Science.gov

Sample records for energy activation cross

  1. Transitions, cross sections and neutron binding energy in 186Re by Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, A. G.; Hurst, A. M.; Firestone, R. B.; Revay, Zs.; Szentmiklosi, L.; McHale, S. R.; McClory, J. W.; Detwiler, B.; Carroll, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    The nuclide 186Re possesses an isomer with 200,000 year half-life while its ground state has a half-life of 3.718 days. It is also odd-odd and well-deformed nucleus, so should exhibit a variety of other interesting nuclear-structure phenomena. However, the available nuclear data is rather sparse; for example, the energy of the isomer is only known to within + 7 keV and, with the exception of the J?=1- ground state, every proposed level is tentative in the ENSDF. Previously, Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) was utilized to study natRe with 186,188Re being produced via thermal neutron capture. Recently, an enriched 185Re target was irradiated by thermal neutrons at the Budapest Research Reactor to build on those results. Prompt (primary and secondary) and delayed gamma-ray transitions were measured with a large-volume, Compton-suppressed HPGe detector. Absolute cross sections for each gamma transition were deduced and corrected for self attenuation within the sample. Fifty-two primary gamma-ray transitions were newly identified and used to determine a revised value of the neutron binding energy. DICEBOX was used to simulate the decay scheme and the total radiative thermal neutron capture cross section was found to be 97+/-3 b Supported by DTRA (Detwiler) through HDTRA1-08-1-0014.

  2. Activation energies control the macroscopic properties of physically cross-linked materials.

    PubMed

    Appel, Eric A; Forster, Rebecca A; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Toprakcioglu, Chris; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-09-15

    Here we show the preparation of a series of water-based physically cross-linked polymeric materials utilizing cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) ternary complexes displaying a range of binding, and therefore cross-linking, dynamics. We determined that the mechanical strength of these materials is correlated directly with a high energetic barrier for the dissociation of the CB[8] ternary complex cross-links, whereas facile and rapid self-healing requires a low energetic barrier to ternary complex association. The versatile CB[8] ternary complex has, therefore, proven to be a powerful asset for improving our understanding of challenging property-structure relationships in supramolecular systems and their associated influence on the bulk behavior of dynamically cross-linked materials.

  3. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  4. Measurement of activation cross-sections for high-energy neutron-induced reactions of Bi and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Naik, Haladhara; Shahid, Muhammad; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-08-01

    The cross-sections for 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi, 209Bi(n, 5n)205Bi, natPb(n, xn)204mPb, natPb(n, xn)203Pb, natPb(n, xn)202mPb,natPb(n, xn)201Pb, natPb(n, xn)200Pb, natPb(n, αxn)203Hg and natPb(n, p xn)202Tl reactions were determined at the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Korea in the neutron energy range of 15.2 to 37.2 MeV. The above cross-sections were obtained by using the activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The quasi-monoenergetic neutron used for the above reactions are based on the 9Be(p, n) reaction. Simulations of the spectral flux from the Be target were done using the MCNPX program. The cross-sections were estimated with the TALYS 1.6 code using the default parameter. The data from the present work and literature were compared with the data from the EAF-2010 and the TENDL-2013 libraries, and calculated values of TALYS 1.6 code. It shows that appropriate level density model, the γ-ray strength function, and the spin cut-off parameter are needed to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theoretical values from TALYS 1.6 code.

  5. Activation energy and capture cross section of majority carrier traps in Zn doped InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    Schottky barrier diodes were fabricated on Zn doped InP Wafers. The diodes were radiation damaged with 2 MeV protons to a dose of 2 x 10(exp 12)cm(sup -2). The damage was analyzed by DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) using the double correlation technique. Capture cross sections were measured directly. Two major defects were observed in the DLTS spectra. The first defect, was H4 at Ev + 0.29 eV, with capture cross section 1.1 x 10(exp -17)cm(sup 2). The second defect, was H5 at Ev + 0.53 eV. Its capture cross section varied with temperature as described by the relationship sigma = sigma(sub 0) exp(delta(E)/kT) where sigma(sub 0) = 1.3 x 10(exp -19)cm(sup 2) and delta(E) = .08 eV. This relationship yields a sigma of 5.9 x 10(exp -21)cm(sup 2) at room temperature. The surprisingly small capture cross section of H5 and its temperature dependence are discussed in terms of the multiphonon emission process for carrier capture at the defect. The advantages of the improved experimental techniques used are also discussed.

  6. Active Learning Crosses Generations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Diane K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of intergenerational programs, highlighting a child care program that offers age-appropriate and mutually beneficial activities for children and elders within a nearby retirement community. The program has adopted High/Scope's active learning approach to planning and implementing activities that involve both generations. The…

  7. Extension of the energy range of experimental activation cross-sections data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium up to 50MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-11-01

    The energy range of our earlier measured activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium were extended from 40MeV up to 50MeV. The traditional stacked foil irradiation technique and non-destructive gamma spectrometry were used. No experimental data were found in literature for this higher energy range. Experimental cross-sections for the formation of the radionuclides (113,110)Sn, (116m,115m,114m,113m,111,110g,109)In and (115)Cd are reported in the 37-50MeV energy range, for production of (110)Sn and (110g,109)In these are the first measurements ever. The experimental data were compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS 1.6 nuclear model code as listed in the on-line library TENDL-2014.

  8. Novel method to determine capture cross-section activation energies by deep-level transient spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado, J.; Gomez, A.; Calleja, E.; Muñoz, E.

    1988-02-01

    Deep-center characterization by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) allows a direct determination of the trap thermal emission activation energy. However, capture barrier energy measurements, based on trap partial filling by pulses of increasing width, require a quite different experimental processing and pose some hardware difficulties. In this letter we present a new method to determine the trap capture barrier energy, one that requires constant-width filling pulses and obtains capture information from standard DLTS data. This technique has been applied to Te-, Sn-, and Si-related DX centers in AlGaAs alloys.

  9. ACTIV87: Fast Neutron Activation Cross Section File

    1993-08-01

    4. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND AND INFORMATION ACTIV87 is a compilation of fast neutron induced activation reaction cross-sections. The compilation covers energies from threshold to 20 MeV and is based on evaluated data taken from other evaluated data libraries and individual evaluations. The majority of these evaluations were performed by using available experimental data. The aforementioned available experimental data were used in the selection of needed parameters for theoretical computations and for normalizing the results of suchmore » computations. Theoretical calculations were also used for interpolation and extrapolation of experimental cross-section data. All of the evaluated data curves were compared with experimental data that had been reported over the four year period preceding 1987. Only those cross-sections not in contradiction with experimental data that was current in 1987 were retained in the activation file, ACTIV87. In cases of several conflicting evaluations, that evaluation was chosen which best corresponded to the experimental data. A few evaluated curves were renormalized in accordance with the results of the latest precision measurements. 5. APPLICATION OF THE DATA 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA The following libraries and individual files of evaluated neutron cross-section data were used for the selection of the activation cross-sections: the BOSPOR Library, the Activation File of the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, the Evaluated Neutron Data File (ENDF/B-V) Activation File, the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82), and individual evaluations carried out under various IAEA research contracts. The file of selected reactions contains 206 evaluated cross-section curves of the (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,a) reactions which lead to radioactive products and may be used in many practical applications of neutron activation analysis. Some competing activation reactions, usually with low cross-section values, are given for completeness.« less

  10. A Modified activation method for reaction total cross section and yield measurements at low astrophysically relevant energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemov, S. V.; Igamov, S. B.; Karakhodjaev, A. A.; Radyuk, G. A.; Tojiboyev, O. R.; Salikhbaev, U. S.; Ergashev, F. Kh.; Nam, I. V.; Aliev, M. K.; Kholbaev, I.; Rumi, R. F.; Khalikov, R. I.; Eshkobilov, Sh. Kh.; Muminov, T. M.

    2016-07-01

    The activation method is proposed for collection of the sufficient statistics during the investigation of the nuclear astrophysical reactions at low energies with the short-living residual nuclei formation. The main feature is a multiple cyclical irradiation of a target by an ion beam and measurement of the radioactivity decay curve. The method was tested by the yield measurement of the 12C(p,γ)13N reaction with detecting the annihilation γγ- coincidences from 13N(β+ν)13C decay at the two-arm scintillation spectrometer.

  11. Activation Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  12. The cross-activation theory at 10.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Edward M; Brang, David; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2011-09-01

    In 2001, Ramachandran and Hubbard introduced the cross-activation model of grapheme-colour synaesthesia. On the occasion of its 10-year anniversary, we review the evidence from experiments that have been conducted to test the model to assess how it has fared. We examine data from behavioural, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), anatomical studies (diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry), and electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies of grapheme-colour synaesthesia. Although much of this evidence has supported the basic cross-activation hypothesis, our growing knowledge of the neural basis of synaesthesia, grapheme, and colour processing has necessitated two specific updates and modifications to the basic model: (1) our original model assumed that binding and parietal cortex functions were normal in synaesthesia; we now recognize that parietal cortex plays a key role in synaesthetic binding, as part of a two-stage model. (2) Based on MEG data we have recently collected demonstrating that synaesthetic responses begin within 140 ms of stimulus presentation, and an updated understanding of the neural mechanisms of reading as hierarchical feature extraction, we present a revised and updated version of the cross-activation model, the cascaded cross-tuning model. We then summarize data demonstrating that the cross-activation model may be extended to account for other forms of synaesthesia and discuss open questions about how learning, development, and cortical plasticity interact with genetic factors to lead to the full range of synaesthetic experiences. Finally, we outline a number of future directions needed to further test the cross-activation theory and to compare it with alternative theories. PMID:21923784

  13. 75 FR 18495 - XTO Energy Inc., Cross Timbers Energy Services, Inc., Complainants v. Midcontinent Express...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission XTO Energy Inc., Cross Timbers Energy Services, Inc., Complainants v.... and Cross Timbers Energy Services, Inc. (Complainants) filed a formal complaint against...

  14. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  15. Energy: A Cross-Curricular Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalonde, Christine

    This guide is based on the premise that lives (and lifestyles) revolve around the production, consumption, and conversion of energy. Yet for such an all-encompassing concept little accompanying factual knowledge exists at the grade-school level. The objectives (and the resulting activities and extensions) are focused on the needs of the upper…

  16. Cross Psi(B)-energy operator-based signal detection.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Abdel-Ouahab; Cexus, Jean-Christophe; Abed-Meraim, Karim

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, two methods for signal detection and time-delay estimation based on the cross Psi(B)-energy operator are proposed. These methods are well suited for mono-component AM-FM signals. The Psi(B) energy operator measures how much one signal is present in another one. The peak of the Psi(B) operator corresponds to the maximum of interaction between the two signals. Compared to the cross-correlation function, the Psi(B) operator includes temporal information and relative changes of the signal which are reflected in its first and second derivatives. The discrete version of the continuous-time form of the Psi(B) operator, which is used in its implementation, is presented. The methods are illustrated on synthetic and real signals and the results compared to those of the matched filter and the cross correlation. The real signals correspond to impulse responses of buried objects obtained by active sonar in iso-speed single path environments. PMID:18537379

  17. Cross Psi(B)-energy operator-based signal detection.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Abdel-Ouahab; Cexus, Jean-Christophe; Abed-Meraim, Karim

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, two methods for signal detection and time-delay estimation based on the cross Psi(B)-energy operator are proposed. These methods are well suited for mono-component AM-FM signals. The Psi(B) energy operator measures how much one signal is present in another one. The peak of the Psi(B) operator corresponds to the maximum of interaction between the two signals. Compared to the cross-correlation function, the Psi(B) operator includes temporal information and relative changes of the signal which are reflected in its first and second derivatives. The discrete version of the continuous-time form of the Psi(B) operator, which is used in its implementation, is presented. The methods are illustrated on synthetic and real signals and the results compared to those of the matched filter and the cross correlation. The real signals correspond to impulse responses of buried objects obtained by active sonar in iso-speed single path environments.

  18. Science Activities in Energy: Electrical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 16 activities relating to electrical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined in a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  19. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 12 activities relating to solar energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's supplement…

  20. Science Activities in Energy: Chemical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 15 activities relating to chemical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  1. Cross coupling reactions of polyfluoroarenes via C-F activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Alex D; Love, Jennifer A

    2010-11-21

    This Perspective provides an overview of transition metal-catalyzed cross coupling reactions of polyfluoroarenes. When appropriate, stoichiometric C-F activation and subsequent reaction are briefly covered.

  2. Measurements of the cross section for the (182)W(n,p)(182(m+g))Ta and (184)(n,p)(184)Ta reactions in the 14MeV energy range using the activation technique.

    PubMed

    Song, Yueli; Zhou, Fengqun; Tian, Mingli; Li, Yong; Yuan, Shuqing; Lan, Changlin

    2015-04-01

    The cross section for the (182)W(n,p)(182(m+g))Ta and (184)W(n,p)(184)Ta reactions has been measured in the neutron energy range of 13.5-14.7MeV using the activation technique and a coaxial HPGe γ-ray detector. In our experiment, the fast neutrons were produced by the T(d,n)(4)He reaction at the ZF-300-II Intense Neutron Generator at Lanzhou University. Natural wolfram foils of 99.9% purity were used as target materials. The neutron flux was determined using the monitor reaction (93)Nb(n,2n)(92m)Nb and the neutron energies were determined using the method of cross-section ratio measurements employing the (90)Zr(n,2n)(89)Zr to (93)Nb(n,2n)(92m)Nb reactions. The results of this work are compared with experimental data found in the literature and the estimates obtained from a published empirical formula based on the statistical model with Q-value dependence and odd-even effects taken into consideration.

  3. Changing Conceptions of Activation Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background material which relates to the concept of activation energy, fundamental in the study of chemical kinetics. Compares the related concepts of the Arrhenius activation energy, the activation energy at absolute zero, the enthalpy of activation, and the threshold energy. (CS)

  4. Stark resonances of the Yukawa potential: Energies and widths, crossings and avoided crossings

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Bylicki, Miroslaw

    2011-02-15

    The resonance energy spectrum of a system interacting with the Yukawa potential and embedded in an external homogeneous and static electric field is investigated. The positions and widths of levels have been computed by using the complex coordinate rotation method. Interesting avoided-crossing and crossing effects appear.

  5. Activities Handbook for Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVito, Alfred; Krockover, Gerald H.

    The purpose of this handbook is to present information about energy and to translate this information into learning activities for children. Chapter 1, "Energy: A Delicate Dilemma," presents activities intended to provide an introduction to energy and energy usage. Chapter 2, "What are the Sources of Energy?" provides background information and…

  6. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Linda L.

    Energy activities are provided in this student activity book. They include: (1) an energy walk; (2) forms of energy in the home; (3) energy conversion; (4) constructing a solar hot dog cooker (with instructions for drawing a parabola); (5) interviewing senior citizens to learn about energy use in the past; (6) packaging materials; (7) insulation;…

  7. Science Activities in Energy: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 14 activities relating to energy conservation. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a simple card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  8. Cross-impacts analysis development and energy policy analysis applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roop, J.M.; Scheer, R.M.; Stacey, G.S.

    1986-12-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe the cross-impact analysis process and microcomputer software developed for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PPA) of DOE. First introduced in 1968, cross-impact analysis is a technique that produces scenarios of future conditions and possibilities. Cross-impact analysis has several unique attributes that make it a tool worth examining, especially in the current climate when the outlook for the economy and several of the key energy markets is uncertain. Cross-impact analysis complements the econometric, engineering, systems dynamics, or trend approaches already in use at DOE. Cross-impact analysis produces self-consistent scenarios in the broadest sense and can include interaction between the economy, technology, society and the environment. Energy policy analyses that couple broad scenarios of the future with detailed forecasting can produce more powerful results than scenario analysis or forecasts can produce alone.

  9. Science Activities in Energy: Wind Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 12 activities related to wind energy for elementary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question. Topics include: (1) At what time of day is there enough wind to make electricity where you live?; (2) Where is the windiest spot on your schoolground?; and…

  10. High Energy Measurement of the Deuteron Photodisintegration Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Elaine Schulte

    2002-05-01

    New measurements of the high energy deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section were made at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. Two experiments were performed. Experiment E96-003 was performed in experimental Hall C. The measurements were designed to extend the highest energy differential cross section values to 5.5 GeV incident photon energy at forward angles. This builds upon previous high energy measurements in which scaling consistent with the pQCD constituent counting rules was observed at 90 degrees and 70 degrees in the center of mass. From the new measurements, a threshold for the onset of constituent counting rule scaling seems present at transverse momentum approximately 1.3 GeV/c. The second experiment, E99-008, was performed in experimental Hall A. The measurements were designed to explore the angular distribution of the differential cross section at constant energy. The measurements were made symmetric about 90 degrees

  11. Non-Stationary Effects and Cross Correlations in Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Panischev, Oleg; Demin, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    In this paper within the framework of the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) we consider the dynamic properties of the solar activity by analyzing the Zurich sunspot numbers. As is well-known astrophysics objects are the non-stationary open systems, whose evolution are the quite individual and have the alternation effects. The main difference of FNS compared to other related methods is the separation of the original signal reflecting the dynamics of solar activity into three frequency bands: system-specific "resonances" and their interferential contributions at lower frequencies, chaotic "random walk" ("irregularity-jump") components at larger frequencies, and chaotic "irregularity-spike" (inertial) components in the highest frequency range. Specific parameters corresponding to each of the bands are introduced and calculated. These irregularities as well as specific resonance frequencies are considered as the information carriers on every hierarchical level of the evolution of a complex natural system with intermittent behavior, consecutive alternation of rapid chaotic changes in the values of dynamic variables on small time intervals with small variations of the values on longer time intervals ("laminar" phases). The jump and spike irregularities are described by power spectra and difference moments (transient structural functions) of the second order. FNS allows revealing the most crucial points of the solar activity dynamics by means of "spikiness" factor. It is shown that this variable behaves as the predictor of crucial changes of the sunspot number dynamics, particularly when the number comes up to maximum value. The change of averaging interval allows revealing the non-stationary effects depending by 11-year cycle and by inside processes in a cycle. To consider the cross correlations between the different variables of solar activity we use the Zurich sunspot numbers and the sequence of corona's radiation energy. The FNS-approach allows extracting the

  12. Classroom Activities for Cross-Cultural Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Virginia Vogel, Ed.; And Others

    One-fourth of the students in Boston public schools have parents who were born outside of the United States. This guide contains a series of classroom activities, produced by Boston teachers and aides, that are designed to take advantage of the abundant cultural diversity found in Boston schools by encouraging these dual-culture students to share…

  13. Locating Minimum Energy Crossing Points Using Eom-Cc Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epifanovsky, E.; Krylov, A. I.

    2009-06-01

    Non-adiabatic and spin-forbidden processes involve transitions between electronic states through potential energy surface (PES) crossings. They are often found in atmospheric and combustion chemistry, photochemistry and photobiology. To describe the kinetics of such processes, a version of transition state theory can be applied. Locating the minimum energy crossing point of the PESs is the first step of characterizing a spin-forbidden reaction. The point corresponds to the transition state of the process. This work presents a computational procedure for minimizing singlet-triplet crossings of PESs, which is applied to a benchmark series of methylene-related radicals, formaldehyde, and oxybenzene, an intermediate in atmospheric formation of phenol. The intersection minimum in the studied methylene-related radicals is located very close to the excited state minimum, singlet for CH_2 and triplet for CHF and CF_2. The crossing in oxybenzene is found along the CO wagging coordinate. In the case of para-benzyne, which has a singlet-triplet adiabatic excitation energy of less than 0.2 eV, the crossing minimum is unexpectedly located 0.65 eV above the ground state equilibrium energy and corresponds to a distorted ring geometry.

  14. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 14 activities related to solar energy for secondary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question such as: (1) how much solar heat comes from the sun? or (2) how many times do you have to run water through a flat-plate collector to get a 10 degree rise in…

  15. pi+- p differential cross sections at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    H. Denz; P. Amaudruz; J.T. Brack; J. Breitschopf; P. Camerini; J.L. Clark; H. Clement; L. Felawka; E. Fragiacomo; E.F. Gibson; N. Grion; G.J. Hofman; B. Jamieson; E.L. Mathie; R. Meier; G. Moloney; D. Ottewell; O. Patarakin; J.D. Patterson; M.M. Pavan; S. Piano; K. Raywood; R.A. Ristinen; R. Rui; M.E. Sevior; G.R. Smith; J. Stahov; R. Tacik; G.J. Wagner; F. von Wrochem; D.M. Yeomans

    2005-12-03

    Differential cross sections for pi- p and pi+ p elastic scattering were measured at five energies between 19.9 and 43.3 MeV. The use of the CHAOS magnetic spectrometer at TRIUMF, supplemented by a range telescope for muon background suppression, provided simultaneous coverage of a large part of the full angular range, thus allowing very precise relative cross section measurements. The absolute normalization was determined with a typical accuracy of 5 %. This was verified in a simultaneous measurement of muon proton elastic scattering. The measured cross sections show some deviations from phase shift analysis predictions, in particular at large angles and low energies. From the new data we determine the real part of the isospin forward scattering amplitude.

  16. Cross-Grade Comparison of Students' Understanding of Energy Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam-Arslan, Aysegul

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this cross-grade study were (1) to determine the level of understanding of energy concepts of students at different academic grades and the differences in understanding between these grades and (2) to analyse the conceptual development of these students. Two hundred and forty-three students at 3 different levels (high school,…

  17. On total cross sections and slopes at superhigh energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeremian, S. S.; Zhamkochian, V. M.

    1985-01-01

    Hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus interactions are investigated in the framework of the Reggeon field theory with critical and supercritical pomerons and multiple scattering theory. A good agreement is obtained with experimental data on cross sections of proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions at high energies.

  18. Activities for Teaching Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Jack Lee; Cantrell, Joseph S.

    1980-01-01

    Plans and activities are suggested for teaching elementary children about solar energy. Directions are included for constructing a flat plate collector and a solar oven. Activities for a solar field day are given. (SA)

  19. Energy transfer between laser beams crossing in ignition hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Williams, E A; Thomas, C A; Callahan, D A; Weber, S; Haan, S W; Salmonson, J D; Dixit, S; Hinkel, D E; Edwards, M J; MacGowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J

    2008-10-03

    The full scale modeling of power transfer between laser beams crossing in plasmas is presented. A new model was developed, allowing calculation of the propagation and coupling of pairs of laser beams with their associated plasma wave in three dimensions. The full laser beam smoothing techniques used in ignition experiments are modeled, and their effects on crossed-beam energy transfer is investigated. A shift in wavelength between the beams can move the instability off resonance and reduce the transfer, hence preserving the symmetry of the capsule implosion.

  20. Bootstrap testing for cross-correlation under low firing activity.

    PubMed

    González-Montoro, Aldana M; Cao, Ricardo; Espinosa, Nelson; Cudeiro, Javier; Mariño, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    A new cross-correlation synchrony index for neural activity is proposed. The index is based on the integration of the kernel estimation of the cross-correlation function. It is used to test for the dynamic synchronization levels of spontaneous neural activity under two induced brain states: sleep-like and awake-like. Two bootstrap resampling plans are proposed to approximate the distribution of the test statistics. The results of the first bootstrap method indicate that it is useful to discern significant differences in the synchronization dynamics of brain states characterized by a neural activity with low firing rate. The second bootstrap method is useful to unveil subtle differences in the synchronization levels of the awake-like state, depending on the activation pathway.

  1. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, M S; Baba, M

    2016-08-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of (104m,104g,105g,106m,110m)Ag, (100,101)Pd, (99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102g,105)Rh and (103,97)Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed. PMID:27235887

  2. Improved activation cross sections for vanadium and titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.W.; Arthur, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    Vanadium alloys such as V-20Ti and V-Cr-Ti are attractive candidates for use as structural materials in fusion-reactor blankets. The virtual absence of long-lived activation products in these alloys suggest the possibility of reprocessing on an intermediate time scale. We have employed the modern Hauser-Feshbach nuclear-model code GNASH to calculate cross sections for neutron-activation reactions in /sup 50/V and /sup 51/V, to allow a more accurate assessment of induced radioactivity in vanadium alloys. In addition, cross sections are calculated for the reactions /sup 46/Ti(n,2n) and /sup 45/Ti(n,2n) in order to estimate the production of /sup 44/Ti, a 1.2-MeV gamma-ray source with a half-life of 47 years.

  3. Thermal neutron capture cross sections and neutron separation energies for 23Na(n,γ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Revay, Zs.; Belgya, T.

    2014-01-01

    Prompt thermal neutron capture γ-ray cross sections σγ were measured for the 23Na(n,γ) reaction with guided cold neutron beams at the Budapest Reactor. The 24Na γ-ray cross sections were internally standardized with a stoichiometric NaCl target by using standard 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl γ-ray cross sections. Transitions were assigned to levels in 24Na based primarily upon the known nuclear structure information from the literature, producing a nearly complete neutron capture decay scheme. The total radiative thermal neutron cross section σ0 was determined from the sum of prompt γ-ray cross section populating the ground state as 0.540 (3) b, and from the activation γ-ray cross sections for the decay of 24Na as 0.542 (3) b. The isomer cross section σ0 (23Nam, t1/2=20.20ms)=0.501(3) b and the 24Na neutron separation energy Sn=6959.352(18) keV were also determined in these experiments. New level spins and parities were proposed on the basis of new transition assignments and the systematics of reduced transition probabilities for the primary γ rays.

  4. Proton capture cross sections on neutron-magic 144Sm at astrophysically relevant energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, N.; Hayashi, K.; Ueno, S.; Yatsu, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Takahashi, N.

    2016-02-01

    Background: The p nuclei, which are not produced by neutron capture processes, are present with a typical isotopic abundance of 0.01%-0.3%. Abundance decreases with an increase in atomic number. However, the neutron-magic isotopes of 92Mo and 144Sm exhibit unusually large abundances in comparison. A combination of proton and α -particle capture reactions and neutron emission reactions are key to understanding this issue. Currently, complex network calculations do not have access to much experimental data, and hence require theoretically predicted reaction rates in order to estimate final abundances produced in nucleosynthesis. Purpose: Few experimental cross sections of (p ,γ) reactions on heavy nuclides with mass numbers of 130-150 have been reported. The 144Sm(p ,γ )145Eu reaction is the main destruction pathway for the nucleosynthesis of the 144Sm nuclide. In the present paper, experimental cross sections of the 144Sm(p ,γ )145Eu reaction at a range including astrophysically relevant energies for the p process were determined to compare with theoretical predictions using the Hauser-Feshback statistical model. Methods: The 144Sm was deposited on a high-purity Al foil with the molecular plating method. Stacks consisting of Ta degrader foils, 144Sm targets, and Cu foils used as flux monitors were irradiated with 14.0-MeV proton beams. The 144Sm(p ,γ )145Eu cross sections were determined from the 145Eu activities and the proton fluence estimated from the 65Zn activity in the Cu monitor foil. The proton energies bombarded on each 144Sm target were estimated using srim2013. Results: We determined the 144Sm(p ,γ )145Eu cross sections at proton energies between 2.8 and 7.6 MeV. These energies encompass nucleosynthesis temperatures between 3 and 5 GK. The cross sections at energies higher than 3.8 MeV agreed well with theoretically predicted cross sections using talys using the generalized superfluid (GS) model for level densities. However, calculations using non

  5. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A.; Hemmers, O.

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.

  6. Crossed-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W; Edgell, D H; Michel, D T; Froula, D H; Goncharov, V N; Craxton, R S; Divol, L; Epstein, R; Follett, R; Kelly, J H; Kosc, T Z; Maximov, A V; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, P; Myatt, J F; Sangster, T C; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Stoeckl, C

    2012-05-22

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have showed discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicate the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10%-20%. This appears to be due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) that involves electromagnetic-seeded, low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  7. Cross-domain active learning for video concept detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Li, Chao; Shi, Yuan; Xiong, Zhang; Hauptmann, Alexander G.

    2011-08-01

    As video data from a variety of different domains (e.g., news, documentaries, entertainment) have distinctive data distributions, cross-domain video concept detection becomes an important task, in which one can reuse the labeled data of one domain to benefit the learning task in another domain with insufficient labeled data. In this paper, we approach this problem by proposing a cross-domain active learning method which iteratively queries labels of the most informative samples in the target domain. Traditional active learning assumes that the training (source domain) and test data (target domain) are from the same distribution. However, it may fail when the two domains have different distributions because querying informative samples according to a base learner that initially learned from source domain may no longer be helpful for the target domain. In our paper, we use the Gaussian random field model as the base learner which has the advantage of exploring the distributions in both domains, and adopt uncertainty sampling as the query strategy. Additionally, we present an instance weighting trick to accelerate the adaptability of the base learner, and develop an efficient model updating method which can significantly speed up the active learning process. Experimental results on TRECVID collections highlight the effectiveness.

  8. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of biology experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher information…

  9. Activation energy measurements of cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature sweeps of cheeses using small amplitude oscillatory shear tests produced values for activation energy of flow (Ea) between 30 and 44 deg C. Soft goat cheese and Queso Fresco, which are high-moisture cheeses and do not flow when heated, exhibited Ea values between 30 and 60 kJ/mol. The ...

  10. Energy Technology: A Cross-Curricular Approach in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamazaki, Sadato; King, Cyril; Shinde, Mika; Ohiwa, Osamu; Hirai, Sohichiro

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly describes a curriculum study that had two main purposes. The first purpose was to develop and reflect upon a new energy technology curriculum at the lower secondary school level using an action research method. The second purpose was to determine the effect of collaborative activities, with the families of the pupils enrolled…

  11. Energy and angle differential cross sections for the electron-impact double ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James P; Pindzola, M S; Robicheaux, F

    2008-01-01

    Energy and angle differential cross sections for the electron-impact double ionization of helium are calculated using a non-perturbative time-dependent close-coupling method. Collision probabilities are found by projection of a time evolved nine dimensional coordinate space wave function onto fully antisymmetric products of spatial and spin functions representing three outgoing Coulomb waves. At an incident energy of 106 eV, we present double energy differential cross sections and pentuple energy and angle differential cross sections. The pentuple energy and angle differential cross sections are found to be in relative agreement with the shapes observed in recent (e,3e) reaction microscope experiments. Integration of the differential cross sections over all energies and angles yields a total ionization cross section that is also in reasonable agreement with absolute crossed-beams experiments.

  12. Energy harvesting from vibration with cross-linked polypropylene piezoelectrets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Liming; Sessler, Gerhard M.

    2015-07-15

    Piezoelectret films are prepared by modification of the microstructure of polypropylene foam sheets cross-linked by electronic irradiation (IXPP), followed by proper corona charging. Young’s modulus, relative permittivity, and electromechanical coupling coefficient of the fabricated films, determined by dielectric resonance spectra, are about 0.7 MPa, 1.6, and 0.08, respectively. Dynamic piezoelectric d{sub 33} coefficients up to 650 pC/N at 200 Hz are achieved. The figure of merit (FOM, d{sub 33} ⋅ g{sub 33}) for a more typical d{sub 33} value of 400 pC/N is about 11.2 GPa{sup −1}. Vibration-based energy harvesting with one-layer and two-layer stacks of these films is investigated at various frequencies and load resistances. At an optimum load resistance of 9 MΩ and a resonance frequency of 800 Hz, a maximum output power of 120 μW, referred to the acceleration g due to gravity, is obtained for an energy harvester consisting of a one-layer IXPP film with an area of 3.14 cm{sup 2} and a seismic mass of 33.7 g. The output power can be further improved by using two-layer stacks of IXPP films in electric series. IXPP energy harvesters could be used to energize low-power electronic devices, such as wireless sensors and LED lights.

  13. Energy harvesting from vibration with cross-linked polypropylene piezoelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Liming; Sessler, Gerhard M.

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectret films are prepared by modification of the microstructure of polypropylene foam sheets cross-linked by electronic irradiation (IXPP), followed by proper corona charging. Young's modulus, relative permittivity, and electromechanical coupling coefficient of the fabricated films, determined by dielectric resonance spectra, are about 0.7 MPa, 1.6, and 0.08, respectively. Dynamic piezoelectric d33 coefficients up to 650 pC/N at 200 Hz are achieved. The figure of merit (FOM, d33 ṡ g33) for a more typical d33 value of 400 pC/N is about 11.2 GPa-1. Vibration-based energy harvesting with one-layer and two-layer stacks of these films is investigated at various frequencies and load resistances. At an optimum load resistance of 9 MΩ and a resonance frequency of 800 Hz, a maximum output power of 120 μW, referred to the acceleration g due to gravity, is obtained for an energy harvester consisting of a one-layer IXPP film with an area of 3.14 cm2 and a seismic mass of 33.7 g. The output power can be further improved by using two-layer stacks of IXPP films in electric series. IXPP energy harvesters could be used to energize low-power electronic devices, such as wireless sensors and LED lights.

  14. Nonvanishing high energy correlation corrections to the photoionization cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, Miron Ya

    2000-06-01

    Recently a prominent discrepancy was observed (see D. L. Hansen et al., Phys.. Rev.A, 60, R2641-44, 1999) between the experimental data and the results of RPAE calculations for Ar 3s-electron photoionization cross section at relatively high frequencies, from 500 eV up to 1KeV. This finding confirms the prediction (M.Ya. Amusia, in: Adv. At. Mol. Opt. Phys., ed. Bates, Academic Press, 17, 1-54, 1981), that it exists a correlation correction, whose relative role does not decrease with the photon energy growth. It appears due to strong mixing of pure "one-vacancy" and "two vacancy-one excited electron" states. Because of this correction the observed cross section differs from obtained in HF or RPAE approximations by a factor, which is photon frequency independent . This factor can be accurately enough calculated in the second order of the Many Body Perturbation Theory, giving the result of 0.75 for 3s-electrons. Similar factor for 3p-electrons is close to 1. These results are in reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  15. WAPA Daily Energy Accounting Activities

    1990-10-01

    ISA (Interchange, Scheduling, & Accounting) is the interchange scheduling system used by the DOE Western Area Power Administration to perform energy accounting functions associated with the daily activities of the Watertown Operations Office (WOO). The system's primary role is to provide accounting functions for scheduled energy which is exchanged with other power companies and power operating organizations. The system has a secondary role of providing a historical record of all scheduled interchange transactions. The followingmore » major functions are performed by ISA: scheduled energy accounting for received and delivered energy; generation scheduling accounting for both fossil and hydro-electric power plants; metered energy accounting for received and delivered totals; energy accounting for Direct Current (D.C.) Ties; regulation accounting; automatic generation control set calculations; accounting summaries for Basin, Heartland Consumers Power District, and the Missouri Basin Municipal Power Agency; calculation of estimated generation for the Laramie River Station plant; daily and monthly reports; and dual control areas.« less

  16. Cross-Section Measurements in the Fast Neutron Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plompen, Arjan

    2006-04-01

    Generation IV focuses research for advanced nuclear reactors on six concepts. Three of these concepts, the lead, gas and sodium fast reactors (LFR, GFR and SFR) have fast neutron spectra, whereas a fourth, the super-critical water reactor (SCWR), can be configured to have a fast spectrum. Such fast neutron spectra are essential to meet the sustainability objective of GenIV. Nuclear data requirements for GenIV concepts will therefore emphasize the energy region from about 1 keV to 10 MeV. Here, the potential is illustrated of the GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility and the Van de Graaff laboratory at IRMM to measure the relevant nuclear data in this energy range: the total, capture, fission and inelastic-scattering cross sections. In particular, measurement results will be shown for lead and bismuth inelastic scattering for which the need was recently expressed in a quantitative way by Aliberti et al. for Accelerator Driven Systems. Even without completion of the quantitative assessment of the data needs for GenIV concepts at ANL it is clear that this particular effort is of relevance to LFR system studies.

  17. Prediction of energy expenditure and physical activity in preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate, nonintrusive, and feasible methods are needed to predict energy expenditure (EE) and physical activity (PA) levels in preschoolers. Herein, we validated cross-sectional time series (CSTS) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) models based on accelerometry and heart rate (HR) ...

  18. Active calibration target for bistatic radar cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, M.; Odendaal, J. W.; Joubert, J.; Cilliers, J. E.; Smit, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Either passive calibration targets are expensive and complex to manufacture or their bistatic radar cross section (RCS) levels are significantly lower than the monostatic RCS levels of targets such as spheres, dihedral, and trihedral corner reflectors. In this paper the performance of an active calibration target with relative high bistatic RCS values is illustrated as a reference target for bistatic RCS measurements. The reference target is simple to manufacture, operates over a wide frequency range, and can be configured to calibrate all four polarizations (VV, HH, HV, and VH). Bistatic RCS measurements of canonical targets, performed in a controlled environment, are calibrated with the reference target and the results are compared to simulated results using FEKO.

  19. Energy Activities for the Primary Classroom. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Blue, Comp.

    An energy education program at the primary level should help students to understand the nature and importance of energy, consider different energy sources, learn about energy conservation, prepare for energy related careers, and become energy conscious in other career fields. The activities charts, readings, and experiments provided in this…

  20. Comprehensive Cross-Training among STEM Disciplines in Geothermal Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, J. A.; Dutrow, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    One of the foremost areas of sustainability is society's need for energy. The US uses more energy per capita than any other country in the world with most of this energy coming from fossil fuels. With its link to climate change coupled with declining resources, renewable alternatives are being pursued. Given the high demand for energy, it is not a question of if these alternatives will be utilized but when and where. One of the "greenest" of the green technologies is geothermal energy. It is a renewable resource with a small environmental footprint. To educate advanced undergraduate and graduate students from across STEM disciplines in geothermal energy, a series of three distinct but linked and related courses are being developed and taught. Courses are focused on one of the STEM disciplines to provide students with essential discipline-specific knowledge and taught by different faculty members in the departments of geology, petroleum engineering and mathematics. These courses provide the foundation necessary for interdisciplinary research projects. The first course on Geologic Properties and Processes of Geothermal Energy was developed and taught in 2012. The class had an enrollment of 27 students including: 5 undergraduates and 4 graduate students in Geology, 12 undergraduates and two graduate students in Petroleum Engineering, and 4 non-matriculated undergraduate students. The course began with the essentials of heat and mass transfer, a common deficiency for all students, then progressed to the geologic materials of these systems: minerals, rocks and fluids. To provide students with first hand experience, two short research projects were embedded into the course. The first project involved analyses of cuttings from a well-studied geothermal system (Salton Sea, CA). Students were in teams consisting of both engineers and geologists. The first assignment was to identify minerals in the cuttings. They were then provided with XRD patterns for their cuttings to

  1. Steering quantum transitions between three crossing energy levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, S. S.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2008-02-15

    We calculate the propagator and the transition probabilities for a coherently driven three-state quantum system. The energies of the three states change linearly in time, whereas the interactions between them are pulse shaped. We derive a highly accurate analytic approximation by assuming independent pairwise Landau-Zener transitions occurring instantly at the relevant avoided crossings, and adiabatic evolution elsewhere. Quantum interferences are identified, which occur due to different possible evolution paths in Hilbert space between an initial and a final state. A detailed comparison with numerical results for Gaussian-shaped pulses demonstrates a remarkable accuracy of the analytic approximation. We use the analytic results to derive estimates for the half-width of the excitation profile, and for the parameters required for creation of a maximally coherent superposition of the three states. These results are of potential interest in ladder climbing in alkali-metal atoms by chirped laser pulses, in quantum rotors, in transitions between Zeeman sublevels of a J=1 level in a magnetic field, and in control of entanglement of a pair of spin-1/2 particles. The results for the three-state system can be generalized, without essential difficulties, to higher dimensions.

  2. Hadron cross sections at ultra high energies and unitarity bounds on diffraction dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yodh, G. B.; Gaisser, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    It was shown that if unitarity bounds on diffractive cross sections are valid at ultra high energies then diffractive dominance models which ascribe the increase in total hadron-hadron cross sections to diffractive processes only are ruled out. Calculations also show that cosmic ray cross sections derived from air shower experiments at ultra high energies clearly rule out models for hadron-hadron cross sections with nat.log ns energy dependence and favor those with nat.log n(2)s variation.

  3. An intercomparison of medium energy cross-section codes

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, S.

    1988-05-01

    Five medium energy proton reaction cases are selected for benchmarking nuclear model codes. The quantities calculated are isotopic activation yields for 180 MeV protons on Al and 40-200 MeV protons on Co, and double differential neutron emission spectra from Al, Zr-90 and Pb-208 for 35, 80, 160, 318, and 800 presented consist of three types: a closed form preequilibrium plus evaporation model, an intranuclear-cascade and evaporation model, and a model relying on nuclear systematics. The characteristics of each code are described. There are orders of magnitude differences in the time for each type of code to calculate neutron emission spectra, with codes using systematics, preequilibrium and intranuclear-cascade models requiring seconds, minutes and hours, respectively. Calculations are not compared with experiment in this initial study. For double differential neutron emission spectra, there is good overall agreement in magnitude among the different types of codes at forward angles. Differences where they occur at forward angles are greatest for the mid-energy neutrons emitted. At back angles the incident energy at which the best overall agreement is obtained is 160 MeV and the material for which the best overall agreement is obtained is Al. 4 refs., 7 tabs.

  4. Correlates of college students' physical activity: cross-cultural differences.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R; Jiang, Nan; Fernandez-Rojas, Xinia; Park, Bock-Hee

    2009-10-01

    This study examined cross-cultural differences in personal and behavioral determinants of vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) among college students living in distinctly different cultures, that is, the United States, Costa Rica, India, and South Korea. Participants of this study were recruited from randomly chosen public universities in the 4 countries during the 2006-2007 academic year. A total of 4685 students participated in the study (response rate 90%). Vigorous-intensity PA was measured by asking on how many of the past 7 days the participants participated in PA for at least 20 minutes that made them sweat or breathe hard. For moderate-intensity PA, participants were asked on how many of the past 7 days they participated in PA for at least 30 minutes that did not make them sweat or breathe hard. Findings indicate that whereas perceived overweight and fruit and vegetable consumption are relatively culture-free predictors of PA, gender and TV/video watching are culture-specific predictors. Binge drinking was not predictive of meeting the vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity PA guidelines in any of the 4 countries. PMID:19661101

  5. Energy Storage. Teachers Guide. Science Activities in Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Mary Lynn, Ed.

    Included in this science activities energy package for students in grades 4-10 are 12 activities related to energy storage. Each activity is outlined on the front and back of a single sheet and is introduced by a key question. Most of the activities can be completed in the classroom with materials readily available in any community. Among the…

  6. Introduction to Acoustical Energy. Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Ray; Johnson, Steve

    1998-01-01

    This technology education activity will allow the students to observe acoustical energy and will put them in a problem-solving situation where they must use the movement of a sound-activated diaphragm to perform another activity. (Author)

  7. Elastic and total cross sections for simple biomolecules in the intermediate energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2015-09-01

    The elastic and total cross sections for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone and formamide are calculated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism in the intermediate energy range from 50 eV to 10 keV. These cross sections find application to various fields like radiation damage and biological sciences. The present results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and are found to give excellent agreement. The elastic cross sections reported for most of the targets in the present energy range are done for the first time. The energy dependence of the contribution of ionization and elastic cross section with respect to the total cross section and the correlation of total cross section with polarizability of the molecules are also studied.

  8. Elastic and total cross sections for simple biomolecules in the intermediate energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2015-09-15

    The elastic and total cross sections for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone and formamide are calculated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism in the intermediate energy range from 50 eV to 10 keV. These cross sections find application to various fields like radiation damage and biological sciences. The present results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and are found to give excellent agreement. The elastic cross sections reported for most of the targets in the present energy range are done for the first time. The energy dependence of the contribution of ionization and elastic cross section with respect to the total cross section and the correlation of total cross section with polarizability of the molecules are also studied.

  9. Cross-matching: a modified cross-correlation underlying threshold energy model and match-based depth perception

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Takahiro; Fujita, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional visual perception requires correct matching of images projected to the left and right eyes. The matching process is faced with an ambiguity: part of one eye's image can be matched to multiple parts of the other eye's image. This stereo correspondence problem is complicated for random-dot stereograms (RDSs), because dots with an identical appearance produce numerous potential matches. Despite such complexity, human subjects can perceive a coherent depth structure. A coherent solution to the correspondence problem does not exist for anticorrelated RDSs (aRDSs), in which luminance contrast is reversed in one eye. Neurons in the visual cortex reduce disparity selectivity for aRDSs progressively along the visual processing hierarchy. A disparity-energy model followed by threshold nonlinearity (threshold energy model) can account for this reduction, providing a possible mechanism for the neural matching process. However, the essential computation underlying the threshold energy model is not clear. Here, we propose that a nonlinear modification of cross-correlation, which we term “cross-matching,” represents the essence of the threshold energy model. We placed half-wave rectification within the cross-correlation of the left-eye and right-eye images. The disparity tuning derived from cross-matching was attenuated for aRDSs. We simulated a psychometric curve as a function of graded anticorrelation (graded mixture of aRDS and normal RDS); this simulated curve reproduced the match-based psychometric function observed in human near/far discrimination. The dot density was 25% for both simulation and observation. We predicted that as the dot density increased, the performance for aRDSs should decrease below chance (i.e., reversed depth), and the level of anticorrelation that nullifies depth perception should also decrease. We suggest that cross-matching serves as a simple computation underlying the match-based disparity signals in stereoscopic depth

  10. Cross-matching: a modified cross-correlation underlying threshold energy model and match-based depth perception.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takahiro; Fujita, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional visual perception requires correct matching of images projected to the left and right eyes. The matching process is faced with an ambiguity: part of one eye's image can be matched to multiple parts of the other eye's image. This stereo correspondence problem is complicated for random-dot stereograms (RDSs), because dots with an identical appearance produce numerous potential matches. Despite such complexity, human subjects can perceive a coherent depth structure. A coherent solution to the correspondence problem does not exist for anticorrelated RDSs (aRDSs), in which luminance contrast is reversed in one eye. Neurons in the visual cortex reduce disparity selectivity for aRDSs progressively along the visual processing hierarchy. A disparity-energy model followed by threshold nonlinearity (threshold energy model) can account for this reduction, providing a possible mechanism for the neural matching process. However, the essential computation underlying the threshold energy model is not clear. Here, we propose that a nonlinear modification of cross-correlation, which we term "cross-matching," represents the essence of the threshold energy model. We placed half-wave rectification within the cross-correlation of the left-eye and right-eye images. The disparity tuning derived from cross-matching was attenuated for aRDSs. We simulated a psychometric curve as a function of graded anticorrelation (graded mixture of aRDS and normal RDS); this simulated curve reproduced the match-based psychometric function observed in human near/far discrimination. The dot density was 25% for both simulation and observation. We predicted that as the dot density increased, the performance for aRDSs should decrease below chance (i.e., reversed depth), and the level of anticorrelation that nullifies depth perception should also decrease. We suggest that cross-matching serves as a simple computation underlying the match-based disparity signals in stereoscopic depth perception.

  11. Curve crossing for low-energy elastic scattering of He/+/ by Ne.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbio, S. M.; Doverspike, L. D.; Champion, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The perturbation seen in the experimental differential elastic-scattering cross section for the 40-eV He/+/ + Ne system has been attributed to a single crossing of two intermolecular potential-energy curves. A new theoretical treatment of the curve-crossing problem, namely, that of Delos and Thorson, is employed to obtain the crossing probabilities and phases associated with the crossing. These are determined by utilizing ab initio potentials involved in the crossing and are further used in a partial-wave calculation of the cross section, which is compared with our experiment. The origin of the oscillatory structure observed in the differential cross section is discussed in semiclassical terms by defining the problem in terms of two pseudo-deflection-functions. A rainbow effect is shown to be related to a particular feature (a maximum rather than a minimum) of these deflection functions.

  12. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on gold up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-07-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on gold for production of (197m,197g,195m,195g, 193m,193g,192)Hg, (196m,196g(cum),195g(cum),194,191(cum))Au, (191(cum))Pt and (192)Ir were measured up to 65MeV proton energy, some of them for the first time. The new data are in acceptably good agreement with the recently published earlier experimental data in the overlapping energy region. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 (results in TENDL-2015 on-line library) and EMPIRE 3.2 code. PMID:27156194

  13. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  14. 57Co (n,γ) 58Co reaction cross section: Thermal and resonance integral measurements and energy dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidana, Nora L.; Mesa, Joel; Vanin, Vito R.; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2004-07-01

    The 57Co (n,γ) 58Co thermal and resonance integral cross section were measured as 51 (5) b and 20.0 (19) b , respectively, by irradiating aliquots of 57Co solution sealed inside quartz bottles near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN research reactor and counting the gamma-ray residual activity. The irradiations were monitored using Au-Al alloy foils, with and without Cd cover. The gamma-ray measurements were performed with a shielded HPGe detector. Westcott formalism was applied for the average neutron flux determination. The cross section energy dependence was evaluated using the multilevel Breit-Wigner expression considering the first two resonances and the statistical model for energies above the second resonance. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross section with neutron temperatures between 5 and 100 keV were also evaluated.

