Science.gov

Sample records for energy analysis simulations

  1. Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

  2. Energy Navigation: Simulation Evaluation and Benefit Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lewis, Elliot T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results from two simulation studies investigating the use of advanced flight-deck-based energy navigation (ENAV) and conventional transport-category vertical navigation (VNAV) for conducting a descent through a busy terminal area, using Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures. This research was part of the Low Noise Flight Procedures (LNFP) element within the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project, and the subsequent Airspace Super Density Operations (ASDO) research focus area of the Airspace Project. A piloted simulation study addressed development of flight guidance, and supporting pilot and Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures for high density terminal operations. The procedures and charts were designed to be easy to understand, and to make it easy for the crew to make changes via the Flight Management Computer Control-Display Unit (FMC-CDU) to accommodate changes from ATC.

  3. Analysis and Simulation of a Blue Energy Cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, Ms. Ketki; Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Gabitto, Jorge; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-30

    The mixing process of fresh water and seawater releases a significant amount of energy and is a potential source of renewable energy. The so called ‘blue energy’ or salinity-gradient energy can be harvested by a device consisting of carbon electrodes immersed in an electrolyte solution, based on the principle of capacitive double layer expansion (CDLE). In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of energy production based on the CDLE principle. Experiments and computer simulations were used to study the process. Mesoporous carbon materials, synthesized at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, were used as electrode materials in the experiments. Neutronmore » imaging of the blue energy cycle was conducted with cylindrical mesoporous carbon electrodes and 0.5 M lithium chloride as the electrolyte solution. For experiments conducted at 0.6 V and 0.9 V applied potential, a voltage increase of 0.061 V and 0.054 V was observed, respectively. From sequences of neutron images obtained for each step of the blue energy cycle, information on the direction and magnitude of lithium ion transport was obtained. A computer code was developed to simulate the process. Experimental data and computer simulations allowed us to predict energy production.« less

  4. Survey and Analysis of Weather Data for Building Energy Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, Mahabir S; Shrestha, Som S; New, Joshua Ryan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, calibrated energy modeling of residential and commercial buildings has gained importance in a retrofit-dominated market. Accurate weather data plays an important role in this calibration process and projected energy savings. It would be ideal to measure weather data at the building location to capture relevant microclimate variation but this is generally considered cost-prohibitive. There are data sources publicly available with high temporal sampling rates but at relatively poor geospatial sampling locations. To overcome this limitation, there are a growing number of service providers that claim to provide real time and historical weather data for 20-35 km2 grid across the globe. Unfortunately, there is limited documentation from 3rd-party sources attesting to the accuracy of this data. This paper compares provided weather characteristics with data collected from a weather station inaccessible to the service providers. Monthly average dry bulb temperature; relative humidity; direct, diffuse and horizontal solar radiation; and wind speed are statistically compared. Moreover, we ascertain the relative contributions of each weather variable and its impact on building loads. Annual simulations are calculated for three different building types, including a closely monitored and automated energy efficient research building. The comparison shows that the difference for an individual variable can be as high as 90%. In addition, annual building energy consumption can vary by 7% while monthly building loads can vary by 40% as a function of the provided location s weather data.

  5. Building energy analysis of Electrical Engineering Building from DesignBuilder tool: calibration and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, J.; Osma, G.; Caicedo, C.; Torres, A.; Sánchez, S.; Ordóñez, G.

    2016-07-01

    This research shows the energy analysis of the Electrical Engineering Building, located on campus of the Industrial University of Santander in Bucaramanga - Colombia. This building is a green pilot for analysing energy saving strategies such as solar pipes, green roof, daylighting, and automation, among others. Energy analysis was performed by means of DesignBuilder software from virtual model of the building. Several variables were analysed such as air temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, daylighting, and energy consumption. According to two criteria, thermal load and energy consumption, critical areas were defined. The calibration and validation process of the virtual model was done obtaining error below 5% in comparison with measured values. The simulations show that the average indoor temperature in the critical areas of the building was 27°C, whilst relative humidity reached values near to 70% per year. The most critical discomfort conditions were found in the area of the greatest concentration of people, which has an average annual temperature of 30°C. Solar pipes can increase 33% daylight levels into the areas located on the upper floors of the building. In the case of the green roofs, the simulated results show that these reduces of nearly 31% of the internal heat gains through the roof, as well as a decrease in energy consumption related to air conditioning of 5% for some areas on the fourth and fifth floor. The estimated energy consumption of the building was 69 283 kWh per year.

  6. NPTool: a simulation and analysis framework for low-energy nuclear physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, A.; Morfouace, P.; de Séréville, N.; Flavigny, F.; Labiche, M.; Shearman, R.

    2016-08-01

    The Nuclear Physics Tool (NPTool) is an open source data analysis and Monte Carlo simulation framework that has been developed for low-energy nuclear physics experiments with an emphasis on radioactive beam experiments. The NPTool offers a unified framework for designing, preparing and analyzing complex experiments employing multiple detectors, each of which may comprise some hundreds of channels. The framework has been successfully used for the analysis and simulation of experiments at facilities including GANIL, RIKEN, ALTO and TRIUMF, using both stable and radioactive beams. This paper details the NPTool philosophy together with an overview of the workflow. The framework has been benchmarked through the comparison of simulated and experimental data for a variety of detectors used in charged particle and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Simulation Speed Analysis and Improvements of Modelica Models for Building Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jorissen, Filip; Wetter, Michael; Helsen, Lieve

    2015-09-21

    This paper presents an approach for speeding up Modelica models. Insight is provided into how Modelica models are solved and what determines the tool’s computational speed. Aspects such as algebraic loops, code efficiency and integrator choice are discussed. This is illustrated using simple building simulation examples and Dymola. The generality of the work is in some cases verified using OpenModelica. Using this approach, a medium sized office building including building envelope, heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and control strategy can be simulated at a speed five hundred times faster than real time.

  8. An Exploratory Energy Analysis of Electrochromic Windows in Small and Medium Office Buildings - Simulated Results Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, David B.

    2010-08-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP) has had an active research program in supporting the development of electrochromic (EC) windows. Electrochromic glazings used in these windows have the capability of varying the transmittance of light and heat in response to an applied voltage. This dynamic property allows these windows to reduce lighting, cooling, and heating energy in buildings where they are employed. The exploratory analysis described in this report examined three different variants of EC glazings, characterized by the amount of visible light and solar heat gain (as measured by the solar heat gain coefficients [SHGC] in their “clear” or transparent states). For these EC glazings, the dynamic range of the SHGC’s between their “dark” (or tinted) state and the clear state were: (0.22 - 0.70, termed “high” SHGC); (0.16 - 0.39, termed “low” SHGC); and (0.13 - 0.19; termed “very low” SHGC). These glazings are compared to conventional (static) glazing that meets the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 energy standard for five different locations in the U.S. All analysis used the EnergyPlus building energy simulation program for modeling EC windows and alternative control strategies. The simulations were conducted for a small and a medium office building, where engineering specifications were taken from the set of Commercial Building Benchmark building models developed by BTP. On the basis of these simulations, total source-level savings in these buildings were estimated to range between 2 to 7%, depending on the amount of window area and building location.

  9. Using the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Maguire, J.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important as a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes models that isolate the impacts of specific building components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models; these discrepancies are caused by differences in the models used by the engines or coding errors.

  10. Using the Beopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares-Velasco, Paulo Cesar; Maguire, Jeff; Horowitz, Scott; Christensen, Craig

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures to follow when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important because a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes building models that isolate the impacts of specific components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models. These discrepancies are caused by differences in the algorithms used by the engines or coding errors.

  11. General purpose computational tools for simulation and analysis of medium-energy backscattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Robert A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes a suite of computational tools for general-purpose ion-solid calculations, which has been implemented in the platform-independent computational environment Mathematica®. Although originally developed for medium energy work (beam energies < 300 keV), they are suitable for general, classical, non-relativistic calculations. Routines are available for stopping power, Rutherford and Lenz-Jensen (screened) cross sections, sputtering yields, small-angle multiple scattering, and back-scattering-spectrum simulation and analysis. Also included are a full range of supporting functions, as well as easily accessible atomic mass and other data on all the stable isotopes in the periodic table. The functions use common calling protocols, recognize elements and isotopes by symbolic names and, wherever possible, return symbolic results for symbolic inputs, thereby facilitating further computation. A new paradigm for the representation of backscattering spectra is introduced.

  12. Simulation on a car interior aerodynamic noise control based on statistical energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Wang, Dengfeng; Ma, Zhengdong

    2012-09-01

    How to simulate interior aerodynamic noise accurately is an important question of a car interior noise reduction. The unsteady aerodynamic pressure on body surfaces is proved to be the key effect factor of car interior aerodynamic noise control in high frequency on high speed. In this paper, a detail statistical energy analysis (SEA) model is built. And the vibra-acoustic power inputs are loaded on the model for the valid result of car interior noise analysis. The model is the solid foundation for further optimization on car interior noise control. After the most sensitive subsystems for the power contribution to car interior noise are pointed by SEA comprehensive analysis, the sound pressure level of car interior aerodynamic noise can be reduced by improving their sound and damping characteristics. The further vehicle testing results show that it is available to improve the interior acoustic performance by using detailed SEA model, which comprised by more than 80 subsystems, with the unsteady aerodynamic pressure calculation on body surfaces and the materials improvement of sound/damping properties. It is able to acquire more than 2 dB reduction on the central frequency in the spectrum over 800 Hz. The proposed optimization method can be looked as a reference of car interior aerodynamic noise control by the detail SEA model integrated unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and sensitivity analysis of acoustic contribution.

  13. Energy Simulator Residential Buildings

    1992-02-24

    SERI-RES performs thermal energy analysis of residential or small commercial buildings and has the capability of modeling passive solar equipment such as rock beds, trombe walls, and phase change material. The analysis is accomplished by simulation. A thermal model of the building is created by the user and translated into mathematical form by the program. The mathematical equations are solved repeatedly at time intervals of one hour or less for the period of simulation. Themore » mathematical representation of the building is a thermal network with nonlinear, temperature-dependent controls. A combination of forward finite differences, Jacobian iteration, and constrained optimization techniques is used to obtain a solution. An auxiliary interactive editing program, EDITOR, is included for creating building descriptions. EDITOR checks the validity of the input data and also provides facilities for storing and referencing several types of building description files. Some of the data files used by SERI-RES need to be implemented as direct-access files. Programs are included to convert sequential files to direct-access files and vice versa.« less

  14. Stochastic analysis and simulation of hydrometeorological processes for optimizing hybrid renewable energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekouras, Georgios; Ioannou, Christos; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2013-04-01

    The drawbacks of conventional energy sources including their negative environmental impacts emphasize the need to integrate renewable energy sources into energy balance. However, the renewable sources strongly depend on time varying and uncertain hydrometeorological processes, including wind speed, sunshine duration and solar radiation. To study the design and management of hybrid energy systems we investigate the stochastic properties of these natural processes, including possible long-term persistence. We use wind speed and sunshine duration time series retrieved from a European database of daily records and we estimate representative values of the Hurst coefficient for both variables. We conduct simultaneous generation of synthetic time series of wind speed and sunshine duration, on yearly, monthly and daily scale. To this we use the Castalia software system which performs multivariate stochastic simulation. Using these time series as input, we perform stochastic simulation of an autonomous hypothetical hybrid renewable energy system and optimize its performance using genetic algorithms. For the system design we optimize the sizing of the system in order to satisfy the energy demand with high reliability also minimizing the cost. While the simulation scale is the daily, a simple method allows utilizing the subdaily distribution of the produced wind power. Various scenarios are assumed in order to examine the influence of input parameters, such as the Hurst coefficient, and design parameters such as the photovoltaic panel angle.

  15. Free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex of lactate dehydrogenase: A network analysis of atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    It has long been recognized that the structure of a protein is a hierarchy of conformations interconverting on multiple time scales. However, the conformational heterogeneity is rarely considered in the context of enzymatic catalysis in which the reactant is usually represented by a single conformation of the enzyme/substrate complex. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate with concomitant interconversion of two forms of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+). Recent experimental results suggest that multiple substates exist within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and they are catalytic competent at different reaction rates. In this study, millisecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed on LDH to explore the free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex, and network analysis was used to characterize the distribution of the conformations. Our results provide a detailed view of the kinetic network the Michaelis complex and the structures of the substates at atomistic scale. It also shed some light on understanding the complete picture of the catalytic mechanism of LDH.

  16. Using Process/CFD Co-Simulation for the Design and Analysis of Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.

    2007-04-01

    In this presentation we describe the major features and capabilities of NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) and highlight its application to advanced energy systems, ranging from small fuel cell systems to commercial-scale power plants including the coal-fired, gasification-based electricity and hydrogen plant in the DOE’s $1 billion, 10-year FutureGen demonstration project. APECS is an integrated software suite which allows the process and energy industries to optimize overall plant performance with respect to complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena by combining process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus®) with high-fidelity equipment simulations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models (e.g., FLUENT®).

  17. Energy harvesting using rattleback: Theoretical analysis and simulations of spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Aditya; Singla, Puneet; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the spin resonance of a rattleback subjected to base oscillations which is able to transduce vibrations into continuous rotary motion and, therefore, is ideal for applications in Energy harvesting and Vibration sensing. The rattleback is a toy with some curious properties. When placed on a surface with reasonable friction, the rattleback has a preferred direction of spin. If rotated anti to it, longitudinal vibrations are set up and spin direction is reversed. In this paper, the dynamics of a rattleback placed on a sinusoidally vibrating platform are simulated. We can expect base vibrations to excite the pitch motion of the rattleback, which, because of the coupling between pitch and spin motion, should cause the rattleback to spin. Results are presented which show that this indeed is the case-the rattleback has a mono-peak spin resonance with respect to base vibrations. The dynamic response of the rattleback was found to be composed of two principal frequencies that appeared in the pitch and rolling motions. One of the frequencies was found to have a large coupling with the spin of the rattleback. Spin resonance was found to occur when the base oscillatory frequency was twice the value of the coupled frequency. A linearized model is developed which can predict the values of the two frequencies accurately and analytical expressions for the same in terms of the parameters of the rattleback have been derived. The analysis, thus, forms an effective and easy method for obtaining the spin resonant frequency of a given rattleback. Novel ideas for applications utilizing the phenomenon of spin resonance, for example, an energy harvester composed of a magnetized rattleback surrounded by ferromagnetic walls and a small scale vibration sensor comprising an array of several magnetized rattlebacks, are included.

  18. Software interoperability for energy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Robert J.

    2002-07-31

    This paper provides an overview of software interoperability as it relates to the energy simulation of buildings. The paper begins with a discussion of the difficulties in using sophisticated analysis tools like energy simulation at various stages in the building life cycle, and the potential for interoperability to help overcome these difficulties. An overview of the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), a common data model for supporting interoperability under continuing development by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI) is then given. The process of creating interoperable software is described next, followed by specific details for energy simulation tools. The paper closes with the current status of, and future plans for, the ongoing efforts to achieve software interoperability.

  19. PSTAR: Primary and secondary terms analysis and renormalization: A unified approach to building energy simulations and short-term monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Subbarao, K.

    1988-09-01

    This report presents a unified method of hourly simulation of a building and analysis of performance data. The method is called Primary and Secondary Terms Analysis and Renormalization (PSTAR). In the PSTAR method, renormalized parameters are introduced for the primary terms such that the renormalized energy balance equation is best satisfied in the least squares sense, hence, the name PSTAR. PSTAR allows extraction of building characteristics from short-term tests on a small number of data channels. These can be used for long-term performance prediction (''ratings''), diagnostics, and control of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems (HVAC), comparison of design versus actual performance, etc. By combining realistic building models, simple test procedures, and analysis involving linear equations, PSTAR provides a powerful tool for analyzing building energy as well as testing and monitoring. It forms the basis for the Short-Term Energy Monitoring (STEM) project at SERI.

  20. Energy analysis of electric vehicles using batteries or fuel cells through well-to-wheel driving cycle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanari, Stefano; Manzolini, Giampaolo; Garcia de la Iglesia, Fernando

    This work presents a study of the energy and environmental balances for electric vehicles using batteries or fuel cells, through the methodology of the well to wheel (WTW) analysis, applied to ECE-EUDC driving cycle simulations. Well to wheel balances are carried out considering different scenarios for the primary energy supply. The fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) are based on the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) technology, and it is discussed the possibility to feed the fuel cell with (i) hydrogen directly stored onboard and generated separately by water hydrolysis (using renewable energy sources) or by conversion processes using coal or natural gas as primary energy source (through gasification or reforming), (ii) hydrogen generated onboard with a fuel processor fed by natural gas, ethanol, methanol or gasoline. The battery electric vehicles (BEV) are based on Li-ion batteries charged with electricity generated by central power stations, either based on renewable energy, coal, natural gas or reflecting the average EU power generation feedstock. A further alternative is considered: the integration of a small battery to FCEV, exploiting a hybrid solution that allows recovering energy during decelerations and substantially improves the system energy efficiency. After a preliminary WTW analysis carried out under nominal operating conditions, the work discusses the simulation of the vehicles energy consumption when following standardized ECE-EUDC driving cycle. The analysis is carried out considering different hypothesis about the vehicle driving range, the maximum speed requirements and the possibility to sustain more aggressive driving cycles. The analysis shows interesting conclusions, with best results achieved by BEVs only for very limited driving range requirements, while the fuel cell solutions yield best performances for more extended driving ranges where the battery weight becomes too high. Results are finally compared to those of conventional internal

  1. Analysis of vibrational-translational energy transfer using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.

    1991-01-01

    A new model is proposed for energy transfer between the vibrational and translational modes for use in the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The model modifies the Landau-Teller theory for a harmonic oscillator and the rate transition is related to an experimental correlation for the vibrational relaxation time. Assessment of the model is made with respect to three different computations: relaxation in a heat bath, a one-dimensional shock wave, and hypersonic flow over a two-dimensional wedge. These studies verify that the model achieves detailed balance, and excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained in the shock wave calculation. The wedge flow computation reveals that the usual phenomenological method for simulating vibrational nonequilibrium in the DSMC technique predicts much higher vibrational temperatures in the wake region.

  2. Pellet plant energy simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, D.; Vasquez Pulido, T.; Nielsen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Pellet Plant energy simulator is a software based on advanced algorithms which has the main purpose to see the response of a pellet plant regarding certain location conditions. It combines energy provided by a combined heat and power, and/or by a combustion chamber with the energy consumption of the pellet factory and information regarding weather conditions in order to predict the biomass consumption of the pellet factory together with the combined heat and power, and/or with the biomass consumption of the combustion chamber. The user of the software will not only be able to plan smart the biomass acquisition and estimate its cost, but also to plan smart the preventive maintenance (charcoal cleaning in case of a gasification plant) and use the pellet plant at the maximum output regarding weather conditions and biomass moisture. The software can also be used in order to execute a more precise feasibility study for a pellet plant in a certain location. The paper outlines the algorithm that supports the Pellet Plant Energy Simulator idea and presents preliminary tests results that supports the discussion and implementation of the system

  3. Analysis of an Energy Localization Approximation applied to three-dimensional Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golenbiewski, Kyle L.; Schulze, Tim P.

    2016-10-01

    Heteroepitaxial growth involves depositing one material onto another with a different lattice spacing. This misfit leads to long-range elastic stresses that affect the behavior of the film. Previously, an Energy Localization Approximation was applied to Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of two-dimensional growth in which the elastic field is updated using a sequence of nested domains. We extend the analysis of this earlier work to a three-dimensional setting and show that while it scales with the increase in dimensionality, a more intuitive Energy Truncation Approximation does not.

  4. Energy transport analysis in ultrashort pulse laser ablation through combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen

    2010-09-01

    Mechanisms of energy transport during ultrashort laser pulses (USLPs) ablation are investigated in this paper. Nonequilibrium electron-transport, material ionization, as well as density change effects, are studied using atomistic models--the molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) methods, in addition to the previously studied laser absorption, heat conduction, and stress wave propagation. The target material is treated as consisting of two subsystems: valence-electron system and lattice system. MD method is applied to analyze the motion of atoms while MC method is applied for simulating electron dynamics and multiscattering events between particles. Early-time laser-energy absorption and redistribution as well as later-time material ablation and expansion processes are analyzed. This model is validated in terms of ablation depth, lattice/electron temperature distribution as well as evolution, and plume front velocity, through comparisons with experimental or theoretical results in literature. It is generally believed that the hydrodynamic motion of the ablated material is negligible for USLP but this study shows it is true only for its effect on laser-energy deposition. This study shows that the consideration of hydrodynamic expansion and fast density change in both electron and lattice systems is important for obtaining a reliable energy transport mechanism in the locally heated zone.

  5. Spectral energy analysis of locally resonant nanophononic metamaterials by molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarvar, Hossein; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2016-02-01

    A nanophononic metamaterial is a new type of nanostructured material that features an array, or a forest, of intrinsically distributed resonating substructures. Each substructure exhibits numerous local resonances, each of which may hybridize with the phonon dispersion of the underlying host material, causing significant reductions in the group velocities and consequently a reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. In this Rapid Communication, molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to investigate both the dynamics and the thermal transport properties of a nanophononic metamaterial configuration consisting of a freely suspended silicon membrane with an array of silicon nanopillars standing on the surface. The simulations yield results consistent with earlier lattice-dynamics-based predictions which showed a reduction in the thermal conductivity due to the presence of the local resonators. Using a spectral energy density approach, in which only simulation data are utilized and no a priori information on the nanostructure resonant phonon modes is provided, we show direct evidence of the existence of resonance hybridizations as an inherent mechanism contributing to the slowing down of thermal transport in the host medium.

  6. Analysis of Voyager Observed High-Energy Electron Fluxes in the Heliosheath Using MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washimi, Haruichi; Webber, W. R.; Zank, Gary P.; Hu, Qiang; Florinski, Vladimir; Adams, James; Kubo, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft (V1 and V2) observed electrons of 6-14 MeV in the heliosheath which showed several incidences of flux variation relative to a background of gradually increasing flux with distance from the Sun. The increasing flux of background electrons is thought to result from inward radial diffusion. We compare the temporal electron flux variation with dynamical phenomena in the heliosheath that are obtained from our MHD simulations. Because our simulation is based on V2 observed plasma data before V2 crossed the termination shock, this analysis is effective up to late 2008, i.e., about a year after the V2-crossing, during which disturbances, driven prior to the crossing time, survived in the heliosheath. Several electron flux variations correspond to times directly associated with interplanetary shock events. One noteworthy example corresponds to various times associated with the March 2006 interplanetary shock, these being the collision with the termination shock, the passage past the V1 spacecraft, and the collision with the region near the heliopause, as identified by W.R. Webber et al. for proton/helium of 7-200 MeV. Our simulations indicate that all other electron flux variations, except one, correspond well to the times when a shock-driven magneto-sonic pulse and its reflection in the heliosheath either passed across V1/V2, or collided with the termination shock or with the plasma sheet near the heliopause. This result suggests that variation in the electron flux should be due to either direct or indirect effects of magnetosonic pulses in the heliosheath driven by interplanetary shocks

  7. A Labor Market Analysis of the Electricity Sector for 2030 using the National Energy with Weather System Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, L.; Clack, C.; Marquis, M.; Paine, J.; Picciano, P.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted an analysis that utilized the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models to estimate the temporary and permanent jobs, earnings, and state sales tax revenues that would be created by various scenarios of the National Energy with Weather System (NEWS) simulator. This simulator was created by a collaboration between the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado and the Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL NOAA). The NEWS simulator used three years of high-resolution (13-km, hourly) weather and power data to select the most cost-efficient, resource-maximizing, and complementary locations for wind, solar photovoltaic, and natural gas power plants along with high-voltage direct-current transmission, thereby providing the cheapest possible electricity grid that facilitates the incorporation of large amounts of wind and solar PV. We applied various assumptions to ensure that we produced conservative estimates, while keeping costs in line with those of the NEWS simulator. Our analysis shows that under the lowest carbon-emitting scenario of the NEWS carried out (80% reduction in CO2 compared with 1990 levels), almost ten million new jobs could be created by 2030. Of those jobs, over 400,000 would be permanently supporting the operations of the power plants. That particular scenario would also add over 500 billion to the paychecks of American workers and 75 billion to state tax revenues by 2030. All of this is achieved with average electricity costs of 10.7¢/kWh, because the electric system relies less heavily on fuel and more on jobs constructing, operating, and maintaining infrastructure. We use the current presentation to describe the methods used to reach these findings and examine some potential impacts of our estimates on public policy. Although we are able to identify some systematic problems with the JEDI model, we find that these problems

  8. Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

  9. Overview of validation procedures for building energy-analysis simulation codes. [SUNCAT 2. 4, DEROB 4, DOE 2. 1, BLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Judkoff, R.

    1981-03-01

    SERI is developing a procedure for the validation of Building Energy Analysis Simulation Codes (BEAS). These codes are being used increasingly in the building design process, both directly and as the basis for simplified design tools and guidelines. The importance of the validity of the BEAS in predicting building energy performance is obvious when one considers the money and energy which could be wasted by energy-inefficient designs. However, to date, little or no systematic effort has been made to ensure the validity of the various BEAS. The validation work at SERI consists of three distinct parts: Comparative Study, Analytical Verification, and Empirical Validation. The procedures have been developed for the first two parts, and these procedures have been implemented on a sampling of the major BEAS. Results from this work have shown major problems in two of the BEAS tested. Furthermore, when one building design was run on several of the BEAS, there were large differences in the predicted annual heating loads. The empirical validation procedure will be developed when high quality empirical data become available.

  10. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  11. HEAP: Heat Energy Analysis Program, a computer model simulating solar receivers. [solving the heat transfer problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program which can distinguish between different receiver designs, and predict transient performance under variable solar flux, or ambient temperatures, etc. has a basic structure that fits a general heat transfer problem, but with specific features that are custom-made for solar receivers. The code is written in MBASIC computer language. The methodology followed in solving the heat transfer problem is explained. A program flow chart, an explanation of input and output tables, and an example of the simulation of a cavity-type solar receiver are included.

  12. Analysis and simulation of energy use and cost at a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yilu

    2011-12-01

    The cost of electricity, a major operating cost of municipal wastewater treatment plants, is related to influent flow rate, power price, and power load. With knowledge of inflow and price patterns, plant operators can manage processes to reduce electricity costs. Records of influent flow, power price, and load are evaluated for Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant. Diurnal and seasonal trends are analyzed. Power usage is broken down among treatment processes. A simulation model of influent pumping, a large power user, is developed. It predicts pump discharge and power usage based on wet-well level. Individual pump characteristics are tested in the plant. The model accurately simulates plant inflow and power use for two pumping stations [R2 = 0.68, 0.93 (inflow), R2 =0.94, 0.91(power)]. Wet-well stage-storage relationship is estimated from data. Time-varying wet-well level is added to the model. A synthetic example demonstrates application in managing pumps to reduce electricity cost.

  13. Beading instability in soft cylindrical gels with capillary energy: Weakly non-linear analysis and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taffetani, M.; Ciarletta, P.

    2015-08-01

    Soft cylindrical gels can develop a long-wavelength peristaltic pattern driven by a competition between surface tension and bulk elastic energy. In contrast to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability for viscous fluids, the macroscopic shape in soft solids evolves toward a stable beading, which strongly differs from the buckling arising in compressed elastic cylinders. This work proposes a novel theoretical and numerical approach for studying the onset and the non-linear development of the elasto-capillary beading in soft cylinders, made of neo-Hookean hyperelastic material with capillary energy at the free surface, subjected to axial stretch. Both a theoretical study, deriving the linear and the weakly non-linear stability analyses for the problem, and numerical simulations, investigating the fully non-linear evolution of the beaded morphology, are performed. The theoretical results prove that an axial elongation can not only favour the onset of beading, but also determine the nature of the elastic bifurcation. The fully non-linear phase diagrams of the beading are also derived from finite element numerical simulations, showing two peculiar morphological transitions when varying either the axial stretch or the material properties of the gel. Since the bifurcation is found to be subcritical for very slender cylinders, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is finally performed. In this case, it is shown that a surface sinusoidal imperfection can resonate with the corresponding marginally stable solution, thus selecting the emerging beading wavelength. In conclusion, the results of this study provide novel guidelines for controlling the beaded morphology in different experimental conditions, with important applications in micro-fabrication techniques, such as electrospun fibres.

  14. Numerical simulation and analysis of energy loss in a nanosecond spark gap switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrinovich, I. V.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2014-11-01

    A system of differential equations for the RLC circuit of a capacitor-switch assembly was derived being supplemented with an equation for the spark resistance of the switch in accordance with the Braginsky model. The parameters that affect the solutions of equations for the circuit with parallel or series connection of several capacitor-switch assemblies to a common inductive load were determined. Based on numerical solution of the system of equations, a dependence of the energy ES released in the spark within the first halfperiod on the discharge circuit and switch parameters was found.

  15. Empirical validation of building energy-analysis simulation programs: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; Burch, J.

    1982-09-01

    Under the auspices of the DOE Passive/Hybrid Solar Division Class A Monitoring and Validation Program, SERI has engaged in several areas of research in fiscal year 1982. This research has included: (1) development of a validation methodology, (2) development of a performance monitoring methodology designed to meet the specific data needs for validation of analysis/design tools, (3) construction and monitoring of a 1000-ft/sup 2/ multizone skin-load-dominated test facility, (4) construction and monitoring of a two-zone test cell, and (5) sample validation studies using the DOE-2.1, BLAST-3.0, and SERIRES-1.0 computer programs. The status of these activities is reported and the validation methodology and the Class A data acquisition capabilities at SERI are described briefly.

  16. Analysis of Energy Spectrum with Low Photon Counts via Bayesian Posterior Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyk, David A.; Protassov, Rostislav; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Connors, Alanna

    1999-04-01

    Recently Bayesian methods have grown rapidly in popularity in many scientific disciplines as several computationally intensive statistical algorithms have become feasible with modern computer power. In this paper, we demonstrate how we have employed these state-of-the-art techniques (e.g., Gibbs sampler and Metropolis-Hastings) to fit today's high-quality, high resolution astrophysical spectral data. These algorithms are very flexible and can be used to fit models that account for the highly hierarchical structure in the collection of high-quality spectra and thus can keep pace with the accelerating progress of new telescope designs. We explicitly model photon arrivals as a Poisson process and, thus, have no difficulty with high resolution low count X-ray and gamma-ray data. These methods will be useful not only for the soon-to-be-launched Chandra X-ray observatory but also such new generation telescopes as XMM, Constellation X, and GLAST. We also explicitly incorporate the instrument response (e.g. via a response matrix and effective area vector), plus background contamination of the data. In particular, we appropriately model the background as the realization of a second Poisson process, thereby eliminating the need to directly subtract off the background counts and the rather embarrassing problem of negative photon counts. The source energy spectrum is modeled as a mixture of a Generalized Linear Model which accounts for the continuum plus absorption and several (Gaussian) line profiles. Generalized Linear Models are the standard method for incorporating covariate information (as in regression) into non-Gaussian models and are thus an obvious but innovative choice in this setting. Using several examples, we illustrate how Bayesian posterior sampling can be used to compute point (i.e., ``best'') estimates of the various model parameters as well as compute error bars on these estimates and construct statistical tests.

  17. Role of the Closing Base Pair for d(GCA) Hairpin Stability: Free Energy Analysis and Folding Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2011-06-30

    Hairpin loops belong to the most important structural motifs in folded nucleic acids. The d(GNA) sequence in DNA can form very stable trinucleotide hairpin loops depending, however, strongly on the closing base pair. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) were employed to study hairpin folding of two DNA sequences, d(gcGCAgc) and d(cgGCAcg), with the same central loop motif but different closing base pairs starting from singlestranded structures. In both cases, conformations of the most populated conformational cluster at the lowest temperature showed close agreement with available experimental structures. For the loop sequence with the less stable G:C closing base pair, an alternative loop topology accumulated as second most populated conformational state indicating a possible loop structural heterogeneity. Comparative-free energy simulations on induced loop unfolding indicated higher stability of the loop with a C:G closing base pair by 3 kcal mol1 (compared to a G:C closing base pair) in very good agreement with experiment. The comparative energetic analysis of sampled unfolded, intermediate and folded conformational states identified electrostatic and packing interactions as the main contributions to the closing base pair dependence of the d(GCA) loop stability.

  18. Energy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    1981-01-01

    The Aquatic Center at Corvallis (Oregon) is analyzed for energy use. Energy conservation in the building would be accomplished best through heavy insulation of exterior surfaces and the maximization of passive solar gain. (Author/MLF)

  19. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    2005-03-02

    DOE2.1E-121SUNOS is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS).« less

  20. Validation Methodology to Allow Simulated Peak Reduction and Energy Performance Analysis of Residential Building Envelope with Phase Change Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.

    2012-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in residential buildings. This paper summarizes NREL efforts to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings: the overall methodology to verify and validate Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) and PCM algorithms in EnergyPlus is presented in this study. It also shows preliminary results of three residential building enclosure technologies containing PCM: PCM-enhanced insulation, PCM impregnated drywall and thin PCM layers. The results are compared based on predicted peak reduction and energy savings using two algorithms in EnergyPlus: the PCM and Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) algorithms.

  1. Suitability of Synthetic Driving Profiles from Traffic Micro-Simulation for Real-World Energy Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yunfei; Wood, Eric; Burton, Evan; Gonder, Jeffrey

    2015-10-14

    A shift towards increased levels of driving automation is generally expected to result in improved safety and traffic congestion outcomes. However, little empirical data exists to estimate the impact that automated driving could have on energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In the absence of empirical data on differences between drive cycles from present day vehicles (primarily operated by humans) and future vehicles (partially or fully operated by computers) one approach is to model both situations over identical traffic conditions. Such an exercise requires traffic micro-simulation to not only accurately model vehicle operation under high levels of automation, but also (and potentially more challenging) vehicle operation under present day human drivers. This work seeks to quantify the ability of a commercial traffic micro-simulation program to accurately model real-world drive cycles in vehicles operated primarily by humans in terms of driving speed, acceleration, and simulated fuel economy. Synthetic profiles from models of freeway and arterial facilities near Atlanta, Georgia, are compared to empirical data collected from real-world drivers on the same facilities. Empirical and synthetic drive cycles are then simulated in a powertrain efficiency model to enable comparison on the basis of fuel economy. Synthetic profiles from traffic micro-simulation were found to exhibit low levels of transient behavior relative to the empirical data. Even with these differences, the synthetic and empirical data in this study agree well in terms of driving speed and simulated fuel economy. The differences in transient behavior between simulated and empirical data suggest that larger stochastic contributions in traffic micro-simulation (relative to those present in the traffic micro-simulation tool used in this study) are required to fully capture the arbitrary elements of human driving. Interestingly, the lack of stochastic contributions from models of human drivers

  2. Bound Flavin-Cytochrome Model of Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis: Analysis by Free Energy Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gongyi; Pachter, Ruth

    2016-06-30

    Flavins are known to enhance extracellular electron transfer (EET) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacteria, which reduce electron acceptors through outer-membrane (OM) cytochromes c. Free-shuttle and bound-redox cofactor mechanisms were proposed to explain this enhancement, but recent electrochemical reports favor a flavin-bound model, proposing two one-electron reductions of flavin, namely, oxidized (Ox) to semiquinone (Sq) and semiquinone to hydroquinone (Hq), at anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. In this work, to provide a mechanistic understanding of riboflavin (RF) binding at the multiheme OM cytochrome OmcA, we explored binding configurations at hemes 2, 5, 7, and 10. Subsequently, on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, binding free energies and redox potential shifts upon RF binding for the Ox/Sq and Sq/Hq reductions were analyzed. Our results demonstrated an upshift in the Ox/Sq and a downshift in the Sq/Hq redox potentials, consistent with a bound RF-OmcA model. Furthermore, binding free energy MD simulations indicated an RF binding preference at heme 7. MD simulations of the OmcA-MtrC complex interfacing at hemes 5 revealed a small interprotein redox potential difference with an electron transfer rate of 10(7)-10(8)/s. PMID:27266856

  3. Energy losing rate and open-circuit voltage analysis of organic solar cells based on detailed photocurrent simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Junsheng; Huang Jiang; Zhang Lei; Jiang Yadong

    2009-09-15

    The J-V characteristics and photovoltaic response of indium tin oxide/pentacene (d nm)/C{sub 60} (40 nm)/BCP (10 nm)/Ag (100 nm) devices have been systematically analyzed. By fitting the J-V characteristics of the fabricated devices, photocurrent densities J{sub ph} were obtained. Meanwhile, we proposed a modified optical transfer matrix theory to satisfy the reasonable trend between P{sub 0}R{sub 0} and film thickness of pentacene layers. Then, we revealed that an accurate rate of energy loss can be defined as E{sub loss}=1-betaJ{sub e}/P{sub 0}R{sub 0}. Also, the relationship between open-circuit voltage V{sub OC}, compensation voltage V{sub 0} and initial polaron-pair bounding energy E{sub B} was determined based on the detailed study and simulation of device photocurrent.

  4. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Lectgure: Improving the precision of high-energy simulation and analysis tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Bryan

    2012-03-01

    Comparing theoretical predictions with experimental data on particle collisions like those at the Large Hadron Collider is far from straightforward. The predictions usually concern fundamental objects (quarks, gluons, leptons, ) whereas the colliding hadrons are complicated bound states. Furthermore, final states of interest often contain high-energy jets of many hadrons, together with underlying lower-energy hadron production. The jets may come from primary interactions producing energetic quarks and gluons, or from the decays of heavy or highly boosted objects, possibly new forms of matter. I will discuss the development of computer simulations of jet production in hard collisions, and of jet-finding algorithms that aim to reconstruct the fundamental collision and decay dynamics from hadronic final states. In both cases, improvements in the underlying theoretical framework have led to a better description of Standard Model processes at the LHC, and better tools for the discovery of any new processes that may lie within its reach.

  5. Thyristor converter simulation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a simulation on thyristor converters. The simulation features nonlinearity, non-uniform firing, and the commutations. Several applications such as a current regulation, a converter frequency characteristics analysis, and a power line disturbance analysis will be presented. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Den Durpel, Luc Van

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims at performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.

  7. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    2005-01-24

    DOE2.1E-121 is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS). DOE2.1E-121 contains modifications to DOE2.1E which allows 1000 zones to be modeled.« less

  8. Post Flight Dynamic Analysis Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, B. R.

    1970-01-01

    Digital six-degrees-of-freedom, open loop Saturn 5 first stage flight evaluation simulation program obtains post flight simulation of the launch vehicle using actual flight data as input. Results are compared with measured data. For preflight analysis, the program uses predicted flight data as input.

  9. Energy analysis of porous water ice under space-simulated conditions: results from the KOSI-8 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhoff, J.; Seidensticker, K. J.; Seiferlin, K.; Spohn, T.

    1995-02-01

    A sublimation experiment (KOSI-8) was performed on a pure, porous water ice sample under conditions of low pressure and temperature and insolation by an artificial sun. Temperatures within the sample, gas flux from the surface, mass loss of the sample during the experiment and the irradiation input were measured for a detailed analysis of energy flow. A main feature of the analysis was the development of a convex temperature profile along the middle axis of the sample as a consequence of heat transfer by water vapor flow. The amount of the energy transport by the water was about 40% of the total heat flux available for heating the sample. To interpret the unusually high temperatures measured a few millimeters below the surface, it is assumed that the radiative energy input penetrates about 3 mm into the sample (solid-state greenhouse effect). To trace the flow of water vapor during the experiment, the top 10 mm of the ice was enriched with 10% HDO. Ice samples for isotopic analyses were taken from the post-insolation surface and from various depths. Isotopic enrichment was observed only at the surface, corresponding to a 2.3% admixture of recondensed vapor from the initially 10-mm-thick surface layer, to a depth of 19 mm below the original surface. No isotopic enrichment could be detected below a crust that had formed, i.e. 57 mm below the original surface. During the experiment an average of about 16 mm of the ice eroded from the surface. The weight of the sample was continuously monitored and a total mass loss of 1.75 ± 0.05 kg was measured between start and end of insolation. A comparison of the power balance of a pure, porous ice sample and an ice/dust sample shows that in either case the net flux of energy available for sublimation and warming of the sample is less than 20% of the insolation. In the case of a pure ice sample, most of the irradiation is reflected due to the high albedo; in the case of an ice/dust sample, thermal reradiation of the sample is

  10. Community Energy Consumption Analysis

    1992-02-21

    The TDIST3 program performs an analysis of large integrated community total energy systems (TES) supplying thermal and electrical energy from one or more power stations. The program models the time-dependent energy demands of a group of representative building types, distributes the thermal demands within a thermal utility system (TUS), simulates the dynamic response of a group of power stations in meeting the TUS demands, and designs an optimal base-loaded (electrically) power plant and thermal energymore » storage reservoir combination. The capital cost of the TES is evaluated. The program was developed primarily to analyze thermal utility systems supplied with high temperature water (HTW) from more than one power plant. The TUS consists of a transmission loop and secondary loops with a heat exchanger linking each secondary loop to the transmission loop. The power stations electrical output supplies all community buildings and the HTW supplies the thermal demand of the buildings connected through the TUS, a piping network. Basic components of the TES model are one or more power stations connected to the transmission loop. These may be dual-purpose, producing electricity and HTW, or just heating plants producing HTW. A thermal storage reservoir is located at one power station. The secondary loops may have heating plants connected to them. The transmission loop delivers HTW to local districts; the secondary loops deliver the energy to the individual buildings in a district.« less

  11. Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon

    2010-01-15

    A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

  12. Data, exergy, and energy analysis of a vertical-bore, ground-source heat pump to for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-05-27

    Evidence is provided to support the view that greater than two-thirds of energy required to produce domestic hot water may be extracted from the ground which serves as renewable energy resource. The case refers to a 345 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days (3993 F-days) and CDD of 723 C-days (1301 F-days). The house is operated under simulated occupancy conditions in which the hot water use protocol is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which captures the water consumption lifestyles of the average family in the United States. The 5.275 (1.5-ton) water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) shared the same vertical bore with a 7.56 KW water-to-air ground source heat pump for space conditioning the same house. Energy and exergy analysis of data collected continuously over a twelve month period provide performance metrics and sources of inherent systemic inefficiencies. Data and analyses are vital to better understand how WW-GSHPs may be further improved to enable the ground to be used as a renewable energy resource.

  13. Data, exergy, and energy analysis of a vertical-bore, ground-source heat pump to for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-05-27

    Evidence is provided to support the view that greater than two-thirds of energy required to produce domestic hot water may be extracted from the ground which serves as renewable energy resource. The case refers to a 345 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days (3993 F-days) and CDD of 723 C-days (1301 F-days). The house is operated under simulated occupancy conditions in which the hot water use protocol is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which captures themore » water consumption lifestyles of the average family in the United States. The 5.275 (1.5-ton) water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) shared the same vertical bore with a 7.56 KW water-to-air ground source heat pump for space conditioning the same house. Energy and exergy analysis of data collected continuously over a twelve month period provide performance metrics and sources of inherent systemic inefficiencies. Data and analyses are vital to better understand how WW-GSHPs may be further improved to enable the ground to be used as a renewable energy resource.« less

  14. Turbulence flight director analysis and preliminary simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. E.; Klein, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A control column and trottle flight director display system is synthesized for use during flight through severe turbulence. The column system is designed to minimize airspeed excursions without overdriving attitude. The throttle system is designed to augment the airspeed regulation and provide an indication of the trim thrust required for any desired flight path angle. Together they form an energy management system to provide harmonious display indications of current aircraft motions and required corrective action, minimize gust upset tendencies, minimize unsafe aircraft excursions, and maintain satisfactory ride qualities. A preliminary fixed-base piloted simulation verified the analysis and provided a shakedown for a more sophisticated moving-base simulation to be accomplished next. This preliminary simulation utilized a flight scenario concept combining piloting tasks, random turbulence, and discrete gusts to create a high but realistic pilot workload conducive to pilot error and potential upset. The turbulence director (energy management) system significantly reduced pilot workload and minimized unsafe aircraft excursions.

  15. The mesoscale forcing of a midlatitude upper-tropospheric jet streak by a simulated convective system. 2: Kinetic energy and resolution analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Bart J.; Johnson, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    A kinetic energy (KE) analysis of the forcing of a mesoscale upper-tropospheric jet streak by organized diabatic processes within the simulated convective system (SCS) that was discussed in Part 1 is presented in this study. The relative contributions of the ageostrophic components of motion to the generation of KE of the convectively generated jet streak are compared, along with the KE generation by the rotational (nondivergent) and irrotational (divergent) mass transport. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations of SCS development to resolution is also briefly examined. Analysis within isentropic coordinates provides for an explicit determination of the influence of the diabatic processes on the generation of KE. The upper-level production of specific KE is due predominatly to the inertial advective ageostrophic component (IAD), and as such represents the primary process through which the KE of the convectively generated jet streak is realized. A secondary contribution by the inertial diabatic (IDI) term is observed. Partitioning the KE generation into its rotational and irrotational components reveals that the latter, which is directly linked to the diabatic heating within the SCS through isentropic continuity requirements, is the ultimate source of KE generation as the global area integral of generation by the rotational component vanishes. Comparison with an identical dry simulation reveals that the net generation of KE must be attributed to latent heating. Both the IAD and IDI ageostrophic components play important roles in this regard. Examination of results from simulations conducted at several resolutions supports the previous findings in that the effects of diabatic processes and ageostrophic motion on KE generation remain consistent. Resolution does impact the location and timing of SCS development, a result that has important implications in forecasting the onset of convection that develops from evolution of the large-scale flow and moisture

  16. Economic Analysis. Computer Simulation Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling Inst., Washington, DC. Educational Technology Center.

    A multimedia course in economic analysis was developed and used in conjunction with the United States Naval Academy. (See ED 043 790 and ED 043 791 for final reports of the project evaluation and development model.) This volume of the text discusses the simulation of behavioral relationships among variable elements in an economy and presents…

  17. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  18. Building energy analysis tool

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry; Parker, Andrew; Long, Nicholas; Metzger, Ian; Dean, Jesse; Lisell, Lars

    2016-04-12

    A building energy analysis system includes a building component library configured to store a plurality of building components, a modeling tool configured to access the building component library and create a building model of a building under analysis using building spatial data and using selected building components of the plurality of building components stored in the building component library, a building analysis engine configured to operate the building model and generate a baseline energy model of the building under analysis and further configured to apply one or more energy conservation measures to the baseline energy model in order to generate one or more corresponding optimized energy models, and a recommendation tool configured to assess the one or more optimized energy models against the baseline energy model and generate recommendations for substitute building components or modifications.

  19. Crisis on Mars: Classroom Energy Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribble, Donald A.

    1979-01-01

    Described in this article is an energy conservation simulation game in which students participate in a space mission to Mars. Activities such as decision making, valuing, and problem solving occur during the game. (SA)

  20. Multiphysics simulations of nanoarchitectures and analysis of germanium core-shell anode nanostructure for lithium-ion energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, T.; Rohan, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports multiphysics simulations (COMSOL) of relatively low conductive cathode oxide materials in nanoarchitectures that operate within the appropriate potential range (cut-off voltage 2.5 V) at 3 times the C-rate of micron scale thin film materials while still accessing 90% of material. This paper also reports a novel anode fabrication of Ge sputtered on a Cu nanotube current collector for lithium-ion batteries. Ge on Cu nanotubes is shown to alleviate the effect of volume expansion, enhancing mechanical stability at the nanoscale and improved the electronic characteristics for increased rate capabilities.

  1. Advancement of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Payment

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lixing; Shirey, Don; Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Sharma, Chandan; Lawrie, Linda; Strand, Rick; Pedersen, Curt; Fisher, Dan; Lee, Edwin; Witte, Mike; Glazer, Jason; Barnaby, Chip

    2011-09-30

    EnergyPlus{sup TM} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. The 5-year project was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and was divided into 5 budget period between 2006 and 2011. During the project period, 11 versions of EnergyPlus were released. This report summarizes work performed by an EnergyPlus development team led by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC). The team members consist of DHL Consulting, C. O. Pedersen Associates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Oklahoma State University, GARD Analytics, Inc., and WrightSoft Corporation. The project tasks involved new feature development, testing and validation, user support and training, and general EnergyPlus support. The team developed 146 new features during the 5-year period to advance the EnergyPlus capabilities. Annual contributions of new features are 7 in budget period 1, 19 in period 2, 36 in period 3, 41 in period 4, and 43 in period 5, respectively. The testing and validation task focused on running test suite and publishing report, developing new IEA test suite cases, testing and validating new source code, addressing change requests, and creating and testing installation package. The user support and training task provided support for users and interface developers, and organized and taught workshops. The general support task involved upgrading StarTeam (team sharing) software and updating existing utility software. The project met the DOE objectives and completed all tasks successfully. Although the EnergyPlus software was enhanced significantly

  2. A Simulated Growth Hormone Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Mary

    1996-08-01

    Growth hormone is a drug that is sometimes abused by amateur or professional athletes for performance-enhancement. This laboratory is a semimicroscale simulation analysis of a sample of "urine" to detect proteins of two very different molecular weights. Gel filtration uses a 10 mL disposable pipette packed with Sephadex. Students analyze the fractions from the filtration by comparing colors of the Brilliant Blue Coomassie Dye as it interacts with the proteins in the sample to a standard set of known concentration of protein with the dye. The simulated analysis of growth hormone is intended to be included in a unit on organic chemistry or in the second year of high school chemistry.

  3. Simulation of proton-induced energy deposition in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernald, Kenneth W.; Kerns, Sherra E.

    1988-01-01

    A time-efficient simulation technique was developed for modeling the energy deposition by incident protons in modern integrated circuits. To avoid the excessive computer time required by many proton-effects simulators, a stochastic method was chosen to model the various physical effects responsible for energy deposition by incident protons. Using probability density functions to describe the nuclear reactions responsible for most proton-induced memory upsets, the simulator determines the probability of a proton hit depositing the energy necessary for circuit destabilization. This factor is combined with various circuit parameters to determine the expected error-rate in a given proton environment. An analysis of transient or dose-rate effects is also performed. A comparison to experimental energy-disposition data proves the simulator to be quite accurate for predicting the expected number of events in certain integrated circuits.

  4. Simulation based analysis of laser beam brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, Michael; Wiethop, Philipp; Schmid, Daniel; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Laser beam brazing is a well-established joining technology in car body manufacturing with main applications in the joining of divided tailgates and the joining of roof and side panels. A key advantage of laser brazed joints is the seam's visual quality which satisfies highest requirements. However, the laser beam brazing process is very complex and process dynamics are only partially understood. In order to gain deeper knowledge of the laser beam brazing process, to determine optimal process parameters and to test process variants, a transient three-dimensional simulation model of laser beam brazing is developed. This model takes into account energy input, heat transfer as well as fluid and wetting dynamics that lead to the formation of the brazing seam. A validation of the simulation model is performed by metallographic analysis and thermocouple measurements for different parameter sets of the brazing process. These results show that the multi-physical simulation model not only can be used to gain insight into the laser brazing process but also offers the possibility of process optimization in industrial applications. The model's capabilities in determining optimal process parameters are exemplarily shown for the laser power. Small deviations in the energy input can affect the brazing results significantly. Therefore, the simulation model is used to analyze the effect of the lateral laser beam position on the energy input and the resulting brazing seam.

  5. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims atmore » performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.« less

  6. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are

  7. Improving Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the residential building retrofit market. Reducing the energy use of existing homes in the United States offers significant energy-saving opportunities, which can be identified through building simulation software tools that calculate optimal packages of efficiency measures. To improve the accuracy of energy analysis for residential buildings, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Buildings Research team developed the Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), a method for diagnosing and correcting errors in building energy audit software and calibration procedures. BESTEST-EX consists of building physics and utility bill calibration test cases, which software developers can use to compare their tools simulation findings to reference results generated with state-of-the-art simulation tools. Overall, the BESTEST-EX methodology: (1) Tests software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensures building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantifies impacts of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX is helping software developers identify and correct bugs in their software, as well as develop and test utility bill calibration procedures.

