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Sample records for energy electron dosimetry

  1. Design and dosimetry of a few leaf electron collimator for energy modulated electron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Yahya, Khalid; Verhaegen, Frank; Seuntjens, Jan

    2007-12-15

    Despite the capability of energy modulated electron therapy (EMET) to achieve highly conformal dose distributions in superficial targets it has not been widely implemented due to problems inherent in electron beam radiotherapy such as planning dosimetry accuracy, and verification as well as a lack of systems for automated delivery. In previous work we proposed a novel technique to deliver EMET using an automated 'few leaf electron collimator' (FLEC) that consists of four motor-driven leaves fit in a standard clinical electron beam applicator. Integrated with a Monte Carlo based optimization algorithm that utilizes patient-specific dose kernels, a treatment delivery was incorporated within the linear accelerator operation. The FLEC was envisioned to work as an accessory tool added to the clinical accelerator. In this article the design and construction of the FLEC prototype that match our compact design goals are presented. It is controlled using an in-house developed EMET controller. The structure of the software and the hardware characteristics of the EMET controller are demonstrated. Using a parallel plate ionization chamber, output measurements were obtained to validate the Monte Carlo calculations for a range of fields with different energies and sizes. Further verifications were also performed for comparing 1-D and 2-D dose distributions using energy independent radiochromic films. Comparisons between Monte Carlo calculations and measurements of complex intensity map deliveries show an overall agreement to within {+-}3%. This work confirms our design objectives of the FLEC that allow for automated delivery of EMET. Furthermore, the Monte Carlo dose calculation engine required for EMET planning was validated. The result supports the potential of the prototype FLEC for the planning and delivery of EMET.

  2. Neutron dosimetry at a high-energy electron-positron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, Roberto

    Electron-positron colliders with energy of hundreds of MeV per beam have been employed for studies in the domain of nuclear and sub-nuclear physics. The typical structure of such a collider includes an LINAC, able to produce both types of particles, an accumulator ring and a main ring, whose diameter ranges from several tens to hundred meters and allows circulating particle currents of several amperes per beam. As a consequence of the interaction of the primary particles with targets, shutters, structures and barriers, a complex radiation environment is produced. This paper addresses the neutron dosimetry issues associated with the operation of such accelerators, referring in particular to the DAΦ NE complex, operative since 1997 at INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Italy). Special attention is given to the active and passive techniques used for the spectrometric and dosimetric characterization of the workplace neutron fields, for radiation protection dosimetry purposes.

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyukha, Alex; Trompier, Francois

    2011-05-05

    Necessity for, principles of, and general concepts of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) retrospective dosimetry are presented. Also presented and given in details are examples of EPR retrospective dosimetry applications in tooth enamel, bone, and fingernails with focus on general approaches for solving technical and methodological problems. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible future developments are discussed and an extensive bibliography on EPR retrospective dosimetry is provided.

  4. Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimetry in electron beams - energy dependence and improved film read-out.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Petri; Ojala, Jarkko; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Jokelainen, Ilkka; Kosunen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    For megavoltage photon radiation, the fundamental dosimetry characteristics of Gafchromic EBT3 film were determined in 60Co gamma ray beam with addition of experimental and Monte Carlo (MC)-simulated energy dependence of the film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, and 16 MeV electron beams in water phantom. For the film read-out, two phase correction of scanner sensitivity was applied: a matrix correction for scanning area and dose-dependent correction by iterative procedure. With these corrections, the uniformity of response can be improved to be within ± 50 pixel values (PVs). To improve the read-out accuracy, a procedure with flipped film orientations was established. With the method, scanner uniformity can be improved further and dust particles, scratches and/or dirt on scan-ner glass can be detected and eliminated. Responses from red and green channels were averaged for read-out, which decreased the effect of noise present in values from separate channels. Since the signal level with the blue channel is considerably lower than with other channels, the signal variation due to different perturbation effects increases the noise level so that the blue channel is not recommended to be used for dose determination. However, the blue channel can be used for the detection of emulsion thickness variations for film quality evaluations with unexposed films. With electron beams ranging from 6 MeV to 16 MeV and at reference measurement conditions in water, the energy dependence of the EBT3 film is uniform within 0.5%, with uncertainties close to 1.6% (k = 2). Including 6 MV photon beam and the electron beams mentioned, the energy dependence is within 1.1%. No notable differences were found between the experimental and MC-simulated responses, indicating negligible change in intrinsic energy dependence of the EBT3 film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV-16 MeV electron beams. Based on the dosimetric characteristics of the EBT3 film, the read-out procedure established

  5. Dosimetry of very high energy electrons (VHEE) for radiotherapy applications: using radiochromic film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Subiel, A; Moskvin, V; Welsh, G H; Cipiccia, S; Reboredo, D; Evans, P; Partridge, M; DesRosiers, C; Anania, M P; Cianchi, A; Mostacci, A; Chiadroni, E; Di Giovenale, D; Villa, F; Pompili, R; Ferrario, M; Belleveglia, M; Di Pirro, G; Gatti, G; Vaccarezza, C; Seitz, B; Isaac, R C; Brunetti, E; Wiggins, S M; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Mendonca, M S; Sorensen, A; Boyd, M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2014-10-01

    Very high energy electrons (VHEE) in the range from 100-250 MeV have the potential of becoming an alternative modality in radiotherapy because of their improved dosimetry properties compared with MV photons from contemporary medical linear accelerators. Due to the need for accurate dosimetry of small field size VHEE beams we have performed dose measurements using EBT2 Gafchromic® film. Calibration of the film has been carried out for beams of two different energy ranges: 20 MeV and 165 MeV from conventional radio frequency linear accelerators. In addition, EBT2 film has been used for dose measurements with 135 MeV electron beams produced by a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator. The dose response measurements and percentage depth dose profiles have been compared with calculations carried out using the general-purpose FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code. The impact of induced radioactivity on film response for VHEEs has been evaluated using the MC simulations. A neutron yield of the order of 10(-5) neutrons cm(-2) per incident electron has been estimated and induced activity due to radionuclide production is found to have a negligible effect on total dose deposition and film response. Neutron and proton contribution to the equivalent doses are negligible for VHEE. The study demonstrates that EBT2 Gafchromic film is a reliable dosimeter that can be used for dosimetry of VHEE. The results indicate an energy-independent response of the dosimeter for 20 MeV and 165 MeV electron beams and has been found to be suitable for dosimetry of VHEE.

  6. Dosimetry of very high energy electrons (VHEE) for radiotherapy applications: using radiochromic film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Subiel, A; Moskvin, V; Welsh, G H; Cipiccia, S; Reboredo, D; Evans, P; Partridge, M; DesRosiers, C; Anania, M P; Cianchi, A; Mostacci, A; Chiadroni, E; Di Giovenale, D; Villa, F; Pompili, R; Ferrario, M; Belleveglia, M; Di Pirro, G; Gatti, G; Vaccarezza, C; Seitz, B; Isaac, R C; Brunetti, E; Wiggins, S M; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Mendonca, M S; Sorensen, A; Boyd, M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2014-10-01

    Very high energy electrons (VHEE) in the range from 100-250 MeV have the potential of becoming an alternative modality in radiotherapy because of their improved dosimetry properties compared with MV photons from contemporary medical linear accelerators. Due to the need for accurate dosimetry of small field size VHEE beams we have performed dose measurements using EBT2 Gafchromic® film. Calibration of the film has been carried out for beams of two different energy ranges: 20 MeV and 165 MeV from conventional radio frequency linear accelerators. In addition, EBT2 film has been used for dose measurements with 135 MeV electron beams produced by a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator. The dose response measurements and percentage depth dose profiles have been compared with calculations carried out using the general-purpose FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code. The impact of induced radioactivity on film response for VHEEs has been evaluated using the MC simulations. A neutron yield of the order of 10(-5) neutrons cm(-2) per incident electron has been estimated and induced activity due to radionuclide production is found to have a negligible effect on total dose deposition and film response. Neutron and proton contribution to the equivalent doses are negligible for VHEE. The study demonstrates that EBT2 Gafchromic film is a reliable dosimeter that can be used for dosimetry of VHEE. The results indicate an energy-independent response of the dosimeter for 20 MeV and 165 MeV electron beams and has been found to be suitable for dosimetry of VHEE. PMID:25207591

  7. The IPEMB code of practice for electron dosimetry for radiotherapy beams of initial energy from 2 to 50 MeV based on an air kerma calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, D. I.; Burns, D. T.; Klevenhagen, S. C.; Nahum, A. E.; Pitchford, W. G.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the recommendations of the Electron Dosimetry Working Party of the UK Institution of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and Biology (IPEMB). The recommendations consist of a code of practice for electron dosimetry for radiotherapy beams of initial energy from 2 to 50 MeV. The code is based on the 2 MV (or ) air kerma calibration of the NE 2561/2611 chamber, which is used as the transfer instrument between national standards laboratory and hospitals in the UK. The code utilizes an approach. Designated chambers are the NE 2571 (graphite-walled Farmer chamber), to be calibrated against the transfer instrument in a megavoltage photon beam, and three parallel-plate chambers, to be calibrated against the NE 2571 in a higher-energy electron beam. The practical code is supplemented by comprehensive discussion of the theoretical background and the sources and values of included data.

  8. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  9. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  10. Effects of water on fingernail electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tengda; Zhao, Zhixin; Zhang, Haiying; Zhai, Hezheng; Ruan, Shuzhou; Jiao, Ling; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a promising biodosimetric method, and fingernails are sensitive biomaterials to ionizing radiation. Therefore, kinetic energy released per unit mass (kerma) can be estimated by measuring the level of free radicals within fingernails, using EPR. However, to date this dosimetry has been deficient and insufficiently accurate. In the sampling processes and measurements, water plays a significant role. This paper discusses many effects of water on fingernail EPR dosimetry, including disturbance to EPR measurements and two different effects on the production of free radicals. Water that is unable to contact free radicals can promote the production of free radicals due to indirect ionizing effects. Therefore, varying water content within fingernails can lead to varying growth rates in the free radical concentration after irradiation—these two variables have a linear relationship, with a slope of 1.8143. Thus, EPR dosimetry needs to be adjusted according to the water content of the fingernails of an individual. When the free radicals are exposed to water, the eliminating effect will appear. Therefore, soaking fingernail pieces in water before irradiation, as many researchers have previously done, can cause estimation errors. In addition, nails need to be dehydrated before making accurately quantitative EPR measurements. PMID:27342838

  11. Characterization of a gated fiber-optic-coupled detector for application in clinical electron beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tanyi, James A.; Nitzling, Kevin D.; Lodwick, Camille J.; Huston, Alan L.; Justus, Brian L.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Assessment of the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a novel gated fiber-optic-coupled dosimetry system for clinical electron beam irradiation. Methods: The response of fiber-optic-coupled dosimetry system to clinical electron beam, with nominal energy range of 6-20 MeV, was evaluated for reproducibility, linearity, and output dependence on dose rate, dose per pulse, energy, and field size. The validity of the detector system's response was assessed in correspondence with a reference ionization chamber. Results: The fiber-optic-coupled dosimetry system showed little dependence to dose rate variations (coefficient of variation {+-}0.37%) and dose per pulse changes (with 0.54% of reference chamber measurements). The reproducibility of the system was {+-}0.55% for dose fractions of {approx}100 cGy. Energy dependence was within {+-}1.67% relative to the reference ionization chamber for the 6-20 MeV nominal electron beam energy range. The system exhibited excellent linear response (R{sup 2}=1.000) compared to reference ionization chamber in the dose range of 1-1000 cGy. The output factors were within {+-}0.54% of the corresponding reference ionization chamber measurements. Conclusions: The dosimetric properties of the gated fiber-optic-coupled dosimetry system compare favorably to the corresponding reference ionization chamber measurements and show considerable potential for applications in clinical electron beam radiotherapy.

  12. [Dosimetry of total skin electron irradiation

    PubMed

    Kontra, Gábor; Horváth, Akos; Bajcsay, András; Németh, György

    2000-07-01

    Elaboration of such a simple technique for total skin electron irradiation which ensures good dose homogeneity and minimal x-ray background dose. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We started large electron field irradiations with the Neptun 10p linear accelerator in the National Institute of Oncology -Budapest in 1986. After the installation of the Siemens Mevatron KD linear accelerator it was possible to introduce the modified Stanford technique. This technique satisfies better the requirements given in the objective. The required field size of 200x75 cm is produced as a result of two fields with 30 degrees angular separation (dual field) at a source skin distance of 465 cm. The patient's body is exposed to six dual electron fields. The electron energy is 6 MeV. Despite the long source skin distance the treatment time is relatively short due to the high dose rate (940 mu/min) capability of our Mevatron KD. The in air dose profiles were measured in miniphantom with semiconductor detector. Depth dose curves were measured in water and in polystyrene phantom with semiconductor detector and with films. RESULTS: The measured dose homogeneity of the 6 MeV energy dual field with 30 degrees angular separation is within +/- 5%in a 200x75cm plane field. The depth of dose maximum of the resulting dose distribution of six dual field irradiation is between 2 mm and 5 mm, while the depth of 80% isodose curve is about 8 mm. The total body x-ray background dose is less than 1% of the skin dose. CONCLUSION: The modified Stanford technique adapted to our Mevatron KD linear accelerator is suitable for total skin electron beam therapy. PMID:12050758

  13. High-energy neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Michele Rhea

    2001-12-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for the radiation protection quantity effective dose were calculated for neutrons, photons and protons with energies up to 2 GeV using the MCNPX code. The calculations were performed using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory versions of the MIRD-V male and female anthropomorphic phantoms modified to include the skin and esophagus. The latest high-energy neutron evaluated cross-section libraries and the recommendations given in ICRP Publication 60 and ICRP Publication 74 were utilized to perform the calculations. Sets of fluence-to- effective dose conversion coefficients are given for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral, right-lateral and rotational irradiation geometries. This is the first set of dose conversion coefficients over this energy range calculated for the L-LAT irradiation geometry. A unique set of high-energy neutron depth-dose benchmark experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center/Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE/WNR) complex. The experiments consisted of filtered neutron beams with energies up to 800 MeV impinging on a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 tissue-equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose was measured in the phantom at various depths with tissue-equivalent ion chambers. The phantom and the experimental set-up were modeled using MCNPX. Comparisons of the experimental and computational depth- dose distributions indicate that the absorbed dose calculated by MCNPX is within 13% for neutrons with energies up to 750 MeV. This experiment will serve as a benchmark experiment for the testing of high-energy radiation transport codes for the international radiation protection community.

  14. Energy response improvement for photon dosimetry using pulse analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Dizaji H.

    2016-02-01

    During the last few years, active personal dosimeters have been developed and have replaced passive personal dosimeters in some external monitoring systems, frequently using silicon diode detectors. Incident photons interact with the constituents of the diode detector and produce electrons. These photon-induced electrons deposit energy in the detector's sensitive region and contribute to the response of diode detectors. To achieve an appropriate photon dosimetry response, the detectors are usually covered by a metallic layer with an optimum thickness. The metallic cover acts as an energy compensating shield. In this paper, a software process is performed for energy compensation. Selective data sampling based on pulse height is used to determine the photon dose equivalent. This method is applied to improve the energy response in photon dosimetry. The detector design is optimized for the response function and determination of the photon dose equivalent. Photon personal dose equivalent is determined in the energy range of 0.3-6 MeV. The error values of the calculated data for this wide energy range and measured data for 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co and 241Am-Be sources respectively are up to 20% and 15%. Fairly good agreement is seen between simulation and dose values obtained from our process and specifications from several photon sources.

  15. Monte Carlo calculations of correction factors for plane-parallel ionization chambers in clinical electron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio

    2008-09-15

    Recent standard dosimetry protocols recommend that plane-parallel ionization chambers be used in the measurements of depth-dose distributions or the calibration of low-energy electron beams with beam quality R{sub 50}<4 g/cm{sup 2}. In electron dosimetry protocols with the plane-parallel chambers, the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, in water is assumed to be unity and the replacement correction factor, P{sub repl}, is taken to be unity for well-guarded plane-parallel chambers, at all measurement depths. This study calculated P{sub wall} and P{sub repl} for NACP-02, Markus, and Roos plane-parallel chambers in clinical electron dosimetry using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. The P{sub wall} values for the plane-parallel chambers increased rapidly as a function of depth in water, especially at lower energy. The value around R{sub 50} for NACP-02 was about 10% greater than unity at 4 MeV. The effect was smaller for higher electron energies. Similarly, P{sub repl} values with depth increased drastically at the region with the steep dose gradient for lower energy. For Markus P{sub repl} departed more than 10% from unity close to R{sub 50} due to the narrow guard ring width. P{sub repl} for NACP-02 and Roos was close to unity in the plateau region of depth-dose curves that includes a reference depth, d{sub ref}. It was also found that the ratio of the dose to water and the dose to the sensitive volume in the air cavity for the plane-parallel chambers, D{sub w}/[D{sub air}]{sub pp}, at d{sub ref} differs significantly from that assumed by electron dosimetry protocols.

  16. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M; Desouky, O; Eldib, A; Ma, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  17. Two-parametric model of electron beam in computational dosimetry for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazurik, V. M.; Lazurik, V. T.; Popov, G.; Zimek, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Computer simulation of irradiation process of various materials with electron beam (EB) can be applied to correct and control the performances of radiation processing installations. Electron beam energy measurements methods are described in the international standards. The obtained results of measurements can be extended by implementation computational dosimetry. Authors have developed the computational method for determination of EB energy on the base of two-parametric fitting of semi-empirical model for the depth dose distribution initiated by mono-energetic electron beam. The analysis of number experiments show that described method can effectively consider random displacements arising from the use of aluminum wedge with a continuous strip of dosimetric film and minimize the magnitude uncertainty value of the electron energy evaluation, calculated from the experimental data. Two-parametric fitting method is proposed for determination of the electron beam model parameters. These model parameters are as follow: E0 - energy mono-energetic and mono-directional electron source, X0 - the thickness of the aluminum layer, located in front of irradiated object. That allows obtain baseline data related to the characteristic of the electron beam, which can be later on applied for computer modeling of the irradiation process. Model parameters which are defined in the international standards (like Ep- the most probably energy and Rp - practical range) can be linked with characteristics of two-parametric model (E0, X0), which allows to simulate the electron irradiation process. The obtained data from semi-empirical model were checked together with the set of experimental results. The proposed two-parametric model for electron beam energy evaluation and estimation of accuracy for computational dosimetry methods on the base of developed model are discussed.

  18. [Intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (IORT). Dosimetry problems, first experience].

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, L; Panichelli, V; Benassi, M; Sulprizio, S; Piermattei, A; Azario, L; Arcovito, G; Valentini, V

    1990-10-01

    In this paper, preliminary results on the IORT dosimetry performed on the two radiotherapy centers, "Regina Elena National Cancer Institute" and "S. Cuore Catholic University", are presented. The absolute dosimetry has been performed with ion chambers (ENEA chamber and Markus flat chamber) using a water phantom. The relative measurements have been performed with solid state diodes and radiographic films, calibrated on absolute dosimetry system.

  19. Application of the ICRP/ICRU reference computational phantoms to internal dosimetry: calculation of specific absorbed fractions of energy for photons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Hadid, L; Desbrée, A; Schlattl, H; Franck, D; Blanchardon, E; Zankl, M

    2010-07-01

    The emission of radiation from a contaminated body region is connected with the dose received by radiosensitive tissue through the specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of emitted energy, which is therefore an essential quantity for internal dose assessment. A set of SAFs were calculated using the new adult reference computational phantoms, released by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) together with the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Part of these results has been recently published in ICRP Publication 110 (2009 Adult reference computational phantoms (Oxford: Elsevier)). In this paper, we mainly discuss the results and also present them in numeric form. The emission of monoenergetic photons and electrons with energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV was simulated for three source organs: lungs, thyroid and liver. SAFs were calculated for four target regions in the body: lungs, colon wall, breasts and stomach wall. For quality assurance purposes, the simulations were performed simultaneously at the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU, Germany) and at the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN, France), using the Monte Carlo transport codes EGSnrc and MCNPX, respectively. The comparison of results shows overall agreement for photons and high-energy electrons with differences lower than 8%. Nevertheless, significant differences were found for electrons at lower energy for distant source/target organ pairs. Finally, the results for photons were compared to the SAF values derived using mathematical phantoms. Significant variations that can amount to 200% were found. The main reason for these differences is the change of geometry in the more realistic voxel body models. For electrons, no SAFs have been computed with the mathematical phantoms; instead, approximate formulae have been used by both the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee (MIRD) and the ICRP due to the limitations imposed

  20. Epid Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, Peter B.; Vial, Philip

    2011-05-05

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were introduced originally for patient position verification. The idea of using EPIDs for dosimetry was realised in the 1980s. Little was published on the topic until the mid 1990's, when the interest in EPIDs for dosimetry increased rapidly and continues to grow. The increasing research on EPID dosimetry coincided with the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). EPIDs are well suited to IMRT dosimetry because they are high resolution, two-dimensional (2D) digital detectors. They are also pre-existing on almost all modern linear accelerators. They generally show a linear response to increasing dose. Different types of EPIDs have been clinically implemented, and these have been described in several review papers. The current generation of commercially available EPIDs are indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers, also known as amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs. Disadvantages of a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry include non-water equivalent construction materials, and the energy sensitivity and optical scatter of the phosphor scintillators used to create optical signal from the megavoltage beam. This report discusses current knowledge regarding a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry.

  1. Epid Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were introduced originally for patient position verification. The idea of using EPIDs for dosimetry was realised in the 1980s. Little was published on the topic until the mid 1990's, when the interest in EPIDs for dosimetry increased rapidly and continues to grow. The increasing research on EPID dosimetry coincided with the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). EPIDs are well suited to IMRT dosimetry because they are high resolution, two-dimensional (2D) digital detectors. They are also pre-existing on almost all modern linear accelerators. They generally show a linear response to increasing dose. Different types of EPIDs have been clinically implemented, and these have been described in several review papers. The current generation of commercially available EPIDs are indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers, also known as amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs. Disadvantages of a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry include non-water equivalent construction materials, and the energy sensitivity and optical scatter of the phosphor scintillators used to create optical signal from the megavoltage beam. This report discusses current knowledge regarding a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry.

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry: Methodology and material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert Bruce

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) methodologies for radiation dose reconstruction are investigated using various dosimeter materials. Specifically, methodologies were developed and used that were intended to improve the accuracy and precision of EPR dosimetric techniques, including combining specimen rotation during measurement, use of an internal manganese standard, instrument stabilization techniques and strict measurement protocols. Characterization and quantification of these improvements were preformed on three specific EPR dosimeter materials. The dosimeter materials investigated using these optimized EPR techniques were Walrus teeth, human tooth enamel and alanine dosimeters. Walrus teeth showed the least desirable properties for EPR dosimetry yielding large native signals and low sensitivity (EPR signal per unit dose). The methods for tooth enamel and alanine resulted in large improvements in precision and accuracy. The minimum detectable dose (MDD) found for alanine was approximately 30 mGy (three standard deviations from the measured zero dose value). This is a sensitivity improvement of 5 to 10 over other specialized techniques published in the literature that offer MDD's in the range of 150 mGy to 300 mGy. The accuracy of the method on tooth enamel was comparable to that typically reported in the literature although the measurement precision was increased by about 7. This improvement in measurement precision enables various applications including dose vs. depth profile analysis and a more nondestructive testing evaluation (where the whole sample need not be additively irradiated in order to calibrate its radiation response). A nondestructive evaluation of numerous samples showed that the method could reconstruct the same doses to within 10 mGy of those evaluated destructively. Doses used for this assessment were in the range of 100 to 250 mGy. The method had sufficient stability to measure tooth enamel samples exhibiting extreme anisotropy with a

  3. Superficial Dosimetry Imaging of Čerenkov Emission in Electron Beam Radiotherapy of Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Fox, Colleen J.; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Čerenkov emission is generated from ionizing radiation in tissue above 264keV energy. This study presents the first examination of this optical emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose. Čerenkov emission was imaged from the surface of flat tissue phantoms irradiated with electrons, using a range of field sizes from 6cm×6cm to 20cm×20cm, incident angles from 0 to 50 degrees, and energies from 6 to 18 MeV. The Čerenkov images were compared with estimated superficial dose in phantoms from direct diode measurements, as well as calculations by Monte Carlo and the treatment planning system. Intensity images showed outstanding linear agreement (R2=0.97) with reference data of the known dose for energies from 6MeV to 18MeV. When orthogonal delivery was done, the in-plane and cross-plane dose distribution comparisons indicated very little difference (±2~4% differences) between the different methods of estimation as compared to Čerenkov light imaging. For an incident angle 50 degrees, the Čerenkov images and Monte Carlo simulation show excellent agreement with the diode data, but the treatment planning system (TPS) had at a larger error (OPT=±1~2%, Diode=±2~3%, TPS=±6~8% differences) as would be expected. The sampling depth of superficial dosimetry based on Čerenkov radiation has been simulated in layered skin model, showing the potential of sampling depth tuning by spectral filtering. Taken together, these measurements and simulations indicate that Čerenkov emission imaging might provide a valuable way to superficial dosimetry imaging from incident radiotherapy beams of electrons. PMID:23880473

  4. Superficial dosimetry imaging of Čerenkov emission in electron beam radiotherapy of phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Fox, Colleen J.; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-08-01

    Čerenkov emission is generated from ionizing radiation in tissue above 264 keV energy. This study presents the first examination of this optical emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose. Čerenkov emission was imaged from the surface of flat tissue phantoms irradiated with electrons, using a range of field sizes from 6 cm × 6 cm to 20 cm × 20 cm, incident angles from 0° to 50°, and energies from 6 to 18 MeV. The Čerenkov images were compared with the estimated superficial dose in phantoms from direct diode measurements, as well as calculations by Monte Carlo and the treatment planning system. Intensity images showed outstanding linear agreement (R2 = 0.97) with reference data of the known dose for energies from 6 to 18 MeV. When orthogonal delivery was carried out, the in-plane and cross-plane dose distribution comparisons indicated very little difference (±2-4% differences) between the different methods of estimation as compared to Čerenkov light imaging. For an incident angle 50°, the Čerenkov images and Monte Carlo simulation show excellent agreement with the diode data, but the treatment planning system had a larger error (OPT = ±1˜2%, diode = ±2˜3%, TPS = ±6-8% differences) as would be expected. The sampling depth of superficial dosimetry based on Čerenkov radiation has been simulated in a layered skin model, showing the potential of sampling depth tuning by spectral filtering. Taken together, these measurements and simulations indicate that Čerenkov emission imaging might provide a valuable method of superficial dosimetry imaging from incident radiotherapy beams of electrons.

  5. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered.

  6. Handbook for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for personnel dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The program contained in this Handbook provides a significant advance in the field of radiation protection through a structured means for assuring the quality of personnel dosimetry performance. Since personnel dosimetry performance is directly related to the assurance of worker safety, it has been of key interest to the Department of Energy. Studies conducted over the past three decades have clearly demonstrated a need for personnel dosimetry performance criteria, related testing programs, and improvements in dosimetry technology. In responding to these needs, the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (EH) has developed and initiated a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) which is intended to improve the quality of personnel dosimetry through (1) performance testing, (2) dosimetry and calibration intercomparisons, and (3) applied research. In the interest of improving dosimetry technology, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is also designed to encourage cooperation and technical interchange between DOE laboratories. Dosimetry intercomparison programs have been scheduled which include the use of transport standard instruments, transport standard radioactive sources and special dosimeters. The dosimeters used in the intercomparison program are designed to obtain optimum data on the comparison of dosimetry calibration methodologies and capabilities. This data is used in part to develop enhanced calibration protocols. In the interest of overall calibration update, assistance and guidance for the calibration of personnel dosimeters is available through the DOELAP support laboratories. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent X-Ray Source: An electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Davis, Stephen D.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Rusch, Thomas W.; Axelrod, Steve

    2006-11-15

    A new x-ray source, the model S700 Axxent trade mark sign X-Ray Source (Source), has been developed by Xoft Inc. for electronic brachytherapy. Unlike brachytherapy sources containing radionuclides, this Source may be turned on and off at will and may be operated at variable currents and voltages to change the dose rate and penetration properties. The in-water dosimetry parameters for this electronic brachytherapy source have been determined from measurements and calculations at 40, 45, and 50 kV settings. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport utilized the MCNP5 code and the EPDL97-based mcplib04 cross-section library. Inter-tube consistency was assessed for 20 different Sources, measured with a PTW 34013 ionization chamber. As the Source is intended to be used for a maximum of ten treatment fractions, tube stability was also assessed. Photon spectra were measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and calculated using MCNP. Parameters used in the two-dimensional (2D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism were determined. While the Source was characterized as a point due to the small anode size, <1 mm, use of the one-dimensional (1D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism is not recommended due to polar anisotropy. Consequently, 1D brachytherapy dosimetry parameters were not sought. Calculated point-source model radial dose functions at g{sub P}(5) were 0.20, 0.24, and 0.29 for the 40, 45, and 50 kV voltage settings, respectively. For 1

  8. Review of plastic and liquid scintillation dosimetry for photon, electron, and proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Beddar, Sam

    2016-10-01

    While scintillation dosimetry has been around for decades, the need for a dosimeter tailored to the reality of modern radiation therapy—in particular a real-time, water-equivalent, energy-independent dosimeter with high spatial resolution—has generated renewed interest in scintillators over the last 10 years. With the advent of at least one commercial plastic scintillation dosimeter and the ever-growing scientific literature on this subject, this topical review is intended to provide the medical physics community with a wide overview of scintillation physics, related optical concepts, and applications of plastic scintillation dosimetry.