  15. {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co reaction cross section: Thermal and resonance integral measurements and energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, Nora L.; Mesa, Joel; Vanin, Vito R.; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2004-07-01

    The {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co thermal and resonance integral cross section were measured as 51(5) b and 20.0(19) b, respectively, by irradiating aliquots of {sup 57}Co solution sealed inside quartz bottles near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN research reactor and counting the gamma-ray residual activity. The irradiations were monitored using Au-Al alloy foils, with and without Cd cover. The gamma-ray measurements were performed with a shielded HPGe detector. Westcott formalism was applied for the average neutron flux determination. The cross section energy dependence was evaluated using the multilevel Breit-Wigner expression considering the first two resonances and the statistical model for energies above the second resonance. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross section with neutron temperatures between 5 and 100 keV were also evaluated.

  16. Energy Activities for the Classroom: Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, Herbert L.; Bowman, Mary Lynne

    This resource book contains descriptions of over 100 classroom activities designed to illustrate concepts relating to energy, its production, characteristics, use, and conservations. Each activity integrates the energy lesson into a concept that relates to one or more subject areas common to public school curricula. Many of the activities included…

  17. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  18. Dynamical thresholds and quantum undulations in the energy dependence of rotationally inelastic integral cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Schinke, R.

    1981-12-01

    We report the observation of distinct structures in the energy dependence of rotationally inelastic integral cross sections for the systems He--Na/sub 2/ and Ne--Na/sub 2/. The calculations are performed within the infinite-order-sudden and the coupled states approximation using accurate ab initio potential energy surfaces. The integral cross section for a 0..-->..j' transition typically rises steeply at low energies, reaches a maximum, and declines slowly to the high energy region showing more or less pronounced quantum undulations. The onset of the cross section is determined by dynamical constraints rather than energy conservation. All structures in the integral cross sections are explained in terms of the energy dependence of rotational rainbow features in the corresponding differential cross sections. In particular, the undulations at higher energies stem from the supernumerary rotational rainbows. In this sense they are interpreted as analogous to the glory maxima in the elastic integral cross section for scattering from isotropic potentials. The observed structures are sensitive to the anisotropy of the repulsive branch of the potential energy surface.

  19. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  20. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, J.; Beiter, P.; Flores, F.; Hurlbut, D.; Liu, C.

    2015-02-01

    This presentation and associated spreadsheet examine the level of cross-state renewable energy transactions. Most state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies allow for out-of-state renewable energy or renewable energy certificates to count towards compliance. This analysis focuses on compliance for 2012 and provides stakeholders with an understanding of the extent to which RPSs are being met.

  1. Second Language Proficiency and Cross-Language Lexical Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Hell, Janet G.; Tanner, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Although research has consistently shown that a bilingual's two languages interact on multiple levels, it is also well-established that bilinguals can vary considerably in their proficiency in the second language (L2). In this paper we review empirical studies that have examined how differences in L2 proficiency modulate cross-language…

  2. Lexical Activation of Cross-Language Syntactic Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salamoura, Angeliki; Williams, John N.

    2006-01-01

    Cross-language (L1-to-L2) syntactic priming is the repetition of utterance structure from one language to another independently of meaning and has motivated models of language-shared representations of L1-L2 equivalent structures (Salamoura and Williams, submitted; Schoonbaert, Hartsuiker and Pickering, submitted). These models assume that the…

  3. Stress optimization of leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots for an active Gurney flap mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire Gómez, Jon; Booker, Julian D.; Mellor, Phil H.

    2015-04-01

    The EU's Green Rotorcraft programme is pursuing the development of a functional and airworthy Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter rotor blade. Interest in the development of this `smart adaptive rotor blade' technology lies in its potential to provide a number of aerodynamic benefits, which would in turn translate into a reduction in fuel consumption and noise levels. The AGF mechanism selected employs leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots. These provide important advantages over bearings as they are not susceptible to seizing and do not require maintenance (i.e. lubrication or cleaning). A baseline design of this mechanism was successfully tested both in a fatigue rig and in a 2D wind tunnel environment at flight-representative deployment schedules. For full validation, a flight test would also be required. However, the severity of the in-flight loading conditions would likely compromise the mechanical integrity of the pivots' leaf-springs in their current form. This paper investigates the scope for stress reduction through three-dimensional shape optimization of the leaf-springs of a generic crossed flexure pivot. To this end, a procedure combining a linear strain energy formulation, a parametric leaf-spring profile definition and a series of optimization algorithms is employed. The resulting optimized leaf-springs are proven to be not only independent of the angular rotation at which the pivot operates, but also linearly scalable to leaf-springs of any length, minimum thickness and width. Validated using non-linear finite element analysis, the results show very significant stress reductions relative to pivots with constant cross section leaf-springs, of up to as much as 30% for the specific pivot configuration employed in the AGF mechanism. It is concluded that shape optimization offers great potential for reducing stress in crossed flexure pivots and, consequently, for extending their fatigue life and/or rotational range.

  4. Fragmentation cross sections and binding energies of neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Friedman, W. A.; Mocko, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Aoi, N.; Cook, J. M.; Delaunay, F.; Famiano, M. A.; Hui, H.; Imai, N.; Iwasaki, H.; Motobayashi, T.; Niikura, M.; Onishi, T.; Rogers, A. M.; Sakurai, H.; Suzuki, H.; Takeshita, E.; Takeuchi, S.; Wallace, M. S.

    2007-10-01

    An exponential dependence of the fragmentation cross section on the average binding energy is observed and reproduced with a statistical model. The observed functional dependence is robust and allows the extraction of binding energies from measured cross sections. From the systematics of Cu isotope cross sections, the binding energies of Cu76,77,78,79 have been extracted. They are 636.94±0.4,647.1±0.4,651.6±0.4, and 657.8±0.5 MeV, respectively. Specifically, the uncertainty of the binding energy of Cu75 is reduced from 980 keV, as listed in the 2003 mass table of Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault to 400 keV. The predicted cross sections of two near drip-line nuclei, Na39 and Mg40 from the fragmentation of Ca48 are discussed.

  5. Fragmentation cross sections and binding energies of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Mocko, M.; Cook, J. M.; Delaunay, F.; Famiano, M. A.; Hui, H.; Rogers, A. M.; Wallace, M. S.; Friedman, W. A.; Sun, Z. Y.; Aoi, N.; Imai, N.; Motobayashi, T.; Takeuchi, S.; Iwasaki, H.; Onishi, T.; Sakurai, H.; Suzuki, H.; Niikura, M.

    2007-10-15

    An exponential dependence of the fragmentation cross section on the average binding energy is observed and reproduced with a statistical model. The observed functional dependence is robust and allows the extraction of binding energies from measured cross sections. From the systematics of Cu isotope cross sections, the binding energies of {sup 76,77,78,79}Cu have been extracted. They are 636.94{+-}0.4,647.1{+-}0.4,651.6{+-}0.4, and 657.8{+-}0.5 MeV, respectively. Specifically, the uncertainty of the binding energy of {sup 75}Cu is reduced from 980 keV, as listed in the 2003 mass table of Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault to 400 keV. The predicted cross sections of two near drip-line nuclei, {sup 39}Na and {sup 40}Mg from the fragmentation of {sup 48}Ca are discussed.

  6. Low-energy electron elastic scattering cross sections for excited Au and Pt atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Zineb; Eure, Amanda R.; Msezane, Alfred Z.; Sokolovski, Dmitri

    2010-05-01

    Electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs) and differential cross sections (DCSs) in both impact energy and scattering angle for the excited Au and Pt atoms are calculated in the electron impact energy range 0 ⩽ E ⩽ 4.0 eV. The cross sections are found to be characterized by very sharp long-lived resonances whose positions are identified with the binding energies of the excited anions formed during the collisions. The recent novel Regge-pole methodology wherein is embedded through the Mulholland formula the electron-electron correlations is used together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential incorporating the crucial core-polarization interaction for the calculations of the TCSs. The DCSs are evaluated using a partial wave expansion. The Ramsauer-Townsend minima, the shape resonances and the binding energies of the excited Au - and Pt - anions are extracted from the cross sections, while the critical minima are determined from the DCSs.

  7. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)--the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  8. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE) - the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  9. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-01

    Twin oil (20 & 24 inch) and gas (20 & 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)—the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  10. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-01

    Twin oil (20 & 24 inch) and gas (20 & 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)—the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  11. Extrapolation of hadron cross sections to supercollider energies within the two-component dual parton model

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, R.; Bopp, F.W.; Pertermann, D.; Ranft, J. )

    1992-12-01

    In the framework of a two-component dual parton model we perform a fit to {ital p{bar p}} total, elastic, inelastic, and single-diffractive cross-section data at collider energies. The fit including diffractive data gives better results using the supercritical soft Pomeron instead of the critical one. Because of the different structure function parametrizations the predictions of cross sections at supercollider energies are subject to large uncertainties.

  12. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    An instructional aid for teachers is presented that will allow biology students the opportunity to learn about renewable energy sources. Some of the school activities include using leaves as collectors of solar energy, solar energy stored in wood, and a fuel value test for green and dry woods. A study of organic wastes as a source of fuel is included. (BCS)

  13. Solar energy education. Renewable energy activities for general science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Renewable energy topics are integrated with the study of general science. The literature is provided in the form of a teaching manual and includes such topics as passive solar homes, siting a home for solar energy, and wind power for the home. Other energy topics are explored through library research activities. (BCS)

  14. Measurements of ultra-low-energy electron scattering cross sections of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kitajima, M.; Shigemura, K.; Kurokawa, M.; Odagiri, T.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, K.

    2014-03-05

    A new experimental technique for the total cross section measurements of ultra-low energy electron collisions with atoms and molecules utilizing the synchrotron radiation is presented. The technique employs a combination of the penetrating field technique and the threshold photoionization of rare gas atoms using the synchrotron radiation as an electron source in order to produce a high resolution electron beam at very low energy. Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering from He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in the energy region from extremely low electron energy to 20 eV are presented.

  15. The energy distribution cross section in threshold electron-atom impact ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.

    1974-01-01

    The flatness of the energy differential cross section in impact ionization is derived analytically in the Wannier theory. However it is shown that the Wannier zone is confined to a region of the order E/5 is less than or equal to epsilon is less than or equal to 4E/5, where E is the available energy and epsilon is the energy of the electrons. By contrasting the known results of photoionization and photodetachment, one can cogently argue that in the complementary region where electrons share their energy very unequally the cross section rises to a value independent of E, and that this region determines the form of the threshold law.

  16. High-energy electron-positron photoproduction cross section close to the end of the spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Milstein, A. I.

    2010-10-15

    We consider the cross section of electron-positron pair production by a high-energy photon in a strong Coulomb field close to the end of the electron or positron spectrum. We show that the cross section essentially differs from the result obtained in the Born approximation as well as from the result which takes into account the Coulomb corrections under the assumption that both electron and positron are ultrarelativistic. The cross section of bremsstrahlung in a strong Coulomb field by a high-energy electron is also obtained in the region where the final electron is not ultrarelativistic.

  17. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. IV - CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, H.; Srivastava, S. K.; Chutjian, A.

    1978-01-01

    Using a crossed electron beam-molecular beam scattering geometry and a relative-flow technique, ratios of elastic differential cross sections of CO to those of He have been measured at electron impact energies of 3, 5, 7.5, 9.9, 15, 20, 30, 50, 75, and 100 eV. At each energy, an angular range of 15 to 130 deg has been covered. These ratios have been multiplied by previously known He elastic differential cross sections to obtain elastic differential cross sections for CO. Since pure rotational excitations were not resolved, the elastic differential cross sections are a sum of elastic and pure rotational excitations at room temperature. From a knowledge of differential cross sections (DCS), integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been calculated. Both the DCS and integral cross sections are compared at 50, 75, and 100 eV to a recent two-potential theory of e-molecule scattering. Present results show that the isoelectronic molecules CO and N2 have very similar magnitudes and shapes of their differential cross sections.

  18. Solar Energy Project, Activities: General Solar Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of activities which introduce students to concepts and issues relating to solar energy. Lessons frequently presented in the context of solar energy as it relates to contemporary energy problems. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; necessary skills and knowledge; materials; method;…

  19. Parameter-free calculation of charge-changing cross sections at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Horiuchi, W.; Terashima, S.; Kanungo, R.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Estradé, A.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Charge-changing cross sections at high energies are expected to provide useful information on nuclear charge radii. No reliable theory to calculate the cross section has yet been available. We develop a formula using Glauber and eikonal approximations and test its validity with recent new data on carbon isotopes measured at around 900 A MeV. We first confirm that our theory reproduces the cross sections of 12,13,14C+12C consistently with the known charge radii. Next we show that the cross sections of C-1912 on a proton target are all well reproduced provided the role of neutrons is accounted for. We also discuss the energy dependence of the charge-changing cross sections.

  20. EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth (ENERGY) project: Design and methodology of the ENERGY cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity treatment is by large ineffective long term, and more emphasis on the prevention of excessive weight gain in childhood and adolescence is warranted. To inform energy balance related behaviour (EBRB) change interventions, insight in the potential personal, family and school environmental correlates of these behaviours is needed. Studies on such multilevel correlates of EBRB among schoolchildren in Europe are lacking. The ENERGY survey aims to (1) provide up-to-date prevalence rates of measured overweight, obesity, self-reported engagement in EBRBs, and objective accelerometer-based assessment of physical activity and sedentary behaviour and blood-sample biomarkers of metabolic function in countries in different regions of Europe, (2) to identify personal, family and school environmental correlates of these EBRBs. This paper describes the design, methodology and protocol of the survey. Method/Design A school-based cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2010 in seven different European countries; Belgium, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, and Spain. The survey included measurements of anthropometrics, child, parent and school-staff questionnaires, and school observations to measure and assess outcomes (i.e. height, weight, and waist circumference), EBRBs and potential personal, family and school environmental correlates of these behaviours including the social-cultural, physical, political, and economic environmental factors. In addition, a selection of countries conducted accelerometer measurements to objectively assess physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and collected blood samples to assess several biomarkers of metabolic function. Discussion The ENERGY survey is a comprehensive cross-sectional study measuring anthropometrics and biomarkers as well as assessing a range of EBRBs and their potential correlates at the personal, family and school level, among 10-12 year old children in seven European countries. This study

  1. Measurement of the ^241Am(n,2n) Reaction Cross Section with the Activation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A.; Crowell, A.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Hutcheson, A.; Tornow, W.; Kelley, J.; Angell, C.; Karwowski, H.; Pedroni, R.; Becker, J.; Dashdorj, D.; Macri, R.; Wilhelmy, J.; Bond, E.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Slemmons, A.; Vieira, D.

    2006-10-01

    High-precision measurements of the ^241Am(n,2n)^240Am reaction have been performed with neutron energies from 8.8 to 14.0 MeV. The monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the ^2H(d,n)^3He reaction using the 10 MV Tandem accelerator at TUNL. The radioactive targets consisted of 1mg highly-enriched ^241Am sandwiched between four different thin monitor foils. They were irradiated with a neutron flux of 3x10^7 n cm-2 s-1. After each irradiation the induced activity in the targets and monitors was measured off-line with 60% HPGe detectors. Our preliminary neutron induced cross sections will be compared with recent literature results and statistical model calculations using the GNASH and EMPIRE codes.

  2. Activation cross sections for reactions induced by 14 MeV neutrons on natural tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Junhua; Tuo Fei; Kong Xiangzhong

    2009-05-15

    Cross sections for (n,2n), (n,p), (n,n{sup '}{alpha}), (n,t), (n,d{sup '}), and (n,{alpha}) reactions have been measured on tantalum isotopes at the neutron energies of 13.5 to 14.7 MeV using the activation technique. Data are reported for the following reactions: {sup 181}Ta(n,2n){sup 180}Ta{sup g}, {sup 181}Ta(n,p){sup 181}Hf, {sup 181}Ta(n,n{sup '}{alpha}){sup 177}Lu{sup m}, {sup 181}Ta(n,t){sup 179}Hf{sup m2}, {sup 181}Ta(n,d{sup '}){sup 180}Hf{sup m}, and {sup 181}Ta(n,{alpha}){sup 178}Lu{sup m}. The neutron fluences were determined using the monitor reaction {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na. Results were discussed and compared with the previous works.

  3. Activation cross sections for reactions induced by 14 MeV neutrons on natural ruthenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junhua; Liu, Gang; Tuo, Fei; Kong, Xiangzhong; Liu, Rong; Jiang, Li; Lou, Benchao

    2007-11-01

    Cross sections for (n,2n), (n,p), (n,α), and (n,d*)1 reactions have been measured on ruthenium isotopes at the neutron energies of 13.5 to 14.8 MeV using the activation technique in combination with high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Data are reported for the following reactions: Ru104(n,2n)Ru103, Ru98(n,2n)Ru97, Ru96(n,2n)Ru95, Ru96(n,p)Tc96g, Ru96(n,p)Tc96m, Ru104(n,p)Tc104, Ru102(n,p)Tc102m, Ru104(n,α)Mo101, Ru102(n,α)Mo99, Ru96(n,α)Mo93m, and Ru96(n,d*)Tc95m. Results were discussed and compared with the previous works.

  4. Measurements of the proton-air cross section with high energy cosmic ray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Rasha

    2016-07-01

    Detecting Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) enables us to measure the proton-air inelastic cross section σinel p-air at energies that we are unable to access with particle accelerators. The proton-proton cross section σp-p is subsequently inferred from the proton-air cross section at these energies. UHECR experiments have been reportingon the proton-air inelastic cross section starting with the Fly's Eye in 1984 at √s =30 TeV and ending with the most recent result of the Telescope Array experiment at √s = 95 TeV in 2015. In this proceeding, I will summarize the most recent experimental results on the σinel p-air measurements from the UHECR experiments.

  5. Radar cross section of human cardiopulmonary activity for recumbent subject.

    PubMed

    Kiriazi, John E; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor M

    2009-01-01

    The radar cross section (RCS) corresponding to human cardio-respiratory motion is measured for a subject in two different recumbent positions. Lying face-up (supine), the subject showed an RCS of 0.326 m(2). But when lying face-down (prone), the RCS increased to 2.9 m(2). This is the first reported RCS measurement corresponding to human cardio-respiratory motion. The results obtained in this experiment suggest modeling the upper part of the human body as a half-cylinder where the front body corresponds to the cylindrical surface and the back corresponds to the rectangular one.

  6. Study of the crossing of quasi-energy levels in a four-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Arushanyan, S; Melikyan, A; Saakyan, S

    2011-05-31

    It was shown previously that in taking into account only dipole transitions, the crossing of quasi-energy levels is possible in the system if any of the transitions forms a closed loop. It followed herefrom that for the analysis of the crossing conditions, it is necessary to consider a system which has at least four levels. In this paper we show that we can uniquely specify which quasi-energy levels cross at the given values of the parameters of the atomic system and radiation field, without solving an algebraic quartic equation. It was found that the most suitable system for the implementation of the crossing is the group of energy levels {sup 5}S{sub 1/2}, {sup 5}P{sub 1/2}, {sup 5}P{sub 3/2} and {sup 5}D{sub 3/2} of a rubidium atom. The performed calculations of the laser field intensity and frequency values at which crossing takes place in this system show that they are easily attainable. It turned out that in this system there occur crossing of quasi-energy levels corresponding to the excited atomic levels. (intersection of quasi-energy levels)

  7. Large cross section for super energy transfer from hyperthermal atoms to ambient molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J.; Smith, Jonathan M.; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2016-04-01

    The experimentally measured cross section for super energy transfer collisions between a hyperthermal H atom and an ambient molecule is presented here. This measurement substantiates an emerging energy transfer mechanism with significant cross section, whereby a major fraction of atomic translational energy is converted into molecular vibrational energy through a transient collision-induced reactive complex. Specifically, using nanosecond time-resolved infrared emission spectroscopy, it is revealed that collisions between hyperthermal hydrogen atoms (with 59 kcal/mol of kinetic energy) and ambient SO2 result in the production of vibrationally highly excited SO2 with >14 000 cm-1 of internal energy. The lower limit of the cross section for this super energy transfer process is determined to be 0.53 ±0.05 Å2, i.e., 2% of all hard-sphere collisions. This cross section is orders of magnitude greater than that predicted by the exponential energy gap law, which is commonly used for describing collisional energy transfer through repulsive interactions.

  8. Hybrid energy harvesting using active thermal backplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Dong-Gun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the concept of a new hybrid energy harvesting system by combing solar cells with magneto-thermoelectric generator (MTG, i.e., thermal energy harvesting). The silicon solar cell can easily reach high temperature under normal operating conditions. Thus the heated solar cell becomes rapidly less efficient as the temperature of solar cell rises. To increase the efficiency of the solar cell, air or water-based cooling system is used. To surpass conventional cooling devices requiring additional power as well as large working space for air/water collectors, we develop a new technology of pairing an active thermal backplane (ATB) to solar cell. The ATB design is based on MTG technology utilizing the physics of the 2nd order phase transition of active ferromagnetic materials. The MTG is cost-effective conversion of thermal energy to electrical energy and is fundamentally different from Seebeck TEG devices. The ATB (MTG) is in addition to being an energy conversion system, a very good conveyor of heat through both conduction and convection. Therefore, the ATB can provide dual-mode for the proposed hybrid energy harvesting. One is active convective and conductive cooling for heated solar cell. Another is active thermal energy harvesting from heat of solar cell. These novel hybrid energy harvesting device have potentially simultaneous energy conversion capability of solar and thermal energy into electricity. The results presented can be used for better understanding of hybrid energy harvesting system that can be integrated into commercial applications.

  9. Lecturers' Perception of Research Activities for Knowledge Production in Universities in Cross River State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchendu, C. C.; Osim, R. O.; Odigwe, F. N.; Alade, F. N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined lecturers' perception of research activities for knowledge production in universities in Cross River State, Nigeria. Two hypotheses were isolated to give direction to this investigation. 240 university lecturers were sampled from a population of 1,868 from the two universities in Cross River State, using stratified random…

  10. The Relationship between Cross-Culture Communication Activities and Student Motivation in Studying Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youssef, Hussein Zanaty Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the positive impact of second language learners' cross-cultural awareness in the target language. More specifically, the pedagogical desired outcomes include: (1) exploring how students can increase their motivation in learning a foreign language by engaging in the cross-cultural activity "Sister School…

  11. [The activities of the Russian Society of Red Cross during the First World War].

    PubMed

    Gorelova, L Ye; Rudoiy, N A

    2013-01-01

    During the First World War, the Russian Society of Red Cross used experience of previous wars expanded its activities. The medical service functioned in the conditions of cruel war. For the first time in history, the weapon of mass destruction was applied The merit of the Russian society of Red Cross was development of specialized medical care.

  12. Cross-Linguistic Activation in Bilingual Sentence Processing: The Role of Word Class Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baten, Kristof; Hofman, Fabrice; Loeys, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates how categorial (word class) semantics influences cross-linguistic interactions when reading in L2. Previous homograph studies paid little attention to the possible influence of different word classes in the stimulus material on cross-linguistic activation. The present study examines the word recognition performance of…

  13. Safety enhancement of oil trunk pipeline crossing active faults on Sakhalin Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishkina, E.; Antropova, N.; Korotchenko, T.

    2015-11-01

    The article explores the issues concerning safety enhancement of pipeline active fault crossing on Sakhalin Island. Based on the complexity and analysis results, all the faults crossed by pipeline system are classified into five categories - from very simple faults to extremely complex ones. The pipeline fault crossing design is developed in accordance with the fault category. To enhance pipeline safety at fault crossing, a set of methods should be applied: use of pipes of different safety classes and special trench design in accordance with soil permeability characteristics.

  14. Activation Cross-Sections for 14.2 MeV Neutrons on Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa Rao, C. V.; Lakshmana Das, N.; Thirumala Rao, B. V.; Rama Rao, J.

    1981-12-01

    Using the activation method, the cross-section for the following reactions on molybdenum were measured employing the mixed powder technique and Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectroscopy: 94Mo(n, 2n)93mMo, 3.5 ± 0.5 mbarn; 92Mo(n, 2n)91mMo, 19 ± 3 mbarn; 92Mo(n, 2n)91m+gMo, 226 ± 11 mbarn; 100Mo(n, p)100m2Nb, 9 ± 1 mbarn; 98Mo(n, p)98Nb, 10 ± 1 mbarn; 97Mo(n, p)97mNb, 5 ± 1 mbarn; 96Mo(n, p)96Nb, 12 ± 2 mbarn; 92Mo(n, α)89mZr, 2.1 ± 0.5 mbarn; and 92Mo(n, α)89m+gZr 24 ± 6 mbarn; the neutron energy was 14.2 ± 0.2 MeV. The experimental cross-sections were compared with the predictions of evaporation model and of different versions of pre-equilibrium model. The master equation approach appears to give satisfactory results.

  15. Fusion cross sections for {sup 6,7}Li + {sup 24}Mg reactions at energies below and above the barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Kshetri, Ritesh; Sarkar, M. Saha; Dasmahapatra, B.

    2008-12-15

    Measurement of fusion cross sections for the {sup 6,7}Li + {sup 24}Mg reactions by the characteristic {gamma}-ray method has been done at energies from below to well above the respective Coulomb barriers. The fusion cross sections obtained from these {gamma}-ray cross sections for the two systems are found to agree well with the total reaction cross sections at low energies. The relatively large difference between total cross sections and measured fusion cross sections at higher energies is consistent with the fact that other channels, in particular breakup, open up with an increase of bombarding energy. The breakup channel, however, appears not to have any influence on fusion cross sections. The critical angular momenta (l{sub cr}) deduced from the fusion cross sections are found to have an energy dependence similar to other Li-induced reactions.

  16. Understanding Tensions: Activity Systems Analysis of Cross-Continental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, LanHui Zhang; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using the lens of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory, activity theory, and Engeström's activity systems analysis, this qualitative study explores students' experiences in the context of a sixteen-week transpacific collaboration between seven students at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and seven students from Shandong Normal…

  17. Barrier Crossing and Transport Activated by Kangaroo Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostur, M.; Luczka, J.

    1999-01-01

    We study barrier crossing of Brownian particles in a bistable symmetric potential and transport of Brownian particles in spatially periodic structures, driven by both kangaroo fluctuations and thermal equilibrium noise of zero mean values. We consider exponentially and algebraically correlated kangaroo fluctuations. Starting with the full Newton--Langevin equation for the Brownian particle and by introducing scaling as well as dimensionless variables, we show that the equation is very well approximated by overdamped dynamics in which inertial effects can be neglected. We analyze properties of selected macroscopic characteristics of the system such as the mean first passage time (MFPT) of particles from one minimum of the bistable potential to the other and mean stationary velocity of particles moving in a spatially periodic potential. In dependence upon statistics of kangaroo fluctuations and temperature of the system, macroscopic characteristics exhibit distinctive non-monotonic behavior. Accordingly, there exist optimal statistics of fluctuations optimizing macroscopic characteristics.

  18. Collision Cross Sections for O + Ar(+) Collisions in the Energy Range 0.03-500 eV.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A A; Balint-Kurti, G G; Palov, A P

    2016-07-14

    The interatomic potentials of the a(2)Π and b(2)Π states of the OAr(+) molecule are calculated using the relativistic complete-active space Hartree-Fock method followed by a multireference configuration interaction calculation with an aug-cc-pwCVNZ-DK basis sets where N is 4 and 5. The calculations were followed by an extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. An avoided crossing between the two potential energy curves is found at an internuclear separation of 5.75 bohr (3.04 Å). As the transition probability between the curves is negligible in the relative collision energy range 0.03-500 eV of interest here, collisions on the lower adiabatic a(2)Π potential may be treated without reference to the upper state. For low energies and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers, the one-dimensional radial Schrödinger equation is solved numerically using a Numerov algorithm method to determine the phase shift. The semiclassical JWKB approximation was employed for relative energies greater than 5 eV and orbital angular quantum numbers higher than 500. Differential, integral, transport (diffusion), and viscosity cross sections for elastic collisions of oxygen atoms with argon ions are calculated for the first time for the range of relative collision energies studied. The calculated cross sections are expected to be of utility in the fields of nanotechnology and arc welding. The combination of an Ar(+)((2)P) ion and a O((3)P) atom gives rise to a total of 12 different molecular electronic states that are all coupled by spin-orbit interactions. Potential energy curves for all 12 states are computed at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level and scattering calculations performed. The results are compared with those obtained using just the lowest potential energy curve. PMID:26741565

  19. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on Space Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zi-Wei; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major hazard to space crews, especially in long duration human space explorations. For this reason, they will be protected by radiation shielding that fragments the GCR heavy ions. Here we investigate how sensitive the crew's radiation exposure is to nuclear fragmentation cross sections at different energies. We find that in deep space cross sections between about 0.2 and 1.2 GeV/u have the strongest effect on dose equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV/u are the most important at solar maximum'. On the other hand, at the location of the International Space Station, cross sections at_higher -energies, between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV /u at solar minimum and between about 1.7 and 3.4 GeV/u'at,solar maximum, are the most important This is. due-to the average geomagnetic cutoff for the ISS orbit. We also show the effect of uncertainties in the fragmentation cross sections on the elemental energy spectra behind shielding. These results help to focus the studies of fragmentation cross sections on the proper energy range in order to improve our predictions of crew exposures.

  20. Canalers and Conservationists: The Projected Cross-Florida Canal. Instructional Activities Series IA/S-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Edward A.

    This activity is one of a series of 17 teacher-developed instructional activities for geography at the secondary-grade level described in SO 009 140. This activity investigates environmental quality employing the problem-solving technique. Using a map which shows the proposed route of the cross-Florida barge canal as a focal point, the teacher…

  1. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on the Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Z. W.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays is a major obstacle in long duration human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. We find that, in deep space, cross sections between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/u usually have the largest effect on dose-equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between 0.85 and 1.2 GeV/u have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  2. On the cross section of low-energy electron collisions on ? and ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Pol, H.; Duran, I.; Lorenzo, R.

    1997-05-01

    Recent calculations carried out by several authors on the cross sections of low-energy collisions of electrons with methane molecules show large discrepancies. We have used these cross sections to calculate the drift parameters of methane and carbon dioxide mixtures, at room temperature, by using a computing code we have written based on a modified Holstein - Boltzmann equation. The results are a very sensitive function of the cross sections we used, so we can modify them in order to obtain the best fit with the existing experimental data. In methane, we have found that the theoretical approach recently published by Althorpe et al is much more suitable than the others previously published. In the case of carbon dioxide, our best fits suggest cross section profiles that behave like previous results from Palladino and Sadoulet. We emphasize the importance of the analysis of mixtures with argon in the determination of the cross sections of the cold gases.

  3. The demagnetizing energies of a uniformly magnetized cylinder with an elliptic cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, D. A.; Rowlands, G.

    2003-12-01

    Analytic expressions for the demagnetizing energies are obtained in the form of partial series, for long elliptic cylinders and for squat ones where the ellipticity of the cross-section is unrestrained. This leaves just a small range where the demagnetizing energies are not well defined. It is found that by replacing the elliptic cylinders with rectangular blocks, a good approximation to the demagnetizing energy may be made in this small range.

  4. Cross sections of high-energy hadron interactions in LLA QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryskin, M. G.; Shabelski, Yu. M.

    1992-06-01

    Total, total elastic and diffraction dissociation cross sections ofpp(bar pp) interactions are calculated in the leading logarithmic approximation of QCD in the energy regionsqrt s = 0.05 - 200TeV accounting for absorption effects at the quark level. Our calculations with very large intercept of bare pomeron (Δ>1/2) are in qualitative agreement with the data; however, we predict comparatively large cross section of double-diffraction dissociation.

  5. Energy and Mass-Number Dependence of Hadron-Nucleus Total Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohama, Akihisa; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    We thoroughly investigate how proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections depend on the target mass number A and the proton incident energy. In doing so, we systematically analyze nuclear reaction data that are sensitive to nuclear size, namely, proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections and differential elastic cross sections, using a phenomenological black-sphere approximation of nuclei that we are developing. In this framework, the radius of the black sphere is found to be a useful length scale that simultaneously accounts for the observed proton-nucleus total reaction cross section and first diffraction peak in the proton elastic differential cross section. This framework, which is shown here to be applicable to antiprotons, is expected to be applicable to any kind of projectile that is strongly attenuated in the nucleus. On the basis of a cross-section formula constructed within this framework, we find that a less familiar A1/6 dependence plays a crucial role in describing the energy dependence of proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections.

  6. Personal values and political activism: a cross-national study.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Michele; Schwartz, Shalom H; Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Schoen, Harald; Cieciuch, Jan; Silvester, Jo; Bain, Paul; Bianchi, Gabriel; Kirmanoglu, Hasan; Baslevent, Cem; Mamali, Catalin; Manzi, Jorge; Pavlopoulos, Vassilis; Posnova, Tetyana; Torres, Claudio; Verkasalo, Markku; Lönnqvist, Jan-Erik; Vondráková, Eva; Welzel, Christian; Alessandri, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Using data from 28 countries in four continents, the present research addresses the question of how basic values may account for political activism. Study 1 (N = 35,116) analyses data from representative samples in 20 countries that responded to the 21-item version of the Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ-21) in the European Social Survey. Study 2 (N = 7,773) analyses data from adult samples in six of the same countries (Finland, Germany, Greece, Israel, Poland, and United Kingdom) and eight other countries (Australia, Brazil, Chile, Italy, Slovakia, Turkey, Ukraine, and United States) that completed the full 40-item PVQ. Across both studies, political activism relates positively to self-transcendence and openness to change values, especially to universalism and autonomy of thought, a subtype of self-direction. Political activism relates negatively to conservation values, especially to conformity and personal security. National differences in the strength of the associations between individual values and political activism are linked to level of democratization.

  7. Cross-Language Activation of Phonology in Young Bilingual Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jared, Debra; Cormier, Pierre; Levy, Betty Ann; Wade-Woolley, Lesly

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether children who were learning to read simultaneously in English and French activate phonological representations from only the language in which they are reading or from both of their languages. Children in French Immersion programs in Grade 3 were asked to name aloud cognates, interlingual homographs, interlingual homophones,…

  8. The Role of Cross-Language Activation in Syntactic Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Li-Hao

    2011-01-01

    There is much evidence demonstrating that bilinguals activate lexical representations from both of their languages in a non-selective manner even in sentence context. Comparatively less research has examined the extent to which bilingual lexical representations interacts with syntactic processing in sentence context. The purpose of this study is…

  9. Energy-absorption capability and scalability of square cross section composite tube specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy square cross section tubes to study the influence of specimen geometry on the energy-absorption capability and scalability of composite materials. The tube inside width-to-wall thickness (W/t) ratio was determined to significantly affect the energy-absorption capability of composite materials. As W/t ratio decreases, the energy-absorption capability increases nonlinearly. The energy-absorption capability of Kevlar epoxy tubes was found to be geometrically scalable, but the energy-absorption capability of graphite/epoxy tubes was not geometrically scalable.

  10. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff. PMID:17316078

  11. Rotational Energy Transfer Cross Sections in N2-N2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Green, Sheldon; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotational inelastic transitions of N2 have been studied in the coupled state (CS, also called centrifugal sudden) and infinite-order-sudden (IOS) approximations, using the N2-N2 rigid-rotor potential of van der Avoird et al. For benchmarking purposes, close coupling (CC) calculations have also been carried out over a limited energy range and for even j - even j collisions only. Both the CC and CS cross sections have been obtained with and without exchange symmetry, whereas exchange is neglected in the IOS calculations. The CS results track the CC cross sections rather well. At total energies between 113 to 219 cm(exp -1) the average deviation is 14%. The deviation decrease with increasing energy, indicating that the CS approximation can be used as a substitute at higher energies when the CC calculations become impractical. Comparison between the CS and IOS cross sections at the high energy end of the CS calculation, 500 - 680 cm(exp-1), shows significant differences between the two. In addition, the IOS results exhibits sensitivity to the amount of inelasticity and the results for large DELTA J transitions are subjected to bigger errors. At total energy 113 cm(exp -1) and above, the average deviation between state-to-state cross sections calculated with even and odd exchange symmetries is 1.5%.

  12. Comparative analysis of characteristic electron energy loss spectra and inelastic scattering cross-section spectra of Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, A. S.; Igumenov, A. Yu.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Pchelyakov, O. P.; Zhigalov, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra of Fe have been calculated based on experimental spectra of characteristic reflection electron energy loss as dependences of the product of the inelastic mean free path by the differential inelastic electron scattering cross section on the electron energy loss. It has been shown that the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra have certain advantages over the electron energy loss spectra in the analysis of the interaction of electrons with substance. The peaks of energy loss in the spectra of characteristic electron energy loss and inelastic electron scattering cross sections have been determined from the integral and differential spectra. It has been shown that the energy of the bulk plasmon is practically independent of the energy of primary electrons in the characteristic electron energy loss spectra and monotonically increases with increasing energy of primary electrons in the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra. The variation in the maximum energy of the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra is caused by the redistribution of intensities over the peaks of losses due to various excitations. The inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra have been analyzed using the decomposition of the spectra into peaks of the energy loss. This method has been used for the quantitative estimation of the contributions from different energy loss processes to the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra of Fe and for the determination of the nature of the energy loss peaks.

  13. Au, Bi, Co and Nb cross-section measured by quasimonoenergetic neutrons from p + 7Li reaction in the energy range of 18-36 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majerle, M.; Bém, P.; Novák, J.; Šimečková, E.; Štefánik, M.

    2016-09-01

    Au, Bi, Co and Nb samples were irradiated several times with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from p + 7Li reaction in the energy range of 18-36 MeV. The activities of the samples were measured with the HPGe detector and the reaction rates were calculated. The cross-sections were extracted using the SAND-II method with the reference cross-sections from the EAF-2010 database. The uncertainties of the final results are discussed.

  14. Endpoint behavior of high-energy scattering cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2010-11-01

    In high-energy processes near the endpoint, there emerge new contributions associated with spectator interactions. Away from the endpoint region, these new contributions are suppressed compared to the leading contribution, but the leading contribution becomes suppressed as we approach the endpoint and the new contributions become comparable. We present how the new contributions scale as we reach the endpoint and show that they are comparable to the suppressed leading contributions in deep inelastic scattering by employing a power-counting analysis. The hadronic tensor in deep inelastic scattering is shown to factorize including the spectator interactions, and it can be expressed in terms of the light cone distribution amplitudes of initial hadrons. We also consider the contribution of the spectator contributions in Drell-Yan processes. Here the spectator interactions are suppressed compared to double parton annihilation according to the power counting.

  15. Mathematical simulation of energy expenditure and recovery during sprint cross-country skiing

    PubMed Central

    Moxnes, John F; Moxnes, Eldbjørg Dirdal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A cross-country sprint competition relies on maximal effort durations of 3–4 minutes. Significant anaerobic energy contribution is expected. Anaerobic energy contribution has been estimated in different sports to date from the accumulated O2 deficit. However, the O2-deficit model can be questioned. We investigate anaerobic energy contribution by applying other methods than the O2 deficit. Methods Theoretical model development. Results For sprint cross-country competitions, the anaerobic energy contribution was 20%–25% independent of the employed mathematical model. Recovery times of a minimum 20 minutes were found to be required after sprint races to be sure that the performance in subsequent heats was not influenced. Conclusion The O2-deficit model gave anaerobic energy results in agreement with other models from the literature. Recovery times of a minimum 20 minutes were found to be required after sprint races to be sure that the performance in subsequent heats was not influenced. PMID:24966703

  16. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  17. Effect of Surface Energy Pulses on Supersonic Flow in a Channel of Variable Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of a surface pulse-periodic supply of energy on the formation of shock-wave structures in a plane channel of variable cross section has been studied. Energy is supplied to the constant cross-section units of the channel with the flow Mach number M = 2. The time-average supplied power corresponds to the combustion of hydrogen with the excess-air coefficient from 1 to 10. The problem is solved within the framework of the Euler equations. A dimensionless approach is used to analyze the effect of sources. The applicability of the analytical relations obtained is confirmed by numerical solution of two-dimensional Euler equations.

  18. Channeling Children's Energy through Vocabulary Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares vocabulary development activities for young learners. These activities channel students' energy and make learning more effective and fun. The author stresses the importance of giving young learners a good language-learning experience, and the challenges of teaching young learners who are not literate in their L1.…

  19. Lexical Activation in Bilinguals' Speech Production Is Dynamic: How Language Ambiguous Words Can Affect Cross-Language Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, Daan; Ormel, E.; van Besselaar, Ria; van Hell, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Is the bilingual language production system a dynamic system that can operate in different language activation states? Three experiments investigated to what extent cross-language phonological co-activation effects in language production are sensitive to the composition of the stimulus list. L1 Dutch-L2 English bilinguals decided whether or not a…

  20. On the Cross-Energy Cross-Pitch-Angle Coherence of Electrons in the Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Henderson, M. G.; Kletzing, C.; Redmon, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Relativistic electrons, mainly trapped in the Earth's outer radiation belt, present a highly hazardous radiation environment for electronic hardware on board satellites and spacecraft. Thus developing a predictive capability for MeV electron levels as well as understanding the physics have been deemed critical for both space research and industry communities. In this work, we first demonstrate that a high cross-energy cross-pitch-angle coherence exists between the trapped ~MeV electrons and precipitating ~100s KeV electrons—observed respectively by Van Allen Probes and NOAA POES satellites in different orbits—by conducting a correlation survey on measurements from both high- and low-altitudes. Then, based upon the results, we further test the possibility of using a linear prediction filter model, driven by POES observations from low-Earth-orbits, to predict the energization of MeV electrons after geomagnetic storms, as well as the evolving distributions of MeV electrons in real time. Finally, to account for this high coherence, we provide our hypothesis based upon theoretical calculations and numerical simulations for individual events using diffusion codes with realistic particle and wave inputs from missions including Van Allen Probes. Results from this study unveil new knowledge on radiation belt dynamics, add new science significance to a long existing space infrastructure, and provide practical and useful tools to the whole space community.

  1. High-energy behavior of photon, neutrino, and proton cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles, Carlos A.; Halzen, Francis; Wille, Logan; Kroll, Mike; Reno, Mary Hall

    2015-10-01

    By combining the color dipole model of the nucleon with the assumption that cross sections behave asymptotically as ln2(s ), we are able to describe the data for photon, neutrino and hadron interactions with protons at all energies; s is the center-of-mass energy of the interacting particles. Specifically, we extrapolate the perturbative QCD calculations into the regime of small fractional parton momenta x using a color dipole description of the proton target that guarantees an asymptotic ln2(s ) behavior of all cross sections. The ambiguity of introducing a parametrization associated with the dipole approximation is mitigated by the requirement that the saturation of the small-x structure functions produce ln2(s )-behaved asymptotic cross sections, in agreement with the data. The same formalism allows us to calculate the cross section for the hadronic pair production of charm particles. The results, in particular those for the high-energy neutrino and charm cross sections, are relevant for evaluating the sensitivity as well as the background in neutrino telescopes.

  2. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  3. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  4. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for earth science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A teaching manual is provided to aid teachers in introducing renewable energy topics to earth science students. The main emphasis is placed on solar energy. Activities for the student include a study of the greenhouse effect, solar gain for home heating, measuring solar radiation, and the construction of a model solar still to obtain fresh water. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate a solar still, the greenhouse effect and measurement of the altitude and azimuth of the sun are included. (BCS)

  5. Cross section for production of low-energy electron-positron pairs by relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eby, P. B.

    1991-01-01

    Starting with the lowest-order unscreened QED matrix element for electron-positron pair production by heavy charged particles, the paper calculates the cross section for this process differential in all independent variables and valid for all pair energies small compared to the incident particle energy. Integration over the possible emission angles of one of the pair members gives an expression that is valid for low-energy pairs that can be compared with previous work based on the Weizsaecker-Williams method. Integration over the possible angles of the other pair member then yields an expression identical to one derived by Racah. The high energy-transfer limit of the expression for the cross section integrated over electron and positron angles is found to be identical to that of Kelner in the unscreened case.

  6. Validation Analyses of IEAF-2001 Activation Cross-Section Data for SS-316 and F82H Steels Irradiated in a White d-Li Neutron Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Fischer, U.; v. Möllendorff, U.; Schmuck, I.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.; Wilson, P. P. H.

    2005-05-01

    The evaluated intermediate-energy activation cross-section library IEAF-2001 has been tested against integral experiments with SS-316 and F82H steels exposed to a white neutron flux spectrum extending up to 55 MeV. By making use of the ALARA inventory code the expected γ-active product nuclide inventories were calculated and compared with the measured one. It was found that IEAF-2001 reasonably agrees with experimental data for most of the detected radioisotopes. The reasons for some larger disagreements were found to be the uncertainty of the sample elemental composition, non-validated neutron activation reaction cross sections, and sequential charge particle reactions.

  7. Free molecular collision cross section calculation methods for nanoparticles and complex ions with energy accommodation

    SciTech Connect

    Larriba, Carlos Hogan, Christopher J.

    2013-10-15

    The structures of nanoparticles, macromolecules, and molecular clusters in gas phase environments are often studied via measurement of collision cross sections. To directly compare structure models to measurements, it is hence necessary to have computational techniques available to calculate the collision cross sections of structural models under conditions matching measurements. However, presently available collision cross section methods contain the underlying assumption that collision between gas molecules and structures are completely elastic (gas molecule translational energy conserving) and specular, while experimental evidence suggests that in the most commonly used background gases for measurements, air and molecular nitrogen, gas molecule reemission is largely inelastic (with exchange of energy between vibrational, rotational, and translational modes) and should be treated as diffuse in computations with fixed structural models. In this work, we describe computational techniques to predict the free molecular collision cross sections for fixed structural models of gas phase entities where inelastic and non-specular gas molecule reemission rules can be invoked, and the long range ion-induced dipole (polarization) potential between gas molecules and a charged entity can be considered. Specifically, two calculation procedures are described detail: a diffuse hard sphere scattering (DHSS) method, in which structures are modeled as hard spheres and collision cross sections are calculated for rectilinear trajectories of gas molecules, and a diffuse trajectory method (DTM), in which the assumption of rectilinear trajectories is relaxed and the ion-induced dipole potential is considered. Collision cross section calculations using the DHSS and DTM methods are performed on spheres, models of quasifractal aggregates of varying fractal dimension, and fullerene like structures. Techniques to accelerate DTM calculations by assessing the contribution of grazing gas

  8. Crossing statistic: Bayesian interpretation, model selection and resolving dark energy parametrization problem

    SciTech Connect

    Shafieloo, Arman

    2012-05-01

    By introducing Crossing functions and hyper-parameters I show that the Bayesian interpretation of the Crossing Statistics [1] can be used trivially for the purpose of model selection among cosmological models. In this approach to falsify a cosmological model there is no need to compare it with other models or assume any particular form of parametrization for the cosmological quantities like luminosity distance, Hubble parameter or equation of state of dark energy. Instead, hyper-parameters of Crossing functions perform as discriminators between correct and wrong models. Using this approach one can falsify any assumed cosmological model without putting priors on the underlying actual model of the universe and its parameters, hence the issue of dark energy parametrization is resolved. It will be also shown that the sensitivity of the method to the intrinsic dispersion of the data is small that is another important characteristic of the method in testing cosmological models dealing with data with high uncertainties.

  9. Cross sections for elastic electron scattering by tetramethylsilane in the intermediate-energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Sugohara, R. T.; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Souza, G. L. C. de; Homem, M. G. P.

    2011-12-15

    Organosilicon compounds are of current interest due to the numerous applications of these species in industries. Some of these applications require the knowledge of electron collision cross sections, which are scarce for such compounds. In this work, we report absolute values of differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic electron scattering by tetramethylsilane (TMS) measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range. The relative-flow technique is used to normalize our data. In addition, the independent-atom-model (IAM) and the additivity rule (AR), widely used to model electron collisions with light hydrocarbons, are also applied for e{sup -}-TMS interaction. The comparison of our measured results of cross sections and the calculated data shows good agreement, particularly near the higher-end of incident energies.

  10. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-01

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  11. 75 FR 11938 - Chart Energy and Chemicals, Inc., La Crosse, WI; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Chart Energy and Chemicals, Inc., La Crosse, WI; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated in response to a petition filed...

