–based diet can ameliorate AD pathogenesis. Beginning at a presymptomatic age, 2 groups of male 3xTgAD mice were fed a diet containing a physiological enantiomeric precursor of ketone bodies (KET) or an isocaloric carbohydrate diet. The results of behavioral tests performed at 4 and 7 months after diet initiation revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited significantly less anxiety in 2 different tests. 3xTgAD mice on the KET diet also exhibited significant, albeit relatively subtle, improvements in performance on learning and memory tests. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited decreased Aβ deposition in the subiculum, CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, and the amygdala. KET-fed mice exhibited reduced levels of hyperphosphorylated tau deposition in the same regions of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortex. Thus, a novel ketone ester can ameliorate proteopathic and behavioral deficits in a mouse AD model. PMID:23276384

  13. Lewis base catalyzed, enantioselective aldol addition of methyl trichlorosilyl ketene acetal to ketones.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Fan, Yu; Eastgate, Martin D

    2005-06-24

    The catalytic enantioselective addition of an acetate enolate equivalent to ketones is described. Methyl trichlorosilyl ketene acetal reacts with a wide range of ketones in the presence of pyridine N-oxide to afford the aldol addition products in excellent yields. Chiral 2,2'-pyridyl bis-N-oxides bearing various substituents at the 3,3'- and 6,6'-positions also provide excellent yields of the aldol products with variable enantioselectivities ranging from 94/6 er for aromatic ketones to nearly racemic for aliphatic ketones. An X-ray crystal structure of the complex between a catalyst and silicon tetrachloride (((P)-(R,R)-19.SiCl(4))) has been obtained. Extensive computational analysis provides a stereochemical rationale for the observed trends in enantioselectivities.

  14. A mechanistic analysis of the quantitation of α-hydroxy ketones by the bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Jennifer R; Ricapito, Nicole G; Yueh, Alice; Weiser, Ellen L; Putnam, David

    2012-11-15

    A new class of compounds amenable to quantification by the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay was identified, allowing an expansion of compounds quantifiable within the assay's capacity. In this article, we demonstrate that compounds containing the α-hydroxy ketone structure are easily measured under standard BCA assay conditions. A nonchromophore analyte containing the α-hydroxy ketone structure, 1,3-dihydroxypropan-2-one (commonly known as dihydroxyacetone), and various structural derivatives were explored on an equimolar basis in the BCA assay. Combined with earlier studies exploring α-hydroxy ketones within copper oxidation systems, the data support the mechanism of this class of compound's ability to enolize through an enediol intermediate to generate a strong signal in the BCA assay. This new quantification technique also highlights the potential for α-hydroxy ketones to interfere with other analytes quantified by the BCA assay.

  15. SIMULATION OF ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS FROM SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Li, Gang; Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-10-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) provide the only way to observe the acceleration site of coronal-mass-ejection-driven (CME-driven) shock-accelerated solar energetic particles (SEPs). In gradual SEP events, energetic protons can charge exchange with the ambient solar wind or interstellar neutrals to become ENAs. Assuming a CME-driven shock with a constant speed of 1800 km s{sup –1} and compression ratio of 3.5, propagating from 1.5 to 40 R{sub S} , we calculate the accelerated SEPs at 5-5000 keV and the resulting ENAs via various charge-exchange interactions. Taking into account the ENA losses in the interplanetary medium, we obtain the flux-time profiles of these solar ENAs reaching 1 AU. We find that the arriving ENAs at energies above ∼100 keV show a sharply peaked flux-time profile, mainly originating from the shock source below 5 R{sub S} , whereas the ENAs below ∼20 keV have a flat-top time profile, mostly originating from the source beyond 10 R{sub S} . Assuming the accelerated protons are effectively trapped downstream of the shock, we can reproduce the STEREO ENA fluence observations at ∼2-5 MeV/nucleon. We also estimate the flux of ENAs coming from the charge exchange of energetic storm protons, accelerated by the fast CME-driven shock near 1 AU, with interstellar hydrogen and helium. Our results suggest that appropriate instrumentation would be able to detect ENAs from SEPs and to even make ENA images of SEPs at energies above ∼10-20 keV.

  16. Photoredox Activation for the Direct β-Arylation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Pirnot, Michael T.; Rankic, Danica A.; Martin, David B. C.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2013-01-01

    The direct β-activation of saturated aldehydes and ketones has long been an elusive transformation. We found that photoredox catalysis in combination with organocatalysis can lead to the transient generation of 5π-electron β-enaminyl radicals from ketones and aldehydes that rapidly couple with cyano-substituted aryl rings at the carbonyl β-position. This mode of activation is suitable for a broad range of carbonyl β-functionalization reactions and is amenable to enantioselective catalysis. PMID:23539600

  17. Enantioselective Synthesis of β-(3-Hydroxypyrazol-1-yl)ketones Using An Organocatalyzed Michael Addition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Sanjib; Zhao, Cong-Gui; Ding, Derong

    2009-01-01

    β-(3-Hydroxypyrazol-1-yl)ketones have been prepared in high yields and excellent enantioselectivities (94–98% ee) via a Michael addition reaction between 2-pyrazolin-5-ones and aliphatic acyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones using 9-epi-9-amino-9-deoxyquinine as the catalyst. These results account for the first example of an aza-Michael addition of the ambident 2-pyrazolin-5-one anion to a Michael acceptor. PMID:19415906

  18. Reductive cyclizations of hydroxysulfinyl ketones: enantioselective access to tetrahydropyran and tetrahydrofuran derivatives.

    PubMed

    Carreño, M Carmen; Des Mazery, Renaud; Urbano, Antonio; Colobert, Françoise; Solladié, Guy

    2003-10-03

    The stereocontrolled formation of cis-2,5-disubstituted tetrahydrofurans and cis-2,6-disubstituted tetrahydropyrans is achieved from enantiopure ketosulfinyl esters by reduction, Weinreb's amide, and ketone formation, followed by the reductive cyclization (Et3SiH/TMSOTf) of the resulting hydroxysulfinyl ketones. The sulfoxide-bearing heterocycles were transformed into two natural products, (-)-centrolobine (1) and both enantiomers of cis-(6-methyltetrahydropyran-2-yl)acetic acid (2).

  19. Sources and concentrations of aldehydes and ketones in indoor environments in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Crump, D.R.; Gardiner, D. )

    1989-01-01

    Individual aldehydes and ketones can be separated, identified and quantitatively estimated by trapping the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatives and analysis by HPLC. Appropriate methods and detection limits are reported. Many sources of formaldehyde have been identified by this means and some are found to emit other aldehydes and ketones. The application of this method to determine the concentration of these compounds in the atmospheres of buildings is described and the results compared with those obtained using chromotropic acid or MBTH.

  20. Catalytic transformation of esters of 1,2-azido alcohols into α-amido ketones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongjin; Pak, Han Kyu; Rhee, Young Ho; Park, Jaiwook

    2016-05-05

    The esters of 1,2-azido alcohols were transformed into α-amido ketones without external oxidants through the Ru-catalyzed formation of N-H imines with the liberation of N2 followed by intramolecular migration of the acyl moiety. A wide range of α-amido ketones were obtained, and one-pot transformation into the corresponding oxazoles (or a thiazole) was demonstrated.

  1. Mass spectral determination of aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids using 1,1-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, C A; Howard, R W

    1985-03-01

    Analyses of nanogram to milligram quantities of aliphatic aldehydes, fatty acids, and unhindered aliphatic ketones such as those typically found in pheromonal blends have been effected by treating these mixtures with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine. The aldehydes and ketones formN,N-dimethylhydrazones, while the fatty acids form methyl esters. Structural elucidation of the reaction products was achieved using EI and CI gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  2. Measurements Alcohols, Ketones, and Aldehydes During Trace-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, E. C.; Riemer, D. D.; Hills, A.; Lueb, R.; Fried, A.; Sachse, G.; Crawford, J.; Singh, H.; Blake, D.

    2002-12-01

    A sensitive and selective instrument (fast gas chromatographic mass spectrometer - FGCMS) was developed for the continuous measurement of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs: alcohols, ketones and aldehydes (except for formaldehyde)) containing fewer than 6 carbon atoms and subsequently deployed during the NASA's TRACE-P (Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific) experiment. This paper will briefly describe the instrument and present results obtained from 15 mission flights. Dramatic differences were observed in the mixing ratios and vertical profiles of the longer-lived species, acetone and methanol, compared to the shorter-lived species. For example, between 6 and 7 km, the median mixing ratios for the two longest lived species measured, acetone and methanol, are 765 pptv and 1061 pptv, respectively whereas the combined mixing ratio for all other species measured was less than 500 pptv. A large variety of air masses were encountered during this experiment and this is reflected in the behavior of the measured OVOCs. Relationships between the OVOCs and other trace species will be explored. Implications of these measurements for our current understanding of global tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  3. Determination of acetone and methyl ethyl ketone in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tai, D.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical procedures for the determination of acetone and methyl ethyl ketone in water samples were developed. Concentrations in the milligram-per-liter range were determined by injecting an aqueous sample into the analysis system through an injection port, trapping the organics on Tenax-GC at room temperature, and thermally desorbing the organics into a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector for analysis. Concentrations in the microgram-per-liter range were determined by sweeping the headspace vapors over a water sample at 50C, trapping on Tenax-GC, and thermally desorbing the organics into the gas chromatograph. The precision for two operators of the milligram-per-liter concentration procedure, expressed as the coefficient of variation, was generally less than 2 percent for concentrations ranging from 16 to 160 milligrams per liter. The precision from two operators of the microgram-per-liter concentration procedure was between 2 and 4 percent for concentrations of 20 and 60 micrograms per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Catalytic copolymerization of co/olefin with ketone additive

    SciTech Connect

    Drent, E.

    1989-03-07

    The process of producing a linear alternating polymer of carbon dioxide and at least one ethylenically unsaturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 20 carbon atoms inclusive is described. It consists of contacting carbon monoxide and the hydrocarbon under polymerization conditions in the presence of a catalyst composition prepared from a palladium compound, a non-transition metal salt of a non-hydrohalogenic acid having a pKa less than about 6, a bidentate phosphorus ligand of the formula R/sup 1/R/sup 2/--P--R--P--R/sup 3/R/sup 4/ in which R/sup 1/,R/sup 2/,R/sup 3/ and R/sup 4/ independently are organic radicals of from 1 to 14 carbon atoms inclusive and R is a divalent bridging group of up to 20 carbon atoms and up to 3 carbon atoms in the bridge, and a ketone of from 3 to 20 carbon atoms inclusive and recovering from the resulting product mixture the linear alternating polymer of carbon monoxide and the hydrocarbon.

  5. The effect of ketone bodies and fatty acid on intestinal glucose metabolism during development.

    PubMed

    Kimura, R E; Thulin, G; Warshaw, J B

    1984-07-01

    Glucose oxidation by developing rat intestine changed dramatically during the period of suckling and weaning. After weaning, glucose oxidation to CO2 by intestinal slices increased over 3-fold This was associated with an increase in lactate production from glucose and an increase in the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation. Active pyruvate dehydrogenase in intestine of developing rats also increases in activity at the time of weaning, suggesting that the suppression of glucose oxidation during the suckling period is controlled by pyruvate dehydrogenase. Glucose oxidation to CO2 and pyruvate decarboxylation to CO2 by intestinal slices of postweaned animals was inhibited by exogenous 3-hydroxybutyrate. But exogenous 3-hydroxybutyrate did not inhibit glucose and pyruvate oxidation in intestine of suckling animals which have higher levels of endogenous 3-hydroxybutyrate than intestine of postweaned rats. Palmitate, in contrast, inhibited glucose and pyruvate oxidation by both pre- and postweaned intestine.

  6. Study of the antibacterial and antifungal activities of synthetic benzyl bromides, ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Al-Smadi, Mousa L; Khabour, Omar F; Shuaibu, Fatima A; Hussein, Emad I; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2016-01-01

    Several applications of chalcones and their derivatives encouraged researchers to increase their synthesis as an alternative for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial and fungal infections. In the present study, chalcone derivatives were synthesized through cross aldol condensation reaction between 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)benzaldehyde and multiarm aromatic ketones. The multiarm aromatic ketones were synthesized through nucleophilic substitution reaction between 4-hydroxy acetophenone and benzyl bromides. The benzyl bromides, multiarm aromatic ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives were evaluated for their activities against eleven clinical pathogenic Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, and three pathogenic fungi by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the microbroth dilution technique. The results of the present study demonstrated that benzyl bromide derivatives have strong antibacterial and antifungal properties as compared to synthetic chalcone derivatives and ketones. Benzyl bromides (1a and 1c) showed high ester activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi but moderate activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, these compounds may be considered as good antibacterial and antifungal drug discovery. However, substituted ketones (2a–b) as well as chalcone derivatives (3a–c) showed no activity against all the tested strains except for ketone (2c), which showed moderate activity against Candida albicans. PMID:27877017

  7. Studies on the interaction between ethanol and two industrial solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granvil, C.P.; Sharkawi, M.; Plaa, G.L. )

    1991-03-11

    Methyl n-butyl ketone (MnBK) and methyl isobutyl ketone (MiBK) prolong the duration of ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex (EILRR) in mice. MnBK was almost twice as potent in this regard. To explain this difference, the metabolism of both ketones was studied in male CD-1 mice using GC. MiBK was converted to 4-methyl-2-pentanol (4MPOL) and 4-hydroxy methyl isobutyl ketone (HMP). MnBK metabolites were 2-hexanol (2HOL) and 2,5-hexanedione (2,5HD). The effects of both ketones and metabolites on EILRR and ethanol (E) elimination were studied in mice. The ketones and their metabolites were dissolved in corn oil and injected intraperitoneally 30 min before E 4g/kg for EILRR and 2g/kg for E elimination. In the following doses: MnBK, 5; MiBK, 5; 2HOL, 2.5; 4MPOL, 2.5; and HMP 2.5, significantly prolonged EILRR. Concentrations of E in blood and brain upon return of the righting reflex were similar in solvent-treated and control animals. The mean elimination rate of E was slower in groups given MnBK or 2HOL than in control animals. No change in E elimination was observed with MiBK, HMP, 4MPOL, or 2, 5HD.

  8. Energetic costs of cellular computation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J

    2012-10-30

    Cells often perform computations in order to respond to environmental cues. A simple example is the classic problem, first considered by Berg and Purcell, of determining the concentration of a chemical ligand in the surrounding media. On general theoretical grounds, it is expected that such computations require cells to consume energy. In particular, Landauer's principle states that energy must be consumed in order to erase the memory of past observations. Here, we explicitly calculate the energetic cost of steady-state computation of ligand concentration for a simple two-component cellular network that implements a noisy version of the Berg-Purcell strategy. We show that learning about external concentrations necessitates the breaking of detailed balance and consumption of energy, with greater learning requiring more energy. Our calculations suggest that the energetic costs of cellular computation may be an important constraint on networks designed to function in resource poor environments, such as the spore germination networks of bacteria.

  9. Energetic costs of cellular computation

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cells often perform computations in order to respond to environmental cues. A simple example is the classic problem, first considered by Berg and Purcell, of determining the concentration of a chemical ligand in the surrounding media. On general theoretical grounds, it is expected that such computations require cells to consume energy. In particular, Landauer’s principle states that energy must be consumed in order to erase the memory of past observations. Here, we explicitly calculate the energetic cost of steady-state computation of ligand concentration for a simple two-component cellular network that implements a noisy version of the Berg–Purcell strategy. We show that learning about external concentrations necessitates the breaking of detailed balance and consumption of energy, with greater learning requiring more energy. Our calculations suggest that the energetic costs of cellular computation may be an important constraint on networks designed to function in resource poor environments, such as the spore germination networks of bacteria. PMID:23045633

  10. Cardiac energetics: sense and nonsense.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Colin L

    2003-08-01

    1. The background to current ideas in cardiac energetics is outlined and, in the genomic era, the need is stressed for detailed knowledge of mouse heart mechanics and energetics. 2. The mouse heart is clearly different to the rat in terms of its excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and the common assumption that heart rate difference between mice and humans will account for the eightfold difference in myocardial oxygen consumption is wrong, because the energy per beat of the mouse heart is approximately one-third that of the human heart. 3. In vivo evidence suggests that there may well be an eightfold species difference in the non-beating metabolism of mice and human hearts. It is speculated that the magnitude of basal metabolism in the heart is regulatable and that, in the absence of perfusion, it falls to approximately one-quarter of its in vivo rate and that in clinical conditions, such as hibernation, it probably decreases; its magnitude may be controlled by the endothelium. 4. The active energy balance sheet is briefly discussed and it is suggested that the activation heat accounts for 20-25% of the active energy per beat and cross-bridge turnover accounts for the balance. It is argued that force, not shortening, is the major determinant of cardiac energy usage. 5. The outcome of recent cardiac modelling with variants of the Huxley and Hill/Eisenberg models is described. It has been necessary to invoke 'loose coupling' to replicate the low cardiac energy flux measured at low afterloads (medium to high velocities of shortening). 6. Lastly, some of the unexplained or 'nonsense' energetic data are outlined and eight unsolved problems in cardiac energetics are discussed.

  11. Process for preparing energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Lee, Ronald S [Livermore, CA; Tillotson, Thomas M [Tracy, CA; Hrubesh, Lawrence W [Pleasanton, CA; Swansiger, Rosalind W [Livermore, CA; Fox, Glenn A [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  12. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  13. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  14. Energetic Charged Particles Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Diver, Declan; Pinçon, Jean-Louis; Phelps, Alan D. R.; Bourdon, Anne; Helling, Christiane; Blanc, Elisabeth; Honary, Farideh; Harrison, R. Giles; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Lester, Mark; Rycroft, Michael; Kosch, Mike; Horne, Richard B.; Soula, Serge; Gaffet, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The French government has committed to launch the satellite TARANIS to study transient coupling processes between the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. The prime objective of TARANIS is to detect energetic charged particles and hard radiation emanating from thunderclouds. The British Nobel prize winner C.T.R. Wilson predicted lightning discharges from the top of thunderclouds into space almost a century ago. However, new experiments have only recently confirmed energetic discharge processes which transfer energy from the top of thunderclouds into the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space; they are now denoted as transient luminous events, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and relativistic electron beams. This meeting report builds on the current state of scientific knowledge on the physics of plasmas in the laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas in the Earth's atmosphere to propose areas of future research. The report specifically reflects presentations delivered by the members of a novel Franco-British collaboration during a meeting at the French Embassy in London held in November 2011. The scientific subjects of the report tackle ionization processes leading to electrical discharge processes, observations of transient luminous events, electromagnetic emissions, energetic charged particles and their impact on the Earth's atmosphere. The importance of future research in this area for science and society, and towards spacecraft protection, is emphasized.

  15. Analysis of performance of prepubertal swimmers assessed from anthropometric and bio-energetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Duché, P; Falgairette, G; Bedu, M; Lac, G; Robert, A; Coudert, J

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between anthropometric and bio-energetic data and timed performance over 50 to 400 m was studied in 25 young male swimmers [11.3 (SD 1) years]. Anthropometric measurements included height, body mass, body fat mass, body area, thoracic section area (Ats) thoracic circumferences, lengths of upper limb, bi-acromial and bi-iliac diameters. Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max; direct method), maximal anaerobic power (W(an),max; force-velocity test) and mean power in 30 s sprint (W30 s; Wingate test) were also measured. Each of these bio-energetic variables was expressed in absolute terms, relating to body mass, body area and Ats. The stepwise regression method was used to determine contribution of the variables (anthropometric and/or bio-energetic) of the time achieved over the distance. The W30 s/Ats accounted for 46% of the time over 50 m (negative correlation). The VO2max/Ats and height were negatively correlated with the times of performances over 100 m, 200 m and 400 m, these two variables accounted for 71% to 77% of the performance. These results would indicate that even in young boys, anthropometric and bio-energetic characteristics are both important in swimming performance, particularly the bio-energetic variables expressed per Ats.

  16. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.; Szabo, Adam; Narock, Thomas W.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; Hill, Matthew E.; Vandergriff, Jon D.; McKibben, Robert B.; Lopate, Clifford; Tranquille, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events. acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  17. Raspberry ketone fails to reduce adiposity beyond decreasing food intake in C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Bradley M; Diamond, Stephanie A; Banh, Taylor; Hsiao, Yung-Hsuan; Cole, Rachel M; Li, Jinhui; Simons, Christopher T; Bruno, Richard S; Belury, Martha A; Vodovotz, Yael

    2017-04-05

    As the incidence of obesity continues to increase, identifying novel nutritional therapies to enhance weight loss are needed. Raspberry ketone (RK; 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl) butan-2-one) is a bioactive phytochemical that is marketed as a weight loss supplement in the United States, yet there is scant scientific evidence demonstrating that RK promotes weight loss. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of RK on accumulation of adipose mass, hepatic lipid storage, and levels of plasma adiponectin in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Mice were individually housed and fed a HF control diet (45% kcal from fat) for two weeks to induce weight gain, then assigned to HF control, high-dose (1.74% wt/wt) raspberry ketone (HRK), low-dose (0.25% wt/wt) raspberry ketone (LRK), or a pair-fed group (PF) fed similar food intake to LRK mice. Following five weeks of feeding, mice fed LRK and HRK diets showed reduced food intake and body weight compared to mice maintained on control diet. When normalized to body weight, mice fed HRK diet exhibited decreased inguinal fat mass and increased liver mass compared to the control group. Hepatic steatosis was lowest in mice fed HRK diet, whereas LRK diet did not have an effect when compared to the PF group. Plasma adiponectin concentration was unaffected by RK and pair-feeding. Our findings demonstrate that RK supplementation has limited benefit to adipose loss beyond reducing energy intake in mice fed a high-fat diet. The present study supports the need for appropriate study design when validating weight-loss supplements.

  18. Energetic Particles in Saturn's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Carbary, J. F.; Krupp, N.; Krimigis, S. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Kane, M.

    2007-12-01

    Energetic particle measurements in Saturn's magnetotail reveal a magnetotail dominated by Saturn's rotational dynamics as far back in the tail as 60 Rs, rarely but sometimes spectacularly disrupted by tail reconnection events. Although Cassini spent little time in the tail, and even less at the location of the tail current sheet, the time spent there revealed a pattern of very regular encounters with the energetic particles that fill the current sheet, usually once every Saturn rotation. Carbary et al. 2007a, b show that energetic electrons reappear every rotation when the spacecraft is sufficiently close to the current sheet location, and further that they lie along a spiral in longitude when mapped into the SKR coordinate system (Kurth et al., 2007). Energetic ions are also observed in the same locations, with a mix of hydrogen and oxygen not very different from that observed in the magnetosphere between 10 and 20 Rs. These ions generally display velocities approximately in the corotation direction, but with magnitudes well below rigid corotation (Kane et al., 2007, manuscript in preparation). Two other classes of energetic particle events are also seen in the magnetotail. The first consists of energetic ion and electron beams, likely accelerated in the auroral zone over downward current regions. The second are those generated in tail reconnection events (e.g., Jackman et al., 2007; Hill et al. 2007). We will give examples of all of these phenomena, including both in situ measurements and ENA images/movies. Carbary, J.~F., Mitchell, D.~G., Krimigis, S.~M., Hamilton, D.~C., Krupp, N., Charged particle periodicities in Saturn's outer magnetosphere, Journal of Geophysical Research (Space Physics) 112, 6246 {2007JGRA..11206246C} 2007a Carbary, J. F., D. G. Mitchell, S. M. Krimigis, and N. Krupp (2007), Evidence for spiral pattern in Saturn's magnetosphere using the new SKR longitudes, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L13105, doi:10.1029/2007GL030167 2007b Kurth, W. S., A

  19. Tautomer-selective derivatives of enolate, ketone and enaminone by addition reaction of picolyl-type anions with nitriles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jianliang; Wang, Peng; Cao, Wei; Chen, Xia

    2017-01-01

    We describe an efficient for the synthesis of compounds of tautomeric β-pyridyl/quinolyl-enol, -ketone, -enaminone, which were finally characterized by standard methods like NMR, IR or SCXRD. The addition reaction of lithiated intermediates of picoline, 2-ethylpyridine and 2-methylquinoline, respectively, with nitriles followed by acid hydrolysis afforded the corresponding tautomeric compounds of enol, ketone and emaminone. Interestingly, treatment of 2-methylpyridine or 2-ethylpyridine with nitriles, respectively, yielded mostly β-pyridyl ketone and enol tautomers without enaminones, while 2-methylquinoline with nitriles gave β-quinolyl ketone and enaminone tautomers without enols. The reaction of 2-benzylpyridine with nitriles was not available under the same conditions.

  20. Mesoscale Modeling of Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-23

    This briefing represents interim progress towards these goals. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Heterogeneous explosives , Mesoscale dynamics, Level set method...High  Explosives  Research and Development Branch (RWME) – Damage Mechanisms Branch (RWMW) • Goal: Predict survivability of energetic payload of high...the mechanical  behavior of simple  explosive – Pristine – Damaged • Performed simulations on mechanical RVE’s – From XCMT – Idealized • Developed and

  1. Method for calculating alloy energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A semiempirical method for the computation of alloy energies is introduced. It is based on the equivalent-crystal theory of defect-formation energies in elemental solids. The method is both simple and accurate. Heats of formation as a function of composition are computed for some binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Pd, Pt, and Au using the heats of solution in the dilute limit as experimental input. The separation of heats into strain and chemical components helps in understanding the energetics. In addition, lattice-parameter contractions seen in solid solutions of Ag and Au are accurately predicted. Good agreement with experiment is obtained in all cases.

  2. Onshore energetics in penguins: theory, estimation and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Lewis G; White, Craig R; Fahlman, Andreas; Handrich, Yves; Butler, Patrick J

    2007-08-01

    Penguins are known to have high pedestrian locomotory costs in comparison to other cursorial birds, but the ecological consequences of this difference have received limited attention. Here we present a method for the accurate estimation of onshore energetics based on measurements of body mass, simple morphometrics and distance moved. The method is shown to be similarly accurate to other field-based estimates of energy expenditure, but has the advantage of logistical simplicity. King penguins spend 30-50% of their time ashore and may walk distances of several kilometres to and from their breeding colonies. However, in such cases the total energetic cost of pedestrian locomotion is estimated to be only 1.0% of the energy expended whilst ashore. Thus, despite a high instantaneous cost, pedestrian locomotion is a small and possibly negligible component of total energy turnover in king penguins.

  3. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M. Todd; Baxa, Ulrich; Tam, Joseph; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the effects of a diet in which d-β-hydroxybutyrate-(R)-1,3 butanediol monoester [ketone ester (KE)] replaced equicaloric amounts of carbohydrate on 8-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice. Diets contained equal amounts of fat, protein, and micronutrients. The KE group was fed ad libitum, whereas the control (Ctrl) mice were pair-fed to the KE group. Blood d-β-hydroxybutyrate levels in the KE group were 3-5 times those reported with high-fat ketogenic diets. Voluntary food intake was reduced dose dependently with the KE diet. Feeding the KE diet for up to 1 mo increased the number of mitochondria and doubled the electron transport chain proteins, uncoupling protein 1, and mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in IBAT of the KE group was twice that in IBAT of the Ctrl group. Plasma leptin levels of the KE group were more than 2-fold those of the Ctrl group and were associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity to IBAT. The KE group exhibited 14% greater resting energy expenditure, but the total energy expenditure measured over a 24-h period or body weights was not different. The quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index was 73% higher in the KE group. These results identify KE as a potential antiobesity supplement.—Srivastava, S., Kashiwaya, Y., King, M. T. Baxa, U., Tam, J., Niu, G., Chen, X., Clarke, K., Veech, R. L. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet. PMID:22362892

  4. Energetics, Biomechanics, and Performance in Masters' Swimmers: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria I; Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Neiva, Henrique P; Marinho, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Ferreira, MI, Barbosa, TM, Costa, MJ, Neiva, HP, and Marinho, DA. Energetics, biomechanics, and performance in masters' swimmers: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2069-2081, 2016-This study aimed to summarize evidence on masters' swimmers energetics, biomechanics, and performance gathered in selected studies. An expanded search was conducted on 6 databases, conference proceedings, and department files. Fifteen studies were selected for further analysis. A qualitative evaluation of the studies based on the Quality Index (QI) was performed by 2 independent reviewers. The studies were thereafter classified into 3 domains according to the reported data: performance (10 studies), energetics (4 studies), and biomechanics (6 studies). The selected 15 articles included in this review presented low QI scores (mean score, 10.47 points). The biomechanics domain obtained higher QI (11.5 points), followed by energetics and performance (10.6 and 9.9 points, respectively). Stroke frequency (SF) and stroke length (SL) were both influenced by aging, although SF is more affected than SL. Propelling efficiency (ηp) decreased with age. Swimming performance declined with age. The performance declines with age having male swimmers deliver better performances than female counterparts, although this difference tends to be narrow in long-distance events. One single longitudinal study is found in the literature reporting the changes in performance over time. The remaining studies are cross-sectional designs focusing on the energetics and biomechanics. Overall, biomechanics parameters, such as SF, SL, and ηp, tend to decrease with age. This review shows the lack of a solid body of knowledge (reflected in the amount and quality of the articles published) on the changes in biomechanics, energetics, and performance of master swimmers over time. The training programs for this age-group should aim to preserve the energetics as much as possible and, concurrently, improve the

  5. Energetic Extremes in Aquatic Locomotion by Coral Reef Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Christopher J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Steffensen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquatic locomotion. Using intermittent flow-through respirometry, we found exceptional energetic performance in the Bluelined wrasse Stethojulis bandanensis, which maintains tuna-like optimum cruising speeds (up to 1 metre s−1) while using 40% less energy than expected for their body size. Displaying an exceptional aerobic scope (22-fold above resting), streamlined rigid-body posture, and wing-like fins that generate lift-based thrust, S. bandanensis literally flies underwater to efficiently maintain high optimum swimming speeds. Extreme energetic performance may be key to the colonization of highly variable environments, such as the wave-swept habitats where S. bandanensis and other wing-finned species tend to occur. Challenging preconceived notions of how best to power aquatic locomotion, biomimicry of such lift-based fin movements could yield dramatic reductions in the power needed to propel underwater vehicles at high speed. PMID:23326566

  6. Energetic extremes in aquatic locomotion by coral reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Christopher J; Johansen, Jacob L; Steffensen, John F

    2013-01-01

    Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquatic locomotion. Using intermittent flow-through respirometry, we found exceptional energetic performance in the Bluelined wrasse Stethojulis bandanensis, which maintains tuna-like optimum cruising speeds (up to 1 metre s(-1)) while using 40% less energy than expected for their body size. Displaying an exceptional aerobic scope (22-fold above resting), streamlined rigid-body posture, and wing-like fins that generate lift-based thrust, S. bandanensis literally flies underwater to efficiently maintain high optimum swimming speeds. Extreme energetic performance may be key to the colonization of highly variable environments, such as the wave-swept habitats where S. bandanensis and other wing-finned species tend to occur. Challenging preconceived notions of how best to power aquatic locomotion, biomimicry of such lift-based fin movements could yield dramatic reductions in the power needed to propel underwater vehicles at high speed.