  8. Performance calculation and simulation system of high energy laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Liu, Min; Su, Yu; Zhang, Ke

    2014-12-01

    High energy laser weapons are ready for some of today's most challenging military applications. Based on the analysis of the main tactical/technical index and combating process of high energy laser weapon, a performance calculation and simulation system of high energy laser weapon was established. Firstly, the index decomposition and workflow of high energy laser weapon was proposed. The entire system was composed of six parts, including classical target, platform of laser weapon, detect sensor, tracking and pointing control, laser atmosphere propagation and damage assessment module. Then, the index calculation modules were designed. Finally, anti-missile interception simulation was performed. The system can provide reference and basis for the analysis and evaluation of high energy laser weapon efficiency.

  9. Simulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P. G.; Torcellini, P. A.; Crawley, D.

    2008-01-01

    An energy management system (EMS) is a dedicated computer that can be programmed to control all of a building's energy-related systems, including heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water, interior lighting, exterior lighting, on-site power generation, and mechanized systems for shading devices, window actuators, and double facade elements. Recently a new module for simulating an EMS was added to the EnergyPlus whole-building energy simulation program. An essential part of the EMS module is the EnergyPlus Runtime Language (ERL), which is a simple programming language that is used to specify the EMS control algorithms. The new EMS controls and the flexibility of ERL allow EnergyPlus to simulate many novel control strategies that are not possible with the previous generation of building energy simulation programs. This paper surveys the standard controls in EnergyPlus, presents the new EMS features, describes the implementation of the module, and explores some of the possible applications for the new EMS capabilities in EnergyPlus.

  10. Qgui: A high-throughput interface for automated setup and analysis of free energy calculations and empirical valence bond simulations in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Andberg, Tor Arne Heim; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-07-01

    Structural information and activity data has increased rapidly for many protein targets during the last decades. In this paper, we present a high-throughput interface (Qgui) for automated free energy and empirical valence bond (EVB) calculations that use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for conformational sampling. Applications to ligand binding using both the linear interaction energy (LIE) method and the free energy perturbation (FEP) technique are given using the estrogen receptor (ERα) as a model system. Examples of free energy profiles obtained using the EVB method for the rate-limiting step of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by trypsin are also shown. In addition, we present calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots to obtain the thermodynamic activation enthalpy and entropy with Qgui from running a large number of EVB simulations.

  11. Physics-Based Simulator for NEO Exploration Analysis & Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaram, J.; Cameron, J.; Jain, A.; Kline, H.; Lim, C.; Mazhar, H.; Myint, S.; Nayar, H.; Patton, R.; Pomerantz, M.; Quadrelli, M.; Shakkotai, P.; Tso, K.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the Space Exploration Analysis and Simulation (SEAS) task, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is using physics-based simulations at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to explore potential surface and near-surface mission operations at Near Earth Objects (NEOs). The simulator is under development at JPL and can be used to provide detailed analysis of various surface and near-surface NEO robotic and human exploration concepts. In this paper we describe the SEAS simulator and provide examples of recent mission systems and operations concepts investigated using the simulation. We also present related analysis work and tools developed for both the SEAS task as well as general modeling, analysis and simulation capabilites for asteroid/small-body objects.

  12. EMPIRICAL VALIDATION OF BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION SOFTWARE: ENERGYPLUS

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the results from a study conducted at Iowa Energy Center s Energy Resource Station with EnergyPlus simulation results. The building consists of controlled test rooms, dedicated air handling units and air-cooled chillers for the purpose of obtaining quality data suitable for empirical validation studies. Weather data were also collected at the facility and used for the simulation. Empirical validation can be performed on various levels of the program such as zone level, systems level, and plant level. This study is unique in the sense that it integrates the zones, system, and plant into one analysis. For this study, the difference between empirical and EnergyPlus predicted zone cooling loads varied from 1.7% to 10.2%, but the difference for the compressor power was as much as 22.4%. The paper also describes the potential reasons why simulation results might not match field data.

  13. Simulation of Flywheel Energy Storage System Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.; Wolff, Frederick J.; Dravid, Narayan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the progress made in the controller design and operation of a flywheel energy storage system. The switching logic for the converter bridge circuit has been redefined to reduce line current harmonics, even at the highest operating speed of the permanent magnet motor-generator. An electromechanical machine model is utilized to simulate charge and discharge operation of the inertial energy in the flywheel. Controlling the magnitude of phase currents regulates the rate of charge and discharge. The resulting improvements are demonstrated by simulation.

  14. THE Antarctic Atmospheric Energy Budget: Observations and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, M. J.; Smith, K. L.; Polvani, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new, observationally-based estimate of the atmospheric energy budget for the Antarctic polar cap (the region poleward of 70°S). This energy budget is constructed using state-of-the-art reanalysis products from ECMWF [the ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim)] and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes. We find that the climatological mean Antarctic energy budget is characterized by an approximate balance between the TOA net outgoing radiation and the horizontal convergence of atmospheric energy transport, with the net surface energy flux and atmospheric energy storage generally being small in comparison. We compare these observationally-based results with coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model simulations that have been made available as part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5). While CMIP5 models generally perform well in simulating the observed climatological mean energy budget, some notable model biases are apparent. These biases are most pronounced during the austral summer and fall seasons, with the largest biases (approaching 30 W m-2 for some models) occurring for the TOA net incoming shortwave radiation during summer. Finally, we examine the causes of model biases (e.g., deficiencies in the simulated cloud cover and sea ice), as well as their relationship to the simulated twenty-first century trends in the energy budget. We find a statistically significant inverse correlation across the CMIP5 models between the present-day biases in atmospheric energy transport into the polar cap, and the simulated future changes in energy transport over the twenty-first century. Possible reasons for this relationship are discussed.

  15. WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter - SIMulator)

    2014-11-26

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) is a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model wave energy converters (WECs) when they are subject to operational waves. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/Simulink using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. In WEC-Sim, WECs are modeled by connecting rigid bodies to one another with joint or constraint blocks from the WEC-Sim library. WEC-Sim is a publicly available, open-sourcemore » code to model WECs.« less

  16. WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter - SIMulator)

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-26

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) is a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model wave energy converters (WECs) when they are subject to operational waves. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/Simulink using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. In WEC-Sim, WECs are modeled by connecting rigid bodies to one another with joint or constraint blocks from the WEC-Sim library. WEC-Sim is a publicly available, open-source code to model WECs.

  17. Numerical simulation of magma energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickox, C. E.

    The Magma Energy Program is a speculative endeavor regarding practical utility of electrical power production from the thermal energy which resides in magma. The systematic investigation has identified a number of research areas which have application to the utilization of magma energy and to the field of geothermal energy. Eight topics were identified which involve thermal processes and which are areas for the application of the techniques of numerical simulation. These areas are (1) two-phase flow of the working fluid in the wellbore, (2) thermodynamic cycles for the production of electrical power, (3) optimization of the entire system, (4) solidification and fracturing of the magma caused by the energy extraction process, (5) heat transfer and fluid flow within an open, direct-contact, heat-exchanger, (6) thermal convection in the overlying geothermal region, (7) thermal convection within the magma body, and (8) induced natural convection near the thermal energy extraction device. Modeling issues have been identified which will require systematic investigation in order to develop the most appropriate strategies for numerical simulation. It appears that numerical simulations will be of ever increasing importance to the study of geothermal processes as the size and complexity of the systems of interest increase. It is anticipated that, in the future, greater emphasis will be placed on the numerical simulation of large-scale, three-dimensional, transient, mixed convection in viscous flows and porous media. Increased computational capabilities, e.g.; massively parallel computers, will allow for the detailed study of specific processes in fractured media, non-Darcy effects in porous media, and non-Newtonian effects.

  18. A simulation of high energy cosmic ray propagation 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Kifune, T.; Matsubara, Y.; Mori, M.; Nishijima, K.; Teshima, M.

    1985-01-01

    High energy cosmic ray propagation of the energy region 10 to the 14.5 power - 10 to the 18th power eV is simulated in the inter steller circumstances. In conclusion, the diffusion process by turbulent magnetic fields is classified into several regions by ratio of the gyro-radius and the scale of turbulence. When the ratio becomes larger then 10 to the minus 0.5 power, the analysis with the assumption of point scattering can be applied with the mean free path E sup 2. However, when the ratio is smaller than 10 to the minus 0.5 power, we need a more complicated analysis or simulation. Assuming the turbulence scale of magnetic fields of the Galaxy is 10-30pc and the mean magnetic field strength is 3 micro gauss, the energy of cosmic ray with that gyro-radius is about 10 to the 16.5 power eV.

  19. Reasoning about energy in qualitative simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouche, Pierre; Kuipers, Benjamin J.

    1992-01-01

    While possible behaviors of a mechanism that are consistent with an incomplete state of knowledge can be predicted through qualitative modeling and simulation, spurious behaviors corresponding to no solution of any ordinary differential equation consistent with the model may be generated. The present method for energy-related reasoning eliminates an important source of spurious behaviors, as demonstrated by its application to a nonlinear, proportional-integral controlled. It is shown that such qualitative properties of such a system as stability and zero-offset control are captured by the simulation.

  20. Free energy of steps using atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Rodrigo; Frolov, Timofey; Asta, Mark

    The properties of solid-liquid interfaces are known to play critical roles in solidification processes. Particularly special importance is given to thermodynamic quantities that describe the equilibrium state of these surfaces. For example, on the solid-liquid-vapor heteroepitaxial growth of semiconductor nanowires the crystal nucleation process on the faceted solid-liquid interface is influenced by the solid-liquid and vapor-solid interfacial free energies, and also by the free energies of associated steps at these faceted interfaces. Crystal-growth theories and mesoscale simulation methods depend on quantitative information about these properties, which are often poorly characterized from experimental measurements. In this work we propose an extension of the capillary fluctuation method for calculation of the free energy of steps on faceted crystal surfaces. From equilibrium atomistic simulations of steps on (111) surfaces of Copper we computed accurately the step free energy for different step orientations. We show that the step free energy remains finite at all temperature up to the melting point and that the results obtained agree with the more well established method of thermodynamic integration if finite size effects are taken into account. The research of RF and MA at UC Berkeley were supported by the US National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-1105409). TF acknowledges support through a postdoctoral fellowship from the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science.

  1. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heatmore » absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.« less

  2. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R. L.

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heat absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.

  3. Plans for wind energy system simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreier, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    A digital computer code and a special purpose hybrid computer, were introduced. The digital computer program, the Root Perturbation Method or RPM, is an implementation of the classic floquet procedure which circumvents numerical problems associated with the extraction of Floquet roots. The hybrid computer, the Wind Energy System Time domain simulator (WEST), yields real time loads and deformation information essential to design and system stability investigations.

  4. SIMWEST - A simulation model for wind energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edsinger, R. W.; Warren, A. W.; Gordon, L. H.; Chang, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive and efficient computer program for the modeling of wind energy systems with storage. The level of detail of SIMWEST (SImulation Model for Wind Energy STorage) is consistent with evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems with energy storage options. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and control components. The first program is a precompiler which allows the library components to be put together in building block form. The second program performs the technoeconomic system analysis with the required input/output, and the integration of system dynamics. An example of the application of the SIMWEST program to a current 100 kW wind energy storage system is given.

  5. Simulating granular materials by energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijgsman, D.; Luding, S.

    2016-03-01

    Discrete element methods are extremely helpful in understanding the complex behaviors of granular media, as they give valuable insight into all internal variables of the system. In this paper, a novel discrete element method for performing simulations of granular media is presented, based on the minimization of the potential energy in the system. Contrary to most discrete element methods (i.e., soft-particle method, event-driven method, and non-smooth contact dynamics), the system does not evolve by (approximately) integrating Newtons equations of motion in time, but rather by searching for mechanical equilibrium solutions for the positions of all particles in the system, which is mathematically equivalent to locally minimizing the potential energy. The new method allows for the rapid creation of jammed initial conditions (to be used for further studies) and for the simulation of quasi-static deformation problems. The major advantage of the new method is that it allows for truly static deformations. The system does not evolve with time, but rather with the externally applied strain or load, so that there is no kinetic energy in the system, in contrast to other quasi-static methods. The performance of the algorithm for both types of applications of the method is tested. Therefore we look at the required number of iterations, for the system to converge to a stable solution. For each single iteration, the required computational effort scales linearly with the number of particles. During the process of creating initial conditions, the required number of iterations for two-dimensional systems scales with the square root of the number of particles in the system. The required number of iterations increases for systems closer to the jamming packing fraction. For a quasi-static pure shear deformation simulation, the results of the new method are validated by regular soft-particle dynamics simulations. The energy minimization algorithm is able to capture the evolution of the

  6. Simulating granular materials by energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijgsman, D.; Luding, S.

    2016-11-01

    Discrete element methods are extremely helpful in understanding the complex behaviors of granular media, as they give valuable insight into all internal variables of the system. In this paper, a novel discrete element method for performing simulations of granular media is presented, based on the minimization of the potential energy in the system. Contrary to most discrete element methods (i.e., soft-particle method, event-driven method, and non-smooth contact dynamics), the system does not evolve by (approximately) integrating Newtons equations of motion in time, but rather by searching for mechanical equilibrium solutions for the positions of all particles in the system, which is mathematically equivalent to locally minimizing the potential energy. The new method allows for the rapid creation of jammed initial conditions (to be used for further studies) and for the simulation of quasi-static deformation problems. The major advantage of the new method is that it allows for truly static deformations. The system does not evolve with time, but rather with the externally applied strain or load, so that there is no kinetic energy in the system, in contrast to other quasi-static methods. The performance of the algorithm for both types of applications of the method is tested. Therefore we look at the required number of iterations, for the system to converge to a stable solution. For each single iteration, the required computational effort scales linearly with the number of particles. During the process of creating initial conditions, the required number of iterations for two-dimensional systems scales with the square root of the number of particles in the system. The required number of iterations increases for systems closer to the jamming packing fraction. For a quasi-static pure shear deformation simulation, the results of the new method are validated by regular soft-particle dynamics simulations. The energy minimization algorithm is able to capture the evolution of the

  7. Analysis and Optimization of Building Energy Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Jun Wei

    Energy is one of the most important resources required by modern human society. In 2010, energy expenditures represented 10% of global gross domestic product (GDP). By 2035, global energy consumption is expected to increase by more than 50% from current levels. The increased pace of global energy consumption leads to significant environmental and socioeconomic issues: (i) carbon emissions, from the burning of fossil fuels for energy, contribute to global warming, and (ii) increased energy expenditures lead to reduced standard of living. Efficient use of energy, through energy conservation measures, is an important step toward mitigating these effects. Residential and commercial buildings represent a prime target for energy conservation, comprising 21% of global energy consumption and 40% of the total energy consumption in the United States. This thesis describes techniques for the analysis and optimization of building energy consumption. The thesis focuses on building retrofits and building energy simulation as key areas in building energy optimization and analysis. The thesis first discusses and evaluates building-level renewable energy generation as a solution toward building energy optimization. The thesis next describes a novel heating system, called localized heating. Under localized heating, building occupants are heated individually by directed radiant heaters, resulting in a considerably reduced heated space and significant heating energy savings. To support localized heating, a minimally-intrusive indoor occupant positioning system is described. The thesis then discusses occupant-level sensing (OLS) as the next frontier in building energy optimization. OLS captures the exact environmental conditions faced by each building occupant, using sensors that are carried by all building occupants. The information provided by OLS enables fine-grained optimization for unprecedented levels of energy efficiency and occupant comfort. The thesis also describes a retrofit

  8. Scalable Quantum Simulation of Molecular Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, P. J. J.; Babbush, R.; Kivlichan, I. D.; Romero, J.; McClean, J. R.; Barends, R.; Kelly, J.; Roushan, P.; Tranter, A.; Ding, N.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Coveney, P. V.; Love, P. J.; Neven, H.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Martinis, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    We report the first electronic structure calculation performed on a quantum computer without exponentially costly precompilation. We use a programmable array of superconducting qubits to compute the energy surface of molecular hydrogen using two distinct quantum algorithms. First, we experimentally execute the unitary coupled cluster method using the variational quantum eigensolver. Our efficient implementation predicts the correct dissociation energy to within chemical accuracy of the numerically exact result. Second, we experimentally demonstrate the canonical quantum algorithm for chemistry, which consists of Trotterization and quantum phase estimation. We compare the experimental performance of these approaches to show clear evidence that the variational quantum eigensolver is robust to certain errors. This error tolerance inspires hope that variational quantum simulations of classically intractable molecules may be viable in the near future.

  9. Structure of the antiviral stavudine using quantum chemical methods: Complete conformational space analysis, 3D potential energy surfaces and solid state simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcolea Palafox, M.; Iza, N.

    2012-11-01

    The molecular structure and energy of the anti-HIV, 2',3'-didehydro-3'-deoxythymidine (D4T, stavudine or Zerit) nucleoside analogue was determined by using MP2, B3LYP and B971 quantum chemical methods. The global minimum was determined through 3D potential energy surfaces (PES). These surfaces were built by rotation of the exocyclic χ, γ and β torsional angles, in steps of 20°, and full optimization of the remaining parameters. As consequence 5832 geometries were final optimized. The search located 25 local minimum, 4 of which are by MP2 within a 2 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum. The whole conformational parameters as well as P, νmax were analyzed in all the stable conformers. The global minimum by MP2 corresponds to the calculated values of the exocyclic torsional angles: χ = -103.6°, β = 63.8° and γ = 60.6°. The results obtained are in accordance to those found in thymidine and in related anti-HIV nucleoside analogues. The effect of hydration on the two most stable conformers is analyzed by continuous and discrete models up to 20 water molecules. The solid state was also simulated. The dimer forms found in the crystal unit cell were accurately determined and they are in accordance to the X-ray data.

  10. Molecular Recognition and Free Energy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, William Robert

    This dissertation describes the study of molecular recognition processes by free energy computer simulations. The introductory chapter briefly outlines the scientific development and significance of molecular recognition, and then describes statistical thermodynamic approaches to computer simulations. Chapter 1 analyzes the relationship of small guest molecules to a synthetic host in which one guest molecule is preorganized to be structurally complementary to the host while the second guest molecule must organize itself in order to obtain the same complementarity. The preferential recognition of imidazolidone over N,N^' -dimethylurea to the host is described in terms of the energetic cost of preorganizing the N,N^' -dimethylurea which can exist in several rotationally isomeric states. Chapter 2 describes the development of potential functions for molecular simulations and analyzes the structural, dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of sulfate anion solvation. Finally, chapter 3 describes the binding of sulfate anion to a periplasmic receptor and analyzes three mutants that have anomalous binding affinities for sulfate. Two of the mutants that have a greater than expected affinity for the anion are proposed to recognize and bind a water-anion complex rather than the anion alone, and the third mutant is proposed to have a dramatically decreased affinity for the anion due to steric and polarization effects.

  11. Simulation of Spheromak Evolution and Energy Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bruce I.

    2004-11-01

    Electron temperatures near 400 eV were observed transiently in the Los Alamos CTX spheromak experiment.[1] Temperatures of 100-200 eV have been observed in the SSPX spheromak.[2] Understanding the energy confinement in these experiments is a challenging problem. Results from numerical simulations with the NIMROD nonlinear resistive MHD code (at zero or finite plasma pressure) have shown that closed flux surfaces with net current can arise only after electrostatic drive is reduced.[3,4] Computations in the last year have directly investigated the importance of inductive effects on energy confinement including the evolution of the temperature and number density using thermal transport coefficients, electrical resistivity, and Ohmic heating that are appropriate for collisional plasmas. In conditions with sustained coaxial electrostatic drive, the cold edge plasma impedes parallel thermal conduction to the wall, despite the chaotic magnetic topology, allowing the plasma core temperature to reach tens of eVs. When the drive is temporarily removed, relatively symmetric closed flux surfaces form. Magnetic reconnection occurs rapidly in the cold outer plasma, and core temperatures increase toward 100 eV or more. Applying a second current pulse, as in some SSPX discharges,[5] is shown to improve performance by delaying the onset of MHD modes that are resonant in the closed-flux region, and higher current, increased magnetic fields, and larger volumes of closed flux can be achieved. The simulations reveal the sensitivity with respect to symmetry-breaking magnetic fluctuations of the magnetic surfaces and the energy confinement. We present a detailed comparison of results from nonlinear simulations with laboratory measurements from SSPX[5,6] and assess transport mechanisms through computational diagnostics. The simulation results are yielding electron temperatures and other features agreeing well with SSPX observations. [1] T. R. Jarboe, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 36, 945

  12. Testing simulation and structural models with applications to energy demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Hendrik

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation deals with energy demand and consists of two parts. Part one proposes a unified econometric framework for modeling energy demand and examples illustrate the benefits of the technique by estimating the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital. Part two assesses the energy conservation policy of Daylight Saving Time and empirically tests the performance of electricity simulation. In particular, the chapter "Imposing Monotonicity and Curvature on Flexible Functional Forms" proposes an estimator for inference using structural models derived from economic theory. This is motivated by the fact that in many areas of economic analysis theory restricts the shape as well as other characteristics of functions used to represent economic constructs. Specific contributions are (a) to increase the computational speed and tractability of imposing regularity conditions, (b) to provide regularity preserving point estimates, (c) to avoid biases existent in previous applications, and (d) to illustrate the benefits of our approach via numerical simulation results. The chapter "Can We Close the Gap between the Empirical Model and Economic Theory" discusses the more fundamental question of whether the imposition of a particular theory to a dataset is justified. I propose a hypothesis test to examine whether the estimated empirical model is consistent with the assumed economic theory. Although the proposed methodology could be applied to a wide set of economic models, this is particularly relevant for estimating policy parameters that affect energy markets. This is demonstrated by estimating the Slutsky matrix and the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital, which are crucial parameters used in computable general equilibrium models analyzing energy demand and the impacts of environmental regulations. Using the Berndt and Wood dataset, I find that capital and energy are complements and that the data are significantly consistent with duality

  13. The Energy-Environment Simulator as a Classroom Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, Nancy J.; Van Koevering, Thomas E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use, availability, and flexibility of the Energy-Environment Simulator, a specially designed analog computer which simulates the real-world energy situation and which is programed with estimated United States and world supplies of energy sources and estimated United States energy demands. (MP)

  14. Simulation and analysis of solenoidal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alderwick, A. R.; Jardine, A. P.; Hedgeland, H.; MacLaren, D. A.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.

    2008-12-15

    We present a detailed analysis and simulation of solenoidal, magnetically confined electron bombardment ion sources, aimed at molecular beam detection. The aim is to achieve high efficiency for singly ionized species while minimizing multiple ionization. Electron space charge plays a major role and we apply combined ray tracing and finite element simulations to determine the properties of a realistic geometry. The factors controlling electron injection and ion extraction are discussed. The results from simulations are benchmarked against experimental measurements on a prototype source.

  15. Automated Comparison of Building Energy Simulation Engines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Polly, B.; Horowitz, S.; Booten, B.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation describes the BEopt comparative test suite, which is a tool that facilitates the automated comparison of building energy simulation engines. It also demonstrates how the test suite is improving the accuracy of building energy simulation programs. Building energy simulation programs inform energy efficient design for new homes and energy efficient upgrades for existing homes. Stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from simulation programs. Previous research indicates that software tends to over-predict energy usage for poorly-insulated leaky homes. NREL is identifying, investigating, and resolving software inaccuracy issues. Comparative software testing is one method of many that NREL uses to identify potential software issues.

  16. Differential thermal analysis of lunar soil simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, D.; Setzer, A.

    1991-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis of a lunar soil simulant, 'Minnesota Lunar Simulant-1' (MLS-1) was performed. The MLS-1 was tested in as-received form (in glass form) and with another silica. The silica addition was seen to depress nucleation events which lead to a better glass former.

  17. Competing Uses of Underground Systems Related to Energy Supply: Applying Single- and Multiphase Simulations for Site Characterization and Risk-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, A.; Walter, L.; Darcis, M.; Flemisch, B.; Class, H.

    2012-04-01

    Global climate change, shortage of resources and the resulting turn towards renewable sources of energy lead to a growing demand for the utilization of subsurface systems. Among these competing uses are Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), geothermal energy, nuclear waste disposal, "renewable" methane or hydrogen storage as well as the ongoing production of fossil resources like oil, gas, and coal. Besides competing among themselves, these technologies may also create conflicts with essential public interests like water supply. For example, the injection of CO2 into the underground causes an increase in pressure reaching far beyond the actual radius of influence of the CO2 plume, potentially leading to large amounts of displaced salt water. Finding suitable sites is a demanding task for several reasons. Natural systems as opposed to technical systems are always characterized by heterogeneity. Therefore, parameter uncertainty impedes reliable predictions towards capacity and safety of a site. State of the art numerical simulations combined with stochastic approaches need to be used to obtain a more reliable assessment of the involved risks and the radii of influence of the different processes. These simulations may include the modeling of single- and multiphase non-isothermal flow, geo-chemical and geo-mechanical processes in order to describe all relevant physical processes adequately. Stochastic approaches have the aim to estimate a bandwidth of the key output parameters based on uncertain input parameters. Risks for these different underground uses can then be made comparable with each other. Along with the importance and the urgency of the competing processes this may lead to a more profound basis for a decision. Communicating risks to stake holders and a concerned public is crucial for the success of finding a suitable site for CCS (or other subsurface utilization). We present and discuss first steps towards an approach for addressing the issue of competitive

  18. Integrating software architectures for distributed simulations and simulation analysis communities.

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Fellig, Daniel; Linebarger, John Michael; Moore, Patrick Curtis; Sa, Timothy J.; Hawley, Marilyn F.

    2005-10-01

    The one-year Software Architecture LDRD (No.79819) was a cross-site effort between Sandia California and Sandia New Mexico. The purpose of this research was to further develop and demonstrate integrating software architecture frameworks for distributed simulation and distributed collaboration in the homeland security domain. The integrated frameworks were initially developed through the Weapons of Mass Destruction Decision Analysis Center (WMD-DAC), sited at SNL/CA, and the National Infrastructure Simulation & Analysis Center (NISAC), sited at SNL/NM. The primary deliverable was a demonstration of both a federation of distributed simulations and a federation of distributed collaborative simulation analysis communities in the context of the same integrated scenario, which was the release of smallpox in San Diego, California. To our knowledge this was the first time such a combination of federations under a single scenario has ever been demonstrated. A secondary deliverable was the creation of the standalone GroupMeld{trademark} collaboration client, which uses the GroupMeld{trademark} synchronous collaboration framework. In addition, a small pilot experiment that used both integrating frameworks allowed a greater range of crisis management options to be performed and evaluated than would have been possible without the use of the frameworks.

  19. Advanced Potential Energy Surfaces for Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Alex; Boateng, Henry A; Bradshaw, Richard T; Demerdash, Omar N; Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Margul, Daniel T; Swails, Jason; Zeng, Qiao; Case, David A; Eastman, Peter; Wang, Lee-Ping; Essex, Jonathan W; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pande, Vijay S; Ponder, Jay W; Shao, Yihan; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Todorov, Ilian T; Tuckerman, Mark E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-09-22

    Advanced potential energy surfaces are defined as theoretical models that explicitly include many-body effects that transcend the standard fixed-charge, pairwise-additive paradigm typically used in molecular simulation. However, several factors relating to their software implementation have precluded their widespread use in condensed-phase simulations: the computational cost of the theoretical models, a paucity of approximate models and algorithmic improvements that can ameliorate their cost, underdeveloped interfaces and limited dissemination in computational code bases that are widely used in the computational chemistry community, and software implementations that have not kept pace with modern high-performance computing (HPC) architectures, such as multicore CPUs and modern graphics processing units (GPUs). In this Feature Article we review recent progress made in these areas, including well-defined polarization approximations and new multipole electrostatic formulations, novel methods for solving the mutual polarization equations and increasing the MD time step, combining linear-scaling electronic structure methods with new QM/MM methods that account for mutual polarization between the two regions, and the greatly improved software deployment of these models and methods onto GPU and CPU hardware platforms. We have now approached an era where multipole-based polarizable force fields can be routinely used to obtain computational results comparable to state-of-the-art density functional theory while reaching sampling statistics that are acceptable when compared to that obtained from simpler fixed partial charge force fields.

  20. Advanced Potential Energy Surfaces for Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Alex; Boateng, Henry A; Bradshaw, Richard T; Demerdash, Omar N; Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Margul, Daniel T; Swails, Jason; Zeng, Qiao; Case, David A; Eastman, Peter; Wang, Lee-Ping; Essex, Jonathan W; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pande, Vijay S; Ponder, Jay W; Shao, Yihan; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Todorov, Ilian T; Tuckerman, Mark E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-09-22

    Advanced potential energy surfaces are defined as theoretical models that explicitly include many-body effects that transcend the standard fixed-charge, pairwise-additive paradigm typically used in molecular simulation. However, several factors relating to their software implementation have precluded their widespread use in condensed-phase simulations: the computational cost of the theoretical models, a paucity of approximate models and algorithmic improvements that can ameliorate their cost, underdeveloped interfaces and limited dissemination in computational code bases that are widely used in the computational chemistry community, and software implementations that have not kept pace with modern high-performance computing (HPC) architectures, such as multicore CPUs and modern graphics processing units (GPUs). In this Feature Article we review recent progress made in these areas, including well-defined polarization approximations and new multipole electrostatic formulations, novel methods for solving the mutual polarization equations and increasing the MD time step, combining linear-scaling electronic structure methods with new QM/MM methods that account for mutual polarization between the two regions, and the greatly improved software deployment of these models and methods onto GPU and CPU hardware platforms. We have now approached an era where multipole-based polarizable force fields can be routinely used to obtain computational results comparable to state-of-the-art density functional theory while reaching sampling statistics that are acceptable when compared to that obtained from simpler fixed partial charge force fields. PMID:27513316

  1. Efficient evaluation of collisional energy transfer terms for plasma particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrell, A. E.; Sherlock, M.; Rose, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-based simulations, such as in particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, are widely used in plasma physics research. The analysis of particle energy transfers, as described by the second moment of the Boltzmann equation, is often necessary within these simulations. We present computationally efficient, analytically derived equations for evaluating collisional energy transfer terms from simulations using discrete particles. The equations are expressed as a sum over the properties of the discrete particles.

  2. Virtual Simulation of Vision 21 Energy Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Syamlal, Madhava; Felix, Paul E.; Osawe, Maxwell O.; Fiveland, Woodrow A.; Sloan, David G.; Zitney, Stephen E.; Joop, Frank; Cleetus, Joseph; Lapshin, Igor B.

    2001-11-06

    The Vision 21 Energy plants will be designed by combining several individual power, chemical, and fuel-conversion technologies. These independently developed technologies or technology modules can be interchanged and combined to form the complete Vision 21 plant that achieves the needed level of efficiency and environmental performance at affordable costs. The knowledge about each technology module must be captured in computer models so that the models can be linked together to simulate the entire Vision 21 power plant in a Virtual Simulation environment. Eventually the Virtual Simulation will find application in conceptual design, final design, plant operation and control, and operator training. In this project we take the first step towards developing such a Vision 21 Simulator. There are two main knowledge domains of a plant--the process domain (what is in the pipes), and the physical domain (the pipes and equipment that make up the plant). Over the past few decades, commercial software tools have been developed for each of these functions. However, there are three main problems that inhibit the design and operation of power plants: (1) Many of these tools, largely developed for chemicals and refining, have not been widely adopted in the power industry. (2) Tools are not integrated across functions. For example, the knowledge represented by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of equipment is not used in process-level simulations. (3) No tool exists for readily integrating the design and behavioral knowledge about components. These problems must be overcome to develop the Vision 21 Simulator. In this project our major objective is to achieve a seamless integration of equipment-level and process-level models and apply the integrated software to power plant simulations. Specifically we are developing user-friendly tools for linking process models (Aspen Plus) with detailed equipment models (FLUENT CFD and other proprietary models). Such integration will

  3. Miscible Applied Simulation Techniques for Energy Recovery

    2005-07-01

    During the use of MASTER at the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center (PRRC) as research division of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology a number of modification have been made to the original MASTER. We have worked at minimizing programming errors and incorporating a foaming option for surfactant solution (aqueous phase) injection altemating with gas (SAG) The original program checks and modifications performed at PRRC were under the direction of Dr. Shih-Hsien Changmore » under previous DOE contracts. The final modifications and completion of the documentation were performed by Dr. Zhengwen Zeng under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-01BC15364. Drs. Chang and Zeng worked under Dr. Reid B. Grigg in the Gas Flooding Processes and Flow Heterogeneities Section of PRRC. This work is not intended to have any long-term support from the PRRC, but any errors should be reported to the Department of Energy for inclusion in future releases of MASTER. MASTER is an effective reservoir simulator for modeling a number of fluid flow problems and is a straight forward and economical program. We thank the Department of Energy for the original development of this program and the availability for our use.« less

  4. Energy analysis program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.D.

    1995-04-01

    This report provides an energy analysis overview. The following topics are described: building energy analysis; urban and energy environmental issues; appliance energy efficiency standards; utility planning and policy; energy efficiency, economics, and policy issues; and international energy and environmental issues.

  5. Guidelines for Energy Simulation of Commercial Buildings: Final.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Michael; Caner, Phoebe

    1992-03-01

    This report distills the experience gained from intensive computer building simulation work for the Energy Edge project. The purpose of this report is twofold: to use that experience to guide conservation program managers in their use of modeling, and to improve the accuracy of design-phase computer models. Though the main emphasis of the report is on new commercial construction, it also addresses modeling as it pertains to retrofit construction. To achieve these purposes, this report will: (1) discuss the value of modeling for energy conservation programs; (2) discuss strengths and weaknesses of computer models; (3) provide specific guidelines for model input; (4) discuss input topics that are unusually large drivers of energy use and model inaccuracy; (5) provide guidelines for developing baseline models; (6) discuss types of energy conservation measures (ECMs) and building operation that are not suitable to modeling and present possible alternatives to modeling for analysis; and (7) provide basic requirements for model documentation. This project was initiated to determine whether commercial buildings can be designed and constructed to use at least 30% less energy than if they were designed and built to meet the current regional model energy code, the Model Conservation Standards (MCS) developed by the Pacific Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Planning Council. Secondary objectives of the project are to determine the incremental energy savings of a wide variety of ECMs and to compare the predictive accuracy of design-phase models with models that are carefully tuned to monitored building data.

  6. Energy-Systems Economic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, J.; Slonski, M. L.; Borden, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Energy Systems Economic Analysis (ESEA) program is flexible analytical tool for rank ordering of alternative energy systems. Basic ESEA approach derives an estimate of those costs incurred as result of purchasing, installing and operating an energy system. These costs, suitably aggregated into yearly costs over lifetime of system, are divided by expected yearly energy output to determine busbar energy costs. ESEA, developed in 1979, is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  7. WINS. Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad

    2012-10-30

    Integrating 20% or more wind energy into the system and transmitting large sums of wind energy over long distances will require a decision making capability that can handle very large scale power systems with tens of thousands of buses and lines. There is a need to explore innovative analytical and implementation solutions for continuing reliable operations with the most economical integration of additional wind energy in power systems. A number of wind integration solution paths involve the adoption of new operating policies, dynamic scheduling of wind power across interties, pooling integration services, and adopting new transmission scheduling practices. Such practices can be examined by the decision tool developed by this project. This project developed a very efficient decision tool called Wind INtegration Simulator (WINS) and applied WINS to facilitate wind energy integration studies. WINS focused on augmenting the existing power utility capabilities to support collaborative planning, analysis, and wind integration project implementations. WINS also had the capability of simulating energy storage facilities so that feasibility studies of integrated wind energy system applications can be performed for systems with high wind energy penetrations. The development of WINS represents a major expansion of a very efficient decision tool called POwer Market Simulator (POMS), which was developed by IIT and has been used extensively for power system studies for decades. Specifically, WINS provides the following superiorities; (1) An integrated framework is included in WINS for the comprehensive modeling of DC transmission configurations, including mono-pole, bi-pole, tri-pole, back-to-back, and multi-terminal connection, as well as AC/DC converter models including current source converters (CSC) and voltage source converters (VSC); (2) An existing shortcoming of traditional decision tools for wind integration is the limited availability of user interface, i.e., decision

  8. The perceived value of using BIM for energy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Anderson M.

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is becoming an increasingly important tool in the Architectural, Engineering & Construction (AEC) industries. Some of the benefits associated with BIM include but are not limited to cost and time savings through greater trade and design coordination, and more accurate estimating take-offs. BIM is a virtual 3D, parametric design software that allows users to store information of a model within and can be used as a communication platform between project stakeholders. Likewise, energy simulation is an integral tool for predicting and optimizing a building's performance during design. Creating energy models and running energy simulations can be a time consuming activity due to the large number of parameters and assumptions that must be addressed to achieve reasonably accurate results. However, leveraging information imbedded within Building Information Models (BIMs) has the potential to increase accuracy and reduce the amount of time required to run energy simulations and can facilitate continuous energy simulations throughout the design process, thus optimizing building performance. Although some literature exists on how design stakeholders perceive the benefits associated with leveraging BIM for energy simulation, little is known about how perceptions associated with leveraging BIM for energy simulation differ between various green design stakeholder user groups. Through an e-survey instrument, this study seeks to determine how perceptions of using BIMs to inform energy simulation differ among distinct design stakeholder groups, which include BIM-only users, energy simulation-only users and BIM and energy simulation users. Additionally, this study seeks to determine what design stakeholders perceive as the main barriers and benefits of implementing BIM-based energy simulation. Results from this study suggest that little to no correlation exists between green design stakeholders' perceptions of the value associated with using

  9. Exchange interaction energy in magnetic recording simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Masukazu Tonooka, Shun; Katada, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Maki; Hara, Miki; Wood, Roger

    2015-05-07

    Based on a phenomenological theory, micromagnetic simulations and experiments are used to evaluate an improved function for the exchange interaction between magnetic particles in perpendicular recording media. Assuming diluted spin layers in the particle boundary and a gradual rather than abrupt rotation of magnetization between grain cores, the exchange energy is better described by an even power series of θ, rather than a cosine function. The conventional cosine function does not have a restoring torque near θ = π and adjacent grains tend to align strictly antiparallel. In contrast, using a power series of θ, adjacent grains tend to align at a small angle away from θ = π. This gives rise to a small in-plane magnetization component and therefore a distinct peak in in-plane susceptibility is observed around H = 0. From magnetization measurements of a real medium, a peak is observed around H = 0, which matches with an assumption of 2 or 3 spin layers. In some situations, the exchange interaction between discretized cells for numerical calculation is better described by a power series rather than a cosine function.

  10. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy/Monte Carlo simulation approach for the non-destructive analysis of corrosion patina-bearing alloys in archaeological bronzes: The case of the bowl from the Fareleira 3 site (Vidigueira, South Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottaini, C.; Mirão, J.; Figuereido, M.; Candeias, A.; Brunetti, A.; Schiavon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a well-known technique for non-destructive and in situ analysis of archaeological artifacts both in terms of the qualitative and quantitative elemental composition because of its rapidity and non-destructiveness. In this study EDXRF and realistic Monte Carlo simulation using the X-ray Monte Carlo (XRMC) code package have been combined to characterize a Cu-based bowl from the Iron Age burial from Fareleira 3 (Southern Portugal). The artifact displays a multilayered structure made up of three distinct layers: a) alloy substrate; b) green oxidized corrosion patina; and c) brownish carbonate soil-derived crust. To assess the reliability of Monte Carlo simulation in reproducing the composition of the bulk metal of the objects without recurring to potentially damaging patina's and crust's removal, portable EDXRF analysis was performed on cleaned and patina/crust coated areas of the artifact. Patina has been characterized by micro X-ray Diffractometry (μXRD) and Back-Scattered Scanning Electron Microscopy + Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (BSEM + EDS). Results indicate that the EDXRF/Monte Carlo protocol is well suited when a two-layered model is considered, whereas in areas where the patina + crust surface coating is too thick, X-rays from the alloy substrate are not able to exit the sample.

  11. Exergy Analysis and Operational Efficiency of a Horizontal Ground Source Heat Pump System Operated in a Low-Energy Test House under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Baxter, Van D; Munk, Jeffrey D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents data, analyses, measures of performance, and conclusions for a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) providing space conditioning to a 345m2 house whose envelope is made of structural insulated panels (SIP). The entire thermal load of this SIP house with RSI-3.7 (RUS-21) walls, triple pane windows with a U-factor of 1.64 W/m2 K (0.29 Btu/h ft2 oF) and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of 0.25, a roof assembly with overall thermal resistance of about RSI-8.8 (RUS-50) and low leakage rates of 0.74 ACH at 50Pa was satisfied with a 2.16-Ton (7.56 kW) GSHP unit consuming negligible (9.83kWh) auxiliary heat during peak winter season. The highest and lowest heating COP achieved was 4.90 (October) and 3.44 (February), respectively. The highest and lowest cooling COP achieved was 6.09 (April) and 3.88 (August). These COPs are calculated on the basis of the total power input (including duct, ground loop, and control power losses ). The second Law (Exergy) analysis provides deep insight into how systemic inefficiencies are distributed among the various GSHP components. Opportunities for design and further performance improvements are identified. Through Exergy analysis we provide a true measure of how closely actual performance approaches the ideal, and it unequivocally identifies, better than energy analysis does, the sources and causes of lost work, the root cause of system inefficiencies.

  12. Predesign energy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    A new graphic technique developed to help architects and engineers design more energy-efficient buildings is presented. An energy-efficient design includes two interrelated elements: physical design characteristics which minimize testing, cooling, and lighting loads; and mechanical and electrical subsystems which meet energy loads efficiently. The technique focuses on manipulation of design variables to effectively reduce excessive heat gains and losses. The technique, termed a visual one, is designed to show how a building uses energy. The technique described can also be done manually.

  13. Simulating drought impacts on energy balance in an Amazonian rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbuzeiro, H. A.; Costa, M. H.; Galbraith, D.; Christoffersen, B. O.; Powell, T.; Harper, A. B.; Levine, N. M.; Rowland, L.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Benezoli, V. H.; Meir, P.; da Costa, A. C. L.; Brando, P. M.; Malhi, Y.; Saleska, S. R.; Williams, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The studies of the interaction between vegetation and climate change in the Amazon Basin indicate that up to half of the region's forests may be displaced by savanna vegetation by the end of the century. Additional analyses suggest that complex interactions among land use, fire-frequency, and episodic drought are driving an even more rapid process of the forest impoverishment and displacement referred here as "savannization". But it is not clear whether surface/ecosystem models are suitable to analyze extreme events like a drought. Long-term simulations of throughfall exclusion experiments has provided unique insights into the energy dynamics of Amazonian rainforests during drought conditions. In this study, we evaluate how well six surface/ecosystem models quantify the energy dynamics from two Amazonian throughfall exclusion experiments. All models were run for the Tapajós and Caxiuanã sites with one control plot using normal precipitation (i.e. do not impose a drought) and then the drought manipulation was imposed for several drought treatments (10 to 90% rainfall exclusion). The sap flow, net radiation (Rn), sensible (H), latent (LE) and ground (G) heat flux are used to analyze if the models are able to capture the dynamics of water stress and what the implications for the energy dynamics are. With respect to the model validation, when we compare the sap flow observed and transpiration simulated, models are more accurate to simulate control plots than drought treatments (50% rainfall exclusion). The results show that the models overestimate the sap flow data during the drought conditions, but they were able to capture the changes in the main energy balance components for different drought treatments. The Rn and LE decreased and H increased with more intensity of drought. The models sensitivity analysis indicate that models are more sensitive to drought when rainfall is excluded for more than 60% and when this reduction occurs during the dry season.

  14. In-situ Data Analysis Framework for ACME Land Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Yao, C.; Jia, Y.; Steed, C.; Atchley, S.

    2015-12-01

    The realistic representation of key biogeophysical and biogeochemical functions is the fundamental of process-based ecosystem models. Investigating the behavior of those ecosystem functions within real-time model simulation can be a very challenging due to the complex of both model and software structure of an environmental model, such as the Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) Land Model (ALM). In this research, author will describe the urgent needs and challenges for in-situ data analysis for ALM simulations, and layouts our methods/strategies to meet these challenges. Specifically, an in-situ data analysis framework is designed to allow users interactively observe the biogeophyical and biogeochemical process during ALM simulation. There are two key components in this framework, automatically instrumented ecosystem simulation, in-situ data communication and large-scale data exploratory toolkit. This effort is developed by leveraging several active projects, including scientific unit testing platform, common communication interface and extreme-scale data exploratory toolkit. Authors believe that, based on advanced computing technologies, such as compiler-based software system analysis, automatic code instrumentation, and in-memory data transport, this software system provides not only much needed capability for real-time observation and in-situ data analytics for environmental model simulation, but also the potentials for in-situ model behavior adjustment via simulation steering.

  15. Computer simulations of glasses: the potential energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Zamaan; Alling, Björn; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-07-01

    We review the current state of research on glasses, discussing the theoretical background and computational models employed to describe them. This article focuses on the use of the potential energy landscape (PEL) paradigm to account for the phenomenology of glassy systems, and the way in which it can be applied in simulations and the interpretation of their results. This article provides a broad overview of the rich phenomenology of glasses, followed by a summary of the theoretical frameworks developed to describe this phenomonology. We discuss the background of the PEL in detail, the onerous task of how to generate computer models of glasses, various methods of analysing numerical simulations, and the literature on the most commonly used model systems. Finally, we tackle the problem of how to distinguish a good glass former from a good crystal former from an analysis of the PEL. In summarising the state of the potential energy landscape picture, we develop the foundations for new theoretical methods that allow the ab initio prediction of the glass-forming ability of new materials by analysis of the PEL.

  16. Stochastic Simulation Tool for Aerospace Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.; Moore, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic simulation refers to incorporating the effects of design tolerances and uncertainties into the design analysis model and then determining their influence on the design. A high-level evaluation of one such stochastic simulation tool, the MSC.Robust Design tool by MSC.Software Corporation, has been conducted. This stochastic simulation tool provides structural analysts with a tool to interrogate their structural design based on their mathematical description of the design problem using finite element analysis methods. This tool leverages the analyst's prior investment in finite element model development of a particular design. The original finite element model is treated as the baseline structural analysis model for the stochastic simulations that are to be performed. A Monte Carlo approach is used by MSC.Robust Design to determine the effects of scatter in design input variables on response output parameters. The tool was not designed to provide a probabilistic assessment, but to assist engineers in understanding cause and effect. It is driven by a graphical-user interface and retains the engineer-in-the-loop strategy for design evaluation and improvement. The application problem for the evaluation is chosen to be a two-dimensional shell finite element model of a Space Shuttle wing leading-edge panel under re-entry aerodynamic loading. MSC.Robust Design adds value to the analysis effort by rapidly being able to identify design input variables whose variability causes the most influence in response output parameters.

  17. NANA Strategic Energy Plan & Energy Options Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Hermanson; Brian Yanity

    2008-12-31

    Biomass Feasibility analysis in the upper Kobuk; • Run of the river hydroelectric development for the Upper Kobuk; • Solar photovoltaic (PV) power demonstration projects for Noatak, Ambler, Selawik, Kiana, and Noorvik; • Heat Recovery for several communities; In September 2008, the NRC team participated at the Alaska Rural Energy Conference in Girdwood, Alaska In November 2008, the NRC team gave a presentation on the NANA regional energy plans at a DOE Tribal Energy Program conference in Denver, Colorado. In January 2009, the final SEP report was submitted to NRC.

  18. Efficient Analysis of Simulations of the Sun's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, C. W.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamics in the solar atmosphere, including solar flares, coronal mass ejections, micro-flares and different types of jets, are powered by the evolution of the sun's intense magnetic field. 3D Radiative Magnetohydrodnamics (MHD) computer simulations have furthered our understanding of the processes involved: When non aligned magnetic field lines reconnect, the alteration of the magnetic topology causes stored magnetic energy to be converted into thermal and kinetic energy. Detailed analysis of this evolution entails tracing magnetic field lines, an operation which is not time-efficient on a single processor. By utilizing a graphics card (GPU) to trace lines in parallel, conducting such analysis is made feasible. We applied our GPU implementation to the most advanced 3D Radiative-MHD simulations (Bifrost, Gudicksen et al. 2011) of the solar atmosphere in order to better understand the evolution of the modeled field lines.

  19. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-06-01

    This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

  20. Simulation of energy consumption for quadruped walking vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jingtao; Gao, Feng; Xu, Guoyan

    2006-11-01

    Simulation of energy consumption for walking vehicle is one of the basic way to preliminarily estimate the energy that will be consumed before constructing the real vehicle, providing basis for the design of vehicle to minish energy consumption. One of the most influential factors of the accuracy dynamic simulation is the appropriate contact model between leg and ground. In this paper, we adopt virtual prototyping technique to develop the dynamic modeling of a quadruped walking vehicle considering contact force between legs and ground during walking, finish simulation of dynamics and obtain dynamics characteristics, investigate the effects of different contact condition and the energy consumption. The purpose is to analyze the relationship between energy consumption and relevant influence factors, and the energy efficiency during walking is discussed with different walking velocity, strokes, duty factors and different contact material. Moreover contact force is obtained from simulations. Commercial ADAMS package is used.

  1. Three-dimensional transient analysis capability in SIMULATE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, J.; Rhodes, J. III; Esser, P.; Smith, K.

    1994-12-31

    Transient analysis capability has been added to the advanced nodal methodology of SIMULATE-3. The transient modules couple a transient version of the steady-state nodal method QPANDA with a one-dimensional, bundle-by-bundle thermal-hydraulic feedback module. The accuracy of the code has been assessed by using several benchmark problems, including the LMW benchmark and the Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Reactor Physics (NEACRP) pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod ejection benchmarks.

  2. Energy cost and energy sources during a simulated firefighting activity.

    PubMed

    Perroni, Fabrizio; Tessitore, Antonio; Cortis, Cristina; Lupo, Corrado; D'artibale, Emanuele; Cignitti, Lamberto; Capranica, Laura

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to 1) analyze the energy requirement (VO2eq) and the contribution of the aerobic (VO2ex), anaerobic alactic (VO2al), and anaerobic lactic (VO2la-) energy sources of a simulated intervention; 2) ascertain differences in mean VO2 and heart rate (HR) during firefighting tasks; and 3) verify the relationship between time of job completion and the fitness level of firefighters. Twenty Italian firefighters (age = 32 ± 6 yr, VO2peak = 43.1 ± 4.9 mL·kg·min) performed 4 consecutive tasks (i.e., child rescue; 250-m run; find an exit; 250-m run) that required a VO2eq of 406.26 ± 73.91 mL·kg (VO2ex = 86 ± 5%; VO2al = 9 ± 3%; VO2la- = 5 ± 3%). After 30 minutes, the recovery HR (108 ± 15 beats·min) and VO2 (8.86±2.67mL·kg·min) were higher (p < 0.0001) than basal values (HR = 66 ± 8 beats·min; VO2 = 4.57 ± 1.07 mL·kg·min), indicating that passive recovery is insufficient in reducing the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain of the previous workload. Differences (p < 0.001) between tasks emerged for mean VO2 and HR, with a lack of significant correlation between the time of job completion and the firefighters' aerobic fitness. These findings indicate that unpredictable working conditions highly challenge expert firefighters who need adequate fitness levels to meet the requirements of their work. Practically, to enhance the fitness level of firefighters, specific interval training programs should include a wide variety of tasks requiring different intensities and decision-making strategies.

  3. Fluid Flow Simulation and Energetic Analysis of Anomalocarididae Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2014-11-01

    While an abundance of animal locomotion simulations have been performed modeling the motions of living arthropods and aquatic animals, little quantitative simulation and reconstruction of gait parameters has been done to model the locomotion of extinct animals, many of which bear little physical resemblance to their modern descendants. To that end, this project seeks to analyze potential swimming patterns used by the anomalocaridid family, (specifically Anomalocaris canadensis, a Cambrian Era aquatic predator), and determine the most probable modes of movement. This will serve to either verify or cast into question the current assumed movement patterns and properties of these animals and create a bridge between similar flexible-bodied swimmers and their robotic counterparts. This will be accomplished by particle-based fluid flow simulations of the flow around the fins of the animal, as well as an energy analysis of a variety of sample gaits. The energy analysis will then be compared to the extant information regarding speed/energy use curves in an attempt to determine which modes of swimming were most energy efficient for a given range of speeds. These results will provide a better understanding of how these long-extinct animals moved, possibly allowing an improved understanding of their behavioral patterns, and may also lead to a novel potential platform for bio-inspired underwater autonomous vehicles (UAVs).