  12. Measuring Neutron-Proton Radiative Capture Cross-section at Low Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, To Chin; Kovash, Michael; Matthews, June; Yang, Hongwei; Yang, Yunjie

    2015-10-01

    The experiment aims to fill in a gap in our data for the cross-section of neutron-proton radiative capture (p(n,d γ)) at energies below 500 keV. Current measurements in this energy range are scarce and inconsistent with theoretical predictions and with each other. A well-determined cross-section of the capture reaction in the low energy range is useful in nuclear physics due to its fundamental nature. The measurement is also of interest in cosmology. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), the process by which light elements are formed in early universe, is very sensitive to the p(n,d γ) cross-section in the low energy range. The measurement enables us to put tighter constraints on the theoretical predictions of BBN. We have conducted preliminary measurements in the van de Graaff accelerator facility at the University of Kentucky. Our array of detectors consists of three plastic scintillators to serve as proton targets and deuteron detectors, and five BGO scintillators to detect γ-rays. The combination results in an over-determination of reaction kinematics that discriminates against scattering processes and other backgrounds. We have obtained some early results which show promise for the precise measurement of the p(n,d γ) cross-section.

  13. Cross Section Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Including Secondary Neutron Energy and Angular Distributions.

    1991-03-12

    Version 00 SUSD calculates sensitivity coefficients for one- and two-dimensional transport problems. Variance and standard deviation of detector responses or design parameters can be obtained using cross-section covariance matrices. In neutron transport problems, this code can perform sensitivity-uncertainty analysis for secondary angular distribution (SAD) or secondary energy distribution (SED).

  14. Conservation Activities Related to Energy: Energy Activities for Urban Elementary Students, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Joan S.; And Others

    Presented are simple activities, experiments, and demonstrations relating to energy conservation in the home. Activities are divided into four areas: (1) kitchen, (2) house, (3) transportation, and (4) heating and cooling. The material has been designed to require a minimum of preparation. Activity and game masters are provided. Activities may be…

  15. Determination of (n,γ) Cross Sections of 241Am by Cold Neutron Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genreith, C.; Rossbach, M.; Révay, Zs.; Kudejova, P.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate cross section data of actinides are crucial for criticality calculations of GEN IV reactors and transmutation but also for analytical purposes such as nuclear waste characterization, decommissioning of nuclear installations and safeguard applications. Tabulated data are inconsistent and sometimes associated with large uncertainties. Neutron activation with external cold neutron beams from high flux reactors offers a chance for determination of accurate capture cross sections scalable to the whole 1/√{E}-region even for isotopes with low-lying resonances like 241Am. Preparation of 241Am samples for irradiation at the PGAA station of the FRM II in Garching has been optimized together with PTB in Braunschweig. Two samples were irradiated together with gold flux monitors to extract the thermal neutron capture cross section after appropriate corrections for attenuation of neutrons and photons in the sample. For one sample, the thermal ground state neutron capture cross section was measured as 663.0 ± 28.8 b. The thermal neutron capture cross section was calculated to 725.4 ± 34.4 b. For the other sample, a ground state neutron capture cross section of 649.9 ± 28.2 b was measured and a thermal neutron capture cross section of 711.1 ± 33.9 b was derived.

  16. Fluoroethylenepropylene ferroelectret films with cross-tunnel structure for piezoelectric transducers and micro energy harvesters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Sessler, Gerhard M.; Wang, Yujie

    2014-08-21

    Layered fluoroethylenepropylene (FEP) ferroelectret films with cross-tunnel structure were fabricated from sheets of FEP films by template-patterning followed by a fusion-bonding process and contact charging. The typical piezoelectric d{sub 33} coefficients, measured by a quasi-static method of samples not annealed, are in the range of 1000–3700 pC/N. The resonance behavior of the samples is analyzed by dielectric spectroscopy which also yields Young's modulus. Microphones built with such films exhibit a somewhat decreasing frequency response up to 1 kHz, an increase of the responses due to diffraction effects at higher frequencies, and eventually a peak probably due to a thickness resonance at about 40 kHz. Annealing at 125 °C indicates that the sensitivity stabilizes at about 40% of the original value. From this data, stable dynamic d{sub 33} coefficients of up to 300 pC/N can be calculated. A micro energy harvesting generator utilizing these films and based on the excitation of thickness vibrations is also described. With an active area of 4.3 cm{sup 2} and a seismic mass of 69.5 g, power up to 0.5 μW referred to an acceleration of 1 g can be generated at a frequency of 120 Hz.

  17. Fluoroethylenepropylene ferroelectret films with cross-tunnel structure for piezoelectric transducers and micro energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Sessler, Gerhard M.; Wang, Yujie

    2014-08-01

    Layered fluoroethylenepropylene (FEP) ferroelectret films with cross-tunnel structure were fabricated from sheets of FEP films by template-patterning followed by a fusion-bonding process and contact charging. The typical piezoelectric d33 coefficients, measured by a quasi-static method of samples not annealed, are in the range of 1000-3700 pC/N. The resonance behavior of the samples is analyzed by dielectric spectroscopy which also yields Young's modulus. Microphones built with such films exhibit a somewhat decreasing frequency response up to 1 kHz, an increase of the responses due to diffraction effects at higher frequencies, and eventually a peak probably due to a thickness resonance at about 40 kHz. Annealing at 125 °C indicates that the sensitivity stabilizes at about 40% of the original value. From this data, stable dynamic d33 coefficients of up to 300 pC/N can be calculated. A micro energy harvesting generator utilizing these films and based on the excitation of thickness vibrations is also described. With an active area of 4.3 cm2 and a seismic mass of 69.5 g, power up to 0.5 μW referred to an acceleration of 1 g can be generated at a frequency of 120 Hz.

  18. Application of cross-sectional time series modeling for the prediction of energy expenditure from heart rate and accelerometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate estimation of energy expenditure (EE) in children and adolescents is required for a better understanding of physiological, behavioral, and environmental factors affecting energy balance. Cross-sectional time series (CSTS) models, which account for correlation structure of repeated observati...

  19. BFKL evolution and the growth with energy of exclusive J /Ψ and ϒ photoproduction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, I.; Fernandez Tellez, A.; Hentschinski, M.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate whether the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) low x evolution equation is capable to describe the energy dependence of the exclusive photo-production cross-section of vector mesons J /Ψ and ϒ on protons. Such cross-sections have been measured by both HERA experiments H1 and ZEUS in electron-proton collisions and by LHC experiments ALICE, CMS and LHCb in ultra-peripheral proton-proton and ultra-peripheral proton-lead collisions. Our approach provides a perturbative description of the rise with energy and relies only on a fit of the initial transverse momentum profile of the proton impact factor, which can be extracted from BFKL fits to inclusive HERA data. We find that BFKL evolution is capable to provide a very good description of the energy dependence of the current data set, while the available fits of the proton impact factor require an adjustment in the overall normalization.

  20. Neutrino energy reconstruction and the shape of the charged current quasielastic-like total cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, J.; Sánchez, F.; Simo, I. Ruiz; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2012-06-01

    We show that because of the multinucleon mechanism effects, the algorithm used to reconstruct the neutrino energy is not adequate when dealing with quasielastic-like events, and a distortion of the total flux-unfolded cross-section shape is produced. This amounts to a redistribution of strength from high to low energies, which gives rise to a sizable excess (deficit) of low (high) energy neutrinos. This distortion of the shape leads to a good description of the MiniBooNE unfolded charged current quasielastic-like cross sections published by A. A. Aguilar-Arevalo [(MiniBooNE Collaboration), Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 81, 092005 (2010)]10.1103/PhysRevD.81.092005. However, these changes in the shape are artifacts of the unfolding process that ignores multinucleon mechanisms.

  1. NEUTRON CROSS SECTION COVARIANCES FROM THERMAL ENERGY TO 20 MeV.

    SciTech Connect

    ROCHMAN,D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; MUGHABGHAB, S.F.; PIGNI, M.; KAWANO, T.

    2007-04-27

    We describe new method for energy-energy covariance calculation from the thermal energy up to 20 MeV. It is based on three powerful basic components: (i) Atlas of Neutron Resonances in the resonance region; (ii) the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE in the unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions, and (iii) the Bayesian code KALMAN for correlations and error propagation. Examples for cross section uncertainties and correlations on {sup 90}Zr and {sup 193}Ir illustrate this approach in the resonance and fast neutron regions.

  2. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T. P. T.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  3. Cross-language Activation and the Phonetics of Code-switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, Page Elizabeth

    It is now well established that bilinguals have both languages activated to some degree at all times. This cross-language activation has been documented in several research paradigms, including picture naming, reading, and electrophysiological studies. What is less well understood is how the degree a language is activated can vary in different language environments or contexts. Furthermore, when investigating effects of order of acquisition and language dominance, past research has been mixed, as the two variables are often conflated. In this dissertation, I test how degree of cross-language activation can vary according to context by examining phonetic productions in code-switching speech. Both spontaneous speech and scripted speech are analyzed. Follow-up perception experiments are conducted to see if listeners are able to anticipate language switches, potentially due to the phonetic cues in the signal. Additionally, by focusing on early bilinguals who are L1 Spanish but English dominant, I am able to see what plays a greater role in cross-language activation, order of acquisition or language dominance. I find that speakers do have intermediate phonetic productions in code-switching contexts relative to monolingual contexts. Effects are larger and more consistent in English than Spanish. Similar effects are found in speech perception. Listeners are able to anticipate language switches from English to Spanish but not Spanish to English. Together these results suggest that language dominance is a more important factor than order of acquisition in cross-language activation for early bilinguals. Future models on bilingual language organization and access should take into account both context and language dominance when modeling degrees of cross-language activation.

  4. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of the junior high science curriculum. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  5. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of earth science experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further study; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  6. Energy Activities for Junior High Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Energy Agency, St. Paul.

    The document contains seven learning activities for junior high students on the energy situation. Objectives are to help students gain understanding and knowledge about the relationships between humans and their social and physical environments; solve problems and clarify issues; examine personal beliefs and values; and recognize the relationships…

  7. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Chemistry & Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of chemistry and physics experiments. Each unit presents an introduction to the unit; objectives; required skills and knowledge; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet.…

  8. On the cross-helicity dependence of the energy spectrum in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, J. J.

    2011-01-15

    Phenomenological theories of strong incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence derived by Goldreich and Sridhar (GS) in 1995 and by Boldyrev in 2006 are only applicable to turbulence with vanishing cross-helicity. In this study, these two theories are generalized to treat turbulence with nonvanishing cross-helicity in such a way that the relation (w{sup +}/w{sup -}){sup 2}=({epsilon}{sup +}/{epsilon}{sup -}){sup 2} observed in numerical simulations is satisfied. The average energy (second order structure function) in the generalized GS theory is E(r{sub perpendicular})={phi}{sub 1}({sigma}{sub c})({epsilon}r{sub perpendicular}){sup 2/3} and that in the generalized Boldyrev theory is E(r{sub perpendicular})={phi}{sub 2}({sigma}{sub c})(v{sub A{epsilon}}r{sub perpendicular}){sup 1/2}, where the function {phi}({sigma}{sub c}) describes the dependence on the normalized cross-helicity {sigma}{sub c}. The form of the function {phi}({sigma}{sub c}) is derived through a renormalization of the variable {sigma}{sub c} that yields a one parameter family of solutions. The theory derived by Lithwick, Goldreich, and Sridhar (LGS) in 2007 is a special case of the generalized GS theory derived here; however, other generalizations of the GS theory are obtained that have a different cross-helicity dependence than the LGS theory. This new class of solutions and similar generalizations of Boldyrev's theory are investigated to see how the energy cascade rate {epsilon} changes as a function of {sigma}{sub c} when the energy at a given scale is held fixed. The generalization of Boldyrev's theory derived here is applicable to homogeneous MHD turbulence in the solar wind, for example, and can be used to obtain the turbulent dissipation rate {epsilon} from measurements of the energy spectrum and the normalized cross-helicity.

  9. Neutron capture cross-section measurement for the 186W(n,gamma)187W reaction at 0.0536eV energy.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M S; Chowdhury, M H; Hossain, S M; Latif, Sk A; Hafiz, M A; Islam, M A; Zakaria, A K M; Azharul Islam, S M

    2008-09-01

    The thermal neutron-induced activation cross section for the (186)W(n,gamma)(187)W reaction was measured at 0.0536eV neutron energy using TRIGA Mark-II research reactor, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au monitor reaction induced in a high-purity gold foil was used to determine the effective neutron beam intensity. The activities induced in sample and monitor foils were measured nondestructively by a high-resolution HPGe gamma-ray detector. The present experimental cross-section value is the first one at 0.0536eV. The obtained new cross section that amounts to 26.6+/-1.6b is 2% higher than the recently reported data in ENDF/B-VII and 5% lower than that of JENDL-3.3. PMID:18325774

  10. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  11. AHEAD: Integrated Activities in the High Energy Astrophysics Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Luigi; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ahead Consortium

    2015-09-01

    AHEAD (Integrated Activities in the High Energy Astrophysics Domain) is a forthcoming project approved in the framework of the European Horizon 2020 program (Research Infrastructures for High Energy Astrophysics). The overall objective of AHEAD is to integrate national efforts in high-energy Astrophysics and to promote the domain at the European level, to keep its community at the cutting edge of science and technology and ensure that space observatories for high-energy astrophysics, with particular regard to Athena, are at the state of the art. AHEAD will integrate key research infrastructures for on-ground test and calibration of space-based sensors and electronics and promote their coordinated use. In parallel, the best facilities for data analysis of high-energy astrophysical observatories will be made available to the European community. The technological development will focus on the improvement of selected critical technologies, background modeling, cross calibration, and feasibility studies of space-based instrumentation for the benefit of future high energy missions like Athena, and the best exploitation of existing observatories. AHEAD will support the community via grants for collaborative studies, dissemination of results, and promotion of workshops. A strong public outreach package will ensure that the domain is well publicized at national, European and International level. Networking, joint research activities and access to infrastructures as devised in AHEAD, will serve to establish strong connections between institutes and industry to create the basis for a more rapid advancement of high-energy astrophysical science, space oriented instrumentation and cutting-edge sensor technology in Europe. This enables the development of new technologies and the associated growth of the European technology market with a dedicated technology innovation package, as well as the creation of a new generation of researchers.

  12. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G.; Nixon, K. L.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  13. Cross sections and barriers for nuclear fission induced by high-energy nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Yavshits, S. G.

    2013-03-15

    The cross sections for the fission of {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu target nuclei that was induced by 20- to 1000-MeV neutrons and protons were calculated. The respective calculations were based on the multiconfiguration-fission (MCFx) model, which was used to describe three basic stages of the interaction of high-energy nucleons with nuclei: direct processes (intranuclear cascade), equilibration of the emerging compound system, and the decay of the compound nucleus (statistical model). Fission barriers were calculated within the microscopic approach for isotopic chains formed by 15 to 20 nuclei of the required elements. The calculated fission cross sections were compared with available experimental data. It was shown that the input data set and the theoretical model used made it possible to predict satisfactorily cross section for nuclear fission induced by 20- to 1000-MeV nucleons.

  14. NEUTRON CROSS SECTION EVALUATIONS OF FISSION PRODUCTS BELOW THE FAST ENERGY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    OH,S.Y.; CHANG,J.; MUGHABGHAB,S.

    2000-05-11

    Neutron cross section evaluations of the fission-product isotopes, {sup 95}Mo, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 101}Ru, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 105}Pd, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 131}Xe, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 141}Pr, {sup 141}Nd, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 155}Gd, and {sup 157}Gd were carried out below the fast neutron energy region within the framework of the BNL-KAERI international collaboration. In the thermal energy region, the energy dependence of the various cross-sections was calculated by applying the multi-level Breit-Wigner formalism. In particular, the strong energy dependence of the coherent scattering lengths of {sup 155}Gd and {sup 157}Gd were determined and were compared with recent calculations of Lynn and Seeger. In the resonance region, the recommended resonance parameters, reported in the BNL compilation, were updated by considering resonance parameter information published in the literature since 1981. The s-wave and, if available, p-wave reduced neutron widths were analyzed in terms of the Porter-Thomas distribution to determine the average level spacings and the neutron strength functions. Average radiative widths were also calculated from measured values of resolved energy resonances. The average resonance parameters determined in this study were compared with those in the BNL and other compilations, as well as the ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2.2, and JENDL-3.2 data libraries. The unresolved capture cross sections of these isotopes, computed with the determined average resonance parameters, were compared with measurements, as well as the ENDF/B-VI evaluations. To achieve agreement with the measurements, in a few cases minor adjustments in the average resonance parameters were made. Because of astrophysical interest, the Maxwellian capture cross sections of these nuclides at a neutron temperature of 30 keV were computed and were compared with other compilations and evaluations.

  15. Students' Evaluation of Google Hangouts through a Cross-Cultural Group Discussion Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Michiko

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated perceived ease of use and usefulness of Google Hangouts as an instructional/learning tool. Forty-two teacher education students at U.S and Japanese universities participated in an online cross-cultural activity using Google Hangouts and discussed cultural differences between the two countries and their teaching philosophies.…

  16. Acquisition of Compound Words in Chinese-English Bilingual Children: Decomposition and Cross-Language Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chenxi; Wang, Min; Perfetti, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated compound processing and cross-language activation in a group of Chinese-English bilingual children, and they were divided into four groups based on the language proficiency levels in their two languages. A lexical decision task was designed using compound words in both languages. The compound words in one language contained…

  17. 48 CFR 1852.228-76 - Cross-waiver of liability for space station activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... broad cross-waiver provision to encourage participation in the exploration and use of outer space... for space station activities. 1852.228-76 Section 1852.228-76 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND...

  18. Power Perceptions and Negotiations in a Cross-National Email Writing Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yichun

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates EFL students' perceptions of power differentials and their negotiation strategies when communicating with native English-speaking students via emails. The study involved 28 Taiwanese and American undergraduates who participated in a semester-long cross-national email writing activity. Findings show that students in…

  19. Signal intensity, clinical activity and cross-sectional areas on MRI scans in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Mayer, E J; Fox, D L; Herdman, G; Hsuan, J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P; Potts, M J; Lee, R W J

    2005-10-01

    The signal intensity from inflamed extra-ocular muscles on short tau inversion recovery (STIR)-sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is known to correlate with clinical scores of thyroid eye disease (TED) severity. Twenty-one patients who had undergone repeated MRI scanning for TED were studied retrospectively. Signal intensity of extra-ocular muscles (from STIR-sequence MRI) and cross-sectional area (from STIR and T1 MRI) were correlated with Mourits' clinical activity score (CAS). The area of highest signal intensity within the most inflamed extra-ocular muscle, and the average cross-sectional signal intensity of the most inflamed extra-ocular muscle reliably correlated with CAS, and this was maintained as disease activity changed over time. In contrast, isolated measures of muscle cross-sectional area did not correlate with CAS. The extra-ocular muscle cross-sectional area calculated from STIR-sequence MR images was greater than that measured on T1 images. This suggests that muscle area from STIR-sequence MRI may also detect peri-muscular inflammation. We conclude that the peak signal intensity from the most inflamed extra-ocular muscle remains the most reliable correlate of clinical disease activity obtained from these images. STIR-sequence MRI scans provide a number of useful measures of disease activity in TED.

  20. Cross-Language Activation in Children's Speech Production: Evidence from Second Language Learners, Bilinguals, and Trilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poarch, Gregory J.; van Hell, Janet G.

    2012-01-01

    In five experiments, we examined cross-language activation during speech production in various groups of bilinguals and trilinguals who differed in nonnative language proficiency, language learning background, and age. In Experiments 1, 2, 3, and 5, German 5- to 8-year-old second language learners of English, German-English bilinguals,…

  1. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  2. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  3. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites.

  4. Low energy stopping cross section of light ions in light gases using time of flight techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrejcic, David

    Electronic stopping occurs when an energetic particle interacts with the electrons of a target material, causing charge exchange, excitation, and ionization of the atomic electrons and a corresponding energy loss for the impinging particle. Charge exchange between the projectile and target, in the form of electron capture and electron stripping, is the dominant mode of energy transfer for low energy projectiles in the keV region. In the case of protons in Helium gas, the difference between the ground state energy level of an ionized H atom and the first ionization energy of a Helium atom is large (11.0 eV), and so the process of electron capture is suppressed at very low energy. This leads to a reduction in the stopping cross section near this threshold, and a resultant deviation from the velocity proportionality which is otherwise characteristic of this low energy regime. The present work uses time-of-flight techniques to directly measure the stopping cross section of various target gases for the light ions H +, D+, and He+ using projectile energies between 2.4 -- 22 keV/u. Measurements are obtained using a low-energy linear accelerator fed by an RF ion source at the Colorado School of Mines Department of Physics. System accuracy is checked with a projectile-target pair which has been well measured in the past using gaseous targets in the energy regime of interest (He+-N2). Data is then accumulated for several projectile-target pairs (H+-He, D+-He, H+-N 2, D+-N2, H+-Ne, D+ -Ne, He+-H2, He+-He, He +-Ne). Results show that the stopping cross section of H+, D+ in He does exhibit a threshold effect for projectile energies lower than ˜20 keV/u. This work provides an independent measurement of this interaction, for which we find only two previous data sets below the threshold energy, and whose results differ by an order of magnitude below 6 keV/u. This work also provides measurements of several other projectile-target pairs for which there exist only limited

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and Antibacterial Activity of Cross-Linked Chitosan-Glutaraldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Shan, Chang-Lin; Zhou, Qing; Fang, Yuan; Wang, Yang-Li; Xu, Fei; Han, Li-Rong; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Guo, Long-Biao; Xie, Guan-Lin; Sun, Guo-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This present study deals with synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of cross-linked chitosan-glutaraldehyde. Results from this study indicated that cross-linked chitosan-glutaraldehyde markedly inhibited the growth of antibiotic-resistant Burkholderia cepacia complex regardless of bacterial species and incubation time while bacterial growth was unaffected by solid chitosan. Furthermore, high temperature treated cross-linked chitosan-glutaraldehyde showed strong antibacterial activity against the selected strain 0901 although the inhibitory effects varied with different temperatures. In addition, physical-chemical and structural characterization revealed that the cross-linking of chitosan with glutaraldehyde resulted in a rougher surface morphology, a characteristic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) band at 1559 cm−1, a specific X-ray diffraction peak centered at 2θ = 15°, a lower contents of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, and a higher stability of glucose units compared to chitosan based on scanning electron microscopic observation, FTIR spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern, as well as elemental and thermo gravimetric analysis. Overall, this study indicated that cross-linked chitosan-glutaraldehyde is promising to be developed as a new antibacterial drug. PMID:23670533

  6. Cross-layer cluster-based energy-efficient protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Mammu, Aboobeker Sidhik Koyamparambil; Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; Sainz, Nekane; de la Iglesia, Idoia

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in electronics and wireless communications have enabled the improvement of low-power and low-cost wireless sensors networks (WSNs). One of the most important challenges in WSNs is to increase the network lifetime due to the limited energy capacity of the network nodes. Another major challenge in WSNs is the hot spots that emerge as locations under heavy traffic load. Nodes in such areas quickly drain energy resources, leading to disconnection in network services. In such an environment, cross-layer cluster-based energy-efficient algorithms (CCBE) can prolong the network lifetime and energy efficiency. CCBE is based on clustering the nodes to different hexagonal structures. A hexagonal cluster consists of cluster members (CMs) and a cluster head (CH). The CHs are selected from the CMs based on nodes near the optimal CH distance and the residual energy of the nodes. Additionally, the optimal CH distance that links to optimal energy consumption is derived. To balance the energy consumption and the traffic load in the network, the CHs are rotated among all CMs. In WSNs, energy is mostly consumed during transmission and reception. Transmission collisions can further decrease the energy efficiency. These collisions can be avoided by using a contention-free protocol during the transmission period. Additionally, the CH allocates slots to the CMs based on their residual energy to increase sleep time. Furthermore, the energy consumption of CH can be further reduced by data aggregation. In this paper, we propose a data aggregation level based on the residual energy of CH and a cost-aware decision scheme for the fusion of data. Performance results show that the CCBE scheme performs better in terms of network lifetime, energy consumption and throughput compared to low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH) and hybrid energy-efficient distributed clustering (HEED).

  7. Cross-Layer Cluster-Based Energy-Efficient Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mammu, Aboobeker Sidhik Koyamparambil; Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; Sainz, Nekane; de la Iglesia, Idoia

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in electronics and wireless communications have enabled the improvement of low-power and low-cost wireless sensors networks (WSNs). One of the most important challenges in WSNs is to increase the network lifetime due to the limited energy capacity of the network nodes. Another major challenge in WSNs is the hot spots that emerge as locations under heavy traffic load. Nodes in such areas quickly drain energy resources, leading to disconnection in network services. In such an environment, cross-layer cluster-based energy-efficient algorithms (CCBE) can prolong the network lifetime and energy efficiency. CCBE is based on clustering the nodes to different hexagonal structures. A hexagonal cluster consists of cluster members (CMs) and a cluster head (CH). The CHs are selected from the CMs based on nodes near the optimal CH distance and the residual energy of the nodes. Additionally, the optimal CH distance that links to optimal energy consumption is derived. To balance the energy consumption and the traffic load in the network, the CHs are rotated among all CMs. In WSNs, energy is mostly consumed during transmission and reception. Transmission collisions can further decrease the energy efficiency. These collisions can be avoided by using a contention-free protocol during the transmission period. Additionally, the CH allocates slots to the CMs based on their residual energy to increase sleep time. Furthermore, the energy consumption of CH can be further reduced by data aggregation. In this paper, we propose a data aggregation level based on the residual energy of CH and a cost-aware decision scheme for the fusion of data. Performance results show that the CCBE scheme performs better in terms of network lifetime, energy consumption and throughput compared to low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH) and hybrid energy-efficient distributed clustering (HEED). PMID:25860073

  8. 14 CFR 1266.102 - Cross-waiver of liability for agreements for activities related to the International Space Station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cross-waiver of liability for agreements for activities related to the International Space Station. 1266.102 Section 1266.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION CROSS-WAIVER OF LIABILITY § 1266.102 Cross-waiver...

  9. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and, as a result, crew members ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVAs, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVAs through the Apollo Program.

  10. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and crewmembers (CMs) ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVA, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVA through the Apollo program.

  11. TeV strings and the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultrahigh energies.

    PubMed

    Cornet, F; Illana, J I; Masip, M

    2001-05-01

    In scenarios with the fundamental unification scale at the TeV one expects string excitations of the standard model fields at accessible energies. We study the neutrino-nucleon cross section in these models. We show that duality of the scattering amplitude forces the existence of a tower of massive leptoquarks that mediate the process in the s channel. Using the narrow-width approximation we find a sum rule for the production rate of resonances with different spin at each mass level. We show that these contributions can increase substantially the standard model neutrino-nucleon cross section, although they seem insufficient to explain the cosmic ray events above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min cutoff energy. PMID:11328143

  12. Comparative study of tip cross-sections for efficient galloping energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yaowen; Zhao, Liya; Tang, Lihua

    2013-02-01

    This letter presents a comparative study of different tip cross-sections for small scale wind energy harvesting based on galloping phenomenon. A prototype device is fabricated with a piezoelectric cantilever and a tip body with various cross-section profiles (square, rectangle, triangle, and D-shape) and tested in a wind tunnel. Experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the square-sectioned tip for the low cut-in wind speed of 2.5 m/s and the high peak power of 8.4 mW. An analytical model is established and verified by the experimental results. It is recommended that the square section should be used for small wind galloping energy harvesters.

  13. Catalysts for cross-coupling reactions with non-activated alkyl halides.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Anja C; Beller, Matthias

    2005-01-21

    Despite the problems inherent to metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with alkyl halides, these reactions have become increasingly important during the last few years. Detailed mechanistic investigations have led to a variety of novel procedures for the selective cross-coupling of non-activated alkyl halides bearing beta hydrogen atoms with a variety of organometallic nucleophiles under mild reaction conditions. This Minireview highlights selected examples of metal-catalyzed coupling methods and is intended to encourage chemists to exploit the potential of these approaches in organic synthesis.

  14. Cross-linking and modification of cytochrome c with redox-active metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukes, A.

    1991-05-02

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first part shows that a redox-active trinuclear metal cluster may be used as a cross-linking reagent for proteins. Electron transfer is observed in the protein oligomers. The second part involves labelling the cysteine residue of baker's yeast cytochrome c with chloromercuriferrocene. Chloromercuriferrocene reacts with cytochrome c in two interesting ways. Symmetrization produces two products; two proteins cross-linked with mercury and diferrocenylmercury. Simple substitution of FeHgCl onto the protein followed by the addition of a proton by electrophilic substitution affords ferrocene and the mercuric chloride modified protein. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Review of total cross sections and forward scattering parameters at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M.; White, A.R.

    1991-10-01

    We review the field of the elastic scattering of pp and {bar p}p at the ultra-high energies. The recent total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}, and {rho}-value results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider experiments presented at the 4th `Blois` Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering (Elba, Italy, in May, 1991), allow us a comprehensive overview of the field. 24 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Review of total cross sections and forward scattering parameters at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); White, A.R. . High Energy Physics Div.)

    1991-10-01

    We review the field of the elastic scattering of pp and {bar p}p at the ultra-high energies. The recent total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}, and {rho}-value results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider experiments presented at the 4th Blois' Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering (Elba, Italy, in May, 1991), allow us a comprehensive overview of the field. 24 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. MCNP Continuous-Energy Neutron Cross Section Libraries for Temperatures from 300 to 1365K.

    2001-04-19

    Version 00 UTXS is a project whereby continuous-energy cross section libraries in ACE format suitable for the MCNP code were generated using the NJOY94.105 processing code. Libraries for various materials were generated at typical operating temperatures of the US Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), and the Russian PWR (VVER) as well as libraries for other non-reactor applications such as nuclear medicine.

  18. Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    Switching on clean energy technologies means strengthening the economy while protecting the environment. This activity book for all ages promotes energy awareness, with facts on different types of energy and a variety of puzzles in an energy theme.

  19. Active Control by Conservation of Energy Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Three unrelated experiments are discussed; each was extremely sensitive to initial conditions. The initial conditions are the beginnings of the origins of the information that nonlinearity displays. Initial conditions make the phenomenon unstable and unpredictable. With the knowledge of the initial conditions, active control requires far less power than that present in the system response. The first experiment is on the control of shocks from an axisymmetric supersonic jet; the second, control of a nonlinear panel response forced by turbulent boundary layer and sound; the third, control of subharmonic and harmonics of a panel forced by sound. In all three experiments, control is achieved by redistribution of periodic energy response such that the energy is nearly preserved from a previous uncontrolled state. This type of active control improves the performance of the system being controlled.

  20. Raster image cross-correlation analysis for spatiotemporal visualization of intracellular degradation activities against exogenous DNAs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Jin, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-09-24

    Reducing intracellular DNA degradation is critical to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy. Exogenous DNA incorporation into cells is strictly blocked by the defense machinery of intracellular nuclease activity. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (cross-correlation RICS; ccRICS) are image-based correlation methods. These powerful tools allow the study of spatiotemporal molecular dynamics. Here we performed spatiotemporal ccRICS analyses of fluorescent DNA and directly monitored the process of exogenous DNA degradation in living cell cytoplasm. Such direct monitors of DNA degradation allow us to determine the fate of the exogenous DNA in living cells. On comparing the process in living cells, our study shows that cytoplasmic nuclease activity differs between cell lines; therefore, we propose that the difference of nuclease activity in cytoplasm dictates a different resistance to exogenous DNA incorporation. New insight on efficient gene delivery can be provided with our study.

  1. Raster image cross-correlation analysis for spatiotemporal visualization of intracellular degradation activities against exogenous DNAs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Jin, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Reducing intracellular DNA degradation is critical to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy. Exogenous DNA incorporation into cells is strictly blocked by the defense machinery of intracellular nuclease activity. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (cross-correlation RICS; ccRICS) are image-based correlation methods. These powerful tools allow the study of spatiotemporal molecular dynamics. Here we performed spatiotemporal ccRICS analyses of fluorescent DNA and directly monitored the process of exogenous DNA degradation in living cell cytoplasm. Such direct monitors of DNA degradation allow us to determine the fate of the exogenous DNA in living cells. On comparing the process in living cells, our study shows that cytoplasmic nuclease activity differs between cell lines; therefore, we propose that the difference of nuclease activity in cytoplasm dictates a different resistance to exogenous DNA incorporation. New insight on efficient gene delivery can be provided with our study. PMID:26400011

  2. Titanium spallation cross sections between 30 and 584 MeV and Ar-39 activities on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinburnn, F.; Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The production cross sections of Ar39 for Ti spallation at 45-, 319-, 433-, and 584-MeV proton energies were measured to be 0.37 + or - 0.09, 12.4 + or - 3.7, 9.1 + or - 2.7, and 17.8 + or - 6.2 mb, respectively. Normalized Ar39 production rates and activities are also derived for protons above 40 MeV and for three differential proton spectra of the type approximately E(- alpha). It is concluded that, even for samples of high-Ti content, Ti spallation by solar protons below 200-MeV energy does not contribute significantly to their Ar39 radioactivity.

  3. Executive control modulates cross-language lexical activation during L2 reading: evidence from eye movements.

    PubMed

    Pivneva, Irina; Mercier, Julie; Titone, Debra

    2014-05-01

    Models of bilingual reading such as Bilingual Interactive Activation Plus (Dijkstra & van Heuven, 2002) do not predict a central role for domain-general executive control during bilingual reading, in contrast with bilingual models from other domains, such as production (e.g., the Inhibitory Control Model; Green, 1998). We thus investigated whether individual differences among bilinguals in domain-general executive control modulate cross-language activation during L2 sentence reading, over and above other factors such as L2 proficiency. Fifty French-English bilinguals read L2-English sentences while their eye movements were recorded, and they subsequently completed a battery of executive control and L2 proficiency tasks. High- and low-constraint sentences contained interlingual homographs (chat = "casual conversation" in English, "a cat" in French), cognates (piano in English and French), or L2-specific control words. The results showed that greater executive control among bilinguals but not L2 proficiency reduced cross-language activation in terms of interlingual homograph interference. In contrast, increased L2 proficiency but not executive control reduced cross-language activation in terms of cognate facilitation. These results suggest that models of bilingual reading must incorporate mechanisms by which domain-general executive control can alter the earliest stages of bilingual lexical activation.

  4. Improving Cross-Cultural Training and Measurement of Cross-Cultural Learning. Volume I of the Report of Supplemental Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Research and Education, Denver, CO.

    An in-depth study of the process of adaption among Peace Corps volunteers in Brazil and cross-cultural training methodology is presented in this volume, the first of two reports resulting from the project. Since ultimate aims of cross-cultural learning tend to be described in abstract terms, the fundamental issue had to do with specifying and…

  5. Cross-modal activation of auditory regions during visuo-spatial working memory in early deafness.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Qin, Wen; Liang, Meng; Ming, Dong; Wan, Baikun; Li, Qiang; Yu, Chunshui

    2015-09-01

    Early deafness can reshape deprived auditory regions to enable the processing of signals from the remaining intact sensory modalities. Cross-modal activation has been observed in auditory regions during non-auditory tasks in early deaf subjects. In hearing subjects, visual working memory can evoke activation of the visual cortex, which further contributes to behavioural performance. In early deaf subjects, however, whether and how auditory regions participate in visual working memory remains unclear. We hypothesized that auditory regions may be involved in visual working memory processing and activation of auditory regions may contribute to the superior behavioural performance of early deaf subjects. In this study, 41 early deaf subjects (22 females and 19 males, age range: 20-26 years, age of onset of deafness < 2 years) and 40 age- and gender-matched hearing controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a visuo-spatial delayed recognition task that consisted of encoding, maintenance and recognition stages. The early deaf subjects exhibited faster reaction times on the spatial working memory task than did the hearing controls. Compared with hearing controls, deaf subjects exhibited increased activation in the superior temporal gyrus bilaterally during the recognition stage. This increased activation amplitude predicted faster and more accurate working memory performance in deaf subjects. Deaf subjects also had increased activation in the superior temporal gyrus bilaterally during the maintenance stage and in the right superior temporal gyrus during the encoding stage. These increased activation amplitude also predicted faster reaction times on the spatial working memory task in deaf subjects. These findings suggest that cross-modal plasticity occurs in auditory association areas in early deaf subjects. These areas are involved in visuo-spatial working memory. Furthermore, amplitudes of cross-modal activation during the maintenance stage were

  6. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Timothy J.; Amoyaw, Prince N. -A.; Roewe, Kimberly D.; Simpson, Natalie C.; Maples, Randall D.; Carder Freeman, TaRynn N.; Cain, Amy N.; Le, Justin G.; Archibald, Stephen J.; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, M. O. Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Using transition metals such as manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II), several new metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic chelators namely, cyclen- and cyclam-analogs with benzyl groups, were synthesized and screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The metal-free chelators tested showed little or no antimalarial activity. All the metal complexes of the dibenzyl cross-bridged cyclam ligand exhibited potent antimalarial activity. The Mn2+ complex of this ligand was the most potent with IC50s of 0.127 and 0.157 µM against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) P. falciparum strains, respectively. In general, the dibenzyl hydrophobic ligands showed better antimalarial activity compared to the activity of monobenzyl ligands, potentially because of their higher lipophilicity and thus better cell penetration ability. The higher antimalarial activity displayed by the manganese complex for the cyclam ligand in comparison to that of the cyclen, correlates with the larger pocket of cyclam compared to that of cyclen which produces a more stable complex with the Mn2+. Few of the Cu2+ and Fe2+ complexes also showed improvement in activity but Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ complexes did not show any improvement in activity upon the metal-free ligands for anti-malarial development. PMID:24857776

  7. Production cross sections of products in the proton induced reactions on natNd in the energy region up to 45 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Chul; Kim, Kwangsoo; Song, Tae-Yung; Lee, Young-Ouk; Kim, Guinyun

    2015-11-01

    The production cross sections of 141,143,144,146,148m,148g,149,150Pm, 139m,147,149Nd, 138m,142gPr, and 139gCe in the natNd(p,x) reactions were determined by a stacked-foil activation technique for the proton energy range up to 45 MeV using the MC-50 cyclotron of Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The measured cross sections were compared with literature data as well as data from the TENDL-2014 library based on TALYS 1.6. The production cross sections of the above radionuclides are slightly higher than the literature data but are in general agreement with values in TENDL-2014 library except for 148mPm, 148gPm, 139mNd, and 142gPr. The thick target integral yields of the produced radionuclides were also deducted from the measured cross sections.

  8. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  9. Track structure simulations at relativistic energies: new cross sections for HZE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingfelder, Michael

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of charged particle tracks provide detailed information on highly inhomogeneous spatial distributions of energy depositions, interaction types, and radical species produced. This information is used in Radiation Biology to explore and estimate the effects of radiation quality on biological response. Heavy charged and highly relativistic (HZE) particles are of special interest to men's vision of deep space travel. HZE particles are a component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) present in Deep Space but shielded by the Earth's magnetic field. Little is known on their action on biological matter. Monte Carlo track structure simulations follow the primary, as well as all (produced) secondary particles, event-by-event, from starting of ejection energy to total stopping. This requires reliable cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering events of the incident charged particles with the atoms and molecules of the material under consideration. Liquid water is of special interest since it serves as a substitute for soft tissue. Ionization and excitation cross sections for charged particles are normally calculated within the framework of the (relativistic) plane wave Born approximation (PWBA) or the (relativistic) Bethe approximation. In the PWBA the energyand momentum transfer doubly differential cross section can be written as kinematic factors times the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for single atoms or the dielectric response function (DF) of the material in the condensed phase. The GOS and the DF are a function of the energy transfer and momentum transfer, are independent of the incoming radiation and fully characterize the target. The GOS can be calculated from first principles while the DF is normally modeled using available experimental information and theoretical constraints. In this talk we will review and present new cross section calculations for electrons, protons and relativistic heavy ions with liquid water and other

  10. Activation cross sections of longer-lived radionuclides produced in germanium by alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Takács, M. P.; Ditrói, F.; Aikawa, M.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The cross sections of alpha particles induced nuclear reactions on natural germanium were investigated by using the standard stacked foil target technique, the activation method and high resolution gamma spectrometry. Targets with thickness of about 1 μm were prepared from natural Ge by vacuum evaporation onto 25 μm thick polyimide (Kapton) backing foils. Stacks were composed of Kapton-Ge-Ge-Kapton sandwich target foils and additional titanium monitor foils with nominal thickness of 11 μm to monitor the beam parameters using the natTi(α,x)51Cr reaction. The irradiations were done with Eα = 20.7 and Eα = 51.25 MeV, Iα = 50 nA alpha particle beams for about 1 h. Direct or cumulative activation cross sections were determined for production of the 72,73,75Se, 71,72,74,76,78As, and 69Ge radionuclides. The obtained experimental cross sections were compared to the results of theoretical calculations taken from the TENDL data library based on the TALYS computer code. A comparison was made with available experimental data measured earlier. Thick target yields were deduced from the experimental cross sections and compared with the data published before.

  11. Low energy scattering cross section ratios of 14N(p ,p ) 14N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deBoer, R. J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Görres, J.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Manukyan, K. V.; Moran, M. T.; Smith, K.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Champagne, A. E.; Islam, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    Background: The slowest reaction in the first CNO cycle is 14N(p ,γ ) 15O , therefore its rate determines the overall energy production efficiency of the entire cycle. The cross section presents several strong resonance contributions, especially for the ground-state transition. Some of the properties of the corresponding levels in the 15O compound nucleus remain uncertain, which affects the uncertainty in extrapolating the capture cross section to the low energy range of astrophysical interest. Purpose: The 14N(p ,γ ) 15O cross section can be described by using the phenomenological R matrix. Over the energy range of interest, only the proton and γ -ray channels are open. Since resonance capture makes significant contributions to the 14N(p ,γ ) 15O cross section, resonant proton scattering data can be used to provide additional constraints on the R -matrix fit of the capture data. Methods: A 4 MV KN Van de Graaff accelerator was used to bombard protons onto a windowless gas target containing enriched 14N gas over the proton energy range from Ep=1.0 to 3.0 MeV. Scattered protons were detected at θlab=90 , 120∘, 135∘, 150∘, and 160∘ using ruggedized silicon detectors. In addition, a 10 MV FN Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator was used to accelerate protons onto a solid Adenine (C5H5N5 ) target, of natural isotopic abundance, evaporated onto a thin self-supporting carbon backing, over the energy range from Ep=1.8 to 4.0 MeV. Scattered protons were detected at 28 angles between θlab=30 .4∘ and 167 .7∘ by using silicon photodiode detectors. Results: Relative cross sections were extracted from both measurements. While the relative cross sections do not provide as much constraint as absolute measurements, they greatly reduce the dependence of the data on otherwise significant systematic uncertainties, which are more difficult to quantify. The data are fit simultaneously using an R -matrix analysis and level energies and proton widths are extracted. Even

  12. Cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with energies up to 1 GeV: Analytical formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Bote, David; Salvat, Francesc Jablonski, Aleksander

    2009-11-15

    Analytical formulas are presented for the easy calculation of cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of neutral atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. Each formula contains a number of parameters that are characteristic of the element, the active electron shell and the projectile particle. The values of these parameters were determined by fitting the cross section values in an extensive database that was calculated recently by means of a composite algorithm that combines the distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations. Tables of parameter values are given for all elements, from hydrogen (Z=1) to einsteinium (Z=99). The proposed analytical expressions yield ionization cross sections that agree with those in the numerical database to within about 1%, except for projectiles with near-threshold energies.

  13. Cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with energies up to 1 GeV: Analytical formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bote, David; Salvat, Francesc; Jablonski, Aleksander; Powell, Cedric J.

    2009-11-01

    Analytical formulas are presented for the easy calculation of cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of neutral atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. Each formula contains a number of parameters that are characteristic of the element, the active electron shell and the projectile particle. The values of these parameters were determined by fitting the cross section values in an extensive database that was calculated recently by means of a composite algorithm that combines the distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations. Tables of parameter values are given for all elements, from hydrogen (Z=1) to einsteinium (Z=99). The proposed analytical expressions yield ionization cross sections that agree with those in the numerical database to within about 1%, except for projectiles with near-threshold energies.

  14. Measurement of the elastic, total and diffraction cross sections at tevatron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    The CDF collaboration has measured the differential elastic cross section d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, the single diffraction dissociation double differential cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}{sub sd}/dM{sup 2}dt and the total inelastic cross section for antiproton-proton collisions at center of mass energies {radical}s = 546 and 1,800 GeV. Data for this measurement have been collected in short dedicated runs during the 1988--1989 data taking period of CDF. The elastic scattering slope is 15.28 {+-} 0.58 (16.98 {+-} 0.25) GeV{sup {minus}2} at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV. Using the luminosity independent method (1 + {rho}{sup 2}){sigma}{sub T} is measured to be 62.64 {+-} 0.95 (81.83 {+-} 2.29) mb at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV. Assuming {rho} = 0.15 the elastic, total and single diffraction cross sections are {sigma}{sub el} = 12.87 {+-} 0.30, {sigma}{sub T} = 61.26 {+-} 0.93 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 7.89 {+-} 0.33 mb ({sigma}{sub el} = 19.70 {+-} 0.85, {sigma}{sub T} = 80.03 {+-} 2.24 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 9.46 {+-} 0.44 mb) at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV.

  15. From eV to EeV: Neutrino cross sections across energy scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formaggio, J. A.; Zeller, G. P.

    2012-07-01

    Since its original postulation by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930, the neutrino has played a prominent role in our understanding of nuclear and particle physics. In the intervening 80 years, scientists have detected and measured neutrinos from a variety of sources, both man made and natural. Underlying all of these observations, and any inferences we may have made from them, is an understanding of how neutrinos interact with matter. Knowledge of neutrino interaction cross sections is an important and necessary ingredient in any neutrino measurement. With the advent of new precision experiments, the demands on our understanding of neutrino interactions is becoming even greater. The purpose of this article is to survey our current knowledge of neutrino cross sections across all known energy scales: from the very lowest energies to the highest that we hope to observe. The article covers a wide range of neutrino interactions including coherent scattering, neutrino capture, inverse beta decay, low-energy nuclear interactions, quasielastic scattering, resonant pion production, kaon production, deep inelastic scattering, and ultrahigh energy interactions. Strong emphasis is placed on experimental data whenever such measurements are available.

  16. Excitation energy and nuclear dissipation probed with evaporation-residue cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2011-04-15

    Using a Langevin equation coupled with a statistical decay model, we calculate the excess of evaporation-residue cross sections over its standard statistical-model value as a function of nuclear dissipation strength for {sup 200}Hg compound nuclei (CNs) under two distinct types of initial conditions for populated CNs: (i) high excitation energy but low angular momentum (produced via proton-induced spallation reactions at GeV energies and via peripheral heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies) and (ii) high angular momentum but low excitation energy (produced through fusion mechanisms). We find that the conditions of case (ii) not only amplify the effect of dissipation on the evaporation residues, but also substantially increase the sensitivity of this excess to nuclear dissipation. These results suggest that, in experiments, to obtain accurate information of presaddle nuclear dissipation strength by measuring evaporation-residue cross sections, it is best to choose the heavy-ion-induced fusion reaction approach to yield excited compound nuclei.