  7. Presence and potential significance of aromatic-ketone groups in aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wilson, M.A.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Aquatic humic- and fulvic-acid standards of the International Humic Substances Society were characterized, with emphasis on carbonyl-group nature and content, by carbon-13 nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy, proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. After comparing spectral results of underivatized humic and fulvic acids with spectral results of chemically modified derivatives, that allow improved observation of the carbonyl group, the data clearly indicated that aromatic ketone groups comprised the majority of the carbonyl-group content. About one ketone group per monocyclic aromatic ring was determined for both humic and fulvic acids. Aromatic-ketone groups were hypothesized to form by photolytic rearrangements and oxidation of phenolic ester and hydrocarbon precursors; these groups have potential significance regarding haloform formation in water, reactivity resulting from active hydrogen of the methyl and methylene adjacent to the ketone groups, and formation of hemiketal and lactol structures. Aromatic-ketone groups also may be the point of attachment between aliphatic and aromatic moieties of aquatic humic-substance structure. ?? 1987.

  8. Bioconversion to Raspberry Ketone is Achieved by Several Non-related Plant Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Suvi T; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Rischer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Bioconversion, i.e., the use of biological systems to perform chemical changes in synthetic or natural compounds in mild conditions, is an attractive tool for the production of novel active or high-value compounds. Plant cells exhibit a vast biochemical potential, being able to transform a range of substances, including pharmaceutical ingredients and industrial by-products, via enzymatic processes. The use of plant cell cultures offers possibilities for contained and optimized production processes which can be applied in industrial scale. Raspberry ketone [4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butan-2-one] is among the most interesting natural flavor compounds, due to its high demand and significant market value. The biosynthesis of this industrially relevant flavor compound is relatively well characterized, involving the condensation of 4-coumaryl-CoA and malonyl-CoA by Type III polyketide synthase to form a diketide, and the subsequent reduction catalyzed by an NADPH-dependent reductase. Raspberry ketone has been successfully produced by bioconversion using different hosts and precursors to establish more efficient and economical processes. In this work, we studied the effect of overexpressed RiZS1 in tobacco on precursor bioconversion to raspberry ketone. In addition, various wild type plant cell cultures were studied for their capacity to carry out the bioconversion to raspberry ketone using either 4-hydroxybenzalacetone or betuligenol as a substrate. Apparently plant cells possess rather widely distributed reductase activity capable of performing the bioconversion to raspberry ketone using cheap and readily available precursors.

  9. Bioconversion to Raspberry Ketone is Achieved by Several Non-related Plant Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Häkkinen, Suvi T.; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Rischer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Bioconversion, i.e., the use of biological systems to perform chemical changes in synthetic or natural compounds in mild conditions, is an attractive tool for the production of novel active or high-value compounds. Plant cells exhibit a vast biochemical potential, being able to transform a range of substances, including pharmaceutical ingredients and industrial by-products, via enzymatic processes. The use of plant cell cultures offers possibilities for contained and optimized production processes which can be applied in industrial scale. Raspberry ketone [4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butan-2-one] is among the most interesting natural flavor compounds, due to its high demand and significant market value. The biosynthesis of this industrially relevant flavor compound is relatively well characterized, involving the condensation of 4-coumaryl-CoA and malonyl-CoA by Type III polyketide synthase to form a diketide, and the subsequent reduction catalyzed by an NADPH-dependent reductase. Raspberry ketone has been successfully produced by bioconversion using different hosts and precursors to establish more efficient and economical processes. In this work, we studied the effect of overexpressed RiZS1 in tobacco on precursor bioconversion to raspberry ketone. In addition, various wild type plant cell cultures were studied for their capacity to carry out the bioconversion to raspberry ketone using either 4-hydroxybenzalacetone or betuligenol as a substrate. Apparently plant cells possess rather widely distributed reductase activity capable of performing the bioconversion to raspberry ketone using cheap and readily available precursors. PMID:26635853

  10. Low dielectric fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketone) film and coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Patrick E. (Inventor); Tullos, Gordon L. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to film and coating materials prepared from novel fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketones). A fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketone) is prepared by reacting a bisphenol with 1,1,1,3,3,3 hexafluoro-2,2-bis 4-(4-halobenzoyl) phenyl propane (wherein halo is fluoro or chloro), which is a novel monomer formed as the reaction product of halobenzene (wherein halo is fluoro or chloro) and 1,1,1,3,3,3 hexafluoro-2,2-bis (p-chloro formyl phenyl) propane. Especially beneficial results of this invention are that films and coating materials prepared from the novel fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketone) are essentially optically transparent/colorless and have a lower dielectric constant than otherwise comparable, commercially available poly(phenylene ether ketones). Moreover, unlike the otherwise comparable commercially available materials, the novel fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketones) of the present invention can be solution cast or sprayed to produce the films and coatings. Furthermore, the long term thermal stability of the polymers of the present invention is superior to that of the commercially available materials.

  11. Dynamic Deformation Properties of Energetic Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    the dynamic mechanical properties and detonation of energetic materials. It also included some preliminary data on the effect of particle size on the...study of the dynamic mechanical properties and detonation of energetic materials. It also included some preliminary data on the effect of particle size...qualitative only. 33 5. DEFLAGRATION-TO- DETONATION (DDT) STUDIES As part of an on-going programme to investigate the properties of ultrafine energetic

  12. Multiphase Combustion of Metalized Nanocomposite Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-19

    2013 08/21/2013 08/21/2013 12/19/2014 12/19/2014 Received Paper Shawn C. Stacy, Michelle L. Pantoya. Laser Ignition of Nano -Composite Energetic Loose...Chaudhuri. Linking Molecular Level Chemistry to Macroscopic Combustion Behavior for Nano -energetic Materials with Halogen Containing Oxides, Journal...Keerti Kappagantula, Michelle L. Pantoya, Emily M. Hunt. Impact ignition of aluminum-teflon based energetic materials impregnated with nano

  13. ON THE THERMODYNAMICS OF SOLID INTRUSION SOLUTIONS WITH BODY-CENTERED CUBIC LATTICE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THE PROPERTIES OF AN ELASTICALLY DEFORMED SOLID INTRUSION SOLUTION WITH BODY - CENTERED CUBIC LATTICE, UNBALANCED WITH RESPECT TO ENERGETICALLY DIFFERENT POSITIONS OF THE ATOMS OF THE DISSOLVED SUBSTANCE.

  14. Solar Energetic Particle Spectrometer (SEPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    An outstanding problem of solar and heliospheric physics is the transport of solar energetic particles. The more energetic particles arriving early in the event can be used to probe the transport processes. The arrival direction distribution of these particles carries information about scattering during their propagation to Earth that can be used to test models of interplanetary transport. Also, of considerable importance to crewed space missions is the level of ionizing radiation in the interplanetary medium, and the dose that the crew experiences during an intense solar particle event, as well as the risk to space systems. A recent study concludes that 90% of the absorbed dose results from particles in the energy range 20-550 MeV. We will describe a new compact instrument concept, SEPS, that can cover the energy range from 50-600 MeV with a single compact detector. This energy range has been difficult to cover. There are only limited data, generally available only in broad energy bins, from a few past and present instruments outside Earth s magnetosphere. The SEPS concept can provide improved measurements for this energy range and its simple light-weight design could be easily accommodated on future missions.

  15. National Ignition Campaign Hohlraum Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Atherton, L J; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Dzenitis, E G; Edwards, M J; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Jones, O S; Landen, O; London, R A; Michel, P A; Moody, J D; Milovich, J L; Schneider, M B; Thomas, C A; Town, R J; Warrick, A L; Weber, S V; Widmann, K; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; MacGowan, B J; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Nikroo, A

    2009-11-16

    The first series of experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, 'The National Ignition Facility: ushering in a new age for high energy density science,' Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] tested ignition hohlraum 'energetics,' a term described by four broad goals: (1) Measurement of laser absorption by the hohlraum; (2) Measurement of the x-ray radiation flux (T{sub RAD}{sup 4}) on the surrogate ignition capsule; (3) Quantitative understanding of the laser absorption and resultant x-ray flux; and (4) Determining whether initial hohlraum performance is consistent with requirements for ignition. This paper summarizes the status of NIF hohlraum energetics experiments. The hohlraum targets and experimental design are described, as well as the results of the initial experiments. The data demonstrate low backscattered energy (< 10%) for hohlraums filled with helium gas. A discussion of our current understanding of NIF hohlraum x-ray drive follows, including an overview of the computational tools, i.e., radiation-hydrodynamics codes, that have been used to design the hohlraums. The performance of the codes is compared to x-ray drive and capsule implosion data from the first NIF experiments. These results bode well for future NIF ignition hohlraum experiments.

  16. Hosting anions. The energetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Schmidtchen, Franz P

    2010-10-01

    Hosting anions addresses the widely spread molecular recognition event of negatively charged species by dedicated organic compounds in condensed phases at equilibrium. The experimentally accessible energetic features comprise the entire system including the solvent, any buffers, background electrolytes or other components introduced for e.g. analysis. The deconvolution of all these interaction types and their dependence on subtle structural variation is required to arrive at a structure-energy correlation that may serve as a guide in receptor construction. The focus on direct host-guest interactions (lock-and-key complementarity) that have dominated the binding concepts of artificial receptors in the past must be widened in order to account for entropic contributions which constitute very significant fractions of the total free energy of interaction. Including entropy necessarily addresses the ambiguity and fuzziness of the host-guest structural ensemble and requires the appreciation of the fact that most liquid phases possess distinct structures of their own. Apparently, it is the perturbation of the intrinsic solvent structure occurring upon association that rules ion binding in polar media where ions are soluble and abundant. Rather than specifying peculiar structural elements useful in anion binding this critical review attempts an illumination of the concepts and individual energetic contributions resulting in the final observation of specific anion recognition (95 references).

  17. Blood versus urine ketone monitoring in a pediatric cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes: a crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Goffinet, Line; Barrea, Thierry; Beauloye, Véronique; Lysy, Philippe A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of our study was to determine the influence of routine ketone monitoring on hyperglycemic events (HE) and ketosis in youngsters with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods: Our single-site, controlled and randomized study was conducted on children and adolescents with T1D outside of remission phase. During two crossover periods of 6 months, patients (n = 22) experiencing HE tested ketones alternatively with a blood ketone meter or urine ketone test strips and gave their opinion on screening methods after completion of clinical trial. Moreover, we evaluated levels of awareness of ketone production in a series of 58 patients and sometimes parents via a multiple-choice questionnaire. Results: Based on self-monitoring data, patients experienced a mean of 4.8 HE/month (range 0–9.3). Patients performed accurate ketone tests more frequently during urine (46%) than during blood-testing (29%) periods (p < 0.05); while globally, 50% of ketone tests were inaccurate (i.e. without HE). Ketosis occurred significantly more often during urine (46.4%) than during blood (14.8%) monitoring (p = 0.01), although no episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) were noticed. Duration of hyperglycemia was not different whether patients measured ketones or not, suggesting that ketone monitoring did not affect correction of glycemia. Patients evaluated blood monitoring more frequently as being practical, reliable, and useful compared with urine testing. Scores in the awareness questionnaire were globally low (36.8%) without difference between patients and their parents. Conclusions: Although our study shows differences in outcomes (e.g. accurate use, detection of ketosis) of urine versus blood ketone monitoring, these did not affect the occurrence of HE. Whereas ketone monitoring is part of standardized diabetes education, its implementation in daily routine remains difficult, partly because patient awareness about mechanisms of ketosis is lacking. PMID:28203360

  18. Modification of Chemical Reactivity via Inclusion Complex Formation: Photochemistry of Dibenzyl Ketones and Benzyl Phenylacetates,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    8217 cage effect," % Dibenzyl Ketone a-CD) 1:1.3 99 1 3-CD 1:1 263 91 9 ).-CD 1:1 81 19 DCA 1:6 155 99 0 Dianin’s compdi 1:45 169 95 5 p- Methylbenzyl Benzyl...Ketone zT-CD 1:1.4 229 1 86 1.5 12 95 DCA 1:8 1710 1.5 97 1.5 0 94 Dianin’s compd 1:22 166-167 98 2 100 a- Methylbenzyl Benzy) Ketone 3-CD 1:1 251 1.6...Photolyses of Benzyl Phenylacetates in Various Host Media in Solid State guest~hoet % productsi’ host ratio complex mp. *C AA AB BB p- Methylbenzyl

  19. Inhibition of carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart by alkyl phenyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yorishige; Narumi, Rika; Shimada, Hideaki

    2007-02-01

    The inhibitory effects of alkyl phenyl ketones on carbonyl reductase activity were examined in pig heart. In this study, carbonyl reductase activity was estimated as the ability to reduce 4-benzoylpyridine to S(-)-alpha-phenyl-4-pyridylmethanol in the cytosolic fraction from pig heart (pig heart cytosol). The order of their inhibitory potencies was hexanophenone > valerophenone > heptanophenone > butyrophenone > propiophenone. The inhibitory potencies of acetophenone and nonanophenone were much lower. A significant relationship was observed between Vmax/Km values for the reduction of alkyl phenyl ketones and their inhibitory potencies for carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart cytosol. Furthermore, hexanophenone was a competitive inhibitor for the enzyme activity. These results indicate that several alkyl phenyl ketones including hexanophenone inhibit carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart cytosol, by acting as substrate inhibitors.

  20. Energetic materials and methods of tailoring electrostatic discharge sensitivity of energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Wallace, Ronald S.; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Collins, Eric S.

    2016-11-01

    An energetic material comprising an elemental fuel, an oxidizer or other element, and a carbon nanofiller or carbon fiber rods, where the carbon nanofiller or carbon fiber rods are substantially homogeneously dispersed in the energetic material. Methods of tailoring the electrostatic discharge sensitivity of an energetic material are also disclosed.

  1. [Effect of phenolic ketones on ethanol fermentation and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinlong; Cheng, Yichao; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Junjun; Chen, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Lignin degradation products are toxic to microorganisms, which is one of the bottlenecks for fuel ethanol production. We studied the effects of phenolic ketones (4-hydroxyacetophenone, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone) derived from lignin degradation on ethanol fermentation of xylose and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis NLP31. Ethanol and the cellular fatty acid of yeast were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results indicate that phenolic ketones negatively affected ethanol fermentation of yeast and the lower molecular weight phenolic ketone compound was more toxic. When the concentration of 4-hydroxyacetophenone was 1.5 g/L, at fermentation of 24 h, the xylose utilization ratio, ethanol yield and ethanol concentration decreased by 42.47%, 5.30% and 9.76 g/L, respectively, compared to the control. When phenolic ketones were in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) of yeast cells was improved. When 1.5 g/L of three aforementioned phenolic ketones was added to the fermentation medium, the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast cells increased to 3.03, 3.06 and 3.61, respectively, compared to 2.58 of the control, which increased cell membrane fluidity and instability. Therefore, phenolic ketones can reduce the yeast growth, increase the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast and lower ethanol productivity. Effectively reduce or remove the content of lignin degradation products is the key to improve lignocellulose biorefinery.

  2. Synthesis of Functionalized Dialkyl Ketones From Carboxylic Acid Derivatives and Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Wotal, Alexander C.; Weix, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Unsymmetrical dialkyl ketones can be directly prepared by the nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling of carboxylic acid chlorides or (2-pyridyl)thioesters with alkyl iodides or benzylic chlorides. A wide variety of functional groups are tolerated by this process, including common nitrogen protecting groups and C-B bonds. Even hindered ketones flanked by tertiary and secondary centers can be formed. The mechanism is proposed to involve the reaction of a (L)Ni(alkyl)2 intermediate with the carboxylic acid derivative. PMID:22360350

  3. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling: From ketone and diamine to pyrazine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kun; Huang, Zhiliang; Qi, Xiaotian; Li, Yingzi; Zhang, Guanghui; Liu, Chao; Yi, Hong; Meng, Lingkui; Bunel, Emilio E.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Pao, Chih-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative C–H/N–H coupling between simple ketones and diamines was developed toward the synthesis of a variety of pyrazines. Various substituted ketones were compatible for this transformation. Preliminary mechanistic investigations indicated that radical species were involved. X-ray absorption fine structure experiments elucidated that the Cu(II) species 5 coordinated by two N atoms at a distance of 2.04 Å and two O atoms at a shorter distance of 1.98 Å was a reactive one for this aerobic oxidative coupling reaction. Density functional theory calculations suggested that the intramolecular coupling of cationic radicals was favorable in this transformation. PMID:26601302

  4. Iron-, Cobalt-, and Nickel-Catalyzed Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation and Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Yu, Shen-Luan; Shen, Wei-Yi; Gao, Jing-Xing

    2015-09-15

    Chiral alcohols are important building blocks in the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries. The enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones catalyzed by transition metal complexes, especially asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) and asymmetric hydrogenation (AH), is one of the most efficient and practical methods for producing chiral alcohols. In both academic laboratories and industrial operations, catalysts based on noble metals such as ruthenium, rhodium, and iridium dominated the asymmetric reduction of ketones. However, the limited availability, high price, and toxicity of these critical metals demand their replacement with abundant, nonprecious, and biocommon metals. In this respect, the reactions catalyzed by first-row transition metals, which are more abundant and benign, have attracted more and more attention. As one of the most abundant metals on earth, iron is inexpensive, environmentally benign, and of low toxicity, and as such it is a fascinating alternative to the precious metals for catalysis and sustainable chemical manufacturing. However, iron catalysts have been undeveloped compared to other transition metals. Compared with the examples of iron-catalyzed asymmetric reduction, cobalt- and nickel-catalyzed ATH and AH of ketones are even seldom reported. In early 2004, we reported the first ATH of ketones with catalysts generated in situ from iron cluster complex and chiral PNNP ligand. Since then, we have devoted ourselves to the development of ATH and AH of ketones with iron, cobalt, and nickel catalysts containing novel chiral aminophosphine ligands. In our study, the iron catalyst containing chiral aminophosphine ligands, which are expected to control the stereochemistry at the metal atom, restrict the number of possible diastereoisomers, and effectively transfer chiral information, are successful catalysts for enantioselective reduction of ketones. Among these novel chiral aminophosphine ligands, 22-membered macrocycle P2N4

  5. One-pot Unsymmetrical Ketone Synthesis Employing a Pyrrole-Bearing Formal Carbonyl Dication Linchpin Reagent.

    PubMed

    Heller, Stephen T; Newton, James N; Fu, Tingting; Sarpong, Richmond

    2015-08-17

    A one-pot procedure for the synthesis of unsymmetrical ketones utilizing a pyrrole-bearing carbonyl linchpin reagent (carbonyl linchpin N,O-dimethylhydroxylamine pyrrole; CLAmP) is reported. In contrast to other carbonyl dielectrophile equivalents, CLAmP enables the synthesis of ketones from a variety of organolithium and Grignard reagents. The electrophilic nature of CLAmP enables the addition of less reactive as well as thermally unstable nucleophiles. CLAmP was designed to form kinetically stable tetrahedral intermediates upon the addition of organometallic nucleophiles. Evidence for the existence of persistent tetrahedral intermediates was obtained through in situ IR studies.

  6. One-pot synthesis of β-acetamido ketones using boric acid at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed; Mohammadi, Korosh

    2012-01-01

    β-acetamido ketones were synthesized in excellent yields through one-pot condensation reaction of aldehydes, acetophenones, acetyl chloride, and acetonitrile in the presence of boric acid as a solid heterogeneous catalyst at room temperature. It is the first successful report of boric acid that has been used as solid acid catalyst for the preparation of β-acetamido ketones. The remarkable advantages offered by this method are green catalyst, mild reaction conditions, simple procedure, short reaction times, and good-to-excellent yields of products.

  7. Comparative primate energetics and hominid evolution.

    PubMed

    Leonard, W R; Robertson, M L

    1997-02-01

    There is currently great interest in developing ecological models for investigating human evolution. Yet little attention has been given to energetics, one of the cornerstones of modern ecosystem ecology. This paper examines the ecological correlates of variation in metabolic requirements among extant primate species, and uses this information to draw inferences about the changes in energy demands over the course of human evolution. Data on body size, resting metabolism, and activity budgets for selected anthropoid species and human hunter-gatherers are used to estimate total energy expenditure (TEE). Analyses indicate that relative energy expenditure levels and day ranges are positively correlated with diet quality; that is, more active species tend to consume more energy-rich diets. Human foragers fall at the positive extremes for modern primates in having high expenditure levels, large ranges, and very high quality diets. During hominid evolution, it appears that TEE increased substantially with the emergence of Homo erectus. This increase is partly attributable to larger body size as well as likely increases in day range and activity level. Assuming similar activity budgets for all early hominid species, estimated TEE for H. erectus is 40-45% greater than for the australopithecines. If, however, it is assumed that the evolution of early Homo was also associated with a shift to a more "human-like" foraging strategy, estimated expenditure levels for H. erectus are 80-85% greater than in the australopithecines. Changing patterns of resource distribution associated with the expansion of African savannas between 2.5 and 1.5 mya may been the impetus for a shift in foraging behavior among early members of the genus Homo. Such ecological changes likely would have made animal foods a more attractive resource. Moreover, greater use of animal foods and the resulting higher quality diet would have been important for supporting the larger day ranges and greater energy

  8. Low temperature (550-700 K) oxidation pathways of cyclic ketones: Dominance of HO2-elimination channels yielding conjugated cyclic coproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Scheer, Adam M.; Welz, Oliver; Vasu, Subith S.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-04-13

    The low-temperature oxidation of three cyclic ketones, cyclopentanone (CPO; C5H8O), cyclohexanone (CHO; C6H10 O), and 2-methyl-cyclopentanone (2-Me-CPO; CH3–C5H7 O), is studied between 550 and 700 K and at 4 or 8 Torr total pressure. Initial fuel radicals R are formedvia fast H-abstraction from the ketones by laser-photolytically generated chlorine atoms. Intermediates and products from the subsequent reactions of these radicals in the presence of excess O2 are probed with time and isomeric resolution using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron ionizing radiation. For CPO and CHO the dominant product channel in the R + O2 reactions is chain-terminating HO2-elimination yielding the conjugated cyclic coproducts 2-cyclopentenone and 2-cyclohexenone, respectively. Results on oxidation of 2-Me-CPO also show a dominant contribution from HO2-elimination. Moreover, the photoionization spectrum of the co-product suggests formation of 2-methyl-2-cyclopentenone and/or 2-cyclohexenone, resulting from a rapid Dowd–Beckwith rearrangement, preceding addition to O2, of the initial (2-oxocyclopentyl)methyl radical to 3-oxocyclohexyl. Cyclic ethers, markers for hydroperoxyalkyl radicals (QOOH), key intermediates in chain-propagating and chain-branching low-temperature combustion pathways, are only minor products. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by stationary point calculations on the potential energy surfaces of the associated R + O2 reactions at the CBS-QB3 level. Furthermore, the calculations indicate that HO2-elimination channels are energetically favored and product formation via QOOH is disfavored. Lastly, the prominence of chain-terminating pathways linked with HO2 formation in low-temperature oxidation of cyclic ketones suggests little low

  9. Anisotropic decomposition of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward; Bajar, Sean; Yulga, Brian; Yang Wenge; Hooks, Daniel

    2007-12-12

    Using a white x-ray synchrotron beam, we have dynamically studied radiation-induced decomposition in single crystalline PETN and TATB. By monitoring the integrated intensity of selected diffraction spots via a CCD x-ray camera as a function of time, we have found that the decomposition rate varies dramatically depending upon the orientation of the crystalline axes relative to polarized x-ray beam and for differing diffracting conditions (spots) within the same crystalline orientation. We suggest that this effect is due to Compton scattering of the polarized x-rays with electron clouds that is dependent upon their relative orientation. This novel effect may yield valuable insight regarding anisotropic detonation sensitivity in energetic materials such as PETN.

  10. Extreme solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Properties of extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events, here defined as those leading to ground level enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic rays, are reviewed. We review recent efforts on modeling SEP acceleration to relativistic energies and present simulation results on particle acceleration at shocks driven by fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in different types of coronal magnetic structures and turbulent downstream compression regions. Based on these modeling results, we discuss the possible role of solar and CME parameters in the lack of GLEs during the present sunspot cycle. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support.

  11. Destruction of Energetic Materials in Supercritical Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-25

    THERMOCHEMISTRY OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER...fringe spacing is 13.5 µm and the acoustic signal period is 28.3 ns. 138 SECTION VI THERMOCHEMISTRY OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN...validation calculation studied the solvation free energies of alkali–chloride ion pairs in liquid water. Such information can teach us about the

  12. Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

  13. Chemoselective hydroxylation of aliphatic sp3 C-H bonds using a ketone catalyst and aqueous H2O2.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Conor J; Hilinski, Michael K

    2014-12-19

    The first ketone-catalyzed method for the oxidation of aliphatic C-H bonds is reported. The reaction conditions employ aryl trifluoromethyl ketones in catalytic amounts and hydrogen peroxide as the terminal oxidant. Hydroxylation is stereospecific and chemoselective for tertiary over secondary C-H bonds. A catalytic cycle invoking a dioxirane as the active oxidant is proposed.

  14. Asymmetric Michael addition of ketones to alkylidene malonates and allylidene malonates via enamine-metal Lewis acid bifunctional catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Sarkisian, Ryan; Xu, Zhenghu; Wang, Hong

    2012-09-07

    Novel enamine-metal Lewis acid bifunctional catalysts were successfully applied to the asymmetric Michael addition of ketones to alkylidene malonates, offering excellent stereoselectivity (up to >99% ee and >99:1 dr). The asymmetric Michael addition of ketones to allylidene malonates was also achieved.

  15. An In Silico Knockout Model for Gastrointestinal Absorption Using a Systems Pharmacology Approach - Development and Application for Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Shivva, Vittal; Tucker, Ian G.; Duffull, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption and disposition of ketones is complex. Recent work describing the pharmacokinetics (PK) of d-β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) following oral ingestion of a ketone monoester ((R)-3-hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate) found multiple input sites, nonlinear disposition and feedback on endogenous production. In the current work, a human systems pharmacology model for gastrointestinal absorption and subsequent disposition of small molecules (monocarboxylic acids with molecular weight < 200 Da) was developed with an application to a ketone monoester. The systems model was developed by collating the information from the literature and knowledge gained from empirical population modelling of the clinical data. In silico knockout variants of this systems model were used to explore the mechanism of gastrointestinal absorption of ketones. The knockouts included active absorption across different regions in the gut and also a passive diffusion knockout, giving 10 gut knockouts in total. Exploration of knockout variants has suggested that there are at least three distinct regions in the gut that contribute to absorption of ketones. Passive diffusion predominates in the proximal gut and active processes contribute to the absorption of ketones in the distal gut. Low doses are predominantly absorbed from the proximal gut by passive diffusion whereas high doses are absorbed across all sites in the gut. This work has provided mechanistic insight into the absorption process of ketones, in the form of unique in silico knockouts that have potential for application with other therapeutics. Future studies on absorption process of ketones are suggested to substantiate findings in this study. PMID:27685985

  16. Ketonization of Model Pyrolysis Oil Solutions in a Plug Flow Reactor over a Composite Oxide of Fe, Ce, and Al

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stabilization and upgrading of pyrolysis oil requires the neutralization of the acidic components of the oil. The conversion of small organic acids, particularly acetic acid, to ketones is one approach to addressing the instability of the oils caused by low pH. In the ketonization reaction, acet...