  4. Energy signature analysis: Radar for energy managers

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, L.

    1998-07-01

    Energy Signature Analysis (ESA) acts as a noise filter, to enhance usefulness of energy data. It provides vital feedback on operating and maintenance (O{ampersand}M) consistency and strategies, trends, and on conservation changes to facilities and equipment. Energy and temperatures characterize building performance, Energy use drivers fall in one of two groups: (1) weather and inside temperature, or (2) building characteristics, occupancy, and O and M practices. ESA weather-normalizes with delta T, and uses optimal smoothing to minimize weather, occupancy, and thermostat-driven scatter in energy use. The remaining variability arises from causes of great interest--changes in building characteristics, occupancy patterns, and O and M practices. Energy use rate is plotted versus coincident delta T, for sequenced typical weeks. When nothing but weather changes, consistently managed buildings show low scatter; r{sup 2} for regular occupancy is often 0.96 or better. Efficiency requires consistency; energy use should only change with weather and thermostat settings. Inconsistent management or equipment faults cause scatter, outliers, or an uptrend to alert management. Improved consistence reduces scatter. Worthwhile retrofits, HVAC tuning, and improved management strategies lower the curve. Important changes show merit in a week. High scatter cripples purely statistical uses of building energy data. For ESA, outliers are chances to find inconsistency and behaviors to avoid (high outliers) or foster (low outliers). Area-normalized ESA permits comparing facilities with different size or weather. Model output for new buildings, recast in ESA format, can help track building commissioning or give modelers feedback. Example ESAs use hourly total energy, outside and sampled inside temperatures. Problems found are investigated using hourly HVAC and baseload data. Baseload and HVAC loadshapes show peak-shaving, shut-down and tuning opportunities. New weekly data points show results

  5. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-06-01

    U.S. and China are the world’s top two economics. Together they consumed one-third of the world’s primary energy. It is an unprecedented opportunity and challenge for governments, researchers and industries in both countries to join together to address energy issues and global climate change. Such joint collaboration has huge potential in creating new jobs in energy technologies and services. Buildings in the US and China consumed about 40% and 25% of the primary energy in both countries in 2010 respectively. Worldwide, the building sector is the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas emission. Better understanding and improving the energy performance of buildings is a critical step towards sustainable development and mitigation of global climate change. This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

  6. Acquisition of building geometry in the simulation of energy performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    2001-06-28

    Building geometry is essential to any simulation of building performance. This paper examines the importing of building geometry into simulation of energy performance from the users' point of view. It lists performance requirements for graphic user interfaces that input building geometry, and discusses the basic options in moving from two- to three-dimensional definition of geometry and the ways to import that geometry into energy simulation. The obvious answer lies in software interoperability. With the BLIS group of interoperable software one can interactively import building geometry from CAD into EnergyPlus and dramatically reduce the effort otherwise needed for manual input.The resulting savings may greatly increase the value obtained from simulation, the number of projects in which energy performance simulation is used, and expedite decision making in the design process.

  7. Numerical analysis of applied magnetic field dependence in Malmberg-Penning Trap for compact simulator of energy driver in heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Park, Y.; Soga, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, Nob

    2016-05-01

    To simulate a pulse compression process of space charge dominated beams in heavy ion fusion, we have demonstrated a multi-particle numerical simulation as an equivalent beam using the Malmberg-Penning trap device. The results show that both transverse and longitudinal velocities as a function of external magnetic field strength are increasing during the longitudinal compression. The influence of space-charge effect, which is related to the external magnetic field, was observed as the increase of high velocity particles at the weak external magnetic field.

  8. Strategic Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    NREL complements its scientific research with high-quality, credible, technology-neutral, objective analysis that informs policy and investment decisions as renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies move from innovation through integration. This sheet highlights NREL's analytical capabilities and achievements.

  9. GEANT4 simulations for low energy proton computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Milhoretto, Edney; Schelin, Hugo R; Setti, João A P; Denyak, Valery; Paschuk, Sergei A; Evseev, Ivan G; de Assis, Joaquim T; Yevseyeva, O; Lopes, Ricardo T; Vinagre Filho, Ubirajara M

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the recent results of computer simulations for the low energy proton beam tomographic scanner installed at the cyclotron CV-28 of IEN/CNEN. New computer simulations were performed in order to adjust the parameters of previous simulation within the first experimental results and to understand some specific effects that affected the form of the final proton energy spectra. To do this, the energy and angular spread of the initial proton beam were added, and the virtual phantom geometry was specified more accurately in relation to the real one. As a result, a more realistic view on the measurements was achieved.

  10. National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Berscheid, Alan P.

    2012-07-30

    National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) mission is to: (1) Improve the understanding, preparation, and mitigation of the consequences of infrastructure disruption; (2) Provide a common, comprehensive view of U.S. infrastructure and its response to disruptions - Scale & resolution appropriate to the issues and All threats; and (3) Built an operations-tested DHS capability to respond quickly to urgent infrastructure protection issues.

  11. Energy simulation and optimization for a small commercial building through Modelica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Bryan

    Small commercial buildings make up the majority of buildings in the United States. Energy consumed by these buildings is expected to drastically increase in the next few decades, with a large percentage of the energy consumed attributed to cooling systems. This work presents the simulation and optimization of a thermostat schedule to minimize energy consumption in a small commercial building test bed during the cooling season. The simulation occurs through the use of the multi-engineering domain Dymola environment based on the Modelica open source programming language and is optimized with the Java based optimization program GenOpt. The simulation uses both physically based modeling utilizing heat transfer principles for the building and regression analysis for energy consumption. GenOpt is dynamically coupled to Dymola through various interface files. There are very few studies that have coupled GenOpt to a building simulation program and even fewer studies have used Dymola for building simulation as extensively as the work presented here. The work presented proves Dymola as a viable alternative to other building simulation programs such as EnergyPlus and MatLab. The model developed is used to simulate the energy consumption of a test bed, a commissioned real world small commercial building, while maintaining indoor thermal comfort. Potential applications include smart or intelligent building systems, predictive simulation of small commercial buildings, and building diagnostics.

  12. Home energy rating system building energy simulation test (HERS BESTEST). Volume 2, Tier 1 and Tier 2 tests reference results

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    1995-11-01

    The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Building Energy Simulation Test (BESTEST) is a method for evaluating the credibility of software used by HERS to model energy use in buildings. The method provides the technical foundation for ''certification of the technical accuracy of building energy analysis tools used to determine energy efficiency ratings,'' as called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Title I, Subtitle A, Section 102, Title II, Part 6, Section 271). Certification is accomplished with a uniform set of test cases that Facilitate the comparison of a software tool with several of the best public-domain, state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs available in the United States. The HERS BESTEST work is divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the test case specifications and is a user's manual for anyone wishing to test a computer program. Volume 2 contains the reference results and suggestions for accrediting agencies on how to use and interpret the results.

  13. Shape analysis of simulated breast anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contijoch, Francisco; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution 3D breast imaging, namely, digital breast tomosynthesis and dedicated breast CT, have enabled detailed analysis of the shape and distribution of anatomical structures in the breast. Such analysis is critically important, since the projections of breast anatomical structures make up the parenchymal pattern in clinical images which can mask the existing abnormalities or introduce false alarms; the parenchymal pattern is also correlated with the risk of cancer. As a first step towards the shape analysis of anatomical structures in the breast, we have analyzed an anthropomorphic software breast phantom. The phantom generation is based upon the recursive splitting of the phantom volume using octrees, which produces irregularly shaped tissue compartments, qualitatively mimicking the breast anatomy. The shape analysis was performed by fitting ellipsoids to the simulated tissue compartments. The ellipsoidal semi-axes were calculated by matching the moments of inertia of each individual compartment and of an ellipsoid. The distribution of Dice coefficients, measuring volumetric overlap between the compartment and the corresponding ellipsoid, as well as the distribution of aspect ratios, measuring relative orientations of the ellipsoids, were used to characterize various classes of phantoms with qualitatively distinctive appearance. A comparison between input parameters for phantom generation and the properties of fitted ellipsoids indicated the high level of user control in the design of software breast phantoms. The proposed shape analysis could be extended to clinical breast images, and used to inform the selection of simulation parameters for improved realism.

  14. Materials, Chemistry, and Simulation for Future Energy Technology.

    PubMed

    Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Special Issue: The Future of Energy. The science and engineering of clean energy now is becoming a multidisciplinary area, typically when new materials, chemistry, or mechanisms are met. "Trial and error" is the past. Exploration of new concepts for future clean energy can be accomplished through computer-aided materials design and reaction simulation, thanks to innovations in information technologies. This special issue, a fruit of the Energy Future Conference organized by UNSW Australia, has compiled some excellent examples of such approaches.

  15. Teaching a Model-based Climatology Using Energy Balance Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, David

    1981-01-01

    After outlining the difficulties of teaching climatology within an undergraduate geography curriculum, the author describes and evaluates the use of a computer assisted simulation to model surface energy balance and the effects of land use changes on local climate. (AM)

  16. Kinetic energy of rainfall simulation nozzles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different spray nozzles are used frequently to simulate natural rain for soil erosion and chemical transport, particularly phosphorous (P), studies. Oscillating VeeJet nozzles are used mostly in soil erosion research while constant spray FullJet nozzles are commonly used for P transport. Several ch...

  17. Observationally-Motivated Analysis of Simulated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, M. S.; Macfarlane, B. A.; Gibson, B. K.

    The spatial and temporal relationships between stellar age, kinematics, and chemistry are a fundamental tool for uncovering the physics driving galaxy formation and evolution. Observationally, these trends are derived using carefully selected samples isolated via the application of appropriate magnitude, colour, and gravity selection functions of individual stars; conversely, the analysis of chemodynamical simulations of galaxies has traditionally been restricted to the age, metallicity, and kinematics of 'composite' stellar particles comprised of open cluster-mass simple stellar populations. As we enter the Gaia era, it is crucial that this approach changes, with simulations confronting data in a manner which better mimics the methodology employed by observers. Here, we use the SynCMD synthetic stellar populations tool to analyse the metallicity distribution function of a Milky Way-like simulated galaxy, employing an apparent magnitude plus gravity selection function similar to that employed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE); we compare such an observationally-motivated approach with that traditionally adopted - i.e., spatial cuts alone - in order to illustrate the point that how one analyses a simulation can be, in some cases, just as important as the underlying sub-grid physics employed.

  18. Simulation Toolkit for Renewable Energy Advanced Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Scott; Kemper, Travis; Larsen, Ross; Graf, Peter

    2013-11-13

    STREAMM is a collection of python classes and scripts that enables and eases the setup of input files and configuration files for simulations of advanced energy materials. The core STREAMM python classes provide a general framework for storing, manipulating and analyzing atomic/molecular coordinates to be used in quantum chemistry and classical molecular dynamics simulations of soft materials systems. The design focuses on enabling the interoperability of materials simulation codes such as GROMACS, LAMMPS and Gaussian.

  19. Isentropic Analysis of a Simulated Hurricane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Pauluis, Olivier; Zhang, Fuqing

    2016-01-01

    Hurricanes, like many other atmospheric flows, are associated with turbulent motions over a wide range of scales. Here the authors adapt a new technique based on the isentropic analysis of convective motions to study the thermodynamic structure of the overturning circulation in hurricane simulations. This approach separates the vertical mass transport in terms of the equivalent potential temperature of air parcels. In doing so, one separates the rising air parcels at high entropy from the subsiding air at low entropy. This technique filters out oscillatory motions associated with gravity waves and separates convective overturning from the secondary circulation. This approach is applied here to study the flow of an idealized hurricane simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. The isentropic circulation for a hurricane exhibits similar characteristics to that of moist convection, with a maximum mass transport near the surface associated with a shallow convection and entrainment. There are also important differences. For instance, ascent in the eyewall can be readily identified in the isentropic analysis as an upward mass flux of air with unusually high equivalent potential temperature. The isentropic circulation is further compared here to the Eulerian secondary circulation of the simulated hurricane to show that the mass transport in the isentropic circulation is much larger than the one in secondary circulation. This difference can be directly attributed to the mass transport by convection in the outer rainband and confirms that, even for a strongly organized flow like a hurricane, most of the atmospheric overturning is tied to the smaller scales.

  20. NREL Improves Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a new test procedure to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market. The Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) is a test procedure that enables software developers to evaluate the performance of their audit tools in modeling energy use and savings in existing homes when utility bills are available for model calibration. Similar to NREL's previous energy analysis tests, such as HERS BESTEST and other BESTEST suites included in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, BESTEST-EX compares software simulation findings to reference results generated with state-of-the-art simulation tools such as EnergyPlus, SUNREL, and DOE-2.1E. The BESTEST-EX methodology: (1) Tests software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensures building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantifies impacts of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX includes building physics and utility bill calibration test cases. The diagram illustrates the utility bill calibration test cases. Participants are given input ranges and synthetic utility bills. Software tools use the utility bills to calibrate key model inputs and predict energy savings for the retrofit cases. Participant energy savings predictions using calibrated models are compared to NREL predictions using state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs.

  1. Simulation for analysis and control of superplastic forming. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Aramayo, G.A.; Simunovic, S.; Ludtka, G.M.; Khaleel, M.; Johnson, K.I.; Smith, M.T.; Van Arsdale, G.L.; Lavender, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    A joint study was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy-Lightweight Materials (DOE-LWM) Program. the purpose of the study was to assess and benchmark the current modeling capabilities with respect to accuracy of predictions and simulation time. Two modeling capabilities with respect to accuracy of predictions and simulation time. Two simulation platforms were considered in this study, which included the LS-DYNA3D code installed on ORNL`s high- performance computers and the finite element code MARC used at PNL. both ORNL and PNL performed superplastic forming (SPF) analysis on a standard butter-tray geometry, which was defined by PNL, to better understand the capabilities of the respective models. The specific geometry was selected and formed at PNL, and the experimental results, such as forming time and thickness at specific locations, were provided for comparisons with numerical predictions. Furthermore, comparisons between the ORNL simulation results, using elasto-plastic analysis, and PNL`s results, using rigid-plastic flow analysis, were performed.

  2. Simulated Patient Studies: An Ethical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Karin V; Miller, Franklin G

    2012-01-01

    Context In connection with health care reform, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services commissioned a “mystery shopper,” or simulated patient study, to measure access to primary care. But the study was shelved because of public controversy over “government spying” on doctors. Opponents of the study also raised ethical concerns about the use of deception with human subjects without soliciting their informed consent. Methods We undertook an ethical analysis of the use of simulated patient techniques in health services research, with a particular focus on research measuring access to care. Using a case study, we explored relevant methodological considerations and ethical principles relating to deceptive research without informed consent, as well as U.S. federal regulations permitting exceptions to consent. Findings Several relevant considerations both favor and oppose soliciting consent for simulated patient studies. Making research participation conditional on informed consent protects the autonomy of research subjects and shields them from unreasonable exposure to research risks. However, scientific validity is also an important ethical principle of human subjects research, as the net risks to subjects must be justified by the value to society of the knowledge to be gained. The use of simulated patients to monitor access is a naturalistic and scientifically sound experimental design that can answer important policy-relevant questions, with minimal risks to human subjects. As interaction between researchers and subjects increases, however, so does the need for consent. Conclusions As long as adequate protections of confidentiality of research data are in place, minimally intrusive simulated patient research that gathers policy-relevant data on the health system without the consent of individuals working in that system can be ethically justified when the risks and burdens to research subjects are minimal and the research has the potential to generate

  3. Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benna, Mehdi; Nolan, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Simulator (SAMSIM) is a numerical model dedicated to plan and validate operations of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the surface of Mars. The SAM instrument suite, currently operating on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), is an analytical laboratory designed to investigate the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatiles extracted from solid samples. SAMSIM was developed using Matlab and Simulink libraries of MathWorks Inc. to provide MSL mission planners with accurate predictions of the instrument electrical, thermal, mechanical, and fluid responses to scripted commands. This tool is a first example of a multi-purpose, full-scale numerical modeling of a flight instrument with the purpose of supplementing or even eliminating entirely the need for a hardware engineer model during instrument development and operation. SAMSIM simulates the complex interactions that occur between the instrument Command and Data Handling unit (C&DH) and all subsystems during the execution of experiment sequences. A typical SAM experiment takes many hours to complete and involves hundreds of components. During the simulation, the electrical, mechanical, thermal, and gas dynamics states of each hardware component are accurately modeled and propagated within the simulation environment at faster than real time. This allows the simulation, in just a few minutes, of experiment sequences that takes many hours to execute on the real instrument. The SAMSIM model is divided into five distinct but interacting modules: software, mechanical, thermal, gas flow, and electrical modules. The software module simulates the instrument C&DH by executing a customized version of the instrument flight software in a Matlab environment. The inputs and outputs to this synthetic C&DH are mapped to virtual sensors and command lines that mimic in their structure and connectivity the layout of the instrument harnesses. This module executes

  4. Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2012-11-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  5. Institutional analysis for energy policy

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, F.A.; Cole, R.J.

    1980-07-01

    This report summarizes principles, techniques, and other information for doing institutional analyses in the area of energy policy. The report was prepared to support DOE's Regional Issues Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program. RIIA identifies environmental, health, safety, socioeconomic, and institutional issues that could accompany hypothetical future scenarios for energy consumption and production on a regional basis. Chapter 1 provides some theoretical grounding in institutional analysis. Chapter 2 provides information on constructing institutional maps of the processes for bringing on line energy technologies and facilities contemplated in RIIA scenarios. Chapter 3 assesses the institutional constraints, opportunities, and impacts that affect whether these technologies and facilities would in fact be developed. Chapters 4 and 5 show how institutional analysis can support use of exercises such as RIIA in planning institutional change and making energy policy choices.

  6. Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 100 Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) (PC database for purchase)   This database has been designed to facilitate quantitative interpretation of Auger-electron and X-ray photoelectron spectra and to improve the accuracy of quantitation in routine analysis. The database contains all physical data needed to perform quantitative interpretation of an electron spectrum for a thin-film specimen of given composition. A simulation module provides an estimate of peak intensities as well as the energy and angular distributions of the emitted electron flux.

  7. Guidelines for the analysis of free energy calculations

    PubMed Central

    Klimovich, Pavel V.; Shirts, Michael R.; Mobley, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show considerable promise for applications ranging from drug discovery to prediction of physical properties and structure-function studies. But these calculations are still difficult and tedious to analyze, and best practices for analysis are not well defined or propagated. Essentially, each group analyzing these calculations needs to decide how to conduct the analysis and, usually, develop its own analysis tools. Here, we review and recommend best practices for analysis yielding reliable free energies from molecular simulations. Additionally, we provide a Python tool, alchemical–analysis.py, freely available on GitHub at https://github.com/choderalab/pymbar–examples, that implements the analysis practices reviewed here for several reference simulation packages, which can be adapted to handle data from other packages. Both this review and the tool covers analysis of alchemical calculations generally, including free energy estimates via both thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation-based estimators. Our Python tool also handles output from multiple types of free energy calculations, including expanded ensemble and Hamiltonian replica exchange, as well as standard fixed ensemble calculations. We also survey a range of statistical and graphical ways of assessing the quality of the data and free energy estimates, and provide prototypes of these in our tool. We hope these tools and discussion will serve as a foundation for more standardization of and agreement on best practices for analysis of free energy calculations. PMID:25808134

  8. Guidelines for the analysis of free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Klimovich, Pavel V; Shirts, Michael R; Mobley, David L

    2015-05-01

    Free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations show considerable promise for applications ranging from drug discovery to prediction of physical properties and structure-function studies. But these calculations are still difficult and tedious to analyze, and best practices for analysis are not well defined or propagated. Essentially, each group analyzing these calculations needs to decide how to conduct the analysis and, usually, develop its own analysis tools. Here, we review and recommend best practices for analysis yielding reliable free energies from molecular simulations. Additionally, we provide a Python tool, alchemical-analysis.py, freely available on GitHub as part of the pymbar package (located at http://github.com/choderalab/pymbar), that implements the analysis practices reviewed here for several reference simulation packages, which can be adapted to handle data from other packages. Both this review and the tool covers analysis of alchemical calculations generally, including free energy estimates via both thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation-based estimators. Our Python tool also handles output from multiple types of free energy calculations, including expanded ensemble and Hamiltonian replica exchange, as well as standard fixed ensemble calculations. We also survey a range of statistical and graphical ways of assessing the quality of the data and free energy estimates, and provide prototypes of these in our tool. We hope this tool and discussion will serve as a foundation for more standardization of and agreement on best practices for analysis of free energy calculations.

  9. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$ and $^{12}C$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.

  10. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed formore » $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $$\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$$ and $$^{12}C$$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.« less

  11. Energy Simulations of Commercial Buildings for DOE’s Standards Development Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Sriram; Winiarski, David W.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Jarnagin, Ronald E.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been mandated by the U.S. Congress to promulgate energy conservation standards for certain commercial and industrial equipment [Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 United States Code 6311 et seq. (EPCA)], in particular specific classes of commercial space conditioning and service water heating equipment. In support of the DOE rulemakings that help establish these standards, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted energy simulation analysis to develop energy consumption characteristics and energy load profiles for commercial buildings. DOE uses life-cycle cost effectiveness as a key criterion in establishing energy conservation standards. In the U.S., however, electrical energy costs for commercial buildings can vary by time of day or year, and peak electrical demand can play a significant role in determining the total cost of energy for a commercial building. Hence, it is important to understand not only total electrical energy consumption but also building electric load profiles during the year.

  12. First assessment of continental energy storage in CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta-Valero, Francisco José; García-García, Almudena; Beltrami, Hugo; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2016-05-01

    Although much of the energy gained by the climate system over the last century has been stored in the oceans, continental energy storage remains important to estimate the Earth's energy imbalance and also because crucial positive climate feedback processes such as soil carbon and permafrost stability depend on continental energy storage. Here for the first time, 32 general circulation model simulations from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are examined to assess their ability to characterize the continental energy storage. Results display a consistently lower magnitude of continental energy storage in CMIP5 simulations than the estimates from geothermal data. A large range in heat storage is present across the model ensemble, which is largely explained by the substantial differences in the bottom boundary depths used in each land surface component.

  13. Sampling errors in free energy simulations of small molecules in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Pomès, Régis

    2016-10-01

    Free energy simulations are a powerful tool for evaluating the interactions of molecular solutes with lipid bilayers as mimetics of cellular membranes. However, these simulations are frequently hindered by systematic sampling errors. This review highlights recent progress in computing free energy profiles for inserting molecular solutes into lipid bilayers. Particular emphasis is placed on a systematic analysis of the free energy profiles, identifying the sources of sampling errors that reduce computational efficiency, and highlighting methodological advances that may alleviate sampling deficiencies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  14. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations. Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.

  15. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations.more » Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.« less

  16. Simulating earth core using high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Brambrink, E.; Nourou, A.; Ravasio, A.; Wei, H. G.; Vinci, T.; Mazevet, S.; Occelli, F.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; De Resseguier, T.; Lescoute, E.

    2010-06-01

    The melting curve and equation of state of iron and iron alloys at the inner core boundary (330 GPa, about 5000 K) are still unknown. This severally limits current modelling of earth constitution and dynamics. In this paper, recent numerical and experimental studies performed using laser generated isentropic ramp compression on iron and aluminium samples are presented. On the experimental side, direct laser ramp compression was achieved on iron. Time-resolved measurements were compared to hydrodynamic computations accounting for the polymorphic phase transformations. Before studying iron that presents a solid-solid phase transition along the isentropic path, we studied the time evolution of the atomic structure of aluminium using molecular dynamics simulations at the same length and time scales as the experiment. Like many metals, aluminium presents an elasto-plastic phase transition and we studied, using this microscopic approach, the effect of plasticity on the backward integration technique used to extract equation of state information from the experimental VISAR signal.

  17. Sustain: An experimental test bed for building energy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Donald; Pratt, Kevin; Hencey, Brandon; Jones, Nathaniel; Schumann, Lars; Dobbs, Justin; Dong, Zhao; Bosworth, David; Walter, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Current building energy simulation technology requires extensive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, substantial computational time for accurate simulations, and generates data in formats that make results difficult to interpret. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. This paper describes a novel test bed environment which offers an interactive graphical interface, provides access to simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphic visualization methods for the interpretation of simulation results. Its modular structure makes it suitable for use in early stage building design, for use as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and for use as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are illustrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules.

  18. Hybrid Particle Code Simulations of Mars: The Energy Budget.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, S. H.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The results of our latest hybrid particle simulations using the HALFSHEL code are discussed. The presentation will address the energy budget of the solar wind interaction with Mars. The simulations produce loss rates that are very consistent with measured data, Brecht and Ledvina [2014], therefore inspection of the details of the interaction is now warranted. This paper will address the relationship between the energy flowing into the planet and the energy flowing away from the planet. The partition of the energy between fields, and individual ion species will be addressed as well as the amount of energy deposited in the neutral atmosphere by incoming solar wind plasma and during the process of ion loss caused by acceleration via electric fields. Brecht, S.H. and S.A. Ledvina (2014), "The role of the Martian crustal magnetic fields in controlling ionospheric loss," Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 5340-5346, doi:10.1002/2014GL060841.

  19. Simulation and Non-Simulation Based Human Reliability Analysis Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Shirley, Rachel Elizabeth; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Mandelli, Diego

    2014-12-01

    Part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway develops approaches to estimating and managing safety margins. RISMC simulations pair deterministic plant physics models with probabilistic risk models. As human interactions are an essential element of plant risk, it is necessary to integrate human actions into the RISMC risk model. In this report, we review simulation-based and non-simulation-based human reliability assessment (HRA) methods. Chapter 2 surveys non-simulation-based HRA methods. Conventional HRA methods target static Probabilistic Risk Assessments for Level 1 events. These methods would require significant modification for use in dynamic simulation of Level 2 and Level 3 events. Chapter 3 is a review of human performance models. A variety of methods and models simulate dynamic human performance; however, most of these human performance models were developed outside the risk domain and have not been used for HRA. The exception is the ADS-IDAC model, which can be thought of as a virtual operator program. This model is resource-intensive but provides a detailed model of every operator action in a given scenario, along with models of numerous factors that can influence operator performance. Finally, Chapter 4 reviews the treatment of timing of operator actions in HRA methods. This chapter is an example of one of the critical gaps between existing HRA methods and the needs of dynamic HRA. This report summarizes the foundational information needed to develop a feasible approach to modeling human interactions in the RISMC simulations.

  20. Transport Energy Impact Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.

    2015-05-13

    Presented at the Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Spring 2015 Symposium on May 13, 2015, this presentation by Jeff Gonder of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provides information about NREL's transportation energy impact analysis of connected and automated vehicles.

  1. Simulation models of ecological economics developed with energy language methods

    SciTech Connect

    Odum, H.T. . Dept. of Environmental Engineering Sciences)

    1989-08-01

    The energy-systems language method of modelling and simulation, because of its energy constrained rules, is a means for transferring homologous concepts between levels of the hierarchies of nature. Mathematics of self-organization may justify emulation as the simulation of systems overview without details. Here, these methods are applied to the new fields of ecological economics and ecological engineering . Since the vitality of national economics depends on the symbiotic coupling of environmental resources and human economic behavior, the energy language is adapted to develop overview models of nations relevant to public policies. An overview model of a developing nation is given as an example with simulations for alternative policies. Maximum economic vitality was obtained with trade for external resources, but ultimate economic carrying capacity and standard of living was determined by indigenous resources, optimum utilization and absence of foreign debt.

  2. Materials, Chemistry, and Simulation for Future Energy Technology.

    PubMed

    Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Special Issue: The Future of Energy. The science and engineering of clean energy now is becoming a multidisciplinary area, typically when new materials, chemistry, or mechanisms are met. "Trial and error" is the past. Exploration of new concepts for future clean energy can be accomplished through computer-aided materials design and reaction simulation, thanks to innovations in information technologies. This special issue, a fruit of the Energy Future Conference organized by UNSW Australia, has compiled some excellent examples of such approaches. PMID:26331374

  3. Simulation and Analysis of Launch Teams (SALT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A SALT effort was initiated in late 2005 with seed funding from the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance Human Factors organization. Its objectives included demonstrating human behavior and performance modeling and simulation technologies for launch team analysis, training, and evaluation. The goal of the research is to improve future NASA operations and training. The project employed an iterative approach, with the first iteration focusing on the last 70 minutes of a nominal-case Space Shuttle countdown, the second iteration focusing on aborts and launch commit criteria violations, the third iteration focusing on Ares I-X communications, and the fourth iteration focusing on Ares I-X Firing Room configurations. SALT applied new commercial off-the-shelf technologies from industry and the Department of Defense in the spaceport domain.

  4. Contribution to solving the energy crisis - Simulating the prospects for low cost energy through silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kran, A.

    1978-01-01

    PECAN (Photovoltaic Energy Conversion Analysis) is a highly interactive decision analysis and support system. It simulates the prospects for widespread use of solar cells for the generation of electrical power. PECAN consists of a set of integrated APL functions for evaluating the potential of terrestrial photovoltaics. Specifically, the system is a deterministic simulator, which translates present and future manufacturing technology into economic and financial terms, using the production unit concept. It guides solar cell development in three areas: tactical decision making, strategic planning, and the formulation of alternative options.

  5. Simulation of radiation energy release in air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Christian; Erdmann, Martin; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence of the geomagnetic emission scales quadratically with the energy in the electromagnetic component of the air shower with a second-order dependence on the atmospheric density at the position of the maximum shower development Xmax. In a measurement where Xmax is not accessible, this second order dependence can be approximated using the zenith angle of the incoming direction of the air shower with only a minor loss in accuracy. Our method results in an intrinsic uncertainty of 4% in the determination of the energy in the electromagnetic air-shower component, which is well below current experimental uncertainties.

  6. NREL Develops Diagnostic Test Cases to Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations in order to achieve more accurate energy use and savings predictions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Residential and Commercial Buildings research groups developed a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations. Eight test cases were developed to test surface conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes in building energy simulation programs. These algorithms are used to predict energy flow through external opaque surfaces such as walls, ceilings, and floors. The test cases consist of analytical and vetted numerical heat transfer solutions that have been available for decades, which increases confidence in test results. NREL researchers adapted these solutions for comparisons with building energy simulation results. Testing the new cases with EnergyPlus identified issues with the conduction finite difference (CondFD) heat transfer algorithm in versions 5 and 6. NREL researchers resolved these issues for EnergyPlus version 7. The new test cases will help users and developers of EnergyPlus and other building energy tools to identify and fix problems associated with solid conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes and their boundary conditions. In the long term, improvements to software algorithms will result in more accurate energy use and savings predictions. NREL researchers plan to document the set of test cases and make them available for future consideration by validation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 140: Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs. EnergyPlus users will also have access to the improved CondFD model in version 7 after its next scheduled release.

  7. Plasma simulations of emission line regions in high energy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.

    This dissertation focuses on understanding two different, but in each case extreme, astrophysical environments: the Crab Nebula and emission line galaxies. These relatively local objects are well constrained by observations and are test cases of phenomena seen at high-z where detailed observations are rare. The tool used to study these objects is the plasma simulation code known as Cloudy. The introduction provides a brief summary of relevant physical concepts in nebular astrophysics and presents the basic features and assumptions of Cloudy. The first object investigated with Cloudy, the Crab Nebula, is a nearby supernova remnant that previously has been subject to photoionization modeling to reproduce the ionized emission seen in the nebula's filamentary structure. However, there are still several unanswered questions: (1) What excites the H2 emitting gas? (2) How much mass is in the molecular component? (3) How did the H2 form? (4) What is nature of the dust grains? A large suite of observations including long slit optical and NIR spectra over ionized, neutral and molecular gas in addition to HST and NIR ground based images constrain a particularly bright region of H2 emission, Knot 51, which exhibits a high excitation temperature of ˜3000 K. Simulations of K51 revealed that only a trace amount of H2 is needed to reproduce the observed emission and that H2 forms through an uncommon nebular process known as associative detachment. The final chapters of this dissertation focus on interpreting the narrow line region (NLR) in low-z emission line galaxies selected by a novel technique known as mean field independent component analysis (MFICA). A mixture of starlight and radiation from an AGN excites the gas present in galaxies. MFICA separates galaxies over a wide range of ionization into subsets of pure AGN and pure star forming galaxies allowing simulations to reveal the properties responsible for their observed variation in ionization. Emission line ratios can

  8. On energy and momentum conservation in particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations are a productive and valued tool for the study of nonlinear plasma phenomena, yet there are basic questions about the simulation methods themselves that remain unanswered. Here we study energy and momentum conservation by PIC. We employ both analysis and simulations of one-dimensional, electrostatic plasmas to understand why PIC simulations are either energy or momentum conserving but not both, what role a numerical stability plays in non-conservation, and how errors in conservation scale with the numerical parameters. Conserving both momentum and energy make it possible to model problems such as Jeans'-type equilibria. Avoiding numerical instability is useful, but so is being able to identify when its effect on the results may be important. Designing simulations to achieve the best possible accuracy with the least expenditure of effort requires results on the scaling of error with the numerical parameters. Our results identify the central role of Gauss' law in conservation of both momentum and energy, and the significant differences in numerical stability and error scaling between energy-conserving and momentum-conserving simulations.

  9. High energy beam lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Hartley, J.; Cowan, T.E.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a positron lifetime defect analysis capability based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational with a 60 mCi {sup 22}Na source providing a current of 7 10{sup 5} positrons per second. Lifetime data are derived from a thin plastic transmission detector providing an implantation time and a BaF{sub 2} detector to determine the annihilation time. Positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick sample specimens at counting rates in excess of 2000 per second. The instrument is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for in situ measurements.

  10. Electromyographic analysis on a windsurfing simulator

    PubMed Central

    Campillo, Philippe; Leszczynski, Barbara; Marthe, Cédric; Hespel, Jean Michel

    2007-01-01

    Recent technical innovations in windsurfing have been concentrated on the evolution of the sails and the board. It is only recently that manufacturers have become interested in the wishbones which have evolved becoming thinner and lighter than in the past. A group of six experienced windsurfers participated in an experiment on a land based windsurfing simulator. The goal of the study was to analyze the muscular force used for different techniques for holding onto the wishbone. The test consisted in recording the global electromyographic activity of several muscles on the forearm using surface electrodes. There were two different wind force conditions possible with the simulator: medium (15 kg) and strong (25 kg). Three different wishbone diameters were tested (28, 30 and 32 mm). Four different hand positions on the wishbone were analyzed: leading hand and/or following hand in pronation and/or supination. The electrical muscular activity obtained varied significantly (p < 0.05) depending on the type of grip and according to the diameter of the wishbone. The position with the two hands in supination on a wishbone of 28 mm in diameter was the most economical in muscular terms, notably the flexions of the forearm. The confirmation of the results should lead windsurfers to reconsider the positioning of the wishbone and the adapted posture to waste the least amount of energy possible. Key pointsFemale athletes landed with increased knee valgus and VGRF which may predispose them to ACL injury.Fatigue elicited a similar response in male and female athletes.The effectiveness of sports injury prevention programs may improve by focusing on teaching females to land softer and with less knee valgus. PMID:24149235

  11. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed

  12. Analysis of five simulated straw harvest scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stephen, Jamie; Stumborg, Mark; Fenton, James; Mani, Sudhagar

    2008-01-01

    Almost 36 million tonnes (t) of cereal grains are harvested annually on more than 16 million hectares (ha) in Canada. The net straw production varies year by year depending upon weather patterns, crop fertility, soil conservation measures, harvest method, and plant variety. The net yield of straw, after discounting for soil conservation, averages approximately 2.5 dry (d)t ha-1. Efficient equipment is needed to collect and package the material as a feedstock for industrial applications. This paper investigates the costs, energy input, and emissions from power equipment used for harvesting straw. Five scenarios were investigated: (1) large square bales, (2) round bales, (3) large compacted stacks (loafs), (4) dried chops, and (5) wet chops. The baled or loafed biomass is stacked next to the farm. Dry chop is collected in a large pile and wet chop is ensiled. The baling and stacking cost was $21.47 dt-1 (dry tonne), with little difference between round and large square baling. Loafing was the cheapest option at $17.08 dt-1. Dry chop and piling was $23.90 dt-1 and wet chop followed by ensiling was $59.75 dt-1. A significant portion of the wet chop cost was in ensiling. Energy input and emissions were proportional to the costs for each system, except for loafing, which required more energy input than the baling systems. As a fraction of the energy content of biomass (roughly 16 GJ dt-1), the energy input ranged from 1.2% for baling to 3.2% for ensiling. Emissions from the power equipment ranged from 20.3 kg CO2e dt-1 to more than 40 kg CO2e dt-1. A sensitivity analysis on the effect of yield on collection costs showed that a 33% increase in yield reduced the cost by 20%. Similarly a sensitivity analysis on weather conditions showed that a 10oC cooler climate extended the harvest period by 5-10 days whereas a 10oC warmer climate shortened the harvest period by 2-3 days.

  13. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl H.

    1992-01-01

    Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA) is a method which is used to model linear dynamical systems with many participating modes. The AMA method was originally developed to show the relationship between statistical energy analysis (SEA) and classical modal analysis (CMA). In the limit of a large number of modes of a vibrating system, the classical modal analysis result can be shown to be equivalent to the statistical energy analysis result. As the CMA result evolves into the SEA result, a number of systematic assumptions are made. Most of these assumptions are based upon the supposition that the number of modes approaches infinity. It is for this reason that the term 'asymptotic' is used. AMA is the asymptotic result of taking the limit of CMA as the number of modes approaches infinity. AMA refers to any of the intermediate results between CMA and SEA, as well as the SEA result which is derived from CMA. The main advantage of the AMA method is that individual modal characteristics are not required in the model or computations. By contrast, CMA requires that each modal parameter be evaluated at each frequency. In the latter, contributions from each mode are computed and the final answer is obtained by summing over all the modes in the particular band of interest. AMA evaluates modal parameters only at their center frequency and does not sum the individual contributions from each mode in order to obtain a final result. The method is similar to SEA in this respect. However, SEA is only capable of obtaining spatial averages or means, as it is a statistical method. Since AMA is systematically derived from CMA, it can obtain local spatial information as well.

  14. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  15. Current work in energy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the work performed at Berkeley Lab most recently. One of the Labs accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of US Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US. This analysis is described and played a key role in shaping the US position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. The Labs participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. Described also is a study of leaking electricity, which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of US residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the report summarize results of research activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national Energy Star{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China.

  16. Practical Integration Approach and Whole Building Energy Simulation of Three Energy Efficient Building Technologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. P.; Zhivov, A.; Heron, D.; Deru, M.; Benne, K.

    2010-08-01

    Three technologies that have potential to save energy and improve sustainability of buildings are dedicated outdoor air systems, radiant heating and cooling systems and tighter building envelopes. To investigate the energy savings potential of these three technologies, whole building energy simulations were performed for a barracks facility and an administration facility in 15 U.S. climate zones and 16 international locations.

  17. SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS AND STRATEGIES FOR THE DARK ENERGY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J. P.; Kuhlmann, S.; Biswas, R.; Kovacs, E.; Crane, I.; Hufford, T.; Kessler, R.; Frieman, J. A.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Nugent, P.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Nichol, R. C.; Finley, D. A.; Marriner, J.; Reis, R. R. R.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mukherjee, P.; Parkinson, D.; Sako, M.; and others

    2012-07-10

    We present an analysis of supernova light curves simulated for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova search. The simulations employ a code suite that generates and fits realistic light curves in order to obtain distance modulus/redshift pairs that are passed to a cosmology fitter. We investigated several different survey strategies including field selection, supernova selection biases, and photometric redshift measurements. Using the results of this study, we chose a 30 deg{sup 2} search area in the griz filter set. We forecast (1) that this survey will provide a homogeneous sample of up to 4000 Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range 0.05

  18. Computer simulated building energy consumption for verification of energy conservation measures in network facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plankey, B.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program called ECPVER (Energy Consumption Program - Verification) was developed to simulate all energy loads for any number of buildings. The program computes simulated daily, monthly, and yearly energy consumption which can be compared with actual meter readings for the same time period. Such comparison can lead to validation of the model under a variety of conditions, which allows it to be used to predict future energy saving due to energy conservation measures. Predicted energy saving can then be compared with actual saving to verify the effectiveness of those energy conservation changes. This verification procedure is planned to be an important advancement in the Deep Space Network Energy Project, which seeks to reduce energy cost and consumption at all DSN Deep Space Stations.

  19. Walking in simulated reduced gravity: mechanical energy fluctuations and exchange.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T M; Tolani, N A; Kram, R

    1999-01-01

    Walking humans conserve mechanical and, presumably, metabolic energy with an inverted pendulum-like exchange of gravitational potential energy and horizontal kinetic energy. Walking in simulated reduced gravity involves a relatively high metabolic cost, suggesting that the inverted-pendulum mechanism is disrupted because of a mismatch of potential and kinetic energy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the fluctuations and exchange of mechanical energy of the center of mass at different combinations of velocity and simulated reduced gravity. Subjects walked with smaller fluctuations in horizontal velocity in lower gravity, such that the ratio of horizontal kinetic to gravitational potential energy fluctuations remained constant over a fourfold change in gravity. The amount of exchange, or percent recovery, at 1.00 m/s was not significantly different at 1.00, 0.75, and 0.50 G (average 64.4%), although it decreased to 48% at 0.25 G. As a result, the amount of work performed on the center of mass does not explain the relatively high metabolic cost of walking in simulated reduced gravity.

  20. Multiphysics Simulation in the Development of Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesarajah, Marco; Frey, Georg

    2016-03-01

    This contribution presents a model-based development process for thermoelectric energy harvesting systems. Such systems convert thermal energy into electrical energy and produce enough energy to supply low-power devices. Realizations require three main challenges to be solved: to guarantee optimal thermal connection of the thermoelectric generators, to find a good design for the energy harvesting system, and to find an optimal electrical connection. Therefore, a development process is presented here. The process is divided into different steps and supports the developer in finding an optimal thermoelectric energy harvesting system for a given heat source and given objectives (technical and economical). During the process, several steps are supported by simulation models. Based on developed model libraries in Modelica®/Dymola®, thermal, thermoelectrical, electrical, and control components can be modeled, integrated into different variants, and verified step by step before the system is physically built and finally validated. The process is illustrated by an example through all the steps.

  1. Hybrid Simulation Modeling to Estimate U.S. Energy Elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin-Stern, Adam C.

    This paper demonstrates how an U.S. application of CIMS, a technologically explicit and behaviourally realistic energy-economy simulation model which includes macro-economic feedbacks, can be used to derive estimates of elasticity of substitution (ESUB) and autonomous energy efficiency index (AEEI) parameters. The ability of economies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions depends on the potential for households and industry to decrease overall energy usage, and move from higher to lower emissions fuels. Energy economists commonly refer to ESUB estimates to understand the degree of responsiveness of various sectors of an economy, and use estimates to inform computable general equilibrium models used to study climate policies. Using CIMS, I have generated a set of future, 'pseudo-data' based on a series of simulations in which I vary energy and capital input prices over a wide range. I then used this data set to estimate the parameters for transcendental logarithmic production functions using regression techniques. From the production function parameter estimates, I calculated an array of elasticity of substitution values between input pairs. Additionally, this paper demonstrates how CIMS can be used to calculate price-independent changes in energy-efficiency in the form of the AEEI, by comparing energy consumption between technologically frozen and 'business as usual' simulations. The paper concludes with some ideas for model and methodological improvement, and how these might figure into future work in the estimation of ESUBs from CIMS. Keywords: Elasticity of substitution; hybrid energy-economy model; translog; autonomous energy efficiency index; rebound effect; fuel switching.

  2. A New Model to Simulate Energy Performance of VRF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Pang, Xiufeng; Schetrit, Oren; Wang, Liping; Kasahara, Shinichi; Yura, Yoshinori; Hinokuma, Ryohei

    2014-03-30

    This paper presents a new model to simulate energy performance of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems in heat pump operation mode (either cooling or heating is provided but not simultaneously). The main improvement of the new model is the introduction of the evaporating and condensing temperature in the indoor and outdoor unit capacity modifier functions. The independent variables in the capacity modifier functions of the existing VRF model in EnergyPlus are mainly room wet-bulb temperature and outdoor dry-bulb temperature in cooling mode and room dry-bulb temperature and outdoor wet-bulb temperature in heating mode. The new approach allows compliance with different specifications of each indoor unit so that the modeling accuracy is improved. The new VRF model was implemented in a custom version of EnergyPlus 7.2. This paper first describes the algorithm for the new VRF model, which is then used to simulate the energy performance of a VRF system in a Prototype House in California that complies with the requirements of Title 24 ? the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The VRF system performance is then compared with three other types of HVAC systems: the Title 24-2005 Baseline system, the traditional High Efficiency system, and the EnergyStar Heat Pump system in three typical California climates: Sunnyvale, Pasadena and Fresno. Calculated energy savings from the VRF systems are significant. The HVAC site energy savings range from 51 to 85percent, while the TDV (Time Dependent Valuation) energy savings range from 31 to 66percent compared to the Title 24 Baseline Systems across the three climates. The largest energy savings are in Fresno climate followed by Sunnyvale and Pasadena. The paper discusses various characteristics of the VRF systems contributing to the energy savings. It should be noted that these savings are calculated using the Title 24 prototype House D under standard operating conditions. Actual performance of the VRF systems for real

  3. Simplified building energy analysis tool for architects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaisuparasmikul, Pongsak

    applicable to the earliest stage of design, where more informed analysis of possible alternatives could yield the most benefit and the greatest cost savings both economic and environmental. This is where computer modeling and simulation can really lead to better and energy efficient buildings. Both apply to internal environment and human comfort, and environmental impact from surroundings.

  4. Simulation and Big Data Challenges in Tuning Building Energy Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan

    2013-01-01

    EnergyPlus is the flagship building energy simulation software used to model whole building energy consumption for residential and commercial establishments. A typical input to the program often has hundreds, sometimes thousands of parameters which are typically tweaked by a buildings expert to get it right . This process can sometimes take months. Autotune is an ongoing research effort employing machine learning techniques to automate the tuning of the input parameters for an EnergyPlus input description of a building. Even with automation, the computational challenge faced to run the tuning simulation ensemble is daunting and requires the use of supercomputers to make it tractable in time. In this proposal, we describe the scope of the problem, the technical challenges faced and overcome, the machine learning techniques developed and employed, and the software infrastructure developed/in development when taking the EnergyPlus engine, which was primarily designed to run on desktops, and scaling it to run on shared memory supercomputers (Nautilus) and distributed memory supercomputers (Frost and Titan). The parametric simulations produce data in the order of tens to a couple of hundred terabytes.We describe the approaches employed to streamline and reduce bottlenecks in the workflow for this data, which is subsequently being made available for the tuning effort as well as made available publicly for open-science.

  5. Electron Microburst Energy Dispersion Derived by Test Particle Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Parks, G. K.; Park, Y.; Tsurutani, B.

    2011-12-01

    Electron microbursts, energetic electron precipitation having duration less than 1 sec, have been thought to be generated by chorus wave and electron interactions. While the coincidence of chorus and microburst occurrence supports the wave-particle interaction theory, more crucial evidences have not been observed to explain the origin of microbursts. We think one of the observational evidences could be energy dispersion of microbursts. During chorus waves propagate along magnetic field, the resonance condition should be satisfied at different magnetic latitude for different energy electrons because chorus waves are coherent waves having narrow frequency band and electron microbursts have wide energy range, at least several hundreds KeV. If we observed electron microbursts at low altitude, the arrival time of different energy electrons should make unique energy dispersion structures. In order to observe the energy dispersion, we need a detector having fast time resolution and wide energy range. Our study is focused on defining the time resolution and energy range required to measure microburst energy dispersion. We performed test particles simulation interacting with simple coherent waves like chorus waves. By the wave-particle interaction, energetic electrons (test particles) changed pitch angles and some electrons were detected with energy dispersion at 600 km. We assumed a detector measuring microbursts at the altitude of 600 km. These results provide useful information in designing electron detectors for the future mission.

  6. Simulated galaxy interactions as probes of merger spectral energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars; Hayward, Christopher C.; Brassington, Nicola

    2014-04-10

    We present the first systematic comparison of ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of observed and simulated interacting galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey and probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters. We use 31 galaxies in 14 systems which have been observed with Herschel, Spitzer, GALEX, and 2MASS. We create a suite of GADGET-3 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies with stellar masses comparable to those in our sample of interacting galaxies. Photometry for the simulated systems is then calculated with the SUNRISE radiative transfer code for comparison with the observed systems. For most of the observed systems, one or more of the simulated SEDs match reasonably well. The best matches recover the infrared luminosity and the star formation rate of the observed systems, and the more massive systems preferentially match SEDs from simulations of more massive galaxies. The most morphologically distorted systems in our sample are best matched to the simulated SEDs that are close to coalescence, while less evolved systems match well with the SEDs over a wide range of interaction stages, suggesting that an SED alone is insufficient for identifying the interaction stage except during the most active phases in strongly interacting systems. This result is supported by our finding that the SEDs calculated for simulated systems vary little over the interaction sequence.

  7. Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) provides objective analysis and up-to-date data on global supply chains and manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Policymakers and industry leaders seek CEMAC insights to inform choices to promote economic growth and the transition to a clean energy economy.

  8. Protein thermostability calculations using alchemical free energy simulations.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Daniel; de Groot, Bert L

    2010-05-19

    Thermal stability of proteins is crucial for both biotechnological and therapeutic applications. Rational protein engineering therefore frequently aims at increasing thermal stability by introducing stabilizing mutations. The accurate prediction of the thermodynamic consequences caused by mutations, however, is highly challenging as thermal stability changes are caused by alterations in the free energy of folding. Growing computational power, however, increasingly allows us to use alchemical free energy simulations, such as free energy perturbation or thermodynamic integration, to calculate free energy differences with relatively high accuracy. In this article, we present an automated protocol for setting up alchemical free energy calculations for mutations of naturally occurring amino acids (except for proline) that allows an unprecedented, automated screening of large mutant libraries. To validate the developed protocol, we calculated thermodynamic stability differences for 109 mutations in the microbial Ribonuclease Barnase. The obtained quantitative agreement with experimental data illustrates the potential of the approach in protein engineering and design. PMID:20483340

  9. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl H.

    1988-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is defined by considering the asymptotic limit of Classical Modal Analysis, an approach called Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA). The general approach is described for both structural and acoustical systems. The theoretical foundation is presented for structural systems, and experimental verification is presented for a structural plate responding to a random force. Work accomplished subsequent to the grant initiation focusses on the acoustic response of an interior cavity (i.e., an aircraft or spacecraft fuselage) with a portion of the wall vibrating in a large number of structural modes. First results were presented at the ASME Winter Annual Meeting in December, 1987, and accepted for publication in the Journal of Vibration, Acoustics, Stress and Reliability in Design. It is shown that asymptotically as the number of acoustic modes excited becomes large, the pressure level in the cavity becomes uniform except at the cavity boundaries. However, the mean square pressure at the cavity corner, edge and wall is, respectively, 8, 4, and 2 times the value in the cavity interior. Also it is shown that when the portion of the wall which is vibrating is near a cavity corner or edge, the response is significantly higher.