  9. Polymer gel dosimetry of an electron beam in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, J.; De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The effect of a strong external magnetic field on 4 MeV electron beam was measured with polymer gel dosimetry. The measured entrance dose distribution was compared with a calculated fluence map. The magnetic field was created by use of two permanent Neodymium (NdFeB) magnets that were positioned perpendicular to the electron beam. The magnetic field between the magnets was measured with Hall sensors. Based on the magnetic field measurement and the law of Biot-Savart, the magnetic field distribution was extrapolated. Electron trajectories were calculated using a relativistic Lorentz force operator. Although the simplified computational model that was applied, the shape and position of the calculated entrance fluence map are found to be in good agreement with the measured dose distribution in the first layer of the phantom. In combination with the development of low density polymer gel dosimeters, these preliminary results show the potential of 3D gel dosimetry in MRI-linac applications.

  10. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn—internal electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  11. The application of thermoluminescence dosimetry in X-ray energy discrimination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, V K; Holloway, L; McLean, I D

    2015-12-01

    Clinical dosimetry requires an understanding of radiation energy to accurately determine the delivered dose. For many situations this is known, however there are also many situations where the radiation energy is not well known, thus limiting dosimetric accuracy. This is the case in personnel dosimetry where thermo luminescent (TL) dosimetry is the method of choice. Traditionally beam energy characteristics in personnel dosimetry are determined through discrimination with the use of various filters fitted within a radiation monitor. The presence of scattered and characteristic radiation produced by these metallic filters, however, can compromise the results. In this study the TL response of five materials TLD100, TLD100H, TLD200, TLD400 and TLD500, was measured at various X-ray energies. The TL sensitivity ratio for various combinations of materials as a function of X-ray energy was calculated. The results indicate that in personal dosimetry a combination of three or more TL detector system has a better accuracy of estimation of effective radiation energy of an X-ray beam than some of the current method of employed for energy estimation and has the potential to improve the accuracy in dose determination in a variety of practical situations. The development of this method also has application in other fields including quality assurance of the orthovoltage therapy machines, dosimetry intercomparisons of kilovoltage X-ray beams, and measurement of the dose to critical organs outside a treatment field of a megavoltage therapy beam. PMID:26330215

  12. The application of thermoluminescence dosimetry in X-ray energy discrimination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, V K; Holloway, L; McLean, I D

    2015-12-01

    Clinical dosimetry requires an understanding of radiation energy to accurately determine the delivered dose. For many situations this is known, however there are also many situations where the radiation energy is not well known, thus limiting dosimetric accuracy. This is the case in personnel dosimetry where thermo luminescent (TL) dosimetry is the method of choice. Traditionally beam energy characteristics in personnel dosimetry are determined through discrimination with the use of various filters fitted within a radiation monitor. The presence of scattered and characteristic radiation produced by these metallic filters, however, can compromise the results. In this study the TL response of five materials TLD100, TLD100H, TLD200, TLD400 and TLD500, was measured at various X-ray energies. The TL sensitivity ratio for various combinations of materials as a function of X-ray energy was calculated. The results indicate that in personal dosimetry a combination of three or more TL detector system has a better accuracy of estimation of effective radiation energy of an X-ray beam than some of the current method of employed for energy estimation and has the potential to improve the accuracy in dose determination in a variety of practical situations. The development of this method also has application in other fields including quality assurance of the orthovoltage therapy machines, dosimetry intercomparisons of kilovoltage X-ray beams, and measurement of the dose to critical organs outside a treatment field of a megavoltage therapy beam.

  13. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  14. Implementation of an electronic personal dosimetry system (EPD) at Oldbury-on-Severn power station.

    PubMed

    Clarke, P W; Weeks, A R

    2001-03-01

    This article presents the implementation of an electronic personal dosemeter (EPD) as a film badge replacement at Oldbury-on-Severn power station, which is the first major site to use an approval issued by the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) for dose measurement by an EPD. The practicalities and history behind the introduction of an EPD for personal dosimetry are described. PMID:11281529

  15. A portable electronic system for radiation dosimetry using electrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruvinel, P. E.; Mascarenhas, S.; Cameron, J.

    1990-02-01

    An electret dosimeter with a cylindrical active volume has been introduced by Mascarenhas and collaborators [Proc. 10th Anniversary Conf. 1969-1979, Associacâo Brasileira de Fisicos em Medicina, p. 488; Topics Appl. Phys. 33 (1987) 321] for possible use in personnel and area monitoring. The full energy response curve as well as the degree of reproducibility and accuracy of the dosimeter are reported in a previous report [O. Guerrini, Master Science Thesis, São Carlos, USP-IFQSC (1982)]. For dimensions similar to those of the common pen dosimeter, the electret has a total surface charge of the order of 10 -9 C and it has a readout sensitivity of the order of 10 -5 Gy with a useful range of 5 × 10 -2 Gy. In this paper we describe a portable electronic system to measure X and γ-rays using a cylindrical electret ionization chamber. It uses commercially available operational amplifiers, and charge measurements can also be made by connecting a suitable capacitor in the feedback loop. With this system it is possible to measure equivalent surface charges up to (19.99±0.01) on the dosimeter. The readout doses are shown on a 3 {1}/{2} digit liquid crystal display (LCD). We have used complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and bipolar metal oxide semiconductor (BiMOS) operatonal amplifier devices in the system's design. This choice provides small power consumption and is ideal for battery powered instruments. Furthermore the instrument is ideally suited for in situ measurements of X and γ radiation using a cylindrical electret ionization chamber.

  16. US Department of Energy Laboratory Accredition Program (DOELAP) for personnel dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Carlson, R.D.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Accreditation of personnel dosimetry systems is required for laboratories that conduct personnel dosimetry for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Accreditation is a two-step process which requires the participant to pass a proficiency test and an onsite assessment. The DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is a measurement quality assurance program for DOE laboratories. Currently, the DOELAP addresses only dosimetry systems used to assess the whole body dose to personnel. A pilot extremity DOELAP has been completed and routine testing is expected to begin in January 1994. It is expected that participation in the extremity program will be a regulatory requirement by January 1996.

  17. Skeletal dosimetry in a voxel-based rat phantom for internal exposures to photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Tianwu; Han Dao; Liu Yang; Sun Wenjuan; Liu Qian

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The skeleton makes a significant contribution to the whole body absorbed dose evaluation of rats, since the bone marrow and bone surface in the skeleton express high radiosensitivity and are considered to be important dose-limiting tissues. The bone marrow can be categorized as red bone marrow (RBM) and yellow bone marrow (YBM). It is important to investigate the bone marrow in skeletal dosimetry. Methods: Cryosectional color images of the skeleton of a 156 g rat were segmented into mineral bone (including cortical bone and trabecular bone), RBM, and YBM. These three tissue types were identified at 40 different bone sites and integrated into a previously developed voxel-based rat computational phantom. Photon and electron skeletal absorbed fractions were then calculated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Results: Absorbed fraction (AF) and specific absorbed fraction (SAF) for mineral bone, RBM, and YBM at the 40 different bone sites were established for monoenergetic photon and electron sources placed in 18 organs and seven bone sites. Discrete photon energy was varied from 0.01 to 5.0 MeV in 21 discrete steps, while 21 discrete electron energies were studied, from 0.1 to 10.0 MeV. The trends and values found were consistent with the results of other researchers [M. G. Stabin, T. E. Peterson, G. E. Holburn, and M. A. Emmons, ''Voxel-based mouse and rat models for internal dose calculations,'' J. Nucl. Med. 47, 655-659 (2006)]. S-factors for the radionuclides {sup 169}Er, {sup 143}Pr, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 32}P, and {sup 90}Y, located in 18 organs and seven bone sites for the skeleton, were calculated and are provided in detail. Conclusions: For internal dose calculations, the AF data reveal that the mineral bone in the rat skeletal system is responsible for significant attenuation of gamma rays, especially at low energies. The photon SAF curves of RBM show that, for photon energies greater than 0.6 MeV, there is an increase in secondary photons emitted from the

  18. Practical considerations for electron beam small field size dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Subhash C.; Johnson, Martin W.; Gossman, Michael S. . E-mail: GossmanMS@erlanger.org

    2005-06-30

    Special care of superficial lesions surrounding critical structures, such as an eye, may require tight margins. When this is the case, small megavoltage electron treatment fields and nonstandard treatment distances become necessary. When the field size is found to be less than the practical range of the electron beam, dosimetric measurements should be performed. This research includes data proving that very small electron fields can be employed for treatment with appropriate beam flatness and penumbra. This is accomplished by first coning down the incident beam to a small field size, then secondly by adding a single lead sheet to the patient's skin surface. The aperture of the sheet is required to be greater than 2 x 2 cm{sup 2} in size, and must be cut properly to adequately confine the treatment area.

  19. A new electronic neutron dosimeter (END) for reliable personal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, H.; Cousins, T.; Andrews, H. R.; Machrafi, R.; Voevodskiy, A.; Kovaltchouk, V.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Robins, M.; Larsson, C.; Hugron, R.; Brown, J.

    2008-04-01

    Tests of existing electronic neutron dosimeters by military and civilian groups have revealed significant performance limitations. To meet the operational requirements of emergency response personnel to a radiological/nuclear incident as well as those in the nuclear industry, a new END has been developed. It is patterned after a unique commercial neutron spectral dosemeter known as the N-probe. It uses a pair of small special scintillators on tiny photomultiplier tubes. Special electronics were designed to minimize power consumption to allow for weeks of operation on a single charge. The size, performance, and data analysis for the END have been designed to meet/exceed international standards for electronic neutron dosimeters. Results obtained with the END prototype are presented.

  20. Comparative dosimetry study of three UK centres implementing total skin electron treatment through external audit

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, R; McGovern, M; Greener, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the external audit measurements conducted in two UK centres implementing total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) and the results obtained. Methods: Measurements of output, energy, beam flatness and symmetry at a standard distance (95 or 100 cm SSD) were performed using a parallel plate chamber in solid water. Similarly, output and energy measurements were also performed at the treatment plane for single and dual fields. Clinical simulations were carried out using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic® film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) on an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: Extended distance measurements confirmed that local values for the beam dosimetry at Centres A and B were within 2% for outputs and 1-mm agreement of the expected depth at which the dose is 50% of the maximum for the depth–dose curve in water (R50,D) value. Clinical simulation using TLDs) showed an agreement of −1.6% and −6.7% compared with the expected mean trunk dose for each centre, respectively, and a variation within 10% (±1 standard deviation) across the trunk. The film results confirmed that the delivery of the treatment technique at each audited centre complies with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations. Conclusion: This audit methodology has proven to be a successful way to confirm the agreement of dosimetric parameters for TSEBT treatments at both audited centres and could serve as the basis for an audit template to be used by other audit groups. Advances in knowledge: TSEBT audits are not established in the UK owing to a limited number of centres carrying out the treatment technique. This article describes the audits performed at two UK centres prior to their clinical implementation. PMID:25761213

  1. A generalized calibration procedure for in vivo transit dosimetry using siemens electronic portal imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Gargiulo, Laura; Cilla, Savino; Sabatino, Domenico; Cappiello, Massimo; Di Felice, Cinzia; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Azario, Luigi; Russo, Mariateresa; Pompei, Luciano; D'Onofrio, Guido; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-03-01

    A practical and accurate generalized in vivo dosimetry procedure has been implemented for Siemens linacs supplying 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams, equipped with aSi electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). The in vivo dosimetry method makes use of correlation ratios between EPID transit signal, s (t) (0) (TPR,w,L), and phantom mid-plane dose, D (0)(TPR,w,L), as functions of phantom thickness, w, square field dimensions, L, and tissue-phantom ratio TPR(20,10). The s (t) (0) (TPR,w,L) and D (0)(TPR,w,L) values were defined to be independent of the EPID sensitivity and monitor unit calibration, while their dependence on TPR(20,10) was investigated to determine a set of generalized correlation ratios to be used for beams with TPR(20,10) falling in the examined range. This way, other radiotherapy centers can use the method with no need to locally perform the whole set of measurements in solid water phantoms, required to implement it. Tolerance levels for 3D conformal treatments, ranging between ±5 and ±6% according to tumor type and location, were estimated for comparison purposes between reconstructed isocenter dose, D (iso), and treatment planning system (TPS) computed dose D (iso,TPS). Finally a dedicated software, interfaceable with record and verify (R&V) systems used in the centers, was developed to obtain in vivo dosimetry results in less than 2 min after beam delivery.

  2. ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE DOSIMETRY FOR A LARGE-SCALE RADIATION INCIDENT

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Harold M.; Flood, Ann Barry; Williams, Benjamin B.; Dong, Ruhong; Swarts, Steven G.; He, Xiaoming; Grinberg, Oleg; Sidabras, Jason; Demidenko, Eugene; Gui, Jiang; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Kobayashi, Kyo; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Marsh, Stephen D.P.; Matthews, Thomas P.; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Pennington, Patrick M.; Raynolds, Timothy; Salikhov, Ildar; Wilcox, Dean E.; Zaki, Bassem I.

    2013-01-01

    With possibilities for radiation terrorism and intensified concerns about nuclear accidents since the recent Fukushima Daiichi event, the potential exposure of large numbers of individuals to radiation that could lead to acute clinical effects has become a major concern. For the medical community to cope with such an event and avoid overwhelming the medical care system, it is essential to identify not only individuals who have received clinically significant exposures and need medical intervention but also those who do not need treatment. The ability of electron paramagnetic resonance to measure radiation-induced paramagnetic species, which persist in certain tissues (e.g., teeth, fingernails, toenails, bone, and hair), has led this technique to become a prominent method for screening significantly exposed individuals. Although the technical requirements needed to develop this method for effective application in a radiation event are daunting, remarkable progress has been made. In collaboration with General Electric, and through funding committed by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, electron paramagnetic resonance tooth dosimetry of the upper incisors is being developed to become a Food and Drug Administration-approved and manufacturable device designed to carry out triage for a threshold dose of 2 Gy. Significant progress has also been made in the development of electron paramagnetic resonance nail dosimetry based on measurements of nails in situ under point-of-care conditions, and in the near future this may become a second field-ready technique. Based on recent progress in measurements of nail clippings, we anticipate that this technique may be implementable at remotely located laboratories to provide additional information when the measurements of dose on site need to be supplemented. We conclude that electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry is likely to be a useful part of triage for a large-scale radiation incident. PMID:22850230

  3. A modified Fricke gel dosimeter for fast electron blood dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; de Góes, E. G.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested for more than forty years that blood and blood components be irradiated before allogeneic transfusions for immunosuppressed patients in order to avoid the Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD). Whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and granulocytes may have viable T cells and should be irradiated before transfusion for different patient clinical conditions. According to international guides, absorbed doses from 25 up to 50 Gy should be delivered to the central middle plane of each blood bag. Although gamma and X-rays from radiotherapy equipments and dedicated cell irradiators are commonly used for this purpose, electron beams from Linear Accelerators (LINACs) could be used as well. In this work, we developed a methodology able to acquire dosimetric data from blood irradiations, especially after fast electrons exposures. This was achieved using a proposed Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXGp) dosimeter, which presents closer radiological characteristics (attenuation coefficients and stopping-powers) to the whole blood, as well as complete absorbed dose range linearity. The developed methodology and the FXGp dosimeter were also able to provide isodose curves and field profiles for the irradiated samples.

  4. Evaluation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters for passive dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yukihara, E. G.; Mardirossian, G.; Mirzasadeghi, M.; Guduru, S.; Ahmad, S.

    2008-01-15

    This article investigates the performance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) for application in radiotherapy. Central-axis depth dose curves and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) responses were obtained in a water phantom for 6 and 18 MV photons, and for 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV electron beams from a Varian 21EX linear accelerator. Single OSL measurements could be repeated with a precision of 0.7% (one standard deviation) and the differences between absorbed doses measured with OSLDs and an ionization chamber were within {+-}1% for photon beams. Similar results were obtained for electron beams in the low-gradient region after correction for a 1.9% photon-to-electron bias. The distance-to-agreement values were of the order of 0.5-1.0 mm for electrons in high dose gradient regions. Additional investigations also demonstrated that the OSL response dependence on dose rate, field size, and irradiation temperature is less than 1% in the conditions of the present study. Regarding the beam energy/quality dependence, the relative response of the OSLD for 18 MV was (0.51{+-}0.48)% of the response for the 6 MV photon beam. The OSLD response for the electron beams relative to the 6 MV photon beam. The OSLD response for the electron beams relative to the 6 MV photon beam was in average 1.9% higher, but this result requires further confirmation. The relative response did not seem to vary with electron energy at d{sub max} within the experimental uncertainties (0.5% in average) and, therefore, a fixed correction factor of 1.9% eliminated the energy dependence in our experimental conditions.

  5. Transit Dosimetry for Patient Treatment Verification with an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Sean L.

    The complex and individualized photon fluence patterns constructed during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning must be verified before they are delivered to the patient. There is a compelling argument for additional verification throughout the course of treatment due to the possibility of data corruption, unintentional modification of the plan parameters, changes in patient anatomy, errors in patient alignment, and even mistakes in identifying the correct patient for treatment. Amorphous silicon (aSi) Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) can be utilized for IMRT verification. The goal of this thesis is to implement EPID transit dosimetry, measurement of the dose at a plane behind the patient during their treatment, within the clinical process. In order to achieve this goal, a number of the EPID's dosimetric shortcomings were studied and subsequently resolved. Portal dose images (PDIs) acquired with an aSi EPID suffer from artifacts related to radiation backscattered asymmetrically from the EPID support structure. This backscatter signal varies as a function of field size (FS) and location on the EPID. Its presence can affect pixel values in the measured PDI by up to 3.6%. Two methods to correct for this artifact are offered: discrete FS specific correction matrices and a single generalized equation. The dosimetric comparison between the measured and predicted through-air dose images for 49 IMRT treatment fields was significantly improved (p << .001) after the application of these FS specific backscatter corrections. The formulation of a transit dosimetry algorithm followed the establishment of the backscatter correction and a confirmation of the EPID's positional stability with linac gantry rotation. A detailed characterization of the attenuation, scatter, and EPID response behind an object in the beam's path is necessary to predict transit PDIs. In order to validate the algorithm's performance, 49 IMRT fields were delivered to a

  6. Emergency Dosimetry Using Ceramic Components in Personal Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroukla, E. C.; Bailiff, I. K.; Terry, I.

    2014-02-01

    The rapid assessment of radiation dose to members of the public exposed to significant levels of ionizing radiation during a radiological incident presents a significant difficulty in the absence of planned radiation monitoring. However, within most personal electronic devices components such as resistors with alumina substrates can be found that have potentially suitable properties as solid state dosimeters using luminescence measurement techniques. The suitability of several types of ceramic-based components (e.g., resonators, inductors and resistors) has been previously examined using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques to establish their basic characteristics for the retrospective determination of absorbed dose. In this paper, we present results obtained with aluminum oxide surface mount resistors extracted from mobile phones that further extend this work. Very encouraging results have been obtained related to the measurement of luminescence sensitivity, dose response, reusability, limit of detection, signal reproducibility and known-dose recovery. However, the alumina exhibits a rapid loss of the latent luminescence signal with time following irradiation attributed to athermal (or anomalous) fading. The issues related to obtaining a reliable correction protocol for this loss and the detailed examinations required of the fading behavior are discussed.

  7. WE-E-BRE-01: An Image-Based Skeletal Dosimetry Model for the ICRP Reference Adult Female - Internal Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, S; Maynard, M; Marshall, E; Bolch, W; Sinclair, L; Rajon, D; Wayson, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Limitations seen in previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used software today, include the lack of consideration of electron escape and cross-fire from cortical bone, the modeling of infinite spongiosa, the disregard of the effect of varying cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation, and the lack of use of the more recent ICRP definition of a 50 micron surrogate tissue region for the osteoprogenitor cells - shallow marrow. These limitations were addressed in the present dosimetry model. Methods: Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to active marrow and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the adult female. The bone macrostructure was obtained from the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference phantoms, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 year-old female cadaver. The target tissue regions were active marrow and shallow marrow. The source tissues were active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume and cortical bone surfaces. The marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or modeled analytically. Results: The method of combining macro- and microstructure absorbed fractions calculated using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model for the UF adult male in the Hough et al. study. Conclusion: The calculated skeletal averaged absorbed fractions for each source-target combination were found to follow similar trends of more recent dosimetry models (image-based models) and did not follow current models used in nuclear medicine dosimetry at high energies (due to that models use of an infinite expanse of trabecular spongiosa)

  8. SU-E-QI-15: Single Point Dosimetry by Means of Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET)

    SciTech Connect

    Volotskova, O; Jenkins, C; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov light is generated when a charged particles with energy greater then 250 keV, moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons during the static megavoltage linear accelerator (LINAC) operational mode. Recently, Cerenkov radiation gained considerable interest as possible candidate as a new imaging modality. Optical signals generated by Cerenkov radiation may act as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial radiation dose. We demonstrated a novel single point dosimetry method for megavoltage photon and electron therapy utilizing down conversion of Cerenkov photons. Methods: The custom build signal characterization system was used: a sample holder (probe) with adjacent light tight compartments was connected via fiber-optic cables to a photon counting photomultiplier tube (PMT). One compartment contains a medium only while the other contains medium and red-shifting nano-particles (Q-dots, nanoclusters). By taking the difference between the two signals (Cerenkov photons and CRET photons) we obtain a measure of the down-converted light, which we expect to be proportional to dose as measured with an adjacent ion chamber. Experimental results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations performed using the GEANT4 code. Results: The signal correlation between CR signal, CRET readings and dose produced by LINAC at a single point were investigated. The experimental results were compared with simulations. The dose linearity, signal to noise ratio and dose rate dependence were tested with custom build CRET based probe. Conclusion: Performance characteristics of the proposed single point CRET based probe were evaluated. The direct use of the induced Cerenkov emission and CRET in an irradiated single point volume as an indirect surrogate for the imparted dose was investigated. We conclude that CRET is a promising optical based dosimetry method that offers advantages over those already proposed.

  9. Use of alanine-silicone pellets for electron paramagnetic resonance gamma dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Galindo, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Silicone is proposed as an alternative binding substance in the production of D-L alanine pellets used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of gamma rays. The dosimeters are manufactured at room temperature, making the production simple. Examination by EPR silicone-alanine pellets irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in the dose range 10 to 10(6) Gy shows that the proposed silicone binder does not affect typical alanine dose-response curves. Thermal stability of the pellets below 40 degrees C is good, but their pre-dose EPR signal amplitude is slightly higher than for nonirradiated alanine.

  10. Experimental assessment of gold nanoparticle-mediated dose enhancement in radiation therapy beams using electron spin resonance dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, T; Guidelli, E J; Gómez, J A; Baffa, O; Nicolucci, P

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we aim to experimentally assess increments of dose due to nanoparticle-radiation interactions via electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry performed with a biological-equivalent sensitive material.We employed 2-Methyl-Alanine (2MA) in powder form to compose the radiation sensitive medium embedding gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) 5 nm in diameter. Dosimeters manufactured with 0.1% w/w of AuNPs or no nanoparticles were irradiated with clinically utilized 250 kVp orthovoltage or 6 MV linac x-rays in dosimetric conditions. Amplitude peak-to-peak (App) at the central ESR spectral line was used for dosimetry. Dose-response curves were obtained for samples with or without nanoparticles and each energy beam. Dose increments due to nanoparticles were analyzed in terms of absolute dose enhancements (DEs), calculated as App ratios for each dose/beam condition, or relative dose enhancement factors (DEFs) calculated as the slopes of the dose-response curves.Dose enhancements were observed to present an amplified behavior for small doses (between 0.1-0.5 Gy), with this effect being more prominent with the kV beam. For doses between 0.5-5 Gy, dose-independent trends were observed for both beams, stable around (2.1   ±   0.7) and (1.3   ±   0.4) for kV and MV beams, respectively. We found DEFs of (1.62   ±   0.04) or (1.27   ±   0.03) for the same beams. Additionally, we measured no interference between AuNPs and the ESR apparatus, including the excitation microwaves, the magnetic fields and the paramagnetic radicals.2MA was demonstrated to be a feasible paramagnetic radiation-sensitive material for dosimetry in the presence of AuNPs, and ESR dosimetry a powerful experimental method for further verifications of increments in nanoparticle-mediated doses of biological interest. Ultimately, gold nanoparticles can cause significant and detectable dose enhancements in biological-like samples irradiated at both kilo

  11. Experimental assessment of gold nanoparticle-mediated dose enhancement in radiation therapy beams using electron spin resonance dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, T.; Guidelli, E. J.; Gómez, J. A.; Baffa, O.; Nicolucci, P.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we aim to experimentally assess increments of dose due to nanoparticle-radiation interactions via electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry performed with a biological-equivalent sensitive material. We employed 2-Methyl-Alanine (2MA) in powder form to compose the radiation sensitive medium embedding gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) 5 nm in diameter. Dosimeters manufactured with 0.1% w/w of AuNPs or no nanoparticles were irradiated with clinically utilized 250 kVp orthovoltage or 6 MV linac x-rays in dosimetric conditions. Amplitude peak-to-peak (App) at the central ESR spectral line was used for dosimetry. Dose-response curves were obtained for samples with or without nanoparticles and each energy beam. Dose increments due to nanoparticles were analyzed in terms of absolute dose enhancements (DEs), calculated as App ratios for each dose/beam condition, or relative dose enhancement factors (DEFs) calculated as the slopes of the dose-response curves. Dose enhancements were observed to present an amplified behavior for small doses (between 0.1-0.5 Gy), with this effect being more prominent with the kV beam. For doses between 0.5-5 Gy, dose-independent trends were observed for both beams, stable around (2.1   ±   0.7) and (1.3   ±   0.4) for kV and MV beams, respectively. We found DEFs of (1.62   ±   0.04) or (1.27   ±   0.03) for the same beams. Additionally, we measured no interference between AuNPs and the ESR apparatus, including the excitation microwaves, the magnetic fields and the paramagnetic radicals. 2MA was demonstrated to be a feasible paramagnetic radiation-sensitive material for dosimetry in the presence of AuNPs, and ESR dosimetry a powerful experimental method for further verifications of increments in nanoparticle-mediated doses of biological interest. Ultimately, gold nanoparticles can cause significant and detectable dose enhancements in biological-like samples irradiated at both

  12. Validation of total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique dosimetry data by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Nevelsky, Alexander; Borzov, Egor; Daniel, Shahar; Bar-Deroma, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) is a complex technique which requires many nonstandard measurements and dosimetric procedures. The purpose of this work was to validate measured dosimetry data by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using EGSnrc-based codes (BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). Our MC simulations consisted of two major steps. In the first step, the incident electron beam parameters (energy spectrum, FWHM, mean angular spread) were adjusted to match the measured data (PDD and profile) at SSD = 100 cm for an open field. In the second step, these parameters were used to calculate dose distributions at the treatment distance of 400 cm. MC simulations of dose distributions from single and dual fields at the treatment distance were performed in a water phantom. Dose distribution from the full treatment with six dual fields was simulated in a CT-based anthropomorphic phantom. MC calculations were compared to the available set of measurements used in clinical practice. For one direct field, MC calculated PDDs agreed within 3%/1 mm with the measurements, and lateral profiles agreed within 3% with the measured data. For the OF, the measured and calculated results were within 2% agreement. The optimal angle of 17° was confirmed for the dual field setup. Dose distribution from the full treatment with six dual fields was simulated in a CT-based anthropomorphic phantom. The MC-calculated multiplication factor (B12-factor), which relates the skin dose for the whole treatment to the dose from one calibration field, for setups with and without degrader was 2.9 and 2.8, respectively. The measured B12-factor was 2.8 for both setups. The difference between calculated and measured values was within 3.5%. It was found that a degrader provides more homogeneous dose distribution. The measured X-ray contamination for the full treatment was 0.4%; this is compared to the 0.5% X-ray contamination obtained with the MC calculation. Feasibility of MC simulation in an anthropomorphic phantom

  13. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  14. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R. Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-12-15

    beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

  15. Neutron dosimetry, moderated energy spectrum, and neutron capture therapy for californium-252 medical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, Mark Joseph

    Examination of neutron dosimetry for 252Cf has been conducted using calculative and experimental means. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was used in a distributed computing environment as a parallel virtual machine (PVM) to determine the absorbed neutron dose and neutron energy spectrum from 252Cf in a variety of clinically relevant materials. Herein, a Maxwellian spectrum was used to model the 252Cf neutron emissions within these materials. 252Cf mixed-field dosimetry of Applicator Tube (AT) type sources was measured using 1.0 and 0.05 cm3 tissue-equivalent ion chambers and a miniature GM counter. A dosimetry protocol was formulated similar that of ICRU 45. The 252Cf AT neutron dosimetry was determined in the cylindrical coordinate system formalism recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43. These results demonstrated the overwhelming dependence of dosimetry on the source geometry factor as there was no significant neutron attenuation within the source or encapsulation. Gold foils and TLDs were used to measure the thermal flux in the vicinity of 252Cf AT sources to compare with the results calculated using MCNP. As the fast neutron energy spectrum did not markedly changed at increasing distances from the AT source, neutron dosimetry results obtained with paired ion chambers using fixed sensitivity factors agreed well with MCNP results and those in the literature. Calculations of moderated 252Cf neutron energy spectrum with various loadings of 10B and 157Gd were performed, in addition to analysis of neutron capture therapy dosimetry with these isotopes. Radiological concerns such as personnel exposure and shielding of 252Cf emissions were examined. Feasibility of a high specific-activity 252Cf HDR source was investigated through radiochemical and metallurgical studies using stand-ins such as Tb, Gd and 249Cf. Issues such as capsule burst strength due to helium production for a variety of proposed HDR sources were addressed. A recommended 252Cf source

  16. Internal Photon and Electron Dosimetry of the Newborn Patient – A Hybrid Computational Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S. Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values – absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue – are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida patient model series. Methods Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for the both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron specific absorbed fraction were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose – for both self and cross dose terms – were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Results Values of photon and electron specific absorbed fractions were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA

  17. Internal photon and electron dosimetry of the newborn patient--a hybrid computational phantom study.

    PubMed

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E

    2012-03-01

    Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values--absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue--are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida (UF) patient model series. Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron SAF were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose--for both self- and cross-dose terms--were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Values of photon and electron SAFs were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA/EXM software. A comprehensive model of internal dosimetry is presented in this study for the

  18. Internal photon and electron dosimetry of the newborn patient—a hybrid computational phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S. Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-03-01

    Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values—absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue—are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida (UF) patient model series. Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron SAF were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose--for both self- and cross-dose terms—were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Values of photon and electron SAFs were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA/EXM software. A comprehensive model of internal dosimetry is presented in this study for

  19. Study of runaway electrons using dosimetry of hard x-ray radiations in Damavand tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, C; Pourshahab, B; Hosseini Pooya, S M; Orouji, T; Rasouli, H

    2014-05-01

    In this work several studies have been conducted on hard x-ray emissions of Damavand tokamak based on radiation dosimetry using the Thermoluminescence method. The goal was to understand interactions of runaway electrons with plasma particles, vessel wall, and plasma facing components. Total of 354 GR-200 (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) crystals have been placed on 118 points--three TLDs per point--to map hard x-ray radiation doses on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Results show two distinctive levels of x-ray radiations doses on the exterior of the vessel. The low-dose area on which measured dose is about 0.5 mSv/shot. In the low-dose area there is no particular component inside the vessel. On the contrary, on high-dose area of the vessel, x-ray radiations dose exceeds 30 mSv/shot. The high-dose area coincides with the position of limiters, magnetic probe ducts, and vacuum vessel intersections. Among the high-dose areas, the highest level of dose is measured in the position of the limiter, which could be due to its direct contact with the plasma column and with runaway electrons. Direct collisions of runaway electrons with the vessel wall and plasma facing components make a major contribution for production of hard x-ray photons in Damavand tokamak.