  17. Efficient asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones in ethanol with chiral iridium complexes of spiroPAP ligands as catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Peng; Yuan, Ming-Lei; Yang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Ke; Xie, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2015-04-11

    Highly efficient iridium catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of simple ketones with ethanol as a hydrogen donor has been developed. By using chiral spiro iridium catalysts (S)- a series of alkyl aryl ketones were hydrogenated to chiral alcohols with up to 98% ee.

  18. Energetics and the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Reiches, Meredith W.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Moore, Sophie E.; Ellison, Peter T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: The human immune system is an ever-changing composition of innumerable cells and proteins, continually ready to respond to pathogens or insults. The cost of maintaining this state of immunological readiness is rarely considered. In this paper we aim to discern a cost to non-acute immune function by investigating how low levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) relate to other energetic demands and resources in adolescent Gambian girls. Methodology: Data from a longitudinal study of 66 adolescent girls was used to test hypotheses around investment in immune function. Non-acute (under 2 mg/L) CRP was used as an index of immune function. Predictor variables include linear height velocity, adiposity, leptin, and measures of energy balance. Results: Non-acute log CRP was positively associated with adiposity (β = 0.16, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.17) and levels of the adipokine leptin (β = 1.17, P = 0.006, R2 = 0.09). CRP was also negatively associated with increased investment in growth, as measured by height velocity (β = −0.58, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.13) and lean mass deposition β = −0.42, P = 0.005, R2 = 0.08). Relationships between adiposity and growth explained some, but not all, of this association. We do not find that CRP was related to energy balance. Conclusions and implications: These data support a hypothesis that investment in non-acute immune function is facultative, and sensitive to energetic resources and demands. We also find support for an adaptive association between the immune system and adipose tissue. PMID:28003312

  19. Energetically optimal running requires torques about the centre of mass.

    PubMed

    Usherwood, James R; Hubel, Tatjana Y

    2012-08-07

    Bipedal animals experience ground reaction forces (GRFs) that pass close to the centre of mass (CoM) throughout stance, first decelerating the body, then re-accelerating it during the second half of stance. This results in fluctuations in kinetic energy, requiring mechanical work from the muscles. However, here we show analytically that, in extreme cases (with a very large body pitch moment of inertia), continuous alignment of the GRF through the CoM requires greater mechanical work than a maintained vertical force; we show numerically that GRFs passing between CoM and vertical throughout stance are energetically favourable under realistic conditions; and demonstrate that the magnitude, if not the precise form, of actual CoM-torque profiles in running is broadly consistent with simple mechanical work minimization for humans with appropriate pitch moment of inertia. While the potential energetic savings of CoM-torque support strategies are small (a few per cent) over the range of human running, their importance increases dramatically at high speeds and stance angles. Fast, compliant runners or hoppers would benefit considerably from GRFs more vertical than the zero-CoM-torque strategy, especially with bodies of high pitch moment of inertia--suggesting a novel advantage to kangaroos of their peculiar long-head/long-tail structure.

  20. Femtosecond laser interaction with energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Edward V.; Benterou, Jerry J.; Lee, Ronald S.; Roseke, Frank; Stuart, Brent C.

    2002-09-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation shows promise in machining energetic materials into desired shapes with minimal thermal and mechanical effects to the remaining material. We will discuss the physical effects associated with machining energetic materials and assemblies containing energetic materials, based on experimental results. Interaction of ultra-short laser pulses with matter will produce high temperature plasma at high-pressure which results in the ablation of material. In the case of energetic material, which includes high explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics, this ablation process must be accomplished without coupling energy into the energetic material. Experiments were conducted in order to characterize and better understand the phenomena of femtosecond laser pulse ablation on a variety of explosives and propellants. Experimental data will be presented for laser fluence thresholds, machining rates, cutting depths and surface quality of the cuts.

  1. Energetic Particle Influence on the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Irina A.; Aplin, Karen L.; Arnold, Frank; Bazilevskaya, Galina A.; Harrison, R. Giles; Krivolutsky, Alexei A.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Turunen, Esa; Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2015-11-01

    This manuscript gives an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the effects of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) onto the whole atmosphere, from the lower thermosphere/mesosphere through the stratosphere and troposphere, to the surface. The paper summarizes the different sources and energies of particles, principally galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), solar energetic particles (SEPs) and energetic electron precipitation (EEP). All the proposed mechanisms by which EPP can affect the atmosphere are discussed, including chemical changes in the upper atmosphere and lower thermosphere, chemistry-dynamics feedbacks, the global electric circuit and cloud formation. The role of energetic particles in Earth's atmosphere is a multi-disciplinary problem that requires expertise from a range of scientific backgrounds. To assist with this synergy, summary tables are provided, which are intended to evaluate the level of current knowledge of the effects of energetic particles on processes in the entire atmosphere.

  2. Femtosecond Laser Interaction with Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, E; Benterou, J; Lee, R; Roeske, F; Stuart, B

    2002-03-25

    Femtosecond laser ablation shows promise in machining energetic materials into desired shapes with minimal thermal and mechanical effects to the remaining material. We will discuss the physical effects associated with machining energetic materials and assemblies containing energetic materials, based on experimental results. Interaction of ultra-short laser pulses with matter will produce high temperature plasma at high-pressure which results in the ablation of material. In the case of energetic material, which includes high explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics, this ablation process must be accomplished without coupling energy into the energetic material. Experiments were conducted in order to characterize and better understand the phenomena of femtosecond laser pulse ablation on a variety of explosives and propellants. Experimental data will be presented for laser fluence thresholds, machining rates, cutting depths and surface quality of the cuts.

  3. Observations and Modeling of Geospace Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlin

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic particles and electric and magnetic fields from state-of-art instruments onboard Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of the energetic particles and the fields in the inner magnetosphere and impose new challenges to any quantitative modeling of the physical processes responsible for these observations. Concurrent measurements of energetic particles by satellites in highly inclined low Earth orbits and plasma and fields by satellites in farther distances in the magnetospheres and in the up stream solar wind are the critically needed information for quantitative modeling and for leading to eventual accurate forecast of the variations of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere. In this presentation, emphasis will be on the most recent advance in our understanding of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere and the missing links for significantly advance in our modeling and forecasting capabilities.

  4. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  5. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-01

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  6. Energetic Adaptations Persist after Bariatric Surgery in Severely Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Butte, Nancy F.; Brandt, Mary L.; Wong, William W.; Liu, Yan; Mehta, Nitesh R.; Wilson, Theresa A.; Adolph, Anne L.; Puyau, Maurice R.; Vohra, Firoz A.; Shypailo, Roman J.; Zakeri, Issa F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods post-surgery. Energetic, metabolic and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. Design and Methods At baseline and at 1.5, 6 and 12 months post-baseline, 24-h room calorimetry, body composition and fasting blood biochemistries were measured in eleven obese adolescents relative to five matched controls. Results In RYGB group, mean weight loss was 44±19 kg at 12 months. Total energy expenditure (TEE), activity EE, basal metabolic rate (BMR), sleep EE and walking EE significantly declined by 1.5 months (p=0.001) and remained suppressed at 6 and 12 months. Adjusted for age, sex, FFM and FM, EE was still lower than baseline (p=0.001). Decreases in serum insulin, leptin, and T3, gut hormones, and urinary norepinephrine (NE) paralleled the decline in EE. Adjusted changes in TEE, BMR and/or sleep EE were associated with decreases in insulin, HOMA, leptin, TSH, total T3, PYY3–36, GLP2 and urinary NE and epinephrine (p=0.001–0.05). Conclusions Energetic adaptations in response to RYGB-induced weight loss are associated with changes in insulin, adipokines, thyroid hormones, gut hormones and sympathetic nervous system activity, and persist 12 months post-surgery. PMID:25707380

  7. Pioneer 11 observations of energetic particles in the jovian magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Van Allen, J A; Randall, B A; Baker, D N; Goertz, C K; Sentman, D D; Thomsen, M F; Flindt, H R

    1975-05-02

    Knowledge of the positional distributions, absolute intensities, energy spectra, and angular distributions of energetic electrons and protons in the Jovian magnetosphere has been considerably advanced by the planetary flyby of Pioneer 11 in November-December 1974 along a quite different trajectory from that of Pioneer 10 a year earlier. (i) The previously reported magnetodisc is shown to be blunted and much more extended in latitude on the sunward side than on the dawn side. (ii) Rigid corotation of the population of protons E(p) approximately 1 million electron volts in the magnetodisc is confirmed. (iii) Angular distributions of energetic electrons E(e) > 21 million electron volts in the inner magnetosphere are shown to be compatible with the Kennel-Petschek whistler-mode instability. (iv) A diverse body of magnetospheric effects by the Jovian satellites is found. (v) Observations of energetic electrons in to a radial distance of 1.59 Jovian radii provide a fresh basis for the interpretation of decimetric radio noise emission.

  8. Comparative Performance Assessment of Point-of-Care Testing Devices for Measuring Glucose and Ketones at the Patient Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Kaczmarek, Ewa; Guerra, Elena; Mastrantonio, Fabrizio; Lucarelli, Fausto; Valgimigli, Francesco; Mosca, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background: Point-of-care (POC) testing devices for monitoring glucose and ketones can play a key role in the management of dysglycemia in hospitalized diabetes patients. The accuracy of glucose devices can be influenced by biochemical changes that commonly occur in critically ill hospital patients and by the medication prescribed. Little is known about the influence of these factors on ketone POC measurements. The aim of this study was to assess the analytical performance of POC hospital whole-blood glucose and ketone meters and the extent of glucose interference factors on the design and accuracy of ketone results. Methods: StatStrip glucose/ketone, Optium FreeStyle glucose/ketone, and Accu-Chek Performa glucose were also assessed and results compared to a central laboratory reference method. The analytical evaluation was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) protocols for precision, linearity, method comparison, and interference. Results: The interferences assessed included acetoacetate, acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, galactose, maltose, uric acid, and sodium. The accuracies of both Optium ketone and glucose measurements were significantly influenced by varying levels of hematocrit and ascorbic acid. StatStrip ketone and glucose measurements were unaffected by the interferences tested with exception of ascorbic acid, which reduced the higher level ketone value. The accuracy of Accu-Chek glucose measurements was affected by hematocrit, by ascorbic acid, and significantly by galactose. The method correlation assessment indicated differences between the meters in compliance to ISO 15197 and CLSI 12-A3 performance criteria. Conclusions: Combined POC glucose/ketone methods are now available. The use of these devices in a hospital setting requires careful consideration with regard to the selection of instruments not sensitive to hematocrit variation and presence of interfering substances. PMID:25519295

  9. Comparative performance assessment of point-of-care testing devices for measuring glucose and ketones at the patient bedside.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Kaczmarek, Ewa; Guerra, Elena; Mastrantonio, Fabrizio; Lucarelli, Fausto; Valgimigli, Francesco; Mosca, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Point-of-care (POC) testing devices for monitoring glucose and ketones can play a key role in the management of dysglycemia in hospitalized diabetes patients. The accuracy of glucose devices can be influenced by biochemical changes that commonly occur in critically ill hospital patients and by the medication prescribed. Little is known about the influence of these factors on ketone POC measurements. The aim of this study was to assess the analytical performance of POC hospital whole-blood glucose and ketone meters and the extent of glucose interference factors on the design and accuracy of ketone results. StatStrip glucose/ketone, Optium FreeStyle glucose/ketone, and Accu-Chek Performa glucose were also assessed and results compared to a central laboratory reference method. The analytical evaluation was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) protocols for precision, linearity, method comparison, and interference. The interferences assessed included acetoacetate, acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, galactose, maltose, uric acid, and sodium. The accuracies of both Optium ketone and glucose measurements were significantly influenced by varying levels of hematocrit and ascorbic acid. StatStrip ketone and glucose measurements were unaffected by the interferences tested with exception of ascorbic acid, which reduced the higher level ketone value. The accuracy of Accu-Chek glucose measurements was affected by hematocrit, by ascorbic acid, and significantly by galactose. The method correlation assessment indicated differences between the meters in compliance to ISO 15197 and CLSI 12-A3 performance criteria. Combined POC glucose/ketone methods are now available. The use of these devices in a hospital setting requires careful consideration with regard to the selection of instruments not sensitive to hematocrit variation and presence of interfering substances.

  10. Energetic Fermi/LAT GRB 100414A: Energetic and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tsai, Patrick P.; Tashiro, Makoto S.

    2012-03-01

    This study presents multi-wavelength observational results for energetic GRB 100414A with GeV photons. The prompt spectral fitting using Suzaku/WAM data yielded spectral peak energies of E src peak of 1458.7+132.6 - 106.6 keV and E iso of 34.5+2.0 - 1.8 × 1052 erg with z = 1.368. The optical afterglow light curves between 3 and 7 days were effectively fitted according to a simple power law with a temporal index of α = -2.6 ± 0.1. The joint light curve with earlier Swift/UVOT observations yields a temporal break at 2.3 ± 0.2 days. This was the first Fermi/LAT detected event that demonstrated the clear temporal break in the optical afterglow. The jet opening angle derived from this temporal break was 5fdg8, consistent with those of other well-observed long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-wavelength analyses in this study showed that GRB 100414A follows E src peak-E iso and E src peak-E γ correlations. The late afterglow revealed a flatter evolution with significant excesses at 27.2 days. The most straightforward explanation for the excess is that GRB 100414A was accompanied by a contemporaneous supernova. The model light curve based on other GRB-SN events is marginally consistent with that of the observed light curve.

  11. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. IV. Coronal Mass Ejection Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2016-11-01

    This study entails the fourth part of a global flare energetics project, in which the mass m cme, kinetic energy E kin, and the gravitational potential energy E grav of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is measured in 399 M and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, using a new method based on the EUV dimming effect. EUV dimming is modeled in terms of a radial adiabatic expansion process, which is fitted to the observed evolution of the total emission measure of the CME source region. The model derives the evolution of the mean electron density, the emission measure, the bulk plasma expansion velocity, the mass, and the energy in the CME source region. The EUV dimming method is truly complementary to the Thomson scattering method in white light, which probes the CME evolution in the heliosphere at r ≳ 2 R ⊙, while the EUV dimming method tracks the CME launch in the corona. We compare the CME parameters obtained in white light with the LASCO/C2 coronagraph with those obtained from EUV dimming with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the SDO for all identical events in both data sets. We investigate correlations between CME parameters, the relative timing with flare parameters, frequency occurrence distributions, and the energy partition between magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies. CME energies are found to be systematically lower than the dissipated magnetic energies, which is consistent with a magnetic origin of CMEs.

  12. A one-pot approach to Δ2-isoxazolines from ketones and arylacetylenes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elena Yu; Tatarinova, Inna V; Ivanova, Elena V; Zorina, Nadezhda V; Ushakov, Igor' A; Trofimov, Boris A

    2013-01-04

    The sequential reaction of ketones with arylacetylenes and hydroxylamine in the presence of KOBu(t)/DMSO followed by the treatment of the reaction mixture with H(2)O and KOH leads to Δ(2)-isoxazolines in up to 88% yield.

  13. Stoichiometric Reactions of Acylnickel(II) Complexes with Electrophiles and the Catalytic Synthesis of Ketones

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acylnickel(II) complexes feature prominently in cross-electrophile coupling (XEC) reactions that form ketones, yet their reactivity has not been systematically investigated. We present here our studies on the reactivity of acylnickel(II) complexes with a series of carbon electrophiles. Bromobenzene, α-chloroethylbenzene, bromooctane, and iodooctane were reacted with (dtbbpy)NiII(C(O)C5H11)(Br) (1b) and (dtbbpy)NiII(C(O)tolyl)(Br) (1c) to form a variety of organic products. While reactions with bromobenzene formed complex mixtures of ketones, reactions with α-chloroethylbenzene were highly selective for the cross-ketone product. Reactions with iodooctane and bromooctane also produced the cross-ketone product, but in intermediate yield and selectivity. In most cases the presence or absence of a chemical reductant (zinc) had only a small effect on the selectivity of the reaction. The coupling of 1c with iodooctane (60% yield) was translated into a catalytic reaction, the carbonylative coupling of bromoarenes with primary bromoalkanes (six examples, 60% average yield). PMID:25364092

  14. Chiral primary amine catalyzed asymmetric Michael addition of malononitrile to α-substituted vinyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Fu, Niankai; Zhang, Long; Luo, Sanzhong

    2015-01-16

    The first efficient and highly enantioselective Michael addition-protonation reaction of malononitriles to α-substituted vinyl ketones has been developed by using a chiral primary amine as the organocatalyst. With a Hantzsch ester as the hydride source, an enantioselective tandem reduction, Michael addition-protonation reaction of benzylidenemalononitrile has also been achieved with good yields and high enantioselectivities.

  15. A chiral benzoylthiourea-pyrrolidine catalyst for the highly enantioselective Michael addition of ketones to chalcones.

    PubMed

    Ban, Shu-Rong; Zhu, Xi-Xia; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Li, Qing-Shan

    2014-06-01

    A benzoylthiourea-pyrrolidine catalyst was developed for the asymmetric Michael addition of ketones to chalcones. The corresponding products were obtained in high yields with high level of diastereoselectivities (up to 99:1 dr) and high level of enantioselectivities (up to 94% ee) under mild conditions.

  16. The central role of ketones in reversible and irreversible hydrothermal organic functional group transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ziming; Gould, Ian R.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Shock, Everett L.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of hydrothermal reactions involving organic compounds suggest complex, possibly reversible, reaction pathways that link functional groups from reduced alkanes all the way to oxidized carboxylic acids. Ketones represent a critical functional group because they occupy a central position in the reaction pathway, at the point where Csbnd C bond cleavage is required for the formation of the more oxidized carboxylic acids. The mechanisms for the critical bond cleavage reactions in ketones, and how they compete with other reactions are the focus of this experimental study. We studied a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK), in H2O at 300 °C and 70 MPa for up to 528 h. Product analysis was performed as a function of time at low DBK conversions to reveal the primary reaction pathways. Reversible interconversion between ketone, alcohol, alkene and alkane functional groups is observed in addition to formation of radical coupling products derived from irreversible Csbnd C and Csbnd H homolytic bond cleavage. The product distributions are time-dependent but the bond cleavage products dominate. The major products that accumulate at longer reaction times are toluene and larger, dehydrogenated structures that are initially formed by radical coupling. The hydrogen atoms generated by dehydrogenation of the coupling products are predominantly consumed in the formation of toluene. Even though bond cleavage products dominate, no carboxylic acids were observed on the timescale of the reactions under the chosen experimental conditions.

  17. Catalyst-controlled dioxygenation of olefins: an approach to peroxides, alcohols, and ketones.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Su-Li; Gu, Zhen; Wang, Haijun; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Liang, Yong-Min

    2015-06-05

    An efficient catalytic approach for the synthesis of substituted peroxides, alcohols, and ketones through a catalyst-controlled highly selective dioxygenation of olefins has been demonstrated. The reported methods are mild and practical, can be switched by the selection of different catalytic systems, and employ peroxide as an oxidant and a reagent at room temperature.

  18. Raspberry Ketone Trifluoroacetate, a New Attractant for the Queensland Fruit Fly, Bactrocera Tryoni (Froggatt).

    PubMed

    Siderhurst, Matthew S; Park, Soo J; Buller, Caitlyn N; Jamie, Ian M; Manoukis, Nicholas C; Jang, Eric B; Taylor, Phillip W

    2016-02-01

    Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Q-fly), is a major pest of horticultural crops in eastern Australia. Lures that attract male Q-fly are important for detection of incursions and outbreaks, monitoring of populations, and control by mass trapping and male annihilation. Cuelure, an analog of naturally occurring raspberry ketone, is the standard Q-fly lure, but it has limited efficacy compared with lures that are available for some other fruit flies such as methyl eugenol for B. dorsalis. Melolure is a more recently developed raspberry ketone analog that has shown better attraction than cuelure in some field studies but not in others. A novel fluorinated analog of raspberry ketone, raspberry ketone trifluoroacetate (RKTA), has been developed as a potential improvement on cuelure and melolure. RKTA placed on laboratory cages containing 2-week-old Q-flies elicited strong behavioral responses from males. Quantification of Q-fly responses in these cages, using digital images to estimate numbers of flies aggregated near different lures, showed RKTA attracted and arrested significantly more flies than did cuelure or melolure. RKTA shows good potential as a new lure for improved surveillance and control of Q-fly.

  19. Field captures of wild melon fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) with an improved male attractant, raspberry ketone formate.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eric B; Casana-Giner, Victor; Oliver, James E

    2007-08-01

    Field-trapping evaluations of the new male attractant, formic acid 4-(3-oxobutyl) phenyl ester (raspberry ketone formate [RKF]) were conducted in Hawaii with wild populations of melon flies, Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett (Diptera: Tephritidae), to determine its activity in the field and to evaluate new plastic matrix formulations. All tests were compared with the standard melon fly attractant 4-(4-acetoxyphenyl) -2-butanone (cuelure [CL]), which is the attractant of choice for detection programs aimed at melon fly and other cuelure-responding Bactrocera fruit flies. Results of these tests over a range of doses on cotton wicks showed that at a 1-g dose raspberry ketone formate was 1.5-2 times more attractive compared with cuelure for up to 11 wk in the field. Lower doses applied on cotton wicks were less active, presumably due to hydrolysis of RKF to raspberry ketone. Raspberry ketone formate embedded in a plastic plug formulation also was field tested, and it was shown to be more attractive to male melon fly compared with cuelure. The use of this new attractant in control and detection programs is discussed.

  20. Lewis acid/CpRu dual catalysis in the enantioselective decarboxylative allylation of ketone enolates.

    PubMed

    Linder, David; Austeri, Martina; Lacour, Jérôme

    2009-10-07

    The addition of a Lewis acidic metal triflate salt Mg(OTf)(2) as co-catalyst in the CpRu-catalyzed decarboxylative allylation of in situ-generated ketone enolates allows the reaction to proceed at lower temperature with higher regio- and enantioselectivity. Even so-far-unreactive substrates react.

  1. Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide / sulfonated polyether ether ketone composite membrane for electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetharaman, S.; Ramya, K.; Dhathathreyan, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    A simple and effective method for the preparation of sulfonated polyether ether ketone (SPEEK) based composites with electrochemical reduced graphene oxide (EGO) as inorganic fillers has been described. The resulting dispersions are homogeneous and the cast membranes show significant improvement on tensile strength and thermal properties. It has high ionic conductivity and is cost effective making it a promising alternative membrane for electrochemical applications.

  2. A Nucleophilic Strategy for Enantioselective Intermolecular α-Amination: Access to Enantioenriched α-Arylamino Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Dillon H.; Guasch, Joan; Toste, F. Dean

    2016-01-01

    The enantioselective addition of anilines to azoalkenes was accomplished through the use of a chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. The resulting α-arylamino hydrazones were obtained in good yields and excellent enantioselectivities and provide access to enantioenriched α-arylamino ketones. A serendipitous kinetic resolution of racemic α-arylamino hydrazones is also described. PMID:26066512

  3. Highly efficient and direct heterocyclization of dipyridyl ketone to N,N-bidentate ligands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jie; Dyers, Leon Jr; Mason, Richard Jr; Amoyaw, Prince; Bu, Xiu R.

    2005-01-01

    [reaction: see text] Reaction of various aromatic aldehydes with 2,2'-dipyridyl ketone and ammonium acetate in hot acetic acid provides ready access to a series of substituted 1-pyridylimidazo[1,5-a]pyridines, a class of ligands possessing an N,N-bidentate feature, in good yields.

  4. beta-Hydroxysulfoxides as chiral cyclic ketone equivalents: enantioselective synthesis of polysubstituted cyclohexanones, cyclohexenones and cyclohexenediones.

    PubMed

    Carreño, M Carmen; Pérez-González, Manuel; Ribagorda, María; Somoza, Alvaro; Urbano, Antonio

    2002-12-21

    The beta-hydroxysulfoxide moiety, after oxidation to sulfone, acts as a masked carbonyl group in a cyclic system, opening an easy access to differently substituted enantiomerically pure cyclic ketones by means of aluminium-mediated conjugate additions, stereoselective reductions and elimination by retrocondensation in basic medium.

  5. Benzofuran ketone dosage-dependent rayless goldenrod (Isocoma pluriflora) toxicosis in a caprine model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the dosage of benzofuran ketone compounds (tremetone, 3-hydroxytremetone, dehydrotremetone, and 3-oxyangeloyltremetone) and the duration of exposure to these compounds required to produce clinical signs and the associated pathological changes of rayles ...

  6. Engineering of Ralstonia eutropha H16 for Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Production of Methyl Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jana; MacEachran, Daniel; Burd, Helcio; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Bi, Changhao; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lee, Taek Soon; Hillson, Nathan J.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Singer, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha is a facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacterium able to grow with organic substrates or H2 and CO2 under aerobic conditions. Under conditions of nutrient imbalance, R. eutropha produces copious amounts of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB). Its ability to utilize CO2 as a sole carbon source renders it an interesting new candidate host for the production of renewable liquid transportation fuels. We engineered R. eutropha for the production of fatty acid-derived, diesel-range methyl ketones. Modifications engineered in R. eutropha included overexpression of a cytoplasmic version of the TesA thioesterase, which led to a substantial (>150-fold) increase in fatty acid titer under certain conditions. In addition, deletion of two putative β-oxidation operons and heterologous expression of three genes (the acyl coenzyme A oxidase gene from Micrococcus luteus and fadB and fadM from Escherichia coli) led to the production of 50 to 65 mg/liter of diesel-range methyl ketones under heterotrophic growth conditions and 50 to 180 mg/liter under chemolithoautotrophic growth conditions (with CO2 and H2 as the sole carbon source and electron donor, respectively). Induction of the methyl ketone pathway diverted substantial carbon flux away from PHB biosynthesis and appeared to enhance carbon flux through the pathway for biosynthesis of fatty acids, which are the precursors of methyl ketones. PMID:23686271

  7. Two-carbon homologation of aldehydes and ketones to a,ß-unsaturated aldehydes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphonate reagents were developed for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes or ketones to unbranched- or methyl-branched a,ß-unsaturated aldehydes. The phosphonate reagents, diethyl methylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone and diethyl ethylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone, contained a...

  8. Poly(arylene ether ketone) carrying hyperquaternized pendants: Preparation, stability and conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Kunzhi; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Zhang, Haibo; Pang, Jinhui; Jiang, Zhenhua

    2015-08-01

    A new strategy to synthesize comb-shaped poly(arylene ether ketone) ionomers with hyperquaternized pendants was detailed in this work. Poly(arylene ether ketone) with electron-rich phenyl rings on the side chain was copolymerized. These electron-rich phenyl rings which could be chloromethylated and serve as precursors to cationic sites, are introduced during monomer synthesis. After chloromethylation and quaternization on the side chain, these resulting anion exchange membranes exhibit high conductivities and good dimensional stability, which benefit from the side chain type structure. The highest chloride conductivity of 0.047 S cm-1 was observed in PAEK-QTPM-30 (IEC = 1.58 mmol g-1) and swelling ratio is 31.7% at 80 °C. The structural properties of the synthesized poly(arylene ether ketone)s were investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The anion exchange membranes showed excellent thermal stability up to 200 °C under nitrogen and good chemical stability for high conductivity after treating in alkaline condition up to 30 days. These membranes were studied by IEC, water uptake, dimensional stability. The nano-phase separation from ionic aggregation was confirmed by SAXS. This work implies a viable strategy to improve the performance of anion exchange membranes.

  9. Stereoselective double Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indoles with divinyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Silvanus, Andrew C; Heffernan, Stephen J; Liptrot, David J; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Andrews, Benjamin I; Carbery, David R

    2009-03-05

    A tandem double Friedel-Crafts reaction of indoles and nonsymmetrical divinyl ketones has been achieved. The tandem reaction forms complex [6-5-7]-tricyclic indoles in excellent yields. The reaction is completely regioselective and offers high levels of syn diastereoselectivity. The reaction is also seen to be sensitive to substrate structure and catalyst.

  10. Electrochemical preparation of ether ketones from (poly)propylene glycol monoethers

    SciTech Connect

    Snoble, K.A.J.

    1984-02-14

    This invention is a method for preparing an ether ketone comprising electrolyzing a solution containing a (poly)propylene glycol monoether, hydroxyl ions and optionally water in an electrolytic cell having an anode at least partially coated with nickel peroxide, silver peroxide, cobalt peroxide or copper peroxide.

  11. Highly efficient ligands for palladium-catalyzed asymmetric alkylation of ketone enolates.

    PubMed

    You, S L; Hou, X L; Dai, L X; Zhu, X Z

    2001-01-25

    [figure: see text] Ferrocene-modified chiral pocket ligands have been studied in the palladium-catalyzed asymmetric alkylation of simple ketone enolates, in which (R,R,Sp,Sp)-1 containing two pairs of matched chiralities, central chirality and planar chirality, behaved very efficiently in this reaction and up to 95% ee value was achieved.