  10. Co-Simulation of Building Energy and Control Systems with the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    2010-08-22

    This article describes the implementation of the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB). The BCVTB is a software environment that allows connecting different simulation programs to exchange data during the time integration, and that allows conducting hardware in the loop simulation. The software architecture is a modular design based on Ptolemy II, a software environment for design and analysis of heterogeneous systems. Ptolemy II provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run-time. The BCVTB provides additions to Ptolemy II that allow the run-time coupling of different simulation programs for data exchange, including EnergyPlus, MATLAB, Simulink and the Modelica modelling and simulation environment Dymola. The additions also allow executing system commands, such as a script that executes a Radiance simulation. In this article, the software architecture is presented and the mathematical model used to implement the co-simulation is discussed. The simulation program interface that the BCVTB provides is explained. The article concludes by presenting applications in which different state of the art simulation programs are linked for run-time data exchange. This link allows the use of the simulation program that is best suited for the particular problem to model building heat transfer, HVAC system dynamics and control algorithms, and to compute a solution to the coupled problem using co-simulation.

  11. Institute for Energy Analysis research report 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The Institute for Energy Analysis was established in 1974 to examine broad questions of energy policy. More specifically, it assesses energy policy and energy research and development options and analyzes alternative energy supply and demand projections from technical, economic, and social perspectives. The Institute focuses primarily on national energy issues, but it is also concerned with regional and international energy questions and their implications for solution of domestic energy problems. This report covers carbon dioxide, nuclear power, electric power; biological risk assesment; energy models and data analysis. (PSB)

  12. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H.R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  13. Finecasting for renewable energy with large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, Harmen; Verzijlbergh, Remco

    2016-04-01

    We present results of a single, continuous Large-Eddy Simulation of actual weather conditions during the timespan of a full year, made possible through recent computational developments (Schalkwijk et al, MWR, 2015). The simulation is coupled to a regional weather model in order to provide an LES dataset that is representative of the daily weather of the year 2012 around Cabauw, the Netherlands. This location is chosen such that LES results can be compared with both the regional weather model and observations from the Cabauw observational supersite. The run was made possible by porting our Large-Eddy Simulation program to run completely on the GPU (Schalkwijk et al, BAMS, 2012). GPU adaptation allows us to reach much improved time-to-solution ratios (i.e. simulation speedup versus real time). As a result, one can perform runs with a much longer timespan than previously feasible. The dataset resulting from the LES run provides many avenues for further study. First, it can provide a more statistical approach to boundary-layer turbulence than the more common case-studies by simulating a diverse but representative set of situations, as well as the transition between situations. This has advantages in designing and evaluating parameterizations. In addition, we discuss the opportunities of high-resolution forecasts for the renewable energy sector, e.g. wind and solar energy production.

  14. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H. R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system; and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  15. An Indoor-Outdoor Building Energy Simulator to Study Urban Modification effects on Building Energy Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoobian, N.; Kleissl, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    While there have been significant advances in energy modeling of individual buildings, reviews of the literature highlight the need for improved understanding of how the interaction between buildings and their surroundings modifies the energy savings obtained through green engineering measures. IOBES (Indoor-Outdoor Building Energy Simulator) is a building-to-canopy model that simulates indoor and outdoor building surface temperatures and associated heat fluxes in an urban area to estimate cooling/heating loads and energy use in buildings. In this model the indoor and outdoor energy balance processes are dynamically coupled taking into account real weather conditions, indoor heat sources, building and urban material properties and composition of the building envelope (e.g. windows, insulation), and HVAC equipment. IOBES is also capable to simulate effects of the waste heat from air-conditioning systems on urban canopy air temperature. IOBES performance in simulating transient heat conduction is validated against an analytical solution of interior wall surface temperature response to a step change in outside air temperature. Also performance of IOBES in simulating cooling and heating loads for specific days validated against well-known models like CBS-MASS, BLAST, and TARP. In addition the annual cooling and heating load of other whole building energy simulators are compared to IOBES. An application of IOBES to study the impact of urban heat island mitigation measures such as reflective pavements is presented.

  16. Symmetry energy impact in simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Tobias; Hempel, Matthias; Sagert, Irina; Suwa, Yudai; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    We present a review of a broad selection of nuclear matter equations of state (EOSs) applicable in core-collapse supernova studies. The large variety of nuclear matter properties, such as the symmetry energy, which are covered by these EOSs leads to distinct outcomes in supernova simulations. Many of the currently used EOS models can be ruled out by nuclear experiments, nuclear many-body calculations, and observations of neutron stars. In particular the two classical supernova EOS describe neutron matter poorly. Nevertheless, we explore their impact in supernova simulations since they are commonly used in astrophysics. They serve as extremely soft and stiff representative nuclear models. The corresponding supernova simulations represent two extreme cases, e.g., with respect to the protoneutron star (PNS) compactness and shock evolution. Moreover, in multi-dimensional supernova simulations EOS differences have a strong effect on the explosion dynamics. Because of the extreme behaviors of the classical supernova EOSs we also include DD2, a relativistic mean field EOS with density-dependent couplings, which is in satisfactory agreement with many current nuclear and observational constraints. This is the first time that DD2 is applied to supernova simulations and compared with the classical supernova EOS. We find that the overall behaviour of the latter EOS in supernova simulations lies in between the two extreme classical EOSs. As pointed out in previous studies, we confirm the impact of the symmetry energy on the electron fraction. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry energy becomes less important during the post-bounce evolution, where conversely the symmetric part of the EOS becomes increasingly dominating, which is related to the high temperatures obtained. Moreover, we study the possible impact of quark matter at high densities and light nuclear clusters at low and intermediate densities.

  17. A quantum energy transport model for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sho, Shohiro; Odanaka, Shinji

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes numerical methods for a quantum energy transport (QET) model in semiconductors, which is derived by using a diffusion scaling in the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. We newly drive a four-moments QET model similar with a classical ET model. Space discretization is performed by a new set of unknown variables. Numerical stability and convergence are obtained by developing numerical schemes and an iterative solution method with a relaxation method. Numerical simulations of electron transport in a scaled MOSFET device are discussed. The QET model allows simulations of quantum confinement transport, and nonlocal and hot-carrier effects in scaled MOSFETs.

  18. Merging Energy Policy Decision Support, Education, and Communication: The 'World Energy' Simulation Role-Playing Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney-varga, J. N.; Franck, T.; Jones, A.; Sterman, J.; Sawin, E.

    2013-12-01

    To meet international goals for climate change mitigation and adaptation, as well as energy access and equity, there is an urgent need to explore and define energy policy paths forward. Despite this need, students, citizens, and decision-makers often hold deeply flawed mental models of the energy and climate systems. Here we describe a simulation role-playing game, World Energy, that provides an immersive learning experience in which participants can create their own path forward for global energy policy and learn about the impact of their policy choices on carbon dioxide emissions, temperature rise, energy supply mix, energy prices, and energy demand. The game puts players in the decision-making roles of advisors to the United Nations Sustainable Energy for All Initiative (drawn from international leaders from industry, governments, intergovernmental organizations, and citizens groups) and, using a state-of-the-art decision-support simulator, asks them to negotiate a plan for global energy policy. We use the En-ROADS (Energy Rapid Overview and Decision Support) simulator, which runs on a laptop computer in <0.1 sec. En-ROADS enables users to specify many factors, including R&D-driven cost reductions in fossil fuel-based, renewable, or carbon-neutral energy technologies; taxes and subsidies for different energy sources; performance standards and energy efficiency; emissions prices; policies to address other greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorocarbons, etc.); and assumptions about GDP and population. In World Energy, participants must balance climate change mitigation goals with equity, prices and access to energy, and the political feasibility of policies. Initial results indicate participants gain insights into the dynamics of the energy and climate systems and greater understanding of the potential impacts policies.

  19. Simulation based energy-resource efficient manufacturing integrated with in-process virtual management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katchasuwanmanee, Kanet; Cheng, Kai; Bateman, Richard

    2016-09-01

    As energy efficiency is one of the key essentials towards sustainability, the development of an energy-resource efficient manufacturing system is among the great challenges facing the current industry. Meanwhile, the availability of advanced technological innovation has created more complex manufacturing systems that involve a large variety of processes and machines serving different functions. To extend the limited knowledge on energy-efficient scheduling, the research presented in this paper attempts to model the production schedule at an operation process by considering the balance of energy consumption reduction in production, production work flow (productivity) and quality. An innovative systematic approach to manufacturing energy-resource efficiency is proposed with the virtual simulation as a predictive modelling enabler, which provides real-time manufacturing monitoring, virtual displays and decision-makings and consequentially an analytical and multidimensional correlation analysis on interdependent relationships among energy consumption, work flow and quality errors. The regression analysis results demonstrate positive relationships between the work flow and quality errors and the work flow and energy consumption. When production scheduling is controlled through optimization of work flow, quality errors and overall energy consumption, the energy-resource efficiency can be achieved in the production. Together, this proposed multidimensional modelling and analysis approach provides optimal conditions for the production scheduling at the manufacturing system by taking account of production quality, energy consumption and resource efficiency, which can lead to the key competitive advantages and sustainability of the system operations in the industry.

  20. Protecting High Energy Barriers: A New Equation to Regulate Boost Energy in Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is one of the most common tools in computational chemistry. Recently, our group has employed accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) to improve the conformational sampling over conventional molecular dynamics techniques. In the original aMD implementation, sampling is greatly improved by raising energy wells below a predefined energy level. Recently, our group presented an alternative aMD implementation where simulations are accelerated by lowering energy barriers of the potential energy surface. When coupled with thermodynamic integration simulations, this implementation showed very promising results. However, when applied to large systems, such as proteins, the simulation tends to be biased to high energy regions of the potential landscape. The reason for this behavior lies in the boost equation used since the highest energy barriers are dramatically more affected than the lower ones. To address this issue, in this work, we present a new boost equation that prevents oversampling of unfavorable high energy conformational states. The new boost potential provides not only better recovery of statistics throughout the simulation but also enhanced sampling of statistically relevant regions in explicit solvent MD simulations. PMID:22241967

  1. The mechanism of the effect of U18666a on blocking the activity of 3β-hydroxysterol Δ-24-reductase (DHCR24): molecular dynamics simulation study and free energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiuqiang; Sun, Deliang; Xu, Bo; Zhao, Linlin; Shi, Xiaoqian; Liu, Hongsheng; Gao, Bing; Lu, Xiuli

    2016-02-01

    DHCR24 encodes 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ(24)-reductase (DHCR24) catalyzing the cholesterol synthesis from desmosterol using the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a co-factor. It is generally accepted that U18666a inhibits the reductase activity of DHCR24, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. To explore the mechanism of the inhibitory effect of U18666a on DHCR24, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two complexes including complexes of DHCR24-FAD-desmosterol enzymatic reactive components with and without the inhibitor U18666a. We found that the U18666a bound into the hydrophobic package near the FAD package of DHCR24. Furthermore, binding free energy of DHCR24 and desmosterol without U18666a is -54.86 kcal/mol, while the system with U18666a is -62.23 kcal/mol, suggesting that the affinity of the substrate desmosterol to DHCR24 was increased in response to the U18666a. In addition, U18666a interacts with FAD by newly forming three hydrogen bonds with Lys292, Lys367, and Gly438 of DHCR24. Finally, secondary structural analysis data obtained from the surrounding hot spots showed that U18666a induced dramatic secondary structural changes around the key residues in the interaction of DHCR24, FAD, and desmosterol. Taken together, these results for the first time demonstrate at the molecular structure level that U18666a blocks DHCR24 activity through an allosteric inhibiting mechanism, which may provide new insight into the development of a new type of cholesterol-lowering drug targeting to block the activity of DHCR24. PMID:26815033

  2. Comprehensive energy analysis of a near zero energy home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannumahanthi, Madhuri

    Buildings consume nearly 40% of the entire energy used in the United States. To reduce the residential energy consumption, the Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with Building America is evaluating various energy efficient technologies that might be integrated to produce a Zero Energy Home (ZEH). The research presented in this thesis focuses on evaluating the energy use of individual energy saving components and a near ZEH system in Salt Lake City, Utah. A state-of-the-art software tool, DesignBuilder, which employs an EnergyPlus simulation engine, was used to evaluate the performance of the prototype models. The major energy saving features in the house included photovoltaic thermal (PVT) panels; the hybrid solar panels that combine PV and solar thermal panel technology in a single entity; OASys, a new evaporative cooling unit that has a SEER 40+; structural insulated panels (SIPs); and a hydronic furnace. With real time data acquisition, the performance of the individual components and the near ZEH system was studied. PVT performs with nearly 20% greater efficiency than a conventional photovoltaic (PV) system. OASys reduces the cooling energy use by 60% in comparison with a regular vapor compression air conditioning system. Simulation results indicate 30% reduced energy use with SIPs. The hydronic furnace provides comfortable heating with 2% of the total heating energy as preheat to the water heater. The high efficiency water heater has a peak monthly efficiency of 83%. The actual data usage indicates that the energy efficient house has nearly 50% reduced energy use over a simulated model without the energy saving features and 60% fewer carbon dioxide emissions than a regular house.

  3. Modeling and simulation of a transcutaneous energy transmission system used in artificial organ implants.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wan; Liu, Wei; Qian, Jie; Tang, Houjun; Ye, Pengsheng

    2009-12-01

    We present a mathematical model to simulate transcutaneous energy transmission systems. Treating such systems as resonant power electronic converters, we develop the equivalent circuit equations, for which the circuit variables are then expanded as Fourier series and a multi-frequency averaging method was applied. Keeping terms up to first-order, the analysis produces a dynamic and harmonic model describing these energy transmission systems. With appropriate values for the circuit parameters, numerical results are compared with those of the exact time domain model. This comparison verifies that our model can adequately represent to first-order such energy-transmission systems.

  4. HEAO-1 analysis of Low Energy Detectors (LED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The activities at Penn State University are described. During the period Oct. 1990 to Dec. 1991 work on HEAO-1 analysis of the Low Energy Detectors (LED) concentrated on using the improved detector spectral simulation model and fitting diffuse x-ray background spectral data. Spectral fitting results, x-ray point sources, and diffuse x-ray sources are described.

  5. Simulation of a passive solar energy system. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, M.P.

    1982-12-01

    A simple lumped capacitance-resistance model is used to simulate heat flow in a residential size structure heated passively by the sun. The model takes the form of an analogous electrical circuit. A computer program was written to analyse the circuit. By altering the input parameters of the program, the thermal performance of a wide variety of passive solar designs can be investigated for any geographical location. By comparing program generated data to data taken from experimental test cells in Los Alamos, New Mexico, it was found that the simulation program predicted energy use to within 4 percent of measured values. Also, the computer program predicted temperature swings to within 16 percent of measured swings. Correlation with empirical methods of calculating monthly and annual savings in fuel use for heating was poor. Using the simulation calculations as a base, the predictions of anual savings differed by as much as 76 percent.

  6. Simulating and validating coastal gradients in wind energy resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahmann, Andrea; Floors, Rogier; Karagali, Ioanna; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Simon, Elliot; Courtney, Michael; Badger, Merete; Peña, Alfredo; Hasager, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    The experimental campaign of the RUNE (Reducing Uncertainty of Near-shore wind resource Estimates) project took place on the western coast of Denmark during the winter 2015-2016. The campaign used onshore scanning lidar technology combined with ocean and satellite information and produced a unique dataset to study the transition in boundary layer dynamics across the coastal zone. The RUNE project aims at reducing the uncertainty of near-shore wind resource estimates produced by mesoscale modeling. With this in mind, simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were performed to identify the sensitivity in the coastal gradients of wind energy resources to various model parameters and model inputs. Among these: model horizontal grid spacing and the planetary boundary layer and surface-layer scheme. We report on the differences amongst these simulations and preliminary results on the comparison of the model simulations with the RUNE observations of lidar and satellite measurements and near coastal tall mast.

  7. Energy flux simulation in heterogeneous cropland - a two year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Biernath, Christian; Heinlein, Florian; Priesack, Eckart

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies show that uncertainties in regional and global climate and weather simulations are partly due to inadequate descriptions of the energy flux exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere [Stainforth et al. 2005]. One major shortcoming is the limitation of the grid-cell resolution, which is recommended to be about at least 3x3 km² in most models due to limitations in the model physics. To represent each individual grid cell most models select one dominant soil type and one dominant land use type. This resolution, however, is often too coarse in regions where the spatial heterogeneity of soil and land use types are high, e.g. in Central Europe. The relevance of vegetation (e.g. crops), ground cover, and soil properties to the moisture and energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere is well known [McPherson 2007], but the impact of vegetation growth dynamics on energy fluxes is only partly understood [Gayler et al. 2014]. An elegant method to avoid the shortcoming of grid cell resolution is the so called mosaic approach. This approach is part of the recently developed ecosystem model framework Expert-N [Biernath et al. 2013] . The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the characteristics of five managed field plots, planted with winter wheat, potato and maize on the near surface soil moistures and on the near surface energy flux exchanges of the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. The simulated energy fluxes were compared with eddy flux tower measurements between the respective fields at the research farm Scheyern, North-West of Munich, Germany. To perform these simulations, we coupled the ecosystem model Expert-N to an analytical footprint model [Mauder & Foken 2011] . The coupled model system has the ability to calculate the mixing ratio of the surface energy fluxes at a given point within one grid cell (in this case at the flux tower between the two fields). The approach accounts for the temporarily and spatially

  8. EnergyPlus Weather Data for use with EnergyPlus Simulation Software

    DOE Data Explorer

    EnergyPlus is simulation software from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) that models heating, cooling, lighting, ventilating, and other energy flows as well as water in buildings. Because the environment surrounding any building is an important component of the energy choices that go into the building's design and the energy performance of that building thereafter, weather data from all parts of the world are made available through the EnergyPlus web site. The data are collected from more than 2100 locations — 1042 locations in the USA, 71 locations in Canada, and more than 1000 locations in 100 other countries throughout the world. The weather data are arranged by World Meteorological Organization region and Country. In addition to using the weather data via the utility installed automatically with EnergyPlus software, users may view and download EnergyPlus weather data directly using a weather data layer for Google Earth.

  9. FDTD simulation tools for UWB antenna analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a set of software tools useful for analyzing ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and structures. These tools are used to perform finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of a conical antenna with continuous wave (CW) and UWB pulsed excitations. The antenna is analyzed using spherical coordinate-based FDTD equations that are derived from first principles. The simulation results for CW excitation are compared to simulation and measured results from published sources; the results for UWB excitation are new.

  10. FDTD simulation tools for UWB antenna analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a set of software tools useful for analyzing ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and structures. These tools are used to perform finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of a conical antenna with continuous wave (CW) and UWB pulsed excitations. The antenna is analyzed using spherical coordinate-based FDTD equations that are derived from first principles. The simulation results for CW excitation are compared to simulation and measured results from published sources; the results for UWB excitation are new.

  11. Complexity analysis of simulations with analytic bond-order potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teijeiro, Carlos; Hammerschmidt, Thomas; Seiser, Bernhard; Drautz, Ralf; Sutmann, Godehard

    2016-02-01

    The modeling of materials at the atomistic level with interatomic potentials requires a reliable description of different bonding situations and relevant system properties. For this purpose, analytic bond-order potentials (BOPs) provide a systematic and robust approximation to density functional theory (DFT) and tight binding (TB) calculations at reasonable computational cost. This paper presents a formal analysis of the computational complexity of analytic BOP simulations, based on a detailed assessment of the most computationally intensive parts. Different implementation algorithms are presented alongside with optimizations for efficient numerical processing. The theoretical complexity study is complemented by systematic benchmarks of the scalability of the algorithms with increasing system size and accuracy level of the BOP approximation. Both approaches demonstrate that the computation of atomic forces in analytic BOPs can be performed with a similar scaling as the computation of atomic energies.

  12. Analysis of Boundary Conditions for Crystal Defect Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlacher, V.; Ortner, C.; Shapeev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations of crystal defects are necessarily restricted to finite computational domains, supplying artificial boundary conditions that emulate the effect of embedding the defect in an effectively infinite crystalline environment. This work develops a rigorous framework within which the accuracy of different types of boundary conditions can be precisely assessed. We formulate the equilibration of crystal defects as variational problems in a discrete energy space and establish qualitatively sharp regularity estimates for minimisers. Using this foundation we then present rigorous error estimates for (i) a truncation method (Dirichlet boundary conditions), (ii) periodic boundary conditions, (iii) boundary conditions from linear elasticity, and (iv) boundary conditions from nonlinear elasticity. Numerical results confirm the sharpness of the analysis.

  13. Real-Time Building Energy Simulation Using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiufeng; Bhattachayra, Prajesh; O'Neill, Zheng; Haves, Philip; Wetter, Michael; Bailey, Trevor

    2011-11-01

    Most commercial buildings do not perform as well in practice as intended by the design and their performances often deteriorate over time. Reasons include faulty construction, malfunctioning equipment, incorrectly configured control systems and inappropriate operating procedures (Haves et al., 2001, Lee et al., 2007). To address this problem, the paper presents a simulation-based whole building performance monitoring tool that allows a comparison of building actual performance and expected performance in real time. The tool continuously acquires relevant building model input variables from existing Energy Management and Control System (EMCS). It then reports expected energy consumption as simulated of EnergyPlus. The Building Control Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) is used as the software platform to provide data linkage between the EMCS, an EnergyPlus model, and a database. This paper describes the integrated real-time simulation environment. A proof-of-concept demonstration is also presented in the paper.

  14. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura; Petkova, Petya; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr2+ system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  15. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura; Petkova, Petya; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr{sup 2+} system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  16. Aircraft vulnerability analysis by modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willers, Cornelius J.; Willers, Maria S.; de Waal, Alta

    2014-10-01

    Infrared missiles pose a significant threat to civilian and military aviation. ManPADS missiles are especially dangerous in the hands of rogue and undisciplined forces. Yet, not all the launched missiles hit their targets; the miss being either attributable to misuse of the weapon or to missile performance restrictions. This paper analyses some of the factors affecting aircraft vulnerability and demonstrates a structured analysis of the risk and aircraft vulnerability problem. The aircraft-missile engagement is a complex series of events, many of which are only partially understood. Aircraft and missile designers focus on the optimal design and performance of their respective systems, often testing only in a limited set of scenarios. Most missiles react to the contrast intensity, but the variability of the background is rarely considered. Finally, the vulnerability of the aircraft depends jointly on the missile's performance and the doctrine governing the missile's launch. These factors are considered in a holistic investigation. The view direction, altitude, time of day, sun position, latitude/longitude and terrain determine the background against which the aircraft is observed. Especially high gradients in sky radiance occur around the sun and on the horizon. This paper considers uncluttered background scenes (uniform terrain and clear sky) and presents examples of background radiance at all view angles across a sphere around the sensor. A detailed geometrical and spatially distributed radiometric model is used to model the aircraft. This model provides the signature at all possible view angles across the sphere around the aircraft. The signature is determined in absolute terms (no background) and in contrast terms (with background). It is shown that the background significantly affects the contrast signature as observed by the missile sensor. A simplified missile model is constructed by defining the thrust and mass profiles, maximum seeker tracking rate, maximum

  17. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.

  18. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP)more » methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.« less

  19. Home energy rating system building energy simulation test (HERS BESTEST): Volume 1, Tier 1 and Tier 2 tests user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    1995-11-01

    The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Building Energy Simulation Test (BESTEST) is a method for evaluating the credibility of software used by HERS to model energy use in buildings. The method provides the technical foundation for ''certification of the technical accuracy of building energy analysis tools used to determine energy efficiency ratings,'' as called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Title I, subtitle A,l Section 102, Title II, Part 6, Section 271). Certification is accomplished with a uniform set of test cases that facilitate the comparison of a software tool with several of the best public-domain, state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs available in the United States. This set of test cases represents the Tier 1 and Tier 2 Tests for Certification of Rating Tools as described in DOE 10 CFR Part 437 and the HERS Council Guidelines for Uniformity (HERS Council). A third Tier of tests not included in this document is also planned.

  20. Analysis of metallic nanoantennas for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora Ventura, B.; Díaz de León, R.; García-Torales, G.; Flores, Jorge L.; Alda, Javier; González, Francisco Javier

    2015-09-01

    Recently thermo-electrical nanoantennas, also known as Seebeck nanoantennas, have been proposed as an alternative for solar energy harvesting applications. In this work we present the optical and thermal analysis of metallic nanoantennas operating at infrared wavelengths, this study is performed by numerical simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics. Several different nanoantenna designs were analyzed including dipoles, bowties and square spiral antennas. Results show that metallic nanoantennas can be tuned to absorb electromagnetic energy at infrared wavelengths, and that numerical simulation can be useful in optimizing the performance of these types of nanoantennas at optical and infrared wavelengths.

  1. Mesoscale and Large-Eddy Simulations for Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marjanovic, N

    2011-02-22

    Operational wind power forecasting, turbine micrositing, and turbine design require high-resolution simulations of atmospheric flow over complex terrain. The use of both Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and large-eddy (LES) simulations is explored for wind energy applications using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. To adequately resolve terrain and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, grid nesting is used to refine the grid from mesoscale to finer scales. This paper examines the performance of the grid nesting configuration, turbulence closures, and resolution (up to as fine as 100 m horizontal spacing) for simulations of synoptically and locally driven wind ramping events at a West Coast North American wind farm. Interestingly, little improvement is found when using higher resolution simulations or better resolved turbulence closures in comparison to observation data available for this particular site. This is true for week-long simulations as well, where finer resolution runs show only small changes in the distribution of wind speeds or turbulence intensities. It appears that the relatively simple topography of this site is adequately resolved by all model grids (even as coarse as 2.7 km) so that all resolutions are able to model the physics at similar accuracy. The accuracy of the results is shown in this paper to be more dependent on the parameterization of the land-surface characteristics such as soil moisture rather than on grid resolution.

  2. Scripted Building Energy Modeling and Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Macumber, D.

    2012-10-01

    Building energy analysis is often time-intensive, error-prone, and non-reproducible. Entire energy analyses can be scripted end-to-end using the OpenStudio Ruby API. Common tasks within an analysis can be automated using OpenStudio Measures. Graphical user interfaces (GUI's) and component libraries reduce time, decrease errors, and improve repeatability in energy modeling.

  3. Model and particle-in-cell simulation of ion energy distribution in collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhuwen; Kong, Bo; Luo, Yuee; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Yuansheng

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we propose a self-consistent theoretical model, which is described by the ion energy distributions (IEDs) in collisionless sheaths, and the analytical results for different combined dc/radio frequency (rf) capacitive coupled plasma discharge cases, including sheath voltage errors analysis, are compared with the results of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional plane-parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The IEDs in collisionless sheaths are performed on combination of dc/rf voltage sources electrodes discharge using argon as the process gas. The incident ions on the grounded electrode are separated, according to their different radio frequencies, and dc voltages on a separated electrode, the IEDs, and widths of energy in sheath and the plasma sheath thickness are discussed. The IEDs, the IED widths, and sheath voltages by the theoretical model are investigated and show good agreement with PIC simulations.

  4. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded:  The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA").  Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization.  An intern program.  Staff training.  Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  5. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the

  6. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin-Hu; Ye, Yun-Xiu; Chen, Jian-Ping; Lu, Hai-Jiang; Zhu, Peng-Jia; Jiang, Feng-Jian

    2015-07-01

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at the Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for 12C elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio \\frac{{Δ p}}{p} and 12C elastic cross section are compared without and with radiative energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for 12C elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275083), US Department of Energy contract DE-AC05-84ER-40150 under which Jefferson Science Associates operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Natural Science Foundation of An'hui Educational Committee (KJ2012B179)

  7. Energy dynamics in a simulation of LAPD turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, B.; Carter, T. A.; Schaffner, D.; Umansky, M. V.; Dudson, B.

    2012-10-15

    Energy dynamics calculations in a 3D fluid simulation of drift wave turbulence in the linear Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] illuminate processes that drive and dissipate the turbulence. These calculations reveal that a nonlinear instability dominates the injection of energy into the turbulence by overtaking the linear drift wave instability that dominates when fluctuations about the equilibrium are small. The nonlinear instability drives flute-like (k{sub Parallel-To }=0) density fluctuations using free energy from the background density gradient. Through nonlinear axial wavenumber transfer to k{sub Parallel-To }{ne}0 fluctuations, the nonlinear instability accesses the adiabatic response, which provides the requisite energy transfer channel from density to potential fluctuations as well as the phase shift that causes instability. The turbulence characteristics in the simulations agree remarkably well with experiment. When the nonlinear instability is artificially removed from the system through suppressing k{sub Parallel-To }=0 modes, the turbulence develops a coherent frequency spectrum which is inconsistent with experimental data. This indicates the importance of the nonlinear instability in producing experimentally consistent turbulence.

  8. Bistable solutions for the electron energy distribution function in electron swarms in xenon: a comparison between the results of first-principles particle simulations and conventional Boltzmann equation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatko, Nikolay; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-08-01

    At low reduced electric fields the electron energy distribution function in heavy noble gases can take two distinct shapes. This ‘bistability effect’—in which electron-electron (Coulomb) collisions play an essential role—is analyzed here for Xe with a Boltzmann equation approach and with a first principles particle simulation method. The solution of the Boltzmann equation adopts the usual approximations of (i) searching for the distribution function in the form of two terms (‘two-term approximation’), (ii) neglecting the Coulomb part of the collision integral for the anisotropic part of the distribution function, (iii) treating Coulomb collisions as binary events, and (iv) truncating the range of the electron-electron interaction beyond a characteristic distance. The particle-based simulation method avoids these approximations: the many-body interactions within the electron gas with a true (un-truncated) Coulomb potential are described by a molecular dynamics algorithm, while the collisions between electrons and the background gas atoms are treated with Monte Carlo simulation. We find a good general agreement between the results of the two techniques, which confirms, to a certain extent, the approximations used in the solution of the Boltzmann equation. The differences observed between the results are believed to originate from these approximations and from the presence of statistical noise in the particle simulations.

  9. Analysis of DOE s Roof Savings Calculator with Comparison to other Simulation Engines

    SciTech Connect

    New, Joshua Ryan; Huang, Yu; Levinson, Ronnen; Mellot, Joe; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Childs, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned based on national averages and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance surfaces, HVAC duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation levels, and other parameters. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA. However, RSC gives different energy savings estimates than previous cool roof simulation tools so more thorough software and empirical validation proved necessary. This report consolidates much of the preliminary analysis for comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to that from other simulation engines.

  10. IFC HVAC interface to EnergyPlus - A case of expanded interoperability for energy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Maile, Tobias

    2004-03-29

    Tedious manual input of data that define a building, its systems and its expected pattern of use and operating schedules for building energy performance simulation has in the past diverted time and resources from productive simulation runs. In addition to its previously released IFCtoIDF utility that semiautomates the import of building geometry, the new IFC HVAC interface to EnergyPlus (released at the end of 2003) makes it possible to import and export most of the data that define HVAC equipment and systems in a building directly from and to other IFC compatible software tools. This reduces the manual input of other data needed for successful simulation with EnergyPlus to a minimum. The main purpose of this new interface is to enable import of HVAC equipment and systems definitions, generated by other IFC compatible software tools (such as HVAC systems design tools) and data bases, into EnergyPlus, and to write such definitions contained in EnergyPlus input files to the original IFC files from which building geometry was extracted for the particular EnergyPlus input. In addition, this interface sets an example for developers of other software tools how to import and/or export data other than building geometry from and/or into EnergyPlus. This paper describes the necessary simplifications and shortcuts incorporated in this interface, its operating environment, interface architecture, and the basic conditions and methodology for its use with EnergyPlus.

  11. An analysis of simulated stereo radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisaruck, M. A.; Kaupp, V. H.; Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    Simulated stereo radar imagery is used to investigate parameters for a spaceborne imaging radar. Incidence angles ranging from small to intermediate to large are used with three digital terrain model areas which are representative of relatively flat, moderately rough, and mountainous terrain. The simulated radar imagery was evaluated by interpreters for ease of stereo perception and information content, and rank order within each class of terrain. The interpreter's results are analyzed for trends between the height of a feature and either parallax or vertical exaggeration for a stereo pair. A model is developed which predicts the amount of parallax (or vertical exaggeration) an interpreter would desire for best stereo perception of a feature of a specific height. Results indicate the selection of angle of incidence and stereo intersection angle depend upon the relative relief of the terrain. Examples of the simulated stereo imagery are presented for a candidate spaceborne imaging radar having four selectable angles of incidence.

  12. Simulation of Energy Response of the ATIC Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batkov, K. E.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Case, G.; Christl, M.; Chang, J.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Granger, D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon borne experiment designed to measure the cosmic ray composition for elements from hydrogen to iron and their energy spectra from approx.50 GeV to near 100 TeV. It consists of a Si-matrix detector to determine the charge of a CR particle, a scintillator hodoscope for tracking, carbon interaction targets and a fully active BGO calorimeter. ATIC had its first flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 28/12/2000 to 13/01/2001. The ATIC flight collected approximately 25 million events. For reconstruction of primary spectra from spectra of energy deposits measured in the experiment, correlations between kinetic energy of a primary particle E(sub kin) and energy deposit in the calorimeter E(sub d) should be known. For this purpose, simulations of energy response of the calorimeter on energy spectra of different nuclei were done. The simulations were performed by GEANT-3.21 code with QGSM generator for nucleus - nucleus interactions. The incident flux was taken as isotropic in the ATIC aperture. Primary spectra power-law by momentum were used as inputs according to standard models of cosmic ray acceleration. These spectra become power-law by kinetic energy at E(sub kin) higher than approx.20Mc(sup 2), where M is primary nucleus mass. It should be noted that energy deposit spectra measured by ATIC illustrate similar behavior. Distributions of ratio E(sub kin)/E(sub d) are presented for different energy deposits and for a set of primaries. For power-law regions of energy spectra at E(sub d)> or equal to 20Mc(sup 2) the obtained mean value of E(sub kin)/E(sub d) increases from approx.2.4 for protons to approx.3.1 for iron, while rms/ decreases from 50% for protons to about 15% for iron. These values were obtained for the spectral index gamma=1.6

  13. Parachute system design, analysis, and simulation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, W.D.; McBride, D.D.; Gwinn, K.W.; Waye, D.E.; Hailey, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    For over twenty years designers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed various parachute simulation codes to model deployment, inflation, loading, trajectories, aircraft downwash and line sail. In addition to these codes, material property data bases have been acquired. Recently we have initiated project to integrate these codes and data bases into a single software tool entitled SPARSYS (Sandia PARachute SYstem Simulation). We have constructed a graphical user interface as the driver and framework for SPARSYS. In this paper we present a status report on SPARSYS describing progress in developing and incorporating independent modules, in developing an integrated trajectory package, and in developing a materials data base including high-rate-of-strain data.

  14. Development of EnergyPlus Utility to Batch Simulate Building Energy Performance on a National Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, Jayson F.; Dirks, James A.

    2008-08-29

    EnergyPlus is a simulation program that requires a large number of details to fully define and model a building. Hundreds or even thousands of lines in a text file are needed to run the EnergyPlus simulation depending on the size of the building. To manually create these files is a time consuming process that would not be practical when trying to create input files for thousands of buildings needed to simulate national building energy performance. To streamline the process needed to create the input files for EnergyPlus, two methods were created to work in conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Preprocessor; this reduced the hundreds of inputs needed to define a building in EnergyPlus to a small set of high-level parameters. The first method uses Java routines to perform all of the preprocessing on a Windows machine while the second method carries out all of the preprocessing on the Linux cluster by using an in-house built utility called Generalized Parametrics (GPARM). A comma delimited (CSV) input file is created to define the high-level parameters for any number of buildings. Each method then takes this CSV file and uses the data entered for each parameter to populate an extensible markup language (XML) file used by the NREL Preprocessor to automatically prepare EnergyPlus input data files (idf) using automatic building routines and macro templates. Using a Linux utility called “make”, the idf files can then be automatically run through the Linux cluster and the desired data from each building can be aggregated into one table to be analyzed. Creating a large number of EnergyPlus input files results in the ability to batch simulate building energy performance and scale the result to national energy consumption estimates.

  15. Direct molecular simulation of nitrogen dissociation based on an ab initio potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Paolo Schwartzentruber, Thomas E. Bender, Jason D. Nompelis, Ioannis Candler, Graham V.

    2015-08-15

    The direct molecular simulation (DMS) approach is used to predict the internal energy relaxation and dissociation dynamics of high-temperature nitrogen. An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) is used to calculate the dynamics of two interacting nitrogen molecules by providing forces between the four atoms. In the near-equilibrium limit, it is shown that DMS reproduces the results obtained from well-established quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) analysis, verifying the validity of the approach. DMS is used to predict the vibrational relaxation time constant for N{sub 2}–N{sub 2} collisions and its temperature dependence, which are in close agreement with existing experiments and theory. Using both QCT and DMS with the same PES, we find that dissociation significantly depletes the upper vibrational energy levels. As a result, across a wide temperature range, the dissociation rate is found to be approximately 4–5 times lower compared to the rates computed using QCT with Boltzmann energy distributions. DMS calculations predict a quasi-steady-state distribution of rotational and vibrational energies in which the rate of depletion of high-energy states due to dissociation is balanced by their rate of repopulation due to collisional processes. The DMS approach simulates the evolution of internal energy distributions and their coupling to dissociation without the need to precompute rates or cross sections for all possible energy transitions. These benchmark results could be used to develop new computational fluid dynamics models for high-enthalpy flow applications.

  16. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-09-20

    EnergyPlus is a new generation building performance simulation program offering many new modeling capabilities and more accurate performance calculations integrating building components in sub-hourly time steps. However, EnergyPlus runs much slower than the current generation simulation programs. This has become a major barrier to its widespread adoption by the industry. This paper analyzed EnergyPlus run time from comprehensive perspectives to identify key issues and challenges of speeding up EnergyPlus: studying the historical trends of EnergyPlus run time based on the advancement of computers and code improvements to EnergyPlus, comparing EnergyPlus with DOE-2 to understand and quantify the run time differences, identifying key simulation settings and model features that have significant impacts on run time, and performing code profiling to identify which EnergyPlus subroutines consume the most amount of run time. This paper provides recommendations to improve EnergyPlus run time from the modeler?s perspective and adequate computing platforms. Suggestions of software code and architecture changes to improve EnergyPlus run time based on the code profiling results are also discussed.

  17. Simulating electron energy loss spectroscopy with the MNPBEM toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Within the MNPBEM toolbox, we show how to simulate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of plasmonic nanoparticles using a boundary element method approach. The methodology underlying our approach closely follows the concepts developed by García de Abajo and coworkers (Garcia de Abajo, 2010). We introduce two classes eelsret and eelsstat that allow in combination with our recently developed MNPBEM toolbox for a simple, robust, and efficient computation of EEL spectra and maps. The classes are accompanied by a number of demo programs for EELS simulation of metallic nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanotriangles, and for electron trajectories passing by or penetrating through the metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss how to compute electric fields induced by the electron beam and cathodoluminescence. Catalogue identifier: AEKJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 38886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1222650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Computer: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Operating system: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). RAM:≥1 GB Classification: 18. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 370 External routines: MESH2D available at www.mathworks.com Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for plasmonic nanoparticles. Solution method: Boundary element method using electromagnetic potentials. Reasons for new version: The new version of the toolbox includes two additional classes for the simulation of electron energy

  18. Structural, Physical, and Compositional Analysis of Lunar Simulants and Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul; Street, Kenneth W.; Gaier, James

    2008-01-01

    Relative to the prior manned Apollo and unmanned robotic missions, planned Lunar initiatives are comparatively complex and longer in duration. Individual crew rotations are envisioned to span several months, and various surface systems must function in the Lunar environment for periods of years. As a consequence, an increased understanding of the surface environment is required to engineer and test the associated materials, components, and systems necessary to sustain human habitation and surface operations. The effort described here concerns the analysis of existing simulant materials, with application to Lunar return samples. The interplay between these analyses fulfills the objective of ascertaining the critical properties of regolith itself, and the parallel objective of developing suitable stimulant materials for a variety of engineering applications. Presented here are measurements of the basic physical attributes, i.e. particle size distributions and general shape factors. Also discussed are structural and chemical properties, as determined through a variety of techniques, such as optical microscopy, SEM and TEM microscopy, Mossbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman microspectroscopy, inductively coupled argon plasma emission spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping. A comparative description of currently available stimulant materials is discussed, with implications for more detailed analyses, as well as the requirements for continued refinement of methods for simulant production.

  19. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  20. Dynamic Process Simulation for Analysis and Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Herbert E., Jr.; Himmelblau, David M.

    A computer program for the simulation of complex continuous process in real-time in an interactive mode is described. The program is user oriented, flexible, and provides both numerical and graphic output. The program has been used in classroom teaching and computer aided design. Typical input and output are illustrated for a sample problem to…

  1. In situ and in-transit analysis of cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Brian; Almgren, Ann; Lukić, Zarija; Weber, Gunther; Morozov, Dmitriy; Beckner, Vincent; Day, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    Modern cosmological simulations have reached the trillion-element scale, rendering data storage and subsequent analysis formidable tasks. To address this circumstance, we present a new MPI-parallel approach for analysis of simulation data while the simulation runs, as an alternative to the traditional workflow consisting of periodically saving large data sets to disk for subsequent `offline' analysis. We demonstrate this approach in the compressible gasdynamics/ N-body code Nyx, a hybrid MPI+OpenMP code based on the BoxLib framework, used for large-scale cosmological simulations. We have enabled on-the-fly workflows in two different ways: one is a straightforward approach consisting of all MPI processes periodically halting the main simulation and analyzing each component of data that they own (` in situ'). The other consists of partitioning processes into disjoint MPI groups, with one performing the simulation and periodically sending data to the other `sidecar' group, which post-processes it while the simulation continues (`in-transit'). The two groups execute their tasks asynchronously, stopping only to synchronize when a new set of simulation data needs to be analyzed. For both the in situ and in-transit approaches, we experiment with two different analysis suites with distinct performance behavior: one which finds dark matter halos in the simulation using merge trees to calculate the mass contained within iso-density contours, and another which calculates probability distribution functions and power spectra of various fields in the simulation. Both are common analysis tasks for cosmology, and both result in summary statistics significantly smaller than the original data set. We study the behavior of each type of analysis in each workflow in order to determine the optimal configuration for the different data analysis algorithms.

  2. CFD simulation of Urban Environment to study building energy and Urban Heat Island (UHI) implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarian, Negin; Kleissl, Jan

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations are used to study the street-scale urban environment investigating air flow and heat transfer that affect Urban Heat Island formation and urban energy use. Simulations are performed based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and Large Eddy Simulations using ANSYS/FLUENT. Comprehensive simulations of the daytime urban environment are presented accounting for various contributing factors such as building aspect ratio, stability, and radiative properties of surfaces. Buoyancy and co-occurrence of forced and mixed convective flow regimes are accounted for and the local Richardson number inside the canyon and near building surfaces are examined. A three-dimensional regular building array is used for air flow simulation and thermal analysis. Periodic boundary conditions are used in both stream/span-wise directions representing fully-developed flow and wind profile above the canyon and vortex formation inside the street canyon are studied. The simulations are performed on a clear day in southern California and corresponding daytime solar load is applied for heat transfer purposes. Considering the coupled behavior of thermal effects and flow in the urban environment, we examine surface and canopy air temperature versus building energy use.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition by low-energy electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Furman, D. R.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of detailed atomic cross sections has been used to obtain the spatial deposition of energy by 1-20-eV electrons in molecular hydrogen by a Monte Carlo simulation of the actual trajectories. The energy deposition curve (energy per distance traversed) is quite peaked in the forward direction about the entry point for electrons with energies above the threshold of the electronic states, but the peak decreases and broadens noticeably as the electron energy decreases below 10 eV (threshold for the lowest excitable electronic state of H2). The curve also assumes a very symmetrical shape for energies below 10 eV, indicating the increasing importance of elastic collisions in determining the shape of the curve, although not the mode of energy deposition.

  4. SIMULATIONS OF THE AGS MMPS STORING ENERGY IN CAPACITOR BANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MARNERIS,I.; BADEA, V.S.; BONATI, R.; ROSER, T.; SANDBERG, J.

    2007-06-25

    The Brookhaven AGS Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a thyristor control supply rated at 5500 Amps, +/-9000 Volts. The peak magnet power is 50 MWatts. The power supply is fed from a motor/generator manufactured by Siemens. The generator is 3 phase 7500 Volts rated at 50 MVA. The peak power requirements come from the stored energy in the rotor of the motor/generator. The motor generator is about 45 years old, made by Siemens and it is not clear if companies will be manufacturing similar machines in the future. We are therefore investigating different ways of storing energy for future AGS MMPS operations. This paper will present simulations of a power supply where energy is stored in capacitor banks. Two dc to dc converters will be presented along with the control system of the power section. The switching elements will be IGCT's made by ABB. The simulation program used is called PSIM version 6.1. The average power from the local power authority into the power supply will be kept constant during the pulsing of the magnets at +/-50 MW. The reactive power will also be kept constant below 1.5 MVAR. Waveforms will be presented.

  5. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  6. Energy demands in taekwondo athletes during combat simulation.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Angioluci Diniz; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Dourado, Antonio Carlos; Santos, Victor Gustavo Ferreira; Franchini, Emerson

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate energy system contributions and energy costs in combat situations. The sample consisted of 10 male taekwondo athletes (age: 21 ± 6 years old; height: 176.2 ± 5.3 cm; body mass: 67.2 ± 8.9 kg) who compete at the national or international level. To estimate the energy contributions, and total energy cost of the fights, athletes performed a simulated competition consisting of three 2 min rounds with a 1 min recovery between each round. The combats were filmed to quantify the actual time spent fighting in each round. The contribution of the aerobic (W(AER)), anaerobic alactic (W(PCR)), and anaerobic lactic [Formula: see text] energy systems was estimated through the measurement of oxygen consumption during the activity, the fast component of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, and the change in blood lactate concentration in each round, respectively. The mean ratio of high intensity actions to moments of low intensity (steps and pauses) was ~1:7. The W(AER), W(PCR) and W([La(-)]) system contributions were estimated as 120 ± 22 kJ (66 ± 6%), 54 ± 21 kJ (30 ± 6%), 8.5 kJ (4 ± 2%), respectively. Thus, training sessions should be directed mainly to the improvement of the anaerobic alactic system (responsible by the high-intensity actions), and of the aerobic system (responsible by the recovery process between high-intensity actions).

  7. Nexa: a scalable neural simulator with integrated analysis.

    PubMed

    Benjaminsson, Simon; Lansner, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale neural simulations encompass challenges in simulator design, data handling and understanding of simulation output. As the computational power of supercomputers and the size of network models increase, these challenges become even more pronounced. Here we introduce the experimental scalable neural simulator Nexa, for parallel simulation of large-scale neural network models at a high level of biological abstraction and for exploration of the simulation methods involved. It includes firing-rate models and capabilities to build networks using machine learning inspired methods for e.g. self-organization of network architecture and for structural plasticity. We show scalability up to the size of the largest machines currently available for a number of model scenarios. We further demonstrate simulator integration with online analysis and real-time visualization as scalable solutions for the data handling challenges. PMID:23116128

  8. Consistency analysis on laser signal in laser guided weapon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ruiguang; Zhang, Wenpan; Guo, Hao; Gan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop simulation is widely used in laser semi-active guidance weapon experiments, the authenticity of the laser guidance signal is the key problem of reliability. In order to evaluate the consistency of the laser guidance signal, this paper analyzes the angle of sight, laser energy density, laser spot size, atmospheric back scattering, sun radiation and SNR by comparing the different working state between actual condition and hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Based on measured data, mathematical simulation and optical simulation result, laser guidance signal effects on laser seeker are determined. By using Monte Carlo method, the laser guided weapon trajectory and impact point distribution are obtained, the influence of the systematic error are analyzed. In conclusion it is pointed out that the difference between simulation system and actual system has little influence in normal guidance, has great effect on laser jamming. The research is helpful to design and evaluation of laser guided weapon simulation.

  9. Geometric Modeling, Radiation Simulation, Rendering, Analysis Package

    1995-01-17

    RADIANCE is intended to aid lighting designers and architects by predicting the light levels and appearance of a space prior to construction. The package includes programs for modeling and translating scene geometry, luminaire data and material properties, all of which are needed as input to the simulation. The lighting simulation itself uses ray tracing techniques to compute radiance values (ie. the quantity of light passing through a specific point in a specific direction), which aremore » typically arranged to form a photographic quality image. The resulting image may be analyzed, displayed and manipulated within the package, and converted to other popular image file formats for export to other packages, facilitating the production of hard copy output.« less

  10. Low-Energy Impacts onto Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, Laura M.; Colwell, J.; Mellon, M.; Stemm, B.

    2012-10-01

    Low-Energy Impacts onto Lunar Regolith Simulant Laura M. Seward1, Joshua E. Colwell1, Michael T. Mellon2, and Bradley A. Stemm1, 1Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, 2Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado. Impacts and cratering in space play important roles in the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Low-velocity impacts and disturbances to planetary regolith are also a consequence of manned and robotic exploration of planetary bodies such as the Moon, Mars, and asteroids. We are conducting a program of laboratory experiments to study low-velocity impacts of 1 to 5 m/s into JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant, JSC-Mars-1 Martian regolith simulant, and silica targets under 1 g. We use direct measurement of ejecta mass and high-resolution video tracking of ejecta particle trajectories to derive ejecta mass velocity distributions. Additionally, we conduct similar experiments under microgravity conditions in a laboratory drop tower and on parabolic aircraft with velocities as low as 10 cm/s. We wish to characterize and understand the collision parameters that control the outcome of low-velocity impacts into regolith, including impact velocity, impactor mass, target shape and size distribution, regolith depth, target relative density, and crater depth, and to experimentally determine the functional dependencies of the outcomes of low-velocity collisions (ejecta mass and ejecta velocities) on the controlling parameters of the collision. We present results from our ongoing study showing the positive correlation between impact energy and ejecta mass. The total ejecta mass is also dependent on the packing density (porosity) of the regolith. We find that ejecta mass velocity fits a power-law or broken power-law distribution. Our goal is to understand the physics of ejecta production and regolith compaction in low-energy impacts and experimentally validate predictive models for dust flow and deposition. We will present our

  11. Status of the MIND simulation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera Villanueva, A.; Martin-Albo, J.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Lindroos, L.

    2010-03-30

    A realistic simulation of the Neutrino Factory detectors is required in order to fully understand the sensitivity of such a facility to the remaining parameters and degeneracies of the neutrino mixing matrix. Here described is the status of a modular software framework being developed to accommodate such a study. The results of initial studies of the reconstruction software and expected efficiency curves in the context of the golden channel are given.

  12. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, J.

    2014-12-01

    The deployment and use of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries in automotive and stationary energy storage applications must be optimized to justify their high up-front costs. Given that batteries degrade with use and storage, such optimizations must evaluate many years of operation. As the degradation mechanisms are sensitive to temperature, state-of-charge (SOC) histories, current levels, and cycle depth and frequency, it is important to model both the battery and the application to a high level of detail to ensure battery response is accurately predicted. To address these issues, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) suite. This suite of tools pairs NREL’s high-fidelity battery degradation model with a battery electrical and thermal performance model, application-specific electrical and thermal performance models of the larger system (e.g., an electric vehicle), application-specific system use data (e.g., vehicle travel patterns and driving data), and historic climate data from cities across the United States. This provides highly realistic long-term predictions of battery response and thereby enables quantitative comparisons of varied battery use strategies.

  13. Simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigmon, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    The relative value of thermal energy storage (TES) for heat pump storage (heating and cooling) as a function of storage temperature, mode of storage (hotside or coldside), geographic locations, and utility time of use rate structures were derived. Computer models used to simulate the performance of a number of TES/heat pump configurations are described. The models are based on existing performance data of heat pump components, available building thermal load computational procedures, and generalized TES subsystem design. Life cycle costs computed for each site, configuration, and rate structure are discussed.