  20. Study of runaway electrons using dosimetry of hard x-ray radiations in Damavand tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, C.; Pourshahab, B.; Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Orouji, T.; Rasouli, H.

    2014-05-01

    In this work several studies have been conducted on hard x-ray emissions of Damavand tokamak based on radiation dosimetry using the Thermoluminescence method. The goal was to understand interactions of runaway electrons with plasma particles, vessel wall, and plasma facing components. Total of 354 GR-200 (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) crystals have been placed on 118 points - three TLDs per point - to map hard x-ray radiation doses on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Results show two distinctive levels of x-ray radiations doses on the exterior of the vessel. The low-dose area on which measured dose is about 0.5 mSv/shot. In the low-dose area there is no particular component inside the vessel. On the contrary, on high-dose area of the vessel, x-ray radiations dose exceeds 30 mSv/shot. The high-dose area coincides with the position of limiters, magnetic probe ducts, and vacuum vessel intersections. Among the high-dose areas, the highest level of dose is measured in the position of the limiter, which could be due to its direct contact with the plasma column and with runaway electrons. Direct collisions of runaway electrons with the vessel wall and plasma facing components make a major contribution for production of hard x-ray photons in Damavand tokamak.

  1. Study of runaway electrons using dosimetry of hard x-ray radiations in Damavand tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rasouli, C.; Pourshahab, B.; Rasouli, H.; Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Orouji, T.

    2014-05-15

    In this work several studies have been conducted on hard x-ray emissions of Damavand tokamak based on radiation dosimetry using the Thermoluminescence method. The goal was to understand interactions of runaway electrons with plasma particles, vessel wall, and plasma facing components. Total of 354 GR-200 (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) crystals have been placed on 118 points – three TLDs per point – to map hard x-ray radiation doses on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Results show two distinctive levels of x-ray radiations doses on the exterior of the vessel. The low-dose area on which measured dose is about 0.5 mSv/shot. In the low-dose area there is no particular component inside the vessel. On the contrary, on high-dose area of the vessel, x-ray radiations dose exceeds 30 mSv/shot. The high-dose area coincides with the position of limiters, magnetic probe ducts, and vacuum vessel intersections. Among the high-dose areas, the highest level of dose is measured in the position of the limiter, which could be due to its direct contact with the plasma column and with runaway electrons. Direct collisions of runaway electrons with the vessel wall and plasma facing components make a major contribution for production of hard x-ray photons in Damavand tokamak.

  2. Radiation Dosimetry Study in Dental Enamel of Human Tooth Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Tania; Romanyukha, Alex; Pass, Barry; Misra, Prabhakar

    2009-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of tooth enamel is used for individual dose reconstruction following radiation accidents. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid, minimally invasive technique of obtaining a sample of dental enamel small enough to not disturb the structure and functionality of a tooth and to improve the sensitivity of the spectral signals using X-band (9.4 GHz) and Q-band (34 GHz) EPR technique. In this study EPR measurements in X-band were performed on 100 mg isotropic powdered enamel samples and Q-band was performed on 4 mg, 1×1×3 mm enamel biopsy samples. All samples were obtained from discarded teeth collected during normal dental treatment. To study the variation of the Radiation-Induced Signal (RIS) at different orientations in the applied magnetic field, samples were placed in the resonance cavity for Q-band EPR. X-band EPR measurements were performed on 100 mg isotropic powdered enamel samples. In X-band spectra, the RIS is distinct from the "native" radiation-independent signal only for doses >0.5 Gy. Q-band, however, resolves the RIS and "native" signals and improves sensitivity by a factor of 20, enabling measurements in 2-4 mg tooth enamel samples, as compared to 100 mg for X-band. The estimated lower limit of Q-band dose measurement is 0.5 Gy. Q-band EPR enamel dosimetry results in greater sensitivity and smaller sample size through enhanced spectral resolution. Thus, this can be a valuable technique for population triage in the event of detonation of a radiation dispersal device ("dirty" bomb) or other radiation event with massive casualties. Further, the small 4 mg samples can be obtained by a minimally-invasive biopsy technique.

  3. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  4. Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source. Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolfsson, Emelie; White, Shane; Landry, Guillaume; Lund, Eva; Gustafsson, Håkan; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2015-05-01

    Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film. Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water. Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison. This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

  5. Characterization of a synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diode for radiotherapy electron beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Di Venanzio, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Falco, M. D.; Bagala, P.; Santoni, R.; Pimpinella, M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric properties of synthetic single crystal diamond based Schottky diodes under irradiation with therapeutic electron beams from linear accelerators. Methods: A single crystal diamond detector was fabricated and tested under 6, 8, 10, 12, and 15 MeV electron beams. The detector performances were evaluated using three types of commercial detectors as reference dosimeters: an Advanced Markus plane parallel ionization chamber, a Semiflex cylindrical ionization chamber, and a p-type silicon detector. Preirradiation, linearity with dose, dose rate dependence, output factors, lateral field profiles, and percentage depth dose profiles were investigated and discussed. Results: During preirradiation the diamond detector signal shows a weak decrease within 0.7% with respect to the plateau value and a final signal stability of 0.1% (1{sigma}) is observed after about 5 Gy. A good linear behavior of the detector response as a function of the delivered dose is observed with deviations below {+-}0.3% in the dose range from 0.02 to 10 Gy. In addition, the detector response is dose rate independent, with deviations below 0.3% in the investigated dose rate range from 0.17 to 5.45 Gy/min. Percentage depth dose curves obtained from the diamond detector are in good agreement with the ones from the reference dosimeters. Lateral beam profile measurements show an overall good agreement among detectors, taking into account their respective geometrical features. The spatial resolution of solid state detectors is confirmed to be better than that of ionization chambers, being the one from the diamond detector comparable to that of the silicon diode. A good agreement within experimental uncertainties was also found in terms of output factor measurements between the diamond detector and reference dosimeters. Conclusions: The observed dosimetric properties indicate that the tested diamond detector is a suitable candidate for clinical electron beam dosimetry.

  6. Electron energies in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G.D. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-07-10

    The modern era of electron-electron interactions began a decade ago. Plummer's group initiated a program of using angular resolved photoemission to examine the band structure of the simple metals. Beginning with aluminum, and carrying on to sodium and potassium, they always found that the occupied energy bands were much narrower than expected. For example, the compressed energy bands for metallic potassium suggest a band effective mass of m* = 1.33m{sub e}. This should be compared to the band mass found from optical conductivity m*/m{sub e} = 1.01 {plus minus} 0.01. The discrepancy between these results is startling. It was this great difference which started my group doing calculations. Our program was two-fold. On one hand, we reanalyzed the experimental data, in order to see if Plummer's result was an experimental artifact. On the other hand, we completely redid the electron-electron self-energy calculations for simple metals, using the most modern choices of local-field corrections and vertex corrections. Our results will be reported in these lectures. They can be summarized as following: Our calculations give the same effective masses as the older calculations, so the theory is relatively unchanged; Our analysis of the experiments suggests that the recent measurements of band narrowing are an experimental artifact. 38 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  8. Biologic dosimetry for nuclear environments by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods. Conference paper

    SciTech Connect

    McCreery, M.J.; Swenberg, C.E.; Basso, M.J.; Conklin, J.J.; Hsieh, J.

    1982-06-18

    A number of stable and unstable free radicals are produced by exposure of calcified tissues to ionizing radiation. Identification of the exact molecular nature of these radicals and their kinetic annealing properties awaits further investigation. However, the high stability and the dose-response characteristics of the signal at g = 2.0023 make it very promising for use in biologic dosimetry. A 10-25 mg sample of enamel is enough to determine absorbed dose from 10-10 to the 7th power rads of gamma, X-ray, and accelerated electron exposures. This sample, which is no more than a chip from the ridge of a human tooth, does not expose the living portion of the tooth and so is relatively noninvasive. Investigations to establish a standard method for this procedure and to evaluate neutron dose is in progress. Although the procedures outlined here are relatively noninvasive, this technique affords other approaches that are even less invasive. Unlike optical methods, the sample for EPR analysis does not have to be transparent. It is not even necessary to suspend the sample as a fine powder. As long as the bone or tooth sample is within the dimensional limits of the tuned EPR cavity, it can be analyzed intact. This fact makes in vivo analysis feasible. We are currently making attempts to enlarge the EPR cavity with modification of the corresponding electronic components so that a finger can be analyzed. If this approach is successful, the expedient evaluation of large numbers of casualties might be possible by a method that is noninvasive and nondestructive.

  9. Neutron dosimetry with TL albedo dosemeters at high energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Fehrenbacher, G

    2007-01-01

    The GSF-Personal Monitoring Service uses the TLD albedo dosemeter as standard neutron personal dosemeter. Due to its low sensitivity for fast neutrons however, it is generally not recommended for workplaces at high-energy accelerators. Test measurements with the albedo dosemeter were performed at the accelerator laboratories of GSI in Darmstadt and DESY in Hamburg to reconsider this hypothesis. It revealed that the albedo dosemeter can also be used as personal dosemeter at these workplaces, because at all measurement locations a significant part of neutrons with lower energies could be found, which were produced by scattering at walls or the ground. PMID:17766258

  10. Tooth Retrospective Dosimetry Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Influence of Irradiated Dental Composites.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Céline M; Djurkin, Andrej; Dos Santos-Goncalvez, Ana Maria; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej M; Kobayashi, Kyo; Rychert, Kevin; Beun, Sébastien; Leprince, Julian G; Leloup, Gaëtane; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of a major radiological accident, the medical management of overexposed individuals will rely on the determination of the dose of ionizing radiations absorbed by the victims. Because people in the general population do not possess conventional dosimeters, after the fact dose reconstruction methods are needed. Free radicals are induced by radiations in the tooth enamel of victims, in direct proportion to dose, and can be quantified using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometry, a technique that was demonstrated to be very appropriate for mass triage. The presence of dimethacrylate based restorations on teeth can interfere with the dosimetric signal from the enamel, as free radicals could also be induced in the various composites used. The aim of the present study was to screen irradiated composites for a possible radiation-induced EPR signal, to characterize it, and evaluate a possible interference with the dosimetric signal of the enamel. We investigated the most common commercial composites, and experimental compositions, for a possible class effect. The effect of the dose was studied between 10 Gy and 100 Gy using high sensitivity X-band spectrometer. The influence of this radiation-induced signal from the composite on the dosimetric signal of the enamel was also investigated using a clinical L-Band EPR spectrometer, specifically developed in the EPR center at Dartmouth College. In X-band, a radiation-induced signal was observed for high doses (25-100 Gy); it was rapidly decaying, and not detected after only 24 h post irradiation. At 10 Gy, the signal was in most cases not measurable in the commercial composites tested, with the exception of 3 composites showing a significant intensity. In L-band study, only one irradiated commercial composite influenced significantly the dosimetric signal of the tooth, with an overestimation about 30%. In conclusion, the presence of the radiation-induced signal from dental composites should not

  11. Tooth Retrospective Dosimetry Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Influence of Irradiated Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Céline M.; Djurkin, Andrej; Dos Santos-Goncalvez, Ana Maria; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Kobayashi, Kyo; Rychert, Kevin; Beun, Sébastien; Leprince, Julian G.; Leloup, Gaëtane; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of a major radiological accident, the medical management of overexposed individuals will rely on the determination of the dose of ionizing radiations absorbed by the victims. Because people in the general population do not possess conventional dosimeters, after the fact dose reconstruction methods are needed. Free radicals are induced by radiations in the tooth enamel of victims, in direct proportion to dose, and can be quantified using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometry, a technique that was demonstrated to be very appropriate for mass triage. The presence of dimethacrylate based restorations on teeth can interfere with the dosimetric signal from the enamel, as free radicals could also be induced in the various composites used. The aim of the present study was to screen irradiated composites for a possible radiation-induced EPR signal, to characterize it, and evaluate a possible interference with the dosimetric signal of the enamel. We investigated the most common commercial composites, and experimental compositions, for a possible class effect. The effect of the dose was studied between 10 Gy and 100 Gy using high sensitivity X-band spectrometer. The influence of this radiation-induced signal from the composite on the dosimetric signal of the enamel was also investigated using a clinical L-Band EPR spectrometer, specifically developed in the EPR center at Dartmouth College. In X-band, a radiation-induced signal was observed for high doses (25-100 Gy); it was rapidly decaying, and not detected after only 24h post irradiation. At 10 Gy, the signal was in most cases not measurable in the commercial composites tested, with the exception of 3 composites showing a significant intensity. In L-band study, only one irradiated commercial composite influenced significantly the dosimetric signal of the tooth, with an overestimation about 30%. In conclusion, the presence of the radiation-induced signal from dental composites should not

  12. High-energy neutron dosimetry with superheated drop detectors.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, F; Agosteo, S; Sannikov, A V; Silari, M

    2002-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the response of dichlorodifluoromethane superheated drop detectors was performed in the 46-133 MeV energy range. Experiments with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were performed at the Université Catholique de Leuvain-la-Neuve, Belgium and the Svedberg Laboratory, Sweden, while tests in a broad field were performed at CERN. To determine the response of the detectors to the high-energy beams, the spectra of incident neutrons were folded over functions modelled after the cross sections for the production of heavy ions from the detector elements. The cross sections for fluorine and chlorine were produced in this work by means of the Monte Carlo high-energy transport code HADRON based on the cascade exciton model of nuclear interactions. The new response data permit the interpretation of measurements at high-energy accelerators and on high-altitude commercial flights, where a 30-50% under-response had been consistently recorded with respect to neutron dose equivalent. The introduction of a 1 cm lead shell around the detectors effectively compensates most of the response defect. PMID:12382936

  13. A new approach in the design of electronic portal imaging devices for portal dosimetry in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Badel, J N; Partouche-Sebban, D; Abraham, I; Carrie, C

    2014-09-01

    A CCD-based EPID using new crystal-assembly X-ray (CAX) converters is investigated for radiotherapy dosimetry. The proposed EPID design consists in replacing the common phosphor X-ray converters of current CCD-based EPIDs with high-stopping-power CAX converters. A Test Imaging Device (TID), consisting of a 30-mm-thick CAX converter made of Bismuth Germanate (BGO), coupled to a highly sensitive CCD camera, was used to evaluate the accessible imaging and dosimetric performance of the proposed design. The system response to dose and its dependence on photon beam energy were investigated. The effects of ghosting, dose rate, field size and phantom thickness were evaluated as well. The same measurements were also performed with our clinically used aSi-EPID so that comparisons of performance could be directly inferred. The TID displayed no detectable ghosting or sensitivity to dose rate. Its response to MU exposure was found to be linear within about ±1%. The level of glare induced in the TID and the aSi-EPID were equivalent. The TID resolution was higher than that of the aSi-EPID on the axis, but was found to decrease with off-axis distance. Finally, the image quality, assessed on the basis of signal-to-noise ratio in low dose radiographs of the larynx of a patient, was higher for the TID. The imaging performance accessible with the TID proved to be satisfying and its dosimetric capability was found to be superior to that of the current aSi-EPID.

  14. Dosimetry for electron Intra-Operative RadioTherapy: Comparison of output factors obtained through alanine/EPR pellets, ionization chamber and Monte Carlo-GEANT4 simulations for IORT mobile dedicate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Russo, Giorgio; Casarino, Carlo; Candiano, Giuliana; Gallo, Salvatore; Carlino, Antonio; Brai, Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this work a comparison between the response of alanine and Markus ionization chamber was carried out for measurements of the output factors (OF) of electron beams produced by a linear accelerator used for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). Output factors (OF) for conventional high-energy electron beams are normally measured using ionization chamber according to international dosimetry protocols. However, the electron beams used in IORT have characteristics of dose per pulse, energy spectrum and angular distribution quite different from beams usually used in external radiotherapy, so the direct application of international dosimetry protocols may introduce additional uncertainties in dosimetric determinations. The high dose per pulse could lead to an inaccuracy in dose measurements with ionization chamber, due to overestimation of ks recombination factor. Furthermore, the electron fields obtained with IORT-dedicated applicators have a wider energy spectrum and a wider angular distribution than the conventional fields, due to the presence of electrons scattered by the applicator's wall. For this reason, a dosimetry system should be characterized by a minimum dependence from the beam energy and from angle of incidence of electrons. This become particularly critical for small and bevelled applicators. All of these reasons lead to investigate the use of detectors different from the ionization chamber for measuring the OFs. Furthermore, the complete characterization of the radiation field could be accomplished also by the use of Monte Carlo simulations which allows to obtain detailed information on dose distributions. In this work we compare the output factors obtained by means of alanine dosimeters and Markus ionization chamber. The comparison is completed by the Monte Carlo calculations of OFs determined through the use of the Geant4 application "iort _ therapy" . The results are characterized by a good agreement of response of alanine pellets and Markus

  15. Dosimetry at the sub-cellular scale of Auger-electron emitter 99mTc in a mouse single thyroid follicle.

    PubMed

    Taborda, A; Benabdallah, N; Desbrée, A

    2016-02-01

    The Auger-electrons emitted by (99m)Tc have been recently associated with the induction of thyroid stunning in in vivo experiments in mice, making the dosimetry at the sub-cellular level of (99m)Tc a pertinent and pressing subject. The S-values for (99m)Tc were calculated using MCNP6, which was first validated for studies at the sub-cellular scale and for low energies electrons. The calculation was then performed for (99m)Tc within different cellular compartments in a single mouse thyroid follicle model, considering the radiative and non-radiative transitions of the (99m)Tc radiation spectrum. It was shown that the contribution of the (99m)Tc Auger and low energy electrons to the absorbed dose to the follicular cells' nucleus is important, being at least of the same order of magnitude compared to the emitted photons' contribution and cannot be neglected. The results suggest that Auger-electrons emitted by (99m)Tc play a significant role in the occurrence of the thyroid stunning effect in mice.

  16. Department of Energy standard for the performance testing of personnel dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    This standard is intended to be used in the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for personnel dosimetry systems. It is based on the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) ''Criteria for Testing Personnel Dosimetry Performance,'' ANSI N13.11-1983, recommendations made to DOE in ''Guidelines for the Calibration of Personnel Dosimeters,'' Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)-4515 and comments received during peer review by DOE and DOE contractor personnel. The recommendations contained in PNL-4515 were based on an evaluation of ANSI N13.11 conducted for the Office of Nuclear Safety, DOE, by PNL. Parts of ANSI N13.11 that did not require modification were used essentially intact in this standard to maintain consistency with nationally recognized standards. Modifications to this standard have resulted from several DOE/DOE contractor reviews and a pilot testing session. An initial peer review by selected DOE and DOE contractor representatives on technical content was conducted in 1983. A review by DOE field offices, program offices, and contractors was conducted in mid-1984. A pilot performance testing session sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety was conducted in early 1985 by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Idaho Falls. Results of the pilot test were reviewed in late 1985 by a DOE and DOE contractor committee. 11 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Pencil beam approach for correcting the energy dependence artifact in film dosimetry for IMRT verification.

    PubMed

    Kirov, Assen S; Caravelli, Gregory; Palm, Asa; Chui, Chen; LoSasso, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    The higher sensitivity to low-energy scattered photons of radiographic film compared to water can lead to significant dosimetric error when the beam quality varies significantly within a field. Correcting for this artifact will provide greater accuracy for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification dosimetry. A procedure is developed for correction of the film energy-dependent response by creating a pencil beam kernel within our treatment planning system to model the film response specifically. Film kernels are obtained from EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations of the dose distribution from a 1 mm diameter narrow beam in a model of the film placed at six depths from 1.5 to 40 cm in polystyrene and solid water phantoms. Kernels for different area phantoms (50 x 50 cm2 and 25 x 25 cm2 polystyrene and 30 x 30 cm2 solid water) are produced. The Monte Carlo calculated kernel is experimentally verified with film, ion chamber and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements in polystyrene irradiated by a narrow beam. The kernel is then used in convolution calculations to, predict the film response in open and IMRT fields. A 6 MV photon beam and Kodak XV2 film in a polystyrene phantom are selected to test the method as they are often used in practice and can result in large energy-dependent artifacts. The difference in dose distributions calculated with the film kernel and the water kernel is subtracted from film measurements to obtain a practically film artifact free IMRT dose distribution for the Kodak XV2 film. For the points with dose exceeding 5 cGy (11% of the peak dose) in a large modulated field and a film measurement inside a large polystyrene phantom at depth of 10 cm, the correction reduces the fraction of pixels for which the film dose deviates from dose to water by more than 5% of the mean film dose from 44% to 6%.

  18. Potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering method for improving abutment dosimetry in eMLC-delivered segmented-field electron conformal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Eley, John G.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Matthews, Kenneth L.; Parker, Brent C.; Price, Michael J.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering of the higher energy electron fields for improving abutment dosimetry in the planning volume when using an electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) to deliver segmented-field electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: A discrete (five-step) Gaussian edge spread function was used to match dose penumbras of differing beam energies (6-20 MeV) at a specified depth in a water phantom. Software was developed to define the leaf eMLC positions of an eMLC that most closely fit each electron field shape. The effect of 1D edge feathering of the higher energy field on dose homogeneity was computed and measured for segmented-field ECT treatment plans for three 2D PTVs in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of the x-axis (parallel to leaf motion) and remained constant along the y-axis (perpendicular to leaf motion). Additionally, the effect of 2D edge feathering was computed and measured for one radially symmetric, 3D PTV in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of both axes. For the 3D PTV, the feathering scheme was evaluated for 0.1-1.0-cm leaf widths. Dose calculations were performed using the pencil beam dose algorithm in the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. Dose verification measurements were made using a prototype eMLC (1-cm leaf width). Results: 1D discrete Gaussian edge feathering reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 2D PTVs by 34, 34, and 39%. In the 3D PTV, the broad leaf width (1 cm) of the eMLC hindered the 2D application of the feathering solution to the 3D PTV, and the standard deviation of dose increased by 10%. However, 2D discrete Gaussian edge feathering with simulated eMLC leaf widths of 0.1-0.5 cm reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 3D PTV by 33-28%, respectively. Conclusions: A five-step discrete Gaussian edge

  19. Passive detectors for neutron personal dosimetry: state of the art.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, Francesco; Bos, Adrie J J

    2004-01-01

    Passive, solid-state detectors still dominate the field of neutron personal dosimetry, mainly thanks to their low cost, high reliability and elevated throughput. However, the recent appearance in the market of several electronic personal dosemeters for neutrons presents a challenge to the exclusive use of passive systems for primary or official dosimetry. This scenario drives research and development activities on passive dosemeters towards systems offering greater accuracy of response and lower detection limits. In addition, further applications and properties of the passive detectors, which are not met by the electronic devices, are also being explored. In particular, extensive investigations are in progress on the use of solid-state detectors for aviation and space dosimetry, where high-energy neutron fields are encountered. The present situation is also stimulating an acceleration in the development of international standards on performance and test requirements for passive dosimetry systems, which can expedite significantly the implementation of techniques in commercial personal dosimetry services. Upcoming standards will cover thermoluminescence albedo dosemeters, etched-track detectors, superheated emulsions and direct ion storage chambers, attesting to the level of maturity reached by these techniques. This work reviews the developments in the field of passive neutron dosimetry emerged since the previous Neutron Dosimetry Symposium, reporting on the current status of the subject and indicating the direction of ongoing research. PMID:15353644

  20. Computational Dosimetry for Electron Microbeams: Monte-Carlo Track Simulation with Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H.; Wilson, W E.; Lynch, D J.; Resat, Marianne S.; Trease, Harold E.

    2001-10-15

    Both in vitro and in vivo experiments show that cells that do not receive energy directly from the radiation field (bystanders) respond to radiation exposure. This effect is most easily demonstrated with radiation fields composed of particles with high linear energy transfer (LET) that traverse only a few cells before they are stopped. Even at a moderate fluence of high-LET radiation only a small fraction of cells in the irradiated population are hit; hence, many bystanders are present. Low-LET radiation tends to generate a homogeneous distribution of dose at the cellular level so that identifying bystanders is much more difficult than in experiments with the same fluence of high-LET radiation. Experiments are underway at several laboratories to characterize bystander responses induced by low-LET radiation. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, experiments of this type are being carried out with an electron microbeam. A cell selected to receive energy directly from the irradiation source is placed over a hole in a mask that covers an electron gun. Monte Carlo simulations by Miller et al.(1) suggest that individual mammalian cells in a confluent monolayer could be targeted for irradiation by 25 to 100 keV electrons with minimal dose leakage to their neighbors. These calculations were based on a simple model of the cellular monolayer in which cells were assumed to be cylindrically symmetric with concentric cytoplasm and nucleus. Radial profiles, the lateral extent of cytoplasm and nucleus as a function of depth into a cell, were obtained from confocal microscopy of HeLa-cell monolayers.