  17. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section One - Sources of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the first goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus primarily on the availability of resources, forms of energy, natural laws, and socioeconomic considerations. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These…

  18. Crossed, Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer for Wind/Temperature Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of neutral winds and ion drifts in low-Earth-orbit missions requires measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the flux of neutrals and ions entering the satellite from the ram direction. The magnitude and direction of the neutral-wind (or ion-drift) determine the location of the maximum in the angular distribution of the flux. Knowledge of the angle of maximum flux with respect to satellite coordinates (pointing) is essential to determine the wind (or ion-drift) vector. The crossed Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) spectrometer (see Figure 1) occupies minimal volume and consumes minimal power. Designed for upper atmosphere/ionosphere investigations at Earth altitudes above 100 km, the spectrometer operates by detecting the angular and energy distributions of neutral atoms/molecules and ions in two mutually perpendicular planes. In this configuration, the two detection planes actually cross at the spectrometer center. It is possible to merge two SDEAs so they share a common optical axis and alternate measurements between two perpendicular planes, and reduce the number of ion sources from two to one. This minimizes the volume and footprint significantly and reduces the ion source power by a factor of two. The area of the entrance aperture affects the number of ions detected/second and also determines the energy resolution. Thermionic emitters require heater power of about 100 mW to produce 1 mA of electron beam current. Typically, electron energy is about 100 eV and requires a 100-V supply for electron acceleration to supply an additional 100 mW of power. Thus, ion source power is at most 200 mW. If two ion sources were to be used, the ion source power would be, at most, 400 mW. Detector power, deflection voltage power, and microcontroller and other functions require less than 150 mW. A WTS (wind/ temperature spectrometer) with two separate optical axes would consume about 650 mW, while the crossed SDEA described here consumes about

  19. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book. Revised [and Expanded] Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    A variety of energy activities are provided, including instructions for and questions related to energy films. The activities are organized into five sections. Section 1 (work) includes an activity focusing on movement and change. Section 2 (forms of energy) includes activities related to mechanical (movement), radiant (light), chemical (burning),…

  20. Energy balance, physical activity, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Fair, Alecia Malin; Montgomery, Kara

    2009-01-01

    This chapter posits that cancer is a complex and multifactorial process as demonstrated by the expression and production of key endocrine and steroid hormones that intermesh with lifestyle factors (physical activity, body size, and diet) in combination to heighten cancer risk. Excess weight has been associated with increased mortality from all cancers combined and for cancers of several specific sites. The prevalence of obesity has reached epidemic levels in many parts of the world; more than 1 billion adults are overweight with a body mass index (BMI) exceeding 25. Overweight and obesity are clinically defined indicators of a disease process characterized by the accumulation of body fat due to an excess of energy intake (nutritional intake) relative to energy expenditure (physical activity). When energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over a prolonged period of time, the result is a positive energy balance (PEB), which leads to the development of obesity. This physical state is ideal for intervention and can be modulated by changes in energy intake, expenditure, or both. Nutritional intake is a modifiable factor in the energy balance-cancer linkage primarily tested by caloric restriction studies in animals and the effect of energy availability. Restriction of calories by 10 to 40% has been shown to decrease cell proliferation, increasing apoptosis through anti-angiogenic processes. The potent anticancer effect of caloric restriction is clear, but caloric restriction alone is not generally considered to be a feasible strategy for cancer prevention in humans. Identification and development of preventive strategies that "mimic" the anticancer effects of low energy intake are desirable. The independent effect of energy intake on cancer risk has been difficult to estimate because body size and physical activity are strong determinants of total energy expenditure. The mechanisms that account for the inhibitory effects of physical activity on the carcinogenic process

  1. Activation Energy for Grain Growth in Aluminum Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Ferreira, J L; Hayes, J P

    2004-10-14

    To produce a specific grain size in metallic coatings requires precise control of the time at temperature during the deposition process. Aluminum coatings are deposited using electron-beam evaporation onto heated substrate surfaces. The grain size of the coating is determined upon examination of the microstructure in plan view and cross-section. Ideal grain growth is observed over the entire experimental range of temperature examined from 413 to 843 K. A transition in the activation energy for grain growth from 0.7 to 3.8 eV {center_dot} atom{sup -1} is observed as the temperature increases from <526 K to >588 K. The transition is indicative of the dominant mechanism for grain growth shifting with increasing temperature from grain boundary to lattice diffusion.

  2. Analysis of colliding nuclear matter in terms of symmetry energy and cross-section using computational method

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Arun Bharti, Arun; Gautam, Sakshi

    2015-08-28

    Here we perform a systematic study to extract the information for colliding nuclear matter via symmetry energy and nucleon-nucleon cross section in the fragmentation of some asymmetric colliding nuclei (O{sup 16}+Br{sup 80,} {sup 84,} {sup 92}) in the energy range between 50-200 MeV/nucleon. The simulations are carried out using isospin-dependent quantum-molecular dynamics (IQMD) computational approach for central collisions. Our study reveals that fragmentation pattern of neutron-rich colliding nuclei is sensitive to symmetry energy at lower incident energies, whereas isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon cross section becomes dominant for reactions at higher incident energies.

  3. Active faults crossing trunk pipeline routes: some important steps to avoid the disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besstrashnov, Vladimir; Strom, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Trunk pipelines that pass through tectonically active areas connecting oil and gas reservoirs with terminals and refineries cross active faults that can produce large earthquakes. Besides strong motion affecting vast areas, these earthquakes are often associated with surface faulting that provides additional hazard to pipelines. To avoid significant economic losses and environmental pollution, pipelines should be designed to sustain both effects (shaking and direct rupturing) without pipe damage and spill. Special studies aimed to provide necessary input data for the designers should be performed in the course of engineering survey. However, our experience on conducting and review of such studies for several oil and gas trunk pipelines in Russia show urgent need of more strict definition of basic conceptions and approaches used for identification and localization of these potentially hazardous tectonic features. Identification of active faults (fault zones) considered as causative faults - sources of strong motion caused by seismic waves that affect dozens kilometers of pipeline route can be done by use of both direct and indirect evidence of Late Pleistocene - Holocene activity of faults and fault zones. Since strong motion parameters can be considered as constant within the near-field zone, which width in case of large earthquake is up to dozens kilometers, accuracy of active fault location is not so critical and ±1-2 km precision provided by use of indirect evidence is acceptable. In contrast, if one have to identify and characterize zones of potential surface rupturing that require special design of the endangered pipeline section, only direct evidence of such activity can provide reliable input data for crossing design with relevant accuracy of fault location, amount and direction of displacement. Only traces of surface faults displacing Late Pleistocene - Holocene sediments and/or geomorphic features are considered as direct evidence of fault activity. Just

  4. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2010-09-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

  5. Cross-sectional imaging of functional activation in the rat somatosensory cortex with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, A. D.; Chen, Y.; Ruvinskaya, L.; Devor, A.; Boas, D. A.; Fujimoto, J. G.

    2005-08-01

    Simultaneous optical coherence tomography (OCT) and video microscopy were performed on the rat somatosensory cortex through a thinned skull during forepaw stimulation. Fractional change measurements in OCT images reveal a functional signal timecourse similar to well understood hemodynamic signal timecourses measured with video microscopy. The precise etiology of the observed OCT functional signal is still under investigation, but these results suggest that OCT can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of functional neuro-vascular activation.

  6. Measurement of neutron capture cross-section of the 71Ga(n, γ) 72Ga reaction at 0.0536 eV energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. S.; Chowdhury, M. H.; Hossain, S. M.; Latif, Sk. A.; Hafiz, M. A.; Islam, M. A.; Zakaria, A. K. M.; Yunus, S. M.; Azharul Islam, S. M.

    2008-08-01

    The neutron capture cross-section for the 71Ga(n, γ) 72Ga reaction at 0.0536 eV energy was measured using activation technique based on TRIGA Mark-II research reactor. The 197Au(n, γ) 198Au monitor reaction was used to determine the effective neutron flux. Neutron absorption and γ-ray attenuation in gallium oxide pellet were corrected in determination of cross-section. The cross-section for the above reaction at 0.0536 eV amounts to 2.75 ± 0.14 b. As far as we know there are no experimental data available at our investigated energy. So far we are the first, who carried out experiment with 0.0536 eV neutrons for cross-section measurement. The present result is larger than that of JENDL-3.3, but consistent within the uncertainty range. The value of ENDF/B-VII is higher than this work. The result of this work will be useful to observe energy dependence of neutron capture cross-sections.

  7. Intermediate-energy differential and integral cross sections for vibrational excitation in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Duque, H V; Chiari, L; Jones, D B; Pettifer, Z; da Silva, G B; Limão-Vieira, P; Blanco, F; García, G; White, R D; Lopes, M C A; Brunger, M J

    2014-06-01

    Differential and integral cross section measurements, for incident electron energies in the 20-50 eV range, are reported for excitation of several composite vibrational modes in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). Optimisation and frequency calculations, using GAUSSIAN 09 at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, were also undertaken for the two most abundant conformers of THFA, with results being reported for their respective mode classifications and excitation energies. Those calculations assisted us in the experimental assignments of the composite features observed in our measured energy loss spectra. There are, to the best of our knowledge, no other experimental or theoretical data currently available in the literature against which we can compare the present results.

  8. Modeling of energy transfer between two crossing smoothed laser beams in a plasma with flow profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaitis, A.; Hüller, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Pesme, D.; Duchateau, G.; Porzio, A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the crossed beam energy transfer (CBET) between laser fields generated by optical smoothing methods. The energy transfer, as well as the angular distribution of the outgoing light fields are investigated for two incident smoothed laser beams in a plasma with a flow gradient, allowing for resonant transfer close to the sonic point. Simulations with the code HARMONY based on time-dependent paraxial light propagation are compared to simulations using a new approach based on paraxial complex geometrical optics (PCGO). Both approaches show good agreement for the average energy transfer past a short transient period, which is a promising result for the use of the PCGO method as a module within a hydrodynamics code to efficiently compute CBET in mm-scale plasma configurations. Statistical aspects related to role of laser speckles in CBET are considered via an ensemble of different phase plate realizations.

  9. Intermediate-energy differential and integral cross sections for vibrational excitation in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Pettifer, Z.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; White, R. D.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-06-07

    Differential and integral cross section measurements, for incident electron energies in the 20–50 eV range, are reported for excitation of several composite vibrational modes in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). Optimisation and frequency calculations, using GAUSSIAN 09 at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, were also undertaken for the two most abundant conformers of THFA, with results being reported for their respective mode classifications and excitation energies. Those calculations assisted us in the experimental assignments of the composite features observed in our measured energy loss spectra. There are, to the best of our knowledge, no other experimental or theoretical data currently available in the literature against which we can compare the present results.

  10. ERP Energy and Cognitive Activity Correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael Jay; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel analysis approach for high-density event related scalp potential (ERP) data where the integrated channel-power is used to attain an energy density functional state for channel-clusters of neurophysiological significance. The method is applied to data recorded during a two-stimulus, directed lie paradigm and shows that deceptive responses emit between 8% and 10% less power. A time course analysis of these cognitive activity measures over posterior and anterior regions of the cortex suggests that neocortical interactions, reflecting the differing workload demands during executive and semantic processes, take about 50% longer for the case of deception. These results suggest that the proposed method may provide a useful tool for the analysis of ERP correlates of high-order cognitive functioning. We also report on a possible equivalence between the energy functional distribution and near-infrared signatures that have been measured with other modalities.

  11. Activity Profile and Energy Expenditure Among Active Older Adults, British Columbia, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Maureen C.; Chase, Jocelyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Time spent by young adults in moderate to vigorous activity predicts daily caloric expenditure. In contrast, caloric expenditure among older adults is best predicted by time spent in light activity. We examined highly active older adults to examine the biggest contributors to energy expenditure in this population. Methods Fifty-four community-dwelling men and women aged 65 years or older (mean, 71.4 y) were enrolled in this cross-sectional observational study. All were members of the Whistler Senior Ski Team, and all met current American guidelines for physical activity. Activity levels (sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous) were recorded by accelerometers worn continuously for 7 days. Caloric expenditure was measured using accelerometry, galvanic skin response, skin temperature, and heat flux. Significant variables were entered into a stepwise multivariate linear model consisting of activity level, age, and sex. Results The average (standard deviation [SD]) daily nonlying sedentary time was 564 (92) minutes (9.4 [1.5] h) per day. The main predictors of higher caloric expenditure were time spent in moderate to vigorous activity (standardized β = 0.42 [SE, 0.08]; P < .001) and male sex (standardized β = 1.34 [SE, 0.16]; P < .001). A model consisting of only moderate to vigorous physical activity and sex explained 68% of the variation in caloric expenditure. An increase in moderate to vigorous physical activity by 1 minute per day was associated with an additional 16 kcal expended in physical activity. Conclusion The relationship between activity intensity and caloric expenditure in athletic seniors is similar to that observed in young adults. Active older adults still spend a substantial proportion of the day engaged in sedentary behaviors. PMID:26182147

  12. Universality of high-energy absorption cross sections for black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Decanini, Yves; Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Folacci, Antoine

    2011-02-15

    We consider the absorption problem for a massless scalar field propagating in static and spherically symmetric black holes of arbitrary dimension endowed with a photon sphere. For this wide class of black holes, we show that the fluctuations of the high-energy absorption cross section are totally and very simply described from the properties (dispersion relation and damping) of the waves trapped near the photon sphere and therefore, in the eikonal regime, from the characteristics (orbital period and Lyapunov exponent) of the null unstable geodesics lying on the photon sphere. This is achieved by using Regge pole techniques. They permit us to make an elegant and powerful resummation of the absorption cross section and to extract then all the physical information encoded in the sum over the partial wave contributions. Our analysis induces moreover some consequences concerning Hawking radiation which we briefly report.

  13. Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 7. Idaho cross-tabulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Responses for the state of Idaho to fifty questions asked during the survey (plus four variables computed from responses to several other questions) cross-tabulated against responses to nine questions which represent key explanatory characteristics of residential energy use are presented. The nine key questions are: means of payment for housing; type of dwelling; year dwelling built; total square-footage of living space; type of fuel for main heating system; combined 1978 income; unit cost of electricity; annual electricity consumption; and annual natural gas consumption. The fifty questions and four computed variables which were cross-tabulated against the above, fall into six categories: dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and dwelling characteristics; and insulation. The survey was conducted throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana with a total of 4030 households sampled; 827 households were sampled in Idaho. (MCW)

  14. Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 6. Oregon cross-tabulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Responses for the state of Oregon to fifty questions asked during the survey (plus four variables computed from responses to several other questions) cross-tabulated against responses to nine quesions which represent key explanatory characteristics of residential energy use are presented. The nine key questions are: means of payment for housing; type of dwelling; year dwelling built; total square-footage of living space; type of fuel for main heating system; combined 1978 income; unit cost of electricity; annual electricity consumption; and annual natural gas consumption. The fifty questions and four computed variables which were cross-tabulated against the above, fall into six categories: dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning system; water heating; appliances; demographic and dwelling characteristics; and insulation. The survey was conducted throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana with a total of 4030 households samples; 1165 households were sampled in Oregon. (MCW)

  15. Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 5. Washington cross-tabulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Responses for the state of Washington to fifty questions asked during the survey (plus four variables computed from responses to several other questions) cross-tabulated against responses to nine questions which represent key explanatory characteristics of residential energy use are presented. The nine key questions are: means of payment for housing; type of dwelling; year dwelling built; total square-footage of living space; type of fuel for main heating system; combined 1978 income; unit cost of electricity; annual electricity consumption; and annual natural gas consumption. The fifty questions and four computed variables which were cross-tabulated against the above, fall into six categories: dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and dwelling characteristics; and insulation. The survey was conducted throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana with a total of 4030 households sampled; 1468 households were sampled in Washington. An explanation of the data in the 54 tables is given. (MCW)

  16. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  17. Cross-isobath energy fluxes in semidiurnal barotropic Kelvin waves propagating on wide continental shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Alexander; Zhang, Tianyi

    2016-04-01

    Continental shelf modifies a Kelvin wave into a hybrid Kelvin-edge wave with a non-zero cross-isobath velocity and a phase speed that decreases with increasing wavenumber while the group velocity reaches a minimum at intermediate wavenumbers. We model the modified semidiurnal Kelvin wave adjustment to alongshore variations of the shelf width. The model domain consists of two alongshore-uniform continental shelves of different widths adjoined through a 150 km-long transition zone. Continental shelf and slope topography is adjacent to an ocean of a constant depth, allowing radiation of Poincaré waves. We consider three shelf widths of 150, 250, and 300 km, where properties of a zero mode at semidiurnal frequency change from Kelvin wave-like to edge wave-like. For each shelf width, a zero wave mode has its distinctive alongshore energy flux structure on the shelf. As the incident wave encounters a shelf width variation, the alongshore energy flux converges (diverges) on the shelf resulting in an offshore (onshore) energy flux over the continental slope. Furthermore, if the group velocity approaches zero in the area of the variable shelf width, the incident wave mode scatters into radiating Poincaré waves. On sufficiently wide shelves, a strong cross-isobath energy flux comparable with the incident wave energy flux can be triggered even by relatively modest shelf width variations. The results yield a simple diagnostic for the energy flux direction across the continental margin in a modified semidiurnal Kelvin wave based on the theoretical mode structure and its dispersion properties.

  18. High-energy pp and pp-bar forward elastic scattering and total cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M.; Cahn, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    The present status of elastic pp and pp-bar scattering in the high-energy domain is reviewed, with emphasis on the forward and near-forward regions. The experimental techniques for measuring sigma/sub tot/, rho, and B are discussed, emphasizing the importance of the region in which the nuclear and Coulomb scattering interfere. The impact-parameter representation is exploited to give simple didactic demonstrations of important rigorous theorems based on analyticity, and to illuminate the significance of the slope parameter B and the curvature parameter C. Models of elastic scattering are discussed, and a criterion for the onset of ''asymptopia'' is given. A critique of dispersion relations is presented. Simple analytic functions are used to fit simultaneously the real and imaginary parts of forward scattering amplitudes for both pp and pp-bar, obtained from experimental data for sigma/sub tot/ and rho. It is found that a good fit can be obtained using only five parameters (with a cross section rising as ln/sup 2/s), over the energy range 5 < ..sqrt..s < 62 GeV. The possibilities that (a) the cross section rises only as lns, (b) the cross section rises only locally as ln/sup 2/s, and eventually goes to a constant value, and (c) the cross-section difference between pp and pp-bar does not vanish as s..-->..infinity are examined critically. The nuclear slope parameters B are also fitted in a model-independent fashion. Examination of the fits reveals a new regularity of the pp-bar and the pp systems.

  19. Energy and power limits for microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, D.; Amend, J.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this presentation is to describe a quantitative framework for determining how energy limits microbial activity, biomass and, ultimately, biogeochemical processes. Although this model can be applied to any environment, its utility is demonstrated in marine sediments, which are an attractive test habitat because they encompass a broad spectrum of energy levels, varying amounts of biomass and are ubiquitous. The potential number of active microbial cells in Arkonas Basin (Baltic Sea) sediments are estimated as a function of depth by quantifying the amount of energy that is available to them and the rate at which it is supplied: power. The amount of power supplied per cubic centimeter of sediment is determined by calculating the Gibbs energy of fermentation and sulfate reduction in combination with the rate of particulate organic carbon, POC, degradation. The Reactive Continuum Model (Boudreau and Ruddick, 1991), RCM, is used to determine the rate at which POC is made available for microbial consumption. The RCM represents POC as containing a range of different types of organic compounds whose ability to be consumed by microorganisms varies as a function of the age of the sediment and on the distribution of compound types that were initially deposited. The sediment age model and RCM parameters determined by (Mogollon et al., 2012) are used. The power available for fermentation and sulfate reduction coupled to H2 and acetate oxidation varies from 10-8 W cm-3 at the sediment water interface to between 10-11 - 10-12 W cm-3 at 3.5 meters below the seafloor, mbsf. Using values of maintenance powers for each of these catabolic activities taken from the literature, the total number of active cells in these sediments similarly decreases from just less than 108 cell cm-3 at the SWI to 4.6 x 104 cells cm-3 at 3.5 mbsf. The number of moles of POC decreases from 2.6 x 10-5 to 9.5 x 10-6, also becoming more recalcitrant with depth. Boudreau, B. P. and Ruddick, B. R

  20. Cross sections for proton-induced reactions on Pd isotopes at energies relevant for the {gamma} process

    SciTech Connect

    Dillmann, I.; Coquard, L.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Kaeppeler, F.; Marganiec, J.; Uberseder, E.; Giesen, U.; Heiske, A.; Feinberg, G.; Hentschel, D.; Hilpp, S.; Leiste, H.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2011-07-15

    Proton-activation reactions on natural and enriched palladium samples were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range of E{sub p}=2.75-9 MeV, close to the upper end of the respective Gamow window of the {gamma} process. We have determined cross sections for {sup 102}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 103}Ag, {sup 104}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 105}Ag, and {sup 105}Pd(p, n){sup 105}Ag, as well as partial cross sections of {sup 104}Pd(p, n){sup 104}Ag{sup g}, {sup 105}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, {sup 106}Pd(p, n){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, and {sup 110}Pd(p, n){sup 110}Ag{sup m} with uncertainties between 3% and 15% for constraining theoretical Hauser-Feshbach rates and for direct use in {gamma}-process calculations.

  1. Effective Potential Energies and Transport Cross Sections for Interactions of Hydrogen and Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction energies for N2-He and N2-H2 are calculated by accurate ab initio methods. The virial coefficient and differential scattering cross section for N2-H2 are calculated; the theoretical results are compared with experimental data. The transport collision integrals for N2-H2 and N2-N2 interactions are calculated and tabulated; the results yield transport coefficients that compare well with measured data. Transport coefficients are found to be determined accurately from the interaction energies for a specific configuration of the molecule formed from the interaction partners. Comparisons with results of measurement and accurate calculations demonstrate that the transport properties of complex molecular interactions can be determined rapidly and fairly accurately from the interaction energies of simpler system using combination rules for the short-range parameters of effective interaction energies and the coefficients for the long-range forces. The coefficients for a two-parameter temperature expansion of diffusion and viscosity are tabulated for a realistic universal potential energy that is based primarily on the results of very accurate calculations of the He-He interaction energy.

  2. Low-energy 7Li(t, α)6He cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, F. E.; Fahlsing, R. F.; Jarmie, Nelson; Hardekopf, R. A.; Martinez, R.

    1983-01-01

    The thick target yield of the reaction 7Li(t, α) has been measured to the ground and first excited states of 6He for bombarding energies between 70 and 110 keV. These yields are used to deduce the reaction cross sections and astrophysical S factors at intermediate values of energy. The zero energy S factor S(0) for 7Li(t, α)6He*(1.81) is 14+/-2.5 MeVb. Applications of the measured values of the cross section for this reaction to the diagnostics of high temperature tritium plasmas are discussed. Efforts to detect alphas from induced reactions on other light targets 6Li, 9Be, 10B, and 11B are discussed. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 7Li(t, α)6He, 9Be(t, α)8Li, 11B(t, α)10Be Et=70-110 keV, θ=150°. Measured thick target yields. Deduced σ(θ, E), S(θ, E).

  3. Activity patterns in the Sahara Desert: an interpretation based on cross-sectional geometric properties.

    PubMed

    Nikita, Efthymia; Siew, Yun Ysi; Stock, Jay; Mattingly, David; Lahr, Marta Mirazón

    2011-11-01

    The Garamantian civilization flourished in modern Fezzan, Libya, between 900 BC and 500 AD, during which the aridification of the Sahara was well established. Study of the archaeological remains suggests a population successful at coping with a harsh environment of high and fluctuating temperatures and reduced water and food resources. This study explores the activity patterns of the Garamantes by means of cross-sectional geometric properties. Long bone diaphyseal shape and rigidity are compared between the Garamantes and populations from Egypt and Sudan, namely from the sites of Kerma, el-Badari, and Jebel Moya, to determine whether the Garamantian daily activities were more strenuous than those of other North African populations. Moreover, sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry are assessed at an intra- and inter-population level. The inter-population comparisons showed the Garamantes not to be more robust than the comparative populations, suggesting that the daily Garamantian activities necessary for survival in the Sahara Desert did not generally impose greater loads than those of other North African populations. Sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry in almost all geometric properties of the long limbs were comparatively low among the Garamantes. Only the lower limbs were significantly stronger among males than females, possibly due to higher levels of mobility associated with herding. The lack of systematic bilateral asymmetry in cross-sectional geometric properties may relate to the involvement of the population in bilaterally intensive activities or the lack of regular repetition of unilateral activities.

  4. Total fission cross section of {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb induced by protons at relativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Schmidt, K. H.; Jurado, B.; Pol, H. A.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Pleskac, R.; Enqvist, T.; Rejmund, F.; Giot, L.; Henzl, V.; Lukic, S.; Ngoc, S. N.; Boudard, A.; Leray, S.; Kurtukian, T.; Schmitt, C.; Henzlova, D.; Paradela, C.; Bacquias, A.; Loureiro, D. P.; Foehr, V.; Tarrio, D.; Kezzar, K.

    2011-07-01

    Total fission cross section induced by protons in {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb at energies in the range of 300 to 1000 A MeV have been measured at GSI (Germany) using the inverse kinematics technique. A dedicated setup with high efficiency made it possible to determine these cross sections with high accuracy. The new data seed light in the controversial results obtained so far and contribute to the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energies. (authors)

  5. Inelastic cross sections for low-energy electrons in liquid water: exchange and correlation effects.

    PubMed

    Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-11-01

    Low-energy electrons play a prominent role in radiation therapy and biology as they are the largest contributor to the absorbed dose. However, no tractable theory exists to describe the interaction of low-energy electrons with condensed media. This article presents a new approach to include exchange and correlation (XC) effects in inelastic electron scattering at low energies (below ∼10 keV) in the context of the dielectric theory. Specifically, an optical-data model of the dielectric response function of liquid water is developed that goes beyond the random phase approximation (RPA) by accounting for XC effects using the concept of the many-body local-field correction (LFC). It is shown that the experimental energy-loss-function of liquid water can be reproduced by including into the RPA dispersion relations XC effects (up to second order) calculated in the time-dependent local-density approximation with the addition of phonon-induced broadening in N. D. Mermin's relaxation-time approximation. Additional XC effects related to the incident and/or struck electrons are included by means of the vertex correction calculated by a modified Hubbard formula for the exchange-only LFC. Within the first Born approximation, the present XC corrections cause a significantly larger reduction (∼10-50%) to the inelastic cross section compared to the commonly used Mott and Ochkur approximations, while also yielding much better agreement with the recent experimental data for amorphous ice. The current work offers a manageable, yet rigorous, approach for including non-Born effects in the calculation of inelastic cross sections for low-energy electrons in liquid water, which due to its generality, can be easily extended to other condensed media.

  6. Model dependence of the neutrino-deuteron disintegration cross sections at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mosconi, B.; Ricci, P.; Truhlik, E.; Vogel, P.

    2007-04-15

    Model dependence of the reaction rates for the weak breakup of deuterons by low-energy neutrinos is studied starting from the cross sections derived from potential models and also from pionless effective field theory. Choosing the spread of the reaction yields, caused basically by the different ways the two-body currents are treated, as a measure of the model-dependent uncertainty, we conclude that the breakup reactions are {approx}2-3% uncertain and that even the ratio of the charged to neutral current reaction rates is also {approx}2% uncertain.

  7. Effect of Activation Cross Section Uncertainties on the Radiological Assessment of the MFE/DEMO First Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Cabellos, O; Reyes, S; Sanz, J; Rodriguez, A; Youssef, M; Sawan, M

    2005-05-10

    A Monte Carlo procedure has been applied in this work in order to address the impact of activation cross sections (XS) uncertainties on contact dose rate and decay heat calculations for the outboard first wall (FW) of a magnetic fusion energy (MFE) demonstration (DEMO) reactor. The XSs inducing the major uncertainty in the prediction of activation related quantities have been identified. Results have shown that for times corresponding to maintenance activities the uncertainties effect is insignificant since the dominant XSs involved in these calculations are based on accurate experimental data evaluations. However, for times corresponding to waste management/recycling activities, the errors induced by the XSs uncertainties, which in this case are evaluated using systematic models, must be considered. It has been found that two particular isotopes, {sup 60}Co and {sup 94}Nb, are key contributors to the global DEMO FW activation uncertainty results. In these cases, the benefit from further improvements in the accuracy of the critical reaction XSs is discussed.

  8. Charge regulation and energy dissipation while compressing and sliding a cross-linked chitosan hydrogel layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Tyrode, Eric; Claesson, Per M

    2015-04-01

    Interactions between a silica surface and a surface coated with a grafted cross-linked hydrogel made from chitosan/PAA multilayers are investigated, utilizing colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. Attractive double-layer forces are found to dominate the long-range interaction over a broad range of pH and ionic strength conditions. The deduced potential at the hydrogel/aqueous interface is found to be very low. This situation is maintained in the whole pH-range investigated, even though the degree of protonation of chitosan changes significantly. This demonstrates that pH-variations change the concentration of counterions within the hydrogel to keep the interior close to uncharged, which is similar to what has been observed for polyelectrolyte brushes. Changes in pH and ionic strength affect the adhesion force and the friction force between the silica surface and the hydrogel layer, but not the friction coefficient. This suggests that the main energy dissipation mechanism arises from processes occurring within the hydrogel layer, rather than at the silica/hydrogel interface, and we suggest that it is related to stretching of polymer chains between the cross-linking points. We also find that an increased cross-linking density, from 40% to 100%, in the hydrogel reduces the friction coefficient.

  9. Characterization of radiation-cross-linked, high-density polyethylene for thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, R.B.; Craven, S.M.; Etter, D.E.; Jendrek, E.F.; Nease, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    Electron beam cross-linked high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets (DuPont Alathon, 0.93 MI) have been characterized for potential utility in thermal energy storage applications, before and after up to 500 melt-freeze cycles in ethylene glycol. Up to 95% of the HDPE's initial DSC differential scanning calorimetry ..delta.. H/sub f/ value (44.7 cal/g) (at 1.25/sup 0/C/min cooling rates) was retained up to 9.0 Mrad radiation dosage. Form-stability after 500 melt-freeze cycles was very good at this dosage level. X-ray diffraction measurements showed little difference between irradiated HDPE's and the unirradiated control, indicating that cross-linking occurred primarily in the amorphous regions. FTIR spectroscopy showed the pellets to be uniformly reacted. The ratios of the 965-cm/sup -1/ absorption band (trans RCH=CRH') to the 909-cm/sup -1/ band (RCH=CH/sub 2/) increased with increasing radiation dosage, up to 18 Mrad. Gel contents reached a maximum of 75% at the 13.5 Mrad dosage, indicating that other reactions, in addition to cross-linking, occurred at the highest (18 Mrad) dosage level. 15 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  10. Energy-loss cross sections for inclusive charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions for scattering to the continuum are considered in a high-energy multiple scattering model. Calculations for (p,n) and (He-3,H-3) reactions are made and compared with experimental results for C-12, O-16, and Al-27 targets. Coherent effects are shown to lead to an important role for inelastic multiple scattering terms when light projectiles are considered.

  11. Active ultrasonic cross-correlation flowmeters for mixed-phase pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, S. H.; Raptis, A. C.

    Two ultrasonic flowmeters which employ the active cross-correlation technique and use a simple clamp-on transducer arrangement are discussed. The flowmeter for solid/liquid flows was tested over a wide range of coal concentration in water and oil. The measured velocity based on the peak position of the cross-correlation function is consistently higher by about 15% than the average velocity measured by flow diversion. The origin of the difference results mainly from the flow velocity profiles and the transit-time probability distribution. The flowmeter that can measure particle velocity in a solid/gas flow requires acoustic decoupling arrangement between two sensing stations. The measured velocity is mainly associated with the particles near the wall. Performance of both flowmeters is presented.

  12. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacker, Thomas S.; Marsh, Richard J.; Duchen, Michael R.; Bain, Angus J.

    2013-08-01

    In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water-glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers-Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  13. R-matrix calculations of differential and integral cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, M. M.; Brigg, W. J.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-08-01

    Electron collisions with C2H5OH are studied up to impact energies of 10 eV using several theoretical models. Calculated differential cross sections suggest that the extrapolation to low angles used to extend experimental data and hence give integral cross sections significantly underestimates the large, dipole-driven forward scattering cross section. An improved set of values for the rotationally-unresolved elastic cross section is proposed; the corresponding rotationally resolved cross sections are also presented. Static exchange plus polarisation calculations find a very broad shape resonance in each of the 2A' and 2A'' symmetries in the 7 eV collision region however no resonance at lower energies, in qualitative agreement with the interpretation of some but not all dissociative electron attachment measurements.

  14. Predicting Chinese Children and Youth's Energy Expenditure Using ActiGraph Accelerometers: A Calibration and Cross-Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Zheng; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and cross-validate an equation based on ActiGraph accelerometer GT3X output to predict children and youth's energy expenditure (EE) of physical activity (PA). Method: Participants were 367 Chinese children and youth (179 boys and 188 girls, aged 9 to 17 years old) who wore 1 ActiGraph GT3X…

  15. Caffeine and amphetamine produce cross-sensitization to nicotine-induced locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Celik, Eylem; Uzbay, I Tayfun; Karakas, Sirel

    2006-01-01

    Sensitization development is linked to the addictive potential of the drugs. The same mechanisms might play a role in sensitization development to the different addictive drugs. The aim of the study was to investigate the development of cross-sensitization to caffeine and amphetamine in nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization in mice. Caffeine (2.5-20 mg/kg), amphetamine (1-16 mg/kg) or saline were injected to Swiss-Webster mice and locomotor activity was recorded for 30 min. Nicotine (0.5-2 mg/kg) or saline were injected to mice and locomotor activity was recorded for 30 min. Process was applied for 19 days, every other day (10 sessions). Caffeine (5 mg/kg), amphetamine (4 mg/kg) or saline were challenged to the different groups of nicotine-sensitized mice 2 days later on the last nicotine injection, and locomotor activity was recorded. Repetitive injections of nicotine (0.5-2 mg) produced locomotor sensitization in mice. After caffeine and amphetamine challenge injections, locomotor activity of the nicotine-sensitized mice was found to be significantly higher than saline-pretreated mice. Saline challenge did not produce any significant effect in nicotine- or saline-pretreated mice. Our results suggest that a cross-sensitization developed to both caffeine and amphetamine in nicotine-sensitized mice. In conclusion, similar central mechanisms may be responsible for the development of addiction to these substances.

  16. Energy Loss and Stopping Cross Section Factors for Alphas in Lead Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magness, B.

    2005-03-01

    Lead Iodide is a candidate for use as a room temperature gamma ray sensitive semiconductor similar to mercuric iodide. We report here on values for the energy loss factor and the stopping cross section factor in lead iodide thin films. Vapor diffused purified lead iodide was used to make thick film and thin film samples evaporated on amorphic glass substrates. Thin films were used to take advantage of the surface energy approximation. In addition, separate lead and iodide backscattering peaks from the films are well resolved. Film thickness ranged from 50nm to 1000nm as determined by optical interference methods. The high energy singly ionized helium beam was provided by the CSULA 4 MeV Van de Graff accelerator. Rutherford backscattering was detected at 170^o. Both the input and output energy losses were calculated from the FWHM of the corresponding peaks. The typical energy loss factor was found to be 20.2 eV/angstrom with a 3% uncertainty for a 2.4 MeV input beam. As expected, this value is about one third that of the pure elements.

  17. Sensitivity of the fusion cross section to the density dependence of the symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Umar, A. S.; Stevenson, P. D.; Piekarewicz, J.; Oberacker, V. E.; Maruhn, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    Background: The study of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) and the behavior of nuclear matter under extreme conditions is crucial to our understanding of many nuclear and astrophysical phenomena. Nuclear reactions serve as one of the means for studying the EOS. Purpose: It is the aim of this paper to discuss the impact of nuclear fusion on the EOS. This is a timely subject given the expected availability of increasingly exotic beams at rare isotope facilities [A. B. Balantekin et al., Mod. Phys. Lett. A 29, 1430010 (2014), 10.1142/S0217732314300109]. In practice, we focus on 48Ca+48Ca fusion. Method: We employ three different approaches to calculate fusion cross sections for a set of energy density functionals with systematically varying nuclear matter properties. Fusion calculations are performed using frozen densities, using a dynamic microscopic method based on density-constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (DC-TDHF) approach, as well as direct TDHF study of above barrier cross sections. For these studies, we employ a family of Skyrme parametrizations with systematically varied nuclear matter properties. Results: The folding-potential model provides a reasonable first estimate of cross sections. DC-TDHF, which includes dynamical polarization, reduces the fusion barriers and delivers much better cross sections. Full TDHF near the barrier agrees nicely with DC-TDHF. Most of the Skyrme forces which we used deliver, on the average, fusion cross sections in good agreement with the data. Trying to read off a trend in the results, we find a slight preference for forces which deliver a slope of symmetry energy of L ≈50 MeV that corresponds to a neutron-skin thickness of 48Ca of Rskin=(0.180 -0.210 ) fm. Conclusions: Fusion reactions in the barrier and sub-barrier region can be a tool to study the EOS and the neutron skin of nuclei. The success of the approach will depend on reduced experimental uncertainties of fusion data as well as the development of fusion

  18. 48 CFR 1828.371 - Clauses incorporating cross-waivers of liability for International Space Station activities and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cross-waivers of liability for International Space Station activities and Science or Space Exploration... Station activities and Science or Space Exploration activities unrelated to the International Space Station. (a) In contracts covering International Space Station activities, or Science or Space...

  19. 48 CFR 1828.371 - Clauses incorporating cross-waivers of liability for International Space Station activities and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cross-waivers of liability for International Space Station activities and Science or Space Exploration... Station activities and Science or Space Exploration activities unrelated to the International Space Station. (a) In contracts covering International Space Station activities, or Science or Space...

  20. New measurement of the 3He(α,γ)7Be cross section at medium energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Borge, M. J. G.; Briz, J. A.; Cubero, M.; Fulton, B. R.; Fynbo, H.; Gordillo, N.; Hass, M.; Haquin, G.; Maira, A.; Nácher, E.; Nir-El, Y.; Kumar, V.; McGrath, J.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; Perea, A.; Pesudo, V.; Ribeiro, G.; Sánchez del Rio, J.; Tengblad, O.; Yaniv, R.; Yungreis, Z.

    2012-09-01

    We report on a new cross-section measurement for the 3He(α, γ)7Be reaction at three medium energies of Ec.m. between 1 and 3 MeV. The interest stems from the significant role played by the reaction in calculating an accurate solar neutrino flux and the primordial 7Li abundance. The energy dependence of the astrophysical S34 factor observed in the present work, especially above 1 MeV, highlights the need to constrain theories in order to obtain a precise extrapolated value for S34(0). In this context, a comparison with the recent theoretical work in a fully microscopic fermionic molecular dynamics approach and a few other representative calculations emphasize the need for further experimental as well as theoretical work to resolve the existing conflicts.

  1. The photodetachment cross-section and threshold energy of negative ions in carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmy, E. M.; Woo, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold energy and sunlight photodetachment measurements on negative carbon dioxide ions, using a 2.5 kw light pressure xenon lamp, show that: (1) Electron affinity of CO3(+) is larger than 2.7 e.V. and that an isomeric form of CO3(+) is likely an error; (2) The photodetachment cross section of CO3(-) will roughly be like a step function across the range of 4250 to 2500A, having its threshold energy at 4250A; (3) Sunlight photodetachment rate for CO3(-) is probably much smaller than elsewhere reported; and (4) The probability of having photodetached electrons re-attach to form negative ions is less than 1%. Mass identifying drift tube tests confirm that the slower ion is CO3(-), formed through the O(-) + 2CO2 yields CO3(-) + CO2 reaction.

  2. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  3. Cross-linking effect on dielectric properties of polypropylene thin films and applications in electric energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xuepei; Chung, T. C. Mike

    2011-02-01

    A family of cross-linked polypropylene (x-PP) thin film dielectrics is systematically studied to understand the cross-linking effect on the dielectric properties. Evidently, the butylstyrene (BSt) cross-linkers increase both the dielectric constant (ɛ) and breakdown strength (E), without increasing energy loss. An x-PP dielectric, with 3.65 mol % BSt cross-linkers, exhibits a ɛ ˜3, which is independent of a wide range of temperatures and frequencies, slim D-E hysteresis loops, high breakdown strength (E=650 MV/m), narrow breakdown distribution, and reliable energy storage capacity >5 J/cm3 (double that of state-of-the-art biaxially oriented polypropylene capacitors), without showing any increase in energy loss.

  4. Characterization of the Enzymatic Activity of the Actin Cross-Linking Domain from the Vibrio cholerae MARTXVc Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashov, Dmitri S.; Cordero, Christina L.; Reisler, Emil; Fullner Satchell, Karla J.

    2008-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that exports enterotoxins which alter host cells through a number of mechanisms resulting in diarrheal disease. Among the secreted toxins is the multifunctional, autoprocessing RTX toxin (MARTXVc), which disrupts actin cytoskeleton by covalently cross-linking actin monomers into oligomers. The region of the toxin responsible for cross-linking activity is the actin cross-linking domain (ACD). In this study, we demonstrate unambiguously that ACD utilizes G- and not F-actin as a substrate for the cross-linking reaction and hydrolyzes one molecule of ATP per cross-linking event. Furthermore, major actin binding proteins that regulate actin cytoskeleton in vivo do not block the cross-linking reaction in vitro. Cofilin inhibits the cross-linking of G- and F-actin at high mole ratio to actin, but accelerates F-actin cross-linking at low mole ratios. DNase I blocks completely the cross-linking of actin, likely due to steric hindrance with one of the cross-linking sites on actin. In the context of the holotoxin, the inhibition of Rho by the Rho-inactivating domain of MARTXVc (Sheahan, K.L., Satchell, K.J.F. 2007 Cellular Microbiology 9:1324-1335) would accelerate F-actin depolymerization and provide G-actin, alone or in complex with actin binding proteins, for cross-linking by ACD, ultimately leading to the observed rapid cell rounding. PMID:17951576

  5. Electron ionization cross-section calculations for liquid water at high impact energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Hadjidoukas, P.; Nikjoo, H.; Pathak, A.

    2008-04-01

    Cross-sections for the ionization of liquid water is perhaps the most essential set of data needed for modeling electron transport in biological matter. The complexity of ab initio calculations for any multi-electron target has led to largely heuristic semi-empirical models which take advantage elements of the Bethe, dielectric and binary collision theories. In this work we present various theoretical models for calculating total ionization cross-sections (TICSs) for liquid water over the 10 keV-1 MeV electron energy range. In particular, we extend our recent dielectric model calculations for liquid water to relativistic energies using both the appropriate kinematic corrections and the transverse part. Comparisons are made with widely used atomic and molecular TICS models such as those of Khare and co-workers, Kim-Rudd, Deutsch-Märk, Vriens and Gryzinski. The required dipole oscillator strength was provided by our recent optical-data model which is based on the latest experimental data for liquid water. The TICSs computed by the above models differ by up to 40% from the dielectric results. The best agreement (to within ∼10%) was obtained by Khare's original model and an approximate form of Gryzinski's model. In contrast, the binary-encounter-dipole (BED) models of both Kim-Rudd and Khare and co-workers resulted in ∼10-20% higher TICS values, while discrepancies increased to ∼30-40% when their simpler binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) versions were used. Finally, we discuss to what extent the accuracy of the TICS is indicative of the reliability of the underlying differential cross-sections.

  6. Track structure simulations at relativistic energies: an update on cross section calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingfelder, Michael

    Charged particle track structure simulations follow the primary, as well as all (produced) sec-ondary particles in an event-by-event matter, from starting or ejection energies down to total stopping. They provide detailed information on the spacial distributions of energy depositions, interaction types, and radical species produced. These quantities provide a starting point to describe the interaction of the radiation with matter of biological interest and to explore and estimate the effects of radiation quality on various biological responses of these systems. Of special interest is liquid water which serves as surrogate for soft tissue. Ionization and excitation cross sections for bare charged particles can be calculated within the framework of the (relativistic) plane-wave Born approximation or the (relativistic) Bethe approximation. Both theories rely on a realistic model of the dielectric response function of the material under consideration and need to address relativistic medium polarization effects like the Fermi-density effect in a consistent way. In this talk we will review and present new and updated aspects of charged particle cross section calculations for relativistic heavy ions with liquid water and other materials of biological interest. This includes an updated model for the dielectric response function of liquid water to better reflect new data from inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) experiments using synchrotron radiation and a model for the dielectric response function of calcium, which serves as a bone surrogate. We will also discuss the implementation of relativistic effect, especially of the Fermi-density effect into the cross section calculations. This work is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), grant no. NNJ04HF39G.

  7. Cross-person activity recognition using reduced kernel extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wan-Yu; Zheng, Qing-Hua; Wang, Zhong-Min

    2014-05-01

    Activity recognition based on mobile embedded accelerometer is very important for developing human-centric pervasive applications such as healthcare, personalized recommendation and so on. However, the distribution of accelerometer data is heavily affected by varying users. The performance will degrade when the model trained on one person is used to others. To solve this problem, we propose a fast and accurate cross-person activity recognition model, known as TransRKELM (Transfer learning Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) which uses RKELM (Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) to realize initial activity recognition model. In the online phase OS-RKELM (Online Sequential Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) is applied to update the initial model and adapt the recognition model to new device users based on recognition results with high confidence level efficiently. Experimental results show that, the proposed model can adapt the classifier to new device users quickly and obtain good recognition performance.

  8. Cross-person activity recognition using reduced kernel extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wan-Yu; Zheng, Qing-Hua; Wang, Zhong-Min

    2014-05-01

    Activity recognition based on mobile embedded accelerometer is very important for developing human-centric pervasive applications such as healthcare, personalized recommendation and so on. However, the distribution of accelerometer data is heavily affected by varying users. The performance will degrade when the model trained on one person is used to others. To solve this problem, we propose a fast and accurate cross-person activity recognition model, known as TransRKELM (Transfer learning Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) which uses RKELM (Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) to realize initial activity recognition model. In the online phase OS-RKELM (Online Sequential Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) is applied to update the initial model and adapt the recognition model to new device users based on recognition results with high confidence level efficiently. Experimental results show that, the proposed model can adapt the classifier to new device users quickly and obtain good recognition performance. PMID:24513850

  9. 14 CFR 1266.104 - Cross-waiver of liability for launch agreements for science or space exploration activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... agreements for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the International Space Station. 1266.104... LIABILITY § 1266.104 Cross-waiver of liability for launch agreements for science or space exploration... cross-waiver of liability between the parties to agreements for NASA's science or space...

  10. 14 CFR 1266.104 - Cross-waiver of liability for launch agreements for science or space exploration activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... agreements for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the International Space Station. 1266.104... LIABILITY § 1266.104 Cross-waiver of liability for launch agreements for science or space exploration... cross-waiver of liability between the parties to agreements for NASA's science or space...

  11. 14 CFR 1266.104 - Cross-waiver of liability for launch agreements for science or space exploration activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... agreements for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the International Space Station. 1266.104... LIABILITY § 1266.104 Cross-waiver of liability for launch agreements for science or space exploration... cross-waiver of liability between the parties to agreements for NASA's science or space...

  12. 14 CFR 1266.104 - Cross-waiver of liability for launch agreements for science or space exploration activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cross-waiver of liability for launch agreements for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the International Space Station. 1266.104 Section 1266.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION CROSS-WAIVER...

  13. Caught in the act: covalent cross-linking captures activator-coactivator interactions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Malathy; Dugan, Amanda; Nwokoye, Adaora; Fung, Yik-Hong; Lancia, Jody K; Majmudar, Chinmay Y; Mapp, Anna K

    2011-12-16

    Currently there are few methods suitable for the discovery and characterization of transient, moderate affinity protein-protein interactions in their native environment, despite their prominent role in a host of cellular functions including protein folding, signal transduction, and transcriptional activation. Here we demonstrate that a genetically encoded photoactivatable amino acid, p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine, can be used to capture transient and/or low affinity binding partners in an in vivo setting. In this study, we focused on ensnaring the coactivator binding partners of the transcriptional activator VP16 in S. cerevisiae. The interactions between transcriptional activators and coactivators in eukaryotes are moderate in affinity and short-lived, and due in part to these characteristics, identification of the direct binding partners of activators in vivo has met with only limited success. We find through in vivo photo-cross-linking that VP16 contacts the Swi/Snf chromatin-remodeling complex through the ATPase Snf2(BRG1/BRM) and the subunit Snf5 with two distinct regions of the activation domain. An analogous experiment with Gal4 reveals that Snf2 is also a target of this activator. These results suggest that Snf2 may be a valuable target for small molecule probe discovery given the prominent role the Swi/Snf complex family plays in development and in disease. More significantly, the successful implementation of the in vivo cross-linking methodology in this setting demonstrates that it can be applied to the discovery and characterization of a broad range of transient and/or modest affinity protein-protein interactions. PMID:21977905

  14. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of some novel cross-linked chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Nadia Ahmed; Fahmy, Mona Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Four novel hydrogels based on chitosan were synthesized via a cross-linking reaction of chitosan with different concentrations of oxalyl bis 4-(2,5-dioxo-2H-pyrrol- 1(5H)-yl)benzamide. Their structures were confirmed by fourier transform infrared X-ray (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. The antimicrobial activities of the hydrogels against two crop-threatening pathogenic fungi namely: Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus, RCMBA 06002), and Aspergillus niger (A. niger, RCMBA 06106), and five bacterial species namely: Bacillis subtilis (B. subtilis, RCMBA 6005), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, RCMBA 2004), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumonia, RCMB 000101) as Gram positive bacteria, and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium, RCMB 000104), and Escherichia coli (E. coli, RCMBA 5003) as Gram negative bacteria have been investigated. The prepared hydrogels showed much higher antimicrobial activities than that of the parent chitosan. The hydrogels were more potent in case of Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative bacteria. Increasing the degree of cross-linking in the hydrogels resulted in a weaker antimicrobial activity. PMID:23109847

  15. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Some Novel Cross-Linked Chitosan Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Nadia Ahmed; Fahmy, Mona Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Four novel hydrogels based on chitosan were synthesized via a cross-linking reaction of chitosan with different concentrations of oxalyl bis 4-(2,5-dioxo-2H-pyrrol- 1(5H)-yl)benzamide. Their structures were confirmed by fourier transform infrared X-ray (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. The antimicrobial activities of the hydrogels against two crop-threatening pathogenic fungi namely: Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus, RCMBA 06002), and Aspergillus niger (A. niger, RCMBA 06106), and five bacterial species namely: Bacillis subtilis (B. subtilis, RCMBA 6005), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, RCMBA 2004), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumonia, RCMB 000101) as Gram positive bacteria, and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium, RCMB 000104), and Escherichia coli (E. coli, RCMBA 5003) as Gram negative bacteria have been investigated. The prepared hydrogels showed much higher antimicrobial activities than that of the parent chitosan. The hydrogels were more potent in case of Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative bacteria. Increasing the degree of cross-linking in the hydrogels resulted in a weaker antimicrobial activity. PMID:23109847

  16. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of some novel cross-linked chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Nadia Ahmed; Fahmy, Mona Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Four novel hydrogels based on chitosan were synthesized via a cross-linking reaction of chitosan with different concentrations of oxalyl bis 4-(2,5-dioxo-2H-pyrrol- 1(5H)-yl)benzamide. Their structures were confirmed by fourier transform infrared X-ray (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. The antimicrobial activities of the hydrogels against two crop-threatening pathogenic fungi namely: Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus, RCMBA 06002), and Aspergillus niger (A. niger, RCMBA 06106), and five bacterial species namely: Bacillis subtilis (B. subtilis, RCMBA 6005), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, RCMBA 2004), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumonia, RCMB 000101) as Gram positive bacteria, and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium, RCMB 000104), and Escherichia coli (E. coli, RCMBA 5003) as Gram negative bacteria have been investigated. The prepared hydrogels showed much higher antimicrobial activities than that of the parent chitosan. The hydrogels were more potent in case of Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative bacteria. Increasing the degree of cross-linking in the hydrogels resulted in a weaker antimicrobial activity.