  14. Stochastic Modeling of Overtime Occupancy and Its Application in Building Energy Simulation and Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Kaiyu; Yan, Da; Hong, Tianzhen; Guo, Siyue

    2014-02-28

    Overtime is a common phenomenon around the world. Overtime drives both internal heat gains from occupants, lighting and plug-loads, and HVAC operation during overtime periods. Overtime leads to longer occupancy hours and extended operation of building services systems beyond normal working hours, thus overtime impacts total building energy use. Current literature lacks methods to model overtime occupancy because overtime is stochastic in nature and varies by individual occupants and by time. To address this gap in the literature, this study aims to develop a new stochastic model based on the statistical analysis of measured overtime occupancy data from an office building. A binomial distribution is used to represent the total number of occupants working overtime, while an exponential distribution is used to represent the duration of overtime periods. The overtime model is used to generate overtime occupancy schedules as an input to the energy model of a second office building. The measured and simulated cooling energy use during the overtime period is compared in order to validate the overtime model. A hybrid approach to energy model calibration is proposed and tested, which combines ASHRAE Guideline 14 for the calibration of the energy model during normal working hours, and a proposed KS test for the calibration of the energy model during overtime. The developed stochastic overtime model and the hybrid calibration approach can be used in building energy simulations to improve the accuracy of results, and better understand the characteristics of overtime in office buildings.

  15. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  16. Spacecraft Trajectory Analysis and Mission Planning Simulation (STAMPS) Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puckett, Nancy; Pettinger, Kris; Hallstrom,John; Brownfield, Dana; Blinn, Eric; Williams, Frank; Wiuff, Kelli; McCarty, Steve; Ramirez, Daniel; Lamotte, Nicole; Vu, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    STAMPS simulates either three- or six-degree-of-freedom cases for all spacecraft flight phases using translated HAL flight software or generic GN&C models. Single or multiple trajectories can be simulated for use in optimization and dispersion analysis. It includes math models for the vehicle and environment, and currently features a "C" version of shuttle onboard flight software. The STAMPS software is used for mission planning and analysis within ascent/descent, rendezvous, proximity operations, and navigation flight design areas.

  17. Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2013-02-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  18. Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP.

  19. Simulating environmental changes due to marine hydrokinetic energy installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Craig A.; James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse Daniel; Seetho, Eddy

    2010-08-01

    Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) projects will extract energy from ocean currents and tides, thereby altering water velocities and currents in the site's waterway. These hydrodynamics changes can potentially affect the ecosystem, both near the MHK installation and in surrounding (i.e., far field) regions. In both marine and freshwater environments, devices will remove energy (momentum) from the system, potentially altering water quality and sediment dynamics. In estuaries, tidal ranges and residence times could change (either increasing or decreasing depending on system flow properties and where the effects are being measured). Effects will be proportional to the number and size of structures installed, with large MHK projects having the greatest potential effects and requiring the most in-depth analyses. This work implements modification to an existing flow, sediment dynamics, and water-quality code (SNL-EFDC) to qualify, quantify, and visualize the influence of MHK-device momentum/energy extraction at a representative site. New algorithms simulate changes to system fluid dynamics due to removal of momentum and reflect commensurate changes in turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. A generic model is developed to demonstrate corresponding changes to erosion, sediment dynamics, and water quality. Also, bed-slope effects on sediment erosion and bedload velocity are incorporated to better understand scour potential.

  20. Comparative Lifecycle Energy Analysis: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jeffrey; Canzoneri, Diana

    1992-01-01

    Explores the position that more energy is conserved through recycling secondary materials than is generated from municipal solid waste incineration. Discusses one component of a lifecycle analysis--a comparison of energy requirements for manufacturing competing products. Includes methodological issues, energy cost estimates, and difficulties…

  1. Cochlear implant simulator for surgical technique analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turok, Rebecca L.; Labadie, Robert F.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Noble, Jack H.

    2014-03-01

    Cochlear Implant (CI) surgery is a procedure in which an electrode array is inserted into the cochlea. The electrode array is used to stimulate auditory nerve fibers and restore hearing for people with severe to profound hearing loss. The primary goals when placing the electrode array are to fully insert the array into the cochlea while minimizing trauma to the cochlea. Studying the relationship between surgical outcome and various surgical techniques has been difficult since trauma and electrode placement are generally unknown without histology. Our group has created a CI placement simulator that combines an interactive 3D visualization environment with a haptic-feedback-enabled controller. Surgical techniques and patient anatomy can be varied between simulations so that outcomes can be studied under varied conditions. With this system, we envision that through numerous trials we will be able to statistically analyze how outcomes relate to surgical techniques. As a first test of this system, in this work, we have designed an experiment in which we compare the spatial distribution of forces imparted to the cochlea in the array insertion procedure when using two different but commonly used surgical techniques for cochlear access, called round window and cochleostomy access. Our results suggest that CIs implanted using round window access may cause less trauma to deeper intracochlear structures than cochleostomy techniques. This result is of interest because it challenges traditional thinking in the otological community but might offer an explanation for recent anecdotal evidence that suggests that round window access techniques lead to better outcomes.

  2. Tool for Rapid Analysis of Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; McCall, Kurt E.; Hurtado, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Designing a spacecraft, or any other complex engineering system, requires extensive simulation and analysis work. Oftentimes, the large amounts of simulation data generated are very di cult and time consuming to analyze, with the added risk of overlooking potentially critical problems in the design. The authors have developed a generic data analysis tool that can quickly sort through large data sets and point an analyst to the areas in the data set that cause specific types of failures. The Tool for Rapid Analysis of Monte Carlo simulations (TRAM) has been used in recent design and analysis work for the Orion vehicle, greatly decreasing the time it takes to evaluate performance requirements. A previous version of this tool was developed to automatically identify driving design variables in Monte Carlo data sets. This paper describes a new, parallel version, of TRAM implemented on a graphical processing unit, and presents analysis results for NASA's Orion Monte Carlo data to demonstrate its capabilities.

  3. Energy Analysis Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Analysis Program has played an active role in the analysis and discussion of energy and environmental issues at several levels. (1) at the international level, with programs as developing scenarios for long-term energy demand in developing countries and organizing leading an analytic effort, ``Energy Efficiency, Developing Countries, and Eastern Europe,`` part of a major effort to increase support for energy efficiency programs worldwide; (2) at national level, the Program has been responsible for assessing energy forecasts and policies affecting energy use (e.g., appliance standards, National Energy Strategy scenarios); and (3) at the state and utility levels, the Program has been a leader in promoting integrated resource utility planning; the collaborative process has led to agreement on a new generation of utility demand-site programs in California, providing an opportunity to use knowledge and analytic techniques of the Program`s researchers. We continue to place highest on analyzing energy efficiency, with particular attention given to energy use in buildings. The Program continues its active analysis of international energy issues in Asia (including China), the Soviet Union, South America, and Western Europe. Analyzing the costs and benefits of different levels of standards for residential appliances continues to be the largest single area of research within the Program. The group has developed and applied techniques for forecasting energy demand (or constructing scenarios) for the United States. We have built a new model of industrial energy demand, are in the process of making major changes in our tools for forecasting residential energy demand, have built an extensive and documented energy conservation supply curve of residential energy use, and are beginning an analysis of energy-demand forecasting for commercial buildings.

  4. Energy Analysis Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Analysis Program has played an active role in the analysis and discussion of energy and environmental issues at several levels. (1) at the international level, with programs as developing scenarios for long-term energy demand in developing countries and organizing leading an analytic effort, Energy Efficiency, Developing Countries, and Eastern Europe,'' part of a major effort to increase support for energy efficiency programs worldwide; (2) at national level, the Program has been responsible for assessing energy forecasts and policies affecting energy use (e.g., appliance standards, National Energy Strategy scenarios); and (3) at the state and utility levels, the Program has been a leader in promoting integrated resource utility planning; the collaborative process has led to agreement on a new generation of utility demand-site programs in California, providing an opportunity to use knowledge and analytic techniques of the Program's researchers. We continue to place highest on analyzing energy efficiency, with particular attention given to energy use in buildings. The Program continues its active analysis of international energy issues in Asia (including China), the Soviet Union, South America, and Western Europe. Analyzing the costs and benefits of different levels of standards for residential appliances continues to be the largest single area of research within the Program. The group has developed and applied techniques for forecasting energy demand (or constructing scenarios) for the United States. We have built a new model of industrial energy demand, are in the process of making major changes in our tools for forecasting residential energy demand, have built an extensive and documented energy conservation supply curve of residential energy use, and are beginning an analysis of energy-demand forecasting for commercial buildings.

  5. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of the energy transfer between building blocks in a phenylene ethynylene dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Kleiman, Valeria D; Tretiak, Sergei; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2009-07-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of electronic and vibrational energy transfer between two- and three-ring linear poly(phenylene ethynylene) units linked by meta-substitution is studied by nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. The molecular dynamics with quantum transitions (1, 2) method is used including an "on the fly" calculation of the potential energy surfaces and electronic couplings. The results show that during the first 40 fs after a vertical photoexcitation to the S(2) state, the nonadiabatic coupling between S(2) and S(1) states causes a fast transfer of the electronic populations. A rapid decrease of the S(1)-S(2) energy gap is observed, reaching a first conical intersection at approximately 5 fs. Therefore, the first hopping events take place, and the S(2) state starts to depopulate. The analysis of the structural and energetic properties of the molecule during the jumps reveals the main role that the ethynylene triple bond plays in the unidirectional energy transfer process. PMID:19378966

  6. Feasibility of generating quantitative composition images in dual energy mammography: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. For years, mammography has been used as the gold standard for localizing breast cancer, despite its limitation in determining cancer composition. Therefore, the purpose of this simulation study is to confirm the feasibility of obtaining tumor composition using dual energy digital mammography. To generate X-ray sources for dual energy mammography, 26 kVp and 39 kVp voltages were generated for low and high energy beams, respectively. Additionally, the energy subtraction and inverse mapping functions were applied to provide compositional images. The resultant images showed that the breast composition obtained by the inverse mapping function with cubic fitting achieved the highest accuracy and least noise. Furthermore, breast density analysis with cubic fitting showed less than 10% error compare to true values. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the feasibility of creating individual compositional images and capability of analyzing breast density effectively.

  7. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Energy Savings: The Simulated Energy and Experimental Hygrothermal Performance of Cold Climate Foundation Wall Insulation Retrofit Measures -- Phase I, Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L. F.; Steigauf, B.

    2013-04-01

    A split simulation whole building energy/3-dimensional earth contact model (termed the BUFETS/EnergyPlus Model or BEM) capable of modeling the full range of foundation systems found in the target retrofit housing stock has been extensively tested. These foundation systems that include abovegrade foundation walls, diabatic floors or slabs as well as lookout or walkout walls, currently cannot be modeled within BEopt.

  8. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Energy Savings. The Simulated Energy and Experimental Hygrothermal Performance of Cold Climate Foundation Wall Insulation Retrofit Measures -- Phase I, Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Steigauf, Brianna

    2013-04-01

    A split simulation whole building energy / 3-dimensional earth contact model (termed the BUFETS/EnergyPlus Model or BEM) capable of modeling the full range of foundation systems found in the target retrofit housing stock has been extensively tested. These foundation systems that include abovegrade foundation walls, diabatic floors or slabs as well as lookout or walkout walls, currently cannot be modeled within BEopt.

  9. Starlight emergence angle error analysis of star simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Guo-yu

    2015-10-01

    With continuous development of the key technologies of star sensor, the precision of star simulator have been to be further improved, for it directly affects the accuracy of star sensor laboratory calibration. For improving the accuracy level of the star simulator, a theoretical accuracy analysis model need to be proposed. According the ideal imaging model of star simulator, the theoretical accuracy analysis model can be established. Based on theoretically analyzing the theoretical accuracy analysis model we can get that the starlight emergent angle deviation is primarily affected by star position deviation, main point position deviation, focal length deviation, distortion deviation and object plane tilt deviation. Based on the above affecting factors, a comprehensive deviation model can be established. According to the model, the formula of each factors deviation model separately and the comprehensive deviation model can be summarized and concluded out. By analyzing the properties of each factors deviation model and the comprehensive deviation model formula, concluding the characteristics of each factors respectively and the weight relationship among them. According the result of analysis of the comprehensive deviation model, a reasonable designing indexes can be given by considering the star simulator optical system requirements and the precision of machining and adjustment. So, starlight emergence angle error analysis of star simulator is very significant to guide the direction of determining and demonstrating the index of star simulator, analyzing and compensating the error of star simulator for improving the accuracy of star simulator and establishing a theoretical basis for further improving the starlight angle precision of the star simulator can effectively solve the problem.

  10. Thermostructural analysis of simulated cowl lips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    1988-01-01

    Three dimensional finite element analyses using MSC/NASTRAN and MARC are performed to predict the thermal and structural response of various cooling schemes under high heat loads. Steady state heat transfer analyses and elastic stress analyses are performed using MSC/NASTRAN. Elastic/plastic analyses are done using MARC. To help verify these analyses experimentally, a hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine was modified to use the exhaust stream as a high enthalpy, high heat flux source to evaluate various actively cooled, simulated cowl lip (leading edges) segments as well as flat structural segments. Cross flow and parallel flow cooling configurations were tested and analyzed using cooling fluids of water and gaseous hydrogen. In addition, various material types, including high conductivity copper, nickel, and a copper and graphite metal matrix composite were tested and compared.

  11. Analysis of ship maneuvering data from simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frette, V.; Kleppe, G.; Christensen, K.

    2011-03-01

    We analyze complex manuevering histories of ships obtained from training sessions on bridge simulators. Advanced ships are used in fields like offshore oil exploration: dive support vessels, supply vessels, anchor handling vessels, tugs, cable layers, and multi-purpose vessels. Due to high demands from the operations carried out, these ships need to have very high maneuverability. This is achieved through a propulsion system with several thrusters, water jets, and rudders in addition to standard propellers. For some operations, like subsea maintenance, it is crucial that the ship accurately keeps a fixed position. Therefore, bridge systems usually incorporate equipment for Dynamic Positioning (DP). DP is a method to keep ships and semi submersible rigs in a fixed position using the propulsion systems instead of anchors. It may also be used for sailing a vessel from one position to another along a predefined route. Like an autopilot on an airplane, DP may operate without human involvement. The method relies on accurate determination of position from external reference systems like GPS, as well as a continuously adjusted mathematical model of the ship and external forces from wind, waves and currents. In a specific simulator exercise for offshore crews, a ship is to be taken up to an installation consisting of three nearby oil platforms connected by bridges (Frigg field, North Sea), where a subsea inspection is to be carried out. Due to the many degrees of freedom during maneuvering, including partly or full use of DP, the chosen routes vary significantly. In this poster we report preliminary results on representations of the complex maneuvering histories; representations that allow comparison between crew groups, and, possibly, sorting of the different strategic choices behind.

  12. Terascale simulations for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Sharp, W M; Celata, C M; Lee, E P; Vay, J-L; Davidson, R C; Kaganovich, I; Lee, W W; Qin, H; Welch, D R; Haber, I; Kishek, R A

    2000-06-08

    The intense ion beams in a heavy ion Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) driver and fusion chamber are non-neutral plasmas whose dynamics are largely dominated by space charge. We propose to develop a ''source-to-target'' Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam simulation capability: a description of the kinetic behavior of this complex, nonlinear system which is both integrated and detailed. We will apply this new capability to further our understanding of key scientific issues in the physics of ion beams for IFE. The simulations will entail self-consistent field descriptions that require interprocessor communication, but are scalable and will run efficiently on terascale architectures. This new capability will be based on the integration of three types of simulations, each requiring terascale computing: (1) simulations of acceleration and confinement of the space-charge-dominated ion beams through the driver (accelerator, pulse compression line, and final focusing system) which accurately describe their dynamics, including emittance growth (phase-space dilution) effects; these are particle-in-cell (PIC) models; (2) electromagnetic (EM) and magnetoinductive (Darwin) simulations which describe the beam and the fusion chamber environment, including multibeam, neutralization, stripping, beam and plasma ionization processes, and return current effects; and (3) highly detailed simulations (6f, multispecies PIC, continuum Vlasov), which can examine electron effects and collective modes in the driver and chamber, and can study halo generation with excellent statistics, to ensure that these effects do not disrupt the focusability of the beams. The code development will involve: (i) adaptation of existing codes to run efficiently on multi-SMP computers that use a hybrid of shared and distributed memory; (ii) development of new and improved numerical algorithms, e.g., averaging techniques that will afford larger timesteps; and (iii) incorporation of improved physics models (e.g., for self

  13. A Computer Simulation of the U.S. Energy Crisis, Energy. Teacher Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the teacher's guide to accompany the student guide which together comprise one of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. The computer program, ENERGY, at the base of this unit, simulates the pattern of energy consumption in the United States. The total energy demand is determined by energy use in the various sectors…

  14. a Two-Dimensional Device Simulator Using a Generalized Energy Transport Model and its Application in Deep Sub - Device Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zezhong

    1992-01-01

    A generalized energy transport (G-ET) model is introduced. This model incorporates the effects of non -analytic carrier distribution functions and the dominant scattering process on the formulation of the energy transport model, also includes effects of the electron transfer between the lower valley occurs in multivalley semi-conductors. A path-integration and slope-weighting Monte Carlo (PSMC) method is introduced to speed up the conventional MC method, and to improve its accuracy and smoothness. A stable extended S-G discretization algorithm was developed for the G-ET model. Further, many numerical techniques, including methods of mesh auto generation, updating and scaling, trial solution with 2D extrapolation, a global convergence test, a convergence refining, a forced -damping and residual-current filtering, were developed to improve the convergence and the computation efficiency. UMDFET2, a general submicron device simulator, was implemented with G-ET model, an efficient hot electron injection model, a Fowler-Nordheim tunneling model, an impact ionization model, and a model for band-to-band tunneling have also been added. A discretized gate capacitor (DGC) EPROM model and post-processing quasi-transient (PPQT) method has been introduced to efficiently and accurately simulate EPROM devices. Deep submicron NMOS devices have been simulated to study velocity overshoot and hot electron effects. UMDFET2 has been successfully used to predict the V_{t}, I_{ds}, I_{sub}, I_{g}, the programming and erasing characteristics V_ {t}(t) of submicron EPROM/Flash devices. A "Virtual Fab", which consists of statistics analysis tool for experimental design and data analysis, SUPREM3/4 for process simulation, and UMDFET2 for device simulation, has been used successfully for EPROM device design and optimization, and has demonstrated a good predicting ability with excellent overall accuracy. The correlation of the ET models and MC models has been studied, and it has been found that

  15. Impact of the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS) on Building Energy Performance Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    2007-08-01

    The U.S. National Institute for Building Sciences (NIBS) started the development of the National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS). Its goal is to define standard sets of data required to describe any given building in necessary detail so that any given AECO industry discipline application can find needed data at any point in the building lifecycle. This will include all data that are used in or are pertinent to building energy performance simulation and analysis. This paper describes the background that lead to the development of NBIMS, its goals and development methodology, its Part 1 (Version 1.0), and its probable impact on building energy performance simulation and analysis.

  16. Effective Energy Simulation and Optimal Design of Side-lit Buildings with Venetian Blinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tian

    Venetian blinds are popularly used in buildings to control the amount of incoming daylight for improving visual comfort and reducing heat gains in air-conditioning systems. Studies have shown that the proper design and operation of window systems could result in significant energy savings in both lighting and cooling. However, there is no convenient computer tool that allows effective and efficient optimization of the envelope of side-lit buildings with blinds now. Three computer tools, Adeline, DOE2 and EnergyPlus widely used for the above-mentioned purpose have been experimentally examined in this study. Results indicate that the two former tools give unacceptable accuracy due to unrealistic assumptions adopted while the last one may generate large errors in certain conditions. Moreover, current computer tools have to conduct hourly energy simulations, which are not necessary for life-cycle energy analysis and optimal design, to provide annual cooling loads. This is not computationally efficient, particularly not suitable for optimal designing a building at initial stage because the impacts of many design variations and optional features have to be evaluated. A methodology is therefore developed for efficient and effective thermal and daylighting simulations and optimal design of buildings with blinds. Based on geometric optics and radiosity method, a mathematical model is developed to reasonably simulate the daylighting behaviors of venetian blinds. Indoor illuminance at any reference point can be directly and efficiently computed. They have been validated with both experiments and simulations with Radiance. Validation results show that indoor illuminances computed by the new models agree well with the measured data, and the accuracy provided by them is equivalent to that of Radiance. The computational efficiency of the new models is much higher than that of Radiance as well as EnergyPlus. Two new methods are developed for the thermal simulation of buildings. A

  17. Parabolic trough collector power plant performance simulation for an interactive solar energy Atlas of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Mercedes; Frasquet, Miguel; Al Rished, Abdulaziz; Tuomiranta, Arttu; Gasim, Sami; Ghedira, Hosni

    2016-05-01

    The collaboration between the Research Center for Renewable Energy Mapping and Assessment (ReCREMA) at Masdar Institute of Science and Technology and the King Abdullah City for Atomic & Renewable Energy (KACARE) aims to create an interactive web tool integrated in the Renewable Resource Atlas where different solar thermal electricity (STE) utility-scale technologies will be simulated. In this paper, a methodology is presented for sizing and performance simulation of the solar field of parabolic trough collector (PTC) plants. The model is used for a case study analysis of the potential of STE in three sites located in the central, western, and eastern parts of Saudi Arabia. The plant located in the north (Tayma) has the lowest number of collectors with the best production along the year.

  18. Hydrodynamical N-body simulations of coupled dark energy cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Marco; Pettorino, Valeria; Robbers, Georg; Springel, Volker

    2010-04-01

    If the accelerated expansion of the Universe at the present epoch is driven by a dark energy scalar field, there may well be a non-trivial coupling between the dark energy and the cold dark matter (CDM) fluid. Such interactions give rise to new features in cosmological structure growth, like an additional long-range attractive force between CDM particles, or variations of the dark matter particle mass with time. We have implemented these effects in the N-body code GADGET-2 and present results of a series of high-resolution N-body simulations where the dark energy component is directly interacting with the CDM. As a consequence of the new physics, CDM and baryon distributions evolve differently both in the linear and in the non-linear regime of structure formation. Already on large scales, a linear bias develops between these two components, which is further enhanced by the non-linear evolution. We also find, in contrast with previous work, that the density profiles of CDM haloes are less concentrated in coupled dark energy cosmologies compared with ΛCDM, and that this feature does not depend on the initial conditions setup, but is a specific consequence of the extra physics induced by the coupling. Also, the baryon fraction in haloes in the coupled models is significantly reduced below the universal baryon fraction. These features alleviate tensions between observations and the ΛCDM model on small scales. Our methodology is ideally suited to explore the predictions of coupled dark energy models in the fully non-linear regime, which can provide powerful constraints for the viable parameter space of such scenarios.

  19. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well

  20. Aiding Design of Wave Energy Converters via Computational Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebeli Aqdam, Hejar; Ahmadi, Babak; Raessi, Mehdi; Tootkaboni, Mazdak

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing interest in renewable energy sources, wave energy converters will continue to gain attention as a viable alternative to current electricity production methods. It is therefore crucial to develop computational tools for the design and analysis of wave energy converters. A successful design requires balance between the design performance and cost. Here an analytical solution is used for the approximate analysis of interactions between a flap-type wave energy converter (WEC) and waves. The method is verified using other flow solvers and experimental test cases. Then the model is used in conjunction with a powerful heuristic optimization engine, Charged System Search (CSS) to explore the WEC design space. CSS is inspired by charged particles behavior. It searches the design space by considering candidate answers as charged particles and moving them based on the Coulomb's laws of electrostatics and Newton's laws of motion to find the global optimum. Finally the impacts of changes in different design parameters on the power takeout of the superior WEC designs are investigated. National Science Foundation, CBET-1236462.

  1. Evaluation of Emerging Energy-Efficient Heterogeneous Computing Platforms for Biomolecular and Cellular Simulation Workloads

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John E.; Hallock, Michael J.; Phillips, James C.; Peterson, Joseph R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Many of the continuing scientific advances achieved through computational biology are predicated on the availability of ongoing increases in computational power required for detailed simulation and analysis of cellular processes on biologically-relevant timescales. A critical challenge facing the development of future exascale supercomputer systems is the development of new computing hardware and associated scientific applications that dramatically improve upon the energy efficiency of existing solutions, while providing increased simulation, analysis, and visualization performance. Mobile computing platforms have recently become powerful enough to support interactive molecular visualization tasks that were previously only possible on laptops and workstations, creating future opportunities for their convenient use for meetings, remote collaboration, and as head mounted displays for immersive stereoscopic viewing. We describe early experiences adapting several biomolecular simulation and analysis applications for emerging heterogeneous computing platforms that combine power-efficient system-on-chip multi-core CPUs with high-performance massively parallel GPUs. We present low-cost power monitoring instrumentation that provides sufficient temporal resolution to evaluate the power consumption of individual CPU algorithms and GPU kernels. We compare the performance and energy efficiency of scientific applications running on emerging platforms with results obtained on traditional platforms, identify hardware and algorithmic performance bottlenecks that affect the usability of these platforms, and describe avenues for improving both the hardware and applications in pursuit of the needs of molecular modeling tasks on mobile devices and future exascale computers. PMID:27516922

  2. Annual Energy Consumption Analysis Report for Richland Middle School

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing

    2003-12-18

    Richland Middle School is a single story, 90,000 square feet new school located in Richland, WA. The design team proposed four HVAC system options to serve the building. The proposed HVAC systems are listed as following: (1) 4-pipe fan coil units served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boilers, (2) Ground-source closed water loop heat pumps with water loop heat pumps with boiler and cooling tower, and (3) VAV system served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boiler. This analysis estimates the annual energy consumptions and costs of each system option, in order to provide the design team with a reasonable basis for determining which system is most life-cycle cost effective. eQuest (version 3.37), a computer-based energy simulation program that uses the DOE-2 simulation engine, was used to estimate the annual energy costs.

  3. Analysis & Simulation of Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmatad, Yael Sarah

    2011-12-01

    The nature of supercooled liquids and the glass transition has been debated by many scientists. Several theories have been put forth to describe the remarkable properties of this out-of-equilibrium material. Each of these theories makes specific predictions as to how the scaling of various transport properties in supercooled materials should behave. Given access to a large pool of high-quality supercooled liquid data we seek to compare these theories to one another. Moreover, we explore properties of a pair of models which are the basis for one particularly attractive theory---Chandler-Garrahan theory---and discuss the models' behavior in space-time and possible implications to the behavior of experimental supercooled liquids. Here we investigate the nature of dynamics in supercooled liquids using a two pronged approach. First we analyze the transport properties found in experiments and simulations of supercooled liquids. Then, we analyze simulation trajectories for lattice models which reproduce many of the interesting properties of supercooled liquids. In doing so, we illuminate several glass universalities, common properties of a wide variety of glass formers. By analyzing relaxation time and viscosity data for over 50 data sets and 1200 points, we find that relaxation time can be collapsed onto a single, parabolic curve. This collapse supports a theory of universal glass behavior based on facilitated models proposed by David Chandler and Juan Garrahan in 2003. We then show that the parabolic fit parameters for any particular liquid are a material property: they converge fast and are capable of predicting behavior in regions beyond the included data sets. We compare this property to other popular fitting schemes such as the Vogel-Fulcher, double exponential, and fractional exponential forms and conclude that these three forms result in parameters which are non predictive and therefore not material properties. Additionally, we examine the role of attractive

  4. Analysis of Medication Errors in Simulated Pediatric Resuscitation by Residents

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Evelyn; Barcega, Besh; Kim, Tommy Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The objective of our study was to estimate the incidence of prescribing medication errors specifically made by a trainee and identify factors associated with these errors during the simulated resuscitation of a critically ill child. Methods The results of the simulated resuscitation are described. We analyzed data from the simulated resuscitation for the occurrence of a prescribing medication error. We compared univariate analysis of each variable to medication error rate and performed a separate multiple logistic regression analysis on the significant univariate variables to assess the association between the selected variables. Results We reviewed 49 simulated resuscitations. The final medication error rate for the simulation was 26.5% (95% CI 13.7% – 39.3%). On univariate analysis, statistically significant findings for decreased prescribing medication error rates included senior residents in charge, presence of a pharmacist, sleeping greater than 8 hours prior to the simulation, and a visual analog scale score showing more confidence in caring for critically ill children. Multiple logistic regression analysis using the above significant variables showed only the presence of a pharmacist to remain significantly associated with decreased medication error, odds ratio of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01 – 0.64). Conclusion Our results indicate that the presence of a clinical pharmacist during the resuscitation of a critically ill child reduces the medication errors made by resident physician trainees. PMID:25035756

  5. In-Situ Statistical Analysis of Autotune Simulation Data using Graphical Processing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Niloo; Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan

    2013-08-01

    Developing accurate building energy simulation models to assist energy efficiency at speed and scale is one of the research goals of the Whole-Building and Community Integration group, which is a part of Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The aim of the Autotune project is to speed up the automated calibration of building energy models to match measured utility or sensor data. The workflow of this project takes input parameters and runs EnergyPlus simulations on Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility s (OLCF) computing resources such as Titan, the world s second fastest supercomputer. Multiple simulations run in parallel on nodes having 16 processors each and a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Each node produces a 5.7 GB output file comprising 256 files from 64 simulations. Four types of output data covering monthly, daily, hourly, and 15-minute time steps for each annual simulation is produced. A total of 270TB+ of data has been produced. In this project, the simulation data is statistically analyzed in-situ using GPUs while annual simulations are being computed on the traditional processors. Titan, with its recent addition of 18,688 Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) capable NVIDIA GPUs, has greatly extended its capability for massively parallel data processing. CUDA is used along with C/MPI to calculate statistical metrics such as sum, mean, variance, and standard deviation leveraging GPU acceleration. The workflow developed in this project produces statistical summaries of the data which reduces by multiple orders of magnitude the time and amount of data that needs to be stored. These statistical capabilities are anticipated to be useful for sensitivity analysis of EnergyPlus simulations.

  6. Gyrokinetic theory and simulation of turbulent energy exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.

    2008-01-15

    A previous gyrokinetic theory of turbulent heating [F. L. Hinton and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Plasma 13, 102301 (2006)] is simplified and extended to show that the local radial average of terms in the gyrokinetic turbulent heating (which survive in the drift kinetic limit) are actually closer to a turbulent energy exchange between electrons and ions. The integrated flow for the local exchange is simulated with the GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] delta-f gyrokinetic code and found to be small in a well studied DIII-D [M. A. Mahdavi and J. L. Luxon, ''DIII-D Tokamak Special Issue'' Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] L-mode discharge.

  7. Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of an Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Ryan Foster

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is carried out using the 1-D BUCKY radiation hydrodynamics code for a variety of differing chamber fills, radii, chamber obstructions and first wall materials. Discussion of the first wall temperature rise, x-ray spectrum incident on the wall, shock timing and maximum overpressure are presented. An additional discussion of the impact of different gas opacities and their effect on overall chamber dynamics, including the formation of two shock fronts, is also presented. This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Fusion Technology Institute.

  8. Simulations of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashev, O. E.; Kido, E.

    2015-05-15

    We compare two techniques for simulation of the propagation of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in intergalactic space: the Monte Carlo approach and a method based on solving transport equations in one dimension. For the former, we adopt the publicly available tool CRPropa and for the latter, we use the code TransportCR, which has been developed by the first author and used in a number of applications, and is made available online with publishing this paper. While the CRPropa code is more universal, the transport equation solver has the advantage of a roughly 100 times higher calculation speed. We conclude that the methods give practically identical results for proton or neutron primaries if some accuracy improvements are introduced to the CRPropa code.

  9. Simulating Intense Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2001-02-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program's goal is the development of the body of knowledge needed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) to realize its promise. The intense ion beams that will drive HIF targets are nonneutral plasmas and exhibit collective, nonlinear dynamics which must be understood using the kinetic models of plasma physics. This beam physics is both rich and subtle: a wide range in spatial and temporal scales is involved, and effects associated with both instabilities and non-ideal processes must be understood. Ion beams have a ''long memory'', and initialization of a beam at mid-system with an idealized particle distribution introduces uncertainties; thus, it will be crucial to develop, and to extensively use, an integrated and detailed ''source-to-target'' HIF beam simulation capability. We begin with an overview of major issues.

  10. Simulating Intense Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    2001-02-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program's goal is the development of the body of knowledge needed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) to realize its promise. The intense ion beams that will drive HIF targets are rzonneutral plasmas and exhibit collective, nonlinear dynamics which must be understood using the kinetic models of plasma physics. This beam physics is both rich and subtle: a wide range in spatial and temporal scales is involved, and effects associated with both instabilities and non-ideal processes must be understood. Ion beams have a ''long memory,'' and initialization of a beam at mid-system with an idealized particle distribution introduces uncertainties; thus, it will be crucial to develop, and to extensively use, an integrated and detailed ''source-to-target'' HIF beam simulation capability. We begin with an overview of major issues.

  11. Simulated Energy Usage for a Novel 6 DOF Articulated Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaik, A. A.; Tlale, N.; Bright, G.

    2014-07-01

    The serial robot architecture is widespread in modern day manufacturing, and over the last few decades the technology has matured and settled to its current state. One drawback from the architecture however is the location of motors and gearboxes which are either at the joint it controls or close by. A novel hybrid 6 DOF robot was designed to move all the actuators to the robot base, and to control the desired axis through a set of connected links and gears, while maintaining the same workspace and dexterity. This would reduce the inertia of the movable part of the robot and some of the moment arms on the 3 axes required for translation of the 3 DOF spherical wrist. Doing so would decrease the energy requirements when compared to a 6 DOF serial robot. This paper focuses on the mathematical modelling and simulation of the novel hybrid machine design and compares it to an equivalent serial robot.

  12. Efficient Coalescent Simulation and Genealogical Analysis for Large Sample Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Jerome; Etheridge, Alison M; McVean, Gilean

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in the analysis of genetic variation is to provide realistic genome simulation across millions of samples. Present day coalescent simulations do not scale well, or use approximations that fail to capture important long-range linkage properties. Analysing the results of simulations also presents a substantial challenge, as current methods to store genealogies consume a great deal of space, are slow to parse and do not take advantage of shared structure in correlated trees. We solve these problems by introducing sparse trees and coalescence records as the key units of genealogical analysis. Using these tools, exact simulation of the coalescent with recombination for chromosome-sized regions over hundreds of thousands of samples is possible, and substantially faster than present-day approximate methods. We can also analyse the results orders of magnitude more quickly than with existing methods. PMID:27145223

  13. Delight2 Daylighting Analysis in Energy Plus: Integration and Preliminary User Results

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, William L.; Hitchcock, Robert J.

    2005-04-26

    DElight is a simulation engine for daylight and electric lighting system analysis in buildings. DElight calculates interior illuminance levels from daylight, and the subsequent contribution required from electric lighting to meet a desired interior illuminance. DElight has been specifically designed to integrate with building thermal simulation tools. This paper updates the DElight capability set, the status of integration into the simulation tool EnergyPlus, and describes a sample analysis of a simple model from the user perspective.

  14. Analysis and simulation of a city bus route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Leow Soo

    2014-12-01

    Public transport in crowded cities, in particular bus services play an essential role in the mobility of its citizenry. However, an efficient, reliable and safe bus system is still a distant dream of many cities. This paper uses a simulation approach to provide some insight into the factors that contribute to the service quality of a bus system. SAS Simulation Studio is used to model a city bus route. The simulation model consists of a bus depot, bus stops, terminal station and a bus route. Parameters used in the simulation include the number of buses serving the route, maximum bus capacity, inter departure time of buses, travel time between stops, number of passengers boarding and alighting. The simulation is applied to a real bus route in Kuala Lumpur city center and a sensitivity analysis is performed to evaluate how the different variables affect the service quality of the bus system.

  15. Energy landscape of LeuT from molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gur, Mert; Zomot, Elia; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine transporter (LeuT) has been broadly used as a structural model for understanding the structure-dynamics-function of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters as well as other solute carriers that share the same fold (LeuT fold), as the first member of the family crystallographically resolved in multiple states: outward-facing open, outward-facing occluded, and inward-facing open. Yet, a complete picture of the energy landscape of (sub)states visited along the LeuT transport cycle has been elusive. In an attempt to visualize the conformational spectrum of LeuT, we performed extensive simulations of LeuT dimer dynamics in the presence of substrate (Ala or Leu) and co-transported Na+ ions, in explicit membrane and water. We used both conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with Anton supercomputing machine) and a recently introduced method, collective MD, that takes advantage of collective modes of motions predicted by the anisotropic network model. Free energy landscapes constructed based on ˜40 μs trajectories reveal multiple substates occluded to the extracellular (EC) and/or intracellular (IC) media, varying in the levels of exposure of LeuT to EC or IC vestibules. The IC-facing transmembrane (TM) helical segment TM1a shows an opening, albeit to a smaller extent and in a slightly different direction than that observed in the inward-facing open crystal structure. The study provides insights into the spectrum of conformational substates and paths accessible to LeuT and highlights the differences between Ala- and Leu-bound substates.

  16. Energy Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A; Markel, T; Zolot, M; Sprik, S; Tataria, H; Duong, T

    2005-08-01

    In recent years, hydrogen fuel cell (FC) vehicle technology has received considerable attention as a strategy to decrease oil consumption and reduce harmful emissions. However, the cost, transient response, and cold performance of FC systems may present significant challenges to widespread adoption of the technology for transportation in the next 15 years. The objectives of this effort were to perform energy storage modeling with fuel cell vehicle simulations to quantify the benefits of hybridization and to identify a process for setting the requirements of ES for hydrogen-powered FC vehicles for U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program.

  17. Digital computer simulation of inductor-energy-storage dc-to-dc converters with closed-loop regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.; Owen, H. A.; Wilson, T. G.; Rodriguez, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    The simulation of converter-controller combinations by means of a flexible digital computer program which produces output to a graphic display is discussed. The procedure is an alternative to mathematical analysis of converter systems. The types of computer programming involved in the simulation are described. Schematic diagrams, state equations, and output equations are displayed for four basic forms of inductor-energy-storage dc to dc converters. Mathematical models are developed to show the relationship of the parameters.

  18. Energy consumption program: A computer model simulating energy loads in buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoller, F. W.; Lansing, F. L.; Chai, V. W.; Higgins, S.

    1978-01-01

    The JPL energy consumption computer program developed as a useful tool in the on-going building modification studies in the DSN energy conservation project is described. The program simulates building heating and cooling loads and computes thermal and electric energy consumption and cost. The accuracy of computations are not sacrificed, however, since the results lie within + or - 10 percent margin compared to those read from energy meters. The program is carefully structured to reduce both user's time and running cost by asking minimum information from the user and reducing many internal time-consuming computational loops. Many unique features were added to handle two-level electronics control rooms not found in any other program.

  19. Geothermal Energy Development in the Eastern United States, Sensitivity analysis-cost of geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.M.; Kroll, P.; Nilo, B.

    1982-12-01

    The Geothermal Resources Interactive Temporal Simulation (GRITS) model is a computer code designed to estimate the costs of geothermal energy systems. The interactive program allows the user to vary resource, demand, and financial parameters to observe their effects on delivered costs of direct-use geothermal energy. Due to the large number and interdependent nature of the variables that influence these costs, the variables can be handled practically only through computer modeling. This report documents a sensitivity analysis of the cost of direct-use geothermal energy where each major element is varied to measure the responsiveness of cost to changes in that element. It is hoped that this analysis will assist those persons interested in geothermal energy to understand the most significant cost element as well as those individuals interested in using the GRITS program in the future.

  20. Phonon transport analysis of semiconductor nanocomposites using monte carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malladi, Mayank

    Nanocomposites are composite materials which incorporate nanosized particles, platelets or fibers. The addition of nanosized phases into the bulk matrix can lead to significantly different material properties compared to their macrocomposite counterparts. For nanocomposites, thermal conductivity is one of the most important physical properties. Manipulation and control of thermal conductivity in nanocomposites have impacted a variety of applications. In particular, it has been shown that the phonon thermal conductivity can be reduced significantly in nanocomposites due to the increase in phonon interface scattering while the electrical conductivity can be maintained. This extraordinary property of nanocomposites has been used to enhance the energy conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric devices which is proportional to the ratio of electrical to thermal conductivity. This thesis investigates phonon transport and thermal conductivity in Si/Ge semiconductor nanocomposites through numerical analysis. The Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is adopted for description of phonon thermal transport in the nanocomposites. The BTE employs the particle-like nature of phonons to model heat transfer which accounts for both ballistic and diffusive transport phenomenon. Due to the implementation complexity and computational cost involved, the phonon BTE is difficult to solve in its most generic form. Gray media (frequency independent phonons) is often assumed in the numerical solution of BTE using conventional methods such as finite volume and discrete ordinates methods. This thesis solves the BTE using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique which is more convenient and efficient when non-gray media (frequency dependent phonons) is considered. In the MC simulation, phonons are displaced inside the computational domain under the various boundary conditions and scattering effects. In this work, under the relaxation time approximation, thermal transport in the nanocomposites are

  1. Life cycle analysis of energy systems: Methods and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel-cycle analysis if not the same as life-cycle analysis, although the focus on defining a comprehensive system for analysis leads toward the same path. This approach was the basis of the Brookhaven Reference Energy System. It provided a framework for summing total effects over an explicitly defined fuel cycle. This concept was computerized and coupled with an extensive data base in ESNS -- the Energy Systems Network Simulator. As an example, ESNS was the analytical basis for a comparison of health and environmental effects of several coal conversion technologies. With advances in computer systems and methods, however, ESNS has not been maintained at Brookhaven. The RES approach was one of the bases of the OECD COMPASS Project and the UNEP comparative assessment of environmental impacts of energy sources. An RES model alone has limitations in analyzing complex energy systems, e.g., it is difficult to handle feedback in the network. The most recent version of a series of optimization models is MARKAL, a dynamic linear programming model now used to assess strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the energy system. MARKAL creates an optimal set of reference energy systems over multiple time periods, automatically incorporating dynamic feedback and allowing fuel switching and end-use conservation to meet useful energy demands.

  2. Life cycle analysis of energy systems: Methods and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.C.

    1992-08-01

    Fuel-cycle analysis if not the same as life-cycle analysis, although the focus on defining a comprehensive system for analysis leads toward the same path. This approach was the basis of the Brookhaven Reference Energy System. It provided a framework for summing total effects over an explicitly defined fuel cycle. This concept was computerized and coupled with an extensive data base in ESNS -- the Energy Systems Network Simulator. As an example, ESNS was the analytical basis for a comparison of health and environmental effects of several coal conversion technologies. With advances in computer systems and methods, however, ESNS has not been maintained at Brookhaven. The RES approach was one of the bases of the OECD COMPASS Project and the UNEP comparative assessment of environmental impacts of energy sources. An RES model alone has limitations in analyzing complex energy systems, e.g., it is difficult to handle feedback in the network. The most recent version of a series of optimization models is MARKAL, a dynamic linear programming model now used to assess strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the energy system. MARKAL creates an optimal set of reference energy systems over multiple time periods, automatically incorporating dynamic feedback and allowing fuel switching and end-use conservation to meet useful energy demands.

  3. Predicting System Accidents with Model Analysis During Hybrid Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land D.; Throop, David R.

    2002-01-01

    Standard discrete event simulation is commonly used to identify system bottlenecks and starving and blocking conditions in resources and services. The CONFIG hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool can simulate such conditions in combination with inputs external to the simulation. This provides a means for evaluating the vulnerability to system accidents of a system's design, operating procedures, and control software. System accidents are brought about by complex unexpected interactions among multiple system failures , faulty or misleading sensor data, and inappropriate responses of human operators or software. The flows of resource and product materials play a central role in the hazardous situations that may arise in fluid transport and processing systems. We describe the capabilities of CONFIG for simulation-time linear circuit analysis of fluid flows in the context of model-based hazard analysis. We focus on how CONFIG simulates the static stresses in systems of flow. Unlike other flow-related properties, static stresses (or static potentials) cannot be represented by a set of state equations. The distribution of static stresses is dependent on the specific history of operations performed on a system. We discuss the use of this type of information in hazard analysis of system designs.

  4. Pick-up Ion Sputtering of Mars' Atmosphere: Analysis of MAVEN Data and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Hayley N.; Leclercq, Ludivine; Johnson, Robert E.; Curry, Shannon; Elrod, Meredith K.; Luhmann, Janet; Leblanc, Francois

    2016-10-01

    One of the ways hot oxygen escapes the exosphere of Mars is through sputtering caused by the precipitation of, primarily, O+ pickup ions. This process is thought to have been particularly important early in martian history, as it is correlated with increased solar activity (Luhmann 1992). With ion precipitation data from the MAVEN mission for a variety of solar conditions (Leblanc 2015), we can potentially see the effect of atmospheric sputtering. To determine if this process is apparent in MAVEN data, we first model the thermosphere and exosphere with an O and CO2 Direct Simulation Monte Carlo model. We then introduce a heat flux representative of the energy deposited by pickup ions for a variety solar conditions and look for the resulting signatures in the in situ neutral and ion atmospheric data from the NGIMS instrument available on the PDS. Preliminary simulations and data analysis are suggestive. Analysis of the simulations and the data analysis will be presented.

  5. Energy analysis program. 1995 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    This year the role of energy technology research and analysis supporting governmental and public interests is again being challenged at high levels of government. This situation is not unlike that of the early 1980s, when the Administration questioned the relevance of a federal commitment to applied energy research, especially for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Then Congress continued to support such activities, deeming them important to the nation`s interest. Today, Congress itself is challenging many facets of the federal role in energy. The Administration is also selectively reducing its support, primarily for the pragmatic objective of reducing federal expenditures, rather than because of principles opposing a public role in energy. this report is divided into three sections: International Energy and the global environment; Energy, economics, markets, and policy; and Buildings and their environment.

  6. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  7. Dispersion analysis techniques within the space vehicle dynamics simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.; Kuhn, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulation (SVDS) program was evaluated as a dispersion analysis tool. The Linear Error Analysis (LEA) post processor was examined in detail and simulation techniques relative to conducting a dispersion analysis using the SVDS were considered. The LEA processor is a tool for correlating trajectory dispersion data developed by simulating 3 sigma uncertainties as single error source cases. The processor combines trajectory and performance deviations by a root-sum-square (RSS process) and develops a covariance matrix for the deviations. Results are used in dispersion analyses for the baseline reference and orbiter flight test missions. As a part of this study, LEA results were verified as follows: (A) Hand calculating the RSS data and the elements of the covariance matrix for comparison with the LEA processor computed data. (B) Comparing results with previous error analyses. The LEA comparisons and verification are made at main engine cutoff (MECO).

  8. Imaging Simulations for DESTINY, the Dark Energy Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, T. R.; DESTINY Science Team

    2004-12-01

    We describe a mission concept for a 1.8-meter near-infrared (NIR) grism-mode space telescope optimized to return richly sampled Hubble diagrams of Type Ia and Type II supernovae (SNe) over the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.7 for determining cosmological distances, measuring the expansion rate of the Universe as a function of time, and characterizing the nature of dark energy. The central concept for our proposed Dark Energy Space Telescope (DESTINY) is an all-grism NIR survey camera. SNe will be discovered by repeated imaging of an area located at the north ecliptic pole. Grism spectra with resolving power l/Dl = R * 100 will provide broad-band spectrophotometry, redshifts, SNe classification, as well as valuable time-resolved diagnostic data for understanding the SN explosion physics. Our approach features only a single mode of operation, a single detector technology, and a single instrument. Although grism spectroscopy is slow compared to SN detection in any single broad-band filter for photometry, or to conventional slit spectra for spectral diagnostics, the multiplex advantage of observing a large field-of-view over a full octave in wavelength simultaneously makes this approach highly competitive. In this poster we present exposure simulations to demonstrate the efficiency of the DESTINY approach.

  9. Whole-House Energy Analysis Procedures for Existing Homes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes a proposed set of guidelines for analyzing the energy savings achieved by a package of retrofits or an extensive rehabilitation of an existing home. It also describes certain field test and audit methods that can help establish accurate building system performance characteristics that are needed for a meaningful simulation of whole-house energy use. Several sets of default efficiency values have been developed for older appliances that cannot be easily tested and for which published specifications are not readily available. These proposed analysis procedures are documented more comprehensively in NREL Technical Report TP-550-38238.

  10. Cyber security analysis testbed : combining real, emulation, and simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Villamarin, Charles H.; Eldridge, John M.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-07-01

    Cyber security analysis tools are necessary to evaluate the security, reliability, and resilience of networked information systems against cyber attack. It is common practice in modern cyber security analysis to separately utilize real systems of computers, routers, switches, firewalls, computer emulations (e.g., virtual machines) and simulation models to analyze the interplay between cyber threats and safeguards. In contrast, Sandia National Laboratories has developed novel methods to combine these evaluation platforms into a hybrid testbed that combines real, emulated, and simulated components. The combination of real, emulated, and simulated components enables the analysis of security features and components of a networked information system. When performing cyber security analysis on a system of interest, it is critical to realistically represent the subject security components in high fidelity. In some experiments, the security component may be the actual hardware and software with all the surrounding components represented in simulation or with surrogate devices. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a cyber testbed that combines modeling and simulation capabilities with virtual machines and real devices to represent, in varying fidelity, secure networked information system architectures and devices. Using this capability, secure networked information system architectures can be represented in our testbed on a single, unified computing platform. This provides an 'experiment-in-a-box' capability. The result is rapidly-produced, large-scale, relatively low-cost, multi-fidelity representations of networked information systems. These representations enable analysts to quickly investigate cyber threats and test protection approaches and configurations.

  11. Computer simulation of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and process economics of the fluid milk process.

    PubMed

    Tomasula, P M; Yee, W C F; McAloon, A J; Nutter, D W; Bonnaillie, L M

    2013-05-01

    Energy-savings measures have been implemented in fluid milk plants to lower energy costs and the energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although these measures have resulted in reductions in steam, electricity, compressed air, and refrigeration use of up to 30%, a benchmarking framework is necessary to examine the implementation of process-specific measures that would lower energy use, costs, and CO2 emissions even further. In this study, using information provided by the dairy industry and equipment vendors, a customizable model of the fluid milk process was developed for use in process design software to benchmark the electrical and fuel energy consumption and CO2 emissions of current processes. It may also be used to test the feasibility of new processing concepts to lower energy and CO2 emissions with calculation of new capital and operating costs. The accuracy of the model in predicting total energy usage of the entire fluid milk process and the pasteurization step was validated using available literature and industry energy data. Computer simulation of small (40.0 million L/yr), medium (113.6 million L/yr), and large (227.1 million L/yr) processing plants predicted the carbon footprint of milk, defined as grams of CO2 equivalents (CO2e) per kilogram of packaged milk, to within 5% of the value of 96 g of CO 2e/kg of packaged milk obtained in an industry-conducted life cycle assessment and also showed, in agreement with the same study, that plant size had no effect on the carbon footprint of milk but that larger plants were more cost effective in producing milk. Analysis of the pasteurization step showed that increasing the percentage regeneration of the pasteurizer from 90 to 96% would lower its thermal energy use by almost 60% and that implementation of partial homogenization would lower electrical energy use and CO2e emissions of homogenization by 82 and 5.4%, respectively. It was also demonstrated that implementation of steps to lower non

  12. Computer simulation of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and process economics of the fluid milk process.

    PubMed

    Tomasula, P M; Yee, W C F; McAloon, A J; Nutter, D W; Bonnaillie, L M

    2013-05-01

    Energy-savings measures have been implemented in fluid milk plants to lower energy costs and the energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although these measures have resulted in reductions in steam, electricity, compressed air, and refrigeration use of up to 30%, a benchmarking framework is necessary to examine the implementation of process-specific measures that would lower energy use, costs, and CO2 emissions even further. In this study, using information provided by the dairy industry and equipment vendors, a customizable model of the fluid milk process was developed for use in process design software to benchmark the electrical and fuel energy consumption and CO2 emissions of current processes. It may also be used to test the feasibility of new processing concepts to lower energy and CO2 emissions with calculation of new capital and operating costs. The accuracy of the model in predicting total energy usage of the entire fluid milk process and the pasteurization step was validated using available literature and industry energy data. Computer simulation of small (40.0 million L/yr), medium (113.6 million L/yr), and large (227.1 million L/yr) processing plants predicted the carbon footprint of milk, defined as grams of CO2 equivalents (CO2e) per kilogram of packaged milk, to within 5% of the value of 96 g of CO 2e/kg of packaged milk obtained in an industry-conducted life cycle assessment and also showed, in agreement with the same study, that plant size had no effect on the carbon footprint of milk but that larger plants were more cost effective in producing milk. Analysis of the pasteurization step showed that increasing the percentage regeneration of the pasteurizer from 90 to 96% would lower its thermal energy use by almost 60% and that implementation of partial homogenization would lower electrical energy use and CO2e emissions of homogenization by 82 and 5.4%, respectively. It was also demonstrated that implementation of steps to lower non

  13. Big Data Visual Analytics for Exploratory Earth System Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Shipman, Galen M.; Smith, Brian E.; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Dali; Shi, Xiaoying; Williams, Dean N.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called big data analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques are inadequate in dealing with the complexities of today s data. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a visual analytics system, called the Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment (EDEN), with specific application to the analysis of complex earth system simulation data sets. EDEN represents the type of interactive visual analysis tools that are necessary to transform data into insight, thereby improving critical comprehension of earth system processes. In addition to providing an overview of EDEN, we describe real-world studies using both point ensembles and global Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) simulations.