  1. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, Michely C.; Sampaio, Francisco G. A.; Petchevist, Paulo C. D.; de Oliveira, André L.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2011-12-01

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  2. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Rivera, T

    2012-12-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) is applied worldwide for personal and medical dosimetry. TLD method has resulted in many interesting findings in medicine as TL dosimeters have many relevant advantages such as high sensitivity, small physical size, tissue equivalence, etc. The main characteristics of various TL materials used in radiation measurements and their practical consequences are overviewed: well defined TL glow curve, batch homogeneity, signal stability after irradiation, precision and accuracy, response with dose, and influence of energy. In this paper a brief summary of the advances in the application of thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) to dosimetry in radiation therapy application is presented.

  3. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu; and others

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  4. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum.

  5. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum. PMID:27548518

  6. Monte Carlo techniques for scattering foil design and dosimetry in total skin electron irradiations.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sung-Joon; Pareek, Prem N; Spencer, Sharon; Duan, Jun; Brezovich, Ivan A

    2005-06-01

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) with single fields requires large electron beams having good dose uniformity, dmax at the skin surface, and low bremsstrahlung contamination. To satisfy these requirements, energy degraders and scattering foils have to be specially designed for the given accelerator and treatment room. We used Monte Carlo (MC) techniques based on EGS4 user codes (BEAM, DOSXYZ, and DOSRZ) as a guide in the beam modifier design of our TSEI system. The dosimetric characteristics at the treatment distance of 382 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD) were verified experimentally using a linear array of 47 ion chambers, a parallel plate chamber, and radiochromic film. By matching MC simulations to standard beam measurements at 100 cm SSD, the parameters of the electron beam incident on the vacuum window were determined. Best match was achieved assuming that electrons were monoenergetic at 6.72 MeV, parallel, and distributed in a circular pattern having a Gaussian radial distribution with full width at half maximum = 0.13 cm. These parameters were then used to simulate our TSEI unit with various scattering foils. Two of the foils were fabricated and experimentally evaluated by measuring off-axis dose uniformity and depth doses. A scattering foil, consisting of a 12 x 12 cm2 aluminum plate of 0.6 cm thickness and placed at isocenter perpendicular to the beam direction, was considered optimal. It produced a beam that was flat within +/-3% up to 60 cm off-axis distance, dropped by not more than 8% at a distance of 90 cm, and had an x-ray contamination of <3%. For stationary beams, MC-computed dmax, Rp, and R50 agreed with measurements within 0.5 mm. The MC-predicted surface dose of the rotating phantom was 41% of the dose rate at dmax of the stationary phantom, whereas our calculations based on a semiempirical formula in the literature yielded a drop to 42%. The MC simulations provided the guideline of beam modifier design for TSEI and estimated the

  7. Current internal-dosimetry practices at US Department of Energy facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub, R. J.; Murphy, B. L.; Selby, J. M.; Vallario, B. J.

    1985-04-01

    The internal dosimetry practice at DOE facilities were characterized. The purpose was to determine the size of the facilities' internal dosimetry programs, the uniformity of the programs among the facilities, and the areas of greatest concern to health physicists in providing and reporting accurate estimates of internal radiation dose and in meeting proposed changes in internal dosimetry. The differences among the internal-dosimetry programs are related to the radioelements in use at each facility and, to some extent, the number of workers at each facility. The differences include different frequencies in the use of quality control samples, different minimum detection levels, different methods of recording radionuclides, different amounts of data recorded in the permanent record, and apparent differences in modeling the metabolism of radionuclides within the body. Recommendations for improving internal-dosimetry practices include studying the relationship between air-monitoring/survey readings and bioassay data, establishing uniform methods for recording bioassay results, developing more sensitive direct-bioassay procedures, establishing a mechanism for sharing information on internal-dosimetry procedures among DOE facilities, and developing mathematical models and interactive computer codes that can help quantify the uptake of radioactive materials and predict their distribution in the body.

  8. A low energy electron magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of a highly sensitive magnetometer based on the deflection of low energy electron beams in magnetic fields is analyzed. Because of its extremely low mass and consequently high e/m ratio, a low energy electron is easily deflected in a magnetic field, thus providing a basis for very low field measurement. Calculations for a specific instrument design indicate that a low energy electron magnetometer (LEEM) can measure magnetic fields as low as 1000 nT. The anticipated performance of LEEM is compared with that of the existing high resolution magnetometers in selected applications. The fast response time of LEEM makes it especially attractive as a potential instrument for magnetic signature analysis in large engineering systems.

  9. Backscatter factors and mass energy-absorption coefficient ratios for diagnostic radiology dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Benmakhlouf, Hamza; Bouchard, Hugo; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro

    2011-11-21

    Backscatter factors, B, and mass energy-absorption coefficient ratios, (μ(en)/ρ)(w, air), for the determination of the surface dose in diagnostic radiology were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The main purpose was to extend the range of available data to qualities used in modern x-ray techniques, particularly for interventional radiology. A comprehensive database for mono-energetic photons between 4 and 150 keV and different field sizes was created for a 15 cm thick water phantom. Backscattered spectra were calculated with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo system, scoring track-length fluence differential in energy with negligible statistical uncertainty; using the Monte Carlo computed spectra, B factors and (μ(en)/ρ)(w, air) were then calculated numerically for each energy. Weighted averaging procedures were subsequently used to convolve incident clinical spectra with mono-energetic data. The method was benchmarked against full Monte Carlo calculations of incident clinical spectra obtaining differences within 0.3-0.6%. The technique used enables the calculation of B and (μ(en)/ρ)(w, air) for any incident spectrum without further time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations. The adequacy of the extended dosimetry data to a broader range of clinical qualities than those currently available, while keeping consistency with existing data, was confirmed through detailed comparisons. Mono-energetic and spectra-averaged values were compared with published data, including those in ICRU Report 74 and IAEA TRS-457, finding average differences of 0.6%. Results are provided in comprehensive tables appropriated for clinical use. Additional qualities can easily be calculated using a designed GUI interface in conjunction with software to generate incident photon spectra.

  10. Low energy electron magnetometer using a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low energy electron beam magnetometer utilizes near-monoenergetic electrons thereby reducing errors due to electron energy spread and electron nonuniform angular distribution. In a first embodiment, atoms in an atomic beam of an inert gas are excited to a Rydberg state and then electrons of near zero energy are detached from the Rydberg atoms. The near zero energy electrons are then accelerated by an electric field V(acc) to form the electron beam. In a second embodiment, a filament emits electrons into an electrostatic analyzer which selects electrons at a predetermined energy level within a very narrow range. These selected electrons make up the electron beam that is subjected to the magnetic field being measured.

  11. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  12. Conditions for reliable time-resolved dosimetry of electronic portal imaging devices for fixed-gantry IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Patyal, Baldev; Mandapaka, Anant; Jung, Jae Won; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Oh

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The continuous scanning mode of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) that offers time-resolved information has been newly explored for verifying dynamic radiation deliveries. This study seeks to determine operating conditions (dose rate stability and time resolution) under which that mode can be used accurately for the time-resolved dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams.Methods: The authors have designed the following test beams with variable beam holdoffs and dose rate regulations: a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm open beam to serve as a reference beam; a sliding window (SW) beam utilizing the motion of a pair of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves outside the 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm jaw; a step and shoot (SS) beam to move the pair in step; a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam. The beams were designed in such a way that they all produce the same open beam output of 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm. Time-resolved ion chamber measurements at isocenter and time-resolved and integrating EPID measurements were performed for all beams. The time-resolved EPID measurements were evaluated through comparison with the ion chamber and integrating EPID measurements, as the latter are accepted procedures. For two-dimensional, time-resolved evaluation, a VMAT beam with an infield MLC travel was designed. Time-resolved EPID measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of such EPID dose images for this beam were performed and intercompared.Results: For IMRT beams (SW and SS), the authors found disagreement greater than 2%, caused by frame missing of the time-resolved mode. However, frame missing disappeared, yielding agreement better than 2%, when the dose rate of irradiation (and thus the frame acquisition rates) reached a stable and planned rate as the dose of irradiation was raised past certain thresholds (a minimum 12 s of irradiation per shoot used for SS IMRT). For VMAT, the authors found that dose rate does not affect the frame

  13. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement for various detectors used in photon and electron beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2011-07-01

    The subject of this study is the 'shift of the effective point of measurement', Δz, well known as a method of correction compensating for the 'displacement effect' in photon and electron beam dosimetry. Radiochromic EBT 1 films have been used to measure the 'true' TPR curves of 6 and 15 MV photons and 6 and 9 MeV electrons in the solid water-equivalent material RW3. For the Roos and Markus chambers, the cylindrical 'PinPoint', 'Semiflex' and 'Rigid-Stem' chambers, the 2D-Array and the E-type silicon diode (all from PTW-Freiburg), the positions of the effective points of measurement have been determined by direct or indirect comparison between their TPR curves and those of the EBT 1 film. Both for the Roos and Markus chambers, we found Δz = (0.4 ± 0.1) mm, which confirms earlier experimental and Monte Carlo results, but means a shortcoming of the 'water-equivalent window thickness' formula. For the cylindrical chambers, the ratio Δz/r was observed to increase with r, confirming a recent Monte Carlo prediction by Tessier (2010 E2-CN-182, Paper no 147, IDOS, Vienna) as well as the experimental observations by Johansson et al (1978 IAEA Symp. Proc. (Vienna) IAEA-SM-222/35 pp 243-70). According to a theoretical consideration, the shift of the effective point of measurement from the reference point of the detector is caused by a gradient of the fluence of the ionizing particles. As the experiments have shown, the value of Δz depends on the construction of the detector, but remains invariant under changes of radiation quality and depth. Other disturbances, which do not belong to the class of 'gradient effects', are not corrected by shifting the effective point of measurement.

  14. On the uncertainties of photon mass energy-absorption coefficients and their ratios for radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Pedro; Burns, David T; Salvat, Francesc

    2012-04-21

    with those of Hubbell (1977 Rad. Res. 70 58-81), except for the lowest energy range (radiodiagnostic) where it is concluded that current databases and their systematic analysis represent an improvement over the older Hubbell estimations. The results for (µ(en)/ρ)(graphite,air) for the gamma-ray dosimetry range are moderately higher than those of Seltzer and Bergstrom (2005 private communication).

  15. SU-E-T-188: Film Dosimetry Verification of Monte Carlo Generated Electron Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Enright, S; Asprinio, A; Lu, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions from film measurements to Monte Carlo generated electron treatment plans. Irradiation with electrons offers the advantages of dose uniformity in the target volume and of minimizing the dose to deeper healthy tissue. Using the Monte Carlo algorithm will improve dose accuracy in regions with heterogeneities and irregular surfaces. Methods: Dose distributions from GafChromic{sup ™} EBT3 films were compared to dose distributions from the Electron Monte Carlo algorithm in the Eclipse{sup ™} radiotherapy treatment planning system. These measurements were obtained for 6MeV, 9MeV and 12MeV electrons at two depths. All phantoms studied were imported into Eclipse by CT scan. A 1 cm thick solid water template with holes for bonelike and lung-like plugs was used. Different configurations were used with the different plugs inserted into the holes. Configurations with solid-water plugs stacked on top of one another were also used to create an irregular surface. Results: The dose distributions measured from the film agreed with those from the Electron Monte Carlo treatment plan. Accuracy of Electron Monte Carlo algorithm was also compared to that of Pencil Beam. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo had much higher pass rates than distributions from Pencil Beam when compared to the film. The pass rate for Monte Carlo was in the 80%–99% range, where the pass rate for Pencil Beam was as low as 10.76%. Conclusion: The dose distribution from Monte Carlo agreed with the measured dose from the film. When compared to the Pencil Beam algorithm, pass rates for Monte Carlo were much higher. Monte Carlo should be used over Pencil Beam for regions with heterogeneities and irregular surfaces.

  16. Review of the near-earth space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianming; Chen, Xiaoqian; Li, Shiyou

    2016-07-01

    The near-earth space radiation environment has a great effect to the spacecraft and maybe do harm to the astronaut's health. Thus, how to measure the radiation has become a serious challenge. In order to provide sufficient protection both for astronauts and for instruments on-board, dose equivalent and linear energy transfer should be measured instead of merely measuring total radiation dose. This paper reviews the methods of radiation measurement and presents a brief introduction of dosimetry instruments. The method can be divided into two different kinds, i.e., positive dosimetry and passive dosimetry. The former usually includes electronic devices which can be used for data storage and can offer simultaneous monitoring on space radiation. The passive dosimetry has a much simple structure, and need extra operation after on-orbit missions for measuring. To get more reliable data of radiation dosimetry, various instruments and methods had been applied in the spacecrafts and the manned spacecrafts in particular. The outlook of the development in the space radiation dosimetry measurement is also presented.

  17. Complete radiative terms for the electron/electronic energy equation

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, S.A.; Carlson, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    A derivation of the radiative terms in the electron/electronic energy equation is presented, properly accounting for the effects of absorption and emission of radiation on the individual energy modes of the gas. This electron/electronic energy equation with the complete radiative terms has successfully been used to model the radiation-dominated precursor ahead of the bow shock of a hypersonic vehicle entering the Earth`s atmosphere. 8 refs.

  18. Thermo electronic laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, L. K.; Rasor, N. S.

    1976-01-01

    The thermo electronic laser energy converter (TELEC) is described and compared to the Waymouth converter and the conventional thermionic converter. The electrical output characteristics and efficiency of TELEC operation are calculated for a variety of design variables. Calculations and results are briefly outlined. It is shown that the TELEC concept can potentially convert 25 to 50 percent of incident laser radiation into electric power at high power densities and high waste heat rejection temperatures.

  19. Low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies (6 to 16 keV) at SSRL beamline 1-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipe, N. E.; Chatterji, S.; Fassò, A.; Kase, K. R.; Seefred, R.; Olko, P.; Bilski, P.; Soares, C.

    1997-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation facilities provide a unique opportunity for low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies because of the availability of monochromatic x-ray beams. Results of such studies performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) are described. Polish lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), MTS-N(LiF:Mg, Ti- 0.4 mm thick), MCP-N (LiF:Mg, Cu, P - 0.4 mm thick) were exposed free in air to monochromatic x-rays (6-16 keV). These exposures were monitored with an SSRL ionization chamber. The responses (counts/Gy) of MTS-N and MCP-N were generally found to increase with increasing energy. The response at 16 keV is about 3 and 4 times higher than the response at 6 keV for MTS-N and MCP-N, respectively. Irradiation at 6 keV indicates a fairly linear dose response for both type of TLDs over a dose range of 0.01 to 0.4 Gy. In addition there appears to be no significant difference in responses between irradiating the TLDs from the front and the back sides. The energy response of the PTW ionization chamber type 23342 relative to the SSRL ionization chamber is within ±4.5% between 6 and 16 keV. Both the TLDs and the PTW ionization chamber can also be used for beam dosimetry.

  20. Response of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy (<1 MeV)

    SciTech Connect

    Tedgren, Aasa Carlsson; Hedman, Angelica; Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Carlsson, Gudrun Alm

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since absorbed dose to water can be determined accurately and with traceability to primary standards in such beams, using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. For use in brachytherapy, beam quality correction factors are needed, which include corrections for differences in mass energy absorption properties between water and detector as well as variations in detector response (intrinsic efficiency) with radiation quality, caused by variations in the density of ionization (linear energy transfer (LET) -distributions) along the secondary electron tracks. The aim of this work was to investigate experimentally the detector response of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to {sup 60}Co and to address discrepancies between the results found in recent publications of detector response. Methods: LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters of formulation MTS-N Poland were irradiated to known values of air kerma free-in-air in x-ray beams at tube voltages 25-250 kV, in {sup 137}Cs- and {sup 60}Co-beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free-in-air into values of mean absorbed dose in the dosimeters in the actual irradiation geometries were made using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. X-ray energy spectra were measured or calculated for the actual beams. Detector response relative to that for {sup 60}Co was determined at each beam quality. Results: An increase in relative response was seen for all beam qualities ranging from 8% at tube voltage 25 kV (effective energy 13 keV) to 3%-4% at 250 kV (122 keV effective energy) and {sup 137}Cs with a minimum at 80 keV effective energy (tube voltage 180 kV). The variation with effective energy was similar to that reported by Davis et al.[Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 106, 33-43 (2003)] with our values being systematically lower by 2%-4%. Compared to the

  1. Housing Electrons: Relating Quantum Numbers, Energy Levels, and Electron Configurations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Anthony

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that combines the concepts of quantum numbers and probability locations, energy levels, and electron configurations in a concrete, hands-on way. Uses model houses constructed out of foam board and colored beads to represent electrons. (JRH)

  2. Electron energy loss and diffraction of backscattered electrons from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Aizel, Koceila; Vos, Maarten

    2010-05-01

    Electrons backscattered from crystals can show Kikuchi patterns: variations in intensity for different outgoing directions due to diffraction by the lattice. Here, we measure these effects as a function of their energy loss for 30 keV electrons backscattered from silicon. The change in diffraction contrast with energy loss depends strongly on the scattering geometry. At steep incidence on the sample, diffraction contrast in the observed Kikuchi bands decreases rapidly with energy loss. For an energy loss larger than about 150 eV the contrast is more than 5 times less than the contrast due to electrons near zero energy loss. However, for grazing incidence angles, maximum Kikuchi band contrast is observed for electrons with an energy loss near 60 eV, where the contrast is more than 2.5× larger than near zero energy loss. In addition, in this grazing incidence geometry, the Kikuchi diffraction effects stay significant even for electrons that have lost hundreds of electron volts. For the maximum measured energy loss of 440 eV, the electrons still show a contrast that is 1.5 × larger than that of the electrons near zero energy loss. These geometry-dependent observations of Kikuchi band diffraction contrast are interpreted based on the elastic and inelastic scattering properties of electrons and dynamical diffraction simulations.

  3. Dosimetry for infant exposures to electronic article surveillance system: posture, physical dimension and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Li, Congsheng; Wu, Tongning

    2015-04-01

    The use of electronic article surveillance (EAS) systems has become popular in many public sites. As a consequence, concern has risen about infant exposure to magnetic fields (MFs) from this kind of device. To evaluate infant exposure to MFs of an EAS system (operating at 125 kHz and 13.56 MHz), we numerically compared dosimetric results among adult, child and infant models. Results revealed that postures insignificantly influenced dosimetric results if there was a similar cross-sectional area under exposure. Although safety limits are unlikely to be exceeded, the infant has higher SAR values for brain and central nervous system tissues compared with adult (1.5x at 125 kHz and 112x at 13.56 MHz), which deserve further investigation. Infant's specific anatomy (e.g., non-proportionally large head and high fat content) did not induce higher SAR values. The numerical models developed in the study (stroller and postured infant models) could be freely used for nonprofit academic research. PMID:25756750

  4. Electron correlation energies in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Shane Patrick

    This dissertation is a study of electron correlation energies Ec in atoms. (1) Accurate values of E c are computed for isoelectronic sequences of "Coulomb-Hooke" atoms with varying mixtures of Coulombic and Hooke character. (2) Coupled-cluster calculations in carefully designed basis sets are combined with fully converged second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) computations to obtain fairly accurate, non-relativistic Ec values for the 12 closed-shell atoms from Ar to Rn. The complete basis-set (CBS) limits of MP2 energies are obtained for open-shell atoms by computations in very large basis sets combined with a knowledge of the MP2/CBS limit for the next larger closed-shell atom with the same valence shell structure. Then higher-order correlation corrections are found by coupled-cluster calculations using basis sets that are not quite as large. The method is validated for the open-shell atoms from Al to Cl and then applied to get E c values, probably accurate to 3%, for the 4th-period open-shell atoms: K, Sc-Cu, and Ga-Br. (3) The results show that, contrary to quantum chemical folklore, MP2 overestimates |Ec| for atoms beyond Fe. Spin-component scaling arguments are used to provide a simple explanation for this overestimation. (4) Eleven non-relativistic density functionals, including some of the most widely-used ones, are tested on their ability to predict non-relativistic, electron correlation energies for atoms and their cations. They all lead to relatively poor predictions for the heavier atoms. Several novel, few-parameter, density functionals for the correlation energy are developed heuristically. Four new functionals lead to improved predictions for the 4th-period atoms without unreasonably compromising accuracy for the lighter atoms. (5) Simple models describing the variation of E c with atomic number are developed.

  5. Energy Efficient Electronics Cooling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Steve O'Shaughnessey; Tim Louvar; Mike Trumbower; Jessica Hunnicutt; Neil Myers

    2012-02-17

    Parker Precision Cooling Business Unit was awarded a Department of Energy grant (DE-EE0000412) to support the DOE-ITP goal of reducing industrial energy intensity and GHG emissions. The project proposed by Precision Cooling was to accelerate the development of a cooling technology for high heat generating electronics components. These components are specifically related to power electronics found in power drives focused on the inverter, converter and transformer modules. The proposed cooling system was expected to simultaneously remove heat from all three of the major modules listed above, while remaining dielectric under all operating conditions. Development of the cooling system to meet specific customer's requirements and constraints not only required a robust system design, but also new components to support long system functionality. Components requiring further development and testing during this project included pumps, fluid couplings, cold plates and condensers. All four of these major categories of components are required in every Precision Cooling system. Not only was design a key area of focus, but the process for manufacturing these components had to be determined and proven through the system development.

  6. Electron Attachment to Molecules at Low Electron Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Garscadden, A.; Wadehra, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most efficient ways of producing negative ions is by the process of dissociative electron attachment to molecules. Here, a diatomic or polyatomic molecule dissociates, by the impact of a low energy electron, into component atoms (or smaller molecular species) while the incident electron attaches itself to one of the dissociating fragments.

  7. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A; Lepage, M; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. PMID:20150687

  8. Correlation between energy deposition and molecular damage from Auger electrons: A case study of ultra-low energy (5–18 eV) electron interactions with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaee, Mohammad Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The present study introduces a new method to establish a direct correlation between biologically related physical parameters (i.e., stopping and damaging cross sections, respectively) for an Auger-electron emitting radionuclide decaying within a target molecule (e.g., DNA), so as to evaluate the efficacy of the radionuclide at the molecular level. These parameters can be applied to the dosimetry of Auger electrons and the quantification of their biological effects, which are the main criteria to assess the therapeutic efficacy of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Methods: Absorbed dose and stopping cross section for the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV emitted by{sup 125}I within DNA were determined by developing a nanodosimetric model. The molecular damages induced by these Auger electrons were investigated by measuring damaging cross section, including that for the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Nanoscale films of pure plasmid DNA were prepared via the freeze-drying technique and subsequently irradiated with low-energy electrons at various fluences. The damaging cross sections were determined by employing a molecular survival model to the measured exposure–response curves for induction of DNA strand breaks. Results: For a single decay of{sup 125}I within DNA, the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV deposit the energies of 12.1 and 9.1 eV within a 4.2-nm{sup 3} volume of a hydrated or dry DNA, which results in the absorbed doses of 270 and 210 kGy, respectively. DNA bases have a major contribution to the deposited energies. Ten-electronvolt and high linear energy transfer 100-eV electrons have a similar cross section for the formation of DNA double-strand break, while 100-eV electrons are twice as efficient as 10 eV in the induction of single-strand break. Conclusions: Ultra-low-energy electrons (<18 eV) substantially contribute to the absorbed dose and to the molecular damage from Auger-electron emitting radionuclides; hence, they should

  9. Energy-based dosimetry of low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, Martha J.

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) for low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources have advanced to the point where the algorithms may be used in clinical practice. Before these algorithms can be used, a methodology must be established to verify the accuracy of the source models used by the algorithms. Additionally, the source strength metric for these algorithms must be established. This work explored the feasibility of verifying the source models used by MBDCAs by measuring the differential photon fluence emitted from the encapsulation of the source. The measured fluence could be compared to that modeled by the algorithm to validate the source model. This work examined how the differential photon fluence varied with position and angle of emission from the source, and the resolution that these measurements would require for dose computations to be accurate to within 1.5%. Both the spatial and angular resolution requirements were determined. The techniques used to determine the resolution required for measurements of the differential photon fluence were applied to determine why dose-rate constants determined using a spectroscopic technique disagreed with those computed using Monte Carlo techniques. The discrepancy between the two techniques had been previously published, but the cause of the discrepancy was not known. This work determined the impact that some of the assumptions used by the spectroscopic technique had on the accuracy of the calculation. The assumption of isotropic emission was found to cause the largest discrepancy in the spectroscopic dose-rate constant. Finally, this work improved the instrumentation used to measure the rate at which energy leaves the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. This quantity is called emitted power (EP), and is presented as a possible source strength metric for MBDCAs. A calorimeter that measured EP was designed and built. The theoretical framework that the calorimeter relied upon to measure EP

  10. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  11. Mass, energy, and the electron

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, Bernard . E-mail: mulligan.3@osu.edu

    2006-08-15

    The two-component solutions of the Dirac equation currently in use are not separately a particle equation or an antiparticle equation. We present a unitary transformation that uncouples the four-component, force-free Dirac equation to yield a two-component spinor equation for the force-free motion of a relativistic particle and a corresponding two-component, time-reversed equation for an antiparticle. The particle-antiparticle nature of the two equations is established by applying to the solutions of these two-component equations criteria analogous to those applied for establishing the four-component particle and antiparticle solutions of the four-component Dirac equation. Wave function solutions of our two-component particle equation describe both a right and a left circularly polarized particle. Interesting characteristics of our solutions include spatial distributions that are confined in extent along directions perpendicular to the motion, without the artifice of wave packets, and an intrinsic chirality (handedness) that replaces the usual definition of chirality for particles without mass. Our solutions demonstrate that both the rest mass and the relativistic increase in mass with velocity of the force-free electron are due to an increase in the rate of Zitterbewegung with velocity. We extend this result to a bound electron, in which case the loss of energy due to binding is shown to decrease the rate of Zitterbewegung.

  12. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  13. Determination of absorbed dose in high-energy electron and photon radiation by means of an uncalibrated ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Klevenhagen, S C

    1991-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a dosimetric method based on an ionization chamber which has an uncalibrated sensitive volume but which behaves as a Bragg-Gray cavity in high-energy radiation. The new type of chamber developed in the course of this study has a variable volume and is constructed from water-similar materials. It can be used in a water phantom directly in a beam of a therapy megavoltage machine under clinical conditions. The chamber allows absorbed dose to be determined from first principles, overcoming many of the problems encountered with conventional dosimetry based on calibrated chambers. The study involved an intercomparison of the performance of the new chamber in high-energy electron and photon radiation with the conventional calibrated chambers employed according to the established dosimetry protocols. Good agreement was found between these dosimetric methods and it may therefore be concluded that the method developed in this work can be successfully employed for absolute dosimetry. The new chamber is a promising device for research in various aspects of dosimetry.

  14. SU-E-T-284: Revisiting Reference Dosimetry for the Model S700 Axxent 50 KV{sub p} Electronic Brachytherapy Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, JR; Rivard, MJ

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft was characterized in 2006 by Rivard et al. The source design was modified in 2006 to include a plastic centering insert at the source tip to more accurately position the anode. The objectives of the current study were to establish an accurate Monte Carlo source model for simulation purposes, to dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and to determine dose differences between the source with and without the centering insert. Methods: Design information from dissected sources and vendor-supplied CAD drawings were used to devise the source model for radiation transport simulations of dose distributions in a water phantom. Collision kerma was estimated as a function of radial distance, r, and polar angle, θ, for determination of reference TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Simulations were run for 10{sup 10} histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.03% at r=1 cm and 0.08% at r=10 cm. Results: The dose rate distribution the transverse plane did not change beyond 2% between the 2006 model and the current study. While differences exceeding 15% were observed near the source distal tip, these diminished to within 2% for r>1.5 cm. Differences exceeding a factor of two were observed near θ=150° and in contact with the source, but diminished to within 20% at r=10 cm. Conclusions: Changes in source design influenced the overall dose rate and distribution by more than 2% over a third of the available solid angle external from the source. For clinical applications using balloons or applicators with tissue located within 5 cm from the source, dose differences exceeding 2% were observed only for θ>110°. This study carefully examined the current source geometry and presents a modern reference TG-43 dosimetry dataset for the model S700 source.

  15. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals.

  16. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  17. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, Sergei M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  18. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low...

  19. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low...

  20. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low...

  1. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low...

  2. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low...

  3. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  4. Measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on the Godiva IV fast burst assembly for application to neutron dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Hsu, H.H.; Paternoster, R.R.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1996-06-01

    In June, 1995, Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted the 23rd U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The participants tested their facilities accident dosimeters under a variety of neutrons fields produced by the Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) and the Godiva IV fast burst assembly. To provide useful information for the evaluation of the results, the neutron energy Spectrum was determined and the delivered absorbed dose to tissue. The measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on Godiva provides a unique problem in that the burst, which is nearly Gaussian in time, has a full width at half maximum of around 50 microseconds. The neutron spectrum was first determined at low-power while running at delayed critical using a standard set of Bonner spheres. At the same time, the response of a set of TLD dosimeters were measured. After that, measurements were conducted during a burst with another set of TLDs and with sulfur pellets.