  17. Investigation of activation cross-section data of proton induced nuclear reactions on rhenium.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Yamazaki, H; Baba, M; Mohammadi, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of systematic investigations of activation cross-section data for different applications the excitation functions of (nat)Re(p,x)(185)Os, (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181m)Os, (186g)Re, (184m)Re, (184g)Re, (183)Re, (182m)Re, (182g)Re and (181g)Re reactions were measured up to 70MeV. The data for the (nat)Re(p,x) (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181g)Os,(186g)Re, (184m)Re,(182m)Re, (182g)Re, and (181)Re reactions are reported for the first time. The activation method, the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-spectroscopy for activity detection were used. The experimental data were compared with predictions of three theoretical codes. From the measured cross-section thick target integral yields were also calculated and presented.

  18. Muscle activation characteristics in cross-country skiers with a history of anterior compartment pain.

    PubMed

    Federolf, Peter; Bakker, Emily

    2012-11-01

    A large proportion of elite cross-country skiers suffer from chronic anterior compartment syndrome (CACS). This study used surface electromyograms (EMGs) to investigate whether differences existed in the activation characteristics of the tibialis anterior muscle between elite cross-country skiers with a history of anterior compartment pain (symptomatic group) and a pain-free control group. Based on self-reported pain symptoms, twelve young, national-level cross-country ski athletes were assigned to a symptomatic group (N = 5), a control group (N = 4), or analyzed individually if their diagnosis was not certain (N = 3). During skating, EMGs were recorded on five lower leg muscles. The relative increase in EMG power per step when increasing the effort level of skating was larger in the symptomatic group than in the control group for tibialis anterior (143 +/- 12% vs. 125 +/- 23%; Cohen's d = 1.17), peroneus longus (123 +/- 24% vs. 107 +/- 6%; d = 0.91), and gastrocnemius lateralis (167 +/- 51% vs. 117 +/- 12%; d = 1.64). The symptomatic group showed more power in the lower frequency bands of the tibialis anterior's EMG spectra (p < 0.001), whereas no group differences were found in other muscles (all p > 0.2). Within the step cycle, these differences appeared in the swing phase and in the gliding phase during single leg support. The observed differences in the EMG spectra may serve as an early identification of athletes who are at risk of developing CACS.

  19. Silver-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Isocyanides and Active Methylene Compounds by a Radical Process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianquan; Liu, Zhenhua; Liao, Peiqiu; Zhang, Lin; Tu, Tao; Bi, Xihe

    2015-09-01

    Isocyanides are versatile building blocks, and have been extensively exploited in C-H functionalization reactions. However, transition-metal-catalyzed direct C-H functionalization reactions with isocyanides suffer from over-insertion of isocyanides. Reported herein is a radical coupling/isomerization strategy for the cross-coupling of isocyanides with active methylene compounds through silver-catalysis. The method solves the over-insertion issue and affords a variety of otherwise difficult to synthesize β-aminoenones and tricarbonylmethanes under base- and ligand-free conditions. This report presents a new fundamental C-C bond-forming reaction of two basic chemicals.

  20. Energy dependence of fusion evaporation-residue cross sections in the sup 28 Si+ sup 28 Si reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vineyard, M.F.; Bauer, J.S.; Gosdin, C.H.; Trotter, R.S. ); Kovar, D.G.; Beck, C.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Wilkins, B.D.; Rosner, G.; Chowdhury, P.; Ikezoe, H.; Kuhn, W. ); Kolata, J.J.; Hinnefeld, J.D. ); Maguire, C.F. ); Mateja, J.F. ); Prosser, F.W. ); Stephans, G.S.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Velocity distributions of mass-identified evaporation residues produced in the {sup 28}Si+{sup 28}Si reaction have been measured at bombarding energies of 174, 215, 240, 309, 397, and 452 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. These distributions were used to identify evaporation residues and to separate the complete-fusion and incomplete-fusion components. Angular distributions and total cross sections were extracted at all six bombarding energies. The complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections and the deduced critical angular momenta are compared with lower energy data and the predictions of existing models.

  1. Constraining the Lateral Helix of Respiratory Complex I by Cross-linking Does Not Impair Enzyme Activity or Proton Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a multisubunit, membrane-bound enzyme of the respiratory chain. The energy from NADH oxidation in the peripheral region of the enzyme is used to drive proton translocation across the membrane. One of the integral membrane subunits, nuoL in Escherichia coli, has an unusual lateral helix of ∼75 residues that lies parallel to the membrane surface and has been proposed to play a mechanical role as a piston during proton translocation (Efremov, R. G., Baradaran, R., and Sazanov, L. A. (2010) Nature 465, 441–445). To test this hypothesis we have introduced 11 pairs of cysteine residues into Complex I; in each pair one is in the lateral helix, and the other is in a nearby region of subunit N, M, or L. The double mutants were treated with Cu2+ ions or with bi-functional methanethiosulfonate reagents to catalyze cross-link formation in membrane vesicles. The yields of cross-linked products were typically 50–90%, as judged by immunoblotting, but in no case did the activity of Complex I decrease by >10–20%, as indicated by deamino-NADH oxidase activity or rates of proton translocation. In contrast, several pairs of cysteine residues introduced at other interfaces of N:M and M:L subunits led to significant loss of activity, in particular, in the region of residue Glu-144 of subunit M. The results do not support the hypothesis that the lateral helix of subunit L functions like a piston, but rather, they suggest that conformational changes might be transmitted more directly through the functional residues of the proton translocation apparatus. PMID:26134569

  2. Compilation and evaluation of 14-MeV neutron-activation cross sections for nuclear technology applications. Set I

    SciTech Connect

    Evain, B.P.; Smith, D.L.; Lucchese, P.

    1985-04-01

    Available 14-MeV experimental neutron activation cross sections are compiled and evaluated for the following reactions of interest for nuclear-energy technology applications: /sup 27/Al(n,p)/sup 27/Mg, Si(n,X)/sup 28/Al, Ti(n,X)/sup 46/Sc, Ti(n,X)/sup 47/Sc, Ti(n,X)/sup 48/Sc, /sup 51/V(n,p)/sup 51/Ti, /sup 51/V(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 48/Sc, Cr(n,X)/sup 52/V, /sup 55/Mn(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 52/V, /sup 55/Mn(n,2n)/sup 54/Mn, Fe(n,X)/sup 54/Mn, /sup 54/Fe(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 51/Cr, /sup 59/Co(n,p)/sup 59/Fe, /sup 59/Co(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 56/Mn, /sup 59/Co(n,2n)/sup 58/Co, /sup 65/Cu(n,p)/sup 65/Ni, Zn(n,X)/sup 64/Cu, /sup 64/Zn(n,2n)/sup 63/Zn, /sup 113/In(n,n')/sup 113m/In, /sup 115/In(n,n') /sup 115m/In. The compiled values are listed and plotted for reference without adjustments. From these collected results those values for which adequate supplementary information on nuclear constants, standards and experimental errors is provided are selected for use in reaction-by-reaction evaluations. These data are adjusted as needed to account for recent revisions in the nuclear constants and cross section standards. The adjusted results are subsequently transformed to equivalent cross sections at 14.7 MeV for the evaluation process. The evaluations are performed utilizing a least-squares method which considers correlations between the experimental data. 440 refs., 41 figs., 46 tabs.

  3. Physical activity and bone turnover markers: a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Adami, Silvano; Gatti, Davide; Viapiana, Ombretta; Fiore, Carmelo Erio; Nuti, Ranuccio; Luisetto, Giovanni; Ponte, Marco; Rossini, Maurizio

    2008-12-01

    Strenuous physical activity in young individuals has an important effect on both bone mass and bone turnover but the effect of moderate physical activity in adults remains uncertain. In a large cohort (N = 530) of healthy premenopausal women, bone formation markers (osteocalcin and N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen [P1NP]), but not serum C-telopeptide of type 1 collagen (sCTX), were found to be significantly associated with the level of physical activity, and this association remained significant after adjusting the data (ANCOVA) by age and body mass index. Mean spine and hip bone mineral density (BMD) values were positively associated with physical activity but this was statistically significant (P = 0.050) only for adjusted values of spine BMD. Twenty-four healthy sedentary premenopausal women, subscribing to participate in a community exercise program lasting a month, and 18 age-matched controls were included in the longitudinal study. Serum osteocalcin and P1NP, but not sCTX, rose significantly, by ca. 25%, only in the active group after a month of exercise. The changes in the two bone formation markers remained statistically significant for values adjusted for body weight, which fell significantly in the exercise group. In conclusion, both the cross-sectional and the longitudinal parts of our study demonstrate that even minor changes in physical activity are associated with a clear effect on bone formation markers.

  4. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Activation Energies for Carrier Capture by Defects in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modine, N. A.; Wright, A. F.; Lee, S. R.

    The rate of defect-induced carrier recombination is determined by both defect levels and carrier capture cross-sections. Density functional theory (DFT) has been widely and successfully used to predict defect levels, but only recently has work begun to focus on using DFT to determine carrier capture cross-sections. Lang and Henry developed the theory of carrier-capture by multiphonon emission in the 1970s and showed that carrier-capture cross-sections differ between defects primarily due to differences in their carrier capture activation energies. We present an approach to using DFT to calculate carrier capture activation energies that does not depend on an assumed configuration coordinate and that fully accounts for anharmonic effects, which can substantially modify carrier activation energies. We demonstrate our approach for intrinisic defects in GaAs and GaN and discuss how our results depend on the choice of exchange-correlation functional and the treatment of spin polarization. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Energy Efficient, Cross-Layer Enabled, Dynamic Aggregation Networks for Next Generation Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michael S.

    Today, the Internet traffic is growing at a near exponential rate, driven predominately by data center-based applications and Internet-of-Things services. This fast-paced growth in Internet traffic calls into question the ability of the existing optical network infrastructure to support this continued growth. The overall optical networking equipment efficiency has not been able to keep up with the traffic growth, creating a energy gap that makes energy and cost expenditures scale linearly with the traffic growth. The implication of this energy gap is that it is infeasible to continue using existing networking equipment to meet the growing bandwidth demand. A redesign of the optical networking platform is needed. The focus of this dissertation is on the design and implementation of energy efficient, cross-layer enabled, dynamic optical networking platforms, which is a promising approach to address the exponentially growing Internet bandwidth demand. Chapter 1 explains the motivation for this work by detailing the huge Internet traffic growth and the unsustainable energy growth of today's networking equipment. Chapter 2 describes the challenges and objectives of enabling agile, dynamic optical networking platforms and the vision of the Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) to realize these objectives; the research objectives of this dissertation and the large body of related work in this field is also summarized. Chapter 3 details the design and implementation of dynamic networking platforms that support wavelength switching granularity. The main contribution of this work involves the experimental validation of deep cross-layer communication across the optical performance monitoring (OPM), data, and control planes. The first experiment shows QoS-aware video streaming over a metro-scale test-bed through optical power monitoring of the transmission wavelength and cross-layer feedback control of the power level. The second experiment extends the performance

  6. Using the decision ladder to understand road user decision making at actively controlled rail level crossings.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Christine M; Salmon, Paul M; Beanland, Vanessa; Lenné, Michael G; Read, Gemma J M; Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-09-01

    Rail level crossings (RLXs) represent a key strategic risk for railways worldwide. Despite enforcement and engineering countermeasures, user behaviour at RLXs can often confound expectations and erode safety. Research in this area is limited by a relative absence of insights into actual decision making processes and a focus on only a subset of road user types. One-hundred and sixty-six road users (drivers, motorcyclists, cyclists and pedestrians) completed a diary entry for each of 457 naturalistic encounters with RLXs when a train was approaching. The final eligible sample comprised 94 participants and 248 encounters at actively controlled crossings where a violation of the active warnings was possible. The diary incorporated Critical Decision Method probe questions, which enabled user responses to be mapped onto Rasmussen's decision ladder. Twelve percent of crossing events were non-compliant. The underlying decision making was compared to compliant events and a reference decision model to reveal important differences in the structure and type of decision making within and between road user groups. The findings show that engineering countermeasures intended to improve decision making (e.g. flashing lights), may have the opposite effect for some users because the system permits a high level of flexibility for circumvention. Non-motorised users were more likely to access information outside of the warning signals because of their ability to achieve greater proximity to the train tracks and the train itself. The major conundrum in resolving these issues is whether to restrict the amount of time and information available to users so that it cannot be used for circumventing the system or provide more information to help users make safe decisions. PMID:27184305

  7. Dissection of a Ciona regulatory element reveals complexity of cross-species enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Pauls, Stefan; Bacha, Jamil; Elgar, Greg; Loose, Matthew; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2014-06-15

    Vertebrate genomes share numerous conserved non-coding elements, many of which function as enhancer elements and are hypothesised to be under evolutionary constraint due to a need to be bound by combinations of sequence-specific transcription factors. In contrast, few such conserved elements can be detected between vertebrates and their closest invertebrate relatives. Despite this lack of sequence identity, cross-species transgenesis has identified some cases where non-coding DNA from invertebrates drives reporter gene expression in transgenic vertebrates in patterns reminiscent of the expression of vertebrate orthologues. Such instances are presumed to reflect the presence of conserved suites of binding sites in the regulatory regions of invertebrate and vertebrate orthologues, such that both regulatory elements can correctly interpret the trans-activating environment. Shuffling of binding sites has been suggested to lie behind loss of sequence conservation; however this has not been experimentally tested. Here we examine the underlying basis of enhancer activity for the Ciona intestinalis βγ-crystallin gene, which drives expression in the lens of transgenic vertebrates despite the Ciona lineage predating the evolution of the lens. We construct an interactive gene regulatory network (GRN) for vertebrate lens development, allowing network interactions to be robustly catalogued and conserved network components and features to be identified. We show that a small number of binding motifs are necessary for Ciona βγ-crystallin expression, and narrow down the likely factors that bind to these motifs. Several of these overlap with the conserved core of the vertebrate lens GRN, implicating these sites in cross species function. However when we test these motifs in a transgenic vertebrate they prove to be dispensable for reporter expression in the lens. These results show that current models depicting cross species enhancer function as dependent on conserved binding

  8. Using the decision ladder to understand road user decision making at actively controlled rail level crossings.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Christine M; Salmon, Paul M; Beanland, Vanessa; Lenné, Michael G; Read, Gemma J M; Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-09-01

    Rail level crossings (RLXs) represent a key strategic risk for railways worldwide. Despite enforcement and engineering countermeasures, user behaviour at RLXs can often confound expectations and erode safety. Research in this area is limited by a relative absence of insights into actual decision making processes and a focus on only a subset of road user types. One-hundred and sixty-six road users (drivers, motorcyclists, cyclists and pedestrians) completed a diary entry for each of 457 naturalistic encounters with RLXs when a train was approaching. The final eligible sample comprised 94 participants and 248 encounters at actively controlled crossings where a violation of the active warnings was possible. The diary incorporated Critical Decision Method probe questions, which enabled user responses to be mapped onto Rasmussen's decision ladder. Twelve percent of crossing events were non-compliant. The underlying decision making was compared to compliant events and a reference decision model to reveal important differences in the structure and type of decision making within and between road user groups. The findings show that engineering countermeasures intended to improve decision making (e.g. flashing lights), may have the opposite effect for some users because the system permits a high level of flexibility for circumvention. Non-motorised users were more likely to access information outside of the warning signals because of their ability to achieve greater proximity to the train tracks and the train itself. The major conundrum in resolving these issues is whether to restrict the amount of time and information available to users so that it cannot be used for circumventing the system or provide more information to help users make safe decisions.

  9. Enhanced esterification activity through interfacial activation and cross-linked immobilization mechanism of Rhizopus oryzae lipase in a nonaqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Funda

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial activation via surfactant (Tween 80, Triton X-100) treatment was conducted to improve the esterification activity of Rhizopus oryzae lipase that had undergone immobilization through cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEA®) technique. Surfactant pretreated immobilized enzymes exhibited better esterification activity compared to free and non-pretreated immobilized enzyme (Control CLEAs) since higher conversion rates were obtained within shorter times. The superiority of surfactant pretreated CLEAs, especially Tween 80 pretreated CLEAs (T 80 PT CLEAs), were clearly pronounced when longer alcohols were used as substrates. Conversion values exceeded 90% for octyl octanoate, oleyl octanoate and oleyl oleate synthesis with T 80 PT CLEAs whereas Control CLEAs and free enzyme showed no activity. Maximum conversions were achieved in the case equal molars of the substrates or in the case excess of the alcohol to acid in cyclohexane. In solvent free medium containing equal molars of substrates the conversion rates were 85% and 87% with T 80 PT CLEAs respectively for octyl octanoate and oleyl oleate within 2 hours. T 80 PT CLEAs showed 59% of its original activity after 7 consecutive usage for oleyl oleate synthesis. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:899-904, 2016. PMID:27111483

  10. Objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity in women with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Ortega, Francisco B; Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Aparicio, Virginia A; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Femia, Pedro; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterise levels of objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity in women with fibromyalgia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Local Association of Fibromyalgia (Granada, Spain). Participants The study comprised 94 women with diagnosed fibromyalgia who did not have other severe somatic or psychiatric disorders, or other diseases that prevent physical loading, able to ambulate and to communicate and capable and willing to provide informed consent. Primary outcome measures Sedentary time and physical activity were measured by accelerometry and expressed as time spent in sedentary behaviours, average physical activity intensity (counts/minute) and amount of time (minutes/day) spent in moderate intensity and in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA). Results The proportion of women meeting the physical activity recommendations of 30 min/day of MVPA on 5 or more days a week was 60.6%. Women spent, on average, 71% of their waking time (approximately 10 h/day) in sedentary behaviours. Both sedentary behaviour and physical activity levels were similar across age groups, waist circumference and percentage body fat categories, years since clinical diagnosis, marital status, educational level and occupational status, regardless of the severity of the disease (all p>0.1). Time spent on moderate-intensity physical activity and MVPA was, however, lower in those with greater body mass index (BMI) (−6.6 min and −7 min, respectively, per BMI category increase, <25, 25–30, >30 kg/m2; p values for trend were 0.056 and 0.051, respectively). Women spent, on average, 10 min less on MVPA (p<0.001) and 22 min less on sedentary behaviours during weekends compared with weekdays (p=0.051). Conclusions These data provide an objective measure of the amount of time spent on sedentary activities and on physical activity in women with fibromyalgia. PMID:23794573

  11. 48 CFR 1852.228-78 - Cross-waiver of liability for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the International Space Station. 1852.228-78... Cross-waiver of liability for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the International... Liability for Science or Space Exploration Activities Unrelated to the International Space Station (OCT...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.228-78 - Cross-waiver of liability for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the International Space Station. 1852.228-78... Cross-waiver of liability for science or space exploration activities unrelated to the International... Liability for Science or Space Exploration Activities Unrelated to the International Space Station (OCT...

  13. Cross-language activation in children's speech production: evidence from second language learners, bilinguals, and trilinguals.

    PubMed

    Poarch, Gregory J; van Hell, Janet G

    2012-03-01

    In five experiments, we examined cross-language activation during speech production in various groups of bilinguals and trilinguals who differed in nonnative language proficiency, language learning background, and age. In Experiments 1, 2, 3, and 5, German 5- to 8-year-old second language learners of English, German-English bilinguals, German-English-Language X trilinguals, and adult German-English bilinguals, respectively, named pictures in German and in English; in Experiment 4, 6- to 8-year-old German monolinguals named pictures in German. In both language conditions, cognate status was manipulated. We found that the bidirectional cognate facilitation effect was significant in all groups except the German monolinguals (Experiment 4) and, critically, the child second language learners (Experiment 1) in whom only native language (L1) German had an effect on second language (L2) English. The findings demonstrate how the integration of languages into a child's system follows a developmental path that, at lower levels of proficiency, allows only limited cross-language activation. The results are interpreted against the backdrop of the developing language systems of the children both for early second language learners and for early bi- and trilinguals. PMID:22138311

  14. Cross-activation and detraining effects of tongue exercise in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Schaser, Allison J; Ciucci, Michelle R; Connor, Nadine P

    2016-01-15

    Voice and swallowing deficits can occur with aging. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow may be used to treat swallowing disorders, but may also benefit vocal function due to cross-system activation effects. It is unknown how exercise-based neuroplasticity contributes to behavior and maintenance following treatment. Eighty rats were used to examine behavioral parameters and changes in neurotrophins after tongue exercise paired with a swallow. Tongue forces and ultrasonic vocalizations were recorded before and after training/detraining in young and old rats. Tissue was analyzed for neurotrophin content. Results showed tongue exercise paired with a swallow was associated with increased tongue forces at all ages. Gains diminished after detraining in old rats. Age-related changes in vocalizations, neurotrophin 4 (NT4), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were found. Minimal cross-system activation effects were observed. Neuroplastic benefits were demonstrated with exercise in old rats through behavioral improvements and up-regulation of BDNF in the hypoglossal nucleus. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow should be developed, studied, and optimized in human clinical research to treat swallowing and voice disorders in elderly people.

  15. Cross-language activation in children's speech production: evidence from second language learners, bilinguals, and trilinguals.

    PubMed

    Poarch, Gregory J; van Hell, Janet G

    2012-03-01

    In five experiments, we examined cross-language activation during speech production in various groups of bilinguals and trilinguals who differed in nonnative language proficiency, language learning background, and age. In Experiments 1, 2, 3, and 5, German 5- to 8-year-old second language learners of English, German-English bilinguals, German-English-Language X trilinguals, and adult German-English bilinguals, respectively, named pictures in German and in English; in Experiment 4, 6- to 8-year-old German monolinguals named pictures in German. In both language conditions, cognate status was manipulated. We found that the bidirectional cognate facilitation effect was significant in all groups except the German monolinguals (Experiment 4) and, critically, the child second language learners (Experiment 1) in whom only native language (L1) German had an effect on second language (L2) English. The findings demonstrate how the integration of languages into a child's system follows a developmental path that, at lower levels of proficiency, allows only limited cross-language activation. The results are interpreted against the backdrop of the developing language systems of the children both for early second language learners and for early bi- and trilinguals.

  16. Sample Energy Conservation Education Activities for Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; LaHart, David E., Ed.

    The booklet contains learning activities for introducing energy and conservation concepts into the existing elementary school curriculum. The activities were developed by Palm Beach County teachers during a one-week workshop. A framework of ideas is divided into three functional categories: universe of energy, living systems and energy, and social…

  17. Cross sections for ionization of tetrahydrofuran by protons at energies between 300 and 3000 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingjie; Rudek, Benedikt; Bennett, Daniel; de Vera, Pablo; Bug, Marion; Buhr, Ticia; Baek, Woon Yong; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rabus, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Double-differential cross sections for ionization of tetrahydrofuran by protons with energies from 300 to 3000 keV were measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt ion accelerator facility. The electrons emitted at angles between 15∘ and 150∘ relative to the ion-beam direction were detected with an electrostatic hemispherical electron spectrometer. Single-differential and total ionization cross sections have been derived by integration. The experimental results are compared to the semiempirical Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht model as well as to the recently reported method based on the dielectric formalism. The comparison to the latter showed good agreement with experimental data in a broad range of emission angles and energies of secondary electrons. The scaling property of ionization cross sections for tetrahydrofuran was also investigated. Compared to molecules of different size, the ionization cross sections of tetrahydrofuran were found to scale with the number of valence electrons at large impact parameters.

  18. Measuring the cross sections of heavy-metal spallation induced by deuterons with energies of 2, 2.94, and 3.5 GeV per nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyushenko, M. Yu.; Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Bukhal, O. V.; Voronko, V. A.; Gusak, K. V.; Zhuk, I. V.; Kudashkin, I. V.; Paraipan, M.; Potapenko, A. S.; Safronova, A. A.; Sotnikov, V. V.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The cross sections for the spallation of the heavy-metal nuclei 181Ta, 197Au, 207Pb, 209Bi, 232Th, and 238U induced by relativistic deuterons with energies of 2, 2.94, and 3.5 GeV per nucleon are measured using the deuteron beam from the Nuclotron accelerator of the JINR Laboratory of High Energy Physics in Dubna, Russia. The cross-section measurements employ a combined experimental technique involving the solidstate nuclear-track detectors and the activation gamma spectrometry. Adding our measurements to the database of experimental nuclear data will make it possible to test the computer codes used for selecting the parameters of the ADS-type facilities.

  19. Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Strategy for Polar Drive at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Radha, P. B.; Marshall, F. J.; Seka, W.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) causes two-beam energy exchange via stimulated Brillouin scattering, which reduces absorbed light and implosion velocity, alters time-resolved scattered-light spectra, and redistributes absorbed light. These effects reduce target performance in symmetric direct-drive and polar-drive (PD) experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The CBET package (Adaawam) incorporated into the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO is an integral part of the 3-D ray-trace package (Mazinisin). The CBET exchange occurs primarily over the equatorial region in PD, where successful mitigation strategies concentrate. Detuning the initial laser wavelength (dλ0) reduces the CBET interaction volume, which can be combined with spot-shape alterations. Employing opposed +/-dλ0 in each hemisphere offers the best single CBET mitigation option. The current NIF layout can be used to test detuning by altering the NIF PD repointing strategy while maintaining adequate symmetry. Simulations (2-D DRACO) predict measurable results: shell trajectory and shape and scattered-light spectrum and distribution. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Vision for cross-layer optimization to address the dual challenges of energy and reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Dehon, Andre; Carter, Nicholas P

    2009-01-01

    We are rapidly approaching an inflection point where the conventional target of producing perfect, identical transistors that operate without upset can no longer be maintained while continuing to reduce the energy per operation. With power requirements already limiting chip performance, continuing to demand perfect, upset-free transistors would mean the end of scaling benefits. The big challenges in device variability and reliability are driven by uncommon tails in distributions, infrequent upsets, one-size-fits-all technology requirements, and a lack of information about the context of each operation. Solutions co-designed across traditional layer boundaries in our system stack can change the game, allowing architecture and software (a) to compensate for uncommon variation, environments, and events, (b) to pass down invariants and requirements for the computation, and (c) to monitor the health of collections of deVices. Cross-layer codesign provides a path to continue extracting benefits from further scaled technologies despite the fact that they may be less predictable and more variable. While some limited multi-layer mitigation strategies do exist, to move forward redefining traditional layer abstractions and developing a framework that facilitates cross-layer collaboration is necessary.

  1. Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 11. Climate Zone 3 cross-tabulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Responses for Climate Zone 3 to fifty questions asked during the survey (plus four variables computed from responses to several other questions) are presented. Climate Zone 3 is defined according to the sum of heating and cooling degree days, and amounts to 7000 to 7999. A map outlines these four zones. The fifty questions were cross-tabulated against responses to nine questions which represent key explanatory characteristics of residential energy use. The nine key questions are: means of payment for housing; type of dwelling; year dwelling built; total square-footage of living space; type of fuel for main heating system; combined 1978 income; unit cost of electricity; annual electricity consumption; and annual natural gas consumption. The fifty questions and four computed variables which were cross-tabulated against the above fall into six categories: dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and dwelling characteristics; and insulation. The survey was conducted throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, with a total of 4030 households sampled. 480 households were sampled in Climate Zone 3. Information on 54 tables is explained. (MCW)

  2. Energy dependence of direct detection cross section for asymmetric mirror dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    An Haipeng; Chen Shaolong; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Nussinov, Shmuel; Zhang Yue

    2010-07-15

    In a recent paper, four of the present authors proposed a class of dark matter models where generalized parity symmetry leads to equality of dark matter abundance with baryon asymmetry of the Universe and predicts dark matter mass to be around 5 GeV. In this paper, we explore how this model can be tested in direct search experiments. In particular, we point out that if the dark matter happens to be the mirror neutron, the direct detection cross section has the unique feature that it increases at low recoil energy unlike the case of conventional weakly interacting massive particles. It is also interesting to note that the predicted spin-dependent scattering could make significant contribution to the total direct detection rate, especially for light nucleus. With this scenario, one could explain recent DAMA and CoGeNT results.

  3. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  4. Simple Activity Demonstrates Wind Energy Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Wind energy is an exciting and clean energy option often described as the fastest-growing energy system on the planet. With some simple materials, teachers can easily demonstrate its key principles in their classroom. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  5. Absolute Photoionization Cross Sections for Br2+ in the 4 p --> 4d and 3d --> 4p Energy Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, A.; Juarez, A. M.; Bilodeau, R. C.; Esteves, D. A.; Hardy, D. A.; Red, E. C.

    2011-05-01

    Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements are reported for Br2+ in the 31 eV to 46 eV and 64 eV to 72 eV photon energy ranges. The first energy range includes the low-lying 2P3 / 2 , 1 / 2 and 2D5 / 2 , 3 / 2 metastable state thresholds and extends for 10 eV above the 4S3 / 2 ground state threshold. Strong photoexcitation-autoionization resonances due to 4p --> nd transitions are seen in the cross-section spectrum and identified based on a quantum-defect analysis of the series. The systematic behavior of the quantum defect parameter of some of the Rydberg series observed in the Br2+ spectrum as well as in previously measured Se+ spectrum, are analyzed as a function of the nuclear charge. The 64 eV to 72 eV energy range contains discrete structure that arises from 3d --> np excitations. The R-matrix photoionization cross section calculations of Cummings and O'Sullivan, PRA, 54 (1996) are compared to our absolute cross section measurements in this energy range. Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements are reported for Br2+ in the 31 eV to 46 eV and 64 eV to 72 eV photon energy ranges. The first energy range includes the low-lying 2P3 / 2 , 1 / 2 and 2D5 / 2 , 3 / 2 metastable state thresholds and extends for 10 eV above the 4S3 / 2 ground state threshold. Strong photoexcitation-autoionization resonances due to 4p --> nd transitions are seen in the cross-section spectrum and identified based on a quantum-defect analysis of the series. The systematic behavior of the quantum defect parameter of some of the Rydberg series observed in the Br2+ spectrum as well as in previously measured Se+ spectrum, are analyzed as a function of the nuclear charge. The 64 eV to 72 eV energy range contains discrete structure that arises from 3d --> np excitations. The R-matrix photoionization cross section calculations of Cummings and O'Sullivan, PRA, 54 (1996) are compared to our absolute cross section measurements in this energy range. This work is

  6. A Comparison of Frontal Theta Activity During Shooting among Biathletes and Cross-Country Skiers before and after Vigorous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, Harri; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Schubert, Michael; Ettema, Gertjan; Baumeister, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies using electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor brain activity have linked higher frontal theta activity to more focused attention and superior performance in goal-directed precision tasks. In biathlon, shooting performance requires focused attention after high-intensity cross-country skiing. Purpose To compare biathletes (serving as experts) and cross-country skiers (novices) and examine the effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity during shooting. Methods EEG frontal theta (4–7 Hz) activity was compared between nine biathletes and eight cross-country skiers at comparable skiing performance levels who fired 100 shots on a 5-m indoor shooting range in quiescent condition followed by 20 shots after each of five 6-min high-intensity roller skiing sessions in the skating technique on a treadmill. Results Biathletes hit 80±14% and 81±10% before and after the roller skiing sessions, respectively. For the cross-country skiers these values were significantly lower than for the biathletes and amounted to 39±13% and 44±11% (p<0.01). Biathletes had on average 6% higher frontal theta activity during shooting as compared to cross-country skiers (F1,15 = 4.82, p = 0.044), but no significant effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity in either of the two groups were found (F1,15 = 0.14, p = 0.72). Conclusions Biathletes had significantly higher frontal theta activity than cross-country skiers during shooting, indicating higher focused attention in biathletes. Vigorous exercise did not decrease shooting performance or frontal theta activity during shooting in biathletes and cross-country skiers. PMID:26981639

  7. Disulfide cross-linking influences symbiotic activities of nodule peptide NCR247.

    PubMed

    Shabab, Mohammed; Arnold, Markus F F; Penterman, Jon; Wommack, Andrew J; Bocker, Hartmut T; Price, Paul A; Griffitts, Joel S; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Walker, Graham C

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of rhizobia with legumes establish the chronic intracellular infection that underlies symbiosis. Within nodules of inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, rhizobia differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This terminal differentiation is driven by host nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that orchestrate the adaptation of free-living bacteria into intracellular residents. Medicago truncatula encodes a family of >700 NCR peptides that have conserved cysteine motifs. NCR247 is a cationic peptide with four cysteines that can form two intramolecular disulfide bonds in the oxidized forms. This peptide affects Sinorhizobium meliloti transcription, translation, and cell division at low concentrations and is antimicrobial at higher concentrations. By preparing the three possible disulfide-cross-linked NCR247 regioisomers, the reduced peptide, and a variant lacking cysteines, we performed a systematic study of the effects of intramolecular disulfide cross-linking and cysteines on the activities of an NCR peptide. The relative activities of the five NCR247 variants differed strikingly among the various bioassays, suggesting that the NCR peptide-based language used by plants to control the development of their bacterial partners during symbiosis is even greater than previously recognized. These patterns indicate that certain NCR bioactivities require cysteines whereas others do not. The results also suggest that NCR247 may exert some of its effects within the cell envelope whereas other activities occur in the cytoplasm. BacA, a membrane protein that is critical for symbiosis, provides protection against all bactericidal forms of NCR247. Oxidative folding protects NCR247 from degradation by the symbiotically relevant metalloprotease HrrP (host range restriction peptidase), suggesting that disulfide bond formation may additionally stabilize NCR peptides during symbiosis. PMID:27551097

  8. A Step Toward Physics-Based Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rates: Measurements of High-Energy Neutron Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Nakagaki, R.; Takahashi, N.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Shima, T.; Sekimoto, S.; Yashima, H.; Shibata, S.; Matsumura, H.; Bajo, K.; Nagao, K.; Satoh, D.; Iwamoto, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Shinohara, A.; Imamura, M.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2010-12-01

    Cosmic-ray produced nuclides are found in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. In extra-terrestrial materials it is in many instances possible to find samples with exposure times much longer than a specifc radionuclide’s half-life so the production rate for a specific geometry can be determined from the saturation activity. For most terrestrial applications this condition is not met, so an exposure age can only be determined if the production rate is independently determined. For terrestrial applications these production rates are ascertained by using geologic calibration sites. These calibrations themselves are not without ambiguity at times. Physics-based production rates are an alternative means by which production rates can be determined. Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are the essential tool in model calculations of cosmogenic nuclide production rates in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. However, even when the fundamental physics of neutron transport within planetary materials (atmospheres and surface materials) is modeled properly, the reliability of the results is limited by the lack of measured cross sections. Indeed, at the present time, the lack of the excitation functions for nuclides produced by high-energy neutrons that dominate the production of cosmogenic nuclides, is the largest uncertainty in cosmogenic nuclide production rate models. To improve the accuracy of cosmogenic nuclide production rates we are performing measurements of the high-energy neutron excitation functions [1]. Target materials, representing compounds found in naturally occurring minerals, were exposed to quasi-monoenergetic neutrons at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The neutrons are produced utilizing the reaction 7Li(p, n). The first two irradiations used 300 MeV and 392 MeV primary proton beams, yielding average neutron energies of 287 MeV and 370 MeV, respectively. After bombardment by neutrons, the short half

  9. Gait models and mechanical energy in three cross-country skiing techniques.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Barbara; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Zamparo, Paola; Schena, Federico

    2014-11-01

    Fluctuations in mechanical energy of the body center of mass (COM) have been widely analyzed when investigating different gaits in human and animal locomotion. We applied this approach to estimate the mechanical work in cross-country skiing and to identify the fundamental mechanisms of this particular form of locomotion. We acquired movements of body segments, skis, poles and plantar pressures for eight skiers while they roller skied on a treadmill at 14 km h(-1) and a 2 deg slope using three different techniques (diagonal stride, DS; double poling, DP; double poling with kick, DK). The work associated with kinetic energy (KE) changes of COM was not different between techniques; the work against gravity associated with potential energy (PE) changes was higher for DP than for DK and was lowest for DS. Mechanical work against the external environment was 0.87 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DS, 0.70 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DP and 0.79 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DK. The work done to overcome frictional forces, which is negligible in walking and running, was 17.8%, 32.3% and 24.8% of external mechanical work for DS, DP and DK, respectively. The pendulum-like recovery (R%) between PE and KE was ~45%, ~26% and ~9% for DP, DK and DS, respectively, but energy losses by friction are not accounted for in this computation. The pattern of fluctuations of PE and KE indicates that DS can be described as a 'grounded running', where aerial phases are substituted by ski gliding phases, DP can be described as a pendular gait, whereas DK is a combination of both. PMID:25355851

  10. Gait models and mechanical energy in three cross-country skiing techniques.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Barbara; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Zamparo, Paola; Schena, Federico

    2014-11-01

    Fluctuations in mechanical energy of the body center of mass (COM) have been widely analyzed when investigating different gaits in human and animal locomotion. We applied this approach to estimate the mechanical work in cross-country skiing and to identify the fundamental mechanisms of this particular form of locomotion. We acquired movements of body segments, skis, poles and plantar pressures for eight skiers while they roller skied on a treadmill at 14 km h(-1) and a 2 deg slope using three different techniques (diagonal stride, DS; double poling, DP; double poling with kick, DK). The work associated with kinetic energy (KE) changes of COM was not different between techniques; the work against gravity associated with potential energy (PE) changes was higher for DP than for DK and was lowest for DS. Mechanical work against the external environment was 0.87 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DS, 0.70 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DP and 0.79 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DK. The work done to overcome frictional forces, which is negligible in walking and running, was 17.8%, 32.3% and 24.8% of external mechanical work for DS, DP and DK, respectively. The pendulum-like recovery (R%) between PE and KE was ~45%, ~26% and ~9% for DP, DK and DS, respectively, but energy losses by friction are not accounted for in this computation. The pattern of fluctuations of PE and KE indicates that DS can be described as a 'grounded running', where aerial phases are substituted by ski gliding phases, DP can be described as a pendular gait, whereas DK is a combination of both.

  11. Ab initio Potential-Energy Surfaces and Electron-Spin-Exchange Cross Sections for H-O2 Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    Accurate quartet- and doublet-state potential-energy surfaces for the interaction of a hydrogen atom and an oxygen molecule in their ground states have been determined from an ab initio calculation using large-basis sets and the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method. These potential surfaces have been used to calculate the H-O2 electron-spin-exchange cross section; the square root of the cross section (in a(sub 0)), not taking into account inelastic effects, can be obtained approximately from the expressions 2.390E(sup -1/6) and 5.266-0.708 log10(E) at low and high collision energies E (in E(sub h)), respectively. These functional forms, as well as the oscillatory structure of the cross section found at high energies, are expected from the nature of the interaction energy. The mean cross section (the cross section averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution) agrees reasonably well with the results of measurements.

  12. Myosin III-mediated cross-linking and stimulation of actin bundling activity of Espin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiyang; Li, Jianchao; Raval, Manmeet H; Yao, Ningning; Deng, Xiaoying; Lu, Qing; Nie, Si; Feng, Wei; Wan, Jun; Yengo, Christopher M; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-01-01

    Class III myosins (Myo3) and actin-bundling protein Espin play critical roles in regulating the development and maintenance of stereocilia in vertebrate hair cells, and their defects cause hereditary hearing impairments. Myo3 interacts with Espin1 through its tail homology I motif (THDI), however it is not clear how Myo3 specifically acts through Espin1 to regulate the actin bundle assembly and stabilization. Here we discover that Myo3 THDI contains a pair of repeat sequences capable of independently and strongly binding to the ankyrin repeats of Espin1, revealing an unexpected Myo3-mediated cross-linking mechanism of Espin1. The structures of Myo3 in complex with Espin1 not only elucidate the mechanism of the binding, but also reveal a Myo3-induced release of Espin1 auto-inhibition mechanism. We also provide evidence that Myo3-mediated cross-linking can further promote actin fiber bundling activity of Espin1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12856.001 PMID:26785147

  13. The energy-level crossing behavior and quantum Fisher information in a quantum well with spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. H.; Zheng, Q.; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We study the energy-level crossing behavior in a two-dimensional quantum well with the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings (SOCs). By mapping the SOC Hamiltonian onto an anisotropic Rabi model, we obtain the approximate ground state and its quantum Fisher information (QFI) via performing a unitary transformation. We find that the energy-level crossing can occur in the quantum well system within the available parameters rather than in cavity and circuit quantum eletrodynamics systems. Furthermore, the influence of two kinds of SOCs on the QFI is investigated and an intuitive explanation from the viewpoint of the stationary perturbation theory is given. PMID:26931762

  14. The D(+) + H2 reaction: differential and integral cross sections at low energy and rate constants at low temperature.

    PubMed

    González-Lezana, Tomás; Scribano, Yohann; Honvault, Pascal

    2014-08-21

    The D(+) + H2 reaction is investigated by means of a time independent quantum mechanical (TIQM) and statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods. Differential cross sections and product rotational distributions obtained with these two theoretical approaches for collision energies between 1 meV and 0.1 eV are compared to analyze the dynamics of the process. The agreement observed between the TIQM differential cross sections and the SQM predictions as the energy increases revealed the role played by the complex-forming mechanism. The importance of a good description of the asymptotic regions is also investigated by calculating rate constants for the title reaction at low temperature. PMID:24802076

  15. Cross-talk between reproduction and energy homeostasis: central impact of estrogens, leptin and kisspeptin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Casey C; Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system receives hormonal cues (e.g., estrogens and leptin, among others) that influence reproduction and energy homeostasis. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion via classical steroid signaling and rapid non-classical membrane-initiated signaling. Because GnRH neurons are void of leptin receptors, the actions of leptin on these neurons must be indirect. Although it is clear that the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus is the primary site of overlap between these two systems, it is still unclear which neural network(s) participate in the cross-talk of E2 and leptin, two hormones essential for reproductive function and metabolism. Herein we review the progress made in understanding the interactions between reproduction and energy homeostasis by focusing on the advances made to understand the cellular signaling of E2 and leptin on three neural networks: kisspeptin, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Although critical in mediating the actions of E2 and leptin, considerable work still remains to uncover how these neural networks interact in vivo. PMID:25372735

  16. Diagnosing Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Using Beamlets of Unabsorbed Light from Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    A new diagnostic is now being fielded to record the unabsorbed laser light from implosions on OMEGA. Unabsorbed light from each OMEGA beam is imaged as a distinct ``spot'' in time-integrated images. Each spot is, in essence, the end point of a beamlet of light that originates from a specific region of a beam profile and follows a path determined by refraction. The intensity of light in the beamlet varies along that path because of absorption and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) with other beamlets. This diagnostic allows for the detailed investigation of the effects of CBET on specific locations of the beam profile. A pinhole can be used to isolate specific spots, allowing the time-resolved spectrum of the beamlet to be measured. A fully 3-D CBET hydrodynamics code postprocessor is used to model the intensity and wavelength of each beamlet as it traverses the coronal plasma to the diagnostic. The model predicts that if a single beam in a symmetric implosion is turned off, the recorded intensity of nearby spots will decrease by ~ 15% as a result of loss of CBET from the dropped beam. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Dissipation of Energy, Cross Helicity, and Magnetic Helicity in Ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluie, Hussein; Eyink, Gregory L.; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2007-11-01

    The ``invariants'' of ideal MHD--energy, cross helicity, and magnetic helicity--need not be conserved in the limit of zero viscosity and resistivity if the solution fields become singular. This is observed to occur in MHD turbulence, where the effective dissipation is due to nonlinear cascade of the invariants to small-scales. We study the large-scale balances of the three invariants via a ``coarse-graining'' approach related to Wilson-Kadanoff renormalization group. The ideal dissipation in this framework is due to ``turbulent stress'' and ``turbulent EMF'' generated by eliminated plasma motions below the coarse-graining length. We derive upper bounds on these turbulent contributions to the MHD equations and improve the necessary conditions of [1] for ideal dissipation. In particular, we show that the conditions for turbulent dissipation/forward cascade of magnetic helicity are so severe--infinite 3rd-order moments of the velocity & magnetic fields!--that they are unlikely to ever naturally occur. We also establish local balance equations in space-time of the three invariants, both for measurable ``coarsed-grained'' variables and also for ``bare'' fields. On this basis we give physical interpretations of the turbulent cascades, in terms of work concepts for energy and in terms of topological linkage [2] for the two helicities. [1] Caflisch et al. 1997 Comm. Math. Phys. 184, 443-455 [2] Moffatt, H. K. 1969 J. Fluid Mech. 35, 117-129.

  18. Environment degradation, economic growth and energy consumption nexus: A wavelet-windowed cross correlation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammazi, Rania; Aloui, Chaker

    2015-10-01

    This paper analyzes the interactive linkages between carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, energy consumption (EC) and economic growth (EG) using a novel approach namely wavelet windowed cross correlation (WWCC) for six oil-exporting countries from the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) region over the period 1980-2012. Our empirical results show that there exists a bidirectional causal relationship between EC and EG. However, the results support the occurrence of unidirectional causality from EC to CO2 emissions without any feedback effects, and there exists a bidirectional causal relationship between EG and CO2 emissions for the region as a whole. The study suggests that environmental and energy policies should recognize the differences in the nexus between EC and EG in order to maintain sustainable EG in the GCC region. Our findings will be useful for GCC countries to better evaluate its situation in the future climate negotiations. The overall findings will help GCC countries assess its position better in future climate change negotiations.

  19. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g. monitoring) the relationship is not clear. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between parent's PA-related practices, general parenting style, and children's PA level. Methods During the spring of 2007 a diverse group of 99 parent-child dyads (29% White, 49% Black, 22% Hispanic; 89% mothers) living in low-income rural areas of the US participated in a cross-sectional study. Using validated questionnaires, parents self-reported their parenting style (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and uninvolved) and activity-related parenting practices. Height and weight were measured for each dyad and parents reported demographic information. Child PA was measured objectively through accelerometers and expressed as absolute counts and minutes engaged in intensity-specific activity. Results Seventy-six children had valid accelerometer data. Children engaged in 113.4 ± 37.0 min. of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day. Children of permissive parents accumulated more minutes of MVPA than those of uninvolved parents (127.5 vs. 97.1, p < 0.05), while parents who provided above average levels of support had children who participated in more minutes of MVPA (114.2 vs. 98.3, p = 0.03). While controlling for known covariates, an uninvolved parenting style was the only parenting behavior associated with child physical activity. Parenting style moderated the association between two parenting practices - reinforcement and monitoring - and child physical activity. Specifically, post-hoc analyses revealed that for the permissive parenting style group, higher levels of parental reinforcement or monitoring were associated with higher

  20. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and adolescent girls’ physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the influences on physical activity is crucial, particularly among important target groups such as adolescent girls. This study describes cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and girls’ participation in organized sport, walking/cycling trips and objectively assessed moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Methods Data were collected from adolescent girls (n=222) and their parents in 2004 and again in 2006. Parents self-reported their demographic characteristics and parenting style. Girls self-reported their organized sport participation and weekly walking/cycling trips, while MVPA was assessed using accelerometers. Linear regression and interaction analyses were performed. Interactions between socio-demographic factors and parenting style with organized sport, walking/cycling trips and MVPA are presented. Results There were cross-sectional associations between authoritative (B=−0.45, p=0.042) and indulgent (B=−0.56, p=0.002) parenting and the number of walking/cycling trips, and authoritarian (B=0.27, p=0.033) parenting and frequency of organized sport. Significant interactions included those between: family status, authoritative parenting and daily (p=0.048) and week day (p=0.013) MVPA; education, indulgent parenting and MVPA on weekend days (p=0.006); and, employment, authoritarian parenting and duration and frequency of organized sport (p=0.004), highlighting the complexity of these relationships. Longitudinal analyses revealed significant decreases in organized sport and MVPA, significant increases in walking/cycling trips and no significant associations between parenting and physical activity. Conclusion Parenting styles appear to influence walking and cycling trips among adolescent girls, though not physical activity within other domains. Socio-demographic characteristics interact with the relationships between parenting and physical activity. While these findings can inform the

  1. Asymmetric Suzuki Cross-Couplings of Activated Secondary Alkyl Electrophiles: Arylations of Racemic α-Chloroamides

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Pamela M.; Fu, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    A nickel-catalyzed stereoconvergent method for the enantioselective Suzuki arylation of racemic α-chloroamides has been developed. This process represents the first example of an asymmetric arylation of an α-haloamide, of an enantioselective arylation of an α-chlorocarbonyl compound, and of an asymmetric Suzuki reaction with an activated alkyl electrophile or an arylboron reagent. The method is also applicable to the corresponding enantioselective cross-coupling of α-bromoamides. The coupling products can be transformed without racemization into useful enantioenriched α-arylcarboxylic acids and primary alcohols. An unprecedented (and modest) kinetic resolution of the α-chloroamide has been observed; a mechanistic study indicates that the selectivity likely reflects the discrimination by the chiral catalyst of the two enantiomeric α-chloroamides in an irreversible oxidative-addition process. PMID:20698665

  2. Continuous Processing of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Suspensions via Dynamic Cross-Flow Filtration.