  12. Two-Carbon Homologation of Ketones to 3-Methyl Unsaturated Aldehydes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The usual scheme of two-carbon homologation of ketones to 3-methyl unsaturated aldehydes by Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons condensations with phosphonate esters, such as triethyl-2-phosphonoacetate, involves three steps. The phosphonate condensation step results in extension of the carbon chain by two carb...

  13. Effects of Insecticidal Ketones Present in Mint Plants on GABAA Receptor from Mammalian Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela Eugenia; Marin, Leticia Delgado; García, Daniel Asmed

    2017-01-01

    Background: The genus Mentha, an important member of the Lamiaceae family, is represented by many species commonly known as mint. The insecticidal activity of Mentha oil and its main components has been tested and established against various insects/pests. Among these, the ketone monoterpenes that are most common in different Mentha species demonstrated insect toxicity, with pulegone being the most active, followed by carvone and menthone. Considering that the GABAA receptor (GABAA-R) is one of the main insecticide targets on neurons, and that pulegone would modulate the insect GABA system, it may be expected that the insecticidal properties of Mentha ketones are mediated by their interaction with this receptor. Objective: In order to discern the pharmacological actions of these products when used as insecticides on mammalian organisms, we evaluated the pharmacologic activity of ketones, commonly present in Mentha plants, on native GABAA-R from rats. Materials and Methods: Determination of ketones effects on allosterically enhanced benzodiazepine binding, using primary cultures of cortical neurons, which express functional receptors and MTT assay to evaluate their cell toxicity. Results: Our results seem to indicate that ketone components of Mentha, with proven repellent or insecticide activity, were able to behave as GABAA-R negative allosteric modulators in murine cells and consequently could exhibit convulsant activity in mammalians. Only pulegone at the highest assayed concentration (2 mM) showed a significant reduction in cell viability after exposure for 24 hr. Conclusion: The present results strongly suggest that the ketone components of Mentha are able to exhibit convulsant activity in mammalian organisms, but functional assays and in vivo experiments would be necessary to corroborate this proposed action. SUMMARY The pharmacological activity of insecticide ketones, commonly present in Mentha plants, was evaluated on native GABAA receptor from mammalian

  14. Lack of energetic equivalence in forest soil invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ehnes, Roswitha B; Pollierer, Melanie M; Erdmann, Georgia; Klarner, Bernhard; Eitzinger, Bernhard; Digel, Christoph; Ott, David; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Brose, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Ecological communities consist of small abundant and large non-abundant species. The energetic equivalence rule is an often-observed pattern that could be explained by equal energy usage among abundant small organisms and non-abundant large organisms. To generate this pattern, metabolism (as an indicator of individual energy use) and abundance have to scale inversely with body mass, and cancel each other out. In contrast, the pattern referred to as biomass equivalence states that the biomass of all species in an area should be constant across the body-mass range. In this study, we investigated forest soil communities with respect to metabolism, abundance, population energy use, and biomass. We focused on four land-use types in three different landscape blocks (Biodiversity Exploratories). The soil samples contained 870 species across 12 phylogenetic groups. Our results indicated positive sublinear metabolic scaling and negative sublinear abundance scaling with species body mass. The relationships varied mainly due to differences among phylogenetic groups or feeding types, and only marginally due to land-use type. However, these scaling relationships were not exactly inverse to each other, resulting in increasing population energy use and biomass with increasing body mass for most combinations of phylogenetic group or feeding type with land-use type. Thus, our results are mostly inconsistent with the classic perception of energetic equivalence, and reject the biomass equivalence hypothesis while documenting a specific and nonrandom pattern of how abundance, energy use, and biomass are distributed across size classes. However, these patterns are consistent with two alternative predictions: the resource-thinning hypothesis, which states that abundance decreases with trophic level, and the allometric degree hypothesis, which states that population energy use should increase with population average body mass, due to correlations with the number of links of consumers and

  15. Animal Galloping and Human Hopping: An Energetics and Biomechanics Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstedt, Stan L.; Mineo, Patrick M.; Schaeffer, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates fundamental principles of mammalian locomotion. It provides opportunities to interrogate aspects of locomotion from biomechanics to energetics to body size scaling. It has the added benefit of having results with robust signal to noise so that students will have success even if not "meticulous" in…

  16. Paleo Mars energetic particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, Markku; McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Kallio, Esa

    2015-12-01

    A young Mars may well have possessed a global dipolar magnetic field that provided protection for the planet's atmosphere from the space weather environment. Against this background, we study in the present paper the effect of various dipole magnetic fields on particle precipitation (range 10 keV-4.5 MeV) on the upper Martian atmosphere as the magnetosphere gradually declined to become an induced magnetosphere. We utilized a hybrid plasma model to provide, in a self-consistent fashion, simulations (that included ion-kinetic effects) of the interaction between the Martian obstacle (magnetized or otherwise) and the solar wind. Besides the intrinsic dipole, with field strengths of ~100 nT and below, we assume modern solar and atmospheric parameters to examine the effect of the single variable, that is the dipole strength. We thereby investigated the precipitation of solar energetic particles on the upper atmosphere of the planet in circumstances characterized by the evolution of a diminishing Martian dynamo that initially generated an ideal dipolar field. It is demonstrated that an assumed Martian dipole would have provided, in the energy range investigated, significant shielding against proton impingement and that the interaction between the solar wind and the assumed Martian magnetic dipole would have been responsible for generating the shielding effect identified.

  17. The Galileo Energetic Particles Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.; Mcentire, R. W.; Jaskulek, S.; Wilken, B.

    1992-01-01

    Amongst its complement of particles and fields instruments, the Galileo spacecraft carries an Energetic Particles Detector (EPD) designed to measure the characteristics of particle populations important in determining the size, shape, and dynamics of the Jovian magnetosphere. To do this the EPD provides 4pi angular coverage and spectral measurements for Z greater than or equal to 1 ions from 20 keV to 55 MeV, for electrons from 15 keV to greater than 11 MeV, and for the elemental species helium through iron from approximately 10 keV/nucl to 15 MeV/nucl. Two bidirectional telescopes, mounted on a stepping platform, employ magnetic deflection, energy loss versus energy, and time-of-flight techniques to provide 64 rate channels and pulse height analysis of priority selected events. The EPD data system provides a large number of possible operational modes from which a small number will be selected to optimize data collection during the many encounter and cruise phases of the mission. The EPD employs a number of safeing algorithms that are to be used in the event that its self-checking procedures indicate a problem. The instrument and its operation are described.

  18. Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    2014-08-01

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was flown for ~161 days in six flights over Antarctica. High energy cosmic-ray data were collected over a wide energy range from ~ 10^10 to > 10^14 eV at an average altitude of ~38.5 km with ~3.9 g/cm2 atmospheric overburden. Cosmic-ray elements from protons (Z = 1) to iron nuclei (Z = 26) are separated with excellent charge resolution. Building on success of the balloon flights, the payload is being reconfigured for exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). This ISS-CREAM instrument is configured with the CREAM calorimeter for energy measurements, and four finely segmented Silicon Charge Detector layers for precise charge measurements. In addition, the Top and Bottom Counting Detectors (TCD and BCD) and Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) have been newly developed. The TCD and BCD are scintillator based segmented detectors to separate electrons from nuclei using the shower profile differences, while BSD distinguishes electrons from nuclei by detecting thermal neutrons that are dominant in nuclei induced showers. An order of magnitude increase in data collecting power is possible by utilizing the ISS to reach the highest energies practical with direct measurements. The project status including results from on-going analysis of existing data and future plans will be discussed.

  19. POET: POlarimeters for Energetic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.; McConnell, M. L.; Bloser, P.; Legere, J.; Macri, J.; Ryan, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Angelini, L.; Sakamoto, T.; Black, J. K.; Hartmann, D. H.; Kaaret, P.; Zhang, B.; Ioka, K.; Nakamura, T.; Toma, K.; Yamazaki, R.; Wu, X.

    2008-01-01

    POET (Polarimeters for Energetic Transients) is a Small Explorer mission concept proposed to NASA in January 2008. The principal scientific goal of POET is to measure GRB polarization between 2 and 500 keV. The payload consists of two wide FoV instruments: a Low Energy Polarimeter (LEP) capable of polarization measurements in the energy range from 2-15 keV and a high energy polarimeter (Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment - GRAPE) that will measure polarization in the 60-500 keV energy range. Spectra will be measured from 2 keV up to 1 MeV. The POET spacecraft provides a zenith-pointed platform for maximizing the exposure to deep space. Spacecraft rotation will provide a means of effectively dealing with systematics in the polarization response. POET will provide sufficient sensitivity and sky coverage to measure statistically significant polarization for up to 100 GRBs in a two-year mission. Polarization data will also be obtained for solar flares, pulsars and other sources of astronomical interest.

  20. Energetic cost of ichthyophonus infection in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vollenweider, Johanna J.; Gregg, J.L.; Heintz, R.A.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    The energetic costs of fasting and Ichthyophonus infection were measured in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) in a lab setting at three temperatures. Infected herring incurred significant energetic costs, the magnitude of which depended on fish condition at the time of infection (fat versus lean). Herring that were fed continually and were in relatively good condition at the time of infection (fat) never stored lipid despite ad libitum feeding. In feeding herring, the energetic cost of infection was a 30 reduction in total energy content relative to controls 52 days post infection. Following food deprivation (lean condition), infection caused an initial delay in the compensatory response of herring. Thirty-one days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 32 reduction in total energy content relative to controls. Body composition of infected herring subsequently recovered to some degree, though infected herring never attained the same energy content as their continuously fed counterparts. Fifty-two days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 6 reduction in total energy content relative to controls. The greatest impacts of infection occurred in colder temperatures, suggesting Ichthyophonus-induced reductions in body condition may have greater consequences in the northern extent of herring's range, where juveniles use most of their energy reserves to survive their first winter. Copyright ?? 2011 Johanna J. Vollenweider et al.

  1. Energetic Physiology Mediates Individual Optimization of Breeding Phenology in a Migratory Arctic Seabird.

    PubMed

    Hennin, Holly L; Bêty, Jöel; Legagneux, Pierre; Gilchrist, H Grant; Williams, Tony D; Love, Oliver P

    2016-10-01

    The influence of variation in individual state on key reproductive decisions impacting fitness is well appreciated in evolutionary ecology. Rowe et al. (1994) developed a condition-dependent individual optimization model predicting that three key factors impact the ability of migratory female birds to individually optimize breeding phenology to maximize fitness in seasonal environments: arrival condition, arrival date, and ability to gain in condition on the breeding grounds. While empirical studies have confirmed that greater arrival body mass and earlier arrival dates result in earlier laying, no study has assessed whether individual variation in energetic management of condition gain effects this key fitness-related decision. Using an 8-year data set from over 350 prebreeding female Arctic common eiders (Somateria mollissima), we tested this component of the model by examining whether individual variation in two physiological traits influencing energetic management (plasma triglycerides: physiological fattening rate; baseline corticosterone: energetic demand) predicted individual variation in breeding phenology after controlling for arrival date and body mass. As predicted by the optimization model, individuals with higher fattening rates and lower energetic demand had the earliest breeding phenology (shortest delays between arrival and laying; earliest laying dates). Our results are the first to empirically determine that individual flexibility in prebreeding energetic management influences key fitness-related reproductive decisions, suggesting that individuals have the capacity to optimally manage reproductive investment.

  2. ENERGETIC FERMI/LAT GRB 100414A: ENERGETIC AND CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, Yuji; Tsai, Patrick P.; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.

    2012-03-20

    This study presents multi-wavelength observational results for energetic GRB 100414A with GeV photons. The prompt spectral fitting using Suzaku/WAM data yielded spectral peak energies of E{sup src}{sub peak} of 1458.7{sup +132.6}{sub -106.6} keV and E{sub iso} of 34.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 52} erg with z = 1.368. The optical afterglow light curves between 3 and 7 days were effectively fitted according to a simple power law with a temporal index of {alpha} = -2.6 {+-} 0.1. The joint light curve with earlier Swift/UVOT observations yields a temporal break at 2.3 {+-} 0.2 days. This was the first Fermi/LAT detected event that demonstrated the clear temporal break in the optical afterglow. The jet opening angle derived from this temporal break was 5.{sup 0}8, consistent with those of other well-observed long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-wavelength analyses in this study showed that GRB 100414A follows E{sup src}{sub peak}-E{sub iso} and E{sup src}{sub peak}-E{sub {gamma}} correlations. The late afterglow revealed a flatter evolution with significant excesses at 27.2 days. The most straightforward explanation for the excess is that GRB 100414A was accompanied by a contemporaneous supernova. The model light curve based on other GRB-SN events is marginally consistent with that of the observed light curve.

  3. Modelling the locomotor energetics of extinct hominids.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P A

    1999-10-01

    Bipedality is the defining characteristic of Hominidae and, as such, an understanding of the adaptive significance and functional implications of bipedality is imperative to any study of human evolution. Hominid bipedality is, presumably, a solution to some problem for the early hominids, one that has much to do with energy expenditure. Until recently, however, little attention could be focused on the quantifiable energetic aspects of bipedality as a unique locomotor form within Primates because of the inability to measure empirically the energy expenditure of non-modern hominids. A recently published method provides a way of circumventing the empirical measurement dilemma by calculating energy expenditure directly from anatomical variables and movement profiles. Although the origins of bipedality remain clouded, two discernible forms of locomotor anatomy are present in the hominid fossil record: the australopithecine and modern configurations. The australopithecine form is best represented by AL 288-1, a partial skeleton of Australopithecus afarensis, and is characterized as having short legs and a wide pelvis. The modern form is represented by modern humans and has long legs and a narrow pelvis. Human walking is optimized to take advantage of the changing levels of potential and kinetic energy that occur as the body and limbs move through the stride cycle. Although this optimization minimizes energy expenditure, some energy is required to maintain motion. I quantify this energy by developing a dynamic model that uses kinematic equations to determine energy expenditure. By representing both configurations with such a model, I can compare their rates of energy expenditure. I find that the australopithecine configuration uses less energy than that of a modern human. Despite arguments presented in the anthropological literature, the shortness of the legs of AL 288-1 provides no evidence that she was burdened with a compromised or transitional locomotor anatomy

  4. Telemetered cephalopod energetics: swimming, soaring, and blimping.

    PubMed

    O'Dor, Ron

    2002-11-01

    Cephalopods are uniquely suited to field energetic studies. Their hollow mantles that pump water for respiration and jetting also can accommodate differential transducer-transmitters. These transmitters indicate pressure-flow power output, which can be calibrated against oxygen consumption by swim-tunnel respirometry. Radio-acoustic positioning telemetry (RAPT) records pressure-flow power and animal movements with meter accuracy in nature. Despite inherent inefficiencies, jetting is the primary mode of locomotion for both primitive nautilus and powerful, migratory oceanic squids. In between, large-finned squid and cuttlefish mix jetting with fin undulation in complex gaits that increase locomotor efficiency. Our studies show that the complex nervous systems cephalopods evolved to control mixed gaits are also sensitive to flow and density fields in nature and that they use these to further reduce locomotion costs. Buoyed up by evacuated shells, nautilus and cuttlefish live in boundary layers and navigate cheaply through them like balloonists. Large-finned, negatively buoyant squid soar like eagles in rising currents, but lose control in currents above one body length per second. Many muscular squids have life histories linked to current systems. Neutrally buoyant ammoniacal cephalopods in the mesopelagic are a limiting case in need of study. The small density differential between seawater and isotonic ammonium chloride trebles their volume, making them blimp-like with very low power densities. Some species live entirely in this restricted habitat, but most become ammoniacal late in ontogeny, as they approach semelparous reproduction. Ammonium retained for buoyancy as carbon is terminally mobilized from muscle protein for gametes and energy, compensates for lost muscle power.

  5. The adolescent transition under energetic stress

    PubMed Central

    Reiches, Meredith W.; Moore, Sophie E.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Prentice, Ann; Sawo, Yankuba; Ellison, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives: Life history theory predicts a shift in energy allocation from growth to reproductive function as a consequence of puberty. During adolescence, linear growth tapers off and, in females, ovarian steroid production increases. In this model, acquisition of lean mass is associated with growth while investment in adiposity is associated with reproduction. This study examines the chronological and developmental predictors of energy allocation patterns among adolescent women under conditions of energy constraint. Methodology: Fifty post-menarcheal adolescent women between 14 and 20 years old were sampled for weight and body composition at the beginning and end of 1 month in an energy-adequate season and 1 month in the subsequent energy-constrained season in a rural province of The Gambia. Results: Chronologically and developmentally younger adolescent girls gain weight in the form of lean mass in both energy-adequate and energy-constrained seasons, whereas older adolescents lose lean mass under conditions of energetic stress (generalized estimating equation (GEE) Wald chi-square comparing youngest tertile with older two tertiles 9.750, P = 0.002; GEE Wald chi-square comparing fast- with slow-growing individuals for growth rate 19.806, P < 0.001). When energy is limited, younger adolescents lose and older adolescents maintain fat (GEE Wald chi-square for interaction of age and season 6.568, P = 0.010; GEE Wald chi-square comparing fast- with slow-growing individuals for interaction of growth rate and season 7.807, P = 0.005). Conclusions and implications: When energy is constrained, the physiology of younger adolescents invests in growth while that of older adolescent females privileges reproductively valuable adipose tissue. PMID:24481188

  6. Hydrodynamics and energetics of jumping copepod nauplii and copepodids.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Navish; Andersen, Anders; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Within its life cycle, a copepod goes through drastic changes in size, shape and swimming mode. In particular, there is a stark difference between the early (nauplius) and later (copepodid) stages. Copepods inhabit an intermediate Reynolds number regime (between ~1 and 100) where both viscosity and inertia are potentially important, and the Reynolds number changes by an order of magnitude during growth. Thus we expect the life stage related changes experienced by a copepod to result in hydrodynamic and energetic differences, ultimately affecting the fitness. To quantify these differences, we measured the swimming kinematics and fluid flow around jumping Acartia tonsa at different stages of its life cycle, using particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry. We found that the flow structures around nauplii and copepodids are topologically different, with one and two vortex rings, respectively. Our measurements suggest that copepodids cover a larger distance compared to their body size in each jump and are also hydrodynamically quieter, as the flow disturbance they create attenuates faster with distance. Also, copepodids are energetically more efficient than nauplii, presumably due to the change in hydrodynamic regime accompanied with a well-adapted body form and swimming stroke.

  7. Detection of Ketones by a Novel Technology: Dipolar Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS).

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Zhang, Qiangling; Zhou, Wenzhao; Zou, Xue; Wang, Hongmei; Huang, Chaoqun; Shen, Chengyin; Chu, Yannan

    2017-03-17

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has played an important role in the field of real-time monitoring of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to its advantages such as low limit of detection (LOD) and fast time response. Recently, a new technology of proton extraction reaction mass spectrometry (PER-MS) with negative ions OH(-) as the reagent ions has also been presented, which can be applied to the detection of VOCs and even inorganic compounds. In this work, we combined the functions of PTR-MS and PER-MS in one instrument, thereby developing a novel technology called dipolar proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS). The selection of PTR-MS mode and PER-MS mode was achieved in DP-PTR-MS using only water vapor in the ion source and switching the polarity. In this experiment, ketones (denoted by M) were selected as analytes. The ketone (molecular weight denoted by m) was ionized as protonated ketone [M + H](+) [mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) m + 1] in PTR-MS mode and deprotonated ketone [M - H](-) (m/z m - 1) in PER-MS mode. By comparing the m/z value of the product ions in the two modes, the molecular weight of the ketone can be positively identified as m. Results showed that whether it is a single ketone sample or a mixed sample of eight kinds of ketones, the molecular weights can be detected with DP-PTR-MS. The newly developed DP-PTR-MS not only maintains the original advantages of PTR-MS and PER-MS in sensitive and rapid detection of ketones, but also can estimate molecular weight of ketones. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Detection of Ketones by a Novel Technology: Dipolar Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue; Zhang, Qiangling; Zhou, Wenzhao; Zou, Xue; Wang, Hongmei; Huang, Chaoqun; Shen, Chengyin; Chu, Yannan

    2017-03-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has played an important role in the field of real-time monitoring of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to its advantages such as low limit of detection (LOD) and fast time response. Recently, a new technology of proton extraction reaction mass spectrometry (PER-MS) with negative ions OH- as the reagent ions has also been presented, which can be applied to the detection of VOCs and even inorganic compounds. In this work, we combined the functions of PTR-MS and PER-MS in one instrument, thereby developing a novel technology called dipolar proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS). The selection of PTR-MS mode and PER-MS mode was achieved in DP-PTR-MS using only water vapor in the ion source and switching the polarity. In this experiment, ketones (denoted by M) were selected as analytes. The ketone (molecular weight denoted by m) was ionized as protonated ketone [M + H]+ [mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) m + 1] in PTR-MS mode and deprotonated ketone [M - H]- (m/z m - 1) in PER-MS mode. By comparing the m/z value of the product ions in the two modes, the molecular weight of the ketone can be positively identified as m. Results showed that whether it is a single ketone sample or a mixed sample of eight kinds of ketones, the molecular weights can be detected with DP-PTR-MS. The newly developed DP-PTR-MS not only maintains the original advantages of PTR-MS and PER-MS in sensitive and rapid detection of ketones, but also can estimate molecular weight of ketones.

  9. Exospheres and Energetic Neutral Atoms of Mars, Venus and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Smith, H. Todd; Garnier, Philippe; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Delva, Magda; Gröller, Hannes; Mura, Alessandro

    Our understanding of the upper atmosphere of unmagnetized bodies such as Mars, Venus and Titan has improved significantly in this decade. Recent observations by in situ and remote sensing instruments on board Mars Express, Venus Express and Cassini have revealed characteristics of the neutral upper atmospheres (exospheres) and of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). The ENA environment in the vicinity of the bodies is by itself a significant study field, but ENAs are also used as a diagnostic tool for the exosphere and the interaction with the upstream plasmas. Synergy between theoretical and modeling work has also improved considerably. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of our understanding of the neutral environment in the vicinity of unmagnetized planets.

  10. Exospheres and Energetic Neutral Atoms of Mars, Venus and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Smith, H. Todd; Garnier, Philippe; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Delva, Magda; Gröller, Hannes; Mura, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    Our understanding of the upper atmosphere of unmagnetized bodies such as Mars, Venus and Titan has improved significantly in this decade. Recent observations by in situ and remote sensing instruments on board Mars Express, Venus Express and Cassini have revealed characteristics of the neutral upper atmospheres (exospheres) and of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). The ENA environment in the vicinity of the bodies is by itself a significant study field, but ENAs are also used as a diagnostic tool for the exosphere and the interaction with the upstream plasmas. Synergy between theoretical and modeling work has also improved considerably. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of our understanding of the neutral environment in the vicinity of unmagnetized planets.

  11. Applications and implications of ecological energetics.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Sean; Arnall, Sophie G; Munn, Adam; Bradshaw, S Don; Maloney, Shane K; Dixon, Kingsley W; Didham, Raphael K

    2014-05-01

    The ecological processes that are crucial to an animal's growth, survival, and reproductive fitness have energetic costs. The imperative for an animal to meet these costs within the energetic constraints of the environment drives many aspects of animal ecology and evolution, yet has largely been overlooked in traditional ecological paradigms. The field of 'ecological energetics' is bringing comparative physiology out of the laboratory and, for the first time, is becoming broadly accessible to field ecologists addressing real-world questions at many spatial and temporal scales. In an era of unprecedented global environmental challenges, ecological energetics opens up the tantalising prospect of a more predictive, mechanistic understanding of the drivers of threatened species decline, delivering process-based modelling approaches to natural resource management.

  12. Energetic particle characteristics of magnetotail flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    During the recent ISEE-3 Geotail Mission three events have been identified from the magnetometer data which are consistent with a spacecraft crossing of a magnetotail flux rope. Energetic electron and proton observations obtained by the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system during two of the possible flux rope events are presented. During one event remote sensing of the flux rope with energetic protons reveals that the flux rope is crossed by the spacecraft from south to north. This allows determination of the bandedness of the magnetic field twist and of the flux rope velocity relative to the spacecraft. A minimal flux rope radius of 3 earth radii is derived. Energetic proton intensity is highest just inside of the flux rope and decreases towards the core. Energetic electrons are streaming tailward near the outer boundary, indicating openness of the field lines, and are isotropic through the inner part of the flux rope.

  13. Energetic salt of trinitrophloroglucinol and melamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Patrick R.; Leonard, Philip W.; Lichthardt, Joseph P.; Tappan, Bryce C.; Ramos, Kyle J.

    2017-01-01

    We hope to harness the field of energetic co-crystals for development of insensitive, high-performing explosives. As demonstrated by other groups, co-crystals of energetic materials are diverse in their resultant properties versus the native materials. Herein, we discuss the synthesis, characterization, and testing of an energetic co-crystal of trinitrophloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxy-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) and melamine. Although melamine is not an energetic material, high nitrogen content and insensitivity can be of benefit in a co-crystal. Currently, trinitrophloroglucinol (TNPG) and melamine have been found to exist as a 1:1 ionic co-crystal. Characterization by NMR, IR, small-scale sensitivity, thermal stability and powder X-ray diffraction have all been used to characterize the individual compounds as well as the co-crystals developed.

  14. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of ketones from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Volatilization is a significant process in determining the fate of many organic compounds in streams and rivers. Quantifying this process requires knowledge of the mass-transfer coefficient from water, which is a function of the gas-film and liquid-film coefficients. The gas-film coefficient can be determined by measuring the flux for the volatilization of pure organic liquids. Volatilization fluxes for acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 3-pentanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-octanone were measured in the laboratory over a range of temperatures. Gas-film coefficients were then calculated from these fluxes and from vapor pressure data from the literature. An equation was developed for predicting the volatilization flux of pure liquid ketones as a function of vapor pressure and molecular weight. Large deviations were found for acetone, and these were attributed to the possibility that acetone may be hydrogen bonded. A second equation for predicting the flux as a function of molecular weight and temperature resulted in large deviations for 4methyl-2-pentanone. These deviations were attributed to the branched structure of this ketone. Four factors based on the theory of volatilization and relating the volatilization flux or rate to the vapor pressure, molecular weight, temperature, and molecular diffusion coefficient were not constant as suggested by the literature. The factors generally increased with molecular weight and with temperature. Values for acetone corresponded to ketones with a larger molecular weight, and the acetone factors showed the greatest dependence on temperature. Both of these results are characteristic of compounds that are hydrogen bonded. Relations from the literature commonly used for describing the dependence of the gas-film coefficient on molecular weight and molecular diffusion coefficient were not applicable to the ketone gas-film coefficients. The dependence on molecular weight and molecular diffusion coefficient was in

  15. New Trends in Research of Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    material costs) recycling liquidation by combustion liquidation costs " safe " material usage safe disarming cost decreasing about 60-80...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE New Trends in Research of Energetic Materials 5. FUNDING NUMBERS FA8655-04-1-5001 6. AUTHOR(S) Prof Zvatopluk Zeman...Affairs Office) 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The Final Proceedings for New Trends in Research of Energetic Materials , 20

  16. Size distributions of solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E.; Reames, D.; Kahler, S.; Cane, H.

    1991-01-01

    NASA particle detectors on the IMP-8 are employed to determine the size distributions of the peak fluxes of events related to solar-energetic particles including protons and electrons. The energetic proton events show a flatter size distribution which suggests that not all flares are proton flares. Both the electron and proton events are classified as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual', and the impulsive events tend to have a steeper power-law distribution.

  17. Highly functionalized tertiary-carbinols and carbinamines from the asymmetric γ-alkoxyallylboration of ketones and ketimines with the borabicyclodecanes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Hernández, Lorell; Seda, Luis A; Wang, Bo; Soderquist, John A

    2014-08-01

    The first asymmetric γ-alkoxyallylboration of representative ketones provides β-alkoxy tert-homoallylic alcohols 10 whose diastereoselectivities range from 99% syn (acetophenone) to 99% anti (pinacolone) both with high ee (>95%). This distribution is attributable to the c/t isomerization of the BBD reagents and the greater reactivity of 7 vs 1 and of aromatic vs alkyl ketones. A ketone-based direct synthesis of a fostriecin intermediate and the tert-amine 26 are reported, each with high selectivities.

  18. The energetics of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roboz, A.; Nagy, A. F.

    1994-02-01

    We have developed a comprehensive model to study the dynamics and energetics of the ionosphere of Titan. We solved the one-dimensional, time-dependent, coupled continuity and momentum equations for several ion species, together with single ion and electron energy equations, in order to calculate density, velocity, and temperature profiles. Calculations were carried out for several cases corresponding to different local times and configurations of the Titan-Saturn system. In our model the effects of horizontal magnetic fields were assumed to be negligible, except for their effect on reducing the electron and ion thermal conductivities and inhibiting vertical transport in the subram region. The ionospheric density peak was found to be at an altitude of about 1100 km, in accordance with earlier model calculations. The ionosphere is chemically controlled below an altitude of about 1500 km. Above this level, ion densities differ significantly from their chemical equilibrium values due to strong upward ion velocities. Heat is deposited in a narrow region around the ionospheric peak, resulting in temperature profiles increasing sharply and reaching nearly constant values of 800-1000 deg K for electrons and 300 deg K for ions in the topside, assuming conditions appropriate for the wake region. In the subram region magnetic correction factors make the electron heat conductivities negligible, resulting in electron temperatures increasing strongly with altitude and reaching values in the order of 5000 deg K at our upper boundary located at 2200 km. Ion chemical heating is found to play an important role in shaping the ion energy balance in Titan's ionosphere.