  5. High energy electron beams characterization using CaSO4:Dy+PTFE phosphors for clinical therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Rivera, T; Espinoza, A; Von, S M; Alvarez, R; Jiménez, Y

    2012-07-01

    In the present work high energy electron beam dosimetry from linear accelerator (LINACs) for clinical applications using dysprosium doped calcium sulfate embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (CaSO4:Dy+PTFE) was studied. The irradiations were carried out using high electron beams (6 to 18 MeV) from a linear accelerator (LINAC) Varian, CLINAC 2300C/D, for clinical practice purpose. The electron irradiations were obtained using the water solid in order to guarantee electronic equilibrium conditions (EEC). Field shaping for electron beams was obtained with electron cones. Glow curve and other thermoluminescent characteristics of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE were conducted under high electrons beams irradiations. The TL response of the pellets showed an intensity peak centered at around 215 °C. TL response of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE as a function of high electron absorbed dose showed a linearity in a wide range. To obtain reproducibility characteristic, a set of pellets were exposed repeatedly for the same electron absorbed dose. The results obtained in this study can suggest the applicability of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE pellets for high electron beam dosimetry, provided fading is correctly accounted for. PMID:22182630

  6. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  7. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review.

    PubMed

    Fattibene, Paola; Callens, Freddy

    2010-11-01

    When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed.

  8. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  9. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-04-01

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision

  10. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2011-04-04

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision

  11. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  12. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  13. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  14. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  15. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  16. A STUDY ON THE UNCERTAINTY FOR THE ROUTINE DOSIMETRY SERVICE AT THE LEBANESE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION USING HARSHAW 8814 DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Rizk, C; Vanhavere, F

    2016-09-01

    The personal dosimetry service at the Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission uses Harshaw 8814 cards with LiF:Mg,Ti detectors. The dosemeters are read in a Harshaw 6600 TLD reader. In the process of accreditation for the ISO 17025 standard((1)), different influence factors are investigated and the uncertainty has been determined. The Individual Monitoring Service Laboratory-LAEC reads the dosemeters once it receives them from the customer, and new cards are immediately given for the next wearing period. The wearing period is 2 months. The dosemeter results are reported to the customers without background subtraction. Both Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) are reported. For this paper, only the uncertainty on Hp(10) will be focussed. The following factors are taken into account for the uncertainty: calibration factor, dosemeter homogeneity and repeatability, energy and angular dependence, non-linearity, temperature dependence, etc. Also the detection limit was determined. One of the important factors is the correction for fading. This fading correction depends on the procedure used such as storage temperatures, the time-temperature profile of the read-out, pre-heat and annealing conditions. Pre- and post-irradiation fading curves were measured for a storage period up to 182 d at room temperature (15-25°C). The resulting final combined standard uncertainty on the reported doses is of the order of 24 % for doses of ∼1 mSv. PMID:26443544

  17. Energy deposition evaluation for ultra-low energy electron beam irradiation systems using calibrated thin radiochromic film and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Matsui, S; Mori, Y; Nonaka, T; Hattori, T; Kasamatsu, Y; Haraguchi, D; Watanabe, Y; Uchiyama, K; Ishikawa, M

    2016-05-01

    For evaluation of on-site dosimetry and process design in industrial use of ultra-low energy electron beam (ULEB) processes, we evaluate the energy deposition using a thin radiochromic film and a Monte Carlo simulation. The response of film dosimeter was calibrated using a high energy electron beam with an acceleration voltage of 2 MV and alanine dosimeters with uncertainty of 11% at coverage factor 2. Using this response function, the results of absorbed dose measurements for ULEB were evaluated from 10 kGy to 100 kGy as a relative dose. The deviation between the responses of deposit energy on the films and Monte Carlo simulations was within 15%. As far as this limitation, relative dose estimation using thin film dosimeters with response function obtained by high energy electron irradiation and simulation results is effective for ULEB irradiation processes management. PMID:27250416

  18. Semiconductor diode characterization for total skin electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Madrid González, O A; Rivera Montalvo, T

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a semiconductor diode characterization was performed. The diode characterization was completed using an electron beam with 4 MeV of energy. The semiconductor diode calibration used irradiation with an electron beam in an ion chamber. "In vivo" dosimetry was also conducted. The dosimetry results revealed that the semiconductor diode was a good candidate for use in the total skin electron therapy (TSET) treatment control.

  19. Low-energy electron interactions with biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, Carl

    2012-06-01

    Low-energy electron interactions with biomolecules have been the focus of sustained attention over the past decade. The demonstration by Sanche and coworkers that even subexcitation and subionization electrons can induce strand breaks in DNA opened a new frontier in understanding radiation damage to living systems. Many studies of DNA subunits and their analogues, both experimental and theoretical, have elucidated likely mechanisms by which slow electrons attach to and disrupt DNA, although the full picture is far from clear and some elements of it remain controversial. Increasing attention is also being given to low-energy electron collisions with amino acids in order to explore possible mechanisms of electron-mediated radiation damage to proteins. In a completely different context, electron-biomolecule collisions are fundamental to spark ignition and cumbustion of biofuels such as methanol and ethanol. Not to be overlooked, either, is the simplest but most ubiquitous biomolecule of all, water, whose low-energy electron cross sections remain surprisingly ill-characterized. This talk will survery recent ab initio computational studies using the Schwinger multichannel method of DNA- and protein-related molecules, alcohols, and water. Much of the work to be presented was carried out in collaboration with experimentalists who undertook complementary measurements, allowing for useful comparisons to be made. Although the primary focus will be on electronically elastic collisions relevant to dissociative attachment and electron transport, electron-impact excitation cross sections for water will be presented and discussed.

  20. The potential of Ge-doped optical fibre TL dosimetry for 3D verification of high energy IMRT photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Noramaliza M.; Hussein, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-07-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a technique widely used in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer, the most commonly occurring male cancer in the United States and Western Europe. The technique has many attractive features, promising improved radiotherapy over that provided by conventional techniques, including enabling the tumour to be treated with a uniform high dose, capability for shaping the radiation beams to match the shape of the tumour and potentially improving patient outcome. However, there are a number of concerns involving high photon energy IMRT (>10 MV), including greater radiation leakage and the possibility of photo-neutron production. The aim of the present study is to investigate the potential of Ge-doped optical fibre thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry in determining typical out-of-field doses for high energy IMRT. Commercial Ge-doped optical fibres have been employed as the TL dosimeters, offering features such as high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness and small size. Extensive measurements have been made, examining reproducibility, sensitivity, energy response and linearity with dose. Screening for sensitivity to dose of the individual fibres and subsequent selection has led to an overall coefficient of variation (CV) of better than 4 %. Use has been made of an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO) for photon irradiation measurements delivered over the range of nominal energies 6-15 MV as typically used in IMRT treatment of prostate cancer. Comparison has been made with TLD-100 measurements, the latter being corrected at 15 MV for their response to thermal neutrons. The study has demonstrated the Ge-doped optical fibre TL dosimeters to offer good potential for use in IMRT radiotherapy when using 6 MV photons, also indicating a need to correct their response to neutrons when conducting 15 MV irradiations.

  1. Fast transit portal dosimetry using density-scaled layer modeling of aSi-based electronic portal imaging device and Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Cho, Young-Bin; Kim, Sun Mo; DiBiase, Steven

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Fast and accurate transit portal dosimetry was investigated by developing a density-scaled layer model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and applying it to a clinical environment. Methods: The model was developed for fast Monte Carlo dose calculation. The model was validated through comparison with measurements of dose on EPID using first open beams of varying field sizes under a 20-cm-thick flat phantom. After this basic validation, the model was further tested by applying it to transit dosimetry and dose reconstruction that employed our predetermined dose-response-based algorithm developed earlier. The application employed clinical intensity-modulated beams irradiated on a Rando phantom. The clinical beams were obtained through planning on pelvic regions of the Rando phantom simulating prostate and large pelvis intensity modulated radiation therapy. To enhance agreement between calculations and measurements of dose near penumbral regions, convolution conversion of acquired EPID images was alternatively used. In addition, thickness-dependent image-to-dose calibration factors were generated through measurements of image and calculations of dose in EPID through flat phantoms of various thicknesses. The factors were used to convert acquired images in EPID into dose. Results: For open beam measurements, the model showed agreement with measurements in dose difference better than 2% across open fields. For tests with a Rando phantom, the transit dosimetry measurements were compared with forwardly calculated doses in EPID showing gamma pass rates between 90.8% and 98.8% given 4.5 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) and 3% dose difference (DD) for all individual beams tried in this study. The reconstructed dose in the phantom was compared with forwardly calculated doses showing pass rates between 93.3% and 100% in isocentric perpendicular planes to the beam direction given 3 mm DTA and 3% DD for all beams. On isocentric axial planes, the pass rates varied

  2. A method to generate equivalent energy spectra and filtration models based on measurement for multidetector CT Monte Carlo dosimetry simulations.

    PubMed

    Turner, Adam C; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Chris H; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D; Stevens, Donna M; Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a method for generating x-ray source models for performing Monte Carlo (MC) radiation dosimetry simulations of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. These so-called "equivalent" source models consist of an energy spectrum and filtration description that are generated based wholly on the measured values and can be used in place of proprietary manufacturer's data for scanner-specific MDCT MC simulations. Required measurements include the half value layers (HVL1 and HVL2) and the bowtie profile (exposure values across the fan beam) for the MDCT scanner of interest. Using these measured values, a method was described (a) to numerically construct a spectrum with the calculated HVLs approximately equal to those measured (equivalent spectrum) and then (b) to determine a filtration scheme (equivalent filter) that attenuates the equivalent spectrum in a similar fashion as the actual filtration attenuates the actual x-ray beam, as measured by the bowtie profile measurements. Using this method, two types of equivalent source models were generated: One using a spectrum based on both HVL1 and HVL2 measurements and its corresponding filtration scheme and the second consisting of a spectrum based only on the measured HVL1 and its corresponding filtration scheme. Finally, a third type of source model was built based on the spectrum and filtration data provided by the scanner's manufacturer. MC simulations using each of these three source model types were evaluated by comparing the accuracy of multiple CT dose index (CTDI) simulations to measured CTDI values for 64-slice scanners from the four major MDCT manufacturers. Comprehensive evaluations were carried out for each scanner using each kVp and bowtie filter combination available. CTDI experiments were performed for both head (16 cm in diameter) and body (32 cm in diameter) CTDI phantoms using both central and peripheral measurement positions. Both equivalent source model types result in

  3. Applications in Energy, Optics and Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the applications of thin films in energy, optics and electronics. The use of thin-film technologies for heat mirrors, anti-reflection coatings, interference filters, solar cells, and metal contacts is included. (HM)

  4. Bone and mucosal dosimetry in skin radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study using kilovoltage photon and megavoltage electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, James C. L.; Jiang, Runqing

    2012-06-01

    This study examines variations of bone and mucosal doses with variable soft tissue and bone thicknesses, mimicking the oral or nasal cavity in skin radiation therapy. Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc-based codes) using the clinical kilovoltage (kVp) photon and megavoltage (MeV) electron beams, and the pencil-beam algorithm (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system) using the MeV electron beams were performed in dose calculations. Phase-space files for the 105 and 220 kVp beams (Gulmay D3225 x-ray machine), and the 4 and 6 MeV electron beams (Varian 21 EX linear accelerator) with a field size of 5 cm diameter were generated using the BEAMnrc code, and verified using measurements. Inhomogeneous phantoms containing uniform water, bone and air layers were irradiated by the kVp photon and MeV electron beams. Relative depth, bone and mucosal doses were calculated for the uniform water and bone layers which were varied in thickness in the ranges of 0.5-2 cm and 0.2-1 cm. A uniform water layer of bolus with thickness equal to the depth of maximum dose (dmax) of the electron beams (0.7 cm for 4 MeV and 1.5 cm for 6 MeV) was added on top of the phantom to ensure that the maximum dose was at the phantom surface. From our Monte Carlo results, the 4 and 6 MeV electron beams were found to produce insignificant bone and mucosal dose (<1%), when the uniform water layer at the phantom surface was thicker than 1.5 cm. When considering the 0.5 cm thin uniform water and bone layers, the 4 MeV electron beam deposited less bone and mucosal dose than the 6 MeV beam. Moreover, it was found that the 105 kVp beam produced more than twice the dose to bone than the 220 kVp beam when the uniform water thickness at the phantom surface was small (0.5 cm). However, the difference in bone dose enhancement between the 105 and 220 kVp beams became smaller when the thicknesses of the uniform water and bone layers in the phantom increased. Dose in the second bone layer interfacing with air was found to be

  5. Electron energy-distribution functions in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchford, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculation of the electron energy distribution functions in the regime of drift tube experiments is discussed. The discussion is limited to constant applied fields and values of E/N (ratio of electric field strength to neutral density) low enough that electron growth due to ionization can be neglected. (GHT)

  6. Atomic electron binding energies in fermium

    SciTech Connect

    Das, M.P.

    1981-02-01

    Calculations of the binding energies of electrons in fermium by using a relativistic local-density functional theory are reported. It is found that relaxation effects are nonnegligible for inner core orbitals. Calculated orbital binding energies are compared with those due to nonlocal Dirac-Fock calculations and also with those determined experimentally from conversion electron spectroscopy. Finally the usefulness of the local-density approximation for the study of heavy atomic and condensed systems is discussed.

  7. Stability of electron energy in the Fermilab electron cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Carlson, K.; Prost, L.R.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-02-01

    A powerful electron beam (4.3 MeV, 0.1 A DC) generated by an electrostatic accelerator has been used at Fermilab for three years to cool antiprotons in the Recycler ring. For electron cooling to be effective, the electron energy should not deviate from its optimum value by more than 500V. The main tool for studying the energy stability is the electron beam position in a high-dispersion area. The energy ripple (frequencies above 0.2 Hz) was found to be less than 150 eV rms; the main cause of the ripple is the fluctuations of the chain current. In addition, the energy can drift to up to several keV that is traced to two main sources. One of them is a drift of the charging current, and another is a temperature dependence of generating voltmeter readings. The paper describes the efforts to reach the required level of stability as well as the setup, diagnostics, results of measurements, and operational experience.

  8. Tokomak disruption runaway electron beam energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yian

    2012-10-01

    Disruption is one of the major concerns in magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) research. People believe the energetic runaway electron beam can damage the first wall by depositing most of its energy to certain region as heat, melting the wall. However, as the energy of the beam electron is very high (up to 50 MeV), most of the beam energy should be converted as gamma radiation and escape, and the fraction of thermal energy deposition is relatively small. We will calculate the runaway electron energy deposition in typical first wall configurations in ITER disruption scenario, and give the temperature profile of the wall. We will also calculate the bremsstrahlung gamma ray spectra of the beam and discuss the consequences.

  9. In vivo dosimetry with MOSFETs: Dosimetric characterization and first clinical results in intraoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Consorti, Rita . E-mail: consort@tin.it; Petrucci, Assunta; Fortunato, Falbo; Soriani, Antonella; Marzi, Simona; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Landoni, Valeria; Benassi, Marcello

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of metal oxide silicon field effect transistors (MOSFETs) as in vivo dosimetry detectors during electron beams at high dose-per-pulse intraoperative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The MOSFET system response in terms of reproducibility, energy, dose rate and temperature dependence, dose-linearity from 1 to 25 Gy, angular response, and dose perturbation was analyzed in the 6-9-MeV electron beam energy range produced by an intraoperative radiotherapy-dedicated mobile accelerator. We compared these with the 6- and 9-MeV electron beams produced by a conventional accelerator. MOSFETs were also used in clinical dosimetry. Results: In experimental conditions, the overall uncertainty of the MOSFET response was within 3.5% ({+-}SD). The investigated electron energies and the dose rate did not significantly influence the MOSFET calibration factors. The dose perturbation was negligible. In vivo dosimetry results were in accordance with the predicted values within {+-}5%. A discordance occurred either for an incorrect position of the dosimeter on the patient or when a great difference existed between the clinical and calibration setup, particularly when performing exit dose measurements. Conclusion: Metal oxide silicon field effect transistors are suitable for in vivo dosimetry during intraoperative radiotherapy because their overall uncertainty is comparable to the accuracy required in target dose delivery.

  10. Clinical implementation and rapid commissioning of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; van Herk, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    Using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to perform in-vivo dosimetry is one of the most effective and efficient methods of verifying the safe delivery of complex radiotherapy treatments. Previous work has detailed the development of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system that was subsequently used to replace pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Here we show that this system can be readily implemented on a commercial megavoltage imaging platform without modification to EPID hardware and without impacting standard imaging procedures. The accuracy and practicality of the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was confirmed through a comparison with traditional TLD in-vivo measurements performed on five prostate patients. The commissioning time required for the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was initially prohibitive at approximately 10 h per linac. Here we present a method of calculating linac specific EPID dosimetry correction factors that allow a single energy specific commissioning model to be applied to EPID data from multiple linacs. Using this method reduced the required per linac commissioning time to approximately 30 min. The validity of this commissioning method has been tested by analysing in-vivo dosimetry results of 1220 patients acquired on seven linacs over a period of 5 years. The average deviation between EPID based isocentre dose and expected isocentre dose for these patients was (-0.7  ±  3.2)%. EPID based in-vivo dosimetry is now the primary in-vivo dosimetry tool used at our centre and has replaced nearly all pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT treatments.

  11. SU-E-T-308: Systematic Characterization of the Energy Response of Different LiF TLD Crystals for Dosimetry Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, E; Caprile, P; Sanchez-Nieto, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The thermoluminiscense dosimeters (TLDs) are widely used in personal and clinical dosimetry due to its small size, good sensitivity and tissue equivalence, among other advantages. This study presents the characterization of Lithium Fluoride based TLDs, in terms of their absorbed dose response to successive irradiation cycles in a broad range of beam energies, measured under reference conditions. Methods: Four types of Harshaw TLD chips were used: TLD-100, TLD-600 TLD-700 and 100-H. They were irradiated with 10 photon beams of different energy spectrums, from 28 kVp to 18MV (in 30 consecutive cycles for 6 and 18 MV). Results: It was found that the response of the dosimetric system was stabilized (less than ±3%) after 10 cycles for TLD-600 and TLD-700. In the case of TLD-100 and TLD-100H this dependence was not observed. A decreased response to increasing beam energy in terms of absorbed dose to water was observed, as expected, except for TLD-100H which showed the opposite behavior. The less energy dependent detector was the TLD-100H exhibiting a maximum deviation of 12%. The highest variation observed was 33% for TLD-100. The study allowed the determination of calibration factors in absorbed dose for a wide range of energies and materials for different dosimetric applications, such as in-vivo dosimetry during imaging and radiotherapy. Conclusion: The study allowed the determination of calibration factors in absorbed dose for a wide range of energies and materials for different dosimetric applications, such as in-vivo dosimetry during imaging and radiotherapy.

  12. Electronic Devices and Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in electronic devices and systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  13. High energy electron positron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Soding, P.

    1987-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA in a year from now, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics will come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of a few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way more useful to any high energy physicist in particular to newcomers in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions. It includes the most relevant data, parametrizations, theoretical background, and a chapter on detectors. Contents: Foreword; Detectors for High Energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ Physics; Lepton Pair Production and Electroweak Parameters; Hadron Production, Strong and Electroweak Properties; tau Physics; Recent Results on the Charm Sector; Bottom Physics; Lifetime Measurements of tau, Charmed and Beauty Hadrons; UPSILON Spectroscopy; Hadronic Decays of the UPSILON; Quark and Gluon Fragmentation in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ Continuum; Jet Production and QCD; Two Photon Physics; Search for New Particles.

  14. High Energy Electron Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) balloon-borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons. The instrument was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN H2 bean-dine in September of 1999. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well.

  15. History of dose specification in Brachytherapy: From Threshold Erythema Dose to Computational Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2006-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of brachytherapy dosimetry from 1900 to the present. Dosimetric practices in brachytherapy fall into three distinct eras: During the era of biological dosimetry (1900-1938), radium pioneers could only specify Ra-226 and Rn-222 implants in terms of the mass of radium encapsulated within the implanted sources. Due to the high energy of its emitted gamma rays and the long range of its secondary electrons in air, free-air chambers could not be used to quantify the output of Ra-226 sources in terms of exposure. Biological dosimetry, most prominently the threshold erythema dose, gained currency as a means of intercomparing radium treatments with exposure-calibrated orthovoltage x-ray units. The classical dosimetry era (1940-1980) began with successful exposure standardization of Ra-226 sources by Bragg-Gray cavity chambers. Classical dose-computation algorithms, based upon 1-D buildup factor measurements and point-source superposition computational algorithms, were able to accommodate artificial radionuclides such as Co-60, Ir-192, and Cs-137. The quantitative dosimetry era (1980- ) arose in response to the increasing utilization of low energy K-capture radionuclides such as I-125 and Pd-103 for which classical approaches could not be expected to estimate accurate correct doses. This led to intensive development of both experimental (largely TLD-100 dosimetry) and Monte Carlo dosimetry techniques along with more accurate air-kerma strength standards. As a result of extensive benchmarking and intercomparison of these different methods, single-seed low-energy radionuclide dose distributions are now known with a total uncertainty of 3%-5%.

  16. Radon Dosimetry and Monitoring in Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineau, J. F.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * The Atmosphere in Underground Mines * Origin of the radioactivity of the atmosphere in underground mines * Main characteristics of the atmosphere of mines * Temperature * Relative humidity * Particle size distribution of the aerosols * Volume concentration of radon * Age of the ventilation air * Volume concentration of radon decay products * Volume concentration of long-lived aerosols (LLA) * Order of magnitude of the volume concentrations to be measured * Dosimetry: Application to Miners * Dosimetry of miners in France * Integrated dosimetry system * Measuring head * Unit for the detection and measurement of exposure to potential alpha energy * Treatment and reading of the detector films * Expression of the results * Other examples of operational dosimetry * Use of closed passive dosimeters for the dosimetry of miners * Monitoring of Physical Parameters of the Atmospheres * Qualification of non-uranium mines * Monitoring of the environment of mining sites * Optimisation of radiation protection using the dosimetric data * Concluding Remarks * References

  17. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  18. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  19. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations. Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.

  20. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations.more » Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.« less

  1. Photon dosimetry using plastic scintillators in pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Brandon W. Blackburn; James T. Johnson; Scott W. Watson

    2007-04-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to explore using a plastic scintillator as a dosimetry probe in the vicinity of a pulsed bremsstrahlung source in the range 4 to 20 MeV. Taking advantage of the tissue-equivalent properties of this detector in conjunction with the use of a fast digital signal processor near real-time dosimetry was shown to be possible. The importance of accounting for a broad energy electron beam in bremsstrahlung production, and photon scattering and build-up, in correctly interpreting dosimetry results at long stand-off distances is highlighted by comparing real world experiments with ideal geometry simulations. Close agreement was found between absorbed energy calculations based upon spectroscopic techniques and calculations based upon signal integration, showing a ratio between 10 MeV absorbed dose to 12 MeV absorbed dose of 0.66 at a distance of 91.4 m from the accelerator. This is compared with an idealized model simulation with a monoenergetic electron beam and without scattering, where the ratio was 0.46.

  2. EPR/PTFE dosimetry for test reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.; Quirk, T.J.

    2011-07-01

    The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with materials such as alanine is well established as a technique for measurement of ionizing radiation absorbed dose in photon and electron fields such as Co-60, high-energy bremsstrahlung and electron-beam fields [1]. In fact, EPR/Alanine dosimetry has become a routine transfer standard for national standards bodies such as NIST and NPL. In 1992 the Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) at Sandia National Laboratories implemented EPR/Alanine capabilities for use in routine and calibration activities at its Co-60 and pulsed-power facilities. At that time it also investigated the usefulness of the system for measurement of absorbed dose in the mixed neutron/photon environments of reactors such as the Sandia Pulsed Reactor and the Annular Core Research Reactor used for hardness testing of electronics. The RML concluded that the neutron response of alanine was a sufficiently high fraction of the overall dosimeter response that the resulting uncertainties in the photon dose would be unacceptably large for silicon-device testing. However, it also suggested that non-hydrogenous materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) would exhibit smaller neutron response and might be useful in mixed environments. Preliminary research with PTFE in photon environments indicated considerable promise, but further development was not pursued at that time. Because of renewed interest in absorbed dose measurements that could better define the individual contributions of photon and neutron components to the overall dose delivered to a test object, the RML has re-initiated the development of an EPR/PTFE dosimetry system. This effort consists of three stages: 1) Identification of PTFE materials that may be suitable for dosimetry applications. It was speculated that the inconsistency of EPR signatures in the earlier samples may have been due to variability in PTFE manufacturing processes. 2) Characterization of dosimetry in

  3. On Puthoff's Semiclassical Electron and Vacuum Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, N. R.

    2016-09-01

    A possible connection between a point electron and vacuum energy was recently claimed by Puthoff (Int. J. Theor. Phys. 46, 3005 (2007)). He envisions a point electron as an ideally conducting spherical shell with a distributed charge on the surface, in equilibrium with the radiation pressure from electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations on the outside, and claims that his analysis demonstrates the reality of high-energy-density vacuum fluctuation fields. The present paper finds, instead, that the analysis is meaningless without specific knowledge on the cutoff frequency that is a free parameter in the model.

  4. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  5. Low-energy electron-atom bremsstrahlung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper extends recent work providing an elementary calculation of bremsstrahlung and opacity associated with the scattering of low-energy electrons by neutral atoms and molecules. The method applies when the scattering potential is 'hard' or when the collision time is short, applying the classical soft-photon emission probability formula for arbitrary bremsstrahlung photon energy. However, now, in addition to correcting the probability factor for finite bremsstrahlung photon energy, another factor corrects for the reduced phase space available to the outgoing electron. The bremsstrahlung cross section and opacity are then computed directly from the elastic scattering cross section, determined experimentally or calculated; a small (approximately 10 percent) correction is computed from the anisotropic term in the elastic scattering cross section. The opacity is evaluated for electron scattering by H, He, and H2 using experimentally determined values for the elastic scattering cross section, and is compared with more elaborate calculations. The agreement is good (within 10 percent), indicating an accuracy for the general method comparable to variations among the results of different elaborate theoretical computations. The agreement seems to validate the basic approximation of short collision time even at large bremsstrahlung photon energy for electron energies and temperatures up to a few eV.

  6. Fluctuations in energy loss and their implications for dosimetry and radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Steigerwalt, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Serious consideration of the physics of energy deposition indicates that a fundamental change in the interpretation of absorbed dose is required at least for considerations of effects in biological systems. In addition, theoretical approaches to radiobiology and microdosimetry seem to require statistical considerations incorporating frequency distributions of the magnitude of the event sizes within the volume of interest.

  7. Production and dosimetry of simultaneous therapeutic photons and electrons beam by linear accelerator: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Khledi, Navid; Sardari, Dariush; Arbabi, Azim; Ameri, Ahmad; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2015-02-24

    Depending on the location and depth of tumor, the electron or photon beams might be used for treatment. Electron beam have some advantages over photon beam for treatment of shallow tumors to spare the normal tissues beyond of the tumor. In the other hand, the photon beam are used for deep targets treatment. Both of these beams have some limitations, for example the dependency of penumbra with depth, and the lack of lateral equilibrium for small electron beam fields. In first, we simulated the conventional head configuration of Varian 2300 for 16 MeV electron, and the results approved by benchmarking the Percent Depth Dose (PDD) and profile of the simulation and measurement. In the next step, a perforated Lead (Pb) sheet with 1mm thickness placed at the top of the applicator holder tray. This layer producing bremsstrahlung x-ray and a part of the electrons passing through the holes, in result, we have a simultaneous mixed electron and photon beam. For making the irradiation field uniform, a layer of steel placed after the Pb layer. The simulation was performed for 10×10, and 4×4 cm2 field size. This study was showed the advantages of mixing the electron and photon beam by reduction of pure electron's penumbra dependency with the depth, especially for small fields, also decreasing of dramatic changes of PDD curve with irradiation field size.