    PubMed

    Gursch, Johannes; Hohl, Roland; Toschkoff, Gregor; Dujmovic, Diana; Brozio, Jörg; Krumme, Markus; Rasenack, Norbert; Khinast, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Over the last years, continuous manufacturing has created significant interest in the pharmaceutical industry. Continuous filtration at low flow rates and high solid loadings poses, however, a significant challenge. A commercially available, continuously operating, dynamic cross-flow filtration device (CFF) is tested and characterized. It is shown that the CFF is a highly suitable technology for continuous filtration. For all tested model active pharmaceutical ingredients, a material-specific strictly linear relationship between feed and permeate rate is identified. Moreover, for each tested substance, a constant concentration factor is reached. A one-parameter model based on a linear equation is suitable to fully describe the CFF filtration performance. This rather unexpected finding and the concentration polarization layer buildup is analyzed and a basic model to describe the observed filtration behavior is developed.

  3. Fragmentation cross sections of 28Si at beam energies from 290AMeV to 1200A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, C.; Fukumura, A.; Guetersloh, S.B.; Heilbronn, L.H; Iwata, Y.; Miller, J.; Murukami, T.

    2006-08-25

    In planning for long-duration spaceflight, it will beimportant to accurately model the exposure of astronauts to heavy ions inthe Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). As part of an ongoing effort to improveheavy-ion transport codes that will be used in designing futurespacecraft and habitats, fragmentation cross sections of 28Si have beenmeasured using beams with extracted energies from 290A MeV to 1200A MeV,spanning most of the peak region of the energy distribution of siliconions in the GCR. Results were obtained for six elemental targets:hydrogen, carbon, aluminum, copper, tin, and lead. The charge-changingcross sections are found to be energy-independent within the experimentaluncertainties, except for those on the hydrogen target. Cross sectionsfor the heaviest fragments are found to decrease slightly with increasingenergy for lighter targets, but increase with energy for tin and leadtargets. The cross sections are compared to previous measurements atsimilar energies, and to predictions of the NUCFRG2 model used by NASA toevaluate radiation exposures in flight. For charge-changing crosssections, reasonable agreement is found between the present experimentand those of Webber, et al. and Flesch, et al., and NUCFRG2 agrees withthe data to within 3 percent in most cases. Fragment cross sections showless agreement between experiments, and there are substantial differencesbetween NUCFRG2 predictions andthe data.

  4. A reduced energy supply strategy in active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichchou, M. N.; Loukil, T.; Bareille, O.; Chamberland, G.; Qiu, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a control strategy is presented and numerically tested. This strategy aims to achieve the potential performance of fully active systems with a reduced energy supply. These energy needs are expected to be comparable to the power demands of semi-active systems, while system performance is intended to be comparable to that of a fully active configuration. The underlying strategy is called 'global semi-active control'. This control approach results from an energy investigation based on management of the optimal control process. Energy management encompasses storage and convenient restitution. The proposed strategy monitors a given active law without any external energy supply by considering purely dissipative and energy-demanding phases. Such a control law is offered here along with an analysis of its properties. A suboptimal form, well adapted for practical implementation steps, is also given. Moreover, a number of numerical experiments are proposed in order to validate test findings.

  5. Cross-Sectional Investigation of HEMS Activities in Europe: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Gava, Paolo; Truhlář, Anatolij; Sandberg, Mårten; Group, The Euphorea

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To gather information on helicopter emergency medical services (HEMSs) activities across Europe. Methods. Cross-sectional data-collection on daily (15 November 2013) activities of a sample of European HEMSs. A web-based questionnaire with both open and closed questions was used, developed by experts of the European Prehospital Research Alliance (EUPHOREA). Results. We invited 143 bases from 11 countries; 85 (60%) reported base characteristics only and 73 (51%) sample-day data too. The variety of base characteristics was enormous; that is, the target population ranged from 94.000 to 4.500.000. Of 158 requested primary missions, 62 (0.82 per base) resulted in landing. Cardiac aetiology (36%) and trauma (36%) prevailed, mostly of life-threatening severity (43%, 0.64 per mission). Had HEMS been not dispatched, patients would have been attended by another physician in 67% of cases, by paramedics in 24%, and by nurses in 9%. On-board physicians estimated to have caused a major decrease of death risk in 47% of missions, possible decrease in 22%, minor benefit in 17%, no benefit in 11%, and damage in 3%. Earlier treatment and faster transport to hospital were the main reasons for benefit. The most frequent therapeutic procedure was drug administration (78% of missions); endotracheal intubation occurred in 25% of missions and was an option hardly offered by ground crews. Conclusions. The study proved feasible, establishing an embryonic network of European HEMS. The participation rate was low and limits the generalizability of the results. Fortunately, because of its cross-sectional characteristics and the handy availability of the web platform, the study is easily repeatable with an enhanced network. PMID:25538947

  6. Cross sections for H+ and H atoms colliding with Li in the low-keV-energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, E.; Öhrn, Y.

    2008-07-01

    State-to-state, summed charge transfer and stopping cross sections in collisions of protons and neutral hydrogen atoms with lithium atoms have been studied at collision energies ranging from 10to25keV . Cross sections were calculated using electron-nuclear dynamics (END), which is a nonadiabatic, time-dependent, direct approach for the study of ion-atom-molecule interaction processes. Our results show good agreement when compared to available theoretical and experimental data. We find that the charge transfer cross section for protons shows a bump and a maximum as a function of the projectile energy, both of them as a result of the large probability for capture into the projectile 2p orbital. The bump corresponds to a projectile energy of approximately Ep˜0.7keV , and results from the electron capture probability in the low impact parameter region of approximately btilde 2.0a.u. The maximum occurs at Ep˜5keV as a result of the larger capture probability in the intermediate impact parameter region near btilde 8a.u. A similar behavior is found for the electron loss cross section for hydrogen projectiles. We find that the beam charge fraction, for all the energies considered, is nearly neutral. We also find that the largest contribution to the stopping cross section is for impact parameters around btilde 5a.u. Finally, we report the total, electronic, and nuclear stopping cross sections to be within a factor of 2 of the reported values in the SRIM 06 code (SRIM stands for stopping and range of ions in matter) and other available experimental data. The largest discrepancy is due to the charge transfer process as well as to a transient LiH+ molecular ion formed in the low projectile energy region.

  7. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  8. Measurement of reaction cross-sections for 89Y at average neutron energies of 7.24-24.83 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Naik, Haladhara; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shahid, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    We measured neutron-induced reaction cross-sections for 89Y(n,γ)90mY and 89Y(n,α)86Rb reactions with the average neutron energy region from 7.45 to 24.83 MeV by an activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique using the MC-50 Cyclotron at Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The neutron-induced reaction cross-sections of 89Y as a function of neutron energy were taken from the TENDL-2013 library. The flux-weighted average cross-sections for 89Y(n,γ)90mY and 89Y(n,α)86Rb reactions were calculated from the TENDL-2013 values based on mono-energetic neutron and by using the neutron energy spectrum from MCNPX 2.6.0 code. The present results are compared with the flux-weighted values of TENDL-2013 and are found to be in good agreement

  9. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of Pencilluim notatum lipase enzyme with improved activity, stability and reusability characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Saima; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) are considered as an effective tool for the immobilization of enzyme. In this study, Pencillium notatum lipase (PNL) was immobilized as carrier free cross-linked enzyme aggregates using glutaraldehyde (GLA) and Ethylene glycol-bis [succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide] (EG-NHS) as cross-linking agents. The optimal conditions for the synthesis of an efficient lipase CLEAs such as precipitant type, the nature and amount of cross-linking reagent, and cross-linking time were optimized. The recovered activities of CLEAs were considerably dependent on the concentration of GLA; however, the activity recovery was not severely affected by EG-NHS as a mild cross-linker. The EG-NHS aggregates displayed superior hydrolytic (52.08±2.52%) and esterification (64.42%) activities as compared to GLA aggregates which showed 23.8±1.86 and 34.54% of hydrolytic and esterification activity, respectively. Morphological analysis by fluorescence and scanning electron microscope revealed that EG-NHS aggregates were smaller in size with larger surface area compared to GLA aggregates. The pH optima of both types of CLEAs were displaced to slightly alkaline region and higher temperature as compared to native enzyme. Highest enzyme activity of CLEAs was achieved at the pH of 9.0 and 42°C temperature. Moreover, a significant improvement in the thermal resistance was also recorded after immobilization. After ten reusability cycles in aqueous medium, GLA and EG-NHS cross-linked lipase CLEAs preserved 63.62% and 70.9% of their original activities, respectively. The results suggest that this novel CLEA-lipase is potentially usable in many industrial applications.

  10. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of Pencilluim notatum lipase enzyme with improved activity, stability and reusability characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Saima; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) are considered as an effective tool for the immobilization of enzyme. In this study, Pencillium notatum lipase (PNL) was immobilized as carrier free cross-linked enzyme aggregates using glutaraldehyde (GLA) and Ethylene glycol-bis [succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide] (EG-NHS) as cross-linking agents. The optimal conditions for the synthesis of an efficient lipase CLEAs such as precipitant type, the nature and amount of cross-linking reagent, and cross-linking time were optimized. The recovered activities of CLEAs were considerably dependent on the concentration of GLA; however, the activity recovery was not severely affected by EG-NHS as a mild cross-linker. The EG-NHS aggregates displayed superior hydrolytic (52.08±2.52%) and esterification (64.42%) activities as compared to GLA aggregates which showed 23.8±1.86 and 34.54% of hydrolytic and esterification activity, respectively. Morphological analysis by fluorescence and scanning electron microscope revealed that EG-NHS aggregates were smaller in size with larger surface area compared to GLA aggregates. The pH optima of both types of CLEAs were displaced to slightly alkaline region and higher temperature as compared to native enzyme. Highest enzyme activity of CLEAs was achieved at the pH of 9.0 and 42°C temperature. Moreover, a significant improvement in the thermal resistance was also recorded after immobilization. After ten reusability cycles in aqueous medium, GLA and EG-NHS cross-linked lipase CLEAs preserved 63.62% and 70.9% of their original activities, respectively. The results suggest that this novel CLEA-lipase is potentially usable in many industrial applications. PMID:27365121

  11. The Importance of Physical Fitness versus Physical Activity for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deborah Rohm; Steinhardt, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships among physical fitness, physical activity, and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) in male police officers. Data from screenings and physical fitness assessments indicated physical activity must be sufficient to influence fitness before obtaining statistically significant risk-reducing…

  12. Silyl Radical Activation of Alkyl Halides in Metallaphotoredox Catalysis: A Unique Pathway for Cross-Electrophile Coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Patricia; Le, Chi Chip; MacMillan, David W C

    2016-07-01

    A strategy for cross-electrophile coupling has been developed via the merger of photoredox and transition metal catalysis. In this report, we demonstrate the use of commercially available tris(trimethylsilyl)silane with metallaphotoredox catalysis to efficiently couple alkyl bromides with aryl or heteroaryl bromides in excellent yields. We hypothesize that a photocatalytically generated silyl radical species can perform halogen-atom abstraction to activate alkyl halides as nucleophilic cross-coupling partners. This protocol allows the use of mild yet robust conditions to construct Csp(3)-Csp(2) bonds generically via a unique cross-coupling pathway. PMID:27263662

  13. NASA's SMD Cross-Forum Resources for Supporting Scientist Engagement in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Hsu, B. C.; Sharma, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.; Shipp, S. S.; Smith, D.

    2012-12-01

    Sharing the excitement of ongoing scientific discoveries is an important aspect of scientific activity for researchers. Directly engaging scientists in education and public outreach (E/PO) activities has the benefit of directly connecting the public to those who engage in scientific activities. A shortage of training in education methods, public speaking, and working with various public audiences increases barriers to engaging scientists in these types in E/PO activities. NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public forums (astrophysics, earth science, heliophysics, and planetary science) support scientists currently involved in E/PO and who are interested in becoming involved in E/PO through a variety of avenues. Over the past three years, the forums have developed a variety of resources to help engage scientists in education and public outreach. We will showcase the following resources developed through the SMD E/PO cross-forum efforts: Professional development resources for writing NASA SMD E/PO proposals (webinars and other online tools), ongoing professional development at scientific conferences to increase scientist engagement in E/PO activities, toolkits for scientists interested in best practices in E/PO (online guides for K-12 education and public outreach), toolkits to inform scientists of science education resources developed within each scientific thematic community, EarthSpace (a community web space where instructors can find and share about teaching space and earth sciences in the undergraduate classroom, including class materials news and funding opportunities, and the latest education research, http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/), thematic resources for teaching about SMD science topics, and an online database of scientists interested in connecting with education programs. Learn more about the Forum and find resources at http://smdepo.org/.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Cross-Tolerance Delays Platelet-Activating Factor-Induced Sudden Death in Swiss Albino Mice: Involvement of Cyclooxygenase in Cross-Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Shancy Petsel; Lakshmikanth, Chikkamenahalli Lakshminarayana; Chaithra, Vyala Hanumanthareddy; Kumari, Titus Ruth Shantha; Chen, Chu-Huang; McIntyre, Thomas M; Marathe, Gopal Kedihitlu

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling through Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases. Some believe that TLR-mediated pathogenicity is due, in part, to the lipid pro-inflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF), but this has been questioned. To test the direct contribution of PAF in endotoxemia in murine models, we injected PAF intraperitoneally into Swiss albino mice in the presence and absence of LPS. PAF alone (5 μg/mouse) caused death within 15-20 min, but this could be prevented by pretreating mice with PAF-receptor (PAF-R) antagonists or PAF-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). A low dose of LPS (5 mg/kg body wt) did not impair PAF-induced death, whereas higher doses (10 or 20 mg/kg body wt) delayed death, probably via LPS cross-tolerance. Cross-tolerance occurred only when PAF was injected simultaneously with LPS or within 30 min of LPS injection. Tolerance does not appear to be due to an abundant soluble mediator. Histologic examination of lungs and liver and measurement of circulating TNF-α and IL-10 levels suggested that the inflammatory response is not diminished during cross-tolerance. Interestingly, aspirin, a non-specific cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, partially blocked PAF-induced sudden death, whereas NS-398, a specific COX-2 inhibitor, completely protected mice from the lethal effects of PAF. Both COX inhibitors (at 20 mg/kg body wt) independently amplified the cross-tolerance exerted by higher dose of LPS, suggesting that COX-derived eicosanoids may be involved in these events. Thus, PAF does not seem to have a protective role in endotoxemia, but its effects are delayed by LPS in a COX-sensitive way. These findings are likely to shed light on basic aspects of the endotoxin cross-tolerance occurring in many disease conditions and may offer new opportunities for clinical intervention. PMID:27064683

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Cross-Tolerance Delays Platelet-Activating Factor-Induced Sudden Death in Swiss Albino Mice: Involvement of Cyclooxygenase in Cross-Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Shancy Petsel; Lakshmikanth, Chikkamenahalli Lakshminarayana; Chaithra, Vyala Hanumanthareddy; Kumari, Titus Ruth Shantha; Chen, Chu-Huang; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Marathe, Gopal Kedihitlu

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling through Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases. Some believe that TLR-mediated pathogenicity is due, in part, to the lipid pro-inflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF), but this has been questioned. To test the direct contribution of PAF in endotoxemia in murine models, we injected PAF intraperitoneally into Swiss albino mice in the presence and absence of LPS. PAF alone (5 μg/mouse) caused death within 15–20 min, but this could be prevented by pretreating mice with PAF-receptor (PAF-R) antagonists or PAF-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). A low dose of LPS (5 mg/kg body wt) did not impair PAF-induced death, whereas higher doses (10 or 20 mg/kg body wt) delayed death, probably via LPS cross-tolerance. Cross-tolerance occurred only when PAF was injected simultaneously with LPS or within 30 min of LPS injection. Tolerance does not appear to be due to an abundant soluble mediator. Histologic examination of lungs and liver and measurement of circulating TNF-α and IL-10 levels suggested that the inflammatory response is not diminished during cross-tolerance. Interestingly, aspirin, a non-specific cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, partially blocked PAF-induced sudden death, whereas NS-398, a specific COX-2 inhibitor, completely protected mice from the lethal effects of PAF. Both COX inhibitors (at 20 mg/kg body wt) independently amplified the cross-tolerance exerted by higher dose of LPS, suggesting that COX-derived eicosanoids may be involved in these events. Thus, PAF does not seem to have a protective role in endotoxemia, but its effects are delayed by LPS in a COX-sensitive way. These findings are likely to shed light on basic aspects of the endotoxin cross-tolerance occurring in many disease conditions and may offer new opportunities for clinical intervention. PMID:27064683

  16. Cross-Couplings Using Aryl Ethers via C-O Bond Activation Enabled by Nickel Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tobisu, Mamoru; Chatani, Naoto

    2015-06-16

    Arene synthesis has been revolutionized by the invention of catalytic cross-coupling reactions, wherein aryl halides can be coupled with organometallic and organic nucleophiles. Although the replacement of aryl halides with phenol derivatives would lead to more economical and ecological methods, success has been primarily limited to activated phenol derivatives such as triflates. Aryl ethers arguably represent one of the most ideal substrates in terms of availability, cost, safety, and atom efficiency. However, the robust nature of the C(aryl)-O bonds of aryl ethers renders it extremely difficult to use them in catalytic reactions among the phenol derivatives. In 1979, Wenkert reported a seminal work on the nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling of aryl ethers with Grignard reagents. However, it was not until 2004 that the unique ability of a low-valent nickel species to activate otherwise unreactive C(aryl)-O bonds was appreciated with Dankwardt's identification of the Ni(0)/PCy3 system, which significantly expanded the efficiency of the Wenkert reaction. Application of the nickel catalyst to cross-couplings with other nucleophiles was first accomplished in 2008 by our group using organoboron reagents. Later on, several other nucleophiles, including organozinc reagents, amines, hydrosilane, and hydrogen were shown to be coupled with aryl ethers under nickel catalysis. Despite these advances, progress in this field is relatively slow because of the low reactivity of benzene derivatives (e.g., anisole) compared with polyaromatic substrates (e.g., methoxynaphthalene), particularly when less reactive and synthetically useful nucleophiles are used. The "naphthalene problem" has been overcome by the use of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands bearing bulky N-alkyl substituents, which enables a wide range of aryl ethers to be coupled with organoboron nucleophiles. Moreover, the use of N-alkyl-substituted NHC ligands allows the use of alkynylmagnesium reagents, thereby realizing

  17. Theoretical study of differential charge-transfer cross sections for Ne4++He collisions at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J.; Lin, C. D.

    1988-02-01

    A quantal two-channel calculation is applied to study charge-transfer differential cross sections in Ne4+ on He collisions at laboratory impact energies from 220 to 500 eV. The experimental data of Tunnell et al. were used to fit empirical potential curves and coupling terms from which the observed oscillatory structures in the differential cross sections were analyzed. In contrast with the double-charge-transfer process in C4+ on He, where the oscillations in the differential cross sections are attributed to pure Stueckelberg oscillations, we demonstrated that the differential cross sections for charge transfer in Ne4+ on He exhibit many fine fast oscillations and the observed structures are due to the envelopes of these unresolved fast oscillations. Classical deflection functions are used to help in interpreting the calculated oscillations.

  18. Excitation cross sections for krypton by electrons in the 15-100-eV impact-energy range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Srivastava, S. K.; Tanaka, H.; Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections have been determined for the excitation of the 24 lowest electronic states of Kr (some of the transitions are unresolved). The inelastic-scattering cross sections were normalized to the absolute scale with the help of the elastic-scattering differential cross sections (DCS's) which in turn were normalized with respect to absolute He DCS's. The impact energies were 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV and the DCS's were obtained over the range of 5-135 deg scattering angles. The error limits associated with the differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections have been estimated at 25%, 38%, and 46%, respectively.

  19. Energy Conservation Teaching Activities for Home Economics Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jedlicka, Ella, Ed.

    This collection of home economics activities is intended to meet the special needs of home economics teachers who wish to include energy education activities in their curricula. The 45 activities can be used as presented, or can be modified to individual needs or local conditions. Each activity includes: (1) title, (2) objective, (3) activity…

  20. Physical Activity Patterns and Factors Related to Exercise during Pregnancy: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Simony Lira; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Godoy, Ana Carolina; Kasawara, Karina Tamy; Morais, Sirlei Siani

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the physical activity levels of pregnant women and to examine the characteristics associated with the practice of exercise and the activities of daily living during pregnancy. Methods For this cross-sectional study, 1,279 women were recruited within 72 hours postpartum. They were interviewed about their socio-demographic data and obstetric history and were administered self-report questionnaires about exercise and daily physical activities during pregnancy. Data on the current pregnancy, labor, delivery, and newborn outcomes were collected from participants’ medical records. To analyze factors related to the practice of exercise, we used the student t-test, X², and odds ratio (OR), with a corresponding 95% confident interval (CI), followed by a multiple logistic regression. The significance level was 5%. Results Compared to the pre-pregnancy period, the prevalence of physical activity among participants was lower throughout pregnancy (20.1%) (p = 0.01). Half of the women interrupted practicing physical exercise due to pregnancy. The lowest prevalence of exercise was observed in the first (13.6%) and third trimesters (13.4%). Less than half of women received exercise guidance during prenatal care meetings (47.4%). Walking was the most commonly reported exercise, followed by water aerobics. Factors positively associated with exercise practice were higher educational level (OR= 1.82; CI 95% 1.28–2.60), primiparity (OR=1.49; CI 95% 1.07–2.07), exercising before pregnancy (OR= 6.45; CI 95% 4.64–8.96), and exercise guidance during prenatal care (OR=2.54; CI 95% 1.80–3.57). Mildly intense exercise and domestic activities were most frequently reported among pregnant women. There were no differences in maternal and perinatal outcomes between active and sedentary pregnant women. Conclusion The findings indicate that promoting physical activity remains a priority in public health policy, and women of childbearing age, especially those planning a

  1. Intersystem crossing rates of S1 state keto-amino cytosine at low excess energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Etinski, Mihajlo; Blaser, Susan; Frey, Hans-Martin; Marian, Christel; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    The amino-keto tautomer of supersonic jet-cooled cytosine undergoes intersystem crossing (ISC) from the v = 0 and low-lying vibronic levels of its S1(1ππ∗) state. We investigate these ISC rates experimentally and theoretically as a function of S1 state vibrational excess energy Eexc. The S1 vibronic levels are pumped with a ˜5 ns UV laser, the S1 and triplet state ion signals are separated by prompt or delayed ionization with a second UV laser pulse. After correcting the raw ISC yields for the relative S1 and T1 ionization cross sections, we obtain energy dependent ISC quantum yields QISC corr = 1 % -5%. These are combined with previously measured vibronic state-specific decay rates, giving ISC rates kISC = 0.4-1.5 ṡ 109 s-1, the corresponding S1⇝S0 internal conversion (IC) rates are 30-100 times larger. Theoretical ISC rates are computed using SCS-CC2 methods, which predict rapid ISC from the S1; v = 0 state with kISC = 3 ṡ 109 s-1 to the T1(3ππ∗) triplet state. The surprisingly high rate of this El Sayed-forbidden transition is caused by a substantial admixture of 1nOπ∗ character into the S1(1ππ∗) wave function at its non-planar minimum geometry. The combination of experiment and theory implies that (1) below Eexc = 550 cm-1 in the S1 state, S1⇝S0 internal conversion dominates the nonradiative decay with kIC ≥ 2 ṡ 1010 s-1, (2) the calculated S1⇝T1 (1ππ∗⇝3ππ∗) ISC rate is in good agreement with experiment, (3) being El-Sayed forbidden, the S1⇝T1 ISC is moderately fast (kISC = 3 ṡ 109 s-1), and not ultrafast, as claimed by other calculations, and (4) at Eexc ˜ 550 cm-1 the IC rate increases by ˜50 times, probably by accessing the lowest conical intersection (the C5-twist CI) and thereby effectively switching off the ISC decay channels.

  2. Direct Measurement of the 4He(12C, 16O)γ Total Cross Section Near Stellar Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kunihiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Ban, Tadahiko; Hamamoto, Kenichi; Narikiyo, Yoshihiro; Tao, Nariaki; Sagara, Kenshi

    2015-05-01

    A cross section measurement employing a direct 16O detection method for the reaction energies from Ecm = 2.4 to 0.7 MeV is planned at Kyushu University Tandem Laboratory (KUTL). To perform this experiment and to obtain quantitative information about the cross section to within an error of 10%, we have developed several instruments, including a blow-in type windowless gas target, a recoil mass separator and a RF-deflector. The measurements at Ecm = 2.4 and 1.5 MeV have been performed with these instruments. For measuring at Ecm < 1.2 MeV, a hybrid detector employing both, an ionization chamber and a silicon detector was developed to reduce the carbon backgrounds more efficiently. The oxygen ions were clearly separated from carbon background by using the energy deposit in the ionization chamber. Experiment of Ecm = 1.2 MeV was performed and the cross section was obtained.

  3. Modeling for Matrix Multicracking Evolution of Cross-ply Ceramic-Matrix Composites Using Energy Balance Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    The matrix multicracking evolution of cross-ply ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated using energy balance approach. The multicracking of cross-ply CMCs was classified into five modes, i.e., (1) mode 1: transverse multicracking; (2) mode 2: transverse multicracking and matrix multicracking with perfect fiber/matrix interface bonding; (3) mode 3: transverse multicracking and matrix multicracking with fiber/matrix interface debonding; (4) mode 4: matrix multicracking with perfect fiber/matrix interface bonding; and (5) mode 5: matrix multicracking with fiber/matrix interface debonding. The stress distributions of four cracking modes, i.e., mode 1, mode 2, mode 3 and mode 5, are analysed using shear-lag model. The matrix multicracking evolution of mode 1, mode 2, mode 3 and mode 5, has been determined using energy balance approach. The effects of ply thickness and fiber volume fraction on matrix multicracking evolution of cross-ply CMCs have been investigated.

  4. Electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections at low electron energies using a photoelectron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Subramanian, K. P.; Krishnakumar, E.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections have been measured at low electron energies using the powerful technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. The measurements have been carried out at 17 electron energies varying from 0.7 to 10 eV with an accuracy of + or - 2.7 percent. The results obtained in the present work have been compared with other recent measurement and calculations.

  5. Lightstick Magic: Determination of the Activation Energy with PSL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments with lightsticks in which the activation energy for the light-producing reaction is determined. Involves monitoring the light intensity of the lightstick as a function of temperature. Gives students the opportunity to explore the concepts of kinetics and activation energies and the world of computer-interfaced experimentation…

  6. Biomass I. Science Activities in Energy [and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to biomass as a form of energy. (The word biomass is used to describe all solid material of animal or vegetable origin from which energy may be extracted.) Twelve student activities using art, economics,…

  7. Chemical trends in the activation energies of DX centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, O.; Kawai, H.; Mori, Y.; Kaneko, K.

    1984-12-01

    The activation energies of DX centers in AlGaAs doped with six different impurities (S, Se, Te, Si, Ge, and Sn) are measured by deep level transient spectroscopy. Remarkable trends are established, in which the activation energies of DX centers with group IV impurities become shallower as the mass number of the impurity increases, while those with group VI impurities remain constant.

  8. Fabric-based integrated energy devices for wearable activity monitors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungmook; Lee, Jongsu; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Minbaek; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2014-09-01

    A wearable fabric-based integrated power-supply system that generates energy triboelectrically using human activity and stores the generated energy in an integrated supercapacitor is developed. This system can be utilized as either a self-powered activity monitor or as a power supply for external wearable sensors. These demonstrations give new insights for the research of wearable electronics. PMID:25070873

  9. Selected Energy Education Activities for Pennsylvania Middle School Grades. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Nancy; And Others

    These activities are intended to help increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage students to become energy conservationists. The document is divided into sections according to discipline area. A final section is devoted to interdisciplinary activities involving several discipline areas integrated with the energy…

  10. Family leadership styles and adolescent dietary and physical activity behaviors: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transformational leadership is conceptualized as a set of behaviors designed to inspire, energize and motivate others to achieve higher levels of functioning, and is associated with salient health-related outcomes in organizational settings. Given (a) the similarities that exist between leadership within organizational settings and parenting within families, and (b) the importance of the family environment in the promotion of adolescent health-enhancing behaviors, the purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the cross-sectional relationships between parents’ transformational leadership behaviors and adolescent dietary and physical activity behaviors. Methods 857 adolescents (aged 13–15, mean age = 14.70 yrs) completed measures of transformational parenting behaviors, healthful dietary intake and leisure-time physical activity. Regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between family transformational leadership and adolescent health outcomes. A further ‘extreme group analysis’ was conducted by clustering families based on quartile splits. A MANCOVA (controlling for child gender) was conducted to examine differences between families displaying (a) HIGH levels of transformational parenting (consistent HIGH TP), (b) LOW levels of transformational parenting (consistent LOW TP), and (c) inconsistent levels of transformational parenting (inconsistent HIGH-LOW TP). Results Results revealed that adolescents’ perceptions of family transformational parenting were associated with both healthy dietary intake and physical activity. Adolescents who perceived their families to display the highest levels of transformational parenting (HIGH TP group) displayed greater healthy eating and physical activity behaviors than adolescents who perceived their families to display the lowest levels of transformational parenting behaviors (LOW TP group). Adolescents who perceived their families to display inconsistent levels of transformational

  11. Catalytic activity of non-cross-linked microcrystals of aspartate aminotransferase in poly(ethylene glycol).

    PubMed Central

    Kirsten, H; Christen, P

    1983-01-01

    The molar activity of crystalline mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase is decreased to 10% of that of the enzyme in solution. The activity was measured in suspensions of non-cross-linked microcrystals (average dimensions 22 microns X 5 microns X 0.8 microns) in 30% (w/v) poly(ethylene glycol). Kinetic tests ruled out the possibility that diffusion of the substrate in the crystals is rate-limiting. The observed decrease in catalytic efficiency can be attributed exclusively to crystal-packing effects. A direct inhibition by poly(ethylene glycol) is excluded because poly(ethylene glycol), with average Mr 6000, cannot penetrate the liquid channels of the crystals, owing to its large Stokes radius. The crystals examined were triclinic and of the same habit as those used for high-resolution X-ray-crystallographic analysis [Ford, Eichele & Jansonius (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 2559-2563]. The catalytic competence of crystalline aspartate aminotransferase confirms the relevance of the spatial model of this protein for the elucidation of its mechanism of action. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6870840

  12. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  13. Opposite Cross-Talk by Oleate and Palmitate on Insulin Signaling in Hepatocytes through Macrophage Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Guijas, Carlos; Balsinde, Jesús; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation in adipose tissue during obesity is associated with an impairment of the insulin signaling cascade. In this study, we have evaluated the impact of palmitate or oleate overload of macrophage/Kupffer cells in triggering stress-mediated signaling pathways, in lipoapoptosis, and in the cross-talk with insulin signaling in hepatocytes. RAW 264.7 macrophages or Kupffer cells were stimulated with oleate or palmitate, and levels of M1/M2 polarization markers and the lipidomic profile of eicosanoids were analyzed. Whereas proinflammatory cytokines and total eicosanoids were elevated in macrophages/Kupffer cells stimulated with palmitate, enhanced arginase 1 and lower leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels were detected in macrophages stimulated with oleate. When hepatocytes were pretreated with conditioned medium (CM) from RAW 264.7 or Kupffer cells loaded with palmitate (CM-P), phosphorylation of stress kinases and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling was increased, insulin signaling was impaired, and lipoapoptosis was detected. Conversely, enhanced insulin receptor-mediated signaling and reduced levels of the phosphatases protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were found in hepatocytes treated with CM from macrophages stimulated with oleate (CM-O). Supplementation of CM-O with LTB4 suppressed insulin sensitization and increased PTP1B and PTEN. Furthermore, LTB4 decreased insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in hepatocytes, activated the NFκB pathway, and up-regulated PTP1B and PTEN, these effects being mediated by LTB4 receptor BTL1. In conclusion, oleate and palmitate elicit an opposite cross-talk between macrophages/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes. Whereas CM-P interferes at the early steps of insulin signaling, CM-O increases insulin sensitization, possibly by reducing LTB4. PMID:25792746

  14. Detrended cross-correlations between returns, volatility, trading activity, and volume traded for the stock market companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Rafał; Drożdż, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświȩcimka, Paweł

    2015-11-01

    We consider a few quantities that characterize trading on a stock market in a fixed time interval: logarithmic returns, volatility, trading activity (i.e., the number of transactions), and volume traded. We search for the power-law cross-correlations among these quantities aggregated over different time units from 1 min to 10 min. Our study is based on empirical data from the American stock market consisting of tick-by-tick recordings of 31 stocks listed in Dow Jones Industrial Average during the years 2008-2011. Since all the considered quantities except the returns show strong daily patterns related to the variable trading activity in different parts of a day, which are the most evident in the autocorrelation function, we remove these patterns by detrending before we proceed further with our study. We apply the multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis with sign preserving (MFCCA) and show that the strongest power-law cross-correlations exist between trading activity and volume traded, while the weakest ones exist (or even do not exist) between the returns and the remaining quantities. We also show that the strongest cross-correlations are carried by those parts of the signals that are characterized by large and medium variance. Our observation that the most convincing power-law cross-correlations occur between trading activity and volume traded reveals the existence of strong fractal-like coupling between these quantities.

  15. Mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer: Implication of two-state focal zooming on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Huang, H.; Hu, S. X.; Hill, E.; Kelly, J. H.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Shvydky, A.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-08-15

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) during OMEGA low-adiabat cryogenic experiments reduces the hydrodynamic efficiency by ∼35%, which lowers the calculated one-dimensional (1-D) yield by a factor of 7. CBET can be mitigated by reducing the diameter of the laser beams relative to the target diameter. Reducing the diameter of the laser beams by 30%, after a sufficient conduction zone has been generated (two-state zooming), is predicted to maintain low-mode uniformity while recovering 90% of the kinetic energy lost to CBET. A radially varying phase plate is proposed to implement two-state zooming on OMEGA. A beam propagating through the central half-diameter of the phase plate will produce a large spot, while a beam propagating through the outer annular region of the phase plate will produce a narrower spot. To generate the required two-state near-field laser-beam profile, a picket driver with smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) would pass through an apodizer, forming a beam of half the standard diameter. A second main-pulse driver would co-propagate without SSD through its own apodizer, forming a full-diameter annular beam. Hydrodynamic simulations, using the designed laser spots produced by the proposed zooming scheme on OMEGA, show that implementing zooming will increase the implosion velocity by 25% resulting in a 4.5× increase in the 1-D neutron yield. Demonstrating zooming on OMEGA would validate a viable direct-drive CBET mitigation scheme and help establish a pathway to hydrodynamically equivalent direct-drive–ignition implosions by increasing the ablation pressure (1.6×), which will allow for more stable implosions at ignition-relevant velocities.

  16. Alterations in aerobic energy expenditure and neuromuscular function during a simulated cross-country skiathlon with the skating technique.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Nicolas; Mourot, Laurent; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Andersson, Erik; Willis, Sarah J; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2015-04-01

    Here, we tested the hypothesis that aerobic energy expenditure (AEE) is higher during a simulated 6-km (2 loops of 3-km each) "skiathlon" than during skating only on a treadmill and attempted to link any such increase to biomechanical and neuromuscular responses. Six elite male cross-country skiers performed two pre-testing time-trials (TT) to determine their best performances and to choose an appropriate submaximal speed for collection of physiological, biomechanical and neuromuscular data during two experimental sessions (exp). Each skier used, in randomized order, either the classical (CL) or skating technique (SK) for the first 3-km loop, followed by transition to the skating technique for the second 3-km loop. Respiratory parameters were recorded continuously. The EMG activity of the triceps brachii (TBr) and vastus lateralis (VLa) muscles during isometric contractions performed when the skiers were stationary (i.e., just before the first loop, during the transition, and after the second loop); their corresponding activity during dynamic contractions; and pole and plantar forces during the second loop were recorded. During the second 3-km of the TT, skating speed was significantly higher for the SK-SK than CL-SK. During this second loop, AEE was also higher (+1.5%) for CL-SKexp than SK-SKexp, in association with higher VLa EMG activity during both isometric and dynamic contractions, despite no differences in plantar or pole forces, poling times or cycle rates. Although the underlying mechanism remains unclear, during a skiathlon, the transition between the sections of classical skiing and skating alters skating performance (i.e., skiing speed), AEE and neuromuscular function.

  17. Effect of oil droplet size on activation energy for coalescence of oil droplets in an O/W emulsion.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Yayoi; Katsuki, Kazutaka; Matsuno, Ryuichi; Adachi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The activation energy of a reasonable order of magnitude was estimated for the coalescence of oil droplets in an O/W emulsion by formulating the balance of forces acting on a droplet that crosses over the potential barrier to coalesce with another droplet by the DLVO theory and Stokes' law. An emulsion with smaller oil droplets was shown to be more stable.

  18. Simulating Time-Dependent Energy Transfer Between Crossed Laser Beams in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hittinger, J F; Dorr, M R; Berger, R L; Williams, E A

    2004-10-11

    A coupled mode system is derived to investigate a three-wave parametric instability leading to energy transfer between co-propagating laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. The model includes beams of finite width refracting in a prescribed transverse plasma flow with spatial and temporal gradients in velocity and density. The resulting paraxial light equations are discretized spatially with a Crank-Nicholson-type scheme, and these algebraic constraints are nonlinearly coupled with ordinary differential equations in time that describe the ion acoustic response. The entire nonlinear differential-algebraic system is solved using an adaptive, backward-differencing method coupled with Newton's method. A numerical study is conducted in two dimensions that compares the intensity gain of the fully time-dependent coupled mode system with the gain computed under the further assumption of a strongly-damped ion acoustic response. The results demonstrate a time-dependent gain suppression when the beam diameter is commensurate with the velocity gradient scale length. The gain suppression is shown to depend on time-dependent beam refraction and is interpreted as a time-dependent frequency shift.

  19. Active tool use with the contralesional hand can reduce cross-modal extinction of touch on that hand.

    PubMed

    Maravita, Angelo; Clarke, Karen; Husain, Masud; Driver, Jon

    2002-01-01

    After a unilateral brain lesion, patients may show cross-modal, visual-tactile extinction. Such patients may fail to report tactile stimuli on the contralesional hand when presented together with competing visual stimuli near the ipsilesional hand. In this work we tested the hypothesis that this cross-modal extinction may be reduced when a patient has used a tool with the contralesional hand to reach for objects in the ipsilesional visual field. Consistent with previous work, we hypothesize that active use of a tool may extend cross-modal interactions between visual stimuli at the tip of the tool and tactile stimuli on the hand wielding the tool. In the new situation of a tool connecting the contralesional hand with ipsilesional visual space, competition between stimuli on these opposite sides may be reduced, so that extinction decreases. We studied patient BV, who showed reliable cross-modal, visual-tactile extinction after right-hemisphere stroke. In two separate sessions we showed that prolonged tool use (10-20 min) with the contralesional hand in ipsilesional space reduced cross-modal extinction for up to 60-90 min post-training. We propose that an actively used tool may be effective in linking cross-modal stimuli presented along its extension. This can then overcome competition between stimuli presented on opposite sides of the body midline, thus modulating extinction.

  20. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015. PMID:27451109

  1. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015.

  2. Direct observation of intersystem crossing in a thermally activated delayed fluorescence copper complex in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Larissa; Hedley, Gordon J.; Baumann, Thomas; Bräse, Stefan; Samuel, Ifor D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Intersystem crossing in thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials is an important process that controls the rate at which singlet states convert to triplets; however, measuring this directly in TADF materials is difficult. TADF is a significant emerging technology that enables the harvesting of triplets as well as singlet excited states for emission in organic light emitting diodes. We have observed the picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence of a highly luminescent, neutral copper(I) complex in the solid state that shows TADF. The time constant of intersystem crossing is measured to be 27 picoseconds. Subsequent overall reverse intersystem crossing is slow, leading to population equilibration and TADF with an average lifetime of 11.5 microseconds. These first measurements of intersystem crossing in the solid state in this class of mononuclear copper(I) complexes give a better understanding of the excited-state processes and mechanisms that ensure efficient TADF. PMID:26767194

  3. Direct observation of intersystem crossing in a thermally activated delayed fluorescence copper complex in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Larissa; Hedley, Gordon J; Baumann, Thomas; Bräse, Stefan; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2016-01-01

    Intersystem crossing in thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials is an important process that controls the rate at which singlet states convert to triplets; however, measuring this directly in TADF materials is difficult. TADF is a significant emerging technology that enables the harvesting of triplets as well as singlet excited states for emission in organic light emitting diodes. We have observed the picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence of a highly luminescent, neutral copper(I) complex in the solid state that shows TADF. The time constant of intersystem crossing is measured to be 27 picoseconds. Subsequent overall reverse intersystem crossing is slow, leading to population equilibration and TADF with an average lifetime of 11.5 microseconds. These first measurements of intersystem crossing in the solid state in this class of mononuclear copper(I) complexes give a better understanding of the excited-state processes and mechanisms that ensure efficient TADF.

  4. Electric utility solar energy activities: 1980 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, M. C.

    1980-12-01

    Brief descriptions of 839 projects being conducted by 236 utility companies are given. Also included are an index of projects by category, a statistical summary, a list of participating utilities with information contacts and addresses, a list of utilities with projects designated by category, a list of utilities organized by state, a list of available reports on utility sponsored projects, and a list of projects having multiple utility participants. Project categories include solar heating and cooling of buildings, wind energy conversion, solar thermal electric power, photovoltaics, biomass conversion, process heat, and ocean energy conversion.

  5. Inelastic cross-sections and energy loss properties by non-relativistic heavy ions in zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Jennifer; Pimblott, Simon M.

    2016-04-01

    A formalism for the inelastic cross-section for electronic collisions of protons and heavier ions in a material is developed based on a quadratic extrapolation of the experimentally based dipole oscillator strength distribution (DOSD) of the material into the energy momentum plane. The approach is tested by calculating various energy loss properties in zirconium dioxide. Mean free path, stopping power and continuous slowing down approximation (csda) range are predicted as a function of ion energy for various incident ions, with the stopping powers compared to experimental data to assess the effectiveness of the methodology. The DOSD is straightforwardly obtained from the experimentally measured energy loss function data below 80 eV and atomic photo-absorption cross-section data above 100 eV. Agreement between the results of the calculation for stopping power and the experimental data is within 10% for all ions when compared for energies greater than the Bragg peak. The discrepancy is larger below the peak due to limitations in the methodology, especially the failure to make corrections for the Barkas and higher order effects and the lack of charge cycling cross-section data.

  6. Measurement of evaporation residue cross-sections of the reaction 30Si + 238U at subbarrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nagame, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Tsuruta, K.; Hofmann, S.; Hessberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Heinz, S.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lommel, B.; Mazzocco, M.; Schoett, H. J.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Comas, V. F.; Heredia, J. A.

    2007-02-26

    The reaction 30Si + 238U {yields} 268Sg* was studied at beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier. At the above barrier energy of Ec.m. = 144.0 MeV (center-of-mass energy at half thickness of the target), we measured three decay chains of 263Sg produced by evaporation of five neutrons. The cross-section was (67{sub -37}{sup +67}) pb. At subbarrier energy of Ec.m. = 133.0 MeV we measured three spontaneously fissioning nuclei which we assigned to the isotope 264Sg. The half-life of (120{sub -44}{sup +126}) ms was determined. The production cross-section was (10{sub -6}{sup +10}) pb, which is about four orders magnitude larger than the calculation based on the one-dimensional barrier penetration model in the fusion process, showing fusion enhancement caused by the prolate deformation of 238U. At Ec.m. = 128.0 MeV an upper cross-section limit of 15 pb was measured. Compared to excitation functions measured for the lighter system 16O + 238U {yields} 254Fm*, a reduction of the fusion probability was observed at low beam energies indicating increasing competition from quasifission processes.

  7. Ionisation differential cross section measurements for N2 at low incident energy in coplanar and non-coplanar geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Amami, Sadek; Murray, Andrew James; Ning, Chuangang; Madison, Don

    2016-10-01

    Ionisation triple differential cross sections have been determined experimentally and theoretically for the neutral molecule N2 over a range of geometries from coplanar to the perpendicular plane. Data were obtained at incident electron energies ∼10 and ∼20 eV above the ionisation potential of the 3σ g, 1π u and 2σ g states, using both equal and non-equal outgoing electron energies. The data were taken with the incident electron beam in the scattering plane (ψ = 0°), at 45° to this plane and orthogonal to the plane (ψ = 90°). The set of nine measured differential cross sections at a given energy were then inter-normalised to each other. The data are compared to new calculations using various distorted wave methods, and differences between theory and experiment are discussed.

  8. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  9. Energy utilization rates during shuttle extravehicular activities.

    PubMed

    Waligora, J M; Kumar, K V

    1995-01-01

    The work rates or energy utilization rates during EVA are major factors in sizing of life support systems. These rates also provide a measure of ease of EVA and its cost in crew fatigue. From the first Shuttle EVA on the STS-6 mission in 1983, we have conducted 59 man-EVA and 341 man-hours of EVA. Energy utilization rates have been measured on each of these EVA. Metabolic rate was measured during each EVA using oxygen utilization corrected for suit leakage. From 1981-1987, these data were available for average data over the EVA or over large segments of the EVA. Since 1987, EVA oxygen utilization data were available at 2-minute intervals. The average metabolic rate on Shuttle EVA (194 kcal/hr.) has been significantly lower than metabolic rates during Apollo and Skylab missions. Peak rates have been below design levels, infrequent, and of short duration. The data suggest that the energy cost of tasks may be inversely related to the degree of training for the task. The data provide insight on the safety margins provided by life support designs and on the energy cost of Station construction EVA.

  10. Energy utilization rates during shuttle extravehicular activities.

    PubMed

    Waligora, J M; Kumar, K V

    1995-01-01

    The work rates or energy utilization rates during EVA are major factors in sizing of life support systems. These rates also provide a measure of ease of EVA and its cost in crew fatigue. From the first Shuttle EVA on the STS-6 mission in 1983, we have conducted 59 man-EVA and 341 man-hours of EVA. Energy utilization rates have been measured on each of these EVA. Metabolic rate was measured during each EVA using oxygen utilization corrected for suit leakage. From 1981-1987, these data were available for average data over the EVA or over large segments of the EVA. Since 1987, EVA oxygen utilization data were available at 2-minute intervals. The average metabolic rate on Shuttle EVA (194 kcal/hr.) has been significantly lower than metabolic rates during Apollo and Skylab missions. Peak rates have been below design levels, infrequent, and of short duration. The data suggest that the energy cost of tasks may be inversely related to the degree of training for the task. The data provide insight on the safety margins provided by life support designs and on the energy cost of Station construction EVA. PMID:11540993

  11. Transport analysis of measured neutron leakage spectra from spheres as tests of evaluated high energy cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, D. D.; Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.