  14. Propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in extragalactic magnetic fields: a view from cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackstein, S.; Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.; Sigl, G.; Dundovic, A.

    2016-11-01

    We use the CRPROPA code to simulate the propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (with energy ≥1018eV and pure proton composition) through extragalactic magnetic fields that have been simulated with the cosmological ENZO code. We test both primordial and astrophysical magnetogenesis scenarios in order to investigate the impact of different magnetic field strengths in clusters, filaments and voids on the deflection of cosmic rays propagating across cosmological distances. We also study the effect of different source distributions of cosmic rays around simulated Milky Way-like observers. Our analysis shows that the arrival spectra and anisotropy of events are rather insensitive to the distribution of extragalactic magnetic fields, while they are more affected by the clustering of sources within an ˜50 Mpc distance to observers. Finally, we find that in order to reproduce the observed degree of isotropy of cosmic rays at ˜EeV energies, the average magnetic fields in cosmic voids must be ˜ 0.1 nG, providing limits on the strength of primordial seed fields.

  15. Online platform for simulations of ion energy distribution functions behind a plasma boundary sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, Alexander; Shihab, Mohammed; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-10-01

    Plasma processes, particularly plasma etching and plasma deposition are crucial for a large variety of industrial manufacturing purposes. For these processes the knowledge of the ion energy distribution function plays a key role. Measurements of the ion energy and ion angular distribution functions (IEDF, IADF) are at least challenging and often impossible in industrial processes. An alternative to measurements of the IEDF are simulations. With this contribution we present a self-consistent model available online for everyone. The simulation of ion energy and ion angular distribution functions involves the well known plasma boundary sheath model by Brinkmann [1-4], which is controlled via a web interface (http://sheath.tet.rub.de). After a successful simulation run all results are evaluable within the browser and ready for download for further analysis.[4pt] [1] R.P. Brinkmann, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 44, 042002 (2011)[0pt] [2] R.P. Brinkmann, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42, 194009 (2009)[0pt] [3] R.P. Brinkmann, J. App. Phys. 102, 093303 (2007)[0pt] [4] M. Kratzer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 90, 2169 (2001)

  16. Coupled dynamics analysis of wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative description of all key elements of a complete wind energy system computer analysis code is presented. The analysis system addresses the coupled dynamics characteristics of wind energy systems, including the interactions of the rotor, tower, nacelle, power train, control system, and electrical network. The coupled dynamics are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain to provide the basic motions and loads data required for design, performance verification and operations analysis activities. Elements of the coupled analysis code were used to design and analyze candidate rotor articulation concepts. Fundamental results and conclusions derived from these studies are presented.

  17. A simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, A. W.; Edsinger, R. W.; Chan, Y. K.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy and storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic) was developed. The level of detail of Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage (SIMWEST) is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. The first program is a precompiler which generates computer models (in FORTRAN) of complex wind source storage application systems, from user specifications using the respective library components. The second program provides the techno-economic system analysis with the respective I/O, the integration of systems dynamics, and the iteration for conveyance of variables. SIMWEST program, as described, runs on the UNIVAC 1100 series computers.

  18. High resolution simulations of energy absorption in dynamically loaded cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Eakins, D. E.; McShane, G.

    2016-04-01

    Cellular materials have potential application as absorbers of energy generated by high velocity impact. CTH, a Sandia National Laboratories Code which allows very severe strains to be simulated, has been used to perform very high resolution simulations showing the dynamic crushing of a series of two-dimensional, stainless steel metal structures with varying architectures. The structures are positioned to provide a cushion between a solid stainless steel flyer plate with velocities ranging from 300 to 900 m/s, and an initially stationary stainless steel target. Each of the alternative architectures under consideration was formed by an array of identical cells each of which had a constant volume and a constant density. The resolution of the simulations was maximised by choosing a configuration in which one-dimensional conditions persisted for the full period over which the specimen densified, a condition which is most readily met by impacting high density specimens at high velocity. It was found that the total plastic flow and, therefore, the irreversible energy dissipated in the fully densified energy absorbing cell, increase (a) as the structure becomes more rodlike and less platelike and (b) as the impact velocity increases. Sequential CTH images of the deformation processes show that the flow of the cell material may be broadly divided into macroscopic flow perpendicular to the compression direction and jetting-type processes (microkinetic flow) which tend to predominate in rod and rodlike configurations and also tend to play an increasing role at increased strain rates. A very simple analysis of a configuration in which a solid flyer impacts a solid target provides a baseline against which to compare and explain features seen in the simulations. The work provides a basis for the development of energy absorbing structures for application in the 200-1000 m/s impact regime.

  19. A virtual laboratory for the simulation of sustainable energy systems in a low energy building: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, M.; O'Donovan, A.; Murphy, M. D.; Delaney, F.; Hill, M.; Sullivan, P. D. O.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to develop a virtual laboratory simulation platform of the National Building Retrofit Test-bed at the Cork Institute of Technology, Ireland. The building in question is a low-energy retrofit which is provided with electricity by renewable systems including photovoltaics and wind. It can be thought of as a living laboratory, as a number of internal and external building factors are recorded at regular intervals during human occupation. The analysis carried out in this paper demonstrated that, for the period from April to September 2015, the electricity provided by the renewable systems did not consistently match the building’s electricity requirements due to differing load profiles. It was concluded that the use of load shifting techniques may help to increase the percentage of renewable energy utilisation.

  20. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.; Polly, B.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation discusses the goals of NREL Analysis Accuracy R&D; BESTEST-EX goals; what BESTEST-EX is; how it works; 'Building Physics' cases; 'Building Physics' reference results; 'utility bill calibration' cases; limitations and potential future work. Goals of NREL Analysis Accuracy R&D are: (1) Provide industry with the tools and technical information needed to improve the accuracy and consistency of analysis methods; (2) Reduce the risks associated with purchasing, financing, and selling energy efficiency upgrades; and (3) Enhance software and input collection methods considering impacts on accuracy, cost, and time of energy assessments. BESTEST-EX Goals are: (1) Test software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensure building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform up to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantify impact of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX is a repeatable procedure that tests how well audit software predictions compare to the current state of the art in building energy simulation. There is no direct truth standard. However, reference software have been subjected to validation testing, including comparisons with empirical data.

  1. Analysis of the Space Shuttle main engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deabreu-Garcia, J. Alex; Welch, John T.

    1993-01-01

    This is a final report on an analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Program, a digital simulator code written in Fortran. The research was undertaken in ultimate support of future design studies of a shuttle life-extending Intelligent Control System (ICS). These studies are to be conducted by NASA Lewis Space Research Center. The primary purpose of the analysis was to define the means to achieve a faster running simulation, and to determine if additional hardware would be necessary for speeding up simulations for the ICS project. In particular, the analysis was to consider the use of custom integrators based on the Matrix Stability Region Placement (MSRP) method. In addition to speed of execution, other qualities of the software were to be examined. Among these are the accuracy of computations, the useability of the simulation system, and the maintainability of the program and data files. Accuracy involves control of truncation error of the methods, and roundoff error induced by floating point operations. It also involves the requirement that the user be fully aware of the model that the simulator is implementing.

  2. Intercomparison of ion beam analysis software for the simulation of backscattering spectra from two-dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Malinský, P.; Schiettekatte, F.; Zolnai, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The codes RBS-MAST, STRUCTNRA, F95-Rough and CORTEO are simulation codes for ion beam analysis spectra from two- or three-dimensional sample structures. The codes were intercompared in a code-code comparison using an idealized grating structure and by comparison to experimental data from a silicon grating on tantalum interlayer. All codes are in excellent agreement at higher incident energies and not too large energy losses. At lower incident energies, grazing angles of incidence and/or larger energy losses plural scattering effects play an increasing role. Simulation codes with plural scattering capabilities offer higher accuracy and better agreement to experimental results in this regime.

  3. Analysis of utilization of desert habitats with dynamic simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of climate and herbivores on cool desert shrubs in north-western Utah were investigated with a dynamic simulation model. Cool desert shrublands are extensively managed as grazing lands, and are defoliated annually by domestic livestock. A primary production model was used to simulate harvest yields and shrub responses under a variety of climatic regimes and defoliation patterns. The model consists of six plant components, and it is based on equations of growth analysis. Plant responses were simulated under various combinations of 20 annual weather patterns and 14 defoliation strategies. Results of the simulations exhibit some unexpected linearities in model behavior, and emphasize the importance of both the pattern of climate and the level of plant vigor in determining optimal harvest strategies. Model behaviors are interpreted in terms of shrub morphology, physiology and ecology.

  4. Multifractal analysis and simulation of multifractal random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Francois G.; Huang, Yongxiang

    2016-04-01

    Multifractal time series, characterized by a scale invariance and large fluctuations at all scales, are found in many fields of natural and applied sciences. They are found i.e. in many geophysical fields, such as atmospheric and oceanic turbulence, hydrology, earth sciences. Here we consider a quite general type of multifractal time series, called multifractal random walk, as non stationary stochastic processes with intermittent stationary increments. We first quickly recall how such time series can be analyzed and characterized, using structure functions and arbitrary order Hilbert spectral analysis. We then discuss the simulation approach. The main object is to provide a stochastic process generating time series having the same multiscale properties We review recent works on this topic, and provide stochastic simulations in order to verify the theoretical predictions. In the lognormal framework we provide a h - μ plane expressing the scale invariant properties of these simulations. The theoretical plane is compared to simulation results.

  5. Multifractal analysis and simulation of multifractal random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Francois G.; Huang, Yongxiang

    2016-04-01

    Multifractal time series, characterized by a scale invariance and large fluctuations at all scales, are found in many fields of natural and applied sciences. They are found i.e. in many geophysical fields, such as atmospheric and oceanic turbulence, hydrology, earth sciences. Here we consider a quite general type of multifractal time series, called multifractal random walk, as non stationary stochastic processes with intermittent stationary increments. We first quickly recall how such time series can be analyzed and characterized, using structure functions and arbitrary order Hilbert spectral analysis. We then discuss the simulation approach. The main object is to provide a stochastic process generating time series having the same multiscale properties We review recent works on this topic, and provide stochastic simulations in order to verify the theoretical predictions. In the lognormal framework we provide a h ‑ μ plane expressing the scale invariant properties of these simulations. The theoretical plane is compared to simulation results.

  6. Performance Analysis of an Actor-Based Distributed Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Object-oriented design of simulation programs appears to be very attractive because of the natural association of components in the simulated system with objects. There is great potential in distributing the simulation across several computers for the purpose of parallel computation and its consequent handling of larger problems in less elapsed time. One approach to such a design is to use "actors", that is, active objects with their own thread of control. Because these objects execute concurrently, communication is via messages. This is in contrast to an object-oriented design using passive objects where communication between objects is via method calls (direct calls when they are in the same address space and remote procedure calls when they are in different address spaces or different machines). This paper describes a performance analysis program for the evaluation of a design for distributed simulations based upon actors.

  7. GROMOS++ Software for the Analysis of Biomolecular Simulation Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Eichenberger, Andreas P; Allison, Jane R; Dolenc, Jožica; Geerke, Daan P; Horta, Bruno A C; Meier, Katharina; Oostenbrink, Chris; Schmid, Nathan; Steiner, Denise; Wang, Dongqi; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-10-11

    GROMOS++ is a set of C++ programs for pre- and postprocessing of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories and as such is part of the GROningen MOlecular Simulation software for (bio)molecular simulation. It contains more than 70 programs that can be used to prepare data for the production of molecular simulation trajectories and to analyze these. These programs are reviewed and the various structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic quantities that can be analyzed using time series, correlation functions, and distributions are described together with technical aspects of their implementation in GROMOS. A few examples of the use of GROMOS++ for the analysis of MD trajectories are given. A full list of all GROMOS++ programs, together with an indication of their capabilities, is given in the Appendix . PMID:26598168

  8. Simulation Studies of the Jet and Missing Transverse Energy Performance of the Atlas Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielers, M.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of jets and missing transverse energy reconstruction will play an important role for many physics channels at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance of the ATLAS detector for reconstructing jets and missing transverse energy has been evaluated using detailed simulations. In this paper results based on these simulations will be shown for the jet energy resolution, in addition to some selected examples of the simulated jet and missing transverse energy physics performance. Special emphasis will be put on the experimental aspects like electronic and pile-up noise, non-compensation, and dead material, as well as their realisation in the simulation.

  9. Simulation and analysis of a geopotential research mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulations were performed for a Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) to enable the study of the gravitational sensitivity of the range rate measurements between the two satellites and to provide a set of simulated measurements to assist in the evaluation of techniques developed for the determination of the gravity field. The simulations were conducted with two satellites in near circular, frozen orbits at 160 km altitudes separated by 300 km. High precision numerical integration of the polar orbits were used with a gravitational field complete to degree and order 360. The set of simulated data for a mission duration of about 32 days was generated on a Cray X-MP computer. The results presented cover the most recent simulation, S8703, and includes a summary of the numerical integration of the simulated trajectories, a summary of the requirements to compute nominal reference trajectories to meet the initial orbit determination requirements for the recovery of the geopotential, an analysis of the nature of the one way integrated Doppler measurements associated with the simulation, and a discussion of the data set to be made available.

  10. Simulation of daily energy budget and mean soil temperatures at an arid site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, A. D.

    1990-03-01

    Soil temperature is often inadequately based upon relatively few measurements at widely dispersed locations. Within arid regions, such as the desert southwestern United States, soils, microclimates, and thus soil temperature may be markedly heterogeneous. Because extensive measurement of soil temperature is often not feasible, models are needed that simulate soil temperature based on readily available soil survey and “above-ground” weather information. This paper describes a simple energy-budget based model for simulating daily mean temperatures within a bare arid land soil. The model requires basic information on soil physical properties, and daily weather data including air temperature, windspeed, rainfall, and solar radiation to calculate daily surface energy budget components and surface temperature. One of two alternative numerical methods is then used to calculated subsurface temperatures. Tests of the model using 1987 daily temperature data from an arid site at Yuma, Arizona resulted in root mean square deviations within 1.4°C between daily modeled and measured temperatures at both 0.05 and 0.10 m depths. Sensitivity analysis showed modeled temperatures at 0.05 m depth to be most sensitive to parameters affecting the surface energy balance such as air temperature and solar radiation. Modeled temperatures at 1.0m depth were relatively more sensitive to initial temperature conditions and to parameters affecting distribution of energy within the profile such as thermal conductivity.

  11. Advanced nuclear energy analysis technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Murata, Kenneth K.; Romero, Vicente JosÔe; Young, Michael Francis; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2004-05-01

    A two-year effort focused on applying ASCI technology developed for the analysis of weapons systems to the state-of-the-art accident analysis of a nuclear reactor system was proposed. The Sandia SIERRA parallel computing platform for ASCI codes includes high-fidelity thermal, fluids, and structural codes whose coupling through SIERRA can be specifically tailored to the particular problem at hand to analyze complex multiphysics problems. Presently, however, the suite lacks several physics modules unique to the analysis of nuclear reactors. The NRC MELCOR code, not presently part of SIERRA, was developed to analyze severe accidents in present-technology reactor systems. We attempted to: (1) evaluate the SIERRA code suite for its current applicability to the analysis of next generation nuclear reactors, and the feasibility of implementing MELCOR models into the SIERRA suite, (2) examine the possibility of augmenting ASCI codes or alternatives by coupling to the MELCOR code, or portions thereof, to address physics particular to nuclear reactor issues, especially those facing next generation reactor designs, and (3) apply the coupled code set to a demonstration problem involving a nuclear reactor system. We were successful in completing the first two in sufficient detail to determine that an extensive demonstration problem was not feasible at this time. In the future, completion of this research would demonstrate the feasibility of performing high fidelity and rapid analyses of safety and design issues needed to support the development of next generation power reactor systems.

  12. Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

  13. Simulation-Length Requirements in the Loads Analysis of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Haid, L.; Stewart, G.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Lackner, M.; Matha, D.

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the appropriate length of a floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) simulation - a fundamental question that needs to be answered to develop design requirements. To examine this issue, a loads analysis of an example FOWT was performed in FAST with varying simulation lengths. The offshore wind system used was the OC3-Hywind spar buoy, which was developed for use in the International Energy Agency Code Comparison Collaborative Project and supports NREL's offshore 5-megawatt baseline turbine. Realistic metocean data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and repeated periodic wind files were used to excite the structure. The results of the analysis clearly show that loads do not increase for longer simulations. In regards to fatigue, a sensitivity analysis shows that the procedure used for counting half cycles is more important than the simulation length itself. Based on these results, neither the simulation length nor the periodic wind files affect response statistics and loads for FOWTs (at least for the spar studied here); a result in contrast to the offshore oil and gas industry, where running simulations of at least 3 hours in length is common practice.

  14. Simulated, Emulated, and Physical Investigative Analysis (SEPIA) of networked systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, David P.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; McDonald, Michael James; Onunkwo, Uzoma A.; Tarman, Thomas David; Urias, Vincent E.

    2009-09-01

    This report describes recent progress made in developing and utilizing hybrid Simulated, Emulated, and Physical Investigative Analysis (SEPIA) environments. Many organizations require advanced tools to analyze their information system's security, reliability, and resilience against cyber attack. Today's security analysis utilize real systems such as computers, network routers and other network equipment, computer emulations (e.g., virtual machines) and simulation models separately to analyze interplay between threats and safeguards. In contrast, this work developed new methods to combine these three approaches to provide integrated hybrid SEPIA environments. Our SEPIA environments enable an analyst to rapidly configure hybrid environments to pass network traffic and perform, from the outside, like real networks. This provides higher fidelity representations of key network nodes while still leveraging the scalability and cost advantages of simulation tools. The result is to rapidly produce large yet relatively low-cost multi-fidelity SEPIA networks of computers and routers that let analysts quickly investigate threats and test protection approaches.

  15. Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool, which is designed to assess impacts of future land use/built environment patterns on transportation-related energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The tool can be used to evaluate a range of population distribution and urban design scenarios for 2030 and 2050. This tool was produced as part of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  16. Computational simulation for analysis and synthesis of impact resilient structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2013-10-01

    Impact resilient structures are of great interest in many engineering applications varying from civil, land vehicle, aircraft and space structures, to mention a few examples. To design such structure, one has to resort fundamental principles and take into account progress in analytical and computational approaches as well as in material science and technology. With such perspectives, this work looks at a generic beam and plate structure subject to impact loading and carry out analysis and numerical simulation. The first objective of the work is to develop a computational algorithm to analyze flat plate as a generic structure subjected to impact loading for numerical simulation and parametric study. The analysis will be based on dynamic response analysis. Consideration is given to the elastic-plastic region. The second objective is to utilize the computational algorithm for direct numerical simulation, and as a parallel scheme, commercial off-the shelf numerical code is utilized for parametric study, optimization and synthesis. Through such analysis and numerical simulation, effort is devoted to arrive at an optimum configuration in terms of loading, structural dimensions, material properties and composite lay-up, among others. Results will be discussed in view of practical applications.

  17. Digital Simulation-Based Training: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Quesada-Pallarès, Carla; Knogler, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how design characteristics in digital simulation-based learning environments moderate self-efficacy and transfer of learning. Drawing on social cognitive theory and the cognitive theory of multimedia learning, the meta-analysis psychometrically cumulated k?=?15 studies of 25 years of research with a total sample size of…

  18. Cross-impacts analysis development and energy policy analysis applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roop, J.M.; Scheer, R.M.; Stacey, G.S.

    1986-12-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe the cross-impact analysis process and microcomputer software developed for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PPA) of DOE. First introduced in 1968, cross-impact analysis is a technique that produces scenarios of future conditions and possibilities. Cross-impact analysis has several unique attributes that make it a tool worth examining, especially in the current climate when the outlook for the economy and several of the key energy markets is uncertain. Cross-impact analysis complements the econometric, engineering, systems dynamics, or trend approaches already in use at DOE. Cross-impact analysis produces self-consistent scenarios in the broadest sense and can include interaction between the economy, technology, society and the environment. Energy policy analyses that couple broad scenarios of the future with detailed forecasting can produce more powerful results than scenario analysis or forecasts can produce alone.

  19. Filtering analysis of a direct numerical simulation of the turbulent Rayleigh-Benard problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eidson, T. M.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Zang, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    A filtering analysis of a turbulent flow was developed which provides details of the path of the kinetic energy of the flow from its creation via thermal production to its dissipation. A low-pass spatial filter is used to split the velocity and the temperature field into a filtered component (composed mainly of scales larger than a specific size, nominally the filter width) and a fluctuation component (scales smaller than a specific size). Variables derived from these fields can fall into one of the above two ranges or be composed of a mixture of scales dominated by scales near the specific size. The filter is used to split the kinetic energy equation into three equations corresponding to the three scale ranges described above. The data from a direct simulation of the Rayleigh-Benard problem for conditions where the flow is turbulent are used to calculate the individual terms in the three kinetic energy equations. This is done for a range of filter widths. These results are used to study the spatial location and the scale range of the thermal energy production, the cascading of kinetic energy, the diffusion of kinetic energy, and the energy dissipation. These results are used to evaluate two subgrid models typically used in large-eddy simulations of turbulence. Subgrid models attempt to model the energy below the filter width that is removed by a low-pass filter.

  20. Validation studies of the DOE-2 Building Energy Simulation Program. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Winkelmann, F.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents many of the validation studies (Table 1) of the DOE-2 building energy analysis simulation program that have taken place since 1981. Results for several versions of the program are presented with the most recent study conducted in 1996 on version DOE-2.1E and the most distant study conducted in 1981 on version DOE-1.3. This work is part of an effort related to continued development of DOE-2, particularly in its use as a simulation engine for new specialized versions of the program such as the recently released RESFEN 3.1. RESFEN 3.1 is a program specifically dealing with analyzing the energy performance of windows in residential buildings. The intent in providing the results of these validation studies is to give potential users of the program a high degree of confidence in the calculated results. Validation studies in which calculated simulation data is compared to measured data have been conducted throughout the development of the DOE-2 program. Discrepancies discovered during the course of such work has resulted in improvements in the simulation algorithms. Table 2 provides a listing of additions and modifications that have been made to various versions of the program since version DOE-2.1A. One of the most significant recent changes in the program occurred with version DOE-2.1E. An improved algorithm for calculating the outside surface film coefficient was implemented. In addition, integration of the WINDOW 4 program was accomplished resulting in improved ability in analyzing window energy performance. Validation and verification of a program as sophisticated as DOE-2 must necessarily be limited because of the approximations inherent in the program. For example, the most accurate model of the heat transfer processes in a building would include a three-dimensional analysis. To justify such detailed algorithmic procedures would correspondingly require detailed information describing the building and/or HVAC system and energy plant parameters

  1. Energy Analysis Program, 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    With the new federal Administration in place, we have observed increasing attention in the areas of research and analysis that have been central to our interests. Energy efficiency is once again a very high priority in the national agenda. This increased emphasis on energy efficiency was already apparent prior to the national elections in the contents of the National Energy Policy Act (EPACT), passed by Congress in 1992. The Climate Change Action Plan, released by the White House in October 1993, strengthens the federal government`s leadership role in the design and implementation of energy-efficiency programs. Budget submissions show energy efficiency and renewable energy programs among the relatively small number of discretionary programs at the federal level that are expected to receive large percentage increases.

  2. Energy analysis of four geothermal technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herendeen, R. A.; Plant, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Standard energy analysis was applied to liquid-dominated, hot dry rock, geopressure, and vapor-dominated geothermal-electric technologies. It was shown that the four processes are net energy producers, so that the ratios of net electric energy produced over lifetime to primary nonrenewable energy inputs over lifetime exceed unity. The highest energy ratio of 13 + or - 4 is characteristic of vapor-dominated (dry-stream) technology, which is the only method used commercially to produce electricity in the U.S. It is concluded that the energy ratios computed are similar to those of other authors; however, the estimates for liquid-dominated systems are significantly lower due to the inclusion of environmental control costs.

  3. Parallel runway requirement analysis study. Volume 2: Simulation manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Yaghoob S.; Chun, Ken S.

    1993-01-01

    This document is a user manual for operating the PLAND_BLUNDER (PLB) simulation program. This simulation is based on two aircraft approaching parallel runways independently and using parallel Instrument Landing System (ILS) equipment during Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). If an aircraft should deviate from its assigned localizer course toward the opposite runway, this constitutes a blunder which could endanger the aircraft on the adjacent path. The worst case scenario would be if the blundering aircraft were unable to recover and continue toward the adjacent runway. PLAND_BLUNDER is a Monte Carlo-type simulation which employs the events and aircraft positioning during such a blunder situation. The model simulates two aircraft performing parallel ILS approaches using Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) or visual procedures. PLB uses a simple movement model and control law in three dimensions (X, Y, Z). The parameters of the simulation inputs and outputs are defined in this document along with a sample of the statistical analysis. This document is the second volume of a two volume set. Volume 1 is a description of the application of the PLB to the analysis of close parallel runway operations.

  4. Dispersion analysis and linear error analysis capabilities of the space vehicle dynamics simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.; Kuhn, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    Previous error analyses conducted by the Guidance and Dynamics Branch of NASA have used the Guidance Analysis Program (GAP) as the trajectory simulation tool. Plans are made to conduct all future error analyses using the Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulation (SVDS) program. A study was conducted to compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU) error simulations of the two programs. Results of the GAP/SVDS comparison are presented and problem areas encountered while attempting to simulate IMU errors, vehicle performance uncertainties and environmental uncertainties using SVDS are defined. An evaluation of the SVDS linear error analysis capability is also included.

  5. Selecting representative climate simulations for impact studies using cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendlik, Thomas; Gobiet, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    In climate change impact research it is crucial to carefully select the climatic input in order to realistically represent the uncertainty in climate scenarios. Usually, the selection of a few simulations as input for the impact investigation is mostly based on subjective expert judgment. However, a more sophisticated objective approach should consider the fact that these climate simulations stem from an ensemble of opportunity, which might inherit model inter-dependencies and biases. Such objective methods for sub-sampling climate simulations from a larger ensemble receive relatively small attention in scientific literature. This study represents one possible framework to aid selecting representative climate simulations for specific climate impact studies. By doing so, model interdependence is taken into account, leading to a more reliable ensemble. Multivariate statistical methods are used to describe model dependence based on the spatial patterns of their climate change signals. Several meteorological parameters important for impact models are therefor considered simultaneously. After using dimension reduction techniques, like principal component analysis, similar behavior of climate simulations is detected using cluster analysis. From each grouping found, one representative simulation will be selected, leading to a more independent sub-sample while conserving the main climate change characteristics of the original ensemble. This method can be applied using standard statistical software and is easily adoptable to various sets of meteorological variables and regions. We present an application of this method to select representative simulations from the ENSEMBLES regional multi-model ensemble for a variety of climate impact studies spread over the whole European continent in the EU-FP7 project IMPACT2C.

  6. Tube Bulge Process : Theoretical Analysis And Finite Element Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, Raphaeel; Boudeau, Nathalie

    2007-04-07

    This paper is focused on the determination of mechanics characteristics for tubular materials, using tube bulge process. A comparative study is made between two different models: theoretical model and finite element analysis. The theoretical model is completely developed, based first on a geometrical analysis of the tube profile during bulging, which is assumed to strain in arc of circles. Strain and stress analysis complete the theoretical model, which allows to evaluate tube thickness and state of stress, at any point of the free bulge region. Free bulging of a 304L stainless steel is simulated using Ls-Dyna 970. To validate FE simulations approach, a comparison between theoretical and finite elements models is led on several parameters such as: thickness variation at the free bulge region pole with bulge height, tube thickness variation with z axial coordinate, and von Mises stress variation with plastic strain.

  7. Performance Analysis of Cloud Computing Architectures Using Discrete Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, John C.; Golomb, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing offers the economic benefit of on-demand resource allocation to meet changing enterprise computing needs. However, the flexibility of cloud computing is disadvantaged when compared to traditional hosting in providing predictable application and service performance. Cloud computing relies on resource scheduling in a virtualized network-centric server environment, which makes static performance analysis infeasible. We developed a discrete event simulation model to evaluate the overall effectiveness of organizations in executing their workflow in traditional and cloud computing architectures. The two part model framework characterizes both the demand using a probability distribution for each type of service request as well as enterprise computing resource constraints. Our simulations provide quantitative analysis to design and provision computing architectures that maximize overall mission effectiveness. We share our analysis of key resource constraints in cloud computing architectures and findings on the appropriateness of cloud computing in various applications.

  8. Abundance recovery error analysis using simulated AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, William W.; Harsanyi, Joseph C.; Farrand, William H.; Wong, Jennifer A.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement noise and imperfect atmospheric correction translate directly into errors in the determination of the surficial abundance of materials from imaging spectrometer data. The effects of errors on abundance recovery were investigated previously using Monte Carlo simulation methods by Sabol et. al. The drawback of the Monte Carlo approach is that thousands of trials are needed to develop good statistics on the probable error in abundance recovery. This computational burden invariably limits the number of scenarios of interest that can practically be investigated. A more efficient approach is based on covariance analysis. The covariance analysis approach expresses errors in abundance as a function of noise in the spectral measurements and provides a closed form result eliminating the need for multiple trials. Monte Carlo simulation and covariance analysis are used to predict confidence limits for abundance recovery for a scenario which is modeled as being derived from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS).

  9. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  10. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-21

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  11. Theory, Image Simulation, and Data Analysis of Chemical Release Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.

    1994-01-01

    The final phase of Grant NAG6-1 involved analysis of physics of chemical releases in the upper atmosphere and analysis of data obtained on previous NASA sponsored chemical release rocket experiments. Several lines of investigation of past chemical release experiments and computer simulations have been proceeding in parallel. This report summarizes the work performed and the resulting publications. The following topics are addressed: analysis of the 1987 Greenland rocket experiments; calculation of emission rates for barium, strontium, and calcium; the CRIT 1 and 2 experiments (Collisional Ionization Cross Section experiments); image calibration using background stars; rapid ray motions in ionospheric plasma clouds; and the NOONCUSP rocket experiments.

  12. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    The spectrum of gamma energy absorption in the NaI crystal (scintillation detector) is the interaction result of gamma photon with NaI crystal, and it’s associated with the photon gamma energy incoming to the detector. Through a simulation approach, we can perform an early observation of gamma energy absorption spectrum in a scintillator crystal detector (NaI) before the experiment conducted. In this paper, we present a simulation model result of gamma energy absorption spectrum for energy 100-700 keV (i.e. 297 keV, 400 keV and 662 keV). This simulation developed based on the concept of photon beam point source distribution and photon cross section interaction with the Monte Carlo method. Our computational code has been successfully predicting the multiple energy peaks absorption spectrum, which derived from multiple photon energy sources.

  13. Rheological Models of Blood: Sensitivity Analysis and Benchmark Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeliga, Danuta; Macioł, Piotr; Banas, Krzysztof; Kopernik, Magdalena; Pietrzyk, Maciej

    2010-06-01

    Modeling of blood flow with respect to rheological parameters of the blood is the objective of this paper. Casson type equation was selected as a blood model and the blood flow was analyzed based on Backward Facing Step benchmark. The simulations were performed using ADINA-CFD finite element code. Three output parameters were selected, which characterize the accuracy of flow simulation. Sensitivity analysis of the results with Morris Design method was performed to identify rheological parameters and the model output, which control the blood flow to significant extent. The paper is the part of the work on identification of parameters controlling process of clotting.

  14. SLM-based optical simulator for dynamic speckle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberova, Nataliya; Stoykova, Elena; Ivanov, Branimir

    2014-08-01

    The phenomenon of dynamic speckle allows for non-invasive whole-field detection of physical or biological activity in objects through statistical description of laser speckle dynamics. Effective way to improve the statistical analysis is generation of controlled speckle patterns. SLM implementation of an optical simulator of dynamic speckle patterns is proposed by feeding a correlated sequence of 2D random phase distributions to the phase-only SLM. Atthevarying in space correlation radius of the phase fluctuations in the successive frames, the SLM produces regions of different activity on a screen under laser illumination. Feasibility of the proposed approach is proved both by simulation and experiment.

  15. Computer simulation of ion beam analysis of laterally inhomogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.

    2016-03-01

    The program STRUCTNRA for the simulation of ion beam analysis charged particle spectra from arbitrary two-dimensional distributions of materials is described. The code is validated by comparison to experimental backscattering data from a silicon grating on tantalum at different orientations and incident angles. Simulated spectra for several types of rough thin layers and a chessboard-like arrangement of materials as example for a multi-phase agglomerate material are presented. Ambiguities between back-scattering spectra from two-dimensional and one-dimensional sample structures are discussed.

  16. Perturbational formulation of principal component analysis in molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yohei M.; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Tomoda, Shuji; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2008-10-01

    Conformational fluctuations of a molecule are important to its function since such intrinsic fluctuations enable the molecule to respond to the external environmental perturbations. For extracting large conformational fluctuations, which predict the primary conformational change by the perturbation, principal component analysis (PCA) has been used in molecular dynamics simulations. However, several versions of PCA, such as Cartesian coordinate PCA and dihedral angle PCA (dPCA), are limited to use with molecules with a single dominant state or proteins where the dihedral angle represents an important internal coordinate. Other PCAs with general applicability, such as the PCA using pairwise atomic distances, do not represent the physical meaning clearly. Therefore, a formulation that provides general applicability and clearly represents the physical meaning is yet to be developed. For developing such a formulation, we consider the conformational distribution change by the perturbation with arbitrary linearly independent perturbation functions. Within the second order approximation of the Kullback-Leibler divergence by the perturbation, the PCA can be naturally interpreted as a method for (1) decomposing a given perturbation into perturbations that independently contribute to the conformational distribution change or (2) successively finding the perturbation that induces the largest conformational distribution change. In this perturbational formulation of PCA, (i) the eigenvalue measures the Kullback-Leibler divergence from the unperturbed to perturbed distributions, (ii) the eigenvector identifies the combination of the perturbation functions, and (iii) the principal component determines the probability change induced by the perturbation. Based on this formulation, we propose a PCA using potential energy terms, and we designate it as potential energy PCA (PEPCA). The PEPCA provides both general applicability and clear physical meaning. For demonstrating its power, we

  17. Analysis of the interrelationship of energy, economy, and environment: A model of a sustainable energy future for Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boo, Kyung-Jin

    The primary purpose of this dissertation is to provide the groundwork for a sustainable energy future in Korea. For this purpose, a conceptual framework of sustainable energy development was developed to provide a deeper understanding of interrelationships between energy, the economy, and the environment (E 3). Based on this theoretical work, an empirical simulation model was developed to investigate the ways in which E3 interact. This dissertation attempts to develop a unified concept of sustainable energy development by surveying multiple efforts to integrate various definitions of sustainability. Sustainable energy development should be built on the basis of three principles: ecological carrying capacity, economic efficiency, and socio-political equity. Ecological carrying capacity delineates the earth's resource constraints as well as its ability to assimilate wastes. Socio-political equity implies an equitable distribution of the benefits and costs of energy consumption and an equitable distribution of environmental burdens. Economic efficiency dictates efficient allocation of scarce resources. The simulation model is composed of three modules: an energy module, an environmental module and an economic module. Because the model is grounded on economic structural behaviorism, the dynamic nature of the current economy is effectively depicted and simulated through manipulating exogenous policy variables. This macro-economic model is used to simulate six major policy intervention scenarios. Major findings from these policy simulations were: (1) carbon taxes are the most effective means of reducing air-pollutant emissions; (2) sustainable energy development can be achieved through reinvestment of carbon taxes into energy efficiency and renewable energy programs; and (3) carbon taxes would increase a nation's welfare if reinvested in relevant areas. The policy simulation model, because it is based on neoclassical economics, has limitations such that it cannot fully

  18. Energy and environmental analysis of a linear concentrating photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzmann, Tony

    The world is facing an imminent energy supply crisis. In order to sustain and increase our energy supply in an environmentally-conscious manner, it is necessary to advance renewable technologies. Despite this urgency, however, it is paramount to consider the larger environmental effects associated with using renewable energy resources. This research is meant to better understand linear concentrating photovoltaics (LCPVs) from an engineering and environmental standpoint. In order to analyze the LCPV system, a simulation and life cycle assessment (LCA) were developed. The LCPV system serves two major purposes: it produces electricity, and waste heat is collected for heating use. There are three parts to the LCPV simulation. The first part simulates the multijunction cell output so as to calculate the temperature-dependent electricity generation. The second part simulates the cell cooling and waste heat recovery system using a model consisting of heat transfer and fluid flow equations. The waste heat recovery in the LCPV system was linked to a hot water storage system, which was also modeled. Coupling the waste heat recovery simulation and the hot water storage system gives an overall integrated system that is useful for system design, optimization, and acts as a stepping stone for future multijunction cell Photovoltaic/Thermal (PV/T) systems. Finally, all of the LCPV system components were coded in Engineering Equation Solver (EES) and were used in an energy analysis under actual weather and solar conditions for the Phoenix, AZ, region. The life cycle assessment for the LCPV system allowed for an environmental analysis of the system where areas of the highest environmental impact were pinpointed. While conducting the LCA research, each component of the system was analyzed from a resource extraction, production, and use standpoint. The collective production processes of each LCPV system component were gathered into a single inventory of materials and energy flows

  19. Simulation and analysis of conjunctive use with MODFLOW's farm process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Schmid, W.; Faunt, C.C.; Lockwood, B.

    2010-01-01

    The extension of MODFLOW onto the landscape with the Farm Process (MF-FMP) facilitates fully coupled simulation of the use and movement of water from precipitation, streamflow and runoff, groundwater flow, and consumption by natural and agricultural vegetation throughout the hydrologic system at all times. This allows for more complete analysis of conjunctive use water-resource systems than previously possible with MODFLOW by combining relevant aspects of the landscape with the groundwater and surface water components. This analysis is accomplished using distributed cell-by-cell supply-constrained and demand-driven components across the landscape within " water-balance subregions" comprised of one or more model cells that can represent a single farm, a group of farms, or other hydrologic or geopolitical entities. Simulation of micro-agriculture in the Pajaro Valley and macro-agriculture in the Central Valley are used to demonstrate the utility of MF-FMP. For Pajaro Valley, the simulation of an aquifer storage and recovery system and related coastal water distribution system to supplant coastal pumpage was analyzed subject to climate variations and additional supplemental sources such as local runoff. For the Central Valley, analysis of conjunctive use from different hydrologic settings of northern and southern subregions shows how and when precipitation, surface water, and groundwater are important to conjunctive use. The examples show that through MF-FMP's ability to simulate natural and anthropogenic components of the hydrologic cycle, the distribution and dynamics of supply and demand can be analyzed, understood, and managed. This analysis of conjunctive use would be difficult without embedding them in the simulation and are difficult to estimate a priori. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  20. Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2004 for New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.

    2007-08-03

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and New York State Department of State (DOS) requested the help of DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) in estimating the annual building energy savings and cost impacts of adopting ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 (ASHRAE 2004) requirements. This report summarizes the analysis methodology and results of energy simulation in response to that request.

  1. MC 93 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Monte Carlo Simulation in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragovitsch, Peter; Linn, Stephan L.; Burbank, Mimi

    1994-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Heavy Fragment Production for Hadronic Cascade Codes * Monte Carlo Simulations of Space Radiation Environments * Merging Parton Showers with Higher Order QCD Monte Carlos * An Order-αs Two-Photon Background Study for the Intermediate Mass Higgs Boson * GEANT Simulation of Hall C Detector at CEBAF * Monte Carlo Simulations in Radioecology: Chernobyl Experience * UNIMOD2: Monte Carlo Code for Simulation of High Energy Physics Experiments; Some Special Features * Geometrical Efficiency Analysis for the Gamma-Neutron and Gamma-Proton Reactions * GISMO: An Object-Oriented Approach to Particle Transport and Detector Modeling * Role of MPP Granularity in Optimizing Monte Carlo Programming * Status and Future Trends of the GEANT System * The Binary Sectioning Geometry for Monte Carlo Detector Simulation * A Combined HETC-FLUKA Intranuclear Cascade Event Generator * The HARP Nucleon Polarimeter * Simulation and Data Analysis Software for CLAS * TRAP -- An Optical Ray Tracing Program * Solutions of Inverse and Optimization Problems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics Using Inverse Monte Carlo * FLUKA: Hadronic Benchmarks and Applications * Electron-Photon Transport: Always so Good as We Think? Experience with FLUKA * Simulation of Nuclear Effects in High Energy Hadron-Nucleus Collisions * Monte Carlo Simulations of Medium Energy Detectors at COSY Jülich * Complex-Valued Monte Carlo Method and Path Integrals in the Quantum Theory of Localization in Disordered Systems of Scatterers * Radiation Levels at the SSCL Experimental Halls as Obtained Using the CLOR89 Code System * Overview of Matrix Element Methods in Event Generation * Fast Electromagnetic Showers * GEANT Simulation of the RMC Detector at TRIUMF and Neutrino Beams for KAON * Event Display for the CLAS Detector * Monte Carlo Simulation of High Energy Electrons in Toroidal Geometry * GEANT 3.14 vs. EGS4: A Comparison Using the DØ Uranium/Liquid Argon

  2. Production and destruction of eddy kinetic energy in forced submesoscale eddy-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sonaljit; Ramachandran, Sanjiv; Tandon, Amit; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-09-01

    We study the production and dissipation of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in a submesoscale eddy field forced with downfront winds using the Process Study Ocean Model (PSOM) with a horizontal grid resolution of 0.5 km. We simulate an idealized 100 m deep mixed-layer front initially in geostrophic balance with a jet in a domain that permits eddies within a range of O(1 km-100 km). The vertical eddy viscosities and the dissipation are parameterized using four different subgrid vertical mixing parameterizations: the k - ɛ , the KPP, and two different constant eddy viscosity and diffusivity profiles with a magnitude of O(10-2m2s-1) in the mixed layer. Our study shows that strong vertical eddy viscosities near the surface reduce the parameterized dissipation, whereas strong vertical eddy diffusivities reduce the lateral buoyancy gradients and consequently the rate of restratification by mixed-layer instabilities (MLI). Our simulations show that near the surface, the spatial variability of the dissipation along the periphery of the eddies depends on the relative alignment of the ageostrophic and geostrophic shear. Analysis of the resolved EKE budgets in the frontal region from the simulations show important similarities between the vertical structure of the EKE budget produced by the k - ɛ and KPP parameterizations, and earlier LES studies. Such an agreement is absent in the simulations using constant eddy-viscosity parameterizations.

  3. Baroclinic internal wave energy distribution in the Baltic Sea derived from 45 years of circulation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Artem; Soomere, Tarmo; Kurkina, Oxana; Kurkin, Andrey; Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Markus Meier, H. E.

    2016-04-01

    Internal waves and internal tides are an essential component of the functioning of stratified shelf seas. They carry substantial amounts of energy through the water masses, drive key hydrophysical processes such as mixing and overturning and support the functioning of marine ecosystem in many ways. Their particular impact becomes evident near and at the bottom where they often create substantial loads to engineering structures and exert a wide range of impacts on the bottom sediments and evolution of the seabed. We analyse several properties of spatio-temporal distributions of energy of relatively long-period large-scale internal wave motions in the Baltic Sea. The analysis is based on numerically simulated pycnocline variations that are extracted from the hydrographic data calculated by the Rossby Centre Ocean circulation model (RCO) for the entire Baltic Sea for 1961-2005. This model has a horizontal resolution of 2 nautical miles and uses 41 vertical layers with a thickness between 3 m close to the surface and 12 m in 250 m depth. The model is forced with atmospheric data derived from the ERA-40 re-analysis using a regional atmosphere model with a horizontal resolution of 25 km. It also accounts for river inflow and water exchange through the Danish Straits. See (Meier, H.E.M., Höglund, A., 2013. Studying the Baltic Sea circulation with Eulerian tracers, in Soomere, T., Quak, E., eds., Preventive Methods for Coastal Protection, Springer, Cham, Heidelberg, 101-130) for a detailed description of the model and its forcing. The resolution of the model output used in this study (once in 6 hours) is sufficient for estimates of spectral amplitudes of the displacements of isopycnal surfaces with a typical period of 2-12 days. We provide the analysis of kinetic and potential energy of motions with these periods. The resulting maps of the maxima of energy and spatial distributions of near-bottom velocities have been evaluated for the entire simulation interval of 45

  4. A simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume 2: Operation manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, A. W.; Edsinger, R. W.; Burroughs, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive computer program (SIMWEST) developed for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel, and pneumatic) is described. Features of the program include: a precompiler which generates computer models (in FORTRAN) of complex wind source/storage/application systems, from user specifications using the respective library components; a program which provides the techno-economic system analysis with the respective I/O the integration of system dynamics, and the iteration for conveyance of variables; and capability to evaluate economic feasibility as well as general performance of wind energy systems. The SIMWEST operation manual is presented and the usage of the SIMWEST program and the design of the library components are described. A number of example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation is given along with a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

  5. An expanded system simulation model for solar energy storage (technical report), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The simulation model for wind energy storage (SIMWEST) program now includes wind and/or photovoltaic systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic) and is available for the UNIVAC 1100 series and the CDC 6000 series computers. The level of detail is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind and/or photovoltaic energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. The first program is a precompiler which generates computer models (in FORTRAN) of complex wind and/or photovoltaic source/storage/application systems, from user specifications using the respective library components. The second program provides the techno-economic system analysis with the respective I/0, the integration of system dynamics, and the iteration for conveyance of variables.

  6. Review of wind simulation methods for horizontal-axis wind turbine analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, D. C.; Connell, J. R.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews three reports on simulation of winds for use in wind turbine fatigue analysis. The three reports are presumed to represent the state of the art. The Purdue and Sandia methods simulate correlated wind data at two points rotating as on the rotor of a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The PNL method at present simulates only one point, which rotates either as on a horizontal-axis wind turbine blade or as on a vertical-axis wind turbine blade. The spectra of simulated data are presented from the Sandia and PNL models under comparable input conditions, and the energy calculated in the rotational spikes in the spectra by the two models is compared. Although agreement between the two methods is not impressive at this time, improvement of the Sandia and PNL methods is recommended as the best way to advance the state of the art. Physical deficiencies of the models are cited in the report and technical recommendations are made for improvement. The report also reviews two general methods for simulating single-point data, called the harmonic method and the white noise method. The harmonic method, which is the basis of all three specific methods reviewed, is recommended over the white noise method in simulating winds for wind turbine analysis.

  7. Environmental Systems Simulations for Carbon, Energy, Nitrogen, Water, and Watersheds: Design Principles and Pilot Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lant, Christopher; Pérez-Lapeña, Blanca; Xiong, Weidong; Kraft, Steven; Kowalchuk, Rhonda; Blair, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Guided by the Next Generation Science Standards and elements of problem-based learning, four human-environment systems simulations are described in brief--carbon, energy, water, and watershed--and a fifth simulation on nitrogen is described in more depth. These science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education simulations illustrate…

  8. A New Maximum Likelihood Approach for Free Energy Profile Construction from Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Radak, Brian K; Pabis, Anna; York, Darrin M

    2013-01-01

    A novel variational method for construction of free energy profiles from molecular simulation data is presented. The variational free energy profile (VFEP) method uses the maximum likelihood principle applied to the global free energy profile based on the entire set of simulation data (e.g from multiple biased simulations) that spans the free energy surface. The new method addresses common obstacles in two major problems usually observed in traditional methods for estimating free energy surfaces: the need for overlap in the re-weighting procedure and the problem of data representation. Test cases demonstrate that VFEP outperforms other methods in terms of the amount and sparsity of the data needed to construct the overall free energy profiles. For typical chemical reactions, only ~5 windows and ~20-35 independent data points per window are sufficient to obtain an overall qualitatively correct free energy profile with sampling errors an order of magnitude smaller than the free energy barrier. The proposed approach thus provides a feasible mechanism to quickly construct the global free energy profile and identify free energy barriers and basins in free energy simulations via a robust, variational procedure that determines an analytic representation of the free energy profile without the requirement of numerically unstable histograms or binning procedures. It can serve as a new framework for biased simulations and is suitable to be used together with other methods to tackle with the free energy estimation problem.

  9. Magnetic properties and energy-mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hongjun; Lee, Changhoon; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Gong, Xingao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-28

    The magnetic energy levels of a given magnetic solid are closely packed in energy because the interactions between magnetic ions are weak. Thus, in describing its magnetic properties, one needs to generate its magnetic energy spectrum by employing an appropriate spin Hamiltonian. In this review article we discuss how to determine and specify a necessary spin Hamiltonian in terms of first principles electronic structure calculations on the basis of energy-mapping analysis and briefly survey important concepts and phenomena that one encounters in reading the current literature on magnetic solids. Our discussion is given on a qualitative level from the perspective of magnetic energy levels and electronic structures. The spin Hamiltonian appropriate for a magnetic system should be based on its spin lattice, i.e., the repeat pattern of its strong magnetic bonds (strong spin exchange paths), which requires one to evaluate its Heisenberg spin exchanges on the basis of energy-mapping analysis. Other weaker energy terms such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin exchange and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies, which a spin Hamiltonian must include in certain cases, can also be evaluated by performing energy-mapping analysis. We show that the spin orientation of a transition-metal magnetic ion can be easily explained by considering its split d-block levels as unperturbed states with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) as perturbation, that the DM exchange between adjacent spin sites can become comparable in strength to the Heisenberg spin exchange when the two spin sites are not chemically equivalent, and that the DM interaction between rare-earth and transition-metal cations is governed largely by the magnetic orbitals of the rare-earth cation. PMID:23128376

  10. The architecture of MEG simulation and analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, P. W.; Sawada, R.; Cei, F.; Yamada, S.; Schneebeli, M.

    2011-07-01

    MEG ( μ+_{} → e + γ is an experiment dedicated to the search for the μ+_{} → e + γ decay that is strongly suppressed in the Standard Model, but allowed in many alternative models and therefore very sensitive to new physics. The offline software is based on two frameworks. The first is REM in FORTRAN 77, which is used for event generation and the detector simulation package GEM. The other is ROME in C++, used for the readout electronics simulation Bartender and for the reconstruction and analysis program Analyzer. Event display in the simulation is based on GEANT3 graphic libraries and in the reconstruction on ROOT graphic libraries. Data are stored in different formats at various stages of the processing. The frameworks include utilities for I/O, database access and format conversion transparent to the user.

  11. Analysis of differences between seating positions in simulators and orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongan, Philip T.

    1993-01-01

    Crew comments indicate that Space Shuttle simulator seats place crewmembers in a position different from that of the actual Orbiter seats. The crew feel that they launch in a different position, and with a different reach and visibility, from that in which they had trained. This study examined three factors in differences between training and flight positions. Key dimensions, which were considered important to spatial orientation, were compared in the Orbiters and simulators. These were dimensions such as seat back to glare shield and seat pan to overhead. The differences between flight and training crew equipment, and how these differences may contribute to the problem were discussed with engineers and technicians responsible for the equipment. Eye position measurements were taken on subjects to assess any differences that could be attributed to different ingress methods in the Orbiters and the simulators. This report presents the data, analysis, and recommendations.