  8. ENERGY AND ANGULAR DEPENDENCE OF RADIOPHOTOLUMINESCENT GLASS DOSEMETERS FOR EYE LENS DOSIMETRY.

    PubMed

    Silva, E H; Knežević, Ž; Struelens, L; Covens, P; Ueno, S; Vanhavere, F; Buls, N

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that lens opacities can occur at lower radiation doses than previously accepted. In view of these studies, the International Commission of Radiological Protection recommended in 2011 to reduce the eye lens dose limit from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y. This implies in the need of monitoring doses received by the eye lenses. In this study, small rod radiophotoluminescent glass dosemeters (GD-300 series; AGC, Japan) were characterized in terms of their energy (ISO 4037 X-rays narrow spectrum series, S-Cs and S-Co) and angular dependence (0  up to 90 degrees, with 2 ISO energies: N-60 and S-Cs). All acquisitions were performed at SCK•CEN-Belgium, using the ORAMED proposed cylindrical phantom. For selected energies (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-120 and N-250), the response of dosemeters irradiated on the ISO water slab phantom, at the Ruđer Bošković Institute-Croatia, was compared to those irradiated on the cylindrical phantom. GD-300 series showed good energy dependence, relative to S-Cs, on the cylindrical phantom. From 0 up to 45 degrees, the dosemeters showed no significant angular dependence, regardless whether they were tested when placed vertically or horizontally on the cylindrical phantom. However, at higher angles, some angular dependence was observed, mainly when the dosemeters were irradiated with low-energy photons (N-60). Results showed that GD-300 series have good properties related to Hp(3), although some improvements may be necessary.

  9. Influence of trace elements in human tissue in low-energy photon brachytherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; van Gils, Francis; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the dosimetric impact of trace elements in human tissues for low-energy photon sources used in brachytherapy. Monte Carlo dose calculations were used to investigate the dosimetric effect of trace elements present in normal or cancerous human tissues. The effect of individual traces (atomic number Z = 11-30) was studied in soft tissue irradiated by low-energy brachytherapy sources. Three other tissue types (prostate, adipose and mammary gland) were also simulated with varying trace concentrations to quantify the contribution of each trace to the dose distribution. The dose differences between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues were calculated in single- and multi-source geometries. The presence of traces in a tissue produces a difference in the dose distribution that is dependent on Z and the concentration of the trace. Low-Z traces (Na) have a negligible effect (<0.3%) in all tissues, while higher Z (K) had a larger effect (>3%). There is a potentially significant difference in the dose distribution between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues (4%) and even larger if compared to the trace-free composition (15%) in both single- and multi-sourced geometries. Trace elements have a non-negligible (up to 8% in prostate D90) effect on the dose in tissues irradiated with low-energy photon sources. This study underlines the need for further investigation into accurate determination of the trace composition of tissues associated with low-energy brachytherapy. Alternatively, trace elements could be incorporated as a source of uncertainty in dose calculations. This work was part of an invited presentation at the ‘International Workshop on Recent Advances in Monte Carlo Techniques for Radiation Therapy’, held in Montreal, June 8-10, 2011.

  10. DOSEXPRT: A bioassay dosimetry code for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1992-04-01

    The bioassay code DOSEXPRT was developed for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to provide compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480, Chapter 11. DOSEXPRT computes the intake of a radionuclide in any year (considering both acute and chronic intakes) from in vivo measurements of the retained activity and/or measurements of the activity in excreta. The committed effective and organ doses for the intake are computed as well as the effective and organ doses expected to be received in each calendar year out to 50 years beyond the year of intake. The bioassay records used as input for DOSEXPRT are extracted from the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Occupational Health Information System (OHIS). DOSEXPRT implements a set of algorithms with parameters governing the translocation, retention, and excretion of the nuclide contained in data files specific to the nuclide. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent for the intakes in the year. Annual organ and effective doses are computed using additional dose-rate files that contain data on the dose rate at various times following a unit intake. If measurements are presented for more than one assay for a given nuclide, DOSEXPRT estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. DOSEXPRT is accessed off the OHIS MENU No. 4 and designed to be run as a batch processor, but can also be run interactively for testing purposes.

  11. DOSEXPRT: A bioassay dosimetry code for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1992-04-01

    The bioassay code DOSEXPRT was developed for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to provide compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480, Chapter 11. DOSEXPRT computes the intake of a radionuclide in any year (considering both acute and chronic intakes) from in vivo measurements of the retained activity and/or measurements of the activity in excreta. The committed effective and organ doses for the intake are computed as well as the effective and organ doses expected to be received in each calendar year out to 50 years beyond the year of intake. The bioassay records used as input for DOSEXPRT are extracted from the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Occupational Health Information System (OHIS). DOSEXPRT implements a set of algorithms with parameters governing the translocation, retention, and excretion of the nuclide contained in data files specific to the nuclide. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent for the intakes in the year. Annual organ and effective doses are computed using additional dose-rate files that contain data on the dose rate at various times following a unit intake. If measurements are presented for more than one assay for a given nuclide, DOSEXPRT estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. DOSEXPRT is accessed off the OHIS MENU No. 4 and designed to be run as a batch processor, but can also be run interactively for testing purposes.

  12. Methods and computer readable medium for improved radiotherapy dosimetry planning

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Frandsen, Michael W.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Nigg, David W.

    2005-11-15

    Methods and computer readable media are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume irradiated during radiation therapy with a radiation source concentrated internally within a patient or incident from an external beam. The dosimetry plan is available in near "real-time" because of the novel geometric model construction of the treatment volume which in turn allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks therethrough. The particles are exemplary representations of alpha, beta or gamma emissions emanating from an internal radiation source during various radiotherapies, such as brachytherapy or targeted radionuclide therapy, or they are exemplary representations of high-energy photons, electrons, protons or other ionizing particles incident on the treatment volume from an external source. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image of a treatment volume irradiated during radiotherapy having a plurality of pixels of information is obtained.

  13. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  14. Electron energy flux in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Sugiura, M.

    1971-01-01

    Description of studies of electrons between 10 eV and 9.9 keV in the solar wind. The transport of energy in the rest frame of the plasma is evaluated and shown to be parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The presence of electrons from solar events causes this energy-flux density to exceed the heat flow due to thermal electrons. In one such event, the observations are shown to be consistent with the solar-electron observations made at higher energies. When observations are made at a point connected to the earth's bow shock by an interplanetary-field line, a comparatively large energy flux along the field toward the sun is observed, but the heat flow remains outwardly directed during this time interval. In either situation the heat flow is found to be consistent with measurements made on Vela satellites by a different method. These values, less than .01 ergs/sq cm/sec, are sufficiently low to require modifications to the Spitzer-Harm conductivity formula for use in solar-wind theories.

  15. Dosimetry for Neutrons from 0.25 to 15 MeV by the Measurement of Linear Energy Transfer Distributions for Secondary Charged Particles in CR-39 Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawara, Hiroko; Eda, Kazuyoshi; Sanami, Toshiya; Sasaki, Shinichi; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Sonkawade, Rajendra; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Kitajo, Keiichi; Kumagai, Hidenori; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2008-03-01

    In the radiation fields of high energy accelerator facilities, high-altitude aircraft and space flights, high-energy neutron dosimetry of ˜20 MeV or more is a significant issue for radiological protection. We studied the feasibility of experimental measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for secondary charged particles induced by fast neutrons using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. In order to investigate a method of analyzing the CR-39 detectors that is appropriate for fast neutron dosimetry, two-layer CR-39 stacks were exposed to monochromatic neutrons (0.25, 0.55, 5, and 15 MeV) at the Fast Neutron Laboratory of Tohoku University in Japan. We also conducted Monte Carlo calculations to estimate the detection efficiency of the CR-39 detector for recoil protons. The CR-39 detectors treated by single-step chemical etching were used to obtain LET distributions for LET > 10 keV/µm-water. The results indicated that measurements of short-range particles are very important for obtaining the correct LET distributions. Using the measured LET distributions, we calculated neutron sensitivities, absorbed doses and dose equivalents based on the ICRP 60 Q-L relation and averaged quality factors. The dose equivalents were compared with the neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors given by ICRP 74 and the averaged quality factors were compared with weighting factors given by ICRP 60 and ICRP 92.

  16. EBT2 dosimetry of x-rays produced by the electron beam from a Plasma Focus for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccolini, E.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M.; Rocchi, F.; Tartari, A.; Mariotti, F.

    2012-09-01

    The electron beam emitted from the back of Plasma Focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for intraoperative radiation therapy applications. A Plasma Focus device is being developed to this aim, to be utilized as an x-ray source. The electron beam is driven to impinge on 50 {mu}m brass foil, where conversion x-rays are generated. Measurements with gafchromic film are performed to analyse the attenuation of the x-rays beam and to predict the dose given to the culture cell in radiobiological experiments to follow.

  17. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. C. A.; Silva, D. G. M.; Bettega, M. H. F.; da Costa, R. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand and optimize processes occurring during the ignition of plasma and its consequences in post-discharge for an internal combustion engine, especially considering the spark plug, we have produced in this work some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules in the energy range from 60 to 500 eV are reported, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Aditionally to that, measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also discussed, for impact energies of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV and for scattering angles of 5°-130°. The measurements were obtained using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons.

  18. Cross sections required for FMIT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.; Lippincott, E.P.; Mann, F.M.; Oberg, D.L.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1980-05-02

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility, currently under construction, is designed to produce a high flux of high energy neutrons for irradiation effects experiments on fusion reactor materials. Characterization of the flux-fluence-spectrum in this rapidly varying neutron field requires adaptation and extension of currently available dosimetry techniques. This characterization will be carried out by a combination of active, passive, and calculational dosimetry. The goal is to provide the experimenter with accurate neutron flux-fluence-spectra at all positions in the test cell. Plans have been completed for a number of experimental dosimetry stations and provision for these facilities has been incorporated into the FMIT design. Overall needs of the FMIT irradiation damage program delineate goal accuracies for dosimetry that, in turn, create new requirements for high energy neutron cross section data. Recommendations based on these needs have been derived for required cross section data and accuracies.

  19. High Energy Electron Detectors on Sphinx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. R.; Porte, A.; Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Auriel, G.; Coleman, P. L.; Bayol, F.; Lalle, B.; Krishnan, M.; Wilson, K.

    2008-11-01

    Z-pinch plasma radiation sources are used to dose test objects with K-shell (˜1-4keV) x-rays. The implosion physics can produce high energy electrons (> 50keV), which could distort interpretation of the soft x-ray effects. We describe the design and implementation of a diagnostic suite to characterize the electron environment of Al wire and Ar gas puff z-pinches on Sphinx. The design used ITS calculations to model detector response to both soft x-rays and electrons and help set upper bounds to the spurious electron flux. Strategies to discriminate between the known soft x-ray emission and the suspected electron flux will be discussed. H.Calamy et al, ``Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion,'' Phys Plasmas 15, 012701 (2008) J.A.Halbleib et al, ``ITS: the integrated TIGER series of electron/photon transport codes-Version 3.0,'' IEEE Trans on Nuclear Sci, 39, 1025 (1992)

  20. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.

    2012-06-01

    We report an investigation of processes that occur during the ignition of the plasma and its consequences in post-discharge time for an internal combustion engine, in order to find the appropriate parameters to be used in cars that operate with lean mixtures air-fuel. The relevance of this theme has attracted much attention, and has been one of the subjects of collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. We have produced some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules were obtained, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also obtained, for scattering angles of 5 --130 . The measurements were taken using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons. Additionally to these, computer simulation studies of electronic discharge in mixtures of ethanol were performed, using a Zero-Dimensional Plasma Kinetic solver. Previous reported models for combustion of ethanol and cross sections data for momentum transfer of electron collisions with ethanol were used. The time evolutions of the main species densities are reported and the ignition time delay discussed.

  1. A survey of physical dosimetry to date and in the near future: Part 1. Review of standards and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Cassata, James R

    2002-02-01

    This article summarizes the status of the relevant standards and current regulatory issues for use of physical dosimetry devices for the occupational worker in the United States. Included is a summary of relevant standards from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission NUREG-Series, the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP), the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP), and the U.S. Military Specifications and Standards (MIL-STD). Proposed changes to ANSI N13.11-1993, "American National Standard for Dosimetry-Personnel Dosimetry Performance Criteria for Testing," are listed. The strategic changes that the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is making in rulemaking activities related to dosimetry and standards are given. The status of Measurement Program Description (MPD) C.18, "Implementation of Electronic Dosimetry for Primary Dosimetry," from the Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (CIRMS) is given. PMID:11873507

  2. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  3. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  4. Prediction of electron energies in metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Aron; Butler, Keith T

    2014-02-18

    The ability to predict energy levels in metal oxides is paramount to developinguseful materials, such as in the development of water photolysis catalysts and efficient photovoltaic cells. The binding energy of electrons in materials encompasses a wealth of information concerning their physicochemistry. The energies control the optical and electrical properties, dictating for which kinds of chemistry and physics a particular material is useful. Scientists have developed theories and models for electron energies in a variety of chemical systems over the past century. However, the prediction of quantitative energy levels in new materials remains a major challenge. This issue is of particular importance in metal oxide research, where novel chemistries have opened the possibility of a wide range of tailored systems with applications in important fields including light-emitting diodes, energy efficient glasses, and solar cells. In this Account, we discuss the application of atomistic modeling techniques, covering the spectrum from classical to quantum descriptions, to explore the alignment of electron energies between materials. We present a number of paradigmatic examples, including a series of oxides (ZnO, In2O3, and Cu2O). Such calculations allow the determination of a "band alignment diagram" between different materials and can facilitate the prediction of the optimal chemical composition of an oxide for use in a given application. Throughout this Account, we consider direct computational solutions in the context of heuristic models, which are used to relate the fundamental theory to experimental observations. We review a number of techniques that have been commonly applied in the study of electron energies in solids. These models have arisen from different answers to the same basic question, coming from solid-state chemistry and physics perspectives. We highlight common factors, as well as providing a critical appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of each

  5. Collisions between low-energy electrons and small polyatomic targets of biological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, cross section measurements and calculations for DNA prototype molecules have received significant attention from the collisions community, due to the potential applications of this data in modelling electron transport through biological matter with a view to improving radiation dosimetry. Such data are additionally interesting from a fundamental aspect, as small carbon-based molecules are ideal targets for considering effects including target conformation, long-range dynamical interactions and coupling effects between the various degrees of freedom on the scattering properties of the target. At the California State University Fullerton, we have made a series of measurements of the elastic, vibrationally inelastic and electronically inelastic cross sections for a variety of small polyatomic targets, including water and the basic alcohols, ethylene, toluene and several fluorinated alkanes. These processes are important in a range of applications, primarily for modelling electron transport and thermalization, and energy deposition to a biological media. The data were obtained using a high resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer, operating in a crossed beam configuration with a moveable aperture gas source. The gas source design facilitates both an expedient and highly accurate method of removing background signal, and removes uncertainties from the data due to uncertainties in the beam profile. We have also performed scattering calculations employing the Schwinger Multichannel method, in collaboration with the California institute of technology, to compare with our measurements. In this talk, I will present an overview of our recent data and future research plans.

  6. Effect of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution of point sources of low-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Kwok, C S; Bialobzyski, P J; Yu, S K; Prestwich, W V

    1990-01-01

    Perturbation in dose distributions of point sources of low-energy electrons at planar interfaces of cortical bone (CB) and red marrow (RM) was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo codes EGS and the TIGER series. Ultrathin LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the dose distributions of point sources of 204Tl and 147Pm in RM. When the point sources were at 12 mg/cm2 from a planar interface of CB and RM equivalent plastics, dose enhancement ratios in RM averaged over the region 0-12 mg/cm2 from the interface were measured to be 1.08 +/- 0.03 (SE) and 1.03 +/- 0.03 (SE) for 204Tl and 147Pm, respectively. The Monte Carlo codes predicted 1.05 +/- 0.02 and 1.01 +/- 0.02 for the two nuclides, respectively. However, EGS gave consistently 3% higher dose in the dose scoring region than the TIGER series when point sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 0.75 MeV energy were considered in the homogeneous RM situation or in the CB and RM heterogeneous situation. By means of the TIGER series, it was demonstrated that aluminum, which is normally assumed to be equivalent to CB in radiation dosimetry, leads to an overestimation of backscattering of low-energy electrons in soft tissue at a CB-soft-tissue interface by as much as a factor of 2.

  7. Low-energy electron scattering from cyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Guo, Shuangcheng; Meng, Ju; Huang, Xiaotian; Wang, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    The low-energy electron collisions with cyanamide molecule are investigated by using the UK molecular R -matrix codes for electron energies ranging from 0.01 eV to 10 eV. Three models including static-exchange, static-exchange plus polarization, and close-coupling (CC) approximations are employed to reveal the dynamic interaction. Elastic (integrated and differential), momentum-transfer, and excitation cross sections from the ground state to the three low-lying electron excited states have been presented. Two shape resonances, two core-excited resonances, and two Feshbach resonances are detected in the CC approximation. The role of active space in the target and scattering problem including the resonances is discussed. The precise resonance parameters are found to be sensitive to the treatment of polarization effects employed. These resonances may be responsible for the fragments observed in a recent experiment of the dissociative electron attachments to cyanamide. Since the cyanamide molecule has a large permanent dipole moment, a Born closure procedure is used to account for the contribution of partial waves higher than l =4 to obtain converged cross sections.

  8. Energy Transformation in Molecular Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kasha, Michael

    1999-05-17

    This laboratory has developed many new ideas and methods in the electronic spectroscopy of molecules. This report covers the contract period 1993-1995. A number of the projects were completed in 1996, and those papers are included in the report. The DOE contract was terminated at the end of 1995 owing to a reorganizational change eliminating nationally the projects under the Office of Health and Environmental Research, U. S. Department of Energy.

  9. Characterization of calibration curves and energy dependence GafChromic{sup TM} XR-QA2 model based radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomic, Nada Quintero, Chrystian; Aldelaijan, Saad; Bekerat, Hamed; Liang, LiHeng; DeBlois, François; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R.; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the energy response of XR-QA2 GafChromic{sup TM} film over a broad energy range used in diagnostic radiology examinations. The authors also made an assessment of the most suitable functions for both reference and relative dose measurements. Methods: Pieces of XR-QA2 film were irradiated to nine different values of air kerma in air, following reference calibration of a number of beam qualities ranging in HVLs from 0.16 to 8.25 mm Al, which corresponds to effective energy range from 12.7 keV to 56.3 keV. For each beam quality, the authors tested three functional forms (rational, linear exponential, and power) to assess the most suitable function by fitting the delivered air kerma in air as a function of film response in terms of reflectance change. The authors also introduced and tested a new parameterχ = netΔR·e{sup m} {sup netΔR} that linearizes the inherently nonlinear response of the film. Results: The authors have found that in the energy range investigated, the response of the XR-QA2 based radiochromic film dosimetry system ranges from 0.222 to 0.420 in terms of netΔR at K{sub air}{sup air} = 8 cGy. For beam qualities commonly used in CT scanners (4.03–8.25 mm Al), the variation in film response (netΔR at K{sub air}{sup air} = 8 cGy) amounts to ± 5%, while variation in K{sub air}{sup air} amounts to ± 14%. Conclusions: Results of our investigation revealed that the use of XR-QA2 GafChromic{sup TM} film is accompanied by a rather pronounced energy dependent response for beam qualities used for x-ray based diagnostic imaging purposes. The authors also found that the most appropriate function for the reference radiochromic film dosimetry would be the power function, while for the relative dosimetry one may use the exponential response function that can be easily linearized.

  10. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Evans, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  11. Application of a new dosimetry formalism to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Karen E.; Bedford, James L.

    2009-12-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) offers a challenge to classical dosimetry protocols as the beams are dynamic in orientation and aperture shape and may include small apertures. The aim of this paper is to apply a formalism to VMAT beams that has recently been published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) working party to improve the dosimetry for small and non-standard fields. We investigated three possible fields and assessed their suitability as plan class specific reference (pcsr) fields. The factors in the new dosimetry formalism were investigated: the conversion of dose to water from the conventional reference field to the pcsr and then from the pcsr to a treatment plan, using a PTW semiflex chamber, two Farmer chambers and an electron diode. Finally, the dose was compared for Alanine, the new formalism and calculated using Pinnacle3 (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) for two typical clinical VMAT beams. Correction factors between the reference field and the pcsr determined with Alanine range from 0.1% to 2.3% for the three pcsr fields. Dose to water measured using the calibrated ionization chambers is less than 2% different to the dose calculated by Pinnacle3. VMAT planning and delivery procedures have been successfully implemented and a new dosimetry protocol has been investigated for this new technique. Calibration factors for pcsr fields are found to be up to 2.3% different when using the new formalism, compared to using a standard dosimetry protocol. Using the calibration factors determined in the pcsr fields, the ionization chambers and electron diode agree to within 1% with Alanine dosimetry for two clinical VMAT plans. Good agreements between calculations and measurements are found for these two plans when the new formalism is used.

  12. Electronic energy transfer: Localized operator partitioning of electronic energy in composite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yaser; Brumer, Paul

    2012-11-01

    A Hamiltonian based approach using spatially localized projection operators is introduced to give precise meaning to the chemically intuitive idea of the electronic energy on a quantum subsystem. This definition facilitates the study of electronic energy transfer in arbitrarily coupled quantum systems. In particular, the decomposition scheme can be applied to molecular components that are strongly interacting (with significant orbital overlap) as well as to isolated fragments. The result defines a consistent electronic energy at all internuclear distances, including the case of separated fragments, and reduces to the well-known Förster and Dexter results in their respective limits. Numerical calculations of coherent energy and charge transfer dynamics in simple model systems are presented and the effect of collisionally induced decoherence is examined.

  13. Electron energy distribution in a dusty plasma: analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, I B; Kersten, H; Azarenkov, N A

    2015-09-01

    Analytical expressions describing the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a dusty plasma are obtained from the homogeneous Boltzmann equation for electrons. The expressions are derived neglecting electron-electron collisions, as well as transformation of high-energy electrons into low-energy electrons at inelastic electron-atom collisions. At large electron energies, the quasiclassical approach for calculation of the EEDF is applied. For the moderate energies, we account for inelastic electron-atom collisions in the dust-free case and both inelastic electron-atom and electron-dust collisions in the dusty plasma case. Using these analytical expressions and the balance equation for dust charging, the electron energy distribution function, the effective electron temperature, the dust charge, and the dust surface potential are obtained for different dust radii and densities, as well as for different electron densities and radio-frequency (rf) field amplitudes and frequencies. The dusty plasma parameters are compared with those calculated numerically by a finite-difference method taking into account electron-electron collisions and the transformation of high-energy electrons at inelastic electron-neutral collisions. It is shown that the analytical expressions can be used for calculation of the EEDF and dusty plasma parameters at typical experimental conditions, in particular, in the positive column of a direct-current glow discharge and in the case of an rf plasma maintained by an electric field with frequency f=13.56MHz.

  14. MO-D-BRD-02: In Memoriam of Bengt Bjarngard: SBRT II: Small Field Dosimetry - TG155

    SciTech Connect

    Das, I; Reft, C

    2014-06-15

    Specialized radiation treatment such as SRS/SRT. SBRT, IMRT, VMAT, Tomotherapy, CyberKnife and Gamma Knife use small fields or combination of small fields where dosimetry is challenging and uncertain due to non-equilibrium conditions such as longitudinal and lateral disequilibrium. Additionally the primary photon fluence is greatly affected by the obstruction of the source size by the jaws creating a large dose gradient across the field. Electronic equilibrium is a phenomenon associated with the range of secondary particles which depend on the beam energy, photon spectrum and the composition of the medium. Additionally, the finite size of detectors creates volume averaging and fluence perturbations especially in small fields. The IAEA/AAPM has provided a frame work for non-compliant reference dosimetry in small fields1. The AAPM TG-1552 has adopted this frame work to provide guidelines in relative dosimetry. This course provides the insight of TG-155 that defines small field, provides recommendations for suitable detectors and associated correction factors to convert reading to dose. Recommendations of a good working practice for relative dosimetry measurements (PDD, TMR, output factor, etc.) and dose calculations based on the new formulation is are elaborated. It also discusses beam modeling and dose calculations as a critical step in clinical utilization of small field radiotherapy. Small errors in beam data, approximations in dose algorithms, or misaligned of detectors and field settings can propagate into large errors in planned and delivered dose. The modeling and treatment planning aspects of small field dosimetry are reviewed with emphasis on the most critical parts for ensuring accurate and safe radiation therapy. Discussion on k(fmsr, fclin) for commercially available detectors are also provided.1 P. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjall, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich and S. Vatnitsky, “A new

  15. SU-E-T-335: Transit Dosimetry for Verification of Dose Delivery Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, T; Chung, E; Lee, S; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gamma index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.

  16. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Pecharroman-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; Herk, Marcel J.; Mijnheer, Ben van

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D {gamma} evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D {gamma} evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by

  17. The energy dependence and dose response of a commercial optically stimulated luminescent detector for kilovoltage photon, megavoltage photon, and electron, proton, and carbon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reft, Chester S.

    2009-05-15

    Optically stimulated luminescent detectors, which are widely used in radiation protection, offer a number of potential advantages for application in radiation therapy dosimetry. Their introduction into this field has been somewhat hampered by the lack of information on their radiation response in megavoltage beams. Here the response of a commercially available optically stimulated luminescent detector (OSLD) is determined as a function of energy, absorbed dose to water, and linear energy transfer (LET). The detector response was measured as a function of energy for absorbed doses from 0.5 to 4.0 Gy over the following ranges: 125 kVp to18 MV for photons, 6-20 MeV for electrons, 50-250 MeV for protons, and 290 MeV/u for the carbon ions. For the low LET beams, the response of the detector was linear up to 2 Gy with supralinearity occurring at higher absorbed doses. For the kilovoltage photons, the detector response relative to 6 MV increased with decreasing energy due to the higher atomic number of aluminum oxide (11.2) relative to water (7.4). For the megavoltage photons and electrons, the response was independent of energy. The response for protons was also independent of energy, but it was about 6% higher than its response to 6 MV photons. For the carbon ions, the dose response was linear for a given LET from 0.5 to 4.0 Gy, and no supralinearity was observed. However, it did exhibit LET dependence on the response relative to 6 MV photons decreasing from 1.02 at 1.3 keV/{mu}m to 0.41 at 78 keV/{mu}m. These results provide additional information on the dosimetric properties for this particular OSL detector and also demonstrate the potential for their use in photon, electron, and proton radiotherapy dosimetry with a more limited use in high LET radiotherapy dosimetry.

  18. High-energy radiation belt electrons from CRAND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2015-04-01

    A calculation of the inner radiation belt electron source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND) is described. High-energy electrons are included by Lorentz-transforming the β decay spectrum from the neutron rest frame to the Earth's rest frame and combining with the known high-energy albedo neutron energy spectrum. Balancing the electron source with energy loss to atmospheric neutral atoms and plasma, and with a decay lifetime representative of plasma wave scattering, then provides an estimate of trapped electron intensity. It is well below measured values for low energies, confirming that CRAND is not a significant source of those trapped electrons. For kinetic energies above the maximum β decay energy (E > 0.8 MeV) a power law energy spectrum ˜E-4 is predicted. For L = 1.5 and E ≳ 2 MeV the computed omnidirectional trapped electron intensity exceeds an extrapolation of the measured low-energy exponential energy spectrum.

  19. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  20. Photon and electron collimator effects on electron output and abutting segments in energy modulated electron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Olofsson, Lennart; Karlsson, Magnus G.; Karlsson, Mikael

    2005-10-15

    In energy modulated electron therapy a large fraction of the segments will be arranged as abutting segments where inhomogeneities in segment matching regions must be kept as small as possible. Furthermore, the output variation between different segments should be minimized and must in all cases be well predicted. For electron therapy with add-on collimators, both the electron MLC (eMLC) and the photon MLC (xMLC) contribute to these effects when an xMLC tracking technique is utilized to reduce the x-ray induced leakage. Two add-on electron collimator geometries have been analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations: One isocentric eMLC geometry with an isocentric clearance of 35 cm and air or helium in the treatment head, and one conventional proximity geometry with a clearance of 5 cm and air in the treatment head. The electron fluence output for 22.5 MeV electrons is not significantly affected by the xMLC if the shielding margins are larger than 2-3 cm. For small field sizes and 9.6 MeV electrons, the isocentric design with helium in the treatment head or shielding margins larger than 3 cm is needed to avoid a reduced electron output. Dose inhomogeneity in the matching region of electron segments is, in general, small when collimator positions are adjusted to account for divergence in the field. The effect of xMLC tracking on the electron output can be made negligible while still obtaining a substantially reduced x-ray leakage contribution. Collimator scattering effects do not interfere significantly when abutting beam techniques are properly applied.

  1. An EGSnrc investigation of correction factors for ion chamber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Lesley A.