    1973-01-01

    Integral tests of evaluated ENDF/B high-energy cross sections have been made by comparing measured and calculated neutron leakage flux spectra from spheres of various materials. An Am-Be (alpha,n) source was used to provide fast neutrons at the center of the test spheres of Be, CH2, Pb, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W. The absolute leakage flux spectra were measured in the energy range 0.5 to 12 MeV using a calibrated NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometer. Absolute calculations of the spectra were made using version 3 ENDF/B cross sections and an S sub n discrete ordinates multigroup transport code. Generally excellent agreement was obtained for Be, CH2, Pb, and Mo, and good agreement was observed for Nb although discrepancies were observed for some energy ranges. Poor comparative results, obtained for Ta and W, are attributed to unsatisfactory nonelastic cross sections. The experimental sphere leakage flux spectra are tabulated and serve as possible benchmarks for these elements against which reevaluated cross sections may be tested.

  12. Disentangling neutrino-nucleon cross section and high energy neutrino flux with a km{sup 3} neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Borriello, E.; Miele, G.; Mangano, G.; Pisanti, O.; Pastor, S.

    2008-02-15

    The energy-zenith angular event distribution in a neutrino telescope provides a unique tool to determine at the same time the neutrino-nucleon cross section at extreme kinematical regions, and the high-energy neutrino flux. By using a simple parametrization for fluxes and cross sections, we present a sensitivity analysis for the case of a km{sup 3} neutrino telescope. In particular, we consider the specific case of an underwater Mediterranean telescope placed at the NEMO site, although most of our results also apply to an under-ice detector such as IceCube. We determine the sensitivity to departures from standard values of the cross sections above 1 PeV which can be probed independently from an a priori knowledge of the normalization and energy dependence of the flux. We also stress that the capability to tag downgoing neutrino showers in the PeV range against the cosmic-ray induced background of penetrating muons appears to be a crucial requirement to derive meaningful constraints on the cross section.

  13. Disentangling neutrino-nucleon cross section and high energy neutrino flux with a km^3 neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Borriello, E.; Cuoco, A.; Mangano, G.; Miele, G.; Pastor, S.; Pisanti, O.; Serpico, P.D.

    2007-11-01

    The energy-zenith angular event distribution in a neutrino telescope provides a unique tool to determine at the same time the neutrino-nucleon cross section at extreme kinematical regions, and the high energy neutrino flux. By using a simple parameterization for fluxes and cross sections, we present a sensitivity analysis for the case of a km{sup 3} neutrino telescope. In particular, we consider the specific case of an under-water Mediterranean telescope placed at the NEMO site, although most of our results also apply to an under-ice detector such as IceCube. We determine the sensitivity to departures from standard values of the cross sections above 1 PeV which can be probed independently from an a-priori knowledge of the normalization and energy dependence of the flux. We also stress that the capability to tag downgoing neutrino showers in the PeV range against the cosmic ray induced background of penetrating muons appears to be a crucial requirement to derive meaningful constraints on the cross section.

  14. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  15. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies less than or equal to400 MeV. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    For a variety of applications, e.g., accelerator shielding design, neutrons in radiotherapy, radiation damage studies, etc., it is necessary to carry out transport calculations involving medium-energy (greater than or equal to20 MeV) neutrons. A previous paper described neutron-photon multigroup cross sections in the ANISN format for neutrons from thermal to 400 MeV. In the present paper the cross-section data presented previously have been revised to make them agree with available experimental data. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Energy Around Us. A Fall Activity Packet for Fourth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson Community Coll., MI. Dahlem Environmental Education Center.

    This instructional packet is one of 14 school environmental education programs developed for use in the classroom and at the Dahlem Environmental Education Center (DEEC) of the Jackson Community College (Michigan). Provided in the packet are pre-trip activities, field trip activities, and post-trip activities which focus on energy uses, energy…

  17. Energy monitoring system based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Nur Hanim; Husain, Mohd Nor; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abdul; Othman, Mohd Azlishah; Malek, Fareq

    2015-05-01

    Human behaviors always related to day routine activities in a smart house directly give the significant factor to manage energy usage in human life. An Addition that, the factor will contribute to the best efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on the monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior at working place. Besides that, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy saving based on human behaviors. This scenario will help to see the human activity in the workplace in order to get the energy saving and support world green environment.

  18. On the possibility of negative activation energies in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants for model reacting systems was studied to understand some recent experimental measurements which imply the existence of negative activation energies. A collision theory model and classical trajectory calculations are used to demonstrate that the reaction probability can vary inversely with collision energy for bimolecular reactions occurring on attractive potential energy surfaces. However, this is not a sufficient condition to ensure that the rate constant has a negative temperature dependence. On the basis of these calculations, it seems unlikely that a true bimolecular reaction between neutral molecules will have a negative activation energy.

  19. Social observation enhances cross-environment activation of hippocampal place cell patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiang; Ji, Daoyun

    2016-01-01

    Humans and animals frequently learn through observing or interacting with others. The local enhancement theory proposes that presence of social subjects in an environment facilitates other subjects' understanding of the environment. To explore the neural basis of this theory, we examined hippocampal place cells, which represent spatial information, in rats as they stayed in a small box while a demonstrator rat running on a separate, nearby linear track, and as they ran on the same track themselves. We found that place cell firing sequences during self-running on the track also appeared in the box. This cross-environment activation occurred even prior to any self-running experience on the track and was absent without a demonstrator. Our data thus suggest that social observation can facilitate the observer’s spatial representation of an environment without actual self-exploration. This finding may contribute to neural mechanisms of local enhancement. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18022.001 PMID:27692067

  20. Illusory Continuity without Sufficient Sound Energy to Fill a Temporal Gap: Examples of Crossing Glide Tones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Shuntarou

    2012-01-01

    The gap transfer illusion is an auditory illusion where a temporal gap inserted in a longer glide tone is perceived as if it were in a crossing shorter glide tone. Psychophysical and phenomenological experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sound-pressure-level (SPL) differences between crossing glides on the occurrence of the gap…

  1. PROBLEM DEPENDENT DOPPLER BROADENING OF CONTINUOUS ENERGY CROSS SECTIONS IN THE KENO MONTE CARLO COMPUTER CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, S. W. D.; Maldonado, G. Ivan; Celik, Cihangir; Leal, Luiz C

    2014-01-01

    For many Monte Carlo codes cross sections are generally only created at a set of predetermined temperatures. This causes an increase in error as one moves further and further away from these temperatures in the Monte Carlo model. This paper discusses recent progress in the Scale Monte Carlo module KENO to create problem dependent, Doppler broadened, cross sections. Currently only broadening the 1D cross sections and probability tables is addressed. The approach uses a finite difference method to calculate the temperature dependent cross-sections for the 1D data, and a simple linear-logarithmic interpolation in the square root of temperature for the probability tables. Work is also ongoing to address broadening theS (alpha , beta) tables. With the current approach the temperature dependent cross sections are Doppler broadened before transport starts, and, for all but a few isotopes, the impact on cross section loading is negligible. Results can be compared with those obtained by using multigroup libraries, as KENO currently does interpolation on the multigroup cross sections to determine temperature dependent cross-sections. Current results compare favorably with these expected results.

  2. Production activities and economic dependency by age and gender in Europe: A cross-country comparison

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Bernhard; Prskawetz, Alexia; Freund, Inga

    2015-01-01

    We compare selected European countries using an economic dependency ratio which emphasizes the role of age-specific levels of production and consumption. Our analysis reveals large differences in the age- and gender-specific level and type of production activities across selected European countries and identifies possible strategies to adjust age-specific economic behaviour to an ageing population. The cross-country differences in economic dependency of children and elderly persons are largely determined by the age at which people enter, respectively exit, the labour market. The ability of the working age population to support children and elderly persons in turn is strongly influenced by the participation of women in paid work. We also provide a measure for the age-specific production and consumption in form of unpaid household work. The inclusion of unpaid household work leads to a decrease of the gender differences in production activities and indicates that the working age population supports children and elderly persons not only through monetary transfers but also through services produced by unpaid work (e.g. childcare, cooking, cleaning…). Given the available data, we cannot distinguish the age profile of consumption by gender and have to assume – in case of unpaid work - that each member of the household consumes the same. Hence, our results have to be regarded as a first approximation only. Our paper aims to argue that a reform of the welfare system needs to take into account not only public transfers but also private transfers, in particular the transfers in form of goods and services produced through unpaid household work. PMID:26110107

  3. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1-Induced Antibodies Cross-React with Human Plasminogen and Enhance Its Activation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Jessica; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wang, Shuying; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease, and it can cause life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Abnormal activation of the coagulation and fibrinolysis system is one of the hallmarks of DHF/DSS. However, the mechanism underlying hemorrhage in DHF/DSS remains elusive. In previous studies, plasminogen (Plg) cross-reactive Abs, which can recognize DENV nonstructural protein (NS) 1, have been found in dengue patients. However, it is unclear whether these Abs are indeed induced by DENV NS1. Thus, we immunized mice with recombinant NS1 from both bacteria and drosophila to determine whether NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs. The results from the NS1-immunized mouse sera indicated that NS1 immunization induced Abs that could cross-react with Plg. To study the effects of these NS1-induced Plg cross-reactive Abs on fibrinolysis, we isolated several Plg cross-reactive anti-NS1 mAbs from these mice and found that some of them could enhance Plg activation. In addition, epitope mapping with a phage-displayed random peptide library revealed that one of these mAbs (2A5) could recognize NS1 C-terminal residues 305-311, which share sequence homology with Plg residues 590-597. A synthetic peptide of NS1 residues 305-311 could inhibit the binding of both 2A5 and its Fab to Plg and its enhanced activation. Thus, our results suggest that DENV NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs through molecular mimicry, which can enhance Plg activation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS. PMID:26712948

  4. Muscle activity, cross-sectional area, and density following passive standing and whole body vibration: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Masani, Kei; Alizadeh-Meghrazi, Milad; Sayenko, Dimitry G.; Zariffa, Jose; Moore, Cameron; Giangregorio, Lora; Popovic, Milos R.; Catharine Craven, B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of intermittent passive standing (PS) and whole body vibration (WBV) on the electromyography (EMG) activity, cross-sectional area, and density of lower extremity muscles in individuals with chronic motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Case series. Methods Seven adult men with chronic (≥2 years), thoracic motor complete (AIS A–B) SCI completed a 40-week course of thrice-weekly intermittent PS-WBV therapy, in a flexed knee posture (160°), for 45 minutes per session at a frequency of 45 Hz and 0.6–0.7 mm displacement using the WAVE® Pro Plate, with an integrated EasyStand™ standing frame. EMG was measured in major lower extremity muscles to represent muscle activity during PS-WBV. The cross-sectional area and density of the calf muscles were measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the widest calf cross-section (66% of the tibia length) at pre- and post-intervention. All measured variables were compared between the pre- and post-intervention measurements to assess change after the PS-WBV intervention. Results PS-WBV acutely induced EMG activity in lower extremity muscles of SCI subjects. No significant changes in lower extremity EMG activity, muscle cross-sectional area, or density were observed following the 40-week intervention. Conclusions Although acute exposure to PS-WBV can induce electrophysiological activity of lower extremity muscles during PS in men with motor complete SCI, the PS-WBV intervention for 40 weeks was not sufficient to result in enhanced muscle activity, or to increase calf muscle cross-sectional area or density. PMID:25059652

  5. Differential and total cross sections of mutual neutralization in low-energy collisions of isotopes of H++H-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, Sifiso M.; Elander, Nils; Larson, Åsa; Lecointre, Julien; Urbain, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Mutual neutralization in the collisions of H+ and H- is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The quantum-mechanical ab initio model includes covalent states associated with the H (1 )+H (n ≤3 ) limits and the collision energy ranges from 1 meV to 100 eV. The reaction is theoretically studied for collisions between different isotopes of the hydrogen ions. From the partial wave scattering amplitude, the differential and total cross sections are computed. The differential cross section is analyzed in terms of forward- and backward-scattering events, showing a dominance of backward scattering which can be understood by examining the phase of the scattering amplitudes for the gerade and ungerade set of states. The isotope dependence of the total cross section is compared with the one obtained using a semiclassical multistate Landau-Zener model. The final state distribution analysis emphasizes the dominance of the n =3 channel for collisions below 10 eV, while at higher collision energies, the n =2 channel starts to become important. For collisions of ions forming a molecular system with a larger reduced mass, the n =2 channel starts to dominate at lower energies. Using a merged ion-beam apparatus, the branching ratios for mutual neutralization in H+ and H- collisions in the energy range from 11 to 185 eV are measured with position- and time-sensitive particle detectors. The measured and calculated branching ratios satisfactorily agree with respect to state contributions.

  6. Improved dark energy detection through the polarization-assisted cross correlation of the cosmic microwave background with radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ng, Kin-Wang; Pen, Ue-Li

    2011-03-15

    Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect can be estimated by cross-correlating the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky with tracers of the local matter distribution. At late cosmic time, the dark energy-induced decay of gravitation potential generates a cross correlation signal on large angular scales. The dominant noise is the intrinsic CMB anisotropies from the inflationary epoch. In this paper we use CMB polarization to reduce this intrinsic noise. We cross-correlate the microwave sky observed by Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) with the radio source catalog compiled by NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) to study the efficiency of the noise suppression. We find that the error bars are reduced by about 4 to 14% and the statistical power in the signal is improved.

  7. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. III - SF6 and UF6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, W.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed technique has been used to measure the ratios of elastic differential electron scattering cross sections (DCS) for SF6 and UF6 to those of He at electron impact energies of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 75 eV and at scattering angles of 20 to 135 deg. In order to obtain the absolute values of DCS from these ratios, He DCS of McConkey and Preston have been employed in the 20 to 90 deg range. At angles in the 90 to 135 deg range the recently determined cross sections of Srivastava and Trajmar have been utilized. From these DCS, elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been obtained.

  8. 14 CFR 1266.102 - Cross-waiver of liability for agreements for activities related to the International Space Station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... exploration, exploitation, and use of outer space through the International Space Station (ISS). The IGA... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cross-waiver of liability for agreements for activities related to the International Space Station. 1266.102 Section 1266.102 Aeronautics...

  9. 14 CFR 1266.102 - Cross-waiver of liability for agreements for activities related to the International Space Station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exploration, exploitation, and use of outer space through the International Space Station (ISS). The IGA... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cross-waiver of liability for agreements for activities related to the International Space Station. 1266.102 Section 1266.102 Aeronautics...

  10. Asia and Australia: Language Arts around the World, Volume III. Cross Curricular Activities for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lucy

    Suggesting that students in the intermediate grades can explore the world around them and practice valuable skills in spelling, reading, writing, communication, and language, this book presents cross-curricular units designed to integrate language-arts activities into the study of Asian and Australian cultures. The units in the book reach diverse…

  11. Ecology and the Environment. Language Arts around the World, Volume V. Cross-Curricular Activities for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.; Hildebrand, Joan M.; Ericson, Joann H.

    Suggesting that students in the intermediate grades can explore the world around them and practice valuable skills in spelling, reading, writing, communication, and language, this book presents cross-curricular units designed to integrate language-arts activities into the study of ecology and the environment. The units in the book reach diverse…

  12. Energy cost and energy sources during a simulated firefighting activity.

    PubMed

    Perroni, Fabrizio; Tessitore, Antonio; Cortis, Cristina; Lupo, Corrado; D'artibale, Emanuele; Cignitti, Lamberto; Capranica, Laura

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to 1) analyze the energy requirement (VO2eq) and the contribution of the aerobic (VO2ex), anaerobic alactic (VO2al), and anaerobic lactic (VO2la-) energy sources of a simulated intervention; 2) ascertain differences in mean VO2 and heart rate (HR) during firefighting tasks; and 3) verify the relationship between time of job completion and the fitness level of firefighters. Twenty Italian firefighters (age = 32 ± 6 yr, VO2peak = 43.1 ± 4.9 mL·kg·min) performed 4 consecutive tasks (i.e., child rescue; 250-m run; find an exit; 250-m run) that required a VO2eq of 406.26 ± 73.91 mL·kg (VO2ex = 86 ± 5%; VO2al = 9 ± 3%; VO2la- = 5 ± 3%). After 30 minutes, the recovery HR (108 ± 15 beats·min) and VO2 (8.86±2.67mL·kg·min) were higher (p < 0.0001) than basal values (HR = 66 ± 8 beats·min; VO2 = 4.57 ± 1.07 mL·kg·min), indicating that passive recovery is insufficient in reducing the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain of the previous workload. Differences (p < 0.001) between tasks emerged for mean VO2 and HR, with a lack of significant correlation between the time of job completion and the firefighters' aerobic fitness. These findings indicate that unpredictable working conditions highly challenge expert firefighters who need adequate fitness levels to meet the requirements of their work. Practically, to enhance the fitness level of firefighters, specific interval training programs should include a wide variety of tasks requiring different intensities and decision-making strategies.

  13. Evaporation residue cross sections for the {sup 100}Mo + {sup 116}Cd reaction -- energy dissipation in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    In this experiment we tried to measure the evaporation residue cross section over a wide range of beam energies for the {sup 100}Mo + {sup 116}Cd reaction using the FMA. However, because of longer-than-estimated runs needed at each beam energy, and the difficulty of bending evaporation residues at the higher energies in the FMA, data were taken only at beam energies of E{sub beam} = 460, 490, and 521 MeV, which correspond to excitation energies of E{sub exc} = 62, 78, and 95 MeV, respectively. By comparing to results for the {sup 32}S + {sup 184}W reactions measured recently, we expect to demonstrate a strong entrance channel effect related to the hindrance of complete fusion in near-symmetric heavy systems (a fusion hindrance factor of the order 7-10 is expected on the basis of the Extra-Push Model). The data are being analyzed.

  14. Obesity, physical activity and sedentary behavior amongst British and Saudi youth: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Al-Nakeeb, Yahya; Lyons, Mark; Collins, Peter; Al-Nuaim, Anwar; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa; Duncan, Michael J; Nevill, Alan

    2012-04-01

    This study explores differences in weight status, obesity and patterns of physical activity (PA) in relation to gender and age of youth from two culturally, environmentally and geographically diverse countries, the United Kingdom (UK) and Saudi Arabia (SA). A total of 2,290 males and females (15-17 years) volunteered to participate in this study. Participants completed a validated self-report questionnaire that contained 47 items relating to patterns of PA, sedentary activity and eating habits. The questionnaire allows the calculation of total energy expenditure in metabolic equivalent (MET-min) values per week. Significant differences in percentage of overweight/obese and levels of PA were evident between the youth from the two countries, with males being generally more physically active than females. Additionally, there were significant associations between Body Mass Index (BMI), PA and sedentary behaviors; the youth with higher BMI reported lower levels of PA and higher amounts of sedentary time. These findings highlight the diverse nature of lifestyle of youth living in different geographical areas of the world and the need for further research to explore the socio-cultural factors that impact on the prevalence of obesity and patterns of PA of youth in different populations.

  15. Obesity, physical activity and sedentary behavior amongst British and Saudi youth: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Al-Nakeeb, Yahya; Lyons, Mark; Collins, Peter; Al-Nuaim, Anwar; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa; Duncan, Michael J; Nevill, Alan

    2012-04-01

    This study explores differences in weight status, obesity and patterns of physical activity (PA) in relation to gender and age of youth from two culturally, environmentally and geographically diverse countries, the United Kingdom (UK) and Saudi Arabia (SA). A total of 2,290 males and females (15-17 years) volunteered to participate in this study. Participants completed a validated self-report questionnaire that contained 47 items relating to patterns of PA, sedentary activity and eating habits. The questionnaire allows the calculation of total energy expenditure in metabolic equivalent (MET-min) values per week. Significant differences in percentage of overweight/obese and levels of PA were evident between the youth from the two countries, with males being generally more physically active than females. Additionally, there were significant associations between Body Mass Index (BMI), PA and sedentary behaviors; the youth with higher BMI reported lower levels of PA and higher amounts of sedentary time. These findings highlight the diverse nature of lifestyle of youth living in different geographical areas of the world and the need for further research to explore the socio-cultural factors that impact on the prevalence of obesity and patterns of PA of youth in different populations. PMID:22690207

  16. Single-unit activity, threshold crossings, and local field potentials in motor cortex differentially encode reach kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Perel, Sagi; Sadtler, Patrick T.; Oby, Emily R.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Batista, Aaron P.

    2015-01-01

    A diversity of signals can be recorded with extracellular electrodes. It remains unclear whether different signal types convey similar or different information and whether they capture the same or different underlying neural phenomena. Some researchers focus on spiking activity, while others examine local field potentials, and still others posit that these are fundamentally the same signals. We examined the similarities and differences in the information contained in four signal types recorded simultaneously from multielectrode arrays implanted in primary motor cortex: well-isolated action potentials from putative single units, multiunit threshold crossings, and local field potentials (LFPs) at two distinct frequency bands. We quantified the tuning of these signal types to kinematic parameters of reaching movements. We found 1) threshold crossing activity is not a proxy for single-unit activity; 2) when examined on individual electrodes, threshold crossing activity more closely resembles LFP activity at frequencies between 100 and 300 Hz than it does single-unit activity; 3) when examined across multiple electrodes, threshold crossing activity and LFP integrate neural activity at different spatial scales; and 4) LFP power in the “beta band” (between 10 and 40 Hz) is a reliable indicator of movement onset but does not encode kinematic features on an instant-by-instant basis. These results show that the diverse signals recorded from extracellular electrodes provide somewhat distinct and complementary information. It may be that these signal types arise from biological phenomena that are partially distinct. These results also have practical implications for harnessing richer signals to improve brain-machine interface control. PMID:26133797

  17. Annual report and summaries of FY 1993 activities: Division of Energy Biosciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The mission of the Energy Biosciences program is to generate fundamental information about plants and non-health related microorganisms that will constitute the base for new biotechnologies as well as supply information to improve usages of such organisms in their current form. The collective aims are totally consistent with the Department of Energy`s objectives of developing alternate energy sources, replacements for otherwise fossil energy derived products and providing critical fundamental information for the preservation and restoration of environmental conditions affected by energy related activities. The EB program takes full advantage of its organizational locale in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences to directly interact with such disciplines as Materials Sciences, Chemistry, Engineering and Geosciences to promote cross-disciplinary research and planning activities. One of the major specific objectives of the EB program is to probe the enormous capabilities of the specified organisms to carry out biochemical conversions. The limitation to realization of entirely new products and processes via biotechnology is the lack of basic understanding of natural processes. Such knowledge will then afford the advantage of developing procedures to the benefit of people and their society in providing new products along with providing new employment possibilities. This document consists of abstracts of projects supported in FY 1993.

  18. Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1986-01-01

    Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

  19. The Geography of Wind Energy: Problem Solving Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahart, David E.; Allen, Rodney F.

    1985-01-01

    Today there are many attempts to use wind machines to confront the increasing costs of electricity. Described are activities to help secondary students understand wind energy, its distribution, applications, and limitations. (RM)

  20. Leisure-time versus full-day energy expenditure: a cross-sectional study of sedentarism in a Portuguese urban population

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Diane L; Santos, Ana-Cristina; Barros, Henrique

    2005-01-01

    Background Low physical activity is known to be a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disease. With high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in the Portuguese urban population, little is known about how sedentary this population is and what factors are associated to sedentary lifestyles. This study's objective was to examine sedentary lifestyles and their determinants through a cross-sectional study. Methods 2134 adults (18 years and older) were interviewed using a standard questionnaire, comprising of social, behavioural and clinical information. Time spent in a variety of activities per day, including: work, household chores, sports, sedentary leisure time and sleep, were self-reported. Energy expenditure was estimated based on the related metabolic equivalent (MET) and time spent in each activity (min/day). Those with less than 10% of energy expenditure at a moderate intensity of 4 METs or higher were categorised as sedentary. The proportion of sedentary people and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated, and the magnitude of associations, between sedentary lifestyles and the population characteristics, were computed as age-adjusted odds ratios using logistic regression. Results Sedentarism in both genders during leisure time is high at 84%, however in full day energy expenditure, which includes physical activity at work, sleeping hours and household chores, 79% of males and 86% of females are found to be sedentary. In leisure-time only, increased age is associated with higher odds of being sedentary in both genders, as well as in women with increased BMI. In comparison, in full-day energy expenditure, sedentarism is more likely to occur in those with higher levels of education and in white-collar workers. Conclusions A high prevalence of sedentarism is found in the study participants when measuring leisure-time and full-day energy expenditure. The Portuguese population may therefore benefit from additional promotion of physical activity. PMID

  1. Activities contributing to energy expenditure among Guatemalan adults

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Cria O; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Martorell, Reynaldo; Stein, Aryeh D

    2007-01-01

    Background Guatemala has experienced a substantial increase in overweight and obesity in recent years, yet physical activity patterns and consequent energy expenditure are largely unexplored in this population. Methods To describe overall physical activity levels (PAL) and activities contributing to daily energy expenditure, we analyzed time spent in daily activities as reported by 985 women and 819 men, living in rural and urban areas of Guatemala in 2002–04. Results Physical activity levels recommended to prevent obesity (PAL ≥ 1.70) differed by residence/occupation among men (agricultural-rural: 77%; nonagricultural-rural: 36%; urban: 24%; P < 0.01), but not women (rural: 2%; urban: 3%; P = 0.5). Median energy expenditure was higher among agricultural-rural men (44 MET*h/d; MET = metabolic equivalent) compared to nonagricultural-rural (37 MET*h/d) and urban men (35 MET*h/d; P < 0.01); energy expenditure was slightly lower among rural compared to urban women (34 MET*h/d vs. 35 MET*h/d; P < 0.01). Occupation was the largest contributor to energy expenditure (19–24 MET*h/d); among women and nonagricultural-rural and urban men this was primarily of a light intensity. Energy expenditure in sedentary activities ranged from 2 MET*h/d among rural women to 6 MET*h/d among agricultural-rural men. Any sports/exercise time was reported by 35% and 5% of men and women, respectively. Nevertheless, the majority of participants believed they were significantly active to stay healthy. Conclusion Overall, energy expenditure was low in the population not dedicated to agricultural occupations; an increased focus on active leisure-time behaviors may be needed to counterbalance reductions in energy expenditure consequent to sedentarization of primary occupations. PMID:17910754

  2. Removing the barrier to the calculation of activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesele, Oluwaseun O.; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-10-01

    Approaches for directly calculating the activation energy for a chemical reaction from a simulation at a single temperature are explored with applications to both classical and quantum systems. The activation energy is obtained from a time correlation function that can be evaluated from the same molecular dynamics trajectories or quantum dynamics used to evaluate the rate constant itself and thus requires essentially no extra computational work.

  3. Energy: Multidisciplinary Activities for the Classroom. Top Hit Energy Lesson Plans, K-1, 2-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Energy Foundation, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This six-volume set of multidisciplinary instructional materials developed by the National Energy Foundation (NEF) presents energy activities for grades K-1, 2-6. The instructional materials are teacher-developed, teacher-tested, and multi-disciplinary. The lesson plans and activities are organized around seven goal areas of a NEF developed…

  4. 76 FR 65634 - Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Proposed Rulemaking (76 FR 55278). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Goorevich, National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20... assistance to foreign atomic energy activities (76 FR 55278). This regulation provides that persons...

  5. Energy Conservation Activity Guide, Grades 9-12. Bulletin 1602.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Mollie; And Others

    As an interdisciplinary, non-sequential teaching guide, this publication was developed to increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage individuals to become energy conservationists. Sections provide background information for the teacher followed by a variety of student activities using different subject areas for…

  6. Highlands County Energy Education Activities--High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Presented are five instructional units, developed by the Tri-County Teacher Education Center, for the purpose of educating secondary school students on Florida's unique energy problems. Unit one provides a series of value clarification and awareness activities as an introduction to energy. Unit two uses mathematics exercises to examine energy…

  7. Greatly enhanced energy density and patterned films induced by photo cross-linking of poly(vinylidene fluoride-chlorotrifluoroethylene).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Zhong; Li, Zhi-Wei; Cheng, Zhao-Xi; Zhang, Ji-Zong; Shen, Qun-Dong; Ge, Hai-Xiong; Li, Hai-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Greatly enhanced energy density in poly(vinylidene fluoride-chlorotrifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-CTFE)] is realized through interface effects induced by a photo cross-linking method. Being different from nanocomposites with lowered dielectric strength, the cross-linked P(VDF-CTFE)s possess a high breakdown field as well as remarkably elevated polarization, both of which contribute to the enhanced energy density as high as 22.5 J · cm(-3). Moreover, patterned thin films with various shapes and sizes are fabricated by photolithography, which sheds new light on the integration of PVDF-based electroactive polymers into organic microelectronic devices such as flexible pyroelectric/piezoelectric sensor arrays or non-volatile ferroelectric memory devices. PMID:21432976

  8. Increasing quantum yield of sodium salicylate above 80 eV photon energy: Implications for photoemission cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, D.W.; Ferrett, T.A.; Heimann, P.A.; Shirley, D.A.

    1986-08-01

    The quantum yield of the visible scintillator sodium salicylate is found to increase in the incident photon-energy range 80--270 eV. Because of its use as a photon-flux monitor in recent gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, previously reported partial cross sections for Hg (4f-italic, 5p-italic, and 5d-italic subshells) and CH/sub 3/I (I 4d-italic subshell) in this energy range are corrected, and new values are reported. For Hg, the correction brings the experimental data into better overall agreement with theory. However, considerable uncertainty remains in the absolute scale derived from previous Hg photoabsorption measurements, and no single rescaling of the subshell cross sections could simultaneously bring all three into agreement with available theoretical calculations.

  9. On-board In-flight Energy Scale Cross-calibration Effects of Solar X-ray Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väänänen, Mikko

    2009-11-01

    We have surveyed previous spaceborne calibrations, and present results of new cross-calibrations of the X-ray solar instruments: SMART-1 XSM, GOES, RHESSI and Messenger XRS. We use XSM as the baseline instrument, and establish its ground, in-flight and cross-calibration status. Based on these calibrations, we show the relative importance of having an on-board in-flight calibration source for the energy scale with the technical twin instruments XRS and XSM. An observed energy scale drift of 168 eV (0.9%) influenced final fluxes by 25-35% in the 2-5 keV band. An ideal generic in-flight calibration source is discussed in view of the XSM-XRS simulation and the in-flight calibration of the microwave CMB instruments in particular.

  10. Photo-neutron reaction cross-sections for natMo in the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 12-16 and 45-70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, H.; Kim, G. N.; Kapote Noy, R.; Schwengner, R.; Kim, K.; Zaman, M.; Shin, S. G.; Gey, Y.; Massarczyk, R.; John, R.; Junghans, A.; Wagner, A.; Cho, M.-H.

    2016-07-01

    The natMo( γ, xn)90, 91, 99Mo reaction cross-sections were experimentally determined for the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 12, 14, 16, 45, 50, 55, 60 and 70MeV by activation and off-line γ -ray spectrometric technique and using the 20MeV electron linac (ELBE) at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden, Germany, and the 100MeV electron linac at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Pohang, Korea. The natMo( γ, xn)88, 89, 90, 91, 99Mo reaction cross-sections as a function of photon energy were also calculated using the computer code TALYS 1.6. The flux-weighted average cross-sections were obtained from the literature data and the calculated values of TALYS based on mono-energetic photons and are found to be in general agreement with the present results. The flux-weighted average experimental and theoretical cross-sections for the natMo( γ, xn)88, 89, 90, 91, 99Mo reactions increase with the bremsstrahlung end-point energy, which indicates the role of excitation energy. After a certain energy, the individual natMo( γ, xn) reaction cross-sections decrease with the increase of bremsstrahlung energy due to opening of other reactions, which indicates sharing of energy in different reaction channels. The 100Mo( γ, n) reaction cross-section is important for the production of 99Mo , which is a probable alternative to the 98Mo(n, γ) and 235U(n, f ) reactions.

  11. Energy Consumption of Actively Beating Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia and flagella are important for propelling cells or driving fluid over tissues. The microtubule-based core in these organelles, the axoneme, has a nearly universal ``9+2'' arrangement of 9 outer doublet microtubules assembled around two singlet microtubules in the center. Thousands of molecular motor proteins are attached to the doublets and walk on neighboring outer doublets. The motors convert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into sliding motion between adjacent doublet microtubules, resulting in precisely regulated oscillatory beating. Using demembranated sea urchin sperm flagella as an experimental platform, we simultaneously monitor the axoneme's consumption of ATP and its beating dynamics while key parameters, such as solution viscosity and ATP concentration, are varied. Insights into motor cooperativity during beating and energetic consequences of hydrodynamic interactions will be presented.

  12. Monitoring integrin activation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Craig T; Hyun, Young-Min; Kim, Minsoo

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant integrin activation is associated with several immune pathologies. In leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD), the absence or inability of β(2) integrins to undergo affinity upregulation contributes to recurrent infectious episodes and impaired wound healing, while excessive integrin activity leads to an exaggerated inflammatory response with associated tissue damage. Therefore, integrin activation is an attractive target for immunotherapies, and monitoring the effect of agents on integrin activation is necessary during preclinical drug development. The activation of integrins involves the structural rearrangement of both the extracellular and cytoplasmic domains. Here, we describe methods for monitoring integrin conformational activation using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  13. The activation energy for creep of columbium /niobium/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Gulden, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    The activation energy for creep of nominally pure columbium (niobium) was determined in the temperature range from 0.4 to 0.75 T sub M by measuring strain rate changes induced by temperature shifts at constant stress. A peak in the activation energy vs temperature curve was found with a maximum value of 160 kcal/mole. A pretest heat treatment of 3000 F for 30 min resulted in even higher values of activation energy (greater than 600 kcal/mole) in this temperature range. The activation energy for the heat-treated columbium (Nb) could not be determined near 0.5 T sub M because of unusual creep curves involving negligible steady-state creep rates and failure at less than 5% creep strain. It is suggested that the anomalous activation energy values and the unusual creep behavior in this temperature range are caused by dynamic strain aging involving substitutional atom impurities and that this type of strain aging may be in part responsible for the scatter in previously reported values of activation energy for creep of columbium (Nb) near 0.5 T sub M.

  14. Effects of high activation energies on acoustic timescale detonation initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, J. D.; Kassoy, D. R.; Vasilyev, O. V.

    2012-08-01

    Acoustic timescale Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition (DDT) has been shown to occur through the generation of compression waves emitted by a hot spot or reaction centre where the pressure and temperature increase with little diminution of density. In order to compensate for the multi-scale nature of the physico-chemical processes, previous numerical simulations in this area have been limited to relatively small activation energies. In this work, a computational study investigates the effect of increased activation energy on the time required to form a detonation wave and the change in behaviour of each hot spot as the activation energy is increased. The simulations use a localised spatially distributed thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas to facilitate DDT. The Adaptive Wavelet-Collocation Method is used to solve efficiently the 1-D reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics. The DDT process as described in previous work is characterised by the formation of hot spots during an initial transient period, explosion of the hot spots and creation of an accelerating reaction front that reaches the lead shock and forms an overdriven detonation wave. Current results indicate that as the activation energy is raised the chemical heat release becomes more temporally distributed. Hot spots that produce an accelerating reaction front with low activation energies change behaviour with increased activation energy so that no accelerating reaction front is created. An acoustic timescale ratio is defined that characterises the change in behaviour of each hot spot.

  15. The presentation of metabolic dysfunction and the relationship with energy output in breast cancer survivors: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer prognosis can be adversely influenced by obesity, physical inactivity and metabolic dysfunction. Interventions aimed at improving surrogate markers of breast cancer risk such as insulin resistance may result in improved breast cancer outcomes. The design of such interventions may be improved through increased understanding of metabolic presentation in this cohort. This cross-sectional study aimed to characterise the metabolic profile of breast cancer survivors relative to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. A secondary aim was to compare measures of energy output across these groups. Methods Sixty-nine women (mean (SD) age 53.43 (9.39) years) who had completed adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer were recruited. All measures were completed during one assessment conducted 3.1 (1.0) years post diagnosis. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance analysis and waist circumference (WC). Fasting (12 hour) blood samples were drawn to measure lipid profile, glucose, insulin, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR)). Energy output was evaluated by resting metabolic rate (RMR) measured by indirect calorimetry and physical activity measured by accelerometry. Characteristics were compared across four groups (1. WC <80 cm, not insulin resistant; 2. WC 80–87.9 cm, not insulin resistant; 3. WC >88 cm, not insulin resistant; 4. WC >80 cm, insulin resistant) using ANOVA (p < 0.05). Results Group 4 was characterised by significant disturbances in measures of glucose metabolism (glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and HBA1c) and raised CRP compared to other groups. Group 4 also displayed evidence of dyslipidemia and higher body composition values compared to Groups 1 and 2. Both absolute and adjusted RMR were significantly higher in the Group 4 versus all other groups. Physical activity levels were similar for all

  16. Absolute cross sections for vibrational excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, M.; Bazin, M.; Sanche, L.

    2012-09-01

    The absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 0.5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at monolayer coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The vibrational energies compare to those that have been reported from IR spectroscopy of cytosine isolated in Ar matrix, IR and Raman spectra of polycrystalline cytosine, and ab initio calculation. The CSs for the various H bending modes at 142 and 160 meV are both rising from their energy threshold up to 1.7 and 2.1 × 10-17 cm2 at about 4 eV, respectively, and then decrease moderately while maintaining some intensity at 18 eV. The latter trend is displayed as well for the CS assigned to the NH2 scissor along with bending of all H at 179 meV. This overall behavior in electron-molecule collision is attributed to direct processes such as the dipole, quadrupole, and polarization contributions, etc. of the interaction of the incident electron with a molecule. The CSs for the ring deformation at 61 meV, the ring deformation with N-H symmetric wag at 77 meV, and the ring deformations with symmetric bending of all H at 119 meV exhibit common enhancement maxima at 1.5, 3.5, and 5.5 eV followed by a broad hump at about 12 eV, which are superimposed on the contribution due to the direct processes. At 3.5 eV, the CS values for the 61-, 77-, and 119-meV modes reach 4.0, 3.0, and 4.5 × 10-17 cm2, respectively. The CS for the C-C and C-O stretches at 202 meV, which dominates in the intermediate EEL region, rises sharply until 1.5 eV, reaches its maximum of 5.7 × 10-17 cm2 at 3.5 eV and then decreases toward 18 eV. The present vibrational enhancements, correspond to the features found around 1.5 and 4.5 eV in electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS) and those lying within 1.5-2.1 eV, 5.2-6.8 eV, and 9.5-10.9 eV range in dissociative electron attachment (DEA) experiments with cytosine in gas phase. While the ETS features are ascribed

  17. Absolute cross sections for vibrational excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact.

    PubMed

    Michaud, M; Bazin, M; Sanche, L

    2012-09-21

    The absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 0.5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at monolayer coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The vibrational energies compare to those that have been reported from IR spectroscopy of cytosine isolated in Ar matrix, IR and Raman spectra of polycrystalline cytosine, and ab initio calculation. The CSs for the various H bending modes at 142 and 160 meV are both rising from their energy threshold up to 1.7 and 2.1 × 10(-17) cm(2) at about 4 eV, respectively, and then decrease moderately while maintaining some intensity at 18 eV. The latter trend is displayed as well for the CS assigned to the NH(2) scissor along with bending of all H at 179 meV. This overall behavior in electron-molecule collision is attributed to direct processes such as the dipole, quadrupole, and polarization contributions, etc. of the interaction of the incident electron with a molecule. The CSs for the ring deformation at 61 meV, the ring deformation with N-H symmetric wag at 77 meV, and the ring deformations with symmetric bending of all H at 119 meV exhibit common enhancement maxima at 1.5, 3.5, and 5.5 eV followed by a broad hump at about 12 eV, which are superimposed on the contribution due to the direct processes. At 3.5 eV, the CS values for the 61-, 77-, and 119-meV modes reach 4.0, 3.0, and 4.5 × 10(-17) cm(2), respectively. The CS for the C-C and C-O stretches at 202 meV, which dominates in the intermediate EEL region, rises sharply until 1.5 eV, reaches its maximum of 5.7 × 10(-17) cm(2) at 3.5 eV and then decreases toward 18 eV. The present vibrational enhancements, correspond to the features found around 1.5 and 4.5 eV in electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS) and those lying within 1.5-2.1 eV, 5.2-6.8 eV, and 9.5-10.9 eV range in dissociative electron attachment (DEA) experiments with cytosine in gas phase. While the ETS features

  18. Physical activity patterns and estimated daily energy expenditures in normal and overweight tunisian schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Zarrouk, Fayçal; Bouhlel, Ezdine; Feki, Youssef; Amri, Mohamed; Shephard, Roy J.

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to test the normality of physical activity patterns and energy expenditures in normal weight and overweight primary school students. Heart rate estimates of total daily energy expenditure (TEE), active energy expenditure (AEE), and activity patterns were made over 3 consecutive school days in healthy middle-class Tunisian children (46 boys, 44 girls, median age (25th-75th) percentile, 9.2 (8.8-9.9) years. Our cross-section included 52 students with a normal body mass index (BMI) and 38 who exceeded age-specific BMI limits. TEE, AEE and overall physical activity level (PAL) were not different between overweight children and those with a normal BMI [median values (25th-75th) 9.20 (8.20-9.84) vs. 8.88 (7.42-9.76) MJ/d; 3.56 (2.59-4.22) vs. 3.85 (2.77-4.78) MJ/d and 1.74 (1.54-2.04) vs. 1.89 (1.66-2.15) respectively]. Physical activity intensities (PAI) were expressed as percentages of the individual’s heart rate reserve (%HRR). The median PAI for the entire day (PAI24) and for the waking part of day (PAIw) were lower in overweight than in normal weight individuals [16.3 (14.2-18.9) vs. 20.6 (17.9-22.3) %HRR, p < 0.001) and 24.8 (21.6-28.9) vs.26.2 (24.5-30.8) %HRR, p < 0.01], respectively. Overweight children allocated more of their day to sedentary pursuits [385 (336-468) vs 297 (235-468) min/d, p < 0.001], and less time to moderate physical activity [381(321-457) vs. 460 (380-534) min/d, p < 0.01]. Nevertheless, because of the greater energy cost of a given task, total and active daily energy expenditure did not differ from those with a normal BMI. Key points The physical activity intensity for the entire day (PAI24) and for the waking part of day (PAIw) were lower in overweight than in normal weight individuals. However, because the energy cost of activity is greater in those who are overweight, they do not differ in total energy expenditure or in active energy expenditure. Normal children spend more time in moderate activity and less time in

  19. The velocity and energy profiles of elite cross-country skiers executing downhill turns with different radii.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, Oyvind; Bucher Sandbakk, Silvana; Supej, Matej; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the influence of turn radius on velocity and energy profiles when skidding and step turning during more and less effective downhill turns while cross-country skiing. Thirteen elite female cross-country skiers performed single turns with a 9- or 12-m radius using the skidding technique and a 12- or 15-m radius with step turning. Mechanical parameters were monitored using a real-time kinematic Global Navigation Satellite System and video analysis. Step turning was more effective during all phases of a turn, leading to higher velocities than skidding (P < .05). With both techniques, a greater radius was associated with higher velocity (P < .05), but the quality of turning, as assessed on the basis of energy characteristics, was the same. More effective skidding turns involved more pronounced deceleration early in the turn and maintenance of higher velocity thereafter, while more effective step turning involved lower energy dissipation during the latter half of the turn. In conclusion, the single-turn analysis employed here reveals differences in the various techniques chosen by elite cross-country skiers when executing downhill turns of varying radii and can be used to assess the quality of such turns.

  20. Redox-active cross-linkable poly(ionic liquid)s.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xiaofeng; Hempenius, Mark A; Vancso, G Julius

    2012-03-01

    The synthesis of a new class of cross-linkable redox-responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane)-based poly(ionic liquid)s (PFS-PILs) is reported. PFS-PILs self-cross-link at low concentrations into nanogels or form macroscopic hydrogel networks at higher concentrations. PFS-PILs proved to be efficient dispersants in the microemulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate, producing stable PFS-poly(methyl methacrylate) latex suspensions. PMID:22353019

  1. Kinetic energy budget during strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Kinetic energy budgets are computed during a cold air outbreak in association with strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States. The period is characterized by large generation of kinetic energy due to cross-contour flow. Horizontal export and dissipation of energy to subgrid scales of motion constitute the important energy sinks. Rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals during a 36 h period are used in the analysis and reveal that energy fluctuations on a time scale of less than 12 h are generally small even though the overall energy balance does change considerably during the period in conjunction with an upper level trough which moves through the region. An error analysis of the energy budget terms suggests that this major change in the budget is not due to random errors in the input data but is caused by the changing synoptic situation. The study illustrates the need to consider the time and space scales of associated weather phenomena in interpreting energy budgets obtained through use of higher frequency data.

  2. In-medium NN cross sections determined from the nuclear stopping and collective flow in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yingxun; Li Zhuxia; Danielewicz, Pawel

    2007-03-15

    In-medium nucleon-nucleon scattering cross sections are explored by comparing results of quantum molecular dynamics simulations to data on stopping and on elliptic and directed flow in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions. The comparison points to in-medium cross sections which are suppressed at low energies but not at higher energies. Positive correlations are found between the degree of stopping and the magnitudes of elliptic and directed flows.

  3. A new algorithm for predicting triplet-triplet energy-transfer activated complex coordinate in terms of accurate potential-energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frutos, Luis Manuel; Castaño, Obis

    2005-09-01

    The new algorithm presented here allows, for the first time, the determination of the optimal geometrical distortions that an acceptor molecule in the triplet-triplet energy-transfer process undergoes, as well as the dependence of the activation energy of the process on the triplet energy difference of donor and acceptor molecules. This algorithm makes use of the complete potential-energy surfaces (singlet and triplet states), and contrasts with the first-order approximation already published [L. M. Frutos, O. Castaño, J. L. Andrés, M. Merchán, and A. U. Acuña, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 1208 (2004)] in which an expansion of the potential-energy surfaces was used. This algorithm is gradient based and finds the best trajectory for the acceptor molecule, starting from S0 ground-state equilibrium geometry, to achieve the maximum variation of the singlet-triplet energy gap with the minimum energy of activation on S0. Therefore, the algorithm allows the determination of a "reaction path" for the triplet-triplet energy-transfer processes. Also, the algorithm could also serve eventually to find minimum-energy crossing (singlet-triplet) points on the potential-energy surface, which can play an important role in the intersystem crossing process for the acceptor molecules to recover their initial capacity as acceptors. Also addressed is the misleading use of minimum-energy paths in T1 to describe the energy-transfer process by comparing these results with those obtained using the new algorithm. The implementation of the algorithm is illustrated with different potential-energy surface models and it is discussed in the frame of nonvertical behavior.

  4. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energy/spin-flip density functional theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Minezawa, Noriyuki

    2014-10-28

    Examining photochemical processes in solution requires understanding the solvent effects on the potential energy profiles near conical intersections (CIs). For that purpose, the CI point in solution is determined as the crossing between nonequilibrium free energy surfaces. In this work, the nonequilibrium free energy is described using the combined method of linear-response free energy and collinear spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory. The proposed approach reveals the solvent effects on the CI geometries of stilbene in an acetonitrile solution and those of thymine in water. Polar acetonitrile decreases the energy difference between the twisted minimum and twisted-pyramidalized CI of stilbene. For thymine in water, the hydrogen bond formation stabilizes significantly the CI puckered at the carbonyl carbon atom. The result is consistent with the recent simulation showing that the reaction path via this geometry is open in water. Therefore, the present method is a promising way of identifying the free-energy crossing points that play an essential role in photochemistry of solvated molecules.

  5. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: linear-response free energy/spin-flip density functional theory approach.

    PubMed

    Minezawa, Noriyuki

    2014-10-28

    Examining photochemical processes in solution requires understanding the solvent effects on the potential energy profiles near conical intersections (CIs). For that purpose, the CI point in solution is determined as the crossing between nonequilibrium free energy surfaces. In this work, the nonequilibrium free energy is described using the combined method of linear-response free energy and collinear spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory. The proposed approach reveals the solvent effects on the CI geometries of stilbene in an acetonitrile solution and those of thymine in water. Polar acetonitrile decreases the energy difference between the twisted minimum and twisted-pyramidalized CI of stilbene. For thymine in water, the hydrogen bond formation stabilizes significantly the CI puckered at the carbonyl carbon atom. The result is consistent with the recent simulation showing that the reaction path via this geometry is open in water. Therefore, the present method is a promising way of identifying the free-energy crossing points that play an essential role in photochemistry of solvated molecules.