  12. Constraint methods that accelerate free-energy simulations of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Dill, Ken A

    2015-12-28

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules are critical for generating narratives about biological mechanisms. The power of atomistic simulations is that these are physics-based methods that satisfy Boltzmann's law, so they can be used to compute populations, dynamics, and mechanisms. But physical simulations are computationally intensive and do not scale well to the sizes of many important biomolecules. One way to speed up physical simulations is by coarse-graining the potential function. Another way is to harness structural knowledge, often by imposing spring-like restraints. But harnessing external knowledge in physical simulations is problematic because knowledge, data, or hunches have errors, noise, and combinatoric uncertainties. Here, we review recent principled methods for imposing restraints to speed up physics-based molecular simulations that promise to scale to larger biomolecules and motions. PMID:26723628

  13. Constraint methods that accelerate free-energy simulations of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Dill, Ken A.

    2015-12-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules are critical for generating narratives about biological mechanisms. The power of atomistic simulations is that these are physics-based methods that satisfy Boltzmann's law, so they can be used to compute populations, dynamics, and mechanisms. But physical simulations are computationally intensive and do not scale well to the sizes of many important biomolecules. One way to speed up physical simulations is by coarse-graining the potential function. Another way is to harness structural knowledge, often by imposing spring-like restraints. But harnessing external knowledge in physical simulations is problematic because knowledge, data, or hunches have errors, noise, and combinatoric uncertainties. Here, we review recent principled methods for imposing restraints to speed up physics-based molecular simulations that promise to scale to larger biomolecules and motions.

  14. Constraint methods that accelerate free-energy simulations of biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Dill, Ken A.

    2015-12-28

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules are critical for generating narratives about biological mechanisms. The power of atomistic simulations is that these are physics-based methods that satisfy Boltzmann’s law, so they can be used to compute populations, dynamics, and mechanisms. But physical simulations are computationally intensive and do not scale well to the sizes of many important biomolecules. One way to speed up physical simulations is by coarse-graining the potential function. Another way is to harness structural knowledge, often by imposing spring-like restraints. But harnessing external knowledge in physical simulations is problematic because knowledge, data, or hunches have errors, noise, and combinatoric uncertainties. Here, we review recent principled methods for imposing restraints to speed up physics-based molecular simulations that promise to scale to larger biomolecules and motions.

  15. Energy loss analysis of an integrated space power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. D.; Ribeiro, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies related to conceptual topologies of an integrated utility-like space power system are described. The system topologies are comparatively analyzed by considering their transmission energy losses as functions of mainly distribution voltage level and load composition. The analysis is expedited by use of a Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) software. This recently developed computer program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) uses improved load models to solve the power flow within the system. However, present shortcomings of the software with regard to space applications, and incompletely defined characteristics of a space power system make the results applicable to only the fundamental trends of energy losses of the topologies studied. Accountability, such as included, for the effects of the various parameters on the system performance can constitute part of a planning tool for a space power distribution system.

  16. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear

  17. Uncertainty analysis of geothermal energy economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sener, Adil Caner

    This dissertation research endeavors to explore geothermal energy economics by assessing and quantifying the uncertainties associated with the nature of geothermal energy and energy investments overall. The study introduces a stochastic geothermal cost model and a valuation approach for different geothermal power plant development scenarios. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is employed to obtain probability distributions of geothermal energy development costs and project net present values. In the study a stochastic cost model with incorporated dependence structure is defined and compared with the model where random variables are modeled as independent inputs. One of the goals of the study is to attempt to shed light on the long-standing modeling problem of dependence modeling between random input variables. The dependence between random input variables will be modeled by employing the method of copulas. The study focuses on four main types of geothermal power generation technologies and introduces a stochastic levelized cost model for each technology. Moreover, we also compare the levelized costs of natural gas combined cycle and coal-fired power plants with geothermal power plants. The input data used in the model relies on the cost data recently reported by government agencies and non-profit organizations, such as the Department of Energy, National Laboratories, California Energy Commission and Geothermal Energy Association. The second part of the study introduces the stochastic discounted cash flow valuation model for the geothermal technologies analyzed in the first phase. In this phase of the study, the Integrated Planning Model (IPM) software was used to forecast the revenue streams of geothermal assets under different price and regulation scenarios. These results are then combined to create a stochastic revenue forecast of the power plants. The uncertainties in gas prices and environmental regulations will be modeled and their potential impacts will be

  18. Simulation, design, and analysis of azeotropic distillation operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bossen, B.S.; Joergensen, S.B.; Gani, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The computational tools needed for simulation, design, and analysis of azeotropic distillation operations are described. These tools include simple methods to identify the existence of binary and ternary azeotropes and to classify ternary mixtures as homogeneous or heterogeneous. The tools also include more complex methods to compute the phase diagram (or a heterogeneous liquid boiling surface), predict liquid-vapor phase equilibrium, and/or predict liquid-liquid-vapor phase equilibrium for simulations of batch and continuous distillation column operations. Important new features of these tools are the incorporation of a fast and efficient method for test of phase stability in simulation of distillation operations, the ability to handle a large range of mixtures (including mixtures with supercritical compounds), and the ability for computations covering wide ranges of temperature and pressure. On the basis of these tools, simple and consistent design algorithms are developed. The applicability of the design algorithms is verified through process simulation and analysis of the predicted behavior and data from the open literature. Conditions are given for examples illustrating (when and how possible distillation boundaries can be crossed) how multiple steady states can be obtained. Finally, the effect of changes in operating on the dynamic behavior of the azeotropic distillation columns and the sensitivity of design to the prediction of phase equilibria are presented.

  19. Chemodynamical analysis of bulge stars for simulated disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, A.; Kawata, D.; Brook, Chris B.; Gibson, Brad K.

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the kinematics and chemistry of the bulge stars of two simulated disc galaxies using our chemodynamical galaxy evolution code GCD+. First, we compare stars that are born inside the galaxy with those that are born outside the galaxy and are accreted into the centre of the galaxy. Stars that originate outside the bulge are accreted into it early in its formation within 3 Gyr so that these stars have high [α/Fe] as well as a high total energy reflecting their accretion to the centre of the galaxy. Therefore, higher total energy is a good indicator for finding accreted stars. The bulges of the simulated galaxies formed through multiple mergers separated by about a Gyr. Since [α/Fe] is sensitive to the first few Gyr of star formation history, stars that formed during mergers at different epochs show different [α/Fe]. We show that the [Mg/Fe] against star formation time relation can be very useful to identify a multiple merger bulge formation scenario, provided there is sufficiently good age information available. Our simulations also show that stars formed during one of the merger events retain a systematically prograde rotation at the final time. This demonstrates that the orbit of the ancient merger that helped to form the bulge could still remain in the kinematics of bulge stars.

  20. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Sinusoid Foam Sandwich Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L; Littell, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    A sinusoidal-shaped foam sandwich energy absorber was developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research project. The energy absorber, designated the "sinusoid," consisted of hybrid carbon- Kevlar® plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical or crush direction, and a closed-cell ELFOAM(TradeMark) P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/ft3) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorber was to achieve an average floor-level acceleration of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in the design were assessed through quasi-static and dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the design was finalized, a 5-ft-long subfloor beam was fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorber prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LSDYNA ®, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test analysis results are presented for the sinusoid foam sandwich energy absorber as comparisons of load-displacement and acceleration-time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage for each evaluation level (component testing through barrel section drop testing).

  1. Photon energy absorption coefficients for nuclear track detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 Monte Carlo code simulations were used to solve experimental and theoretical complications for calculation of mass energy-absorption coefficients of elements, air, and compounds. The mass energy-absorption coefficients for nuclear track detectors were computed first time using Geant4 Monte Carlo code for energy 1 keV-20 MeV. Very good agreements for simulated results of mass energy-absorption coefficients for carbon, nitrogen, silicon, sodium iodide and nuclear track detectors were observed on comparison with the values reported in the literatures. Kerma relative to air for energy 1 keV-20 MeV and energy absorption buildup factors for energy 50 keV-10 MeV up to 10 mfp penetration depths of the selected nuclear track detectors were also calculated to evaluate the absorption of the gamma photons. Geant4 simulation can be utilized for estimation of mass energy-absorption coefficients in elements and composite materials.

  2. Single Grit Grinding Simulation by Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öpöz, Tahsin Tecelli; Chen, Xun

    2011-01-01

    In this research, basic material removal characteristics in a single grit grinding have been investigated by using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). ABAQUS/Standard is used as a computational environment. The influences of both friction and undeformed chip thickness are considered in the analyses of the grit ploughing, stress distribution and total force variation. Remeshing strategy is performed in the simulation to produce very fine meshes in the contact area to mitigate the material distortion due to large plastic deformation. The results show that the increase of undeformed chip thickness and frictional coefficient would increase ploughing action and grinding stress magnitude. Moreover, friction would cause the stress distribution circle on grit inclined backwards. Finally, FEM analysis can be considered as a strong tool for the single grit simulation of grinding process.

  3. Differential maneuvering simulator data reduction and analysis software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, G. P.; Sigman, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A multielement data reduction and analysis software package has been developed for use with the Langley differential maneuvering simulator (DMS). This package, which has several independent elements, was developed to support all phases of DMS aircraft simulation studies with a variety of both graphical and tabular information. The overall software package is considered unique because of the number, diversity, and sophistication of the element programs available for use in a single study. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the overall DMS data reduction and analysis package by reviewing the development of the various elements of the software, showing typical results that can be obtained, and discussing how each element can be used.

  4. Information Security Analysis Using Game Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schlicher, Bob G; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Information security analysis can be performed using game theory implemented in dynamic simulations of Agent Based Models (ABMs). Such simulations can be verified with the results from game theory analysis and further used to explore larger scale, real world scenarios involving multiple attackers, defenders, and information assets. Our approach addresses imperfect information and scalability that allows us to also address previous limitations of current stochastic game models. Such models only consider perfect information assuming that the defender is always able to detect attacks; assuming that the state transition probabilities are fixed before the game assuming that the players actions are always synchronous; and that most models are not scalable with the size and complexity of systems under consideration. Our use of ABMs yields results of selected experiments that demonstrate our proposed approach and provides a quantitative measure for realistic information systems and their related security scenarios.

  5. Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Shashkov, Mikhail J.

    2012-06-21

    Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

  6. Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sean J; Hecht, Matthew W; Petersen, Mark; Strelitz, Richard; Maltrud, Mathew E; Ahrens, James P; Hlawitschka, Mario; Hamann, Bernd

    2010-10-15

    Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

  7. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored BEopt software, which ensures a consistent analysis platform and accurate simulations. Many BEopt algorithms have been adopted by private-sector HERS software tools that have helped improve the energy efficiency of tens-of-thousands of ENERGY STAR-certified homes.

  8. Analysis of simulated multispectral data from earth resources satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. A.; Rouse, J. W., Jr.; Scheel, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    The validity of the applicability assumption was determined through the simulation of ERTS and Skylab data using available aircraft scanner systems. The research techniques compared aircraft multispectral scanner data obtained under nominal conditions at low altitudes. Maximum likelihood decision criteria algorithms implemented on a digital computer were used to classify training set data. Comparisons between percentages of correct classifications were made, along with implications as to the techniques of satellite analysis.

  9. Simulation and analysis of immobilized-cell fermentors

    SciTech Connect

    Heyman, E.C.; Nguyen, X.N.

    1982-06-01

    Immobilized cell bioreactors are important for developing high-productivity fermentation processes. A computer simulation program has been devised to aid in the design of three basic fermentor types including batch, tubular, and continuous stirred tank and the analysis of important process variables. Parametric studies on the sensitivity of fermentor residence time for the glucose to ethanol yeast fermentation system with changes kinetic constants, film/pore diffusion limitations, gel support characteristics and recycle of product flow are discussed.

  10. Analysis on energy efficiency in healthcare buildings.

    PubMed

    García-Sanz-Calcedo, Justo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze and quantify the average healthcare centres' energy behavior and estimate the possibilities of savings through the use of concrete measures to reduce their energy demand in Extremadura, Spain. It provides the average energy consumption of 55 healthcare centres sized between 500 and 3,500 m². The analysis evaluated data of electricity and fossil fuel energy consumption as well as water use and other energy-consuming devices. The energy solutions proposed to improve the efficiency are quantified and listed. The average annual energy consumption of a healthcare centre is 86.01 kWh/m², with a standard deviation of 16.8 kWh/m². The results show that an annual savings of €4.77/m² is possible. The potential to reduce the energy consumption of a healthcare centre of size 1,000 m² is 10,801 kWh by making an average investment of €11,601, thus saving €2,961/year with an average payback of 3.92 years.

  11. NREL Evaluates the Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Walls to Improve the Accuracy of Building Energy Simulation Tools (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop models of uninsulated wall assemblies that help to improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when modeling potential energy savings in older homes. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed models for evaluating the thermal performance of walls in existing homes that will improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when predicting potential energy savings of existing homes. Uninsulated walls are typical in older homes where the wall cavities were not insulated during construction or where the insulating material has settled. Accurate calculation of heat transfer through building enclosures will help determine the benefit of energy efficiency upgrades in order to reduce energy consumption in older American homes. NREL performed detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to quantify the energy loss/gain through the walls and to visualize different airflow regimes within the uninsulated cavities. The effects of ambient outdoor temperature, radiative properties of building materials, and insulation level were investigated. The study showed that multi-dimensional airflows occur in walls with uninsulated cavities and that the thermal resistance is a function of the outdoor temperature - an effect not accounted for in existing building energy simulation tools. The study quantified the difference between CFD prediction and the approach currently used in building energy simulation tools over a wide range of conditions. For example, researchers found that CFD predicted lower heating loads and slightly higher cooling loads. Implementation of CFD results into building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus will likely reduce the predicted heating load of homes. Researchers also determined that a small air gap in a partially insulated cavity can lead to a significant reduction in thermal resistance. For instance, a 4-in. tall air gap

  12. Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Don Shirey

    2008-02-28

    EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An

  13. Tool Support for Parametric Analysis of Large Software Simulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Pasareanu, Corina; Menzies, Tim; Barrett, Tony

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of large and complex parameterized software systems, e.g., systems simulation in aerospace, is very complicated and time-consuming due to the large parameter space, and the complex, highly coupled nonlinear nature of the different system components. Thus, such systems are generally validated only in regions local to anticipated operating points rather than through characterization of the entire feasible operational envelope of the system. We have addressed the factors deterring such an analysis with a tool to support envelope assessment: we utilize a combination of advanced Monte Carlo generation with n-factor combinatorial parameter variations to limit the number of cases, but still explore important interactions in the parameter space in a systematic fashion. Additional test-cases, automatically generated from models (e.g., UML, Simulink, Stateflow) improve the coverage. The distributed test runs of the software system produce vast amounts of data, making manual analysis impossible. Our tool automatically analyzes the generated data through a combination of unsupervised Bayesian clustering techniques (AutoBayes) and supervised learning of critical parameter ranges using the treatment learner TAR3. The tool has been developed around the Trick simulation environment, which is widely used within NASA. We will present this tool with a GN&C (Guidance, Navigation and Control) simulation of a small satellite system.

  14. Handbook of Scaling Methods in Aquatic Ecology: Measurement, Analysis, Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrasé, Celia

    2004-03-01

    Researchers in aquatic sciences have long been interested in describing temporal and biological heterogeneities at different observation scales. During the 1970s, scaling studies received a boost from the application of spectral analysis to ecological sciences. Since then, new insights have evolved in parallel with advances in observation technologies and computing power. In particular, during the last 2 decades, novel theoretical achievements were facilitated by the use of microstructure profilers, the application of mathematical tools derived from fractal and wavelet analyses, and the increase in computing power that allowed more complex simulations. The idea of publishing the Handbook of Scaling Methods in Aquatic Ecology arose out of a special session of the 2001 Aquatic Science Meeting of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. The edition of the book is timely, because it compiles a good amount of the work done in these last 2 decades. The book is comprised of three sections: measurements, analysis, and simulation. Each contains some review chapters and a number of more specialized contributions. The contents are multidisciplinary and focus on biological and physical processes and their interactions over a broad range of scales, from micro-layers to ocean basins. The handbook topics include high-resolution observation methodologies, as well as applications of different mathematical tools for analysis and simulation of spatial structures, time variability of physical and biological processes, and individual organism behavior. The scientific background of the authors is highly diverse, ensuring broad interest for the scientific community.

  15. The Communications link analysis and simulation system (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Communications Link Analysis and Simulation System (CLASS) is a comprehensive, computerized communications and tracking system analysis tool under development by the Networks Directorate of the NASA/GSFC. The primary use of this system is to provide the capability to predict the performance of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite system (TDRSS) User Communications and Tracking links through the TDRSS. The general capabilities and operational philosophy of the current and final versions of the CLASS are described along with some examples of analyses which have been performed utilizing the capabilities of this system.

  16. Energy consumption analysis of the Venus Deep Space Station (DSS-13)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, N. V.

    1983-01-01

    This report continues the energy consumption analysis and verification study of the tracking stations of the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, and presents an audit of the Venus Deep Space Station (DSS 13). Due to the non-continuous radioastronomy research and development operations at the station, estimations of energy usage were employed in the energy consumption simulation of both the 9-meter and 26-meter antenna buildings. A 17.9% decrease in station energy consumption was experienced over the 1979-1981 years under study. A comparison of the ECP computer simulations and the station's main watt-hour meter readings showed good agreement.

  17. Analysis of Aurora's Performance Simulation Engine for Three Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Janine; Simon, Joseph

    2015-07-07

    Aurora Solar Inc. is building a cloud-based optimization platform to automate the design, engineering, and permit generation process of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. They requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validate the performance of the PV system performance simulation engine of Aurora Solar’s solar design platform, Aurora. In previous work, NREL performed a validation of multiple other PV modeling tools 1, so this study builds upon that work by examining all of the same fixed-tilt systems with available module datasheets that NREL selected and used in the aforementioned study. Aurora Solar set up these three operating PV systems in their modeling platform using NREL-provided system specifications and concurrent weather data. NREL then verified the setup of these systems, ran the simulations, and compared the Aurora-predicted performance data to measured performance data for those three systems, as well as to performance data predicted by other PV modeling tools.

  18. Heat-Energy Analysis for Solar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Heat-energy analysis program (HEAP) solves general heat-transfer problems, with some specific features that are "custom made" for analyzing solar receivers. Can be utilized not only to predict receiver performance under varying solar flux, ambient temperature and local heat-transfer rates but also to detect locations of hotspots and metallurgical difficulties and to predict performance sensitivity of neighboring component parameters.

  19. CURRENT SHEET ENERGETICS, FLARE EMISSIONS, AND ENERGY PARTITION IN A SIMULATED SOLAR ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Katharine K.; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Forbes, Terry G. E-mail: linkerj@predsci.co E-mail: terry.forbes@unh.ed

    2010-10-01

    We investigate coronal energy flow during a simulated coronal mass ejection (CME). We model the CME in the context of the global corona using a 2.5D numerical MHD code in spherical coordinates that includes coronal heating, thermal conduction, and radiative cooling in the energy equation. The simulation domain extends from 1 to 20 R{sub s} . To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to apply detailed energy diagnostics in a flare/CME simulation when these important terms are considered in the context of the MHD equations. We find that the energy conservation properties of the code are quite good, conserving energy to within 4% for the entire simulation (more than 6 days of real time). We examine the energy release in the current sheet as the eruption takes place, and find, as expected, that the Poynting flux is the dominant carrier of energy into the current sheet. However, there is a significant flow of energy out of the sides of the current sheet into the upstream region due to thermal conduction along field lines and viscous drag. This energy outflow is spatially partitioned into three separate components, namely, the energy flux flowing out the sides of the current sheet, the energy flowing out the lower tip of the current sheet, and the energy flowing out the upper tip of the current sheet. The energy flow through the lower tip of the current sheet is the energy available for heating of the flare loops. We examine the simulated flare emissions and energetics due to the modeled CME and find reasonable agreement with flare loop morphologies and energy partitioning in observed solar eruptions. The simulation also provides an explanation for coronal dimming during eruptions and predicts that the structures surrounding the current sheet are visible in X-ray observations.

  20. ANALYSIS OF WIGNER ENERGY IN BGRR GRAPHITE.

    SciTech Connect

    FUHRMANN, M.

    2006-10-31

    Wigner Energy was determined by DSC analysis in cored graphite from the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor. Eight segments (4-inch long slugs) of cores were obtained from BGRR for analysis of Wigner Energy retained in the graphite. Graphite was scraped from each end of each slug giving two samples from each specimen. Between 10 and 20 mg of this graphite powder were weighed into platinum analysis cells and subjected to thermal analysis on a Shimadzu Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC-50). The samples were annealed in nitrogen up to 700 C at a scan rate of 20 C/minute with data recorded at one second intervals. Each sample was run twice; the first scan provided the energy profile of the ''as received'' material and the second scan provided the background energy profile of the specimen, as the Wigner Energy had been removed during the first annealing. An example is shown in Figure 1. The blank was subtracted from the initial scan to give the Wigner energy profile. The appendix contains two graphs for each sample. One graph presents the data in J/s/g and shows the results of the two scans described above; the energy measurement of the ''as received'' and the same sample after annealing. The other graph presents the data in J/g/K, which was calculated by subtracting the background scan data from the first scan and dividing by the heating rate. The heating rate was nominally 20 K /minute (0.333K/s), however regression analysis provided a more accurate heating rate of 0.3506 K/s and this was used to determine J/g/K. These values were plotted against temperature in C. From these plots the temperature at which energy release increases can be determined. The data (J/s/g) were summed providing a measure of total Wigner energy in the sample in Joules per gram. The DSC analysis gives energy content of the graphite that ranges from around 0 (actual measurements of samples from Loc 4 slug 3 were -2.9 and -21.2 J/g) to 212 J/g. Table 1 gives the location and the total

  1. Simulation and template generation for LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais, Boutheina; Grynagier, Adrien; Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Armano, Michele

    The LISA PathFinder (LPF) mission is a technology demonstration mission which aims at testing a number of critical technical challenges that the future LISA (Gravitational wave detection in space) mission will face: LPF can be seen as a complex laboratory experiment in space. It is therefore critical to be able to define which measurements and which actuations will be applied during the scientific part of the mission. The LISA Technology Package (LTP), part of ESA's hardware contribution to LPF, outlines hence the importance of developing an appropriate simulation tool in order to test these strate-gies before launch and to analyse the dynamical behaviour of the system during the mission. The detailed model of the simulation can be used in an off-line mode for further planning: cor-rect estimation of timeline priorities, risk factors, duty cycles, data analysis readiness. The Lisa Technology Package Data Analysis (LTPDA) team has developed an object-oriented MATLAB toolbox for general case of data analysis needs. However, to meet specific needs of LPF mis-sion, a template generation tool has been developed. It provides a recognizable data pattern, avoiding the risk of missing the model during mission's analysis. The aim of the template generator tool is to provide tools to analyse LTP system modeled in State Space Model (SSM). The SSM class, the aim of this poster, includes this tools within the LTPDA toolbox. It can be used to generate the time-domain response for any given actuation and/or noise, the frequency response using bode diagrams and the steady state of the system. It allows the user to project noises on system outputs to get spectra of outputs for given input noises spectra. This class is sufficiently general to be used with a variety of systems once the SSM of the system is provided in the library. Furthermore, one of the main objectives of the data analysis for LPF (the estimation of different parameters of the system), can be achieved by a new

  2. Simulation analysis for ion assisted fast ignition using structured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, H.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.

    2016-05-01

    As the heating efficiency by fast electrons in the fast ignition scheme is estimated to be very low due to their large divergence angle and high energy. To mitigate this problem, low-density plastic foam, which can generate not only proton (H+) but also carbon (C6+) beams, can be introduced to currently used cone-guided targets and additional core heating by ions is expected. According to 2D PIC simulations, it is found that the ion beams also diverge by the static electric field and concave surface deformation. Thus structured targets are suggested to optimize ion beam characteristics, and their improvement and core heating enhancement by ion beams are confirmed.

  3. Vibrational energy flow in the villin headpiece subdomain: Master equation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, David M. E-mail: stock@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Buchenberg, Sebastian; Brettel, Paul; Stock, Gerhard E-mail: stock@physik.uni-freiburg.de

    2015-02-21

    We examine vibrational energy flow in dehydrated and hydrated villin headpiece subdomain HP36 by master equation simulations. Transition rates used in the simulations are obtained from communication maps calculated for HP36. In addition to energy flow along the main chain, we identify pathways for energy transport in HP36 via hydrogen bonding between residues quite far in sequence space. The results of the master equation simulations compare well with all-atom non-equilibrium simulations to about 1 ps following initial excitation of the protein, and quite well at long times, though for some residues we observe deviations between the master equation and all-atom simulations at intermediate times from about 1–10 ps. Those deviations are less noticeable for hydrated than dehydrated HP36 due to energy flow into the water.

  4. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  5. Statistical simulation of internal energy exchange in shock waves using explicit transition probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Erik; Magin, Thierry

    2012-11-01

    A statistical model originally developed for electronic-translational energy transfer in atoms having multiple electronic states (Anderson et al, RGD15, 1986) is applied to the study of internal energy exchange in a polyatomic gas. The model is well-suited for gas kinetic simulations, because it provides an explicit expression for the transition probabilities between internal energy levels. All molecules possessing a given internal energy level are treated as a separate chemical species and all collisions involving exchange of internal energy thus become pseudo-chemical reactions. Post-collision energy levels of the two partners are determined by conserving the total energy of the collision pair and taking into account detailed balance. In the present work, DSMC simulations of relaxation in a stationary gas are performed and compared to those obtained by Anderson et al. Additionally, we apply the model to the simulation of rotational relaxation behind a normal shock wave.

  6. Lower-Energy Requirements for Power-Assist HEV Energy Storage Systems--Analysis and Rationale (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-03-18

    Presented at the 27th International Battery Seminar and Exhibit, 15-18 March 2010, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. NREL conducted simulations and analysis of vehicle test data with research partners in response to a USABC request; results suggest that power-assist hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), like conventional HEVs, can achieve high fuel savings with lower energy requirements at potentially lower cost.

  7. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  8. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  9. Finite element analysis simulations for ultrasonic array NDE inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Jeff; Tweedie, Andrew; Harvey, Gerald; O'Leary, Richard; Mulholland, Anthony; Tant, Katherine; Gachagan, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Advances in manufacturing techniques and materials have led to an increase in the demand for reliable and robust inspection techniques to maintain safety critical features. The application of modelling methods to develop and evaluate inspections is becoming an essential tool for the NDE community. Current analytical methods are inadequate for simulation of arbitrary components and heterogeneous materials, such as anisotropic welds or composite structures. Finite element analysis software (FEA), such as PZFlex, can provide the ability to simulate the inspection of these arrangements, providing the ability to economically prototype and evaluate improved NDE methods. FEA is often seen as computationally expensive for ultrasound problems however, advances in computing power have made it a more viable tool. This paper aims to illustrate the capability of appropriate FEA to produce accurate simulations of ultrasonic array inspections - minimizing the requirement for expensive test-piece fabrication. Validation is afforded via corroboration of the FE derived and experimentally generated data sets for a test-block comprising 1D and 2D defects. The modelling approach is extended to consider the more troublesome aspects of heterogeneous materials where defect dimensions can be of the same length scale as the grain structure. The model is used to facilitate the implementation of new ultrasonic array inspection methods for such materials. This is exemplified by considering the simulation of ultrasonic NDE in a weld structure in order to assess new approaches to imaging such structures.

  10. Macro-System Model for Hydrogen Energy Systems Analysis in Transportation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, V.; Ruth, M.; Sa, T. J.; Goldsby, M. E.

    2012-06-01

    The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

  11. Database Driven 6-DOF Trajectory Simulation for Debris Transport Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Debris mitigation and risk assessment have been carried out by NASA and its contractors supporting Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight (RTF). As a part of this assessment, analysis of transport potential for debris that may be liberated from the vehicle or from pad facilities prior to tower clear (Lift-Off Debris) is being performed by MSFC. This class of debris includes plume driven and wind driven sources for which lift as well as drag are critical for the determination of the debris trajectory. As a result, NASA MSFC has a need for a debris transport or trajectory simulation that supports the computation of lift effect in addition to drag without the computational expense of fully coupled CFD with 6-DOF. A database driven 6-DOF simulation that uses aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for the debris shape that are interpolated from a database has been developed to meet this need. The design, implementation, and verification of the database driven six degree of freedom (6-DOF) simulation addition to the Lift-Off Debris Transport Analysis (LODTA) software are discussed in this paper.

  12. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-07-03

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets.

  13. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li L; Feng, Guo Q; Zhang, Qing G

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  14. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  15. Feature-Based Statistical Analysis of Combustion Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J; Krishnamoorthy, V; Liu, S; Grout, R; Hawkes, E; Chen, J; Pascucci, V; Bremer, P T

    2011-11-18

    We present a new framework for feature-based statistical analysis of large-scale scientific data and demonstrate its effectiveness by analyzing features from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion. Turbulent flows are ubiquitous and account for transport and mixing processes in combustion, astrophysics, fusion, and climate modeling among other disciplines. They are also characterized by coherent structure or organized motion, i.e. nonlocal entities whose geometrical features can directly impact molecular mixing and reactive processes. While traditional multi-point statistics provide correlative information, they lack nonlocal structural information, and hence, fail to provide mechanistic causality information between organized fluid motion and mixing and reactive processes. Hence, it is of great interest to capture and track flow features and their statistics together with their correlation with relevant scalar quantities, e.g. temperature or species concentrations. In our approach we encode the set of all possible flow features by pre-computing merge trees augmented with attributes, such as statistical moments of various scalar fields, e.g. temperature, as well as length-scales computed via spectral analysis. The computation is performed in an efficient streaming manner in a pre-processing step and results in a collection of meta-data that is orders of magnitude smaller than the original simulation data. This meta-data is sufficient to support a fully flexible and interactive analysis of the features, allowing for arbitrary thresholds, providing per-feature statistics, and creating various global diagnostics such as Cumulative Density Functions (CDFs), histograms, or time-series. We combine the analysis with a rendering of the features in a linked-view browser that enables scientists to interactively explore, visualize, and analyze the equivalent of one terabyte of simulation data. We highlight the utility of this new framework for combustion

  16. A Posteriori Analysis for Hydrodynamic Simulations Using Adjoint Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C S; Estep, D; Sandelin, J; Wang, H

    2009-02-26

    This report contains results of analysis done during an FY08 feasibility study investigating the use of adjoint methodologies for a posteriori error estimation for hydrodynamics simulations. We developed an approach to adjoint analysis for these systems through use of modified equations and viscosity solutions. Targeting first the 1D Burgers equation, we include a verification of the adjoint operator for the modified equation for the Lax-Friedrichs scheme, then derivations of an a posteriori error analysis for a finite difference scheme and a discontinuous Galerkin scheme applied to this problem. We include some numerical results showing the use of the error estimate. Lastly, we develop a computable a posteriori error estimate for the MAC scheme applied to stationary Navier-Stokes.

  17. Mixture interpretation: Experimental and simulated reevaluation of qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Sho; Mori, Yuki; Kawai, Chihiro; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji

    2013-03-01

    We present here analytical data using the 15 STR typing (Identifiler) kit regarding heterozygote balance in experimental DNA samples including one or two persons. Surprisingly, the allelic imbalance was observed even in samples consisting of only one person but adequate DNA for the standard protocol. The variance of heterozygote balance was more expanded in two-person mixtures than in one-person samples. Therefore, it is not suitable to use allelic peak heights/areas for estimating the genotypes of the contributors such as the quantitative analysis. We also reevaluated the effectiveness of qualitative analysis by simulation, i.e. consideration of the probability of all possible genotype combinations from the typing results of a mixed DNA sample. As demonstrated, the qualitative analysis using 15 STR loci is still extremely effective even in a mixture from two or three individuals.

  18. Simulation and Analysis for the MiniCLEAN Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Stanley; Miniclean Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The MiniCLEAN dark matter experiment is an ultra-low background liquid argon and neon detector at SNOLAB with a fiducial volume of 150 kg. The ability of the experiment to exchange the target material gives MiniCLEAN both competitive sensitivity to WIMP dark matter and also the opportunity to demonstrate the technologies required to build the multi-ton detectors necessary for dark matter and precision measurements of low energy solar neutrinos. I will discuss the current status of the MiniCLEAN simulation and analysis package, called RAT. RAT is a GEANT4-based full optical simulation, which includes a complete model of the data acquisition system in order to mimic the real detector data stream for development of event-level analysis algorithms. In addition, I will report on projected performance of position reconstruction in RAT and improved timing-based techniques for particle identification.

  19. Analysis of simulated engine sounds using a psychoacoustic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvigneau, Fabian; Liefold, Steffen; Höchstetter, Marius; Verhey, Jesko L.; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is the evaluation and the prediction of the perceived quality of engine sounds, which is predicted in the design process by numerical simulations. Periodic combustion sounds of the operating engine are synthesized with the help of an overall numerical simulation approach before a real prototype exists. The perceived quality of the sound is rated in hearing tests using the method of relative comparison and absolute judgment. Results are transferred into an interval scaled ranking of the stimuli. Based on the data, a psychoacoustic model for sound quality is developed using psychoacoustic parameters. Predictions of this model are used to evaluate the sound quality of several technical design modifications, for example, different engine encapsulations. The results are visualized to allow a simple qualitative analysis of the sound perception. This results in an impartial and objective decision regarding the final design of an acoustic encapsulation with a higher perceived sound quality.

  20. A pulse generator simulating slit-scan chromosome analysis signals.

    PubMed

    Weier, H U; Eisert, W G

    1986-01-01

    A simple circuit is described for generating a variety of electronic pulses to test hardware and software for slit-scan chromosome analysis in a flow cytometer. The pulse shape can be changed to have different numbers of local minima, thereby simulating fluorescence pulses from acrocentric, monocentric, and dicentric chromosomes. Long pulses simulate aggregates of chromosomes. The pulse repetition rate as well as the pulse amplitude is variable. Although the circuitry is built with only three integrated circuits, the pulse-to-pulse variation in shape and height is quite small. After digitization of the analog signals, the constructed histograms of pulse integrals show a relative coefficient of variation below 1%. This signal generator provides a valuable tool for a number of electronic test applications that would otherwise require expensive standard particles analyzed in a well-tuned flow cytometer.

  1. A Computational Approach for Probabilistic Analysis of Water Impact Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Mason, Brian H.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's development of new concepts for the Crew Exploration Vehicle Orion presents many similar challenges to those worked in the sixties during the Apollo program. However, with improved modeling capabilities, new challenges arise. For example, the use of the commercial code LS-DYNA, although widely used and accepted in the technical community, often involves high-dimensional, time consuming, and computationally intensive simulations. The challenge is to capture what is learned from a limited number of LS-DYNA simulations to develop models that allow users to conduct interpolation of solutions at a fraction of the computational time. This paper presents a description of the LS-DYNA model, a brief summary of the response surface techniques, the analysis of variance approach used in the sensitivity studies, equations used to estimate impact parameters, results showing conditions that might cause injuries, and concluding remarks.

  2. Simulation and analysis about noisy range images of laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingbo; He, Jun; Fu, Qiang; Xi, Dan

    2011-06-01

    A measured range image of imaging laser radar (ladar) is usually disturbed by dropouts and outliers. For the difficulty of obtaining measured data and controlling noise level of dropouts and outliers, a new simulation method for range image with noise is proposed. Based on the noise formation mechanism of ladar range image, an accurate ladar range imaging model is formulated, including three major influencing factors: speckle, atmospheric turbulence and receiver noise. The noisy range images under different scenarios are obtained using MATLABTM. Analysis on simulation results reveals that: (1) Despite of detection strategy, the speckle, the atmospheric turbulence and the receiver noise are major factors which cause dropouts and outliers. (2) The receiver noise itself has limited effect on outliers. However, if other factors (speckle, atmospheric turbulence, etc.) also exist, the effect will be sharply enhanced. (3) Both dropouts and outliers exist in background and target regions.

  3. Simulation of probabilistic wind loads and building analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic wind loads likely to occur on a structure during its design life are predicted. Described here is a suitable multifactor interactive equation (MFIE) model and its use in the Composite Load Spectra (CLS) computer program to simulate the wind pressure cumulative distribution functions on four sides of a building. The simulated probabilistic wind pressure load was applied to a building frame, and cumulative distribution functions of sway displacements and reliability against overturning were obtained using NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structure Under Stress), a stochastic finite element computer code. The geometry of the building and the properties of building members were also considered as random in the NESSUS analysis. The uncertainties of wind pressure, building geometry, and member section property were qualified in terms of their respective sensitivities on the structural response.

  4. The Role of Multiphysics Simulation in Multidisciplinary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rifai, Steven M.; Ferencz, Robert M.; Wang, Wen-Ping; Spyropoulos, Evangelos T.; Lawrence, Charles; Melis, Matthew E.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes the applications of the Spectrum(Tm) Solver in Multidisciplinary Analysis (MDA). Spectrum, a multiphysics simulation software based on the finite element method, addresses compressible and incompressible fluid flow, structural, and thermal modeling as well as the interaction between these disciplines. Multiphysics simulation is based on a single computational framework for the modeling of multiple interacting physical phenomena. Interaction constraints are enforced in a fully-coupled manner using the augmented-Lagrangian method. Within the multiphysics framework, the finite element treatment of fluids is based on Galerkin-Least-Squares (GLS) method with discontinuity capturing operators. The arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian method is utilized to account for deformable fluid domains. The finite element treatment of solids and structures is based on the Hu-Washizu variational principle. The multiphysics architecture lends itself naturally to high-performance parallel computing. Aeroelastic, propulsion, thermal management and manufacturing applications are presented.

  5. In-wheel hub SRM simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, Milton W., III

    Is it feasible to replace the conventional gasoline engine and subsequent drive system in a motorcycle with an electric switched reluctance motor (SRM) by placing the SRM inside the rear wheel, thereby removing the need for things such as a clutch, chain, transmission, gears and sprockets? The goal of this thesis is to study the theoretical aspect of prototyping and analyzing an in-wheel electric hub motor to replace the standard gasoline engine traditionally found on motorcycles. With the recent push for clean energy, electric vehicles are becoming more common. All currently produced electric motorcycles use conventional, prefabricated electric motors connected to the traditional sprocket and chain design. This greatly restricts the efficiency and range of these motorcycles. My design stands apart by turning the rear wheel into a SRM which uses electromagnets around a non-magnetic core to convert electrical energy into mechanical force driving the rear wheel. To my knowledge, there is currently no motorcycle designed with an in-wheel hub SRM. A three-phase SRM and a five-phase SRM will be simulated and analyzed using MATLAB with Simulink. Factors such as friction, weight, power, etc. will be taken into account in order to create a realistic simulation as if it were inside the rear wheel of a motorcycle. Since time and finances will not allow for a full scale build, a scaled model three-phase SRM will be attempted for demonstration purposes.

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of Heavy Nuclei Photofission at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade-II, E.; Freitas, E.; Garcia, F.; Tavares, O. A. P.; Duarte, S. B.

    2009-06-03

    A detailed description of photofission process at intermediate energies (200 to 1000 MeV) is presented. The study of the reaction is performed by a Monte Carlo method which allows the investigation of properties of residual nuclei and fissioning nuclei. The information obtained indicate that multifragmentation is negligible at the photon energies studied here, and that the symmetrical fission is dominant. Energy and mass distributions of residual and fissioning nuclei were calculated.

  7. Energy Analysis Program. 1992 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Program became deeply involved in establishing 4 Washington, D.C., project office diving the last few months of fiscal year 1942. This project office, which reports to the Energy & Environment Division, will receive the majority of its support from the Energy Analysis Program. We anticipate having two staff scientists and support personnel in offices within a few blocks of DOE. Our expectation is that this office will carry out a series of projects that are better managed closer to DOE. We also anticipate that our representation in Washington will improve and we hope to expand the Program, its activities, and impact, in police-relevant analyses. In spite of the growth that we have achieved, the Program continues to emphasize (1) energy efficiency of buildings, (2) appliance energy efficiency standards, (3) energy demand forecasting, (4) utility policy studies, especially integrated resource planning issues, and (5) international energy studies, with considerate emphasis on developing countries and economies in transition. These continuing interests are reflected in the articles that appear in this report.

  8. Preliminary analysis of the dynamic heliosphere by MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Washimi, H.; Zank, G. P.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-09-26

    A preliminary analysis of the dynamic heliosphere to estimate the termination shock (TS) distance from the sun around the time when Voyager 1 passed the termination shock at December 16, 2004 is performed by using MHD simulations. For input to this simulation, we use the Voyager 2 solar-wind data. We first find a stationary solution of the 3-D outer heliosphere by assigning a set of LISM parameters as our outer boundary conditions and then the dynamical analysis is performed. The model TS crossing is within 6 months of the observed date. The TS is pushed outward every time a high ram-pressure solar wind pulse arrives. After the end of the high ram-pressure wind, the TS shock shrinks inward. When the last Halloween event passed through the TS at DOY 250, 2004, the TS began to shrink inward very quickly and the TS crossed V1. The highest inward speed of the TS is over 400 km/s. The high ram-pressure solar wind transmitted through the TS becomes a high thermal-pressure plasma in the heliosheath, acting to push the TS inward. This suggests that the position of the TS is determined not only by the steady-state pressure balance condition between the solar wind ram-pressure and the LISM pressure, but by the dynamical ram pressure too. The period when the high ram-pressure solar wind arrives at the TS shock seems to correspond to the period of the TS particle event (Stone et al, 2005, Decker et al., 2005). The TS crossing date will be revised in future simulations using a more appropriate set of parameters for the LISM. This will enable us to undertake a detailed comparison of the simulation results with the TS particle events.

  9. The Communication Link and Error ANalysis (CLEAN) simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebel, William J.; Ingels, Frank M.; Crowe, Shane

    1993-01-01

    During the period July 1, 1993 through December 30, 1993, significant developments to the Communication Link and Error ANalysis (CLEAN) simulator were completed and include: (1) Soft decision Viterbi decoding; (2) node synchronization for the Soft decision Viterbi decoder; (3) insertion/deletion error programs; (4) convolutional encoder; (5) programs to investigate new convolutional codes; (6) pseudo-noise sequence generator; (7) soft decision data generator; (8) RICE compression/decompression (integration of RICE code generated by Pen-Shu Yeh at Goddard Space Flight Center); (9) Markov Chain channel modeling; (10) percent complete indicator when a program is executed; (11) header documentation; and (12) help utility. The CLEAN simulation tool is now capable of simulating a very wide variety of satellite communication links including the TDRSS downlink with RFI. The RICE compression/decompression schemes allow studies to be performed on error effects on RICE decompressed data. The Markov Chain modeling programs allow channels with memory to be simulated. Memory results from filtering, forward error correction encoding/decoding, differential encoding/decoding, channel RFI, nonlinear transponders and from many other satellite system processes. Besides the development of the simulation, a study was performed to determine whether the PCI provides a performance improvement for the TDRSS downlink. There exist RFI with several duty cycles for the TDRSS downlink. We conclude that the PCI does not improve performance for any of these interferers except possibly one which occurs for the TDRS East. Therefore, the usefulness of the PCI is a function of the time spent transmitting data to the WSGT through the TDRS East transponder.

  10. Flood Frequency Analysis Using Continuous Simulation of Catchment Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valent, Peter; Výleta, Roman

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade a substantial effort has been put into the development of new methods for flood frequency analysis (FFA), which would utilize continuous simulation of catchment runoff. Recent trend in FFA is trying to combine the advantages of stochastic weather generators used to generate synthetic time series of meteorological and climatic variables and rainfall-runoff models enabling their transformation to catchment runoff. This approach enables to estimate design floods even in places with short or no historical records of flows at all. This work presents a new methodology for extreme flood estimation, combining a single site stochastic weather generator enabling the generation of daily precipitation amounts and air temperatures and a conceptual lumped rainfall-runoff model. The weather generator takes into account seasonality and complies with the two-part model scheme of Todorovic and Woolhiser (1975), where the precipitation occurrence and amount are generated separately. The model of precipitation amounts generates precipitation amounts for the whole rainfall events. These amounts are further disaggregated into individual days of these events according to a newly proposed method of fragments. In order to avoid a complicated generation of precipitation amounts at multiple sites, the weather generator was used to generate mean areal precipitations and air temperatures calculated using geostatistical methods. The rainfall-runoff model used in the methodology brings an innovative approach of separate simulation of low and extreme flows, which significantly improves the simulation of extreme flows while maintaining a satisfactory simulation of low and medium flows. The newly proposed methodology was used to estimate extreme floods of selected return periods in several mountainous catchments in Slovakia. The results of the analysis showed that the weather generator preserved the selected statistical characteristics of observed precipitation and air

  11. Research on simulation system with the wide range and high-precision laser energy characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ke-yan; Lou, Yan; He, Jing-yi; Tong, Shou-feng; Jiang, Hui-lin

    2012-10-01

    The Hardware-in-the-loop(HWIL) simulation test is one of the important parts for the development and performance testing of semi-active laser-guided weapons. In order to obtain accurate results, the confidence level of the target environment should be provided for a high-seeker during the HWIL simulation test of semi-active laser-guided weapons, and one of the important simulation parameters is the laser energy characteristic. In this paper, based on the semi-active laser-guided weapon guidance principles, an important parameter of simulation of confidence which affects energy characteristics in performance test of HWIL simulation was analyzed. According to the principle of receiving the same energy by using HWIL simulation and in practical application, HWIL energy characteristics simulation systems with the crystal absorption structure was designed. And on this basis, the problems of optimal design of the optical system were also analyzed. The measured results show that the dynamic attenuation range of the system energy is greater than 50dB, the dynamic attenuation stability is less than 5%, and the maximum energy changing rate driven by the servo motor is greater than 20dB/s.

  12. Exosystem Modeling for Mission Simulation and Survey Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savransky, Dmitry

    In the last twenty years, the existence of exoplanets (planets orbiting stars other than our own sun) has gone from conjecture to established fact. The accelerating rate of exoplanet discovery has generated a wealth of important new knowledge, and is due mainly to the development and maturation of a large number of technologies that drive a variety of planet detection and observation methods. The overall goal of the exoplanet community is to study planets around all types of stars, and across all ranges of planetary mass and orbit size. With this capability we will be able to build confidence in planet formation and evolution theories and learn how our solar system came to exist. Achieving this goal requires creating dedicated instrumentation capable of detecting signals that are a small fraction of the magnitude of signals we can observe today. It also requires analyzing highly noisy data sets for the faint patterns that represent the presence of planets. Accurate modeling and simulation are necessary for both these tasks. With detailed planetary and observation models we can predict the type of data that will be generated when a specific instrument observes a specific planetary system. This allows us to evaluate the performance of both the instrument and the data analysis methods used to extract planet signals from observational data. The same simulations can help optimize observation scheduling and statistical analysis of data sets. The purpose of this thesis is to lay down the groundwork necessary for building simulations of this type, and to demonstrate a few of their many possible applications. First, we show how each of four different detection methods (astrometry, doppler spectroscopy, transit photometry and direct imaging) can be described using a common parameter set which also encodes sufficient information to propagate the described exosystem in time. We analyze this parameter set and derive the distribution functions of several of its elements. These

  13. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

    2004-04-30

    The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

  14. Visualization and Analysis of Climate Simulation Performance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Adamidis, Panagiotis; Behrens, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Visualization is the key process of transforming abstract (scientific) data into a graphical representation, to aid in the understanding of the information hidden within the data. Climate simulation data sets are typically quite large, time varying, and consist of many different variables sampled on an underlying grid. A large variety of climate models - and sub models - exist to simulate various aspects of the climate system. Generally, one is mainly interested in the physical variables produced by the simulation runs, but model developers are also interested in performance data measured along with these simulations. Climate simulation models are carefully developed complex software systems, designed to run in parallel on large HPC systems. An important goal thereby is to utilize the entire hardware as efficiently as possible, that is, to distribute the workload as even as possible among the individual components. This is a very challenging task, and detailed performance data, such as timings, cache misses etc. have to be used to locate and understand performance problems in order to optimize the model implementation. Furthermore, the correlation of performance data to the processes of the application and the sub-domains of the decomposed underlying grid is vital when addressing communication and load imbalance issues. High resolution climate simulations are carried out on tens to hundreds of thousands of cores, thus yielding a vast amount of profiling data, which cannot be analyzed without appropriate visualization techniques. This PICO presentation displays and discusses the ICON simulation model, which is jointly developed by the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology and the German Weather Service and in partnership with DKRZ. The visualization and analysis of the models performance data allows us to optimize and fine tune the model, as well as to understand its execution on the HPC system. We show and discuss our workflow, as well as present new ideas and

  15. Lac Courte Oreilles Energy Analysis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Isham; Denise Johnson

    2009-04-01

    and funding to do so will be sought. While we already are in ownership of a Hydro Dam it is currently not functioning to its full capacity we are seeking operation and maintenance firm proposals and funding sources. One of our biggest accomplishment this project gave us was our total Carbon Emissions 9989.45 tons, this will be the number that we will use to base our reductions from. It will help us achieve our goals we have set for ourselves in achieving the Kyoto Protocol and saving our Earth for our future generations. Another major accomplishment and lesson learned is we need to educate ourselves and our people on how to conserve energy to both impact the environment and our own budgets. The Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) Energy Analysis Project will perform an energy audit to gather information on the Tribe's energy usage and determine the carbon emissions. By performing the audit we will be able to identify areas where conservation efforts are most viable and recommend policies that can be implemented. These steps will enable LCO to begin achieving the goals that have been set by the Tribal Governing Board and adopted through resolutions. The goals are to reduce emissions by 25% and to produce 25% of its energy using sustainable sources. The project objectives were very definitive to assist the Tribe in achieving its goals; reducing carbon emissions and obtaining a sustainable source of energy. The following were the outlined objectives: (1) Coordinate LCO's current and future conservation and renewable energy projects; (2) Establish working relationships with outside entities to share information and collaborate on future projects; (3) Complete energy audit and analyze LCO's energy load and carbon emissions; (4) Identify policy changes, education programs and conservation efforts which are appropriate for the LCO Reservation; and (5) Create a plan to identify the most cost effective renewable energy options for LCO.

  16. Pareto optimality in organelle energy metabolism analysis.

    PubMed

    Angione, Claudio; Carapezza, Giovanni; Costanza, Jole; Lió, Pietro; Nicosia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    In low and high eukaryotes, energy is collected or transformed in compartments, the organelles. The rich variety of size, characteristics, and density of the organelles makes it difficult to build a general picture. In this paper, we make use of the Pareto-front analysis to investigate the optimization of energy metabolism in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Using the Pareto optimality principle, we compare models of organelle metabolism on the basis of single- and multiobjective optimization, approximation techniques (the Bayesian Automatic Relevance Determination), robustness, and pathway sensitivity analysis. Finally, we report the first analysis of the metabolic model for the hydrogenosome of Trichomonas vaginalis, which is found in several protozoan parasites. Our analysis has shown the importance of the Pareto optimality for such comparison and for insights into the evolution of the metabolism from cytoplasmic to organelle bound, involving a model order reduction. We report that Pareto fronts represent an asymptotic analysis useful to describe the metabolism of an organism aimed at maximizing concurrently two or more metabolite concentrations.

  17. Advanced Analysis Methods in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpalatha C. Bhat

    2001-10-03

    During the coming decade, high energy physics experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron and around the globe will use very sophisticated equipment to record unprecedented amounts of data in the hope of making major discoveries that may unravel some of Nature's deepest mysteries. The discovery of the Higgs boson and signals of new physics may be around the corner. The use of advanced analysis techniques will be crucial in achieving these goals. The author discusses some of the novel methods of analysis that could prove to be particularly valuable for finding evidence of any new physics, for improving precision measurements and for exploring parameter spaces of theoretical models.