  19. The energetics of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roboz, A.; Nagy, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a comprehensive model to study the dynamics and energetics of the ionosphere of Titan. We solved the one-dimensional, time-dependent, coupled continuity and momentum equations for several ion species, together with single ion and electron energy equations, in order to calculate density, velocity, and temperature profiles. Calculations were carried out for several cases corresponding to different local times and configurations of the Titan-Saturn system. In our model the effects of horizontal magnetic fields were assumed to be negligible, except for their effect on reducing the electron and ion thermal conductivities and inhibiting vertical transport in the subram region. The ionospheric density peak was found to be at an altitude of about 1100 km, in accordance with earlier model calculations. The ionosphere is chemically controlled below an altitude of about 1500 km. Above this level, ion densities differ significantly from their chemical equilibrium values due to strong upward ion velocities. Heat is deposited in a narrow region around the ionospheric peak, resulting in temperature profiles increasing sharply and reaching nearly constant values of 800-1000 deg K for electrons and 300 deg K for ions in the topside, assuming conditions appropriate for the wake region. In the subram region magnetic correction factors make the electron heat conductivities negligible, resulting in electron temperatures increasing strongly with altitude and reaching values in the order of 5000 deg K at our upper boundary located at 2200 km. Ion chemical heating is found to play an important role in shaping the ion energy balance in Titan's ionosphere.

  20. Solar Energetic Particle Spectral Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewaldt, R.; Cohen, C.; Mason, G.; Desai, M.; Labrador, A.; Lee, M.; Li, G.

    2008-05-01

    A new generation of instruments during solar cycle 23 made it possible to measure solar energetic particle (SEP) energy spectra for many species over a broad energy interval (~0.1 to ~100 MeV/nucleon). These observations revealed that most large SEP events have power-law spectra below a few MeV/nucleon with rather hard spectral indices, followed by spectral steepening at higher energies. These spectral breaks are ordered by species - the spectra of lighter elements break at higher energy/nucleon than those for heavier species. To understand the charge-to-mass (Q/M) dependence of these spectral breaks, we have located the breaks for a range of species (e.g., H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe) and correlated the break locations with either measured or average Q/M ratios. As of this writing there are results for 13 large SEP events, based on data from ACE, GOES, SAMPEX, and STEREO, and charge state data from SAMPEX and ACE. We find that the location of the breaks is generally well-represented by a power-law in Q/M. This power-law fit can be related to the Q/M- dependence of the interplanetary diffusion coefficient and to the turbulence spectrum of the interplanetary magnetic field. We find that the slope of the deduced turbulence spectra are correlated with Fe/O and the proton fluence. These results support the idea that proton-amplified Alfven waves are generated in large SEP events, as expected for acceleration at parallel shocks.

  1. Theoretical studies on nitrogen rich energetic azoles.

    PubMed

    Ghule, Vikas Dasharath; Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Jadhav, Pandurang M; Tewari, Surya P

    2011-06-01

    Different nitro azole isomers based on five membered heterocyclics were designed and investigated using computational techniques in order to find out the comprehensive relationships between structure and performances of these high nitrogen compounds. Electronic structure of the molecules have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and the heat of formation has been calculated using the isodesmic reaction approach at B3LYP/6-31G* level. All designed compounds show high positive heat of formation due to the high nitrogen content and energetic nitro groups. The crystal densities of these energetic azoles have been predicted with different force fields. All the energetic azoles show densities higher than 1.87 g/cm(3). Detonation properties of energetic azoles are evaluated by using Kamlet-Jacobs equation based on the calculated densities and heat of formations. It is found that energetic azoles show detonation velocity about 9.0 km/s, and detonation pressure of 40GPa. Stability of the designed compounds has been predicted by evaluating the bond dissociation energy of the weakest C-NO(2) bond. The aromaticity using nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) is also explored to predict the stability via delocalization of the π-electrons. Charge on the nitro group is used to assess the impact sensitivity in the present study. Overall, the study implies that all energetic azoles are found to be stable and expected to be the novel candidates of high energy density materials (HEDMs).

  2. Energetic neutral particles from Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Voyager 1 spacecraft has detected energetic neutral particles escaping from the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. These energetic neutrals are created in charge exchange reactions between radiation belt ions and ambient atoms or molecules in the magnetosphere. If the Io torus is assumed to be the dominant Jovian source region for energetic neutrals, the Voyager observations can be used to infer upper limits to the average ion intensities there below about 200 keV. No readily interpretable in-situ measurements are available in the Io torus at these energies. The middle and outer Jovian magnetospheres may also be a significant source of energetic neutrals. At Saturn, the observed neutral particle count rates are too high to be explained by charge exchange between fast protons and H atoms of the Titan torus. Most of the energetic neutrals may be produced by charge exchanges between heavy ions and a neutral cloud containing H2O in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. If so, the Voyager measurements of energetic neutral fluxes would be the first detected emissions from this region of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  3. Ca(OH)2-Catalyzed Condensation of Aldehydes with Methyl ketones in Dilute Aqueous Ethanol: A Comprehensive Access to α,β-Unsaturated Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Han, Mengting; Luan, Jie; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yuanhua; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Cheap, abundant but seldom-employed Ca(OH)2 was found to be an excellent low-loading (5–10 mol%) catalyst for Claisen-Schmidt condensation of aldehydes with methyl ketones under mild conditions. It was interesting that dilute aqueous ethanol (20 v/v%) was unexpectedly discovered to be the optimal solvent. The reaction was scalable at least to 100 mmol and calcium could be precipitated by CO2 and removed by filtration. Evaporation of solvent directly afforded the product in the excellent 96% yield with high purity, as confirmed by its 1H NMR spectrum. PMID:27443482

  4. Ca(OH)2-Catalyzed Condensation of Aldehydes with Methyl ketones in Dilute Aqueous Ethanol: A Comprehensive Access to α,β-Unsaturated Ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Han, Mengting; Luan, Jie; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yuanhua; Xu, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Cheap, abundant but seldom-employed Ca(OH)2 was found to be an excellent low-loading (5–10 mol%) catalyst for Claisen-Schmidt condensation of aldehydes with methyl ketones under mild conditions. It was interesting that dilute aqueous ethanol (20 v/v%) was unexpectedly discovered to be the optimal solvent. The reaction was scalable at least to 100 mmol and calcium could be precipitated by CO2 and removed by filtration. Evaporation of solvent directly afforded the product in the excellent 96% yield with high purity, as confirmed by its 1H NMR spectrum.

  5. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M Todd; Baxa, Ulrich; Tam, Joseph; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L

    2012-06-01

    We measured the effects of a diet in which D-β-hydroxybutyrate-(R)-1,3 butanediol monoester [ketone ester (KE)] replaced equicaloric amounts of carbohydrate on 8-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice. Diets contained equal amounts of fat, protein, and micronutrients. The KE group was fed ad libitum, whereas the control (Ctrl) mice were pair-fed to the KE group. Blood d-β-hydroxybutyrate levels in the KE group were 3-5 times those reported with high-fat ketogenic diets. Voluntary food intake was reduced dose dependently with the KE diet. Feeding the KE diet for up to 1 mo increased the number of mitochondria and doubled the electron transport chain proteins, uncoupling protein 1, and mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). [(18)F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in IBAT of the KE group was twice that in IBAT of the Ctrl group. Plasma leptin levels of the KE group were more than 2-fold those of the Ctrl group and were associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity to IBAT. The KE group exhibited 14% greater resting energy expenditure, but the total energy expenditure measured over a 24-h period or body weights was not different. The quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index was 73% higher in the KE group. These results identify KE as a potential antiobesity supplement.

  6. Syn/anti isomerization of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones in the determination of airborne unsymmetrical aldehydes and ketones using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivation.

    PubMed

    Binding, N; Müller, W; Witting, U

    1996-10-01

    Aldehydes and ketones readily react with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) to form the corresponding hydrazones. This reaction has been frequently used for the quantification of airborne carbonyl compounds. Since unsymmetrical aldehydes and ketones are known to form isomeric 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones (syn/ anti-isomers), the influence of isomerization on the practicability and accuracy of the 2,4-DNPH-method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid sorbent samplers has been studied with three ketones (methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), methyl isopropyl ketone (MIPK), and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)). With all three ketones the reaction with 2,4-DNPH resulted in mixtures of the isomeric hydrazones which were separated by HPLC and GC and identified by mass spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The isomers show similar chromatographic behaviour in HPLC as well as in GC, thus leading to problems in quantification and interpretation of chromatographic results.

  7. New reactions of germylenes with ketones and assessment of studio general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeder, Ryan David

    New reaction modes of germylenes with ketones are presented. The germylene, Ge[CH(SiMe3)2]2 (1), will undergo reversible [4+2] addition with alkyl or aryl phenones to form a conjugated triene. Anthraquinone or 1,4-naphthylquinone will undergo a similar triene formation, but an insertion by a second molecule of 1 yields a product stable to reversion. In these cases, the second equivalent of germylene acts as a trap for the initially formed conjugated triene. A similar germylene, Ge[N(SiMe3)2]2 ( 2), reacts in analogous fashion with anthraquinone or 1,4-naphthylquinone indicating that it too engages in an equilibrium with phenones. The equilibrium for 2 with phenones lies heavily toward free 2 and phenone as no triene is detected via UV/Vis or NMR spectroscopies. Successful catalytic hydrogenation of the conjugate triene formed from the reaction of 1 with benzophenone is also presented. Other non-phenone ketones react with 1 via either CH or OH insertion. Three acetyl-containing ketones (acetone, butanone and cyclopropyl methyl ketone) have been observed to undergo CH insertion with 1 in the presence of one equivalent of MgCl2. The absence of MgCl 2 yields apparent OH insertion into the enol tautomer of the ketone. All secondary ketones examined undergo OH insertion even in the presence of MgCl2. The development, assessment and a description of a studio version of general chemistry are presented. This new course was implemented in the Fall 2002 semester at the University of Michigan. Content-based interviews focusing on equilibrium indicated that the students from the studio course had a better understanding of the underlying principles of equilibrium than their non-studio counterparts. The students enrolled in the studio course also gave more non-prompted explanations for a chemical reaction demonstrated during the interview, suggesting that they were more capable of transferring their chemical knowledge to new systems. The Motivated Strategies for Learning

  8. Luminescent Properties of Arylpolyene Organic Dyes and Cross-Conjugated Ketones Promising for Quantum Optics and Nanophotonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, N. L.; Vasilyeva, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    The spectral-luminescent properties of some dyes of substituted arylpolyenes and cross-conjugated ketones class in Shpolsky matrices, promising for using in solving quantum optics and nanophotonics, were studied.

  9. Novel quaternary ammonium microblock poly (p-phenylene-co-aryl ether ketone)s as anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xue; Xue, Boxin; Qian, Huidong; Zheng, Jifu; Li, Shenghai; Zhang, Suobo

    2017-02-01

    Using cation compounds as raw materials, three quaternized microblock poly(p-phenylene-co-aryl ether ketone)s (s-, m-, and l-QPP-co-PAEK) were synthesized using a nickel (0)-catalyzed coupling reaction. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties were affixed using cationic quaternary ammonium (QA) groups attached to poly(p-phenylene) by a three-carbon interstitial spacer and nonionic dichloride monomers of various lengths, respectively. The morphology, water uptake, swelling ratio, mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydroxide conductivity and alkaline stability of these new membranes were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the membrane with the longest hydrophobic microblock exhibited high hydroxide conductivity (37.6 mS cm-1 at 80 °C) resulting from the aggregation of ionic clusters observed using TEM. The copolymers with longer hydrophobic nonionic segments exhibited improved alkaline stability, suggesting that the hydrophobic chain shields the QA groups and that the polymer chains pack in a manner that restricts rotation. Controlling the distribution of QA groups in poly(p-phenylene) moieties and tuning the block length of nonionic segments are demonstrated to be effective methods for improving the hydroxide conductivity and alkaline stability of anion exchange membranes.

  10. Molecular modeling of the morphology and transport properties of two direct methanol fuel cell membranes: phenylated sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) versus Nafion

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Dupuis, Michel

    2012-08-14

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine membrane morphology and the transport of water, methanol and hydronium in phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) and Nafion membranes at 360 K for a range of hydration levels. At comparable hydration levels, the pore diameter is smaller, the sulfonate groups are more closely packed, the hydronium ions are more strongly bound to sulfonate groups, and the diffusion of water and hydronium is slower in Ph-SPEEKK relative to the corresponding properties in Nafion. The aromatic carbon backbone of Ph-SPEEKK is less hydrophobic than the fluorocarbon backbone of Nafion. Water network percolation occurs at a hydration level ({lambda}) of {approx}8 H{sub 2}O/SO{sub 3}{sup -}. At {lambda} = 20, water, methanol and hydronium diffusion coefficients were 1.4 x 10{sup -5}, 0.6 x 10{sup -5} and 0.2 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The pore network in Ph-SPEEKK evolves dynamically and develops wide pores for {lambda} > 20, which leads to a jump in methanol crossover and ion transport. This study demonstrates the potential of aromatic membranes as low-cost challengers to Nafion for direct methanol fuel cell applications and the need to develop innovative strategies to combat methanol crossover at high hydration levels.

  11. Modeling the Nanophase Structural Dynamics of Phenylated Sulfonated Poly Ether Ether Ketone Ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) Membranes as a Function of Hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-03-03

    Solvated phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) membranes in the presence of hydronium ions were modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The characterization of the nanophase structure and dynamics of such membranes was carried out as a function of the water content lambda, where lambda is the number of water molecules per sulfonate group, for lambda values of 3.5, 6, 11, 25, and 40. Analysis of pair correlation functions supports the experimental observation of membrane swelling upon hydration as well the increase in water and hydronium ion diffusion with increasing lambda. While the average number of hydrogen bonds between hydronium ions and sulfonate groups is dramatically affected by the hydration level, the average lifetime of the hydrogen bonds remains essentially constant. The membrane is found to be relatively rigid and its overall flexibility shows little dependence on water content. Compared to Nafion, water and ion diffusion coefficients are considerably smaller at lower hydration levels and room temperature. However, at higher lambda values of 25 and 40 these coefficients are comparable to those in Nafion at a lambda value of 16. This study also shows that water diffusion in Ph-SPEEKK membranes at low hydration levels can be significantly improved by raising the temperature with important implications for proton conductivity.

  12. Synthesis and characterizations of electrospun sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) SPEEK nanofiber membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbullah, N.; Sekak, K. A.; Ibrahim, I.

    2016-07-01

    A novel electrospun polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) based on Sulfonated Poly (ether ether ketone) were prepared and characterized. The poly (ether ether ketone) PEEK was sulfonated using concentrated sulfuric acid at room temperature for 60 hours reaction time. The degree sulfonation (DS) of the SPEEK are 58% was determined by H1 NMR using area under the peak of the hydrogen shielding at aromatic ring of the SPEEK. Then, the functional group of the SPEEK was determined using Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) showed O-H vibration at 3433 cm-1 of the sulfonated group (SO2-OH). The effect of the solvent and polymer concentration toward the electrospinning process was investigated which, the DMAc has electrospun ability compared to the DMSO. While, at 20 wt.% of the polymer concentration able to form a fine and uniform nanofiber, this was confirmed by FESEM that shown electrospun fiber mat SPEEK surface at nano scale diameter.

  13. Microbial ketonization of ginsenosides F1 and C-K by Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Jung, Sun Young; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Dae-Young; Min, Jin-Woo; Wang, Chao; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Ginsenosides are the major pharmacological components in ginseng. We isolated lactic acid bacteria from Kimchi to identify microbial modifications of ginsenosides. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strain DCY65-1 belongs to the genus Lactobacillus and is most closely related to Lactobacillus brevis. On the basis of TLC and HPLC analysis, we found two metabolic pathways: F1 → 6α,12β-dihydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and C-K → 12β-hydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside. These results suggest that strain DCY65-1 is capable of potent ketonic decarboxylation, ketonizing the hydroxyl group at C-3. The F1 metabolite had a more potent inhibitory effect on mushroom tyrosinase than did the substrate. Therefore, the F1 and C-K derivatives may be more pharmacologically active compounds, which should be further characterized.

  14. Effects of 70-keV electrons on two polyarylene ether ketones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Kevin B.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Orwoll, Robert A.; Kiefer, Richard L.; Long, Sheila A. T.

    1989-01-01

    Films prepared from two polyarylene ether ketones with the repeat units -PhC(O)PhC(O)-PhOPhXPhO- where X = C(CH3)2 or CH2 and Ph = C6H4, were bombarded with 70-keV electrons. The effects of irradiation were determined from the fraction of gel formed; the intrinsic viscosities, gel permeation chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy of the soluble portion of the irradiated films; and the changes in the IR spectra of the materials. In a Charlesby-Pinner analysis of the gel fractions of the polyarylene ether ketone with the isopropylidene group, the numbers of scission and cross-linking events per 100 eV (9649 kJ/mol) absorbed were found to be small with G(S) = 0.002 and G(X) = 0.009, respectively.

  15. Biocatalytic strategies for the asymmetric synthesis of alpha-hydroxy ketones.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Pilar; Sinisterra, Josep-Vicent; Molinari, Francesco; Alcántara, Andrés R; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2010-02-16

    The development of efficient syntheses for enantiomerically enriched alpha-hydroxy ketones is an important research focus in the pharmaceutical industry. For example, alpha-hydroxy ketones are found in antidepressants, in selective inhibitors of amyloid-beta protein production (used in the treatment of Alzheimer's), in farnesyl transferase inhibitors (Kurasoin A and B), and in antitumor antibiotics (Olivomycin A and Chromomycin A3). Moreover, alpha-hydroxy ketones are of particular value as fine chemicals because of their utility as building blocks for the production of larger molecules. They can also be used in preparing many other important structures, such as amino alcohols, diols, and so forth. Several purely chemical synthetic approaches have been proposed to afford these compounds, together with some organocatalytic strategies (thiazolium-based carboligations, proline alpha-hydroxylations, and so forth). However, many of these chemical approaches are not straightforward, lack selectivity, or are economically unattractive because of the large number of chemical steps required (usually combined with low enantioselectivities). In this Account, we describe three different biocatalytic approaches that have been developed to efficiently produce alpha-hydroxy ketones: (i) The use of thiamine diphosphate-dependent lyases (ThDP-lyases) to catalyze the umpolung carboligation of aldehydes. Enantiopure alpha-hydroxy ketones are formed from inexpensive aldehydes with this method. Some lyases with a broad substrate spectrum have been successfully characterized. Furthermore, the use of biphasic media with recombinant whole cells overexpressing lyases leads to productivities of approximately 80-100 g/L with high enantiomeric excesses (up to >99%). (ii) The use of hydrolases to produce alpha-hydroxy ketones by means of (in situ) dynamic kinetic resolutions (DKRs). Lipases are able to successfully resolve racemates, and many outstanding examples have been reported. However

  16. Metal-Free Trifluoromethylation of Aromatic and Heteroaromatic Aldehydes and Ketones

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to convert simple and common substrates into fluoroalkyl derivatives under mild conditions remains an important goal for medicinal and agricultural chemists. One representative example of a desirable transformation involves the conversion of aromatic and heteroaromatic ketones and aldehydes into aryl and heteroaryl β,β,β-trifluoroethylarenes and -heteroarenes. The traditional approach for this net transformation involves stoichiometric metals and/or multistep reaction sequences that consume excessive time, material, and labor resources while providing low yields of products. To complement these traditional strategies, we report a one-pot metal-free decarboxylative procedure for accessing β,β,β-trifluoroethylarenes and -heteroarenes from readily available ketones and aldehydes. This method features several benefits, including ease of operation, readily available reagents, mild reaction conditions, high functional-group compatibility, and scalability. PMID:25001876

  17. Transfer hydrogenation using recyclable polyurea-encapsulated palladium: efficient and chemoselective reduction of aryl ketones.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Quan; Wu, Hai-Chen; Ramarao, Chandrashekar; Spencer, Jonathan B; Ley, Steven V

    2003-03-21

    A robust and recyclable palladium catalyst [Pd0EnCat] has been prepared by ligand exchange of polyurea-encapsulated palladium(II) acetate with formic acid, resulting in deposition of Pd(0) in the support material; Pd0EnCat is shown to be a highly efficient transfer hydrogenation catalyst for chemoselective reduction of a wide range of aryl ketones to benzyl alcohols.

  18. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling of benzyl chlorides with cyclopropanol-derived ketone homoenolates.

    PubMed

    Nithiy, Nisha; Orellana, Arturo

    2014-11-21

    The palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of cyclopropanol-derived ketone homoenolates with benzyl chlorides is reported. This reaction proceeds in high yields with electron-neutral and electron-rich benzyl chlorides; however, yields are low with electron-poor benzyl chlorides. In addition, a range of cyclopropanols can be coupled in good yields. The reaction can be conducted with a low catalyst loading (1% Pd) and on a gram scale without reduction in yield.

  19. Synthesis of dimethyl aryl acylsulfonium bromides from aryl methyl ketones in a DMSO-HBr system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhiling; Shi, Dahua; Qu, Yingying; Tao, Chuanzhou; Liu, Weiwei; Yao, Guowei

    2013-12-16

    A new, simplified method for the synthesis of dimethyl aryl acylsulfonium salts has been developed. A series of dimethyl aryl acylsulfonium bromides were prepared by the reaction of aryl methyl ketones with hydrobromic acid and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). This sulfonium salt confirms that bromine production and the bromination reaction take place in the DMSO-HBr oxidation system. What's more, it is also a key intermediate for the synthesis of arylglyoxals.

  20. Space radiation effects on poly(aryl-ether-ketone) thin films and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Sykes, George F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the space durability of poly(aryl-ether-ketone) (PEEK) in the forms of films and graphite fiber reinforced composites. The influence of the film's crystallinity on electron radiation stability was evaluated using X-ray diffraction, DSC, FTIR, and mechanical property tests. The mechanical properties of the composites material were evaluated after electron radiation and after electron radiation followed by thermal cycling simulating 30 years in geosynchronous orbit.

  1. Asymmetric catalysis for the construction of quaternary carbon centres: nucleophilic addition on ketones and ketimines.

    PubMed

    Riant, Olivier; Hannedouche, Jérôme

    2007-03-21

    There is a growing need in organic synthesis for efficient methodologies for the asymmetric synthesis of quaternary carbon centres. One of the most attractive and straightforward methods focuses on the use of asymmetric catalysis for the addition of various types of nucleophiles on prochiral ketones and ketimines. A view of the literature from this growing area of research will be presented in this review, with an emphasis on the pioneer works and milestones brought by the main players in this field.

  2. Ketone-alcohol hydrogen-transfer equilibria: is the biooxidation of halohydrins blocked?

    PubMed

    Bisogno, Fabricio R; García-Urdiales, Eduardo; Valdés, Haydee; Lavandera, Iván; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Suárez, Dimas; Gotor, Vicente

    2010-09-24

    To ensure the quasi-irreversibility of the oxidation of alcohols coupled with the reduction of ketones in a hydrogen-transfer (HT) fashion, stoichiometric amounts of α-halo carbonyl compounds have been employed as hydrogen acceptors. The reason that these substrates lead to quasi-quantitative conversions has been tacitly attributed to both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. To provide a clear rationale for this behavior, we investigate herein the redox equilibrium of a selected series of ketones and 2-propanol by undertaking a study that combines experimental and theoretical approaches. First, the activity of the (R)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LBADH) with these substrates was studied. The docking of acetophenone/(R)-1-phenyethanol and α-chloroacetophenone/(S)-2-chloro-1-phenylethanol in the active site of the enzyme confirms that there seems to be no structural reason for the lack of reactivity of halohydrins. This assumption is confirmed by the fact that the corresponding aluminum-catalyzed Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley-Oppenauer (MPVO) reactions afford similar conversions to those obtained with LBADH, showing that the observed reactivity is independent of the catalyst employed. While the initial rates of the enzymatic reductions and the IR ν(C=O) values contradict the general belief that electron-withdrawing groups increase the electrophilicity of the carbonyl group, the calculated ΔG values of the isodesmic redox transformations of these series of ketones/alcohols with 2-propanol/acetone support the thermodynamic control of the reaction. As a result, a general method to predict the degree of conversion obtained in the HT-reduction process of a given ketone based on the IR absorption band of the carbonyl group is proposed, and a strategy to achieve the HT oxidation of halohydrins is also shown.

  3. Acyclic ketones in the defensive secretion of a "daddy longlegs" (Leiobunum vittatum).

    PubMed

    Meinwald, J; Kluge, A F; Carrel, J E; Eisner, T

    1971-07-01

    The defensive secretion of the "daddy longlegs" Leiobunum vittatum was analyzed and found to contain the acyclic ketones 4-methylheptan-3-one and E-4,6-dimethyl-6-octen-3-one as its major organic components. Although 4-methylheptan-3-one has been found previously as an alarm substance in certain ant genera, the second component, whose structure is confirmed by synthesis, is new.

  4. Femtochemistry of Norrish type-I reactions: IV. Highly excited ketones--experimental.

    PubMed

    Sølling, Theis I; Diau, Eric W G; Kötting, Carsten; De Feyter, Steven; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2002-01-18

    Femtosecond dynamics of Norrish type-I reactions of cyclic and acyclic ketones have been investigated in real time for a series of 13 compounds using femtosecond-resolved time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A general physical description of the ultrafast processes of ketones excited into a high-lying Rydberg state is presented. It accounts not only for the results that are presented herein but also for the results of previously reported studies. For highly excited ketones, we show that the Norrish type-I reaction is nonconcerted, and that the first bond breakage occurs along the effectively repulsive S2 surface involving the C-C bond in a manner which is similar to that of ketones in the S1 state (E. W.-G. Diau et al. ChemPhysChem 2001, 2, 273-293). The experimental results show that the wave packet motion out of the initial Franck-Condon region and down to the S2 state can be resolved. This femtosecond (fs) internal conversion from the highly excited Rydberg state to the S2 state proceeds through conical intersections (Rydberg-valence) that are accessed through the C=O stretching motion. In one of these conical intersections, the internal energy is guided into an asymmetric stretching mode. This explains the previously reported pronounced nonstatistical nature of the reaction. The second bond breakage involves an excited-state acyl radical and occurs on a time scale that is up to one order of magnitude longer than the first. We discuss the details regarding the ion chemistry, which determines the appearance of the mass spectra that arise from ionization on the fs time scale. The experimental results presented here, aided by the theoretical work reported in paper III, provide a unified picture of Norrish reactions on excited states and on the ground-state potential energy surfaces.

  5. Ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with α,β-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai-Shuai; Lin, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Dong, Lin

    2015-01-28

    In this paper, a simple and highly efficient ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with various α,β-unsaturated ketones without chelation assistance has been developed. This novel C-H activation methodology exhibits a broad substrate scope such as different substituted indoles, pyrroles, and other azoles. Further synthetic applications of the alkylation products can lead to more attractive 3,4-fused tricyclic indoles.

  6. Highly enantio- and diastereoselective allylic alkylation of Morita-Baylis-Hillman carbonates with allyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Tong, Guanghu; Zhu, Bo; Lee, Richmond; Yang, Wenguo; Tan, Davin; Yang, Caiyun; Han, Zhiqiang; Yan, Lin; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Jiang, Zhiyong

    2013-05-17

    The asymmetric allylic alkylation of Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) carbonates with allyl ketones has been developed. The α-regioselective alkylation adducts, containing a hexa-1,5-diene framework with important synthetic value, were achieved in up to 83% yield, >99% ee, and 50:1 dr by using a commercially available Cinchona alkaloid as the catalyst. From the allylic alkylation adduct, a cyclohexene bearing two adjacent chiral centers was readily prepared.

  7. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  8. Electrochemical Oxidative Decarboxylation of Malonic Acid Derivatives: A Method for the Synthesis of Ketals and Ketones.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaofeng; Luo, Xiya; Dochain, Simon; Mathot, Charlotte; Markò, István E

    2015-10-02

    A novel electrochemical oxidative decarboxylation of disubstituted malonic acids leading to dimethoxy ketals is described. In the presence of NH3, a wide range of disubstituted malonic acids was transformed into the corresponding ketals in good to excellent yields under electrochemical conditions. When the crude reaction mixture, obtained after electrolysis, was directly treated with 1 M aq HCl, the initially generated ketals were smoothly transformed into the corresponding ketones in a single vessel operation.