  6. A review of UK wind energy activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrove, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    Wind power activities in Great Britain are reviewed, including a brief summary of historical windmill usage and details of developmental efforts in large and small wind turbines. An annual average resource of 5 m/sec at 10 m has been extrapolated to predict an 8-10 m/sec resource at the hub heights of large wind turbines. Initial estimates indicate that at least half of Great Britain's annual electricity consumption can be produced from windpowered generators. The potential of offshore large WECS siting is being examined, although the wind-derived electricity from those regions are projected to cost three times that of land-based operation. Recorded wind patterns with 12-48 hr. duration have indicated that at least 20% penetration into the national grid is acceptable. A test 250 kW machine is being built as a model for a 3.7 MW machine, both intended for installation at Orkney, Scotland. Additionally, construction has begun on a 25-m diameter, vertical axis, variable geometry Musgrove wind turbine. The straight-bladed machine will produce a maximum of 130 kW, and is a prototype of multi-MW offshore units.

  7. Energy effective approach for activation of metallurgical slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazov, I. N.; Khaydarov, B. B.; Mamulat, S. L.; Suvorov, D. S.; Saltikova, Y. S.; Yudin, A. G.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigation of the process of mechanical activation of metallurgical slag using different approaches - ball milling and electromagnetic vortex apparatus. Particle size distribution and structure of mechanically activated slag samples were investigated, as well as energetic parameters of the activation process. It was shown that electromagnetic vortex activation is more energy effective and allows to produce microscale milled slag-based concrete using very short treatment time. Activated slag materials can be used as clinker-free cement in civilian and road construction, providing ecology-friendly technology and recycling of high-tonnage industrial waste.

  8. Low Energy Physical Activity Recognition System on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Luis Miguel Soria; Gonzalez-Abril, Luis; Ramirez, Juan Antonio Ortega; de la Concepcion, Miguel Angel Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach to physical activity recognition based on the use of discrete variables obtained from accelerometer sensors is presented. The system first performs a discretization process for each variable, which allows efficient recognition of activities performed by users using as little energy as possible. To this end, an innovative discretization and classification technique is presented based on the χ2 distribution. Furthermore, the entire recognition process is executed on the smartphone, which determines not only the activity performed, but also the frequency at which it is carried out. These techniques and the new classification system presented reduce energy consumption caused by the activity monitoring system. The energy saved increases smartphone usage time to more than 27 h without recharging while maintaining accuracy. PMID:25742171

  9. Ion collision cross sections and transport coefficients extended to intermediate energies and reduced electric fields for He2+ ions colliding with He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicheportiche, A.; Benhenni, M.; Yousfi, M.; Lepetit, B.; Kalus, R.; Gadea, F. X.

    2013-10-01

    This work is devoted to the calculation of transport coefficients for He2+ ions in gaseous He at intermediate reduced electric fields. These swarm data are of great interest for a better understanding of the mechanisms of formation and propagation of the fast plasma bullets or ionization waves observed in dielectric barrier plasma jet devices. For transport data, the collision cross sections required are determined from several theoretical methods based on quantum, semiclassical, and hybrid approaches and a diatomics-in-molecules model for the potential energy surfaces of He3+. The corresponding collision cross sections are then used in an optimized Monte Carlo code to calculate the ion transport coefficients over a wide range of reduced electric fields extending over the experimental range. Calculated transport coefficients are compared with available experimental data at low electric fields. Moreover, an extrapolation method is used in order to determine the reduced mobility for stronger fields. A critical discussion has been performed on the pertinence and the reliability of these different methods of determination of collision cross sections needed for the calculation of ion transport data. Such ion data will be used in electrohydrodynamic and chemical kinetic models of the low-temperature plasma jet to quantify and to tune the active species production for a better use in biomedical applications.

  10. Research on Social Stability Mechanisms Based on Activation Energy and Gradual Activation Reaction Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Miao; Gu, Jifa

    This paper draws a comparison between social stability and chemical reaction process, and brings forward the concept of “social temperature” and “activation energy of social agent”. It is considered that social temperature turns out to be the macro symptom of social average energy, and its unceasing up-climbing roots in the energy accumulation of “inferiorization” process of social system; that “activation energy of social agent” stands for the social energy or temperature where individuals or groups reach the limit of their psychological bearing ability. This paper, basing on above concepts, elaborates on and demonstrates the gradual activation reaction mechanisms of social stability by a lot of concrete examples. It is thought that there is a threshold value for social stability, and the society will be unstable if social temperature goes higher than this value; that the larger the social average activation energy is, the higher the temperature threshold value of social stability will be; and considering that different groups have different activation energy, those fragile groups with low activation energy are often the risk source which might pose a threat to social stability.

  11. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) is a comprehensive, mid?term energy forecasting and policy analysis tool used by EIA. WEPS projects energy supply, demand, and prices by country or region, given assumptions about the state of various economies, international energy markets, and energy policies. The Global Activity Module (GLAM) provides projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of WEPS . GLAM’s baseline economic projection contains the economic assumptions used in WEPS to help determine energy demand and supply. GLAM can also provide WEPS with alternative economic assumptions representing a range of uncertainty about economic growth. The resulting economic impacts of such assumptions are inputs to the remaining supply and demand modules of WEPS .

  12. Indirect Determination of the 230Th(n,f) and 231Th(n,f) Cross Sections for Thorium-Based Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stroberg, S.R.; Allmond, J.M.; Angell, C.; Bernstein, L.A.; Bleuel, D.L.; Burke, J.T.; Gibelin, J.; Phair, L.; Scielzo, N.D.; Swanberg, E.; Wiedeking, M.; Norman, E.B.; Goldblum, Bethany

    2009-09-11

    The Surrogate Ratio Method (SRM) was employed in the first experimental determination of the 231Th(n,f) cross section, relative to the 235U(n,f) cross section, over an equivalent neutron energy range of 360 keV to 10 MeV. The 230Th(n,f) cross section was also deduced using the SRM, relative to the 234U(n,f) cross section, over an equivalent neutron energy range of 220 keV to 25 MeV. The desired compound nuclei were populated using (3He,3He) and (3He) reactions on targets of 232Th and 236U and relative fission decay probabilities were measured. The surrogate 230,231Th(n,f) cross sections were compared to cross section evaluations and directly-measured experimental data, where available.

  13. Very low-energy total cross sections and the experimental scattering length for the positron-xenon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecca, Antonio; Chiari, Luca; Trainotti, Emanuele; Brunger, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    We report total cross-section (TCS) results for low-energy positron scattering from the noble gas xenon. A comparison with previous measurements shows a good level of accord with the recent results of the ANU group (2011 New J. Phys. 13 125004). Very good qualitative agreement is also found with the convergent close-coupling (CCC) calculation of Fursa and Bray (2012 New J. Phys. 14 035002) over most of the common energies. By using the shape of the CCC results as a guide, we also extrapolate our measured cross sections to very low energy. With the aid of the CCC theory, we therefore derive the first experimental estimate for the positron-xenon scattering length of a = -99.2 ± 18.4 au. This value is found to be consistent with the CCC-based estimate and also with those of some other theories. This result supports the existence of a positron-xenon virtual state at a positron energy ɛ = (1.4 ± 0.6) × 10-3 eV.

  14. Low Energy Neutrino Cross Sections: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    This large collection of low-energy (less than 30 GEV) neutrino cross sections is extracted from the results of many experiments from 1973 through 2002. The experiments, facilities, and collaborations include ANL, BNL, and FNAL in the U.S., along with CERN, Gargamelle, SKAT, LSND, and others. The data are presented in both tabular and plotted formats. The Durham High Energy Physics Database Group makes these data available in one place, easy to access and compare. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  15. Energy-aware Activity Classification using Wearable Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Montoye, Alexander; Moore, Rebecca; Pfeiffer, Karin; Biswas, Subir

    2013-05-29

    This paper presents implementation details, system characterization, and the performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity analysis. Specific machine learning mechanisms are implemented for recognizing a target set of activities with both out-of-body and on-body processing arrangements. Impacts of energy consumption by the on-body sensors are analyzed in terms of activity detection accuracy for out-of-body processing. Impacts of limited processing abilities for the on-body scenario are also characterized in terms of detection accuracy, by varying the background processing load in the sensor units. Impacts of varying number of sensors in terms of activity classification accuracy are also evaluated. Through a rigorous systems study, it is shown that an efficient human activity analytics system can be designed and operated even under energy and processing constraints of tiny on-body wearable sensors.

  16. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes. PMID:27627349

  17. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  18. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10-23m3 ), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  19. Cellular Links between Neuronal Activity and Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Pavan K.; Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal activity, astrocytic responses to this activity, and energy homeostasis are linked together during baseline, conscious conditions, and short-term rapid activation (as occurs with sensory or motor function). Nervous system energy homeostasis also varies during long-term physiological conditions (i.e., development and aging) and with adaptation to pathological conditions, such as ischemia or low glucose. Neuronal activation requires increased metabolism (i.e., ATP generation) which leads initially to substrate depletion, induction of a variety of signals for enhanced astrocytic function, and increased local blood flow and substrate delivery. Energy generation (particularly in mitochondria) and use during ATP hydrolysis also lead to considerable heat generation. The local increases in blood flow noted following neuronal activation can both enhance local substrate delivery but also provides a heat sink to help cool the brain and removal of waste by-products. In this review we highlight the interactions between short-term neuronal activity and energy metabolism with an emphasis on signals and factors regulating astrocyte function and substrate supply. PMID:22470340

  20. Evaporation residue cross sections for the {sup 64}Ni + {sup 144,154}Sm reaction -- Energy dissipation in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The fission hindrance of hot nuclei was deduced recently from an enhanced emission of GDR {gamma} rays, neutrons and charged particles prior to scission of heavy nuclei. In the most recent experiments addressing this topic, namely new measurements of the pre-scission {gamma} rays and evaporation residues from the {sup 32}S + {sup 184}W reaction, a rather sharp transition from negligible to full one-body dissipation occurs over the excitation energy region E{sub exc} = 60-100 MeV. However, the cross section does not appear to level out or start to decline again at the upper end of the energy range as expected in this interpretation. It is therefore clearly desirable to extend the excitation energy range to look for such an effect in order to either corroborate or refute this interpretation.

  1. Low-energy cross sections in the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuma, M.

    2008-09-15

    The low-energy {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction is analyzed with the potential model. The potentials are chosen from the deep potential describing the {alpha}-particle nuclear rainbow phenomena at high energies. Below E{sub c.m.}=1 MeV, the cross section is found to be dominated by the E2 transition to the ground state of {sup 16}O. No enhancement of the E1 component at low energies is predicted. The extrapolated astrophysical S-factors at E{sub c.m.}=0.3 MeV are S{sub E2}=150 keV b and S{sub E1}=3 keV b.

  2. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  3. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  4. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Angell, C. T.; Becker, J. A.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallin, B.; Fotiades, N.; Howell, C. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kiser, M.; Macri, R. A.; Nelson, R. O.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Weisel, G. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on 235,238U and 241Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with En = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt γ rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  5. The actin-microtubule cross-linking activity of Drosophila Short stop is regulated by intramolecular inhibition.

    PubMed

    Applewhite, Derek A; Grode, Kyle D; Duncan, Mara C; Rogers, Stephen L

    2013-09-01

    Actin and microtubule dynamics must be precisely coordinated during cell migration, mitosis, and morphogenesis--much of this coordination is mediated by proteins that physically bridge the two cytoskeletal networks. We have investigated the regulation of the Drosophila actin-microtubule cross-linker Short stop (Shot), a member of the spectraplakin family. Our data suggest that Shot's cytoskeletal cross-linking activity is regulated by an intramolecular inhibitory mechanism. In its inactive conformation, Shot adopts a "closed" conformation through interactions between its NH(2)-terminal actin-binding domain and COOH-terminal EF-hand-GAS2 domain. This inactive conformation is targeted to the growing microtubule plus end by EB1. On activation, Shot binds along the microtubule through its COOH-terminal GAS2 domain and binds to actin with its NH(2)-terminal tandem CH domains. We propose that this mechanism allows Shot to rapidly cross-link dynamic microtubules in response to localized activating signals at the cell cortex.

  6. Measurement of the inelastic pp cross-section at a centre-of-mass energy of = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R. C. M.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-02-01

    The cross-section for inelastic proton-proton collisions, with at least one prompt long-lived charged particle of transverse momentum p T > 0 .2GeV /c in the pseudorapidity range 2 .0 < η < 4 .5, is measured by the LHCb experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of = 7 TeV. The cross-section in this kinematic range is determined to be σ {inel/acc} = 55 .0 ± 2 .4 mb with an experimental uncertainty that is dominated by systematic contributions. Extrapolation to the full phase space, using P ythia 6, yields σ inel = 66 .9 ± 2 .9 ± 4 .4 mb, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second is due to the extrapolation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. High-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator for enhanced acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-05-01

    A high-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator (Cr-PCR) coupled with an electromechanical Helmholtz resonator (EMHR) is proposed to improve acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting. Owing to the strongly directional wave-scattering effect of the cross-plate corners, strong confinement of acoustic waves emerges. Consequently, the proposed Cr-PCR structure exhibits ∼353.5 times higher Q value and ∼6.1 times greater maximum pressure amplification than the phononic crystal resonator (Cy-PCR) (consisting of cylindrical scatterers) of the same size. Furthermore, the harvester using the proposed Cr-PCR and the EMHR has ∼22 times greater maximum output-power volume density than the previous harvester using Cy-PCR and EMHR structures.

  8. Think Globally: Cross-Linguistic Variation in Electrophysiological Activity during Sentence Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Kretzschmar, Franziska; Tune, Sarah; Wang, Luming; Genc, Safiye; Philipp, Markus; Roehm, Dietmar; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates systematic cross-linguistic differences in the electrophysiological correlates of conflicts between form and meaning ("semantic reversal anomalies"). These engender P600 effects in English and Dutch (e.g. [Kolk et al., 2003] and [Kuperberg et al., 2003]), but a biphasic N400--late positivity pattern in German (Schlesewsky…

  9. Crossed Molecular Beam Studies and Dynamics of Decomposition of Chemically Activated Radicals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1973-09-01

    The power of the crossed molecular beams method in the investigation of the dynamics of chemical reactions lies mainly in the direct observation of the consequences of single collisions of well controlled reactant molecules. The primary experimental observations which provide information on reaction dynamics are the measurements of angular and velocity distributions of reaction products.

  10. Little Shrimp, Big Results: A Model of an Integrative, Cross-Curricular Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerson, Nicole; Piser, Carol; Walka, Keith

    2010-01-01

    This integrative, cross-curricular lab engages middle school biology students in an exercise involving ecology, arthropod biology, and mathematics. Students research the anatomy and behavioral patterns of a species of brine shrimp, compare the anatomy of adult and juvenile brine shrimp, and graph and interpret results. In this article, the authors…

  11. Our Environment. Language Arts Theme Units, Volume I. Cross Curricular Activities for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.; Hildebrand, Joan M.; Ericson, Joann H.

    Suggesting that students in the primary grades can explore the world around them and practice valuable skills in spelling, reading, writing, communication, and language, this book presents cross-curricular units on the environment that reach diverse needs by working through emotional memory, deductive reasoning, and multiple intelligences.…

  12. 76 FR 5802 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cross-Media...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Electronic Reporting Rule (Renewal); EPA ICR No. 2002.05, OMB Control No. 2025-0003 AGENCY: Environmental...: Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule (Renewal). ICR numbers: EPA ICR No. 2002.05, OMB Control Number... in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment,...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.228-76 - Cross-waiver of liability for international space station activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of liability provision authorized by 14 CFR 1266.102. (2) “Damage” means: (i) Bodily injury to, or..., exploitation, and use of outer space through the ISS. The objective of this clause is to extend this cross..., exploitation, and use of outer space through the International Space Station (ISS). The Parties intend...

  14. 48 CFR 1852.228-76 - Cross-waiver of liability for space station activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of liability provision authorized by 14 CFR 1266.102. (2) “Damage” means: (i) Bodily injury to, or..., exploitation, and use of outer space through the ISS. The objective of this clause is to extend this cross..., exploitation, and use of outer space through the International Space Station (ISS). The Parties intend...

  15. Intriguing Animals. Language Arts Theme Units, Volume IV. Cross Curricular Activities for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.; Hildebrand, Joan M.; Ericson, Joann H.

    Suggesting that students in the primary grades can explore the world around them and practice valuable skills in spelling, reading, writing, communication, and language, this book presents cross-curricular units on intriguing animals that reach diverse needs by working through emotional memory, deductive reasoning, and multiple intelligences.…

  16. Reconsidering Privatization in Cross-Border Engagements: The Sometimes Public Nature of Private Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Jason E.; Kinser, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Privatization trends in higher education have typically been analyzed from the perspective of the institution and its relationship with the sponsoring state. The recent phenomenon of international cross-border higher education, however, represents a more complicated picture of privatization. Geographic separation from the sponsoring state is an…

  17. Origin of activation energy in a superionic conductor.

    PubMed

    Kamishima, O; Kawamura, K; Hattori, T; Kawamura, J

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of cation diffusion with many-body effects are discussed using Ag β-alumina as an example of a superionic conductor. Polarized Raman spectra of Ag β-alumina have been measured at room temperature. The interatomic potentials were determined by a non-linear least square fitting between the phonon eigenvalues from the Raman observations and a dynamical matrix calculation based on a rigid-ion model. The obtained potential parameters for the model crystal of Ag β-alumina successfully reproduce the macroscopic properties with respect to the heat capacity, isothermal compressibility and self-diffusion constant. A molecular dynamics (MD) calculation has been carried out using the model crystal of Ag β-alumina to understand the many-body effects for the fast ionic diffusion. It was found that the Ag-Ag repulsion by excess Ag defects significantly reduced the cost of the energy difference of the occupancy between the stable and metastable sites. It is possible for the system to take various configurations of the mobile ions through defects easily, and then the fast ionic diffusion will appear. On the other hand, the Ag-Ag repulsion changes the dynamics of the Ag ions from a random hopping to a cooperative motion. In the cooperative motion, the ionic transport becomes difficult due to the additional energy required for the structural relaxation of the surrounding Ag ions. We propose a new insight into the superionic conduction, that is, the activation energy for the ionic transport is composed of two kinds of elements: a 'static' activation energy and a 'dynamic' one. The static activation energy is the cost of the averaged energy difference in the various structural configurations in the equilibrium state. The dynamic activation energy is the additional energy required for the structural relaxation induced by the jump process.

  18. United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, R.J.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

  19. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  20. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  1. A continuous active monitoring approach to identify cross-connections between potable water and effluent distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Friedler, E; Alfiya, Y; Shaviv, A; Gilboa, Y; Harussi, Y; Raize, O

    2015-03-01

    A continuous active monitoring approach was developed for identification of cross-connections between potable water supply systems and treated wastewater effluent reuse distribution systems. The approach is based on monitoring the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) at the potable water system while injecting sulfite (a reducing agent) into the effluent line. A sharp decrease in the ORP of the potable water would indicate a cross-connection event. The approach was tested in batch experiments on treated municipal wastewater effluent of varying degree of treatment, and at dilution ratios of up to 1:100 (effluent/potable). The approach was then examined under continuous flow conditions, which simulated cross-connection events at various dilution ratios (up to 1:100). In the continuous runs, differences between the potable water ORP and the effluent-potable water mixture (containing sulfite as sodium bisulfite (SBS)) ORP were 450-630 mV. This suggests high potential for identifying a cross-connection event. Implementation of the approach includes adding sulfite to effluent used for agricultural irrigation; hence, possible effects on soil and on crops were studied in soil columns and pots planted with basil (Ocimum basilicum) as a model plant. No negative effects of sulfite addition to the irrigation effluent were observed in the irrigated soils and plants, and therefore, it could be safely implemented also in agricultural applications. PMID:25701471

  2. A continuous active monitoring approach to identify cross-connections between potable water and effluent distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Friedler, E; Alfiya, Y; Shaviv, A; Gilboa, Y; Harussi, Y; Raize, O

    2015-03-01

    A continuous active monitoring approach was developed for identification of cross-connections between potable water supply systems and treated wastewater effluent reuse distribution systems. The approach is based on monitoring the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) at the potable water system while injecting sulfite (a reducing agent) into the effluent line. A sharp decrease in the ORP of the potable water would indicate a cross-connection event. The approach was tested in batch experiments on treated municipal wastewater effluent of varying degree of treatment, and at dilution ratios of up to 1:100 (effluent/potable). The approach was then examined under continuous flow conditions, which simulated cross-connection events at various dilution ratios (up to 1:100). In the continuous runs, differences between the potable water ORP and the effluent-potable water mixture (containing sulfite as sodium bisulfite (SBS)) ORP were 450-630 mV. This suggests high potential for identifying a cross-connection event. Implementation of the approach includes adding sulfite to effluent used for agricultural irrigation; hence, possible effects on soil and on crops were studied in soil columns and pots planted with basil (Ocimum basilicum) as a model plant. No negative effects of sulfite addition to the irrigation effluent were observed in the irrigated soils and plants, and therefore, it could be safely implemented also in agricultural applications.

  3. Benefits of creating a cross-country data framework for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, Alex; McNeil, Michael; Pantano, Stephen

    2013-10-15

    As manufacturers now sell a similar range of consumer electronics and home appliances to major markets around the world, the task of identifying a product’s energy efficiency rating has usually been the responsibility of each country and its respective government agency. This has led to a multitude of energy efficiency testing procedures, ratings, and certifications, resulting in disparate data being captured on identical products. Furthermore, lack of consistent product identification criteria means product energy performance is not easily connected to relevant information about the product such as market availability, price or real world energy consumption. This paper presents a new data standard for reporting energy performance and related product information that can be adopted internationally. To inform the development of this standard, we explore the existing energy efficiency market data for the two example products of TVs and Room Air Conditioners. This paper discusses current/future use cases of appliance level energy efficiency data across all stakeholders, including consumers, retailers/manufacturers, global standards organizations, third party service providers, and regulatory agencies. It also explains the key benefits of moving to a common international data framework for energy efficiency, such as: 1) a centralized product information repository for comparing energy use, ratings/certifications, and pricing data 2) improved access to relevant consumer electronics and appliance data to facilitate new policy development and harmonization across markets 3) enablement of retailers and other third parties to embed actionable energy efficiency information as part of the consumer experience.

  4. The Benefits of Creating a Cross-Country Data Framework for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, Alex; McNeil, Michael; Pantano, Stephen

    2013-09-11

    As manufacturers now sell a similar range of consumer electronics and home appliances to major markets around the world, the task of identifying a product?s energy efficiency rating has usually been the responsibility of each country and its respective government agency. This has led to a multitude of energy efficiency testing procedures, ratings, and certifications, resulting in disparate data being captured on identical products. Furthermore, lack of consistent product identification criteria means product energy performance is not easily connected to relevant information about the product such as market availability, price or real world energy consumption. This paper presents a new data standard for reporting energy performance and related product information that can be adopted internationally. To inform the development of this standard, we explore the existing energy efficiency market data for the two example products of TVs and Room Air Conditioners. This paper discusses current/future use cases of appliance level energy efficiency data across all stakeholders, including consumers, retailers/manufacturers, global standards organizations, third party service providers, and regulatory agencies. It also explains the key benefits of moving to a common international data framework for energy efficiency, such as: 1) a centralized product information repository for comparing energy use, ratings/certifications, and pricing data 2) improved access to relevant consumer electronics and appliance data to facilitate new policy development and harmonization across markets 3) enablement of retailers and other third parties to embed actionable energy efficiency information as part of the consumer experience.

  5. A Fluorescent Reporter of AMPK activity and Cellular Energy Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Peiling; Zheng, Bin; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Sasaki, Atsuo T; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated when the AMP/ATP ratio in cells is elevated due to energy stress. Here we describe a biosensor, AMPKAR, which exhibits enhanced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in response to phosphorylation by AMPK, allowing spatio-temporal monitoring of AMPK activity in single cells. We show that this reporter responds to a variety of stimuli that are known to induce energy stress and that the response is dependent on AMPK α1 & α2 and on the upstream kinase, LKB1. Interestingly we found that AMPK activation is confined to the cytosol in response to energy stress but can be observed in both the cytosol and nucleus in response to calcium elevation. Finally, using this probe with U2OS cells in a microfluidics device, we observed a very high cell-to-cell variability in the amplitude and time course of AMPK activation and recovery in response to pulses of glucose deprivation. PMID:21459332

  6. Reconstruction of limited-angle dual-energy CT using mutual learning and cross-estimation (MLCE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huayu; Xing, Yuxiang

    2016-03-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging has gained a lot of attenuation because of its capability to discriminate materials. We proposes a flexible DECT scan strategy which can be realized on a system with general X-ray sources and detectors. In order to lower dose and scanning time, our DECT acquires two projections data sets on two arcs of limited-angular coverage (one for each energy) respectively. Meanwhile, a certain number of rays from two data sets form conjugate sampling pairs. Our reconstruction method for such a DECT scan mainly tackles the consequent limited-angle problem. Using the idea of artificial neural network, we excavate the connection between projections at two different energies by constructing a relationship between the linear attenuation coefficient of the high energy and that of the low one. We use this relationship to cross-estimate missing projections and reconstruct attenuation images from an augmented data set including projections at views covered by itself (projections collected in scanning) and by the other energy (projections estimated) for each energy respectively. Validated by our numerical experiment on a dental phantom with rather complex structures, our DECT is effective in recovering small structures in severe limited-angle situations. This DECT scanning strategy can much broaden DECT design in reality.

  7. Solid-state effects on thermal-neutron cross sections and on low-energy resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.A.; Mook, H.A.; Hill, N.W.; Shahal, O.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross sections of several single crystals (Si, Cu, sapphire), several polycrystalline samples (Cu, Fe, Be, C, Bi, Ta), and a fine-powder copper sample have been measured from 0.002 to 5 eV. The Cu powder and polycrystalline Fe, Be and C data exhibit the expected abrupt changes in cross section. The cross section of the single crystal of Si is smooth with only small broad fluctuations. The data on two single Cu crystals, the sapphire crystal, cast Bi, and rolled samples of Ta and Cu have many narrow peaks approx. 10/sup -3/ eV wide. High resolution (0.3%) transmission measurements were made on the 1.057-eV resonance in /sup 240/Pu and the 0.433-eV resonance in /sup 180/Ta, both at room and low temperatures to study the effects of crystal binding. Although the changes in Doppler broadening with temperature were apparent, no asymmetries due to a recoilless contribution were observed.

  8. Volumetric deformation of live cells induced by pressure-activated cross-membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Hui, T H; Zhou, Z L; Qian, J; Lin, Y; Ngan, A H W; Gao, H

    2014-09-12

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  9. Volumetric Deformation of Live Cells Induced by Pressure-Activated Cross-Membrane Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, T. H.; Zhou, Z. L.; Qian, J.; Lin, Y.; Ngan, A. H. W.; Gao, H.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  10. Measurement of energy contrast of amplified ultrashort pulses using cross-polarized wave generation and spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Marin; Meier, Amanda K; Galloway, Benjamin; Adams, Daniel E; Squier, Jeff A; Durfee, Charles G

    2014-07-28

    We present a method using spectral interferometry (SI) to characterize a pulse in the presence of an incoherent background such as amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The output of a regenerative amplifier is interfered with a copy of the pulse that has been converted using third-order cross-polarized wave generation (XPW). The ASE shows as a pedestal background in the interference pattern. The energy contrast between the short-pulse component and the ASE is retrieved. The spectra of the interacting beams are obtained through an improvement to the self-referenced spectral interferometry (SRSI) analysis. PMID:25089416

  11. Measurement of the Energy Dependent Numu Charged Current Inclusive Cross Section on Iron with the T2K INGRID Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kento

    The Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment is designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters. INGRID is installed 280 m downstream from the T2K target to monitor the direction and intensity of the neutrino beam. It has 14 independent modules which are composed of iron plates and scintillator planes. The purpose of this analysis is to measure the energy dependent muon neutrino charged current inclusive cross section on iron. We estimate the sensitivity of the measurement using toy MC data and the expected error size is 11.5-13.8%.

  12. Cross-layer protocols optimized for real-time multimedia services in energy-constrained mobile ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2003-07-01

    Mobile ad hoc networking (MANET) supports self-organizing, mobile infrastructures and enables an autonomous network of mobile nodes that can operate without a wired backbone. Ad hoc networks are characterized by multihop, wireless connectivity via packet radios and by the need for efficient dynamic protocols. All routers are mobile and can establish connectivity with other nodes only when they are within transmission range. Importantly, ad hoc wireless nodes are resource-constrained, having limited processing, memory, and battery capacity. Delivery of high quality-ofservice (QoS), real-time multimedia services from Internet-based applications over a MANET is a challenge not yet achieved by proposed Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) ad hoc network protocols in terms of standard performance metrics such as end-to-end throughput, packet error rate, and delay. In the distributed operations of route discovery and maintenance, strong interaction occurs across MANET protocol layers, in particular, the physical, media access control (MAC), network, and application layers. The QoS requirements are specified for the service classes by the application layer. The cross-layer design must also satisfy the battery-limited energy constraints, by minimizing the distributed power consumption at the nodes and of selected routes. Interactions across the layers are modeled in terms of the set of concatenated design parameters including associated energy costs. Functional dependencies of the QoS metrics are described in terms of the concatenated control parameters. New cross-layer designs are sought that optimize layer interdependencies to achieve the "best" QoS available in an energy-constrained, time-varying network. The protocol design, based on a reactive MANET protocol, adapts the provisioned QoS to dynamic network conditions and residual energy capacities. The cross-layer optimization is based on stochastic dynamic programming conditions derived from time-dependent models of

  13. Multiple cross mapping (MCM) markedly improves the localization of a QTL for ethanol-induced activation.

    PubMed

    Hitzemann, R; Malmanger, B; Cooper, S; Coulombe, S; Reed, C; Demarest, K; Koyner, J; Cipp, L; Flint, J; Talbot, C; Rademacher, B; Buck, K; McCaughran, J

    2002-11-01

    This study examines the use of multiple cross mapping (MCM) to reduce the interval for an ethanol response QTL on mouse chromosome 1. The phenotype is the acute locomotor response to a 1.5-g/kg i.p. dose of ethanol. The MCM panel consisted of the six unique intercrosses that can be obtained from the C57BL/6J (B6), DBA/2J (D2), BALB/cJ (C) and LP/J (LP) inbred mouse strains (N > or = 600/cross). Ethanol response QTL were detected only with the B6xD2 and B6xC intercrosses. For both crosses, the D2 and C alleles were dominant and decreased ethanol response. The QTL information was used to develop an algorithm for sorting and editing the chromosome 1 Mit microsatellite marker set (http://www.jax.org). This process yielded a cluster of markers between 82 and 85cM (MGI). Evidence that the QTL was localized in or near this interval was obtained by the analysis of a sample (n = 550) of advanced cross heterogenous stock animals. In addition, it was observed that one of the BXD recombinant inbred strains (BXD-32) had a recombination in the interval of interest which produced the expected change in behavior. Overall, the data obtained suggest that the information available within existing genetic maps coupled with MCM data can be used to reduce the QTL interval. In addition, the MCM data set can be used to interrogate gene expression data to estimate which polymorphisms within the interval of interest are relevant to the QTL.

  14. Energy expended by boys playing active video games.

    PubMed

    White, Kate; Schofield, Grant; Kilding, Andrew E

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine energy expenditure (EE) during a range of active video games (AVGs) and (2) determine whether EE during AVGs is influenced by gaming experience or fitness. Twenty-six boys (11.4±0.8 years) participated and performed a range of sedentary activities (resting, watching television and sedentary gaming), playing AVGs (Nintendo® Wii Bowling, Boxing, Tennis, and Wii Fit Skiing and Step), walking and running including a maximal fitness test. During all activities, oxygen uptake, heart rate and EE were determined. The AVGs resulted in a significantly higher EE compared to rest (63-190%, p≤0.001) and sedentary screen-time activities (56-184%, p≤0.001). No significant differences in EE were found between the most active video games and walking. There was no evidence to suggest that gaming experience or aerobic fitness influenced EE when playing AVGs. In conclusion, boys expended more energy during active gaming compared to sedentary activities. Whilst EE during AVG is game-specific, AVGs are not intense enough to contribute towards the 60min of daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity that is currently recommended for children.

  15. Transglutaminase cross-linking effect on sensory characteristics and antioxidant activities of Maillard reaction products from soybean protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Song, Na; Tan, Chen; Huang, Meigui; Liu, Ping; Eric, Karangwa; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Shuqin; Jia, Chengsheng

    2013-01-01

    To improve the yield of Maillard peptides, a microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) was used to increase the content of 1000-5000Da peptides in soybean protein hydrolysates by using a cross-linking reaction. The sensory characteristics and antioxidant activities of corresponding Maillard Reaction Products (MSPC) was then evaluated. After cross-linking treatment the content of 1000-5000Da peptides in protein hydrolysates and the yield of Maillard peptides increased by 21.19% and 8.71%, respectively, which contributed to the improved mouthfulness of MSPC. The bitter amino acids were significantly decreased and the umami acids were markedly increased in MSPC. Volatile compounds identified by GC-MS analysis showed that the content of the important meaty flavour compounds (such as 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, bis(2-methyl-3-furyl)disulfide) of MSPC were dramatically higher than that of MRPs from uncross-linking peptides. Combined with sensory evaluation, it was confirmed that MTGase cross-linking improved the flavour Characteristics and did not affect the antioxidant activity of MSPC.

  16. Influence of differential elastic nucleon-nucleon cross section on stopping and collective flow in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjia; Guo, Chenchen; Li, Qingfeng; Li, Zhuxia; Su, Jun; Zhang, Hongfei

    2016-08-01

    We considered three different nucleon-nucleon (NN) elastic differential cross sections: the Cugnon et al. parameterized differential cross section [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. B 111, 215 (1996), 10.1016/0168-583X(95)01384-9], the differential cross section derived from the collision term of the self-consistent relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation proposed by Mao et al. [Z. Phys. A 347, 173 (1994), 10.1007/BF01292373], and the isotropic differential cross section within the newly updated version of the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model. By doing so, we investigated the influence of the differential elastic NN cross section on various observables (e.g., nuclear stopping, both the rapidity and transverse-velocity dependence of the directed and elliptic flows) in Au+Au collisions at beam energies 150, 250, 400, and 800 MeV /nucleon . By comparing calculations with those three differential cross sections, we found that the nuclear stopping power and the directed and elliptic flows are affected to some extent by the differential cross sections, and the impact of differential cross section on those observables becomes more visible as the beam energy increases. The effect on the elliptic flow difference v2n-v2H and ratio v2n/v2H of neutrons versus hydrogen isotopes (Z =1 ), which have been used as sensitive observables for probing nuclear symmetry energy at high densities, is weak.

  17. 78 FR 64414 - Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... concerning Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities since 1986. (76 FR 55278) The NOPR reflected a need.... ] DATES: DOE will continue to accept written comments on the SNOPR published August 2, 2013 (78 FR 46829... a second opportunity to comment. (78 FR 46829) II. Second Public Meeting A public meeting on...

  18. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  19. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-04-22

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter.

  20. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H.; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter. PMID:27103586

  1. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H.; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-04-01

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter.

  2. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    SciTech Connect

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z.; Duque, H. V.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Duflot, D.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  3. Activation energy and entropy for viscosity of wormlike micelle solutions.

    PubMed

    Chandler, H D

    2013-11-01

    The viscosities of two surfactant solutions which form wormlike micelles (WLMs) were studied over a range of temperatures and strain rates. WLM solutions appear to differ from many other shear thinning systems in that, as the shear rate increases, stress-shear rate curves tend to converge with temperature rather than diverge and this can sometimes lead to higher temperature curves crossing those at lower. Behaviour was analysed in terms of activation kinetics. It is suggested that two mechanisms are involved: Newtonian flow, following an Arrhenius law superimposed on a non-Newtonian flow described by a stress assisted kinetic law, this being a more general form of the Arrhenius law. Anomalous flow is introduced into the kinetic equation via a stress dependent activation entropy term.

  4. On the nature of cross-isobath energy fluxes in topographically modified barotropic semidiurnal Kelvin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianyi; Yankovsky, Alexander E.

    2016-05-01

    Continental shelf topography modifies a Kelvin wave into a hybrid Kelvin-edge wave with a nonzero across-isobath velocity and a phase speed that decreases with increasing wave number while the group velocity reaches a minimum at intermediate wave numbers. We model the modified semidiurnal Kelvin wave adjustment to alongshore changes in the shelf width. The model domain consists of two alongshore-uniform continental shelves of different widths adjoined through a 150 km long transition zone. The continental shelf and slope are adjacent to an ocean of a constant depth, allowing radiation of Poincaré waves. We consider three shelf widths of 150, 250, and 300 km, where properties of a zero mode at semidiurnal frequency change from Kelvin wave like to edge wave like. For each shelf width, a zero wave mode has its distinctive alongshore energy flux structure on the shelf. As the incident wave encounters a variable shelf width, the alongshore energy flux converges (diverges) on the shelf resulting in an offshore (onshore) energy flux over the continental slope. Furthermore, for a strongly convergent alongshore energy flux, the incident wave mode scatters into radiating Poincaré waves. On sufficiently wide shelves, a strong across-isobath energy flux comparable with the incident wave energy flux can be triggered even by relatively modest changes of shelf width. An energy flux divergence parameter De is defined, which scales with magnitude and direction of the energy flux across the continental slope. More than 50% of the incident energy flux scatters into modes radiating offshore when De is -1 or less.

  5. Thermodynamic Derivation of the Activation Energy for Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play a key role in the radiative and hydrological balance of the upper troposphere. Their correct representation in atmospheric models requires an understanding of the microscopic processes leading to ice nucleation. A key parameter in the theoretical description of ice nucleation is the activation energy, which controls the flux of water molecules from the bulk of the liquid to the solid during the early stages of ice formation. In most studies it is estimated by direct association with the bulk properties of water, typically viscosity and self-diffusivity. As the environment in the ice-liquid interface may differ from that of the bulk, this approach may introduce bias in calculated nucleation rates. In this work a theoretical model is proposed to describe the transfer of water molecules across the ice-liquid interface. Within this framework the activation energy naturally emerges from the combination of the energy required to break hydrogen bonds in the liquid, i.e., the bulk diffusion process, and the work dissipated from the molecular rearrangement of water molecules within the ice-liquid interface. The new expression is introduced into a generalized form of classical nucleation theory. Even though no nucleation rate measurements are used to fit any of the parameters of the theory the predicted nucleation rate is in good agreement with experimental results, even at temperature as low as 190 K, where it tends to be underestimated by most models. It is shown that the activation energy has a strong dependency on temperature and a weak dependency on water activity. Such dependencies are masked by thermodynamic effects at temperatures typical of homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets; however, they may affect the formation of ice in haze aerosol particles. The new model provides an independent estimation of the activation energy and the homogeneous ice nucleation rate, and it may help to improve the interpretation of experimental results and the

  6. Thermodynamic derivation of the activation energy for ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play a key role in the radiative and hydrological balance of the upper troposphere. Their correct representation in atmospheric models requires an understanding of the microscopic processes leading to ice nucleation. A key parameter in the theoretical description of ice nucleation is the activation energy, which controls the flux of water molecules from the bulk of the liquid to the solid during the early stages of ice formation. In most studies it is estimated by direct association with the bulk properties of water, typically viscosity and self-diffusivity. As the environment in the ice-liquid interface may differ from that of the bulk, this approach may introduce bias in calculated nucleation rates. In this work a theoretical model is proposed to describe the transfer of water molecules across the ice-liquid interface. Within this framework the activation energy naturally emerges from the combination of the energy required to break hydrogen bonds in the liquid, i.e., the bulk diffusion process, and the work dissipated from the molecular rearrangement of water molecules within the ice-liquid interface. The new expression is introduced into a generalized form of classical nucleation theory. Even though no nucleation rate measurements are used to fit any of the parameters of the theory the predicted nucleation rate is in good agreement with experimental results, even at temperature as low as 190 K, where it tends to be underestimated by most models. It is shown that the activation energy has a strong dependency on temperature and a weak dependency on water activity. Such dependencies are masked by thermodynamic effects at temperatures typical of homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets; however, they may affect the formation of ice in haze aerosol particles. The new model provides an independent estimation of the activation energy and the homogeneous ice nucleation rate, and it may help to improve the interpretation of experimental results and the

  7. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section Three - Conversion of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the third goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus on understanding conservation processes, efficiencies, socioeconomic costs, and personal decision-making. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These activities,…

  8. Physical Activity and Its Correlates among Adults in Malaysia: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Cai Lian, Tam; Bonn, Gregory; Si Han, Yeoh; Chin Choo, Yap; Chee Piau, Wong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and rates of non-communicable diseases linked to physical inactivity have increased dramatically in Malaysia over the past 20 years. Malaysia has also been identified as one of the least physically active countries in the world with over 60% of adults being essentially sedentary. This study examines the relationship of socio-demographic factors to physical activity among 770 adults from 3 Malaysian states. Physical activity levels were significantly related to ethnicity, gender, age, occupation and educational level. Controlling for inter-relationships among these variables; age, gender, Chinese ethnicity and education level were found to have unique effects on total physical activity, as well as moderate and vigorous exercise. As would be expected, younger people were more physically active, engaging more in both moderate and vigorous types of exercise and males were generally more active than females. Contrary to findings from many developed countries, however, more educated Malaysians were less likely to engage in all types of physical activity. Ethnic Chinese participants, and to a lesser degree Indians also consistently reported lower levels of activity. Possible intervention strategies are discussed that specifically target ethnic and cultural norms related to physical activity. Future research programs exploring barriers to participation and perceptions of physical activity, as well as programs to encourage active life styles among youths are also suggested. PMID:27332883

  9. Physical Activity and Its Correlates among Adults in Malaysia: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Cai Lian, Tam; Bonn, Gregory; Si Han, Yeoh; Chin Choo, Yap; Chee Piau, Wong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and rates of non-communicable diseases linked to physical inactivity have increased dramatically in Malaysia over the past 20 years. Malaysia has also been identified as one of the least physically active countries in the world with over 60% of adults being essentially sedentary. This study examines the relationship of socio-demographic factors to physical activity among 770 adults from 3 Malaysian states. Physical activity levels were significantly related to ethnicity, gender, age, occupation and educational level. Controlling for inter-relationships among these variables; age, gender, Chinese ethnicity and education level were found to have unique effects on total physical activity, as well as moderate and vigorous exercise. As would be expected, younger people were more physically active, engaging more in both moderate and vigorous types of exercise and males were generally more active than females. Contrary to findings from many developed countries, however, more educated Malaysians were less likely to engage in all types of physical activity. Ethnic Chinese participants, and to a lesser degree Indians also consistently reported lower levels of activity. Possible intervention strategies are discussed that specifically target ethnic and cultural norms related to physical activity. Future research programs exploring barriers to participation and perceptions of physical activity, as well as programs to encourage active life styles among youths are also suggested. PMID:27332883

  10. Giant cross-polarization conversion of terahertz radiation by plasmons in an active graphene metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polischuk, O. V.; Melnikova, V. S.; Popov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Results of theoretical investigation of the cross-polarization conversion of terahertz (THz) radiation by the graphene metasurface formed by a periodic array of graphene nanoribbons located at the surface of a high-refractive-index dielectric substrate are presented. Giant polarization conversion at the plasmon resonance frequencies takes place without applying external DC magnetic field. Pumping graphene by its direct optical illumination or diffusion pumping allows for compensating the Drude losses in graphene and leads to further enhancement of the polarization conversion. It is shown that the total polarization conversion can be achieved in the total internal reflection regime of THz wave from the graphene metasurface at room temperature.

  11. Effective Potential Energies and Transport Cross Sections for Atom-Molecule Interactions of Nitrogen and Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The potential energy surfaces for H2-N and N2-N interactions are calculated by accurate ab initio methods and applied to determine transport data. The results confirm that an effective potential energy for accurately determining transport properties can be calculated using a single orientation. A simple method is developed to determine the dispersion coefficients of effective potential energies Effective potential energies required for O2-O collisions are determ=ined. The H2-N, N2-N, O2-H, and O2-O collision integrals are calculated and tabulated for a large range of temperatures. The theoretical values of the N2-N and O2-O diffusion coefficients compare well with measured data available at room temperature.

  12. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Mathies, R.A.; Hung, S.C.; Ju, J.

    1998-12-29

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures. 22 figs.

  13. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Mathies, Richard A.; Hung, Su-Chun; Ju, Jingyue

    1998-01-01

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures.

  14. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Puria, Sunil; Steele, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  15. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  16. Awareness of physical activity in healthy middle-aged adults: a cross-sectional study of associations with sociodemographic, biological, behavioural, and psychological factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interventions to promote physical activity have had limited success. One reason may be that inactive adults are unaware that their level of physical activity is inadequate and do not perceive a need to change their behaviour. We aimed to assess awareness of physical activity, defined as the agreement between self-rated and objective physical activity, and to investigate associations with sociodemographic, biological, behavioural, and psychological factors. Methods We conducted an exploratory, cross-sectional analysis of awareness of physical activity using baseline data collected from 453 participants of the Feedback, Awareness and Behaviour study (Cambridgeshire, UK). Self-rated physical activity was measured dichotomously by asking participants if they believed they were achieving the recommended level of physical activity. Responses were compared to objective physical activity, measured using a combined accelerometer and heart rate monitor (Actiheart®). Four awareness groups were created: overestimators, realistic inactives, underestimators, and realistic actives. Logistic regression was used to assess associations between awareness group and potential correlates. Results The mean (standard deviation) age of participants was 47.0 (6.9) years, 44.4% were male, and 65.1% were overweight (body mass index ≥ 25). Of the 258 (57.0%) who were objectively classified as inactive, 130 (50.4%) misperceived their physical activity by incorrectly stating that they were meeting the guidelines (overestimators). In a multivariable logistic regression model adjusted for age and sex, those with a lower body mass index (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.95, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.90 to 1.00), higher physical activity energy expenditure (OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.06) and self-reported physical activity (OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.19), and lower intention to increase physical activity (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.48 to 0.99) and

  17. The effect of external magnetic fields on the catalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Changlai; Li, Ren; Li, Ran; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-04-21

    Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the adsorption system, which is beneficial to the reaction. From the analysis of the partial density states, it could be seen that the 2p orbital of the carbon atom in bromobenzene and the 4d orbital of the Pd atom overlap more closely in the presence of MFs, which is beneficial for the electron transfer from the Pd substrate to the bromobenzene molecule. This study is helpful in understanding the interaction between MFs and catalysts and regulating the process of catalytic reactions via MFs. PMID:27043428

  18. Physical Activity Energy Expenditure in Dutch Adolescents: Contribution of Active Transport to School, Physical Education, and Leisure Time Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slingerland, Menno; Borghouts, Lars B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Detailed knowledge about physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) can guide the development of school interventions aimed at reducing overweight in adolescents. However, relevant components of PAEE have never been objectively quantified in this population. This study investigated the contribution of active transport to and from…

  19. Geminal cross-coupling for AIE-active topological tetraarylethene fluorophores (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Chen, Tao; Chen, Ze-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The cross-coupling reactions have been used in C-C bond formation which can be used extensively in optoelectronic materials for organic light emitting diode (OLED), organic photovoltaics and chemical biosensing. Here, we report twofold geminal C-C bond formation at 1,1-dibromoolefins via cross-coupling reactions of aromatic boronic esters over Pd catalysts for multiple topological configurations of π-conjugated molecules. We employ a series of recipes from a precursor toolbox to produce π-conjugated macrocycles, conjugated dendrimers, 1-dimensional linear conjugated polymers, 2-dimensional conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) and crosslinking conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CCPNs). The π-conjugated macrocycles, dendrimers and 1-D polymers show characteristic aggregation-induced emission properties. 2-D conjugated microporous polymers possess unique porosity of 2-3 nm. This universal strategy toward definite topological configurations of π-conjugated molecules enables efficient coupling of aryl bromides with various coupling partners under mild conditions affording multiple topological conjugated systems with abundant optical and optoelectronic interest.

  20. Cross-language phonological activation: evidence from masked onset priming and ERPs.

    PubMed

    Jouravlev, Olessia; Lupker, Stephen J; Jared, Debra

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the present research was to provide direct evidence for the cross-language interaction of phonologies at the sub-lexical level by using the masked onset priming paradigm. More specifically, we investigated whether there is a cross-language masked onset priming effect (MOPE) with L2 (English) primes and L1 (Russian) targets and whether it is modulated by the orthographic similarity of primes and targets. Primes and targets had onsets that overlapped either only phonologically, only orthographically, both phonologically and orthographically, or did not have any overlap. Phonological overlap, but not orthographic overlap, between primes and targets led to faster naming latencies. In contrast, the ERP data provided evidence for effects of both phonological and orthographic overlap. Finally, the time-course of phonological and orthographic processing for our bilinguals mirrored the time-course previously reported for monolinguals in the ERP data. These results provide evidence for shared representations at the sub-lexical level for a bilingual's two languages.