  18. Bifurcations analysis of turbulent energy cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Divitiis, Nicola de

    2015-03-15

    This note studies the mechanism of turbulent energy cascade through an opportune bifurcations analysis of the Navier–Stokes equations, and furnishes explanations on the more significant characteristics of the turbulence. A statistical bifurcations property of the Navier–Stokes equations in fully developed turbulence is proposed, and a spatial representation of the bifurcations is presented, which is based on a proper definition of the fixed points of the velocity field. The analysis first shows that the local deformation can be much more rapid than the fluid state variables, then explains the mechanism of energy cascade through the aforementioned property of the bifurcations, and gives reasonable argumentation of the fact that the bifurcations cascade can be expressed in terms of length scales. Furthermore, the study analyzes the characteristic length scales at the transition through global properties of the bifurcations, and estimates the order of magnitude of the critical Taylor-scale Reynolds number and the number of bifurcations at the onset of turbulence.

  19. Improved spectrum simulation for validating SEM-EDS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statham, P.; Penman, C.; Duncumb, P.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray microanalysis by SEM-EDS requires corrections for the many physical processes that affect emitted intensity for elements present in the material. These corrections will only be accurate provided a number of conditions are satisfied and it is essential that the correct elements are identified. As analysis is pushed to achieve results on smaller features and more challenging samples it becomes increasingly difficult to determine if all conditions are upheld and whether the analysis results are valid. If a theoretical simulated spectrum based on the measured analysis result is compared with the measured spectrum, any marked differences will indicate problems with the analysis and can prevent serious mistakes in interpretation. To achieve the necessary accuracy a previous theoretical model has been enhanced to incorporate new line intensity measurements, differential absorption and excitation of emission lines, including the effect of Coster-Kronig transitions and an improved treatment of bremsstrahlung for compounds. The efficiency characteristic has been measured for a large area SDD detector and data acquired from an extensive set of standard materials at both 5 kV and 20 kV. The parameterized model has been adjusted to fit measured characteristic intensities and both background shape and intensity at the same beam current. Examples are given to demonstrate how an overlay of an accurate theoretical simulation can expose some non-obvious mistakes and provide some expert guidance towards a valid analysis result. A new formula for calculating the effective mean atomic number for compounds has also been derived that is appropriate and should help improve accuracy in techniques that calculate the bremsstrahlung or use a bremsstrahlung measurement for calibration.

  20. Nonlinear transient analysis via energy minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.; Knight, N. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The formulation basis for nonlinear transient analysis of finite element models of structures using energy minimization is provided. Geometric and material nonlinearities are included. The development is restricted to simple one and two dimensional finite elements which are regarded as being the basic elements for modeling full aircraft-like structures under crash conditions. The results indicate the effectiveness of the technique as a viable tool for this purpose.

  1. Scripted Building Energy Modeling and Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, E.; Macumber, D.; Benne, K.; Goldwasser, D.

    2012-08-01

    Building energy modeling and analysis is currently a time-intensive, error-prone, and nonreproducible process. This paper describes the scripting platform of the OpenStudio tool suite (http://openstudio.nrel.gov) and demonstrates its use in several contexts. Two classes of scripts are described and demonstrated: measures and free-form scripts. Measures are small, single-purpose scripts that conform to a predefined interface. Because measures are fairly simple, they can be written or modified by inexperienced programmers.

  2. Analysis and simulation of a torque assist automated manual transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvagno, E.; Velardocchia, M.; Vigliani, A.

    2011-08-01

    The paper presents the kinematic and dynamic analysis of a power-shift automated manual transmission (AMT) characterised by a wet clutch, called assist clutch (ACL), replacing the fifth gear synchroniser. This torque assist mechanism becomes a torque transfer path during gearshifts, in order to overcome a typical dynamic problem of the AMTs, that is the driving force interruption. The mean power contributions during gearshifts are computed for different engine and ACL interventions, thus allowing to draw considerations useful for developing the control algorithms. The simulation results prove the advantages in terms of gearshift quality and ride comfort of the analysed transmission.

  3. Functional analysis of the binding model of microbial inulinases using docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Puneet Kumar; Joseph, Josmi; Goyal, Sukriti; Grover, Abhinav; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-04-01

    Recently inulinase has regained interest due to its usage in the production of fructooligosaccharides, biofuels, and in pharmaceutical industries. Inulinases properties are experimentally reported by nomerous studies but their characteristics are just partially explained by only a few computational investigations. In the present study we have investigated exoinulinase and endoinulinase from different microbial sources toward their catalytic activity. Docking and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation were carried out for microbial endoinulinase and exoinulinase docked with 1-kestose and fructose-6-phosphate respectively. Pseudomonas mucidolens (-7.42 kcal mol(-1) binding energy), docked with fructose-6-phosphate, was recorded as the most favorable binding energy, Pseudomonas mucidolens made hydrogen bonds with fructose-6-phosphate and the amino acids involved were arginine 286, tryptophan 158, and isoleucine 87. After the simulation only tryptophan 158 remained bonded and additionally valine 156 made hydrogen bonds with fructose-6-phosphate. Aspergillus niger docked with 1-kestose was bonded with the involvement of threonine 271, aspartate 285, threonine 288, and proline 283, after the simulation aspartate 285 was retained till the end of the simulation. The present study thus refers to the indication of depicting binding analysis of microbial inulinases.

  4. Analysis of lunar regolith thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Colozza, A.J.

    1991-11-01

    The concept of using lunar regolith as a thermal energy storage medium was evaluated. The concept was examined by mathematically modeling the absorption and transfer of heat by the lunar regolith. Regolith thermal and physical properties were established through various sources as functions of temperature. Two cases were considered: a semi-infinite, constant temperature, cylindrical heat source embedded in a continuum of lunar regolith and a spherically shaped molten zone of lunar regolith set with an initial temperature profile. The cylindrical analysis was performed in order to examine the amount of energy which can be stored in the regolith during the day. At night, the cylinder acted as a perfect insulator. This cycling was performed until a steady state situation was reached in the surrounding regolith. It was determined that a cycling steady state occurs after approximately 15 day/night cycles. Results were obtained for cylinders of various diameters. The spherical molten zone analysis was performed to establish the amount of thermal energy, within the regolith, necessary to maintain some molten material throughout a nighttime period. This surrounding temperature profile was modeled after the cycling steady state temperature profile established by the cylindrical analysis. It was determined that a molten sphere diameter of 4.76 m is needed to maintain a core temperature near the low end of the melting temperature range throughout one nighttime period.

  5. Analysis of lunar regolith thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of using lunar regolith as a thermal energy storage medium was evaluated. The concept was examined by mathematically modeling the absorption and transfer of heat by the lunar regolith. Regolith thermal and physical properties were established through various sources as functions of temperature. Two cases were considered: a semi-infinite, constant temperature, cylindrical heat source embedded in a continuum of lunar regolith and a spherically shaped molten zone of lunar regolith set with an initial temperature profile. The cylindrical analysis was performed in order to examine the amount of energy which can be stored in the regolith during the day. At night, the cylinder acted as a perfect insulator. This cycling was performed until a steady state situation was reached in the surrounding regolith. It was determined that a cycling steady state occurs after approximately 15 day/night cycles. Results were obtained for cylinders of various diameters. The spherical molten zone analysis was performed to establish the amount of thermal energy, within the regolith, necessary to maintain some molten material throughout a nighttime period. This surrounding temperature profile was modeled after the cycling steady state temperature profile established by the cylindrical analysis. It was determined that a molten sphere diameter of 4.76 m is needed to maintain a core temperature near the low end of the melting temperature range throughout one nighttime period.

  6. Calibrated energy simulations of potential energy savings in actual retail buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhafi, Zuhaira

    Retail stores are commercial buildings with high energy consumption due to their typically large volumes and long hours of operation. This dissertation assesses heating, ventilating and air conditioning saving strategies based on energy simulations with input parameters from actual retail buildings. The dissertation hypothesis is that "Retail store buildings will save a significant amount of energy by (1) modifying ventilation rates, and/or (2) resetting set point temperatures. These strategies have shown to be beneficial in previous studies. As presented in the literature review, potential energy savings ranged from 0.5% to 30% without compromising indoor thermal comfort and indoor air quality. The retail store buildings can be ventilated at rates significantly lower than rates called for in the ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2010 while maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Therefore, two dissertation objectives are addressed: (1) Investigate opportunities to reduce ventilation rates that do not compromise indoor air quality in retail stores located in Central Pennsylvania, (2) Investigate opportunities to increase (in summer) and decrease (in winter) set point temperatures that do not compromise thermal comfort. This study conducted experimental measurements of ventilation rates required to maintain acceptable air quality and indoor environmental conditions requirements for two retail stores using ASHRAE Standard 62.1_2012. More specifically, among other parameters, occupancy density, indoor and outdoor pollutant concentrations, and indoor temperatures were measured continuously for one week interval. One of these retail stores were tested four times for a yearlong time period. Pollutants monitored were formaldehyde, carbon dioxide, particle size distributions and concentrations, as well as total volatile organic compounds. As a part of the base protocol, the number of occupants in each store was hourly counted during the test, and the results reveal that the occupant

  7. Passivhaus: indoor comfort and energy dynamic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Antonella; Pagliuca, Antonello; Cardinale, Nicola; Rospi, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    The research aims to verify the energy performance as well as the indoor comfort of an energy class A+ building, built so that the sum of the heat passive contributions of solar radiation, transmitted through the windows, and the heat generated inside the building, are adeguate to compensate for the envelope loss during the cold season. The building, located in Emilia Romagna (Italy), was built using a wooden structure, an envelope realized using a pinewood sandwich panels (transmittance U = 0.250 W/m2K) and, inside, a wool flax insulation layer and thermal window frame with low-emissivity glass (U = 0524 W/m2K). The building design and construction process has followed the guidelines set by "CasaClima". The building has been modeled in the code of dynamic calculation "Energy Plus" by the Design Builder application and divided it into homogenous thermal zones, characterized by winter indoor temperature set at 20 ° (+ / - 1 °) and summer indoor temperature set at 26 ° (+ / - 1 °). It has modeled: the envelope, as described above, the "free" heat contributions, the air conditioning system, the Mechanical Ventilation system as well as home automation solutions. The air conditioning system is an heat pump, able to guarantee an optimization of energy consumption (in fact, it uses the "free" heat offered by the external environment for conditioning indoor environment). As regards the air recirculation system, it has been used a mechanical ventilation system with internal heat cross-flow exchanger, with an efficiency equal to 50%. The domotic solutions, instead, regard a system for the control of windows external screening using reeds, adjustable as a function of incident solar radiation and a lighting management system adjusted automatically using a dimmer. A so realized building meets the requirement imposed from Italian standard UNI/TS 11300 1, UNI/TS 11300 2 and UNI/TS 11300 3. The analysis was performed according to two different configurations: in "spontaneous

  8. Energy Efficient Biomolecular Simulations with FPGA-based Reconfigurable Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, Scott S; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2010-05-01

    Reconfigurable computing (RC) is being investigated as a hardware solution for improving time-to-solution for biomolecular simulations. A number of popular molecular dynamics (MD) codes are used to study various aspects of biomolecules. These codes are now capable of simulating nanosecond time-scale trajectories per day on conventional microprocessor-based hardware, but biomolecular processes often occur at the microsecond time-scale or longer. A wide gap exists between the desired and achievable simulation capability; therefore, there is considerable interest in alternative algorithms and hardware for improving the time-to-solution of MD codes. The fine-grain parallelism provided by Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) combined with their low power consumption make them an attractive solution for improving the performance of MD simulations. In this work, we use an FPGA-based coprocessor to accelerate the compute-intensive calculations of LAMMPS, a popular MD code, achieving up to 5.5 fold speed-up on the non-bonded force computations of the particle mesh Ewald method and up to 2.2 fold speed-up in overall time-to-solution, and potentially an increase by a factor of 9 in power-performance efficiencies for the pair-wise computations. The results presented here provide an example of the multi-faceted benefits to an application in a heterogeneous computing environment.

  9. A simulation of high energy cosmic ray propagation 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Kamata, K.; Kifune, T.; Matsubara, Y.; Mori, M.; Nishijima, K.

    1985-01-01

    The cosmic ray propagation in the Galactic arm is simulated. The Galactic magnetic fields are known to go along with so called Galactic arms as a main structure with turbulences of the scale about 30pc. The distribution of cosmic ray in Galactic arm is studied. The escape time and the possible anisotropies caused by the arm structure are discussed.

  10. Dynamical energy analysis for built-up acoustic systems at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, D J; Giani, S; Tanner, G

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods for describing the intensity distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave fields in the high frequency asymptotic limit are often based on flow transport equations. Common techniques are statistical energy analysis, employed mostly in the context of vibro-acoustics, and ray tracing, a popular tool in architectural acoustics. Dynamical energy analysis makes it possible to interpolate between standard statistical energy analysis and full ray tracing, containing both of these methods as limiting cases. In this work a version of dynamical energy analysis based on a Chebyshev basis expansion of the Perron-Frobenius operator governing the ray dynamics is introduced. It is shown that the technique can efficiently deal with multi-component systems overcoming typical geometrical limitations present in statistical energy analysis. Results are compared with state-of-the-art hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin finite element simulations.

  11. Theoretical analysis and simulation for a facilitated asymmetric exclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Bing-Bing; Wu, Chao-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Driven diffusive systems are important models in nonequilibrium state statistical mechanics. This paper studies an asymmetric exclusion process model with nearest rear neighbor interactions associated with energy. The exact flux expression of the model is obtained by a cluster mean-field method. Based on the flux expression, the properties of the fundamental diagram have been investigated in detail. To probe the energy's influence on the coarsening process of the system, Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to acquire the monotonic phase boundary in energy-density space. Above the phase boundary, the system is inhomogeneous and the normalized residence distribution p (s ) is nonmonotonically decreasing. Under the phase boundary, the system is homogeneous and p (s ) is monotonically decreasing. Further study comparatively shows that the system has turned into a microscopic inhomogeneous state from a homogeneous state before the system current arrives at maximum, if nearest rear neighbor interactions are strong. Our findings offer insights to deeply understand the dynamic features of nonequilibrium state systems.

  12. Theoretical analysis and simulation for a facilitated asymmetric exclusion process.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Bing-Bing; Wu, Chao-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Driven diffusive systems are important models in nonequilibrium state statistical mechanics. This paper studies an asymmetric exclusion process model with nearest rear neighbor interactions associated with energy. The exact flux expression of the model is obtained by a cluster mean-field method. Based on the flux expression, the properties of the fundamental diagram have been investigated in detail. To probe the energy's influence on the coarsening process of the system, Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to acquire the monotonic phase boundary in energy-density space. Above the phase boundary, the system is inhomogeneous and the normalized residence distribution p(s) is nonmonotonically decreasing. Under the phase boundary, the system is homogeneous and p(s) is monotonically decreasing. Further study comparatively shows that the system has turned into a microscopic inhomogeneous state from a homogeneous state before the system current arrives at maximum, if nearest rear neighbor interactions are strong. Our findings offer insights to deeply understand the dynamic features of nonequilibrium state systems. PMID:27627252

  13. Proteomic analysis of mouse hypothalamus under simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Poonam; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Ramesh, Vani; Kim, Helen; Barnes, Stephen; Kulkarni, Anil; Hall, Joseph C; Wilson, Bobby L; Thomas, Renard L; Pellis, Neal R; Ramesh, Govindarajan T

    2008-11-01

    Exposure to altered microgravity during space travel induces changes in the brain and these are reflected in many of the physical behavior seen in the astronauts. The vulnerability of the brain to microgravity stress has been reviewed and reported. Identifying microgravity-induced changes in the brain proteome may aid in understanding the impact of the microgravity environment on brain function. In our previous study we have reported changes in specific proteins under simulated microgravity in the hippocampus using proteomics approach. In the present study the profiling of the hypothalamus region in the brain was studied as a step towards exploring the effect of microgravity in this region of the brain. Hypothalamus is the critical region in the brain that strictly controls the pituitary gland that in turn is responsible for the secretion of important hormones. Here we report a 2-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of the mouse hypothalamus in response to simulated microgravity. Lowered glutathione and differences in abundance expression of seven proteins were detected in the hypothalamus of mice exposed to microgravity. These changes included decreased superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2) and increased malate dehydrogenase and peroxiredoxin-6, reflecting reduction of the antioxidant system in the hypothalamus. Taken together the results reported here indicate that oxidative imbalance occurred in the hypothalamus in response to simulated microgravity.

  14. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. PMID:26377510

  15. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.

    1994-12-31

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility was constructed in southern New Mexico for spice and herb dehydration. Annual operational costs are dominated by energy costs, due primarily to the energy intensity of dehydration. A feasibility study was performed to determine whether the use of biomass resources as a feedstock for a cogeneration system would be an economical option. The project location allowed access to unusual biomass feedstocks including cotton gin trash, pecan shells and in-house residues. A resource assessment of the immediate project area determined that approximately 120,000 bone dry tons of biomass feedstocks are available annually. Technology characterization for the plant energy requirements indicated gasification systems offer fuel flexibility advantages over combustion systems although vendor support and commercial experience are limited. Regulatory siting considerations introduce a level of uncertainty because of a lack of a precedent in New Mexico for gasification technology and because vendors of commercial gasifiers have little experience operating such a facility nor gathering emission data. A public opinion survey indicated considerable support for renewable energy use and biomass energy utilization. However, the public opinion survey also revealed limited knowledge of biomass technologies and concerns regarding siting of a biomass facility within the geographic area. The economic analysis conducted for the study is based on equipment vendor quotations, and indicates there will be difficulty competing with current prices of natural gas.

  16. SimProp: a simulation code for ultra high energy cosmic ray propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Aloisio, R.; Grillo, A.F.; Boncioli, D.; Petrera, S.; Salamida, F. E-mail: denise.boncioli@roma2.infn.it E-mail: petrera@aquila.infn.it

    2012-10-01

    A new Monte Carlo simulation code for the propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays is presented. The results of this simulation scheme are tested by comparison with results of another Monte Carlo computation as well as with the results obtained by directly solving the kinetic equation for the propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays. A short comparison with the latest flux published by the Pierre Auger collaboration is also presented.

  17. Computational Analysis of Energy Pooling to Harvest Low-Energy Solar Energy in Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacount, Michael; Shaheen, Sean; Rumbles, Garry; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Hu, Nan; Ostrowski, Dave; Lusk, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Current photovoltaic energy conversions do not typically utilize low energy sunlight absorption, leaving large sections of the solar spectrum untapped. It is possible, though, to absorb such radiation, generating low-energy excitons, and then pool them to create higher energy excitons, which can result in an increase in efficiency. Calculation of the rates at which such upconversion processes occur requires an accounting of all possible molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) pathways. There are two paths associated with the upconversion. The cooperative mechanism involves a three-body interaction in which low energy excitons are transferred sequentially onto an acceptor molecule. The accretive pathway, requires that an exciton transfer its energy to a second exciton that subsequently transfers its energy to the acceptor molecule. We have computationally modeled both types of molecular QED obtaining rates using a combination of DFT and many-body Green function theory. The simulation platform is exercised by considering upconversion events associated with material composed of a high energy absorbing core of hexabenzocoronene (HBC) and low energy absorbing arms of oligothiophene. In addition, we make estimates for all competing processes in order to judge the relative efficiencies of these two processes.

  18. Simulated scaling method for localized enhanced sampling and simultaneous "alchemical" free energy simulations: a general method for molecular mechanical, quantum mechanical, and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhi; Fajer, Mikolai; Yang, Wei

    2007-01-14

    A potential scaling version of simulated tempering is presented to efficiently sample configuration space in a localized region. The present "simulated scaling" method is developed with a Wang-Landau type of updating scheme in order to quickly flatten the distributions in the scaling parameter lambdam space. This proposal is meaningful for a broad range of biophysical problems, in which localized sampling is required. Besides its superior capability and robustness in localized conformational sampling, this simulated scaling method can also naturally lead to efficient "alchemical" free energy predictions when dual-topology alchemical hybrid potential is applied; thereby simultaneously, both of the chemically and conformationally distinct portions of two end point chemical states can be efficiently sampled. As demonstrated in this work, the present method is also feasible for the quantum mechanical and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations.

  19. Net charge changes in the calculation of relative ligand-binding free energies via classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Reif, Maria M; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-30

    The calculation of binding free energies of charged species to a target molecule is a frequently encountered problem in molecular dynamics studies of (bio-)chemical thermodynamics. Many important endogenous receptor-binding molecules, enzyme substrates, or drug molecules have a nonzero net charge. Absolute binding free energies, as well as binding free energies relative to another molecule with a different net charge will be affected by artifacts due to the used effective electrostatic interaction function and associated parameters (e.g., size of the computational box). In the present study, charging contributions to binding free energies of small oligoatomic ions to a series of model host cavities functionalized with different chemical groups are calculated with classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Electrostatic interactions are treated using a lattice-summation scheme or a cutoff-truncation scheme with Barker-Watts reaction-field correction, and the simulations are conducted in boxes of different edge lengths. It is illustrated that the charging free energies of the guest molecules in water and in the host strongly depend on the applied methodology and that neglect of correction terms for the artifacts introduced by the finite size of the simulated system and the use of an effective electrostatic interaction function considerably impairs the thermodynamic interpretation of guest-host interactions. Application of correction terms for the various artifacts yields consistent results for the charging contribution to binding free energies and is thus a prerequisite for the valid interpretation or prediction of experimental data via molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis and correction of electrostatic artifacts according to the scheme proposed in the present study should therefore be considered an integral part of careful free-energy calculation studies if changes in the net charge are involved.

  20. Analysis of forest structure using thematic mapper simulator data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Westman, W. E.; Brass, J. A.; Stephenson, N. J.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Spanner, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data for sensing forest structure information has been explored by principal components and feature selection techniques. In a survey of forest structural properties conducted for 123 field sites of the Sequoia National Park, the canopy closure could be well estimated (r = 0.62 to 0.69) by a variety of channel bands and band ratios, without reference to the forest type. Estimation of the basal area was less successful (r = 0.51 or less) on the average, but could be improved for certain forest types when data were stratified by floristic composition. To achieve such a stratification, individual sites were ordinated by a detrended correspondence analysis based on the canopy of dominant species. The analysis of forest structure in the Sequoia data suggests that total basal area can be best predicted in stands of lower density, and in younger even-aged managed stands.

  1. Structural Simulations and Conservation Analysis -Historic Building Information Model (HBIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, C.; Murphy, M.; McCarthy, S.; Brechin, F.; Casidy, C.; Dirix, E.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper the current findings to date of the Historic Building Information Model (HBIM) of the Four Courts in Dublin are presented. The Historic Building Information Model (HBIM) forms the basis for both structural and conservation analysis to measure the impact of war damage which still impacts on the building. The laser scan survey was carried out in the summer of 2014 of the internal and external structure. After registration and processing of the laser scan survey, the HBIM was created of the damaged section of the building and is presented as two separate workflows in this paper. The first is the model created from historic data, the second a procedural and segmented model developed from laser scan survey of the war damaged drum and dome. From both models structural damage and decay simulations will be developed for documentation and conservation analysis.

  2. Probability theory versus simulation of petroleum potential in play analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    An analytic probabilistic methodology for resource appraisal of undiscovered oil and gas resources in play analysis is presented. This play-analysis methodology is a geostochastic system for petroleum resource appraisal in explored as well as frontier areas. An objective was to replace an existing Monte Carlo simulation method in order to increase the efficiency of the appraisal process. Underlying the two methods is a single geologic model which considers both the uncertainty of the presence of the assessed hydrocarbon and its amount if present. The results of the model are resource estimates of crude oil, nonassociated gas, dissolved gas, and gas for a geologic play in terms of probability distributions. The analytic method is based upon conditional probability theory and a closed form solution of all means and standard deviations, along with the probabilities of occurrence. ?? 1987 J.C. Baltzer A.G., Scientific Publishing Company.

  3. Hydrogen analysis depth calibration by CORTEO Monte-Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Reichart, P.; Bergmaier, A.; Greubel, C.; Schiettekatte, F.; Dollinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen imaging with sub-μm lateral resolution and sub-ppm sensitivity has become possible with coincident proton-proton (pp) scattering analysis (Reichart et al., 2004). Depth information is evaluated from the energy sum signal with respect to energy loss of both protons on their path through the sample. In first order, there is no angular dependence due to elastic scattering. In second order, a path length effect due to different energy loss on the paths of the protons causes an angular dependence of the energy sum. Therefore, the energy sum signal has to be de-convoluted depending on the matrix composition, i.e. mainly the atomic number Z, in order to get a depth calibrated hydrogen profile. Although the path effect can be calculated analytically in first order, multiple scattering effects lead to significant deviations in the depth profile. Hence, in our new approach, we use the CORTEO Monte-Carlo code (Schiettekatte, 2008) in order to calculate the depth of a coincidence event depending on the scattering angle. The code takes individual detector geometry into account. In this paper we show, that the code correctly reproduces measured pp-scattering energy spectra with roughness effects considered. With more than 100 μm thick Mylar-sandwich targets (Si, Fe, Ge) we demonstrate the deconvolution of the energy spectra on our current multistrip detector at the microprobe SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator lab. As a result, hydrogen profiles can be evaluated with an accuracy in depth of about 1% of the sample thickness.

  4. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  5. Jet analysis by neural networks in high energy hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, P.; Nardulli, G.; Pasquariello, G.

    1995-02-01

    We study the possibility to employ neural networks to simulate jet clustering procedures in high energy hadron-hadron collisions. We concentrate our analysis on the Fermilab Tevatron energy and on the kt] algorithm. We employ both supervised and unsupervised neural networks. In the first case we consider a multilayer feed-forward network trained by the backpropagation algorithm: our results show that these networks can satisfactorily simulate the relevant features of the kt] algorithm. We consider also unsupervised learning, where the neural network autonomously organizes the events in clusters. The results of this analysis are discussed and compared with the supervised approach.

  6. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  7. Maximum likelihood analysis of low energy CDMS II germanium data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fritts, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Graham, M.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nelson, R. H.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using geant4 to simulate the surface-event background from 210Pb decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. We confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  8. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and flatfoot: analysis with simulated walking.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kota; Kitaoka, Harold B; Fujii, Tadashi; Crevoisier, Xavier; Berglund, Lawrence J; Zhao, Kristin D; Kaufman, Kenton R; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-02-01

    Many biomechanical studies investigated pathology of flatfoot and effects of operations on flatfoot. The majority of cadaveric studies are limited to the quasistatic response to static joint loads. This study examined the unconstrained joint motion of the foot and ankle during stance phase utilizing a dynamic foot-ankle simulator in simulated stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Muscle forces were applied on the extrinsic tendons of the foot using six servo-pneumatic cylinders to simulate their action. Vertical and fore-aft shear forces were applied and tibial advancement was performed with the servomotors. Three-dimensional movements of multiple bones of the foot were monitored with a magnetic tracking system. Twenty-two fresh-frozen lower extremities were studied in the intact condition, then following sectioning peritalar constraints to create a flatfoot and unloading the posterior tibial muscle force. Kinematics in the intact condition were consistent with gait analysis data for normals. There were altered kinematics in the flatfoot condition, particularly in coronal and transverse planes. Calcaneal eversion relative to the tibia averaged 11.1±2.8° compared to 5.8±2.3° in the normal condition. Calcaneal-tibial external rotation was significantly increased in flatfeet from mean of 2.3±1.7° to 8.1±4.0°. There were also significant changes in metatarsal-tibial eversion and external rotation in the flatfoot condition. The simulated PTTD with flatfoot was consistent with previous data obtained in patients with PTTD. The use of a flatfoot model will enable more detailed study on the flatfoot condition and/or effect of surgical treatment.

  9. Stochastic algorithms for the analysis of numerical flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2001-12-14

    Recent progress in simulation methodologies and new, high-performance parallel architectures have made it is possible to perform detailed simulations of multidimensional combustion phenomena using comprehensive kinetics mechanisms. However, as simulation complexity increases, it becomes increasingly difficult to extract detailed quantitative information about the flame from the numerical solution, particularly regarding the details of chemical processes. In this paper we present a new diagnostic tool for analysis of numerical simulations of combustion phenomena. Our approach is based on recasting an Eulerian flow solution in a Lagrangian frame. Unlike a conventional Lagrangian viewpoint in which we follow the evolution of a volume of the fluid, we instead follow specific chemical elements, e.g., carbon, nitrogen, etc., as they move through the system. From this perspective an ''atom'' is part of some molecule that is transported through the domain by advection and diffusion. Reactions ca use the atom to shift from one species to another with the subsequent transport given by the movement of the new species. We represent these processes using a stochastic particle formulation that treats advection deterministically and models diffusion as a suitable random-walk process. Within this probabilistic framework, reactions can be viewed as a Markov process transforming molecule to molecule with given probabilities. In this paper, we discuss the numerical issues in more detail and demonstrate that an ensemble of stochastic trajectories can accurately capture key features of the continuum solution. We also illustrate how the method can be applied to studying the role of cyanochemistry on NOx production in a diffusion flame.

  10. Stochastic algorithms for the analysis of numerical flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-04-26

    Recent progress in simulation methodologies and high-performance parallel computers have made it is possible to perform detailed simulations of multidimensional reacting flow phenomena using comprehensive kinetics mechanisms. As simulations become larger and more complex, it becomes increasingly difficult to extract useful information from the numerical solution, particularly regarding the interactions of the chemical reaction and diffusion processes. In this paper we present a new diagnostic tool for analysis of numerical simulations of reacting flow. Our approach is based on recasting an Eulerian flow solution in a Lagrangian frame. Unlike a conventional Lagrangian view point that follows the evolution of a volume of the fluid, we instead follow specific chemical elements, e.g., carbon, nitrogen, etc., as they move through the system . From this perspective an ''atom'' is part of some molecule of a species that is transported through the domain by advection and diffusion. Reactions cause the atom to shift from one chemical host species to another and the subsequent transport of the atom is given by the movement of the new species. We represent these processes using a stochastic particle formulation that treats advection deterministically and models diffusion and chemistry as stochastic processes. In this paper, we discuss the numerical issues in detail and demonstrate that an ensemble of stochastic trajectories can accurately capture key features of the continuum solution. The capabilities of this diagnostic are then demonstrated by applications to study the modulation of carbon chemistry during a vortex-flame interaction, and the role of cyano chemistry in rm NO{sub x} production for a steady diffusion flame.

  11. Nesting large-eddy simulations within mesoscale simulations for wind energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D; Chow, F K; Kosovic, B; Lundquist, K A

    2008-09-08

    With increasing demand for more accurate atmospheric simulations for wind turbine micrositing, for operational wind power forecasting, and for more reliable turbine design, simulations of atmospheric flow with resolution of tens of meters or higher are required. These time-dependent large-eddy simulations (LES), which resolve individual atmospheric eddies on length scales smaller than turbine blades and account for complex terrain, are possible with a range of commercial and open-source software, including the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In addition to 'local' sources of turbulence within an LES domain, changing weather conditions outside the domain can also affect flow, suggesting that a mesoscale model provide boundary conditions to the large-eddy simulations. Nesting a large-eddy simulation within a mesoscale model requires nuanced representations of turbulence. Our group has improved the Weather and Research Forecasting model's (WRF) LES capability by implementing the Nonlinear Backscatter and Anisotropy (NBA) subfilter stress model following Kosovic (1997) and an explicit filtering and reconstruction technique to compute the Resolvable Subfilter-Scale (RSFS) stresses (following Chow et al, 2005). We have also implemented an immersed boundary method (IBM) in WRF to accommodate complex terrain. These new models improve WRF's LES capabilities over complex terrain and in stable atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate approaches to nesting LES within a mesoscale simulation for farms of wind turbines in hilly regions. Results are sensitive to the nesting method, indicating that care must be taken to provide appropriate boundary conditions, and to allow adequate spin-up of turbulence in the LES domain.

  12. Analysis of GEANT4 Physics List Properties in the 12 GeV MOLLER Simulation Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haufe, Christopher; Moller Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    To determine the validity of new physics beyond the scope of the electroweak theory, nuclear physicists across the globe have been collaborating on future endeavors that will provide the precision needed to confirm these speculations. One of these is the MOLLER experiment - a low-energy particle experiment that will utilize the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab's CEBAF accelerator. The motivation of this experiment is to measure the parity-violating asymmetry of scattered polarized electrons off unpolarized electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. This measurement would allow for a more precise determination of the electron's weak charge and weak mixing angle. While still in its planning stages, the MOLLER experiment requires a detailed simulation framework in order to determine how the project should be run in the future. The simulation framework for MOLLER, called ``remoll'', is written in GEANT4 code. As a result, the simulation can utilize a number of GEANT4 coded physics lists that provide the simulation with a number of particle interaction constraints based off of different particle physics models. By comparing these lists with one another using the data-analysis application ROOT, the most optimal physics list for the MOLLER simulation can be determined and implemented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 714001.

  13. The PandaRoot framework for simulation, reconstruction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataro, Stefano; PANDA Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future facility FAIR will study anti-proton proton and anti-proton nucleus collisions in a beam momentum range from 2 GeV/c up to 15 GeV/c. The PandaRoot framework is part of the FairRoot project, a common software framework for the future FAIR experiments, and is currently used to simulate detector performances and to evaluate different detector concepts. It is based on the packages ROOT and Virtual MonteCarlo with Geant3 and Geant4. Different reconstruction algorithms for tracking and particle identification are under development and optimization, in order to achieve the performance requirements of the experiment. In the central tracker a first track fit is performed using a conformal map transformation based on a helix assumption, then the track is used as input for a Kalman Filter (package genfit), using GEANE as track follower. The track is then correlated to the pid detectors (e.g. Cerenkov detectors, EM Calorimeter or Muon Chambers) to evaluate a global particle identification probability, using a Bayesian approach or multivariate methods. Further implemented packages in PandaRoot are: the analysis tools framework Rho, the kinematic fitter package for vertex and mass constraint fits, and a fast simulation code based upon parametrized detector responses. PandaRoot was also tested on an Alien-based GRID infrastructure. The contribution will report about the status of PandaRoot and show some example results for analysis of physics benchmark channels.

  14. MDAnalysis: a toolkit for the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Michaud-Agrawal, Naveen; Denning, Elizabeth J; Woolf, Thomas B; Beckstein, Oliver

    2011-07-30

    MDAnalysis is an object-oriented library for structural and temporal analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories and individual protein structures. It is written in the Python language with some performance-critical code in C. It uses the powerful NumPy package to expose trajectory data as fast and efficient NumPy arrays. It has been tested on systems of millions of particles. Many common file formats of simulation packages including CHARMM, Gromacs, Amber, and NAMD and the Protein Data Bank format can be read and written. Atoms can be selected with a syntax similar to CHARMM's powerful selection commands. MDAnalysis enables both novice and experienced programmers to rapidly write their own analytical tools and access data stored in trajectories in an easily accessible manner that facilitates interactive explorative analysis. MDAnalysis has been tested on and works for most Unix-based platforms such as Linux and Mac OS X. It is freely available under the GNU General Public License from http://mdanalysis.googlecode.com. PMID:21500218

  15. LOOS: an extensible platform for the structural analysis of simulations.

    PubMed

    Romo, Tod D; Grossfield, Alan

    2009-01-01

    We have developed LOOS (Lightweight Object-Oriented Structure-analysis library) as an object-oriented library designed to facilitate the rapid development of tools for the structural analysis of simulations. LOOS supports the native file formats of most common simulation packages including AMBER, CHARMM, CNS, Gromacs, NAMD, Tinker, and X-PLOR. Encapsulation and polymorphism are used to simultaneously provide a stable interface to the programmer and make LOOS easily extensible. A rich atom selection language based on the C expression syntax is included as part of the library. LOOS enables students and casual programmer-scientists to rapidly write their own analytical tools in a compact and expressive manner resembling scripting. LOOS is written in C++ and makes extensive use of the Standard Template Library and Boost, and is freely available under the GNU General Public License (version 3) LOOS has been tested on Linux and MacOS X, but is written to be portable and should work on most Unix-based platforms. PMID:19965179

  16. Free energy simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field and metadynamics on GPU platform.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiangda; Zhang, Yuebin; Chu, Huiying; Li, Guohui

    2016-03-01

    The free energy calculation library PLUMED has been incorporated into the OpenMM simulation toolkit, with the purpose to perform enhanced sampling MD simulations using the AMOEBA polarizable force field on GPU platform. Two examples, (I) the free energy profile of water pair separation (II) alanine dipeptide dihedral angle free energy surface in explicit solvent, are provided here to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our implementation. The converged free energy profiles could be obtained within an affordable MD simulation time when the AMOEBA polarizable force field is employed. Moreover, the free energy surfaces estimated using the AMOEBA polarizable force field are in agreement with those calculated from experimental data and ab initio methods. Hence, the implementation in this work is reliable and would be utilized to study more complicated biological phenomena in both an accurate and efficient way. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Simulation Development and Analysis of Crew Vehicle Ascent Abort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Chi S.

    2016-01-01

    I have taken thus far that focus on pure logic, simulation code focuses on mimicking the physical world with some approximation and can have inaccuracies or numerical instabilities. Learning from my mistake, I adopted new methods to analyze these different simulations. One method the student used was to numerically plot various physical parameters using MATLAB to confirm the mechanical behavior of the system in addition to comparing the data to the output from a separate simulation tool called FAST. By having full control over what was being outputted from the simulation, I could choose which parameters to change and to plot as well as how to plot them, allowing for an in depth analysis of the data. Another method of analysis was to convert the output data into a graphical animation. Unlike the numerical plots, where all of the physical components were displayed separately, this graphical display allows for a combined look at the simulation output that makes it much easier for one to see the physical behavior of the model. The process for converting SOMBAT output for EDGE graphical display had to be developed. With some guidance from other EDGE users, I developed a process and created a script that would easily allow one to display simulations graphically. Another limitation with the SOMBAT model was the inability for the capsule to have the main parachutes instantly deployed with a large angle between the air speed vector and the chutes drag vector. To explore this problem, I had to learn about different coordinate frames used in Guidance, Navigation & Control (J2000, ECEF, ENU, etc.) to describe the motion of a vehicle and about Euler angles (e.g. Roll, Pitch, Yaw) to describe the orientation of the vehicle. With a thorough explanation from my mentor about the description of each coordinate frame, as well as how to use a directional cosine matrix to transform one frame to another, I investigated the problem by simulating different capsule orientations. In the end

  18. Simulation of soft hadron hadron collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, K.

    1987-01-01

    An event generator to simulate ultrarelativistic hadron hadron collisions is proposed. It is based on the following main assumptions: the process can be divided into two independent steps, string formation and string fragmentation; strings are formed as a consequence of color exchange between a quark of the projectile and a quark of the target; the fragmentation of strings is the same as in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation or in lepton nucleon scattering. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Arcing in Leo and Geo Simulated Environments: Comparative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Galofaro, Joel TY.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive tests of two solar array samples in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environments have demonstrated that the arc inception voltage was 2-3 times lower in the LEO plasma than in the GEO vacuum. Arc current pulse wave forms are also essentially different in these environments. Moreover, the wide variations of pulse forms do not allow introducing the definition of a "standard arc wave form" even in GEO conditions. Visual inspection of the samples after testing in a GEO environment revealed considerable damage on coverglass surfaces and interconnects. These harmful consequences can be explained by the discharge energy being one order of magnitude higher in vacuum than in background plasma. The tests also revealed a potential danger of powerful electrostatic discharges that could be initiated on the solar array surface of a satellite in GEO during the ignition of an arcjet thruster.

  20. Cold gas in cluster cores: global stability analysis and non-linear simulations of thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Prakriti Pal; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-04-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis and idealized numerical simulations in global thermal balance to understand the condensation of cold gas from hot/virial atmospheres (coronae), in particular the intracluster medium (ICM). We pay particular attention to geometry (e.g. spherical versus plane-parallel) and the nature of the gravitational potential. Global linear analysis gives a similar value for the fastest growing thermal instability modes in spherical and Cartesian geometries. Simulations and observations suggest that cooling in haloes critically depends on the ratio of the cooling time to the free-fall time (tcool/tff). Extended cold gas condenses out of the ICM only if this ratio is smaller than a threshold value close to 10. Previous works highlighted the difference between the nature of cold gas condensation in spherical and plane-parallel atmospheres; namely, cold gas condensation appeared easier in spherical atmospheres. This apparent difference due to geometry arises because the previous plane-parallel simulations focused on in situ condensation of multiphase gas but spherical simulations studied condensation anywhere in the box. Unlike previous claims, our non-linear simulations show that there are only minor differences in cold gas condensation, either in situ or anywhere, for different geometries. The amount of cold gas depends on the shape of tcool/tff; gas has more time to condense if gravitational acceleration decreases towards the centre. In our idealized plane-parallel simulations with heating balancing cooling in each layer, there can be significant mass/energy/momentum transfer across layers that can trigger condensation and drive tcool/tff far beyond the critical value close to 10.

  1. Workshop on data acquisition and trigger system simulations for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: DAQSIM: A data acquisition system simulation tool; Front end and DCC Simulations for the SDC Straw Tube System; Simulation of Non-Blocklng Data Acquisition Architectures; Simulation Studies of the SDC Data Collection Chip; Correlation Studies of the Data Collection Circuit & The Design of a Queue for this Circuit; Fast Data Compression & Transmission from a Silicon Strip Wafer; Simulation of SCI Protocols in Modsim; Visual Design with vVHDL; Stochastic Simulation of Asynchronous Buffers; SDC Trigger Simulations; Trigger Rates, DAQ & Online Processing at the SSC; Planned Enhancements to MODSEM II & SIMOBJECT -- an Overview -- R.; DAGAR -- A synthesis system; Proposed Silicon Compiler for Physics Applications; Timed -- LOTOS in a PROLOG Environment: an Algebraic language for Simulation; Modeling and Simulation of an Event Builder for High Energy Physics Data Acquisition Systems; A Verilog Simulation for the CDF DAQ; Simulation to Design with Verilog; The DZero Data Acquisition System: Model and Measurements; DZero Trigger Level 1.5 Modeling; Strategies Optimizing Data Load in the DZero Triggers; Simulation of the DZero Level 2 Data Acquisition System; A Fast Method for Calculating DZero Level 1 Jet Trigger Properties and Physics Input to DAQ Studies.

  2. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful; Halder, Amal

    2015-05-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data.

  3. Geometry-independent energy band simulator for radially symmetric diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, T.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a geometrically independent method to calculate the energy band diagram of radially symmetric diodes is reported. For radially symmetric diodes, the calculation of electron (or hole) energies across the junction can be reduced to a singular spatially dependent variable. Because geometry is not incorporated into the calculation a priori, by reducing the physics to a single spatial variable, energy band calculations can be performed in multiple geometries, simultaneously, for direct comparison to each other. The calculation outlined herein is pseudo-analytical and does not utilize finite element and/or control volume methods. It is, therefore, capable of generating spatially analytic equations for analyzing limiting scenarios of the junction, beneficial for yielding insight into the physics and design criteria of depletion for non-planar semiconducting devices.

  4. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  5. The Energy Landscape Analysis of Cancer Mutations in Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Anshuman; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2011-01-01

    The growing interest in quantifying the molecular basis of protein kinase activation and allosteric regulation by cancer mutations has fueled computational studies of allosteric signaling in protein kinases. In the present study, we combined computer simulations and the energy landscape analysis of protein kinases to characterize the interplay between oncogenic mutations and locally frustrated sites as important catalysts of allostetric kinase activation. While structurally rigid kinase core constitutes a minimally frustrated hub of the catalytic domain, locally frustrated residue clusters, whose interaction networks are not energetically optimized, are prone to dynamic modulation and could enable allosteric conformational transitions. The results of this study have shown that the energy landscape effect of oncogenic mutations may be allosteric eliciting global changes in the spatial distribution of highly frustrated residues. We have found that mutation-induced allosteric signaling may involve a dynamic coupling between structurally rigid (minimally frustrated) and plastic (locally frustrated) clusters of residues. The presented study has demonstrated that activation cancer mutations may affect the thermodynamic equilibrium between kinase states by allosterically altering the distribution of locally frustrated sites and increasing the local frustration in the inactive form, while eliminating locally frustrated sites and restoring structural rigidity of the active form. The energy landsape analysis of protein kinases and the proposed role of locally frustrated sites in activation mechanisms may have useful implications for bioinformatics-based screening and detection of functional sites critical for allosteric regulation in complex biomolecular systems. PMID:21998754

  6. Characterization and FDTD simulation analysis on light trapping structures of amorphous silicon thin films by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lu; Jin, Jing; Yuan, Zhijun; Yang, Weiguang; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin; Zhou, Jun; Lou, Qihong

    2016-05-01

    The effect of laser energy density on the light-trapping structures of amorphous silicon (α-Si) thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The thin films are irradiated by a frequency-doubled (λ = 532 nm) Nd:YAG pulsed nanosecond laser. An effective finite difference time domain (FDTD) model is built to find the optimized laser energy density (EL) for the light trapping structures of α-Si. Based on the simulation analysis, it shows the variation of reflection spectra with laser energy density. The optimized reflection spectra at EL = 1000 mJ/cm2 measured by UV-visible spectroscopy confirms to agree well with that corresponding to the depth to diameter ratio (h/D) in the FDTD simulation. The surface morphology characterization by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) accords fairly well to of light-trapping modeling in the simulation.

  7. Statistical energy analysis of nonlinear vibrating systems.

    PubMed

    Spelman, G M; Langley, R S

    2015-09-28

    Nonlinearities in practical systems can arise in contacts between components, possibly from friction or impacts. However, it is also known that quadratic and cubic nonlinearity can occur in the stiffness of structural elements undergoing large amplitude vibration, without the need for local contacts. Nonlinearity due purely to large amplitude vibration can then result in significant energy being found in frequency bands other than those being driven by external forces. To analyse this phenomenon, a method is developed here in which the response of the structure in the frequency domain is divided into frequency bands, and the energy flow between the frequency bands is calculated. The frequency bands are assigned an energy variable to describe the mean response and the nonlinear coupling between bands is described in terms of weighted summations of the convolutions of linear modal transfer functions. This represents a nonlinear extension to an established linear theory known as statistical energy analysis (SEA). The nonlinear extension to SEA theory is presented for the case of a plate structure with quadratic and cubic nonlinearity. PMID:26303923

  8. Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-02-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

  9. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  10. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  11. Structures, dynamics, and water permeation free energy across bilayers of Lipid A and its analog studied with molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Huang, Tiefan; Qiao, Baofu; Zhang, Mo; Ma, Heng; Zhang, Lin

    2014-11-20

    Fundamental studies of the supramolecular layer structures, dynamics and water permeation free energy of hexa-acyl-chain Lipid A and its analogue of tetra-acyl chains would be useful for polymer membranes design for endotoxin removal in water treatment, drug delivery and other biotechnologies. In this work, we studied their supramolecular bilayer by using molecular dynamics simulations and efficient free energy computations. Our simulation accuracy was verified by the agreement between the bilayer structural properties (structure factor, bilayer thickness, and the area per lipid) and lateral diffusion coefficient in our simulation and experimental measurements. More importantly, our simulation for the first time illustrated hexagonal compact packing of the hydrocarbon acyl chains within a leaflet of Lipid A membrane (at 298 K and water content of 40 wt %), which is consistent with experiments. In contrast, Lipid A analogue is found with less ordered ripple structures at the same condition. Our study also demonstrated slower dynamics and larger and broader free energy barrier (∼23 kJ/mol) for water permeation for Lipid A, compared with that of Lipid A analogue. Moreover, the analysis of dynamics showed that highly hydrated hydrophilic diglucosamine backbone is structurally stable, whereas the interdigitated hydrophobic acyl chain tails inside the membrane with faster dynamics screen the aqueous environment from the lipid interior and also reinforce the membrane's structural stability.

  12. Energy Simulation studies in IEA/SHC Task 18 advanced glazing and associated materials for solar and building applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.; Lyons, P.

    1995-04-01

    Researchers participating in IEA/SHC Task 18 on advanced glazing materials have as their primary objective the development of new innovative glazing products such as high performance glazings, wavelength selective glazings, chromogenic optical switching devices, and light transport mechanisms that will lead to significant energy use reductions and increased comfort in commercial and residential buildings. Part of the Task 18 effort involves evaluation of the energy and comfort performance of these new glazings through the use of various performance analysis simulation tools. Eleven countries (Australia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) are contributing to this multi-year simulation study to better understand the complex heat transfer interactions that determine window performance. Each country has selected particular simulation programs and identified the following items to guide the simulation tasks: (1) geographic locations; (2) building types; (3) window systems and control strategies; and (4) analysis parameters of interest. This paper summarizes the results obtained thus far by several of the research organizations.

  13. Energy analysis of convectively induced wind perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Buechler, Dennis E.

    1989-01-01

    Budgets of divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy (KD and KR) are examined for four upper level wind speed maxima that develop during the fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV) and the first AVE-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME I). A similar budget analysis is performed for a low-level jet stream during AVE-SESAME I. The energetics of the four upper level speed maxima is found to have several similarities. The dominant source of KD is cross-contour flow by the divergent wind, and KD provides a major source of KR via a conversion process. Conversion from available potential energy provides an additional source of KR in three of the cases. Horizontal maps reveal that the conversions involving KD are maximized in regions poleward of the convection. Low-level jet development during AVE-SESAME I appears to be assisted by convective activity to the west.

  14. Simulating maize production, water and surface energy balance, and canopy temperature under full and deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface energy balance is critical to the understanding of crop evapotranspiration (ET) requirement and crop water stresses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the simulation of crop growth, water and surface energy balance components, and canopy temperature under full and deficit irrigated...

  15. The Stevens-Levolor Environmental Simulator and the study of interior shading for energy efficient windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandyck, R. L.; Konen, T. P.

    A window systems and experiments in a unique environmental simulator with an artificial sun were tested. It is shown that interior venetian blind shading is an effective window energy management technique. Predictive methods of generating shading coefficients applicable to modern venetian blinds is confirmed. The findings indicating light colored, as well as highly reflective blinds yielded as significant energy savings.

  16. Simulating Tall Buildings Using EnergyPlus: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P. G.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2005-07-01

    The energy performance of six high-performance buildings around the United States was monitored and evaluated by the NREL. The six buildings include the Visitor Center at Zion National Park, the NREL Thermal Test Facility, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Merrill Center, the BigHorn Home Improvement Center, the Cambria Office Building, and the Oberlin College Lewis Center.

  17. A Simulation of an Energy-Efficient Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Richard J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A shoe box is converted into a model home to demonstrate the energy efficiency of various insulation measures. Included are instructions for constructing the model home from a shoe box, insulating the shoe box, several activities involving different insulation measures, extensions of the experiment, and post-lab discussion topics. (DS)

  18. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  19. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  20. Design, simulation, fabrication, and characterization of MEMS vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxaal, John

    Energy harvesting from ambient sources has been a longtime goal for microsystem engineers. The energy available from ambient sources is substantial and could be used to power wireless micro devices, making them fully autonomous. Self-powered wireless sensors could have many applications in for autonomous monitoring of residential, commercial, industrial, geological, or biological environments. Ambient vibrations are of particular interest for energy harvesting as they are ubiquitous and have ample kinetic energy. In this work a MEMS device for vibration energy harvesting using a variable capacitor structure is presented. The nonlinear electromechanical dynamics of a gap-closing type structure is experimentally studied. Important experimental considerations such as the importance of reducing off-axis vibration during testing, characterization methods, dust contamination, and the effect of grounding on parasitic capacitance are discussed. A comprehensive physics based model is developed and validated with two different microfabricated devices. To achieve maximal power, devices with high aspect ratio electrodes and a novel two-level stopper system are designed and fabricated. The maximum achieved power from the MEMS device when driven by sinusoidal vibrations was 3.38 muW. Vibrations from HVAC air ducts, which have a primary frequency of 65 Hz and amplitude of 155 mgrms, are targeted as the vibration source and devices are designed for maximal power harvesting potential at those conditions. Harvesting from the air ducts, the devices reached 118 nW of power. When normalized to the operating conditions, the best figure of merit of the devices tested was an order of magnitude above state-of-the-art of the devices (1.24E-6).