  9. Biocatalytic route to chiral acyloins: P450-catalyzed regio- and enantioselective α-hydroxylation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; Roiban, Gheorghe-Doru; Lonsdale, Richard; Ilie, Adriana; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-01-16

    P450-BM3 and mutants of this monooxygenase generated by directed evolution are excellent catalysts for the oxidative α-hydroxylation of ketones with formation of chiral acyloins with high regioselectivity (up to 99%) and enantioselectivity (up to 99% ee). This constitutes a new route to a class of chiral compounds that are useful intermediates in the synthesis of many kinds of biologically active compounds.

  10. Body lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body lice are tiny insects (scientific name is Pediculus humanus corporis ) that are spread through close contact ... disease Images Body louse Lice, body with stool (Pediculus humanus) Body louse, female and larvae Head louse ...

  11. Diastereo- and enantioselective iridium-catalyzed allylation of cyclic ketone enolates: synergetic effect of ligands and barium enolates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenyong; Chen, Ming; Hartwig, John F

    2014-11-12

    We report asymmetric allylic alkylation of barium enolates of cyclic ketones catalyzed by a metallacyclic iridium complex containing a phosphoramidite ligand derived from (R)-1-(2-naphthyl)ethylamine. The reaction products contain adjacent quaternary and tertiary stereocenters. This process demonstrates that unstabilized cyclic ketone enolates can undergo diastereo- and enantioselective Ir-catalyzed allylic substitution reactions with the proper choice of enolate countercation. The products of these reactions can be conveniently transformed to various useful polycarbocyclic structures.

  12. Enantioselective formal [3+3] cycloadditions of ketones and cyclic 1-azadienes by cascade enamine-enamine catalysis.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Long; Xiao, You-Cai; Du, Wei; Chen, Ying-Chun

    2015-02-16

    An asymmetric formal [3+3] cycloaddition process with diversely structured aliphatic ketones and electron-deficient cyclic 1-azadienes was developed by cascade enamine-enamine catalysis of a cinchona-based primary amine. This sequence involved a domino Michael addition-Mannich reaction to afford spirocyclic architectures in excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity. Importantly, high regioselectivity was realized for a number of unsymmetrical aliphatic ketone substrates.

  13. Gold nanoparticles on OMS-2 for heterogeneously catalyzed aerobic oxidative α,β-dehydrogenation of β-heteroatom-substituted ketones.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Daichi; Jin, Xiongjie; Yatabe, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2016-12-06

    In the presence of Au nanoparticles supported on manganese oxide OMS-2 (Au/OMS-2), various kinds of β-heteroatom-substituted α,β-unsaturated ketones (heteroatom = N, O, S) can be synthesized through α,β-dehydrogenation of the corresponding saturated ketones using O2 (in air) as the oxidant. The catalysis of Au/OMS-2 is truly heterogeneous, and the catalyst can be reused.

  14. Steric vs. electronic effects in the Lactobacillus brevis ADH-catalyzed bioreduction of ketones.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Cristina; Borzęcka, Wioleta; Sattler, Johann H; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Lavandera, Iván; Gotor, Vicente

    2014-01-28

    Lactobacillus brevis ADH (LBADH) is an alcohol dehydrogenase that is commonly employed to reduce alkyl or aryl ketones usually bearing a methyl, an ethyl or a chloromethyl as a small ketone substituent to the corresponding (R)-alcohols. Herein we have tested a series of 24 acetophenone derivatives differing in their size and electronic properties for their reduction employing LBADH. After plotting the relative activity against the measured substrate volumes we observed that apart from the substrate size other effects must be responsible for the activity obtained. Compared to acetophenone (100% relative activity), other small substrates such as propiophenone, α,α,α-trifluoroacetophenone, α-hydroxyacetophenone, and benzoylacetonitrile had relative activities lower than 30%, while medium-sized ketones such as α-bromo-, α,α-dichloro-, and α,α-dibromoacetophenone presented relative activities between 70% and 550%. Moreover, the comparison between the enzymatic activity and the obtained final conversions using an excess or just 2.5 equiv. of the hydrogen donor 2-propanol, denoted again deviations between them. These data supported that these hydrogen transfer (HT) transformations are mainly thermodynamically controlled. For instance, bulky α-halogenated derivatives could be quantitatively reduced by LBADH even employing 2.5 equiv. of 2-propanol independently of their kinetic values. Finally, we found good correlations between the IR absorption band of the carbonyl groups and the degrees of conversion obtained in these HT processes, making this simple method a convenient tool to predict the success of these transformations.

  15. Drude polarizable force field for aliphatic ketones and aldehydes, and their associated acyclic carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Meagan C.; Aytenfisu, Asaminew H.; Lin, Fang-Yu; He, Xibing; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2017-02-01

    The majority of computer simulations exploring biomolecular function employ Class I additive force fields (FF), which do not treat polarization explicitly. Accordingly, much effort has been made into developing models that go beyond the additive approximation. Development and optimization of the Drude polarizable FF has yielded parameters for selected lipids, proteins, DNA and a limited number of carbohydrates. The work presented here details parametrization of aliphatic aldehydes and ketones (viz. acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butaryaldehyde, isobutaryaldehyde, acetone, and butanone) as well as their associated acyclic sugars (uc(d)-allose and uc(d)-psicose). LJ parameters are optimized targeting experimental heats of vaporization and molecular volumes, while the electrostatic parameters are optimized targeting QM water interactions, dipole moments, and molecular polarizabilities. Bonded parameters are targeted to both QM and crystal survey values, with the models for ketones and aldehydes shown to be in good agreement with QM and experimental target data. The reported heats of vaporization and molecular volumes represent a compromise between the studied model compounds. Simulations of the model compounds show an increase in the magnitude and the fluctuations of the dipole moments in moving from gas phase to condensed phases, which is a phenomenon that the additive FF is intrinsically unable to reproduce. The result is a polarizable model for aliphatic ketones and aldehydes including the acyclic sugars uc(d)-allose and uc(d)-psicose, thereby extending the available biomolecules in the Drude polarizable FF.

  16. A review of the energetics of pollination biology.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Kimberly P; McDougall, Freya O; Seymour, Roger S

    2013-10-01

    Pollination biology is often associated with mutualistic interactions between plants and their animal pollen vectors, with energy rewards as the foundation for co-evolution. Energy is supplied as food (often nectar from flowers) or as heat (in sun-tracking or thermogenic plants). The requirements of pollinators for these resources depend on many factors, including the costs of living, locomotion, thermoregulation and behaviour, all of which are influenced by body size. These requirements are modified by the availability of energy offered by plants and environmental conditions. Endothermic insects, birds and bats are very effective, because they move faster and are more independent of environmental temperatures, than are ectothermic insects, but they are energetically costly for the plant. The body size of endothermic pollinators appears to be influenced by opposing requirements of the animals and plants. Large body size is advantageous for endotherms to retain heat. However, plants select for small body size of endotherms, as energy costs of larger size are not matched by increases in flight speed. If high energy costs of endothermy cannot be met, birds and mammals employ daily torpor, and large insects reduce the frequency of facultative endothermy. Energy uptake can be limited by the time required to absorb the energy or eliminate the excess water that comes with it. It can also be influenced by variations in climate that determine temperature and flowering season.

  17. Laser Ignition of Energetic Materials Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devries, Nora M.; Oreilly, John J.; Forch, Brad E.

    1993-11-01

    Lasers inherently possess many desirable attributes making them excellent igniters for a wide range of energetic materials such as pyrotechnics, explosives, and gun propellants. Lasers can be made very small, have modest powereD requirements, are invulnerable to external stimuli, are very reliable, and can deliver radiative energy to remote locations through optical fibers. Although the concept of using lasers for the initiation of energetic materials is not new, successful integration of laser technology into military systems has the potential to provide significant benefits. In order to efficiently expedite the evolution of the laser ignition technology for military applications, it was desirable to coordinate the effort with the JANNAF combustion community. The laser ignition of Energetic Materials Workshop was originated by Brad Forch, Austin Barrows, Richard Beyer and Arthur Cohen of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL).

  18. Sol-gel processing of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tillotson, T.M.; Hrubesh, L.H.; Fox, G.L.; Simpson, R.L.; Lee, R.W.; Swansiger, R.W.; Simpson, L.R.

    1997-08-18

    As part of a new materials effort, we are exploring the use of sol- gel chemistry to manufacture energetic materials. Traditional manufacturing of energetic materials involves processing of granular solids. One application is the production of detonators where powders of energetic material and a binder are typically mixed and compacted at high pressure to make pellets. Performance properties are strongly dependent on particle size distribution, surface area of its constituents, homogeneity of the mix, and void volume. The goal is to produce detonators with fast energy release rate the are insensitive to unintended initiation. In this paper, we report results of our early work in this field of research, including the preparation of detonators from xerogel molding powders and aerogels, comparing the material properties with present state-of-the-art technology.

  19. Viewing perspective in energetic neutral atom intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2008-09-01

    Through interspacecraft comparison of energetic neutral oxygen (ENO) intensity from two different vantage points provided by IMAGE and Geotail, Lui et al. (2005) showed that viewing perspective plays a very important role in the observed ENO intensity level during a magnetic storm period. Motivated by the findings of Lui et al. (2005), we investigate how viewing perspective influences energetic neutral atom emissions from a modeling perspective. The main results of this paper are that (1) our simulation results, based upon O+ ion fluxes from the Comprehensive Ring Current Model and the subsequent ENO calculation, reproduce the total differential ENO intensity obtained from two spacecraft to a reasonable degree and (2) further analysis of our results indicates that pitch angle anisotropy in ring current ion flux, a crucial physical quantity in ring current dynamics, is one major contributor to the difference in energetic neutral atom intensity from different viewing perspectives.

  20. TREC to WHERE? Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Gehlert, Sarah; Patterson, Ruth E.; Colditz, Graham A.; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Hu, Frank B.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Sturgeon, Kathleen M.; Thornquist, Mark; Tobias, Deirdre; Nebeling, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    When information is exchanged across disciplinary boundaries, resources are shared, and discipline-specific approaches are altered to achieve a common scientific goal, we create a new intellectual space for transdisciplinary research. This approach, fostered heavily by multiple National Cancer Institute funded initiatives, has the potential to forge new understanding of major public health issues. By breaking down disciplinary barriers, we work toward making real, meaningful, and lasting forward motion in addressing key public health issues. One of the transdisciplinary initiatives of the National Cancer Institute is TREC: Transdisicplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer. In this article, we review the goals and scope of TREC, as well as the ways in which the initiative promotes transdisciplinary science. A particular focus is on multiple examples of the most unique aspect of the initiative: the funding of developmental projects across multiple TREC centers, toward the goal of incubating high risk science that has the potential to translate into major leaps forward in understanding energetics in cancer. As we enter an era of greater focus on investigator initiated science, new approaches may be needed to ensure that the peer review process is not solely organized along disciplinary lines. Inclusion of expertise regarding transdisciplinarity, as well as representation from multiple scientific disciplines within a panel may allow transdisciplinary research to receive an educated hearing. The body of researchers trained to work in a transdisciplinary research space is ideally suited to address these challenges. PMID:26792261

  1. TREC to WHERE? Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Kathryn H; Gehlert, Sarah; Patterson, Ruth E; Colditz, Graham A; Chavarro, Jorge E; Hu, Frank B; Neuhouser, Marian L; Sturgeon, Kathleen M; Thornquist, Mark; Tobias, Deirdre; Nebeling, Linda C

    2016-04-01

    When information is exchanged across disciplinary boundaries, resources are shared, and discipline-specific approaches are altered to achieve a common scientific goal, we create a new intellectual space for transdisciplinary research. This approach, fostered heavily by multiple NCI-funded initiatives, has the potential to forge new understanding of major public health issues. By breaking down disciplinary barriers, we work toward making real, meaningful, and lasting forward motion in addressing key public health issues. One of the transdisciplinary initiatives of the NCI is TREC: Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer. In this article, we review the goals and scope of TREC, as well as the ways in which the initiative promotes transdisciplinary science. A particular focus is on multiple examples of the most unique aspect of the initiative: the funding of developmental projects across multiple TREC centers, toward the goal of incubating high-risk science that has the potential to translate into major leaps forward in understanding energetics in cancer. As we enter an era of greater focus on investigator-initiated science, new approaches may be needed to ensure that the peer review process is not solely organized along disciplinary lines. Inclusion of expertise regarding transdisciplinarity, as well as representation from multiple scientific disciplines within a panel, may allow transdisciplinary research to receive an educated hearing. The body of researchers trained to work in a transdisciplinary research space is ideally suited to address these challenges.

  2. Energetic utilisation of refuse derived fuels from landfill mining.

    PubMed

    Rotheut, Martin; Quicker, Peter

    2017-02-19

    The residence of municipal solid waste within a landfill body results in a significant change of material properties. Experiences with the energetic utilisation of the burnable fractions from formerly landfilled waste are hardly documented, the influence of refuse derived fuels (RDF) from such materials on the performance of modern waste-to-energy plants is not sufficiently described in scientific literature. Therefore this study focuses on the energetic utilisation of refuse derived fuel from landfilled waste, processed in a mechanical waste treatment facility, and the impact of the material on the operation of the incineration plant. Additionally, the possibility of direct combustion of non-pre-treated excavated landfill material has been evaluated in the same facility. First, sampling and analysis of the fuel has been carried out. Based on this, a large-scale combustion experiment was planned and conducted in an industrial waste-to-energy plant. Steam mass flow rate, concentration of harmful substances in the raw gas, as well as total emissions of the facility have been monitored in detail. Furthermore, the influence of the landfilled material on the additive consumption has been determined. The combustion residues (bottom ash) were also sampled and analysed. Based on the evaluation of operating data and analysis of both fuel and residue, suitable thermal treatment approaches for the refuse-derived fuel and the non-pre-treated excavated material have been assessed.

  3. Neptune's inner magnetosphere and aurora: Energetic particle constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Acuna, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    A dramatic and peculiar dropout of greater than 500-keV ions (but not electrons) was observed within Neptune's inner magnetosphere near 2 R(sub N) as the Voyager 2 spacecraft approached the planet. Unlike a number of other energetic particle features this feature could not be accounted for by known material bodies in the context of the most utilized magnetic field models (neither the offset tilted dipole models nor the spehrical harmonic model 'O8'). However, the configuration of Neptune's inner magnetosphere is highly uncertain. By applying a novel technique, utilizing energetic particle measurements, to constrain the magnetic field configuration of the inner regions, we show that appeals to unobserved materials within Neptune's system are unnecessary, and that the ion dropout feature was, in all likelihood, the result of ion interactions with maximum L excursions of the ring 1989N1R. The constraints also favor the se of the M2 magnetic field model (Selesnick, 1992) over the previous models. An electron feature was probably absent because the electron interactions with the ring occurred substantially before the ion interactions (about 2 hours for the electrons versus a few minutes for the ions). Pitch-angle scattering apparently eliminated the electron signature. Minimum scattering rates determined based on this premise yield enough electron precipitation power to explain the brightest component of Neptune's aurora. We propose that this bright component is analogous to the Earth's diffuse aurora.

  4. Neptune's inner magnetosphere and aurora: Energetic particle constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Acuna, M. H.

    1994-08-01

    A dramatic and peculiar dropout of greater than 500-keV ions (but not electrons) was observed within Neptune's inner magnetosphere near 2 RN as the Voyager 2 spacecraft approached the planet. Unlike a number of other energetic particle features this feature could not be accounted for by known material bodies in the context of the most utilized magnetic field models (neither the offset tilted dipole models nor the spehrical harmonic model 'O8'). However, the configuration of Neptune's inner magnetosphere is highly uncertain. By applying a novel technique, utilizing energetic particle measurements, to constrain the magnetic field configuration of the inner regions, we show that appeals to unobserved materials within Neptune's system are unnecessary, and that the ion dropout feature was, in all likelihood, the result of ion interactions with maximum L excursions of the ring 1989N1R. The constraints also favor the se of the M2 magnetic field model (Selesnick, 1992) over the previous models. An electron feature was probably absent because the electron interactions with the ring occurred substantially before the ion interactions (about 2 hours for the electrons versus a few minutes for the ions). Pitch-angle scattering apparently eliminated the electron signature. Minimum scattering rates determined based on this premise yield enough electron precipitation power to explain the brightest component of Neptune's aurora. We propose that this bright component is analogous to the Earth's diffuse aurora.

  5. Energetics and longevity in birds

    PubMed Central

    Furness, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    The links between energy expenditure and ageing are different at different levels of enquiry. When studies have examined the relationships between different species within a given class the association is generally negative—animals with greater metabolism per gram of tissue live shorter lives. Within species, or between classes (e.g. between birds and mammals) the association is the opposite—animals with higher metabolic rates live longer. We have previously shown in mammals that the negative association between lifespan and metabolic rate is in fact an artefact of using resting rather than daily energy expenditure, and of failing to adequately take into account the confounding effects of body size and the lack of phylogenetic independence of species data. When these factors are accounted for, across species of mammals, the ones with higher metabolism also have the largest lifetime expenditures of energy—consistent with the inter-class and intra-specific data. A previous analysis in birds did not yield the same pattern, but this may have been due to a lack of sufficient power in the analysis. Here we present an analysis of a much enlarged data set (>300 species) for metabolic and longevity traits in birds. These data show very similar patterns to those in mammals. Larger individuals have longer lives and lower per-gram resting and daily energy expenditures, hence there is a strong negative relationship between longevity and mass-specific metabolism. This relationship disappears when the confounding effects of body mass and phylogeny are accounted for. Across species of birds, lifetime expenditure of energy per gram of tissue based on both daily and resting energy expenditure is positively related to metabolic intensity, mirroring these statistical relationships in mammals and synergising with the positive associations of metabolism with lifespan within species and between vertebrate classes. PMID:19424858

  6. Novel Energetic Materials for Counter WMD Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    derivatives Dense high nitrogen molecular and ionic materials A. Structure and synthesis of energetic salts ofN, N’ -dinitrourea (DNU) B. Impact...Engineering Data, 2008, 53(2), 520-524. Ye, C.; Gao, H.; Twamley, B.; Shreeve, J. M. " Structure and Synthesis of Energetic Salts ofN, N’ -dinitrourea...N Y (~+ ~SFs 2a-c NH2 N y ~ " N-N~ \\-sFs 4a-c Q y- N ~SFs 6a Structure and Properties ofSFs-containing Salts Cation Anion No. Td d 6

  7. Exogenous Ketone Supplements Reduce Anxiety-Related Behavior in Sprague-Dawley and Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ari, Csilla; Kovács, Zsolt; Juhasz, Gabor; Murdun, Cem; Goldhagen, Craig R.; Koutnik, Andrew P.; Poff, Angela M.; Kesl, Shannon L.; D’Agostino, Dominic P.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional ketosis has been proven effective for seizure disorders and other neurological disorders. The focus of this study was to determine the effects of ketone supplementation on anxiety-related behavior in Sprague-Dawley (SPD) and Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. We tested exogenous ketone supplements added to food and fed chronically for 83 days in SPD rats and administered sub-chronically for 7 days in both rat models by daily intragastric gavage bolus followed by assessment of anxiety measures on elevated plus maze (EPM). The groups included standard diet (SD) or SD + ketone supplementation. Low-dose ketone ester (LKE; 1,3-butanediol-acetoacetate diester, ~10 g/kg/day, LKE), high dose ketone ester (HKE; ~25 g/kg/day, HKE), beta-hydroxybutyrate-mineral salt (βHB-S; ~25 g/kg/day, KS) and βHB-S + medium chain triglyceride (MCT; ~25 g/kg/day, KSMCT) were used as ketone supplementation for chronic administration. To extend our results, exogenous ketone supplements were also tested sub-chronically on SPD rats (KE, KS and KSMCT; 5 g/kg/day) and on WAG/Rij rats (KE, KS and KSMCT; 2.5 g/kg/day). At the end of treatments behavioral data collection was conducted manually by a blinded observer and with a video-tracking system, after which blood βHB and glucose levels were measured. Ketone supplementation reduced anxiety on EPM as measured by less entries to closed arms (sub-chronic KE and KS: SPD rats and KSMCT: WAG/Rij rats), more time spent in open arms (sub-chronic KE: SPD and KSMCT: WAG/Rij rats; chronic KSMCT: SPD rats), more distance traveled in open arms (chronic KS and KSMCT: SPD rats) and by delayed latency to entrance to closed arms (chronic KSMCT: SPD rats), when compared to control. Our data indicates that chronic and sub-chronic ketone supplementation not only elevated blood βHB levels in both animal models, but reduced anxiety-related behavior. We conclude that ketone supplementation may represent a promising anxiolytic strategy through a

  8. Exogenous Ketone Supplements Reduce Anxiety-Related Behavior in Sprague-Dawley and Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats.

    PubMed

    Ari, Csilla; Kovács, Zsolt; Juhasz, Gabor; Murdun, Cem; Goldhagen, Craig R; Koutnik, Andrew P; Poff, Angela M; Kesl, Shannon L; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional ketosis has been proven effective for seizure disorders and other neurological disorders. The focus of this study was to determine the effects of ketone supplementation on anxiety-related behavior in Sprague-Dawley (SPD) and Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. We tested exogenous ketone supplements added to food and fed chronically for 83 days in SPD rats and administered sub-chronically for 7 days in both rat models by daily intragastric gavage bolus followed by assessment of anxiety measures on elevated plus maze (EPM). The groups included standard diet (SD) or SD + ketone supplementation. Low-dose ketone ester (LKE; 1,3-butanediol-acetoacetate diester, ~10 g/kg/day, LKE), high dose ketone ester (HKE; ~25 g/kg/day, HKE), beta-hydroxybutyrate-mineral salt (βHB-S; ~25 g/kg/day, KS) and βHB-S + medium chain triglyceride (MCT; ~25 g/kg/day, KSMCT) were used as ketone supplementation for chronic administration. To extend our results, exogenous ketone supplements were also tested sub-chronically on SPD rats (KE, KS and KSMCT; 5 g/kg/day) and on WAG/Rij rats (KE, KS and KSMCT; 2.5 g/kg/day). At the end of treatments behavioral data collection was conducted manually by a blinded observer and with a video-tracking system, after which blood βHB and glucose levels were measured. Ketone supplementation reduced anxiety on EPM as measured by less entries to closed arms (sub-chronic KE and KS: SPD rats and KSMCT: WAG/Rij rats), more time spent in open arms (sub-chronic KE: SPD and KSMCT: WAG/Rij rats; chronic KSMCT: SPD rats), more distance traveled in open arms (chronic KS and KSMCT: SPD rats) and by delayed latency to entrance to closed arms (chronic KSMCT: SPD rats), when compared to control. Our data indicates that chronic and sub-chronic ketone supplementation not only elevated blood βHB levels in both animal models, but reduced anxiety-related behavior. We conclude that ketone supplementation may represent a promising anxiolytic strategy through a

  9. Energetic optimisation of foraging honeybees: flexible change of strategies in response to environmental challenges.

    PubMed

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Kovac, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Heterothermic insects like honeybees, foraging in a variable environment, face the challenge of keeping their body temperature high to enable immediate flight and to promote fast exploitation of resources. Because of their small size they have to cope with an enormous heat loss and, therefore, high costs of thermoregulation. This calls for energetic optimisation which may be achieved by different strategies. An 'economizing' strategy would be to reduce energetic investment whenever possible, for example by using external heat from the sun for thermoregulation. An 'investment-guided' strategy, by contrast, would be to invest additional heat production or external heat gain to optimize physiological parameters like body temperature which promise increased energetic returns. Here we show how honeybees balance these strategies in response to changes of their local microclimate. In a novel approach of simultaneous measurement of respiration and body temperature foragers displayed a flexible strategy of thermoregulatory and energetic management. While foraging in shade on an artificial flower they did not save energy with increasing ambient temperature as expected but acted according to an 'investment-guided' strategy, keeping the energy turnover at a high level (∼56-69 mW). This increased thorax temperature and speeded up foraging as ambient temperature increased. Solar heat was invested to increase thorax temperature at low ambient temperature ('investment-guided' strategy) but to save energy at high temperature ('economizing' strategy), leading to energy savings per stay of ∼18-76% in sunshine. This flexible economic strategy minimized costs of foraging, and optimized energetic efficiency in response to broad variation of environmental conditions.

  10. Femtochemistry of norrish type-I reactions: I. Experimental and theoretical studies of acetone and related ketones on the S1 surface.

    PubMed

    Diau, E W; Kötting, C; Zewail, A H

    2001-05-18

    The dissociation dynamics of two acetone isotopomers ([D0 ]- and [D6 ]acetone) after 93 kcal mol(-1) (307 nm) excitation to the S1 (n,π*) state have been investigated using femtosecond pump-probe mass spectrometry. We found that the nuclear motions of the molecule on the S1 surface involve two time scales. The initial femtosecond motion corresponds to the dephasing of the wave packet out of the Franck-Condon region on the S1 surface. For longer times, the direct observation of the build-up of the acetyl radical confirms that the S1 α-cleavage dynamics of acetone is on the nanosecond time scale. Density functional theory and ab initio calculations have been carried out to characterize the potential energy surfaces for the S0 , S1 , and T1 states of acetone and six other related aliphatic ketones. For acetone, the S1 energy barrier along the single α-positioned carbon-carbon (α-CC) bond-dissociation coordinate (to reach the S0 /S1 conical intersection) was calculated to be 18 kcal mol(-1) (∼110 kcal mol(-1) above the S0 minimum) for the first step of the nonconcerted α-CC bond cleavage; the concerted path is energetically unfavorable, consistent with experiments. The S1 barrier heights for other aliphatic ketones were found to be substantially lower than that of acetone by methyl substitutions at the α-position. The α-CC bond dissociation energy barrier of acetone on the T1 surface was calculated to be only 5 kcal mol(-1) (∼90 kcal mol(-1) above the S0 minimum), which is substantially lower than the barrier on the S1 surface. Based on the calculations, the α-cleavage reaction mechanism of acetone occurring on the S0 , S1 , and T1 surfaces can be better understood via a simple physical picture within the framework of valence-bond theory. The theoretical calculations support the conclusion that the observed nanosecond-scale S1 dynamics of acetone below the barrier is governed by a rate-limiting S1 →T1 intersystem crossing process followed by

  11. Rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) with aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.M.; Allen, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of aldehydes and ketones are formed in the troposphere by the gas-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. These compounds are expected to readily partition into cloud, fog, and aquated aerosol drops where they can participate in a variety of aqueous-phase reactions. It has been previously demonstrated by other researchers that aqueous-phase photochemical reactions involving aromatic aldehydes and ketones may lead to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidant for S(IV) and is also an {center_dot}OH precursor. Aldehydes and ketones may also participate in other aqueous-phase reactions within atmospheric water drops including reactions with {center_dot}OH. Rate constants for reactions involving {center_dot}OH in aqueous solutions have been reported for only a limited number of tropospheric aldehydes and ketones. The authors have measured the rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of {center_dot}OH with several tropospheric aldehydes and ketones by the technique of competition kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by continuous illumination at 313 nm of an aqueous acidified solution containing Fe(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, an {center_dot}OH scavenger, the aldehyde or ketone whose rate constant was to be measured, and a standard for which the rate constant for reaction with {center_dot}OH is well known. Nitrobenzene was used as the standard in all experiments. Loss of the aldehyde or ketone and the standard were monitored by HPLC. Losses attributable to direct photolysis and dark reactions were minimal.

  12. Energetics of the Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, John A.

    1983-01-01

    The use of semiconductors as electrodes for electrochemistry requires an understanding of both solid-state physics and electrochemistry, since phenomena associated with both disciplines are seen in semiconductor/electrolyte systems. The interfacial energetics of these systems are discussed. (JN)

  13. Energetics of geostrophic adjustment in rotating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Wu, R. S.

    2002-09-01

    Energetics of geostrophic adjustment in rotating how is examined in detail with a linear shallow water model. The Initial Unbalanced flow considered first falls under two classes. The first is similar to that adopted by Gill and is here referred to as it mass imbalance model, for the flow is initially motionless but with a sea surface displacement. The other is the same as that considered by Rossby and is referred to as I momentum imbalance model since there is only a velocity perturbation in the initial field. The significant feature of the energetics of geostrophic adjustment for the above two extreme models is that althongh the energy conversion ratio has a large case-to-case variability for different initial conditions, Its value is bounded below by 0 and above by 1 / 2. Based on the discussion of the above extreme models, the energetics of adjustment for an arbitrary initial condition is investigated. It is found that the characteristics of the energetics of geostrophic adjustment mentioned above are also applicable to adjustment of the general unbalanced flow under the condition that the energy conversion ratio is redefined as the conversion ratio between the change of kinetic energy and potential energy of the deviational fields.

  14. Pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    A large area, high flux beam of energetic oxygen atoms, E about 5 eV, has been developed to study the interaction of atomic oxygen with materials appropriate for spacecraft in low earth orbit. A description of the operating conditions and characteristics of the beam along with typical sample irradiation results are provided.

  15. Cryocycling of energetic materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, S.; Nilson, R.; Handrock, J.; Revelli, V.; Weingarten, L.