    Radiation dosimetry is used to quantify the dose delivered during radiation therapy by using ionization chambers with several correction factors. Knowledge of these factors is needed at well below the 1% level in order to maintain the overall uncertainty on the reference dosimetry near 1-2%. The small magnitude of the corrections renders measurements very difficult. Monte Carlo calculations are widely used for this purpose, however they require very low statistical uncertainties. A new user-code, CSnrc, for the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system is described. CSnrc uses a correlated sampling variance reduction technique to reduce the uncertainty for dose ratio calculations. Compared to an existing EGSnrc user-code from which it was developed, CSnrc shows gains in efficiency of up to a factor of 64 and achieves much lower statistical uncertainties on correction factors than previously published. CSnrc is used to compute the central electrode correction factor, Pcel, in a broader range of beams than previously used and at the depths relevant to modern protocols. For photon beams, the CSnrc values compare well with the values used in dosimetry protocols whereas for electron beams, CSnrc shows up to a 0.2% correction for a graphite electrode, a correction currently ignored by dosimetry protocols. The difference from currently used values is slightly less for an aluminum electrode. CSnrc is also used to compute the wall correction factor, P wall. For cylindrical chambers in photon beams, the CSnrc calculations are compared to the currently used Almond-Svensson formalism and differ from this formalism by as much as 0.8%. The CSnrc values are used to explain some previously published experiments showing problems with Pwall . For electron beams, where dosimetry protocols assume a Pwall of unity, CSnrc calculations show a correction as large as 0.6%. For parallel-plate chambers, there is little information available regarding Pwall in photon beams. CSnrc shows corrections of over 2

  2. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  3. High energy electron beams for ceramic joining

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Helmich, D.R.; Loehman, R.E.; Clifford, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Joining of structural ceramics is possible using high melting point metals such as Mo and Pt that are heated with a high energy electron beam, with the potential for high temperature joining. A 10 MeV electron beam can penetrate through 1 cm of ceramic, offering the possibility of buried interface joining. Because of transient heating and the lower heat capacity of the metal relative to the ceramic, a pulsed high power beam has the potential for melting the metal without decomposing or melting the ceramic. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the process with a series of 10 MeV, 1 kW electron beam experiments. Shear strengths up to 28 MPa have been measured. This strength is comparable to that reported in the literature for bonding silicon nitride to molybdenum with copper-silver-titanium braze, but weaker than that reported for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with gold-nickel braze. The bonding mechanism appears to be a thin silicide layer.

  4. Laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Justus, B.L.; Huston, A.L.

    1996-06-01

    We report a novel laser-heated thermoluminescence dosimeter that is radically different from previous laser-heated dosimeters. The dosimeter is a semiconductor and metal ion doped silica glass that has excellent optical transparency. The high optical quality of the glass essentially eliminates laser power loss due to light scattering. This efficient utilization of the laser power permits operation of the dosimeter without strong absorption of the laser, as is required in traditional laser-heated dosimetry. Our laser-heated dosimeter does not rely on the diffusion of heat from a separate, highly absorbing substrate, but operates via intimate, localized heating within the glass dosimeter due to the absorption of the laser light by rare earth ion dopants in the glass. Following absorption of the laser light, the rare earth ions transfer energy to the surrounding glass via nonradiative relaxation processes, resulting in rapid, localized temperature increases sufficient to release all the filled traps near the ions. As the heat diffuses radially away from the rare earth ions the temperature plummets dramatically on a manometer distance scale and the release of additional filled traps subsides. A key distinguishing feature of this laser-heated dosimeter is the ability to read the dose information more than once. While laser-heating provides complete information about the radiation exposure experienced by the glass due to the release of locally heated traps, the process leaves the remaining filled bulk traps undisturbed. The bulk traps can be read using traditional bulk heating methods and can provide a direct determination of an accumulated dose, measured following any number of laser-heated readouts. Laser-heated dosimetry measurements have been performed using a solid state diode laser for the readout following radiation exposure with a {sup 60}Co source.

  5. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Lima, M. A. P.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2013-05-01

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π* anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ* shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π* resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004), 10.1021/jp048759a]. The existence of the σ* shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998), 10.1088/0953-4075/31/11/004] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π* molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  6. International Reactor Dosimetry Data.

    1982-06-28

    Version 00 IRDF-82 contains 620 neutron group cross sections (SAND-II format) based on the ENDF/B-V Special Purpose Dosimetry File as well as other reaction cross sections important for dosimetry applications. In addition, multigroup spectra for ten reference benchmarks are also provided.

  7. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Arne

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both by international organizations (IAEA) and national laboratories have helped to improve the reliability of dose measurements. Several dosimeter systems like calorimetry, perspex, and radiochromic dye films are being improved and new systems have emerged, e.g. spectrophotometry of dichromate solution for reference and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading to traceable and reliable dosimetry are discussed.

  8. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  9. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, R. D.; McDevitt, M.; Ma, D.; Jurcic, J.; Scheinberg, D.; Larson, S.; Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-10

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7 h, {beta}{sup +}=33%) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  10. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R. D.; McDevitt, M.; Ma, D.; Jurcic, J.; Scheinberg, D.; Larson, S.; Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T1/2=14.7 h, β+=33%) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  11. From ``micro`` to ``macro`` internal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    Radiation dose is the amount of radiation energy deposited per unit mass of absorbing tissue. Internal dosimetry applies to assessments of dose to internal organs from penetrating radiation sources outside the body and from radionuclides taken into the body. Dosimetry is essential for correlating energy deposition with biological effects that are observed when living tissues are irradiated. Dose-response information provides the basis for radiation protection standards and risk assessment. Radiation interactions with living matter takes place on a microscopic scale, and the manifestation of damage may be evident at the cellular, multi-cellular, and even organ levels of biological organization. The relative biological effectiveness of ionization radiation is largely determined by the spatial distribution of energy deposition events within microscopic as well as macroscopic biological targets of interest. The spatial distribution of energy imparted is determined by the spatial distribution of radionuclides and properties of the emitted charged-particle radiation involved. The nonuniformity of energy deposition events in microscopic volumes, particularly from high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, results in large variations in the amount of energy imparted to very small volumes or targets. Microdosimetry is the study of energy deposition events at the cellular level. Macrodosimetry is a term for conventional dose averaging at the tissue or organ level. In between is a level of dosimetry sometimes referred to as multi-cellular dosimetry. The distinction between these terms and their applications in assessment of dose from internally deposited radionuclides is described.

  12. Energy transformation in molecular electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kasha, M.

    1985-07-25

    Our new optical pumping spectroscopy (steady state, and double-laser pulse) allows the production and study of the unstable rare tautomer in its ground and excited states, including picosecond dynamic studies. Molecules under study here included 7-azaindole (model for biological purines), 3-hydroxyflavone (model for plant flavones), lumichrome, and other heterocyclics. New detailed molecular mechanisms for proton transfer are derived, especially with catalytic assisting molecules. A new proton-transfer laser of extraordinary efficiency has become a side dividend, possibly worth of industrial development. The excited and highly reactive singlet molecular oxygen species /sup 1/..delta../sub g/) has proven to be ubiquitous in chemical peroxide systems and in physically excited sensitizer-oxygen systems. Hyperbaric oxygen mechanisms in biology probably involve singlet oxygen. We have undertaken a spectroscopic study of tris - dibenzoylmethane chelates of Al, Gd, Eu, and Yb trivalent ions. These chelates offer a variety of electronic behaviors, from Z-effects on ..pi..-electron spin-orbital coupling (Al, Gd) to Weissman intramolecular energy transfer to 4f mestable levels (Eu, Gd). Elegant new spectroscopic resolution at 77K permits separation of tautomeric, parasitic self-absorption, dissociation, and cage effects to be resolved. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Energy transformation in molecular electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasha, M.

    1985-07-01

    Our new optical pumping spectroscopy allows the production and study of the unstable rate tautomer in its ground and excited states, including picosecond dynamic studies. Molecules under study here included 7-azaindole 3-hydroxyflavone, lumichrome, and other heterocyclics. New detailed molecular mechanisms for proton transfer are derived, especially with catalytic assisting molecules. A new proton-transfer laser of extraordinary efficiency has become a side dividend, possibly worthy of industrial development. The excited and highly reactive singlet molecular oxygen species (1) DELTA sub g has proven to be ubiquitous in chemical peroxide systems and in physically excited sensitizer-oxygen systems. Hyperbaric oxygen mechanisms in biology probably involve singlet oxygen. We have undertaken a spectroscopic study of trisdibenzoylmethane chelates of Al, Gd, Eu, and Yb trivalent ions. These chelates offer a variety of electronic behaviors, from Z-effects on (PI)--electron spin-orbital coupling (Al, Gd) to Weissman intramolecular energy transfer to 4f mestable levels (Eu, Gd). Elegant new spectroscopic resolution at 77K permits separation of tautomeric, parasitic self-absorption, dissociation, and cage effects to be resolved.

  14. Modified electron acoustic field and energy applied to observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    Improved electrostatic acoustic field and energy have been debated in vortex trapped hot electrons and fluid of cold electrons with pressure term plasmas. The perturbed higher-order modified-Korteweg-de Vries equation (PhomKdV) has been worked out. The effect of trapping and electron temperatures on the electro-field and energy properties in auroral plasmas has been inspected.

  15. Imaging electronic motions in atoms by energy-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2014-09-01

    We propose energy-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction as a means of directly imaging target electronic motions whose space, time, and energy information can be simultaneously retrieved from time-resolved diffraction measurements. The energy-resolved diffraction images are simulated for breathing, wiggling, and hybrid modes of electronic motion in the H atom. The simulations demonstrate the capabilities of ultrafast electron diffraction to image and distinguish different kinds of electronic motion. The theoretical analysis of the scattering process identifies the requirements for time- and state-resolved imaging of electronic motion and provides interpretations of the results.

  16. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  17. Sterilization of foods with low-energy electrons (``soft-electrons'')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Takahashi, Yoko; Todoriki, Setsuko

    1998-06-01

    Electrons with an energy of 300 keV or lower were defined as "Soft-electrons", which showed several advantages over conventional irradiation with gamma-rays or high-energy electrons in decontamination of grains and spices. Energies of electrons necessary to reduce microbial loads to levels lower than 10 CFU/g were 60 keV for brown rice, 75 keV for wheat, 100 keV for white pepper, coriander and basil, 130 keV for buckwheat, 160 keV for rough rice, and 210 keV for black pepper. Electrons with such energies did not significantly influence the quality.

  18. Electron energy distribution function by using probe method in electron cyclotron resonance multicharged ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, Sho Kurisu, Yosuke; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). High-energy electrons in ECRIS plasma affect electron energy distribution and generate multicharged ion. In this study, we measure electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of low energy region (≦100 eV) in ECRIS plasma at extremely low pressures (10{sup −3}–10{sup −5} Pa) by using cylindrical Langmuir probe. From the result, it is found that the EEDF correlates with the electron density and the temperature from the conventional probe analysis. In addition, we confirm that the tail of EEDF spreads to high energy region as the pressure rises and that there are electrons with high energy in ECR multicharged ion source plasma. The effective temperature estimated from the experimentally obtained EEDF is larger than the electron temperature obtained from the conventional method.

  19. Electron energy distribution function by using probe method in electron cyclotron resonance multicharged ion source.

    PubMed

    Kumakura, Sho; Kurisu, Yosuke; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). High-energy electrons in ECRIS plasma affect electron energy distribution and generate multicharged ion. In this study, we measure electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of low energy region (≦100 eV) in ECRIS plasma at extremely low pressures (10(-3)-10(-5) Pa) by using cylindrical Langmuir probe. From the result, it is found that the EEDF correlates with the electron density and the temperature from the conventional probe analysis. In addition, we confirm that the tail of EEDF spreads to high energy region as the pressure rises and that there are electrons with high energy in ECR multicharged ion source plasma. The effective temperature estimated from the experimentally obtained EEDF is larger than the electron temperature obtained from the conventional method.

  20. Electron Microburst Energy Dispersion Derived by Test Particle Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Parks, G. K.; Park, Y.; Tsurutani, B.

    2011-12-01

    Electron microbursts, energetic electron precipitation having duration less than 1 sec, have been thought to be generated by chorus wave and electron interactions. While the coincidence of chorus and microburst occurrence supports the wave-particle interaction theory, more crucial evidences have not been observed to explain the origin of microbursts. We think one of the observational evidences could be energy dispersion of microbursts. During chorus waves propagate along magnetic field, the resonance condition should be satisfied at different magnetic latitude for different energy electrons because chorus waves are coherent waves having narrow frequency band and electron microbursts have wide energy range, at least several hundreds KeV. If we observed electron microbursts at low altitude, the arrival time of different energy electrons should make unique energy dispersion structures. In order to observe the energy dispersion, we need a detector having fast time resolution and wide energy range. Our study is focused on defining the time resolution and energy range required to measure microburst energy dispersion. We performed test particles simulation interacting with simple coherent waves like chorus waves. By the wave-particle interaction, energetic electrons (test particles) changed pitch angles and some electrons were detected with energy dispersion at 600 km. We assumed a detector measuring microbursts at the altitude of 600 km. These results provide useful information in designing electron detectors for the future mission.

  1. The energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Meyer, P.; Moses, D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft X-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares.

  2. Electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections at low electron energies using a photoelectron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Subramanian, K. P.; Krishnakumar, E.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections have been measured at low electron energies using the powerful technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. The measurements have been carried out at 17 electron energies varying from 0.7 to 10 eV with an accuracy of + or - 2.7 percent. The results obtained in the present work have been compared with other recent measurement and calculations.

  3. Extrapolation chamber mounted on perspex for calibration of high energy photon and electron beams from a clinical linear accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, R.; Binukumar, J. P.; Sivakumar, S. S.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Davis, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to establish radiation standards for absorbed doses, for clinical high energy linear accelerator beams. In the nonavailability of a cobalt-60 beam for arriving at Nd, water values for thimble chambers, we investigated the efficacy of perspex mounted extrapolation chamber (EC) used earlier for low energy x-rays and beta dosimetry. Extrapolation chamber with facility for achieving variable electrode separations 10.5mm to 0.5mm using micrometer screw was used for calibrations. Photon beams 6 MV and 15 MV and electron beams 6 MeV and 15 MeV from Varian Clinac linacs were calibrated. Absorbed Dose estimates to Perspex were converted into dose to solid water for comparison with FC 65 ionisation chamber measurements in water. Measurements made during the period December 2006 to June 2008 are considered for evaluation. Uncorrected ionization readings of EC for all the radiation beams over the entire period were within 2% showing the consistency of measurements. Absorbed doses estimated by EC were in good agreement with in-water calibrations within 2% for photons and electron beams. The present results suggest that extrapolation chambers can be considered as an independent measuring system for absorbed dose in addition to Farmer type ion chambers. In the absence of standard beam quality (Co-60 radiations as reference Quality for Nd,water) the possibility of keeping EC as Primary Standards for absorbed dose calibrations in high energy radiation beams from linacs should be explored. As there are neither Standard Laboratories nor SSDL available in our country, we look forward to keep EC as Local Standard for hospital chamber calibrations. We are also participating in the IAEA mailed TLD intercomparison programme for quality audit of existing status of radiation dosimetry in high energy linac beams. The performance of EC has to be confirmed with cobalt-60 beams by a separate study, as linacs are susceptible for minor variations in dose

  4. Thermal electron energy distribution measurements in the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Nagy, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    A recoverable payload instrumented for twilight airglow studies was launched by an Aerobee 150 from the White Sands Test Range on Feb. 8, 1971 at 13.56 UT. The payload included a low energy electron spectrometer (HARP) and a cylindrical Langmuir probe. The HARP electron spectrometer is a new device designed to make high resolution differential electron flux measurements. Measurements of ionospheric electron energy distribution in the range from about 0.2 to 4.0 eV are presented.

  5. Energy distribution asymmetry of electron precipitation signatures at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobiah, Y. I. J.; Barabash, S.; Nilsson, H.; Stenberg, G.; Lundin, R.; Coates, A. J.; Winningham, J. D.; Frahm, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    The different types of asymmetry observed in the energy distributions of electrons and heavy-ions (M/Q=16-44) during signatures of electron precipitation in the Martian ionosphere have been classified. This has been achieved using the space plasma instrumentation of MEX ASPERA-3 from peri-centre altitude to 2200 km. ASPERA-3 ELS observes signatures of electron precipitation on 43.0% of MEX orbits. Unaccelerated electrons in the form of sudden electron flux enhancements are the most common type of electron precipitation signature at Mars and account for ∼70% of the events observed in this study. Electrons that form unaccelerated electron precipitation signatures are either local ionospheric electrons with enhanced density, or electrons transported from another region of ionosphere, solar wind or tail, or a combination of local and transported electrons. The heating of electrons has a strong influence on the shape of most electron energy spectra from accelerated precipitation signatures. On most occasions the general flow of heavy-ions away from Mars is unchanged during the precipitation of electrons, which is thought to be the result of the finite gyroradius effect of the heavy-ions on crustal magnetic field lines. Only ∼17% of events show some form of heavy-ion acceleration that is either concurrent or at the periphery of an electron precipitation signature. The most common combination of electron and heavy-ion energy distributions for signatures of electron precipitation involves electrons that visually have very little asymmetry or are isotropic and heavy-ions that have a upward net flux, and suggest the upward current associated with aurora. Due to a lack of reliable measurements of electrons travelling towards Mars, it is likely we miss further evidence of upward currents. The second most common combination of electron and heavy-ion energy distributions for signatures of electron precipitation, are those distributions of electrons that are asymmetric and

  6. Automatic in vivo portal dosimetry of all treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Rozendaal, R.; Mijnheer, B.; van Herk, M.; Mans, A.

    2013-11-01

    At our institution EPID (electronic portal imaging device) dosimetry is routinely applied to perform in vivo dose verification of all patient treatments with curative intent since January 2008. The major impediment of the method has been the amount of work required to produce and inspect the in vivo dosimetry reports (a time-consuming and labor-intensive process). In this paper we present an overview of the actions performed to implement an automated in vivo dosimetry solution clinically. We reimplemented the EPID dosimetry software and modified the acquisition software. Furthermore, we introduced new tools to periodically inspect the record-and-verify database and automatically run the EPID dosimetry software when needed. In 2012, 95% of our 3839 treatments scheduled for in vivo dosimetry were analyzed automatically (27 633 portal images of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields, 5551 portal image data of VMAT arcs, and 2003 portal images of non-IMRT fields). The in vivo dosimetry verification results are available a few minutes after delivery and alerts are immediately raised when deviations outside tolerance levels are detected. After the clinical introduction of this automated solution, inspection of the detected deviations is the only remaining work. These newly developed tools are a major step forward towards full integration of in vivo EPID dosimetry in radiation oncology practice.

  7. Electron attachment to carbon dioxide clusters at very low electron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stamatovic, A.; Leiter, K.; Ritter, W.; Stephan, K.; Maerk, T.D.

    1985-09-15

    Electron attachment to CO/sub 2/ clusters formed by nozzle expansion was investigated in a crossed molecular-beam--electron-impact--mass spectrometer system. In addition to cluster ions previously observed at 3--4 eV electron energy we observe presently cluster ions produced at around zero electron energy. Some of these ions are likely produced by a less dissociative production mechanism allowing the probing of cluster beams with better reliability than previously.

  8. An extension of the Eisberg-Resnick treatment for electron energies in many-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, M. A. B.; Bennett, I.

    1989-03-01

    Eisberg and Resnick present a simple argument for the energy of an electron in a multielectron atom using the concept of shielding from electrons in inner shells. The results of such a treatment are unfortunately confined so as to be out of range of experimental values. Here, the effect of electrons in outer shells is included, and, in the nonrelativistic region, energies are obtained for electrons in the first and second shells in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  9. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W. S.

    2001-09-01

    Models and the conceptual framework necessary for an understanding of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) are described. Examples of various OSL readout schemes are described, along with examples of the use of OSL in radiation dosimetry.

  10. Electron polarimetry at low energies in Hall C at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, D.

    2013-11-01

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered.

  11. Variations in dose response with x-ray energy of LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence dosimeters: implications for clinical dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Lisa; Hood, Claire; Warren-Forward, Helen; Haque, Mamoon; Kron, Tomas

    2004-09-01

    In many medical procedures where accurate radiation dose measurements are needed, the variation of detector response with x-ray energy is of concern. The response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to a range of x-ray energies was analysed in monoenergetic (synchrotron), diagnostic and therapy radiation beams with the aim of implementing this dosimeter into clinical practice where existing dosimetry techniques are limited due to lack of sensitivity or tissue equivalence (e.g. neonatal radiography, mammography and brachytherapy). LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs in different forms from two manufacturers (MCP-N: TLD Poland, GR200: SDDML China) were irradiated using x-ray beams covering 10 keV to 18 MVp. Dose readings were compared with an ionization chamber. The effect of different TLD types and annealing cycles on clinical utility was investigated. The measured energy response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs was fit to a simple model devised by Kron et al (1998 Phys. Med. Biol. 43 3235-59) to describe the variation of TLD response with x-ray energy. If TLDs are handled as recommended in the present paper, the energy response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P deviates by a maximum of 15% from unity and agrees with the model to within 5% or experimental uncertainty between 15 keV and 10 MeV. LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs of all forms have consistent and superior energy response compared to the standard material LiF:Mg,Ti and are therefore suitable for a wide range of applications in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy.

  12. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7&hthinsp;h,&hthinsp;{beta}{sup +}=33{percent}) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Investigation of effect of variations in bone fraction and red marrow cellularity on bone marrow dosimetry in radio-immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilderman, S. J.; Roberson, P. L.; Bolch, W. E.; Dewaraja, Y. K.

    2013-07-01

    A method is described for computing patient-specific absorbed dose rates to active marrow which accounts for spatial variation in bone volume fraction and marrow cellularity. A module has been added to the 3D Monte Carlo dosimetry program DPM to treat energy deposition in the components of bone spongiosa distinctly. Homogeneous voxels in regions containing bone spongiosa (as defined on CT images) are assumed to be comprised only of bone, active (red) marrow and inactive (yellow) marrow. Cellularities are determined from biopsy, and bone volume fractions are computed from cellularities and CT-derived voxel densities. Electrons are assumed to deposit energy locally in the three constituent components in proportions determined by electron energy absorption fractions which depend on energy, cellularity, and bone volume fraction, and which are either taken from the literature or are derived from Monte Carlo simulations using EGS5. Separate algorithms are used to model primary β particles and secondary electrons generated after photon interactions. Treating energy deposition distinctly in bone spongiosa constituents leads to marrow dosimetry results which differ from homogeneous spongiosa dosimetry by up to 20%. Dose rates in active marrow regions with cellularities of 20, 50, and 80% can vary by up to 20%, and can differ by up to 10% as a function of bone volume fraction. Dose to bone marrow exhibits a strong dependence on marrow cellularity and a potentially significant dependence on bone volume fraction.

  14. Dosimetry characteristics of metallic cones for intraoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nyerick, C E; Ochran, T G; Boyer, A L; Hogstrom, K R

    1991-07-01

    Dosimetry data were obtained on the first dedicated linear accelerator of its type designed for electron intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) within an operating room. The linear accelerator uses a high dose rate, 9 Gy.min-1, to reduce the treatment time. Its chrome-plated brass treatment cones, designed with straight ends and 22.5 degrees beveled ends, are not mechanically attached to the collimator head, but are aligned using a laser projection system. Dosimetry measurements were made for each combination of energy (6, 9, 12, 15, and 16 MeV), cone size (diameters range from 5 to 12 cm), and cone type (22.5 degrees beveled or straight). From these data, depth-dose curves, cone output, and air-gap correction factors were generated that allow the calculation of the monitor setting for delivering a prescribed dose at any depth for any irradiation condition (energy, cone, air gap). Isodose data were measured for every cone using film in a solid water phantom. Scatter off the inside wall of the cone resulted in peripheral dose horns near the surface that were energy and cone dependent, being as large as 120%.

  15. Dosimetry characteristics of metallic cones for intraoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nyerick, C.E.; Ochran, T.G.; Boyer, A.L.; Hogstrom, K.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Dosimetry data were obtained on the first dedicated linear accelerator of its type designed for electron intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) within an operating room. The linear accelerator uses a high dose rate, 9 Gy.min-1, to reduce the treatment time. Its chrome-plated brass treatment cones, designed with straight ends and 22.5 degrees beveled ends, are not mechanically attached to the collimator head, but are aligned using a laser projection system. Dosimetry measurements were made for each combination of energy (6, 9, 12, 15, and 16 MeV), cone size (diameters range from 5 to 12 cm), and cone type (22.5 degrees beveled or straight). From these data, depth-dose curves, cone output, and air-gap correction factors were generated that allow the calculation of the monitor setting for delivering a prescribed dose at any depth for any irradiation condition (energy, cone, air gap). Isodose data were measured for every cone using film in a solid water phantom. Scatter off the inside wall of the cone resulted in peripheral dose horns near the surface that were energy and cone dependent, being as large as 120%.

  16. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.

    1979-10-25

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employing crossed electric and magnetic fields, separates the electrons from the ions as they are extracted from the ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90/sup 0/ to each other, the electrons remain at approximately the electrical potential at which they were generated. The electromagnetic forces cause the ions to be accelerated to the full accelerating supply voltage energy while being deflected through an angle of less than 90/sup 0/. The electrons precess out of the accelerating field region into an electron recovery region where they are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply energy. It is possible, by this method, to collect > 90% of the electrons extracted along with the negative ions from a negative ion source beam at < 4% of full energy.

  17. Dose conversion and wall correction factors for Fricke dosimetry in high-energy photon beams: analytical model and Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Ma, C M; Nahum, A E

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the dose conversion and wall correction factors for Fricke dosimetry in high-energy photon beams calculated using both an analytical general cavity model and Monte Carlo techniques. The conversion factor is calculated as the ratio of the absorbed dose in water to that in the Fricke dosimeter solution with a water-walled vessel. The wall correction factor accounts for the change in the absorbed dose to the dosimeter solution caused by the inhomogeneous dosimeter wall material. A usercode based on the EGS4 Monte Carlo system, with the application of a correlated sampling variance reduction technique, has been employed in the calculations of these factors and the parameters used in the cavity model. Good agreement has been achieved between the predictions of the model and that obtained by direct Monte Carlo simulation and also with other workers' experiments. It is shown that Fricke dosimeters in common use cannot be considered to be 'large' detectors and therefore 'general cavity theory' should be applied in converting the dose to water. It is confirmed that plastic dosimeter vessels have a negligible wall effect. The wall correction factor for a 1 mm thick Pyrex-walled vessel varies with incident photon energy from 1.001 +/- 0.001 for a 60Co beam to 0.983 +/- 0.001 for a 24 MV (TPR(10)20 = 0.80) photon beam. This implies that previous Fricke measurements with glass-walled vessels should be re-evaluated. PMID:8426871

  18. Taurine for EPR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Maghraby, A; Mansour, A; Tarek, E

    2012-08-01

    EPR dosimetry is characterized by its non-destructive read-out and the possibility of dose archival. Here, taurine is proposed as a radiation dosimeter using EPR spectroscopy. The EPR spectrum of taurine was studied and assigned, and changes in the taurine EPR spectrum as a result of the change in both modulation amplitude and microwave power were quantified. For gamma radiation, the energy absorption coefficient and the collision mass stopping power of taurine were compared to the corresponding values of soft tissue and alanine, in addition to calculation of effective atomic numbers. The response of taurine to gamma radiation doses in the range from 0.1 to 50 kGy was investigated, as well as that in the range from 1.0 to 20.0 Gy using numerically enhanced EPR taurine spectra. Both response curves showed a linear behavior. In addition, the time dependence of radiation-induced radicals was studied for short (during the first 6 h after irradiation) and long (during about 3 months after irradiation) time periods, and a reasonable degree of stability of the taurine radicals was observed. It is concluded that taurine is a promising dosimeter, which is characterized by its simple spectrum, radical stability, and wide range of linear response to gamma radiation.

  19. Secondary Electron Emission Yield in the Limit of Low Electron Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, A. N.; Smirnov, A. S.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Raitses, Y.; Demidov, V. I.

    2013-10-01

    Secondary electron emission (SEE) from solids plays an important role in many areas of science and technology. In recent years, there has been renewed interest in the experimental and theoretical studies of SEE. Several recent studies proposed that the reflectivity of very low energy electrons from solid surface approaches unity in the limit of zero electron energy, see e.g. discussion in Ref.. If this were indeed the case, this effect would have profound implications on the formation of electron clouds in particle accelerators, plasma measurements with electrostatic Langmuir probes, and operation of Hall plasma thrusters for spacecraft propulsion. It appears that, the proposed high electron reflectivity at low electron energies contradicts to numerous previous experimental studies of the secondary electron emission. We address possible causes of these contradictions. Research partially supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Dosimetry Methods of Fast Neutron Using the Semiconductor Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. Zaki, Dizaji; Kakavand, T.; F. Abbasi, Davani

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor detectors based on a silicon pin diode are frequently used in the detection of different nuclear radiations. For the detection and dosimetry of fast neutrons, these silicon detectors are coupled with a fast neutron converter. Incident neutrons interact with the converter and produce charged particles that can deposit their energy in the detectors and produce a signal. In this study, three methods are introduced for fast neutron dosimetry by using the silicon detectors, which are: recoil proton spectroscopy, similarity of detector response function with conversion function, and a discriminator layer. Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the response of dosimetry systems based on these methods. In the different doses of an 241Am-Be neutron source, dosimetry responses are evaluated. The error values of measured data for dosimetry by these methods are in the range of 15-25%. We find fairly good agreement in the 241Am-Be neutron sources.