    1997-08-01

    The Cryocycling of Energetic Materials Project was executed in the period FY`94-96 as a Life Cycle Engineering activity in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on advanced conventional munitions. This MOU is an agreement between the Departments of Energy and Defense (Office of Munitions) that facilitates the development of technologies of mutual interest to the two Departments. The cryocycling process is a safe, environmentally friendly, and cost effective means of rubblizing bulk energetic materials so that they can be easily reused in a variety of new products. For this reason, cryocycling of excess solid energetic materials is one of the recycle/reuse strategies under study for demilitarized munitions in the Departments of Energy and Defense. These strategies seek to minimize the environmental damage associated with disposal of decommissioned energetic materials. In addition, they encourage technologies that can be used to derive economic benefit from reuse/reapplication of materials that would otherwise be treated as hazardous wastes. 45 refs., 38 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. The Energetic Brain: Understanding and Managing ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Cecil R.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Harrison, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    ADHD affects millions of people-some 3 to 5% of the general population. Written by a neuroscientist who has studied ADHD, a clinician who has diagnosed and treated it for 30 years, and a special educator who sees it daily, "The Energetic Brain" provides the latest information from neuroscience on how the ADHD brain works and shows how to harness…

  17. The energetics of low browsing in sauropods

    PubMed Central

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Wilkinson, David M.

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been argued that the probable high cost of travel for sauropod dinosaurs would have made exploiting high forage energetically attractive, if this reduced the need to travel between food patches. This argument was supported by simple calculations. Here, we take a similar approach to evaluate the energetics of foraging close to the ground. We predict that small extensions of the neck beyond the minimum required for the mouth to reach the ground bring substantial energetic savings. Each increment of length brings a further saving, but the sizes of such benefits decrease with increasing neck length. However, the observed neck length of around 9 m for Brachiosaurus (for example) is predicted to reduce the overall cost of foraging by 80 per cent, compared with a minimally necked individual. We argue that the long neck of the sauropods may have been under positive selection for low foraging (instead of, or as well as, exploitation of high foraging), if this long neck allowed a greater area of food to be exploited from a given position and thus reduced the energetically expensive movement of the whole animal. PMID:21429913

  18. Energy Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    ARL-TR-7719 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Energy Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon by Louis B Levine, Matthew...it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7719 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Energy ...

  19. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  20. Energetic electrons generated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried

    2015-12-01

    > electrons are accelerated up to energies beyond 30 keV is one of the open questions in solar physics. A flare is considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Which mechanisms lead to the production of energetic electrons in the magnetic reconnection region is discussed in this paper. Two of them are described in more detail.

  1. Calorimetric study of the energetics of pregnancy in golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Quek, V S; Trayhurn, P

    1990-10-01

    The energetics of pregnancy have been assessed in the golden hamster, using continuous whole body indirect calorimetry to determine energy expenditure throughout gestation. Energy intake was unchanged during pregnancy, either on a daily or cumulative basis. The total energy expenditure per animal was, however, significantly higher (14%) in pregnant hamsters than in virgin control animals. The increase in total expenditure was the result of increases in daily energy expenditure over the last one-third of gestation (mean increase 21%), the period during which the energy costs associated with fetal growth are highest. The respiratory quotient (RQ) of the control hamsters was approximately 0.95, but in the pregnant group there was a progressive reduction over the second half of gestation, and by parturition the RQ had fallen to 0.80. The changes in RQ indicate that there is a switch toward the oxidation of fat, away from the oxidation of carbohydrate, in the later stages of pregnancy. Measurements of body lipid suggest that the fall in RQ in the second half of pregnancy is the result of a net utilization of maternal fat reserves; 42% of maternal body lipid was lost during pregnancy, with most of the loss occurring over the final one-third of gestation. Because energy expenditure is increased (relative to virgin controls) without any change in energy intake, it is evident that the efficiency of energy utilization (energy gain per unit of energy intake) is not increased during pregnancy in the golden hamster.

  2. Dinosaur energetics: setting the bounds on feasible physiologies and ecologies.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The metabolic status of dinosaurs has long been debated but remains unresolved as no consistent picture has emerged from a range of anatomical and isotopic evidence. Quantitative analysis of dinosaur energetics, based on general principles applicable to all vertebrates, shows that many features of dinosaur lifestyle are compatible with a physiology similar to that of extant lizards, scaled up to dinosaur body masses and temperatures. The analysis suggests that sufficient metabolic scope would have been available to support observed dinosaur growth rates and allow considerable locomotor activity, perhaps even migration. Since at least one dinosaur lineage evolved true endothermy, this study emphasizes there was no single dinosaur physiology. Many small theropods were insulated with feathers and appear to have been partial or full endotherms. Uninsulated small taxa, and all juveniles, presumably would have been ectothermic, with consequent diurnal and seasonal variations in body temperature. In larger taxa, inertial homeothermy would have resulted in warm and stable body temperatures but with a basal metabolism significantly below that of extant mammals or birds of the same size. It would appear that dinosaurs exhibited a range of metabolic levels to match the broad spectrum of ecological niches they occupied.

  3. Energetic particle physics issues for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarizes our present understanding of the following energetic/alpha particle physics issues for the 21 MA, 20 TF coil ITER Interim Design configuration and operational scenarios: (a) toroidal field ripple effects on alpha particle confinement, (b) energetic particle interaction with low frequency MHD modes, (c) energetic particle excitation of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes, and (d) energetic particle transport due to MHD modes. TF ripple effects on alpha loss in ITER under a number of different operating conditions are found to be small with a maximum loss of 1%. With careful plasma control in ITER reversed-shear operation, TF ripple induced alpha loss can be reduced to below the nominal ITER design limit of 5%. Fishbone modes are expected to be unstable for {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 1%, and sawtooth stabilization is lost if the ideal kink growth rate exceeds 10% of the deeply trapped alpha precessional drift frequency evaluated at the q = 1 surface. However, it is expected that the fishbone modes will lead only to a local flattening of the alpha profile due to small banana size. MHD modes observed during slow decrease of stored energy after fast partial electron temperature collapse in JT-60U reversed-shear experiments may be resonant type instabilities; they may have implications on the energetic particle confinement in ITER reversed-shear operation. From the results of various TAE stability code calculations, ITER equilibria appear to lie close to TAE linear stability thresholds. However, the prognosis depends strongly on q profile and profiles of alpha and other high energy particles species. If TAE modes are unstable in ITER, the stochastic diffusion is the main loss mechanism, which scales with ({delta}B{sub r}/B){sup 2}, because of the relatively small alpha particle banana orbit size. For isolated TAE modes the particle loss is very small, and TAE modes saturate via the resonant wave-particle trapping process at very small amplitude.

  4. Arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via blocking peroxynitrite formation in mouse spinal cord white matter.

    PubMed

    Vana, Adam C; Li, Shihe; Ribeiro, Rachel; Tchantchou, Flaubert; Zhang, Yumin

    2011-09-01

    Inhibition of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) has recently been found to attenuate the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a commonly used animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the protective mechanisms that underlie PLA(2) inhibition are still not well understood. In this study, we found that cytosolic PLA(2) (cPLA(2)) was highly expressed in infiltrating lymphocytes and macrophages/microglia in mouse spinal cord white matter. Although cPLA(2) is also expressed in spinal cord neurons and oligodendrocytes, there were no differences observed in these cell types between EAE and control animals. Arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF3), a cPLA(2) inhibitor, significantly reduced the clinical symptoms and inhibited the body weight loss typically found in EAE mice. AACOCF3 also attenuated the loss of mature, myelin producing, oligodendrocytes, and axonal damage in the spinal cord white matter. Nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity, an indicator of peroxynitrite formation, was dramatically increased in EAE mice and attenuated by treatment with AACOCF3. These protective effects were not evident when AA861, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, was used. In primary cultures of microglia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced an upregulation of cPLA(2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and components of the NADPH oxidase complex, p47phox and p67phox. AACOCF3 significantly attenuated iNOS induction, nitric oxide production and the generation of reactive oxygen species in reactive microglia. Similar to the decomposition catalyst of peroxynitrite, AACOCF3 also blocked oligodendrocyte toxicity induced by reactive microglia. These results suggest that AACOCF3 may prevent oligodendrocyte loss in EAE by attenuating peroxynitrite formation in the spinal cord white matter.

  5. Methyl ethyl ketone blocks status epilepticus induced by lithium-pilocarpine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Osamu; Sugiyama, Eriko; Hasebe, Nobuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Hosoi, Rie; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Abe, Kohji; Gee, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: A ketogenic diet has been used successfully to treat patients with intractable epilepsy, although the mechanism is unknown. Acetone has been shown to have an anticonvulsive effect in various animal models. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether other ketones, 2-butanone (methyl ethyl ketone: MEK) and 3-pentanone (diethyl ketone: DEK), also show anticonvulsive effects in lithium-pilocarpine (Li-pilocarpine)-induced status epilepticus (SE) in rats. Experimental approach: Anticonvulsive effects of MEK and DEK in Li-pilocarpine SE rats were measured by behavioural scoring. Anti-seizure effects of MEK were also evaluated using electroencephalography (EEG). Neuroprotective effect of MEK was investigated by haematoxylin and eosin staining 4 weeks after the treatment with pilocarpine. Key results: Acetone, MEK and DEK showed anticonvulsant effects in Li-pilocarpine-induced SE rats. Treatment with MEK twice (8 mmol·kg−1 and 5 mmol·kg−1) almost completely blocked spontaneous recurrent cortical seizure EEG up to 4 weeks after the administration of pilocarpine. MEK also showed strong neuroprotective effects in Li-pilocarpine-treated rats 4 weeks following the administration of pilocarpine. Significant neural cell death occurred in the hippocampus of Li-pilocarpine SE rats, especially in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. In contrast, normal histological characteristics were observed in these regions in the MEK-pretreated rats. Conclusions and implications: Both MEK and DEK showed strong anticonvulsive effects in Li-pilocarpine-induced SE rats. They also inhibited continuous recurrent seizure and neural damage in hippocampal region for 4 weeks after the treatment with pilocarpine. These findings appear to be of value in the investigation of epilepsy. PMID:19694724

  6. STIMULATION OF TARSAL RECEPTORS OF THE BLOWFLY BY ALIPHATIC ALDEHYDES AND KETONES

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, L. E.; Dethier, V. G.

    1949-01-01

    Rejection of eight aldehydes, eight ketones, five secondary alcohols, and 3-pentanol has been studied in the blowfly Phormia regina Meigen. The data agree with results previously reported for normal alcohols and several series of glycols in showing a logarithmic increase in stimulating effect with increasing chain length. The order of increasing effectiveness among the different species of compounds thus far investigated is the following: polyglycols, diols, secondary alcohols, iso-alcohols, normal alcohols, ketones, iso-aldehydes, normal aldehydes. Curves relating the logarithms of threshold concentration to the logarithms of chain length for diols, alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones show inflections in the 3 to 6 carbon range. Above and below the region of inflection the curves are nearly rectilinear. The slopes for the upper limbs (smaller molecules) are of the order of –2; for the lower limbs, about –10. Comparisons of the threshold data with numerical values for molecular weights, molecular areas and volumes, oil-water distribution coefficients, activity coefficients, standard free energies, vapor pressures, boiling points, melting points, dipole moments, dielectric constants, and degree of association are discussed briefly, and it is concluded that none of the comparisons serves to bring the data from the several series and from the two portions of each series into a single homogeneous system. A qualitative comparison with water solubilities shows fewer discrepancies. It is suggested that the existence of a combination of aqueous and lipoid phases at the receptor surface would fit best with what is presently known about the relationship between chemical structure and stimulating effect in contact chemoreception. In this hypothesis the smaller and more highly water-soluble compounds are envisaged as gaining access to the receptors partly through the aqueous phase, the larger molecules predominantly through the lipoid phase. PMID:18114559

  7. Micro-initiators as the fundamental building blocks of micro-energetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Amish; Fuchs, Brian

    2007-04-01

    The need for smaller and less expensive MIL-STD 1901A compliant safe and arm-fire (S&A/A-F) devices to safely initiate rocket motors requires a better understanding of energetic initiation and firing train functionality. Applications broadly include NLOS artillery rocket-assist motors, high I sp miniature thrusters for UAVs, composite molded thrusters for hypersonic flow temperatures, and smart munitions. Every energetic system needs an initiation mechanism. For the past decade, many groups have worked on reducing the footprint of these systems through batch processing and miniaturization. However, the typical miniaturization and semiconductor-style benefits such as "faster, smaller, cheaper" are only now being investigated for micro-energetics. Advancement of this field requires key breakthroughs in the following areas: 1) a SAFE and batch micro-energetics deposition and patterning step, 2) The compatibility of subsequent (post or pre) MEMS processing steps, 3) better understanding of the micro-initiation energetic train, and 4) special environmental standards for the manufacturer and specialized product qualification/testing. This body of work spotlights 'low-cost' MEMS-based initiators, typical chemical compounds used today in the industry and the associated sensitivities and dangers to be encountered. The micro-scale firing trains required for smart munitions, including warhead and propellant applications, can be made multifunctional for use with legacy and IM-compliant energetics. Methods of focusing industry on reliability and the importance of characterizing formulation, composition, and performance will also be discussed. Most importantly, however, is the need to focus industry on implementing a low-cost micro initiator methodology.

  8. Raspberry ketone in food supplements--High intake, few toxicity data--A cause for safety concern?

    PubMed

    Bredsdorff, Lea; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Hallas-Møller, Torben; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2015-10-01

    Raspberry ketone (4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone) is marketed on the Internet as a food supplement. The recommended intake is between 100 and 1400 mg per day. The substance is naturally occurring in raspberries (up to 4.3 mg/kg) and is used as a flavouring substance. Toxicological studies on raspberry ketone are limited to acute and subchronic studies in rats. When the lowest recommended daily dose of raspberry ketone (100 mg) as a food supplement is consumed, it is 56 times the established threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) of 1800 μg/day for Class 1 substances. The margin of safety (MOS) based on a NOAEL of 280 mg/kg bw/day for lower weight gain in rats is 165 at 100 mg and 12 at 1400 mg. The recommended doses are a concern taking into account the TTC and MOS. Investigations of raspberry ketone in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models indicated potential cardiotoxic effects and potential effects on reproduction/development. Taking into account the high intake via supplements, the compound's toxic potential should be clarified with further experimental studies. In UK the pure compound is regarded as novel food requiring authorisation prior to marketing but raspberry ketone is not withdrawn from Internet sites from this country.

  9. Enantioselective conjugate addition of nitro compounds to α,β-unsaturated ketones: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Rubén; Andrés, José M; Álvarez, Rosana; Muruzábal, María D; de Lera, Ángel R; Pedrosa, Rafael

    2011-05-16

    A series of chiral thioureas derived from easily available diamines, prepared from α-amino acids, have been tested as catalysts in the enantioselective Michael additions of nitroalkanes to α,β-unsaturated ketones. The best results are obtained with the bifunctional catalyst prepared from L-valine. This thiourea promotes the reaction with high enantioselectivities and chemical yields for aryl/vinyl ketones, but the enantiomeric ratio for alkyl/vinyl derivatives is very modest. The addition of substituted nitromethanes led to the corresponding adducts with excellent enantioselectivity but very poor diastereoselectivity. Evidence for the isomerization of the addition products has been obtained from the reaction of chalcone with [D(3)]nitromethane, which shows that the final addition products epimerize under the reaction conditions. The epimerization explains the low diastereoselectivity observed in the formation of adducts with two adjacent tertiary stereocenters. Density functional studies of the transition structures corresponding to two alternative activation modes of the nitroalkanes and α,β-unsaturated ketones by the bifunctional organocatalyst have been carried out at the B3LYP/3-21G* level. The computations are consistent with a reaction model involving the Michael addition of the thiourea-activated nitronate to the ketone activated by the protonated amine of the organocatalyst. The enantioselectivities predicted by the computations are consistent with the experimental values obtained for aryl- and alkyl-substituted α,β-unsaturated ketones.

  10. A Prediction of Proton-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Ketones in Lewis Basic Solvent through Facile Splitting of Hydrogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Heshmat, Mojgan; Privalov, Timofei

    2017-01-23

    A ketone's carbonyl carbon is electrophilic and harbors a part of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the carbonyl group, resembling a Lewis acidic center; under the right circumstances it exhibits very useful chemical reactivity, although the natural electrophilicity of the ketone's carbonyl carbon is often not strong enough on its own to produce such reactivity. Quantum chemical calculations predict that a proton shared between a ketone and the Lewis basic solvent molecule (dioxane or THF) activates carbonyl carbon to the point of enabling a facile heterolytic splitting of H2 . Proton-catalyzed hydrogenation of a ketone in Lewis basic solvent is the result. The mechanism involves the interaction of H2 with the enhanced Lewis acidity of a carbonyl carbon and the free Lewis basic solvent molecule polarizes H2 and enables the hydride-type attack on carbonyl carbon, which is very strongly influenced by the proton shared between a ketone and solvent. The hydride-type attack on carbon is reminiscent of the splitting of H2 by singlet carbenes except that, in this case, a Lewis base from the surrounding environment (solvent) is necessary for polarization of H2 and acceptance of the proton resulting from the heterolytic splitting of H2 .

  11. Directed reductive amination of beta-hydroxy-ketones: convergent assembly of the ritonavir/lopinavir core.

    PubMed

    Menche, Dirk; Arikan, Fatih; Li, Jun; Rudolph, Sven

    2007-01-18

    An efficient procedure for the directed reductive amination of beta-hydroxy-ketones (3) for the stereoselective preparation of 1,3-syn-amino alcohols (6) is reported. The operationally simple protocol uses Ti(iOPr)4 for coordination of the intermediate imino alcohol (5) and PMHS as the reducing agent. The method was expanded to an asymmetric aldol reductive amination sequence to allow a highly convergent synthesis of the hydroxy-amine core of the HIV-protease inhibitors ritonavir and lopinavir. [reaction: see text].

  12. Primary-tertiary diamine-catalyzed Michael addition of ketones to isatylidenemalononitrile derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Akshay; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2014-01-01

    Simple primary-tertiary diamines easily derived from natural primary amino acids were used to catalyze the Michael addition of ketones with isatylidenemalononitrile derivatives. Diamine 1a in combination with D-CSA as an additive provided Michael adducts in high yield (up to 94%) and excellent enantioselectivity (up to 99%). The catalyst 1a was successfully used to catalyze the three-component version of the reaction by a domino Knoevenagel-Michael sequence. The Michael adduct 4a was transformed into spirooxindole 6 by a reduction with sodium borohydride in a highly enantioselective manner.

  13. Alpha-alkylation of ketones by addition of zinc enamides to unactivated olefins.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaharu; Hatakeyama, Takuji; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2004-09-29

    A zinc enamide generated from the corresponding N-aryl imine undergoes addition to an unactivated olefin, such as ethylene, 1-octene, and isobutylene, to generate an alpha-alkylated gamma-zincioimine intermediate in good to excellent yield. Terminal and gem-disubstituted olefins react with >99% regioselectivity, allowing the C-C bond formation to take place at the more hindered carbon of the double bond. The organozinc intermediate undergoes further C-C bond formation with a carbon electrophile to give, upon hydrolysis of the imine, an alpha-alkylated ketone bearing a variety of functionalized primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl groups.

  14. Accelerated simulations of aromatic polymers: application to polyether ether ketone (PEEK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Richard J.; Spencer, James S.; Mostofi, Arash A.; Sutton, Adrian P.

    2014-10-01

    For aromatic polymers, the out-of-plane oscillations of aromatic groups limit the maximum accessible time step in a molecular dynamics simulation. We present a systematic approach to removing such high-frequency oscillations from planar groups along aromatic polymer backbones, while preserving the dynamical properties of the system. We consider, as an example, the industrially important polymer, polyether ether ketone (PEEK), and show that this coarse graining technique maintains excellent agreement with the fully flexible all-atom and all-atom rigid bond models whilst allowing the time step to increase fivefold to 5 fs.

  15. Electroless nickel-phosphorus coating on poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotubes composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Tong; Di, Lizhi; Yang, De'an

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve electromagnetic shielding property of poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotubes composite, a nickel-phosphorus coating was covered on the composite by electroless plating. The morphologies of the substrates and the coatings were characterized by SEM. XPS was performed to analyze the surface composition and chemical states before and after chemical etching. The results showed that lots of microscopic holes appeared and evenly distributed on the surface, and the concentration of hydrophilic groups on the surface increased after the composite was etched. Thermal shock test showed that the adhesive strength between the coating and the composite was good.

  16. Osmium pyme complexes for fast hydrogenation and asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Walter; Ballico, Maurizio; Del Zotto, Alessandro; Siega, Katia; Magnolia, Santo; Rigo, Pierluigi

    2008-01-01

    The osmium compound trans,cis-[OsCl2(PPh3)2(Pyme)] (1) (Pyme=1-(pyridin-2-yl)methanamine), obtained from [OsCl2(PPh3)3] and Pyme, thermally isomerizes to cis,cis-[OsCl2(PPh3)(2)(Pyme)] (2) in mesitylene at 150 degrees C. Reaction of [OsCl2(PPh3)3] with Ph2P(CH2)(4)PPh2 (dppb) and Pyme in mesitylene (150 degrees C, 4 h) leads to a mixture of trans-[OsCl2(dppb)(Pyme)] (3) and cis-[OsCl2(dppb)(Pyme)] (4) in about an 1:3 molar ratio. The complex trans-[OsCl2(dppb)(Pyet)] (5) (Pyet=2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethanamine) is formed by reaction of [OsCl2(PPh3)3] with dppb and Pyet in toluene at reflux. Compounds 1, 2, 5 and the mixture of isomers 3/4 efficiently catalyze the transfer hydrogenation (TH) of different ketones in refluxing 2-propanol and in the presence of NaOiPr (2.0 mol %). Interestingly, 3/4 has been proven to reduce different ketones (even bulky) by means of TH with a remarkably high turnover frequency (TOF up to 5.7 x 10(5) h(-1)) and at very low loading (0.05-0.001 mol %). The system 3/4 also efficiently catalyzes the hydrogenation of many ketones (H2, 5.0 atm) in ethanol with KOtBu (2.0 mol %) at 70 degrees C (TOF up to 1.5 x 10(4) h(-1)). The in-situ-generated catalysts prepared by the reaction of [OsCl2(PPh3)3] with Josiphos diphosphanes and (+/-)-1-alkyl-substituted Pyme ligands, promote the enantioselective TH of different ketones with 91-96 % ee (ee=enantiomeric excess) and with a TOF of up to 1.9 x 10(4) h(-1) at 60 degrees C.

  17. Triaryl-Substituted Divinyl Ketones Cyclization: Nazarov Reaction versus Friedel-Crafts Electrophilic Substitution.

    PubMed

    Shirinian, Valerii Z; Lvov, Andrey G; Yadykov, Anton V; Yaminova, Liana V; Kachala, Vadim V; Markosyan, Ashot I

    2016-12-16

    The acid-catalyzed cyclization of a wide range of triaryl-substituted divinyl ketones has been studied. It was found that the reaction pathway strongly depends on the nature of the aryl substituent at the α-position to the carbonyl group. An electron-rich aromatic substituent promotes the reaction to proceed through the intramolecular Friedel-Crafts electrophilic substitution giving dihydronaphthalene derivatives. In contrast, the presence of an electron-deficient substituent is favorable for the Nazarov 4π-conrotatory cyclization yielding triaryl-substituted cyclopentenones. The electrophilic substitution reaction was applied to thiophene and thiazole derivatives.

  18. Hydrogen-Borrowing and Interrupted-Hydrogen-Borrowing Reactions of Ketones and Methanol Catalyzed by Iridium**

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Di; Poole, Darren L; Shotton, Camilla C; Kornahrens, Anne F; Healy, Mark P; Donohoe, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Reported herein is the use of catalytic [{Ir(cod)Cl}2] to facilitate hydrogen-borrowing reactions of ketone enolates with methanol at 65 °C. An oxygen atmosphere accelerates the process, and when combined with the use of a bulky monodentate phosphine ligand, interrupts the catalytic cycle by preventing enone reduction. Subsequent addition of pro-nucleophiles to the reaction mixture allowed a one-pot methylenation/conjugate addition protocol to be developed, which greatly expands the range of products that can be made by this methodology. PMID:25491653

  19. Multiplicity of Diverse Heterocycles from Polymer-Supported α-Acylamino Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Pudelová, Nadĕžda; Krchňák, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-supported α-acylamino ketones were transformed to seven types of structurally unrelated heterocyclic compounds. Syntheses involved variety of chemical routes and comprised diverse chemistries (C-C, C=C, C-N, C=N, C-O bond formations). Different sizes of heterocycles (4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered rings) were prepared, including dihydro-pyrrol-2-ones, pyrazin-2-ones, dihydro-triazepin-6-ones, morpholin-3-ones, imidazoles, β-lactams, and isoquinolin-1-ones. Further elaboration to fused ring systems was also documented. PMID:19689103

  20. Exploring Ultrafast Structural Dynamics for Energetic Enhancement or Disruption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    indirect laser heating and on-resonant optical pumping, to excite/perturb the energetic material to observe changes in the electronic and molecular...time scales necessary to monitor early times of energetic events. 15. SUBJECT TERMS ultrafast, energetic, femtosecond, TATB, flash heating , transient...absorption spectra of RDX after flash heating (left) Raman spectra of RDX after flash heating (right) .............................................7

  1. Laser-induced reactions in energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Ping

    1999-07-01

    Several energetic materials have been investigated under shock wave loading, heating, and photodissociation. This dissertation highlights some efforts to understand energetic material from an angle of basic physical processes and elementary chemical reactions. The first series of experiments was performed to study laser-generated shock waves in energetic materials. Shock waves are generated by pulsed laser vaporization of thin aluminum films. The rapidly expanding aluminum plasma launches a shock wave into the adjacent layer of energetic material, initiating chemical reactions. The shock velocity has been measured by a velocity interferometer. Shock pressures as high as 8 GPa have been generated in this manner. A simple model is proposed to predict laser-generated shock pressure. Several energetic materials have been studied under laser- generated shock wave. The second series of experiments was conducted to study thermal decomposition and photodissociation of energetic materials. Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP) and poly(glycidyl nitrate) (PGN) have been investigated by pulsed infrared laser pyrolysis and ultraviolet laser photolysis of thin films at 17-77 K. Reactions are monitored by transmission infrared spectroscopy. Photolysis of GAP at 266 nm shows that the initial reaction steps are elimination of molecular nitrogen with subsequent formation of imines. Thermal decomposition of GAP by infrared laser pyrolysis reveals products similar to the UV experiments after warming. Laser pyrolysis of PGN indicated that the main steps of decomposition are elimination of NO2 and CH2O from the nitrate ester functional group. It seems that the initial thermal decomposition mechanism of GAP and PGN are the same from heating rate of several degrees per second to 107 oC/s. The third series of experiments is about detailed study of photodissociation mechanism of methyl nitrate. Photodissociation of methyl nitrate isolated in an argon matrix at 17 K has been investigated by 266 nm

  2. Body Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    Body composition refers to the types and amounts of tissues which make up the body. The most acceptable method for assessing body composition is underwater weighing. A subcutaneous skinfold provides a quantitative measurement of fat below the skin. The skinfold technique permits a valid estimate of the body's total fat content. (JN)

  3. Exercise promotes the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through the action of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Sama F; Henry, Jeffrey; Al-Haddad, Rami; El Hayek, Lauretta; Abou Haidar, Edwina; Stringer, Thomas; Ulja, Devyani; Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Holson, Edward B; Ratan, Rajiv R; Ninan, Ipe; Chao, Moses V

    2016-01-01

    Exercise induces beneficial responses in the brain, which is accompanied by an increase in BDNF, a trophic factor associated with cognitive improvement and the alleviation of depression and anxiety. However, the exact mechanisms whereby physical exercise produces an induction in brain Bdnf gene expression are not well understood. While pharmacological doses of HDAC inhibitors exert positive effects on Bdnf gene transcription, the inhibitors represent small molecules that do not occur in vivo. Here, we report that an endogenous molecule released after exercise is capable of inducing key promoters of the Mus musculus Bdnf gene. The metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate, which increases after prolonged exercise, induces the activities of Bdnf promoters, particularly promoter I, which is activity-dependent. We have discovered that the action of β-hydroxybutyrate is specifically upon HDAC2 and HDAC3, which act upon selective Bdnf promoters. Moreover, the effects upon hippocampal Bdnf expression were observed after direct ventricular application of β-hydroxybutyrate. Electrophysiological measurements indicate that β-hydroxybutyrate causes an increase in neurotransmitter release, which is dependent upon the TrkB receptor. These results reveal an endogenous mechanism to explain how physical exercise leads to the induction of BDNF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15092.001 PMID:27253067

  4. A Probable Endocrine Basis for the Depression of Ketone Bodies during Infectious or Inflammatory State in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    were maintained on a commerciel diet -- nals," as promulgated by the Committee on Care and Use of (Wayne Lab-Blox, Allied Mills, Inc., Chicago, IL...Mackreil and Sokal (26). However, in a fasted rat, a direct inhibitory effect of insulin on the hepatic ketogenic IUcapacity could not be demonstrated...in vitro. This obser- a2o- ..C, IIL vation suggests an indirect role of insulin in inhibiting 0 106 VI ., hepatic ketogenic capacity.’ 0 104 HEAT

  5. Exercise promotes the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through the action of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Sama F; Henry, Jeffrey; Al-Haddad, Rami; El Hayek, Lauretta; Abou Haidar, Edwina; Stringer, Thomas; Ulja, Devyani; Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Holson, Edward B; Ratan, Rajiv R; Ninan, Ipe; Chao, Moses V

    2016-06-02

    Exercise induces beneficial responses in the brain, which is accompanied by an increase in BDNF, a trophic factor associated with cognitive improvement and the alleviation of depression and anxiety. However, the exact mechanisms whereby physical exercise produces an induction in brain Bdnf gene expression are not well understood. While pharmacological doses of HDAC inhibitors exert positive effects on Bdnf gene transcription, the inhibitors represent small molecules that do not occur in vivo. Here, we report that an endogenous molecule released after exercise is capable of inducing key promoters of the Mus musculus Bdnf gene. The metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate, which increases after prolonged exercise, induces the activities of Bdnf promoters, particularly promoter I, which is activity-dependent. We have discovered that the action of β-hydroxybutyrate is specifically upon HDAC2 and HDAC3, which act upon selective Bdnf promoters. Moreover, the effects upon hippocampal Bdnf expression were observed after direct ventricular application of β-hydroxybutyrate. Electrophysiological measurements indicate that β-hydroxybutyrate causes an increase in neurotransmitter release, which is dependent upon the TrkB receptor. These results reveal an endogenous mechanism to explain how physical exercise leads to the induction of BDNF.

  6. Effect of monensin on blood ketone bodies, incidence and recurrence of disease and fertility in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Heuer, C; Schukken, Y H; Jonker, L J; Wilkinson, J I; Noordhuizen, J P

    2001-05-01

    Twelve trials designed to test the effect of monensin on milk production were carried out at eight different research farms. Data from these studies were evaluated for effects of monensin on health and reproduction. Monensin was added to the concentrate starting either 2 wk before (293 cows) or 5 wk after calving (601 cows) for periods ranging 16 to 37 wk. Applied after calving, the incidence of clinical mastitis was reduced in the monensin-treated animals. Monensin decreased the rate of intramammary infection (approximated by a change from below to above 250,000 somatic cells in milk) in first lactation heifers by 13%. Indicated by an adjusted incidence rate ratio of 0.58 (P = 0.03), the case incidence of noninfectious lameness decreased from 31% in control cows to 18% in cows receiving monensin before calving. The time from calving to first service was shorter for cows fed monensin before calving. Monensin reduced calving to conception intervals in cows with endometritis during the pretreatment period. No significant effects of monensin were observed for the duration of intra mammory infection (somatic cells in milk above 250,000), infectious lameness, endometritis, cystic ovarian disease, a summary category of 'other diseases,' times from calving to first observed estrus, and from first service to conception.

  7. Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1995-01-01

    A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor.

  8. Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-07-18

    A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor. 4 figs.

  9. Probing the heliosphere with energetic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Shih, K. L.; Jokipii, J. R.; Grzedzielski, S.

    1992-01-01

    The idea of using energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced by charge exchange between energetic ions and ambient neutral atoms, as a diagnostic tool to investigate planetary magnetospheres from a distance has been extended to the investigation of the heliosphere. The paper explores what one can reasonably expect of the heliospheric ENA (HSENA) and what criteria would be imposed on HSENA instruments by concentrating on 10-10 exp 3 keV protons in quiet-time interplanetary space, solar-flare events, corotating interaction regions, and populations have distinctive signatures and that the detection of these particles can reveal energy spatial and propagation of ions in 3D interplanetary space, including the solar-wind termination shock. Such breadth of information could not be gained by in situ means.

  10. Kinetic versus Energetic Discrimination in Biological Copying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-05-01

    We study stochastic copying schemes in which discrimination between a right and a wrong match is achieved via different kinetic barriers or different binding energies of the two matches. We demonstrate that, in single-step reactions, the two discrimination mechanisms are strictly alternative and cannot be mixed to further reduce the error fraction. Close to the lowest error limit, kinetic discrimination results in a diverging copying velocity and dissipation per copied bit. On the other hand, energetic discrimination reaches its lowest error limit in an adiabatic regime where dissipation and velocity vanish. By analyzing experimentally measured kinetic rates of two DNA polymerases, T7 and Polγ, we argue that one of them operates in the kinetic and the other in the energetic regime. Finally, we show how the two mechanisms can be combined in copying schemes implementing error correction through a proofreading pathway.

  11. Energetics of compost production and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, L.F.; Golueke, C.G.; Savage, G.M.

    1986-09-01

    Developments during the past decade have led to a fairly clear delineation of the role of composting in municipal solid waste (MSW) management. However, before that role can be accepted and implemented on a practical scale, certain important environmental and economic factors must be resolved. Of the economic factors, the energetics of composting in waste management is in urgent need of further elaboration and exploration. This need prompted an attempt on the part of the authors of this paper to resolve basic questions regarding the energetics involved in the production and utilization of compost from urban solid waste and municipal sludges, and peripherally, the applicability of these findings to the management of other wastes (e.g., agricultural). Progress made in pursuing this attempt is described in the present paper.

  12. Exploratory analysis of Spanish energetic mining accidents.

    PubMed

    Sanmiquel, Lluís; Freijo, Modesto; Rossell, Josep M

    2012-01-01

    Using data on work accidents and annual mining statistics, the paper studies work-related accidents in the Spanish energetic mining sector in 1999-2008. The following 3 parameters are considered: age, experience and size of the mine (in number of workers) where the accident took place. The main objective of this paper is to show the relationship between different accident indicators: risk index (as an expression of the incidence), average duration index for the age and size of the mine variables (as a measure of the seriousness of an accident), and the gravity index for the various sizes of mines (which measures the seriousness of an accident, too). The conclusions of this study could be useful to develop suitable prevention policies that would contribute towards a decrease in work-related accidents in the Spanish energetic mining industry.

  13. Energetic protons from a disappearing solar filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; Mcguire, R. E.; Stone, R. G.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A solar energetic (E 50 MeV) particle (SEP) event observed at 1 AU began about 15000 UT on 1981 December 5. This event was associated with a fast coronal mass ejection observed with the Solwind coronagraph on the P78-1 satellite. No metric type 2 or type 4 burst was observed, but a weak interplanetary type 2 burst was observed with the low frequency radio experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 satellite. The mass ejection was associated with the eruption of a large solar quiescent filament which lay well away from any active regions. The eruption resulted in an H alpha double ribbon structure which straddled the magnetic inversion line. No impulsive phase was obvious in either the H alpha or the microwave observations. This event indicates that neither a detectable impulsive phase nor a strong or complex magnetic field is necessary for the production of energetic ions.

  14. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  15. Energetics in robotic flight at small scales.

    PubMed

    Karydis, Konstantinos; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-02-06

    Recent advances in design, sensing and control have led to aerial robots that offer great promise in a range of real-world applications. However, one critical open question centres on how to improve the energetic efficiency of aerial robots so that they can be useful in practical situations. This review paper provides a survey on small-scale aerial robots (i.e. less than 1 m(2) area foot print, and less than 3 kg weight) from the point of view of energetics. The paper discusses methods to improve the efficiency of aerial vehicles, and reports on recent findings by the authors and other groups on modelling the impact of aerodynamics for the purpose of building energy-aware motion planners and controllers.

  16. Mitochondrial network energetics in the heart.

    PubMed

    Aon, Miguel A; Cortassa, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    At the core of eukaryotic aerobic life, mitochondrial function like 'hubs' in the web of energetic and redox processes in cells. In the heart, these networks-extending beyond the complex connectivity of biochemical circuit diagrams and apparent morphology-exhibit collective dynamics spanning several spatiotemporal levels of organization, from the cell, to the tissue, and the organ. The network function of mitochondria, i.e., mitochondrial network energetics, represents an advantageous behavior. Its coordinated action, under normal physiology, provides robustness despite failure in a few nodes, and improves energy supply toward a swiftly changing demand. Extensive diffuse loops, encompassing mitochondrial-cytoplasmic reaction/transport networks, control and regulate energy supply and demand in the heart. Under severe energy crises, the network behavior of mitochondria and associated glycolytic and other metabolic networks collapse, thereby triggering fatal arrhythmias.

  17. Streaming energetic electrons in reconnection events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, John W.

    Energetic electrons can be used to probe the large-scale topology of magnetic fields in Earth's magnetotail. In the plasma sheet region near the tail's midplane, these particles normally exhibit the trapped or isotropic angular distributions characteristic of closed magnetic field lines, but brief intervals of intense tailward streaming, indicative of open field lines, are occasionally observed. Such streaming events occur preferentially near the time of substorm onset as the observing spacecraft exits the thinning plasma sheet, and they are usually preceded by a 5-10 minute interval of fast tailward plasma flow and southward magnetic field. These correlated phenomena have been interpreted as evidence for magnetic reconnection at a transient magnetic X-line located ˜15 RE tailward of Earth. Recent studies of energetic electron streaming events report novel reconnection-related phenomena, including heating of plasma electrons, bump-in-tail electron velocity distributions, and possible rotational and tangential magnetic discontinuities.

  18. Streaming energetic electrons in reconnection events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, J. W.

    Energetic electrons can be used to probe the large-scale topology of magnetic fields in earth's magnetotail. In the plasma sheet region near the tail's midplane, these particles normally exhibit the trapped or isotropic angular distributions characteristic of closed magnetic field lines, but brief intervals of intense tailward streaming, indicative of open field lines, are occasionally observed. Such streaming events occur preferentially near the time of substorm onset as the observing spacecraft exits the thinning plasma sheet, and they are usually preceded by a 5-10 minute interval of fast tailward plasma flow and southward magnetic field. These correlated phenomena have been interpreted as evidence for magnetic reconnection at a transient magnetic X-line located at 15 earth radii tailward of earth. Recent studies of energetic electron streaming events report novel reconnection-related phenomena, including heating of plasma electrons, bump-in-tail electron velocity distributions, and possible rotational and tangential magnetic discontinuities.

  19. HAWC and Solar Energetic Transient Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, A.; Ryan, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the volcano Sierra Negra (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC's primary purpose is the study of both galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. The HAWC instrument will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors whose counting rate will be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above the geomagnetic cutoff of the site ( ˜ 8 GV). In particular, HAWC will detect solar energetic particles known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), and the effect of Coronal Mass Ejections on the galactic cosmic rays, known as Forbush Decreases (FDs). The Milagro experiment, the HAWC predecessor, successfully observed GLEs and the HAWC engineering array "VAMOS" already observed a FD. HAWC will be sensitive to γ rays and neutrons produced during large solar flares. In this work, we present the instrument and discuss its capability to observe solar energetic events. i. e., flares and CMEs.

  20. Mitochondrial network energetics in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Aon, Miguel A.; Cortassa, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    At the core of eukaryotic aerobic life, mitochondria function like “hubs” in the web of energetic and redox processes in cells. In the heart, these networks - extending beyond the complex connectivity of biochemical circuit diagrams and apparent morphology - exhibit collective dynamics spanning several spatio-temporal levels of organization, from the cell, to the tissue, and the organ. The network function of mitochondria, i.e. mitochondrial network energetics, represents an advantageous behaviour. Its coordinated action, under normal physiology, provides robustness despite failure in a few nodes, and improves energy supply toward a swiftly changing demand. Extensive diffuse loops, encompassing mitochondrialcytoplasmic reaction/transport networks, control and regulate energy supply and demand in the heart. Under severe energy crises, the network behaviour of mitochondria and associated glycolytic and other metabolic networks collapse, thereby triggering fatal arrhythmias. PMID:22899654

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of mixtures involving ketones and aldehydes by a direct bubble pressure calculation.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Nicolas; Lachet, Véronique; Boutin, Anne

    2010-07-08

    Ketone and aldehyde molecules are involved in a large variety of industrial applications. Because they are mainly present mixed with other compounds, the prediction of phase equilibrium of mixtures involving these classes of molecules is of first interest particularly to design and optimize separation processes. The main goal of this work is to propose a transferable force field for ketones and aldehydes that allows accurate molecular simulations of not only pure compounds but also complex mixtures. The proposed force field is based on the anisotropic united-atoms AUA4 potential developed for hydrocarbons, and it introduces only one new atom, the carbonyl oxygen. The Lennard-Jones parameters of this oxygen atom have been adjusted on saturated thermodynamic properties of both acetone and acetaldehyde. To simulate mixtures, Monte Carlo simulations are carried out in a specific pseudoensemble which allows a direct calculation of the bubble pressure. For polar mixtures involved in this study, we show that this approach is an interesting alternative to classical calculations in the isothermal-isobaric Gibbs ensemble. The pressure-composition diagrams of polar + polar and polar + nonpolar binary mixtures are well reproduced. Mutual solubilities as well as azeotrope location, if present, are accurately predicted without any empirical binary interaction parameters or readjustment. Such result highlights the transferability of the proposed force field, which is an essential feature toward the simulation of complex oxygenated mixtures of industrial interest.

  2. Organic monolith frits encased in polyether ether ketone tubing with improved durability for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin Young; Cheong, Won Jo

    2015-09-01

    This study introduces a preparation method for polymer-encased monolith frits with improved durability for liquid chromatography columns. The inner surface of the polyether ether ketone tubing is pretreated with sulfuric acid in the presence of catalysts (vanadium oxide and sodium sulfate). The tubing was rinsed with water and acetone, flushed with nitrogen, and treated with glycidyl methacrylate. After washing, the monolith reaction mixture composed of lauryl methacrylate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, initiator, and porogenic solvent was filled in the tubing and subjected to in situ polymerization. The tubing was cut into thin slices and used as frits for microcolumns. To check their durability, the frit slices were placed in a vial and a heavy impact was applied on the vial by a vortex mixer for various periods. The frits made in the presence of catalysts were found to be more durable than those made without catalysts. Furthermore, when the monolith-incorporated tubing was used as a chromatography column, the column prepared in the presence of catalysts resulted in a better separation efficiency. The separation performance of the columns installed with the polyether ether ketone encased monolith frits was comparable to that of the columns installed with the commercial stainless-steel screen frits.

  3. Highly selective condensation of biomass-derived methyl ketones as a source of aviation fuel.

    PubMed

    Sacia, Eric R; Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Deaner, Matthew H; Goulas, Konstantinos A; Toste, F Dean; Bell, Alexis T

    2015-05-22

    Aviation fuel (i.e., jet fuel) requires a mixture of C9 -C16 hydrocarbons having both a high energy density and a low freezing point. While jet fuel is currently produced from petroleum, increasing concern with the release of CO2 into the atmosphere from the combustion of petroleum-based fuels has led to policy changes mandating the inclusion of biomass-based fuels into the fuel pool. Here we report a novel way to produce a mixture of branched cyclohexane derivatives in very high yield (>94 %) that match or exceed many required properties of jet fuel. As starting materials, we use a mixture of n-alkyl methyl ketones and their derivatives obtained from biomass. These synthons are condensed into trimers via base-catalyzed aldol condensation and Michael addition. Hydrodeoxygenation of these products yields mixtures of C12 -C21 branched, cyclic alkanes. Using models for predicting the carbon number distribution obtained from a mixture of n-alkyl methyl ketones and for predicting the boiling point distribution of the final mixture of cyclic alkanes, we show that it is possible to define the mixture of synthons that will closely reproduce the distillation curve of traditional jet fuel.

  4. Cyclohexyl Ketone Inhibitors of Pin1 Dock in a Trans-Diaxial Cyclohexane Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoyan G.; Slebodnick, Carla; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclohexyl ketone substrate analogue inhibitors (Ac–pSer-Ψ[C = OCH]-Pip–tryptamine) of Pin1, the cell cycle regulatory peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase), were designed and synthesized as potential electrophilic acceptors for the Pin1 active site Cys113 nucleophile to test a proposed nucleophilic addition-isomerization mechanism. Because they were weak inhibitors, models of all three stereoisomers were docked into the active site of Pin1. Each isomer consistently minimized to a trans-diaxial cyclohexane conformation. From this, we hypothesize that Pin1 stretches substrates into a trans-pyrrolidine conformation to lower the barrier to isomerization. Our reduced amide inhibitor of Pin1 adopted a similar trans-pyrrolidine conformation in the crystal structure. The molecular model of 1, which mimics the l-Ser-l-Pro stereochemistry, in the Pin1 active site showed a distance of 4.4 Å, and an angle of 31° between Cys113-S and the ketone carbon. The computational models suggest that the mechanism of Pin1 PPIase is not likely to proceed through nucleophilic addition. PMID:23028504

  5. Leaf uptake of methyl ethyl ketone and croton aldehyde by Castanopsis sieboldii and Viburnum odoratissimum saplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Akira; Tobe, Seita; Shimizu, Sachie

    2013-05-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is an abundant ketone in the urban atmosphere and croton aldehyde (CA) is a strong irritant to eye, nose, and throat. The use of plants able to absorb these compounds is one suggested mitigation method. In order to investigate this method, we determined the uptake rate of these compounds by leaves of two tree species, Castanopsis sieboldii and Viburnum odoratissimum var. awabuki. Using a flow-through chamber method, we found that these species were capable of absorbing both compounds. We also confirmed that the uptake rate of these compounds normalized to the fumigated concentration (AN) was higher at higher light intensities and that there was a linear relationship between AN and stomatal conductance (gS) for both tree species. In concentration-varying experiments, the uptake of MEK and CA seemed to be restricted by partitioning of MEK between leaf water and air. The ratio of the intercellular VOC concentration (Ci) to the fumigated concentration (Ca) for CA was zero, and the ratio ranged from 0.63 to 0.76 for MEK. The more efficient CA uptake ability may be the result of higher partitioning of CA into leaf water. Our present and previous results also suggest that plant MEK uptake ability was different across plant species, depending on the VOC conversion speed inside leaves.

  6. Synthesis and antidiabetic performance of β-amino ketone containing nabumetone moiety.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Yan, Ju-fang; Song, Xiao-li; Fan, Li; Xu, Jin; Zhou, Guang-ming; Jiang, Li; Yang, Da-cheng

    2012-03-15

    We wish to report the further design and improved synthesis that resulted in two series of target molecules, TM-1 and TM-2, with remarkably simplified structures containing β-amino ketone of discrete nabumetone moiety. These were obtained via a 'one-pot, two-step, three-component' protocol of Mannich reaction with yield up to 97%. A total of 28 out of 31 new compounds were characterized using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, ESI MS and HRMS techniques. Studies on their antidiabetic activities, screened in vitro at 10 μg mL(-1) level, indicate that TM-2 possesses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and α-glucosidase inhibition activity significantly stronger than that of TM-1, and also that of the series B compounds that were previously synthesized by the group. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship points to the sulfanilamide unit as the most probable potent group of β-amino ketone and, on the basis of which, a tangible strategy is presented for the development of new antidiabetic drugs.

  7. Mechanistic Insights on the Hydrogenation of α,β-Unsaturated Ketones and Aldehydes to Unsaturated Alcohols over Metal Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ide, Matthew S.; Hao, Bing; Neurock, Matthew; Davis, Robert J.

    2012-04-06

    The selective hydrogenation of unsaturated ketones (methyl vinyl ketone and benzalacetone) and unsaturated aldehydes (crotonaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde) was carried out with H₂ at 2 bar absolute over Pd/C, Pt/C, Ru/C, Au/C, Au/TiO₂, or Au/Fe₂O₃ catalysts in ethanol or water solvent at 333 K. Comparison of the turnover frequencies revealed Pd/C to be the most active hydrogenation catalyst, but the catalyst failed to produce unsaturated alcohols, indicating hydrogenation of the C=C bond was highly preferred over the C=O bond on Pd. The Pt and Ru catalysts were able to produce unsaturated alcohols from unsaturated aldehydes, but not from unsaturated ketones. Although Au/ Fe₂O₃ was able to partially hydrogenate unsaturated ketones to unsaturated alcohols, the overall hydrogenation rate over gold was the lowest of all of the metals examined. First-principles density functional theory calculations were therefore used to explore the reactivity trends of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and benzalacetone (BA) hydrogenation over model Pt(111) and Ru(0001) surfaces. The observed selectivity over these metals is likely controlled by the significantly higher activation barriers to hydrogenate the C=O bond compared with those required to hydrogenate the C=C bond. Both the unsaturated alcohol and the saturated ketone, which are the primary reaction products, are strongly bound to Ru and can react further to the saturated alcohol. The lower calculated barriers for the hydrogenation steps over Pt compared with Ru account for the higher observed turnover frequencies for the hydrogenation of MVK and BA over Pt. The presence of a phenyl substituent α to the C=C bond in BA increased the barrier for C=C hydrogenation over those associated with the C=C bond in MVK; however, the increase in barriers with phenyl substitution was not adequate to reverse the selectivity trend.

  8. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOEpatents

    Harwell, Lane D.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Greene, Donald L.; Pressly, Gary A.

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  9. Measurement System for Energetic Materials Decomposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    Measurement System for Energetic Materials Decomposition This DURIP grant was used to purchase: 1. Q600 SDT Simultaneous DSC-TGA 2... Decomposition Report Title This DURIP grant was used to purchase: 1. Q600 SDT Simultaneous DSC-TGA 2. Pfeiffer Vacuum Benchtop Thermostar Mass...Spectrometer 3. Vision Research Phantom V12.1-8G-M high speed camera These instruments have been used to evaluate and study decomposition and

  10. Energetic and Structural Study of Diphenylpyridine Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Marisa A. A.; Gomes, Lígia R.; Low, John N.; Santos, Luís M. N. B. F.

    2009-09-01

    The energetic and structural study of three diphenylpyridine isomers is presented in detail. The three isomers, 2,6-, 2,5-, and 3,5-diphenylpyridines, were synthesized via Suzuki-Miyaura methodology based on palladium catalysis, and the crystal structures of the isomers were obtained by X-ray diffraction. The relative energetic stabilities in the condensed and gaseous phases as well as volatilities and structures of the three studied isomers were evaluated, regarding the position of the phenyl groups relative to the nitrogen atom of the pyridine ring. The temperature, standard molar enthalpies, and entropies of fusion were measured and derived by differential scanning calorimetry. The vapor pressures of the considered isomers were determined by a static apparatus based on a MKS capacitance diaphragm manometer. The standard molar enthalpies, entropies, and Gibbs energies of sublimation, at T = 298.15 K, were derived, and the phase diagram near the triple point coordinates were determined for all isomers. The standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of combustion of all crystalline isomers were determined, at T = 298.15 K, by static bomb combustion calorimetry. The standard molar enthalpies of formation, in the crystalline and gaseous phases, at T = 298.15 K, were derived. The experimental results for the energetics in the gaseous phase of the three compounds were compared and assessed with the values obtained by ab initio calculations at different levels of theory (DFT and MP2) showing that, at this level of theory, the computational methods underestimate the energetic stability, in the gaseous phase, for these molecules. In order to understand the aromaticity in the central ring of each isomer, calculations of NICS (B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) level of theory) values on the pyridine ring were also performed.

  11. Composition of energetic particles from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Garrard, T L; Stone, E C

    1994-10-01

    We present a model for composition of heavy ions in the solar energetic particles (SEP). The SEP composition in a typical large solar particle event reflects the composition of the Sun, with adjustments due to fractionation effects which depend on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ion and on the ratio of ionic charge to mass (Q/M). Flare-to-flare variations in composition are represented by parameters describing these fractionation effects and the distributions of these parameters are presented.

  12. The energetic alpha particle transport method EATM

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-02-01

    The EATM method is an evolving attempt to find an efficient method of treating the transport of energetic charged particles in a dynamic magnetized (MHD) plasma for which the mean free path of the particles and the Larmor radius may be long compared to the gradient lengths in the plasma. The intent is to span the range of parameter space with the efficiency and accuracy thought necessary for experimental analysis and design of magnetized fusion targets.

  13. Energetic ion composition of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.K.; Sharp, R.D.; Shelley, E.G.; Johnson, R.G.; Balsiger, H.

    1981-02-01

    Data obtained from the energetic ion mass spectrometer experiment on Isee 1 in the distant plasma sheet are presented. These data show that (1) the plasma sheet has a significant and variable ionospheric component (H/sup +/ and O/sup +/) representing from 10% to more than 50% of the total number density and (2) there is more than one process responsible for the energization of solar wind plasma (H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/) to plasma sheet energies.

  14. Energetic ion composition of the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Sharp, R. D.; Shelley, E. G.; Johnson, R. G.; Balsiger, H.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained from the energetic ion mass spectrometer experiment on Isee 1 in the distant plasma sheet are presented. These data show that (1) the plasma sheet has a significant and variable ionospheric component (H(+) and O(+)) representing from 10% to more than 50% of the total number density and (2) there is more than one process responsible for the energization of solar wind plasma (H(+) and He(++)) to plasma sheet energies.

  15. Hibernation energetics of free-ranging little brown bats.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Kristin A; Willis, Craig K R

    2012-06-15

    Hibernation physiology and energy expenditure have been relatively well studied in large captive hibernators, especially rodents, but data from smaller, free-ranging hibernators are sparse. We examined variation in the hibernation patterns of free-ranging little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) using temperature-sensitive radio-transmitters. First, we aimed to test the hypothesis that age, sex and body condition affect expression of torpor and energy expenditure during hibernation. Second, we examined skin temperature to assess whether qualitative differences in the thermal properties of the hibernacula of bats, compared with the burrows of hibernating rodents, might lead to different patterns of torpor and arousal for bats. We also evaluated the impact of carrying transmitters on body condition to help determine the potential impact of telemetry studies. We observed large variation in the duration of torpor bouts within and between individuals but detected no effect of age, sex or body condition on torpor expression or estimates of energy expenditure. We observed the use of shallow torpor in the midst of periodic arousals, which may represent a unique adaptation of bats for conservation of energy during the most costly phase of hibernation. There was no difference in the body condition of hibernating bats outfitted with transmitters compared with that of control bats captured from the same hibernaculum at the same time. This study provides new information on the energetics of hibernation in an under-represented taxon and baseline data important for understanding how white-nose syndrome, a new disease devastating populations of hibernating bats in North America, may alter the expression of hibernation in affected bats.

  16. Radiation Hydrodynamics Modeling of Hohlraum Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Mauche, Christopher W.; Jones, Ogden S.; Scott, Howard A.

    2015-11-01

    Attempts to model the energetics in NIF Hohlraums have been made with varying degrees of success, with discrepancies of 0-25% being reported for the X-ray flux (10-25% for the NIC ignition platform hohlraums). To better understand the cause(s) of these discrepancies, the effects of uncertainties in modeling thermal conduction, laser-plasma interactions, atomic mixing at interfaces, and NLTE kinetics of the high-Z wall plasma must be quantified. In this work we begin by focusing on the NLTE kinetics component. We detail a simulation framework for developing an integrated HYDRA hohlraum model with predefined tolerances for energetics errors due to numerical discretization errors or statistical fluctuations. Within this framework we obtain a model for a converged 1D spherical hohlraum which is then extended to 2D. The new model is used to reexamine physics sensitivities and improve estimates of the energetics discrepancy. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Nonadditive Compositional Curvature Energetics of Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodt, A. J.; Venable, R. M.; Lyman, E.; Pastor, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    The unique properties of the individual lipids that compose biological membranes together determine the energetics of the surface. The energetics of the surface, in turn, govern the formation of membrane structures and membrane reshaping processes, and thus they will underlie cellular-scale models of viral fusion, vesicle-dependent transport, and lateral organization relevant to signaling. The spontaneous curvature, to the best of our knowledge, is always assumed to be additive. We describe observations from simulations of unexpected nonadditive compositional curvature energetics of two lipids essential to the plasma membrane: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. A model is developed that connects molecular interactions to curvature stress, and which explains the role of local composition. Cholesterol is shown to lower the number of effective Kuhn segments of saturated acyl chains, reducing lateral pressure below the neutral surface of bending and favoring positive curvature. The effect is not observed for unsaturated (flexible) acyl chains. Likewise, hydrogen bonding between sphingomyelin lipids leads to positive curvature, but only at sufficient concentration, below which the lipid prefers negative curvature.

  18. Sol-Gel Manufactured Energetic Materials

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2005-05-17

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  19. Sol-gel manufactured energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2003-12-23

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  20. Fundamental energetic limits of radio communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudais, Jean-Yves

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of the energy consumption of a radiocommunication requires to analyse the life cycle of the elements used. However, this analysis does not specify the energetic limits. Theoretical approaches allow one to draw these limits, which are known in multiple cases of information transmission. However, the answers are not always satisfactory, in particular in the case of time-varying channels. After a brief presentation of the notion of energetic limits of a radiocommunication, and beginning with a global approach, we show that, contrary to the published results, the energetic limits always differ from zero if the physical constraints are correctly expressed. xml:lang="fr" Cependant, les réponses ne sont pas toujours satisfaisantes, particulièrement dans le cas de canaux variants dans le temps. Après une rapide présentation des notions d'énergie limite d'une radiocommunication, et en commençant par une approche globale du problème, nous montrons que, contrairement aux résultats publiés, les limites énergétiques sont toujours différentes de zéro si les contraintes physiques sont correctement exprimées.