  1. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  2. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  3. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  4. Design and experimental testing of air slab caps which convert commercial electron diodes into dual purpose, correction-free diodes for small field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, P. H.; Cranmer-Sargison, G.; Thwaites, D. I.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.; Pedrazzini, G.; Aland, T.; Kenny, J.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Two diodes which do not require correction factors for small field relative output measurements are designed and validated using experimental methodology. This was achieved by adding an air layer above the active volume of the diode detectors, which canceled out the increase in response of the diodes in small fields relative to standard field sizes. Methods: Due to the increased density of silicon and other components within a diode, additional electrons are created. In very small fields, a very small air gap acts as an effective filter of electrons with a high angle of incidence. The aim was to design a diode that balanced these perturbations to give a response similar to a water-only geometry. Three thicknesses of air were placed at the proximal end of a PTW 60017 electron diode (PTWe) using an adjustable “air cap”. A set of output ratios (OR{sub Det}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n}}) for square field sizes of side length down to 5 mm was measured using each air thickness and compared to OR{sub Det}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n}} measured using an IBA stereotactic field diode (SFD). k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} was transferred from the SFD to the PTWe diode and plotted as a function of air gap thickness for each field size. This enabled the optimal air gap thickness to be obtained by observing which thickness of air was required such that k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} was equal to 1.00 at all field sizes. A similar procedure was used to find the optimal air thickness required to make a modified Sun Nuclear EDGE detector (EDGEe) which is “correction-free” in small field relative dosimetry. In addition, the feasibility of experimentally transferring k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r

  5. Atomic electron energies including relativistic effects and quantum electrodynamic corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, M.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Huang, K. N.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    Atomic electron energies have been calculated relativistically. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions served as zeroth-order eigenfunctions to compute the expectation of the total Hamiltonian. A first order correction to the local approximation was thus included. Quantum-electrodynamic corrections were made. For all orbitals in all atoms with 2 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 106, the following quantities are listed: total energies, electron kinetic energies, electron-nucleus potential energies, electron-electron potential energies consisting of electrostatic and Breit interaction (magnetic and retardation) terms, and vacuum polarization energies. These results will serve for detailed comparison of calculations based on other approaches. The magnitude of quantum electrodynamic corrections is exhibited quantitatively for each state.

  6. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zschornack, G.; König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A.

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  7. Influence of binding energies of electrons on nuclear mass predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Guo, Jian-You

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear mass contains a wealth of nuclear structure information, and has been widely employed to extract the nuclear effective interactions. The known nuclear mass is usually extracted from the experimental atomic mass by subtracting the masses of electrons and adding the binding energy of electrons in the atom. However, the binding energies of electrons are sometimes neglected in extracting the known nuclear masses. The influence of binding energies of electrons on nuclear mass predictions are carefully investigated in this work. If the binding energies of electrons are directly subtracted from the theoretical mass predictions, the rms deviations of nuclear mass predictions with respect to the known data are increased by about 200 keV for nuclei with Z, N ⩾ 8. Furthermore, by using the Coulomb energies between protons to absorb the binding energies of electrons, their influence on the rms deviations is significantly reduced to only about 10 keV for nuclei with Z, N ⩾ 8. However, the binding energies of electrons are still important for the heavy nuclei, about 150 keV for nuclei around Z = 100 and up to about 500 keV for nuclei around Z = 120. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the binding energies of electrons to reliably predict the masses of heavy nuclei at an accuracy of hundreds of keV. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205004)

  8. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    SciTech Connect

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  9. LAT Perspectives in Detection of High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Ormes, J. F.; Funk, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) science objectives and capabilities in the detection of high energy electrons in the energy range from 20 GeV to approx. 1 TeV are presented. LAT simulations are used to establish the event selections. It is found that maintaining the efficiency of electron detection at the level of 30% the residual hadron contamination does not exceed 2-3% of the electron flux. LAT should collect approx. ten million of electrons with the energy above 20 GeV for each year of observation. Precise spectral reconstruction with high statistics presents us with a unique opportunity to investigate several important problems such as studying galactic models of IC radiation, revealing the signatures of nearby sources such as high energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, testing the propagation model, and searching for KKDM particles decay through their contribution to the electron spectrum.

  10. PROGRESS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.V.

    2007-09-10

    The fundamental questions about QCD which can be directly answered at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) call for large integrated luminosities. The major goal of RHIC-I1 upgrade is to achieve a 10 fold increase in luminosity of Au ions at the top energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Such a boost in luminosity for RHIC-II is achievable with implementation of high-energy electron cooling. The design of the higher-energy cooler for RHIC-II recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. Such electron beams will be produced with a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Detailed simulations of the electron cooling process and numerical simulations of the electron beam transport including the cooling section were performed. An intensive R&D of various elements of the design is presently underway. Here, we summarize progress in these electron cooling efforts.

  11. Electrothermal energy conversion using electron gas volumetric change inside semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and analyze an electrothermal energy converter using volumetric changes in non-equilibrium electron gas inside semiconductors. The geometric concentration of electron gas under an electric field increases the effective pressure of the electrons, and then a barrier filters out cold electrons, acting like a valve. Nano- and micro-scale features enable hot electrons to arrive at the contact in a short enough time to avoid thermalization with the lattice. Key length and time scales, preliminary device geometry, and anticipated efficiency are estimated for electronic analogs of Otto and Brayton power generators and Joule-Thomson micro refrigerators on a chip. The power generators convert the energy of incident photons from the heat source to electrical current, and the refrigerator can reduce the temperature of electrons in a semiconductor device. The analytic calculations show that a large energy conversion efficiency or coefficient of performance may be possible.

  12. Theoretical study of lithium ionic conductors by electronic stress tensor density and electronic kinetic energy density.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Fujii, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, Li3PO4 and Li3PS4, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  14. Low energy electrons in the inner Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganushkina, Natalia; Sillanpaa, Ilkka; Dugyagin, Stepan; Pitchford, David; Rodriguez, Juan; Runov, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    The fluxes of electrons with energies < 100 keV are not usually analyzed and modeled in details when studying the electron radiation belts. These fluxes constitute the low energy part of the seed population, which is critically important for radiation belt dynamics. Moreover, energetic electrons with energies less than about 100 keV are responsible for hazardous space-weather phenomena such as surface charging. The electron flux at these energies varies highly with geomagnetic activity and even during quiet-time periods. Significant variations in the low-energy electrons can be seen during isolated substorms, not related to any storm periods. Moreover, electron flux variations depend on the electron energy. Statistical analysis of AMC 12 CEASE II ESA instrument data (5-50 keV) and GOES MAGED data (40, 75, 150 keV) have revealed that electron fluxes increase by the same order of magnitude during isolated substorms with 200 nT of AE index and storm-time substorms with 1200 nT of AE index. If substorms are represented as electromagnetic pulses which transport and accelerate electrons additionally, how are their amplitudes determined, if not related directly to a substorm's strength? Another factor of crucial importance is the specification of boundary conditions in the electron plasma sheet. We developed a new model for electron number density and temperature in the plasma sheet as dependent on solar wind and IMF conditions based on THEMIS data analysis. We present observational and modeling results on low energy electrons in the inner magnetosphere with newly-developed, time-dependent boundary conditions with a special focus on the role of substorms for electron transport and acceleration.

  15. Electrospun Fibers for Energy, Electronic, & Environmental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Nicholas M.

    Electrospinning is an established method for creating polymer and bio-polymer fibers of dimensions ranging from ˜10 nanometers to microns. The process typically involves applying a high voltage between a solution source (usually at the end of a capillary or syringe) and a substrate on which the nanofibers are deposited. The high electric field distorts the shape of the liquid droplet, creating a Taylor cone. Additional applied voltage ejects a liquid jet of the polymer solution in the Taylor cone toward the counter electrode. The formation of fibers is generated by the rapid electrostatic elongation and solvent evaporation of this viscoelastic jet, which typically generates an entangled non-woven mesh of fibers with a high surface area to volume ratio. Electrospinning is an attractive alternative to other processes for creating nano-scale fibers and high surface area to volume ratio surfaces due to its low start up cost, overall simplicity, wide range of processable materials, and the ability to generate a moderate amount of fibers in one step. It has also been demonstrated that coaxial electrospinning is possible, wherein the nanofiber has two distinct phases, one being the core and another being the sheath. This method is advantageous because properties of two materials can be combined into one fiber, while maintaining two distinct material phases. Materials that are inherently electrospinable could be made into fibers using this technique as well. The most common applications areas for electrospun fibers are in filtration and biomedical areas, with a comparatively small amount of work done in energy, environmental, and sensor applications. Furthermore, the use of biologically materials in electrospun fibers is an avenue of research that needs more exploration, given the unique properties these materials can exhibit. The research aim of this thesis is to explore the use of electrospun fibers for energy, electrical and environmental applications. For energy

  16. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  17. Electron energy distribution function and electron characteristics of conventional and micro hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Zhechev, D.

    2002-05-01

    The conventional hollow cathode discharge, micro hollow cathode discharge, and the transition between them have been analyzed. The time independent and spatially averaged electron energy distribution function, electron density, mean electron energy, excitation, and ionization rates have been calculated and compared. The direct comparison showed substantial differences between the conventional and micro hollow cathode discharges, particularly in absorbed power per unit volume, degree of ionization, and excitation and ionization rates.

  18. Energy resolution and power consumption of Timepix detector for different detector settings and saturation of front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, M.; Hoang, S.; Stoffle, N.; Soukup, P.; Jakubek, J.; Pinsky, L. S.

    2014-05-01

    An ongoing research project in the area of radiation monitoring employing the Timepix technology from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration profits greatly from optimizing the precision of the position and energy information obtained for the detected quanta. Wider applications of the Timepix technology as a radiation monitor also puts new demands on the precision and speed of the energy calibration. We compare the analog signal in pixel front-end electronics for different sources used during detector evaluation and energy calibration. We use the direct measurement of the analog signal from the pixel preamplifier and comparator to characterize pulse shape differences for different sources, e.g. internal test pulses, external test pulses, ionizing radiation, etc. and study their interchangeability. Accurate per-pixel energy calibration of the Timepix detector enables the direct measurement of the energy deposited by different types of ionizing radiation. The energy calibration process requires the application of a known charge to front-end electronics of each pixel. The small pixel size limits use of the radioactive sources. The 59.54 keV line from 241Am is commonly used as the highest point in calibration curve. The heavy ion dosimetry as encountered in the space radiation environment requires a considerable extrapolation to the energies in the MeV range. We have observed that for energies around and beyond 1 MeV the response of the Timepix's front-end electronics no longer follows the extrapolated calibration function. We have investigated this non-linearity and identified its source. We also propose both hardware and software solutions to suppress this effect. In this paper we show the impact on pixel calibration and the subsequent energy resolution for different detector settings as well as the resulting power consumptions. We discuss the parameter optimization for several different real-world applications.

  19. Nonlinear inelastic electron scattering revealed by plasmon-enhanced electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chun Kai; Liu, Wen Jie; Zhang, Pan Ke; Li, Meng; Zhang, Han Jun; Xu, Ke Zun; Luo, Yi; Chen, Xiang Jun

    2014-10-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy is a powerful tool for identifying the chemical composition of materials. It relies mostly on the measurement of inelastic electrons, which carry specific atomic or molecular information. Inelastic electron scattering, however, has a very low intensity, often orders of magnitude weaker than that of elastically scattered electrons. Here, we report the observation of enhanced inelastic electron scattering from silver nanostructures, the intensity of which can reach up to 60% of its elastic counterpart. A home-made scanning probe electron energy-loss spectrometer was used to produce highly localized plasmonic excitations, significantly enhancing the strength of the local electric field of silver nanostructures. The intensity of inelastic electron scattering was found to increase nonlinearly with respect to the electric field generated by the tip-sample bias, providing direct evidence of nonlinear electron scattering processes.

  20. Electron binding energies using perturbative delta-SCF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhusal, Shusil; Baruah, Tunna; Zope, Rajendra

    The knowledge of fundamental and optical gaps is of significant importance for organic photovoltaics. The electron binding energies estimated from the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues are significantly underestimated. Here, we use our recently outlined perturbative delta-SCF approach to compute the electron binding energies of a number of aromatic organic molecules commonly used in organic photovoltaics. Further, the electron affinities are also computed for the C60, C70 and PCBM. The results show that the perturbative delta-SCF provide adequate description of valence electron binding energies. We also applied the method to compute the core binding energies and the core-valence excited states. While the method can successfully predict the core-valence excited states the results on the core-binding energies are mixed. The strategies for improvement of the core binding energies will be discussed.

  1. OPTIMAL ELECTRON ENERGIES FOR DRIVING CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Alexander, D. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2015-08-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher et al., who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Further, at low electron energies, a much weaker beam flux is required to drive explosive evaporation.

  2. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  3. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge–Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  4. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  5. Beta particle dosimetry of the trabecular region of a thoracic vertebra utilizing NMR microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokisch, Derek William

    Radiation damage to the hematopoietic bone marrow represents the primary limiting factor to the further development of internal emitter therapies such as radioimmunotherapy and the use of incorporated radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. Improvements in radiation dosimetry of bone marrow are believed to be a prerequisite to accurate predictions of myelotoxicity for these radionuclide therapies. Current radiation dosimetry models for the prediction of marrow dose utilize a scheme in which separate calculations of cumulated activity and dose per transition (radionuclide S value) must be made. The selection of an appropriate S value is generally limited to one of only three sources, all of which use as input the trabecular microstructure of an individual measured 20 years ago, and the tissue masses derived from different individuals measured 70 years ago. This work improves on previously developed methods, which may be used to expand the microstructural database (particularly for non-Reference Man patients). Techniques were developed to avoid voxel effects that arise when taking microstructural measurements across a digitized image. In addition, this work developed a basis for comparison of the existing dosimetry models to an accurate methodology allowing for radiation transport in a voxelized image. The images used are obtained using NMR microscopy methods. This work will be the first of its kind in skeletal dosimetry in that it will allow for S- value calculation using microstructural and mass data from the same source. A new method for performing skeletal dosimetry was developed, and absorbed fraction results are found to be consistent in shape with other models. At electron energies less than 100 keV, all models studied were found to be consistent for all source and target combinations. Finally, a dose example comparing accepted methodologies with the one developed in this study illustrated the variance and importance of skeletal tissue masses used in

  6. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W.

    1999-02-01

    Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimetry is attractive to the health physics and dosimetry community due to its all-optical character, fast data acquisition and the avoidance of heating the detector. Until recently there was no luminescent material sensitive enough to radiation, and at the same time suitable for stimulation with visible light, for use in this application. However, anion-deficient aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al2O3:C) appears to be not only an extremely sensitive thermoluminescence (TL) material, but is also well-suited to OSL applications. Several OSL readout protocols have been suggested, including cw-OSL, pulsed OSL (POSL), and 'delayed' OSL (DOSL). The paper discusses the physical mechanisms that give rise to the OSL signals and the dependence of these signals upon absorbed dose. Example applications of the use of OSL from Al2O3:C in environmental radiation and ultraviolet-B dosimetry are discussed.

  7. Low-energy electron-induced reactions in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumainayagam, Christopher R.; Lee, Hsiao-Lu; Nelson, Rachel B.; Haines, David R.; Gunawardane, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss post-irradiation analysis of low-energy (≤50 eV) electron-induced processes in nanoscale thin films. Because electron-induced surface reactions in monolayer adsorbates have been extensively reviewed, we will instead focus on low-energy electron-induced reactions in multilayer adsorbates. The latter studies, involving nanoscale thin films, serve to elucidate the pivotal role that the low-energy electron-induced reactions play in high-energy radiation-induced chemical reactions in condensed matter. Although electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments conducted during irradiation have yielded vital information relevant to primary or initial electron-induced processes, we wish to demonstrate in this review that analyzing the products following low-energy electron irradiation can provide new insights into radiation chemistry. This review presents studies of electron-induced reactions in nanoscale films of molecular species such as oxygen, nitrogen trifluoride, water, alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, nitriles, halocarbons, alkane and phenyl thiols, thiophenes, ferrocene, amino acids, nucleotides, and DNA using post-irradiation techniques such as temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), gel electrophoresis, and microarray fluorescence. Post-irradiation temperature-programmed desorption, in particular, has been shown to be useful in identifying labile radiolysis products as demonstrated by the first identification of methoxymethanol as a reaction product of methanol radiolysis. Results of post-irradiation studies have been used not only to identify radiolysis products, but also to determine the dynamics of electron-induced reactions. For example, studies of the radiolysis yield as a function of incident electron energy have shown that dissociative

  8. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Stirling, William L.

    1982-01-01

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employs crossed electric and magnetic fields to separate the electrons from ions as they are extracted from a negative ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full kinetic energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90.degree. to each other, the electrons are separated from the plasma and remain at approximately the electrical potential of the generator in which they were generated. The electrons migrate from the ion beam path in a precessing motion out of the ion accelerating field region into an electron recovery region provided by a specially designed electron collector electrode. The electron collector electrode is uniformly spaced from a surface of the ion generator which is transverse to the direction of migration of the electrons and the two surfaces are contoured in a matching relationship which departs from a planar configuration to provide an electric field component in the recovery region which is parallel to the magnetic field thereby forcing the electrons to be directed into and collected by the electron collector electrode. The collector electrode is maintained at a potential slightly positive with respect to the ion generator so that the electrons are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply voltage energy.

  9. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically <1 K. Here we show that electron thermal excitation can be effectively suppressed at room temperature, and energy-suppressed electrons, whose energy distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature. PMID:25204839

  10. Dosimetry with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Marino, C.; Silvestri, F.; Lavagno, A.; Truc, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the dosimetry analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal and dose rate dependence of a synthetic single crystal diamond grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique. The measurements carried out by 5 MeV X-ray photons beam show very promising results, even if the dose rate detector response points out that the charge trapping centers distribution is not uniform inside the crystal volume. This handicap that affects the detectors performances, must be ascribed to the growing process. Synthetic single crystal diamonds could be a valuable alternative to air ionization chambers for quality beam control and for intensity modulated radiation therapy beams dosimetry.

  11. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    DOE PAGES

    Harkay, K. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2003-03-20

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in amore » positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.« less

  12. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2003-03-20

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  13. Imaging electronic motions in atoms by energy-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2015-05-01

    We present a general analysis of energy-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction for imaging target electronic motion and numerical simulations of time-resolved spectra of ultrafast electrons scattered from the breathing, wiggling, and hybrid modes of electronic motion in the H atom. We consider pump-probe processes in which a laser pulse creates a coherent superposition of target states that are probed by the electron pulses. Varying the pump-probe delay time, the delay-dependent scattering intensities record the ensuing electronic motions. The kinematics of the scattered electrons is fully resolved; both the scattering angles and the kinetic energies are measured. Therefore, besides the spatial and temporal information, the energy content of the electronic motions can be retrieved from the energy-resolved diffraction patterns, which provide unequivocal interpretations of the electronic motions. Because of this, we are able to explain the counterintuitive temporal behavior of the diffraction images, which show a quite different temporal behavior and little connection to the electron densities. This work has been supported in part by AFOSR Award No. FA9550-12-1-0149.

  14. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  15. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  16. Energy degradation of fast electrons in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yueming; Mccray, Richard

    1991-01-01

    An equation is derived for calculating the energy distribution of fast electrons in a partially ionized gas and a method is provided to solve for the electron degradation spectrum and the energy deposition in different forms (ionization, excitation, or heating). As an example, the energy degradation of fast electrons in a gas of pure hydrogen is calculated, considering excitations to the lowest 10 atomic levels. The Bethe approximation and the continuous slowing-down approximation are discussed and it is concluded that these approximations are accurate to the order of 20 percent for electrons with initial energy of greater than about keV. The method and results can be used to determine heating, excitations, and ionizations by high-energy photoelectrons or cosmic-ray particles in various astrophysical circumstances, such as the interstellar medium, supernova envelopes, and QSO emission-line clouds.

  17. Plasma expansion into vacuum assuming a steplike electron energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Thomas; Schlegel, Theodor; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-04-01

    The expansion of a semi-infinite plasma slab into vacuum is analyzed with a hydrodynamic model implying a steplike electron energy distribution function. Analytic expressions for the maximum ion energy and the related ion distribution function are derived and compared with one-dimensional numerical simulations. The choice of the specific non-Maxwellian initial electron energy distribution automatically ensures the conservation of the total energy of the system. The estimated ion energies may differ by an order of magnitude from the values obtained with an adiabatic expansion model supposing a Maxwellian electron distribution. Furthermore, good agreement with data from experiments using laser pulses of ultrashort durations τ(L)electron distribution is assumed.

  18. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Mel E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu; Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  19. Substituent effect on electronic transition energy of dichlorobenzyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young Wook; Chae, Sang Youl; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2016-01-01

    Ring-substituted benzyl radicals exhibit electronic energies of the D1 → D0 transition being shifted to red region with respect to the benzyl radical. The red-shifts of disubstituted benzyl radicals are highly dependent on the substitution positions irrespective of substituents. By analyzing the red-shifts of dichlorobenzyl radicals observed, we found that the substituent effect on electronic transition energy is attributed to the molecular plane shape of delocalized π electrons. We will discuss the influences of locations of Cl substituents on the D1 → D0 transition energies of dichlorobenzyl radicals using Hückel's molecular orbital theory.

  20. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  1. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    data, damage correlations. Two-dimensional mapping of the calculated fission power for the full-size fuel plate experiment irradiated in the advanced test reactor / G. S. Chang and M. A. Lillo. The radiation safety information computational center: a resource for reactor dosimetry software and nuclear data / B. L. Kirk. Irradiated xenon isotopic ratio measurement for failed fuel detection and location in fast reactor / C. Ito, T. Iguchi and H. Harano. Characterization of dosimetry of the BMRR horizontal thimble tubes and broad beam facility / J.-P. Hu, R. N. Reciniello and N. E. Holden. 2007 nuclear data review / N. E. Holden. Further dosimetry studies at the Rhode Island nuclear science / R. N. Reciniello ... [et al.]. Characterization of neutron fields in the experimental fast reactor Joyo MK-III core / S. Maeda ... [et al.]. Measuring [symbol]Li(n, t) and [symbol]B(n, [symbol]) cross sections using the NIST alpha-gamma apparatus / M. S. Dewey ... [et al.]. Improvement of neutron/gamma field evaluation for restart of JMTR / Y. Nagao ... [et al.]. Monitoring of the irradiated neutron fluence in the neutron transmutation doping process of HANARO / M.-S. Kim and S.-J. Park.Training reactor VR-l neutron spectrum determination / M. Vins, A. Kolros and K. Katovsky. Differential cross sections for gamma-ray production by 14 MeV neutrons on iron and bismuth / V. M. Bondar ... [et al.]. The measurements of the differential elastic neutron cross-sections of carbon for energies from 2 to 133 ke V / O. Gritzay ... [et al.]. Determination of neutron spectrum by the dosimetry foil method up to 35 Me V / S. P. Simakov ... [et al.]. Extension of the BGL broad group cross section library / D. Kirilova, S. Belousov and Kr. Ilieva. Measurements of neutron capture cross-section for tantalum at the neutron filtered beams / O. Gritzayand V. Libman. Measurements of microscopic data at GELINA in support of dosimetry / S. Kopecky ... [et al.]. Nuclide guide and international chart of

  2. Uncertainties in alanine/ESR dosimetry at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias

    2006-11-01

    In radiation therapy, the effect of ionizing radiation is quantified in terms of the absorbed dose to water. Dosimetry with alanine and readout via electron spin resonance (ESR) is a method which is used as a secondary standard by several national metrology institutions. The advantages of the method are the good water-equivalence of the probes, their small size and the very weak dependence of the response on the radiation quality for MV x-rays and high-energy electrons used in radiation therapy. For radiation therapy, a small uncertainty of the applied dose is required. The present publication describes the determination of the uncertainty budget for the alanine/ESR dosimetry system of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), which relies on the use of a reference sample. A method is also presented which allows a reduction of the influence of fading or other changes of the ESR amplitude of irradiated alanine probes with time. If certain conditions are met which are described in detail, a relative uncertainty of less than 0.5% can be reached for probes irradiated with (60)Co in the 5-25 Gy dose range, including the uncertainty of the primary standard. First results for dose values between 2 Gy and 10 Gy are presented as well. From the high accuracy achievable with alanine dosimetry, we conclude that this method has great potential to solve measurement problems for modern methods of radiation therapy such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or tomotherapy.

  3. Modified Fermi energy of electrons in a superhigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cui; Gao, Zhi Fu; Li, Xiang Dong; Wang, Na; Yuan, Jian Ping; Peng, Qiu He

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the electron Landau level stability and its influence on the electron Fermi energy, EF(e), in the circumstance of magnetars, which are powered by magnetic field energy. In a magnetar, the Landau levels of degenerate and relativistic electrons are strongly quantized. A new quantity gn, the electron Landau level stability coefficient is introduced. According to the requirement that gn decreases with increasing the magnetic field intensity B, the magnetic field index β in the expression of EF(e) must be positive. By introducing the Dirac-δ function, we deduce a general formulae for the Fermi energy of degenerate and relativistic electrons, and obtain a particular solution to EF(e) in a superhigh magnetic field (SMF). This solution has a low magnetic field index of β = 1/6, compared with the previous one, and works when ρ ≥ 107g cm-3 and Bcr ≪ B ≤ 1017 Gauss. By modifying the phase space of relativistic electrons, a SMF can enhance the electron number density ne, and decrease the maximum of electron Landau level number, which results in a redistribution of electrons. According to Pauli exclusion principle, the degenerate electrons will fill quantum states from the lowest Landau level to the highest Landau level. As B increases, more and more electrons will occupy higher Landau levels, though gn decreases with the Landau level number n. The enhanced ne in a SMF means an increase in the electron Fermi energy and an increase in the electron degeneracy pressure. The results are expected to facilitate the study of the weak-interaction processes inside neutron stars and the magnetic-thermal evolution mechanism for magnetars.

  4. High-Current Energy-Recovering Electron Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; David Douglas; Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-12-01

    The use of energy recovery provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices, electron-ion colliders, and other applications in photon science and nuclear and high-energy physics. Energy-recovering electron linear accelerators (called energy-recovering linacs, or ERLs) share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, as their six-dimensional beam phase space is largely determined by electron source properties. However, in common with classic storage rings, ERLs possess a high average-current-carrying capability enabled by the energy recovery process, and thus promise similar efficiencies. The authors discuss the concept of energy recovery and its technical challenges and describe the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Infrared Demonstration Free-Electron Laser (IR Demo FEL), originally driven by a 3548-MeV, 5-mA superconducting radiofrequency (srf) ERL, which provided the most substantial demonstration of energy recovery to date: a beam of 250 kW average power. They present an overview of envisioned ERL applications and a development path to achieving the required performance. They use experimental data obtained at the JLab IR Demo FEL and recent experimental results from CEBAF-ERL GeV-scale, comparatively low-current energy-recovery demonstration at JLab to evaluate the feasibility of the new applications of high-current ERLs, as well as ERLs' limitations and ultimate performance.

  5. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  6. Technical Note: Improvements in GEANT4 energy-loss model and the effect on low-energy electron transport in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, I.; Incerti, S.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The GEANT4-DNA physics models are upgraded by a more accurate set of electron cross sections for ionization and excitation in liquid water. The impact of the new developments on low-energy electron transport simulations by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit is examined for improving its performance in dosimetry applications at the subcellular and nanometer level. Methods: The authors provide an algorithm for an improved implementation of the Emfietzoglou model dielectric response function of liquid water used in the GEANT4-DNA existing model. The algorithm redistributes the imaginary part of the dielectric function to ensure a physically motivated behavior at the binding energies, while retaining all the advantages of the original formulation, e.g., the analytic properties and the fulfillment of the f-sum-rule. In addition, refinements in the exchange and perturbation corrections to the Born approximation used in the GEANT4-DNA existing model are also made. Results: The new ionization and excitation cross sections are significantly different from those of the GEANT4-DNA existing model. In particular, excitations are strongly enhanced relative to ionizations, resulting in higher W-values and less diffusive dose-point-kernels at sub-keV electron energies. Conclusions: An improved energy-loss model for the excitation and ionization of liquid water by low-energy electrons has been implemented in GEANT4-DNA. The suspiciously low W-values and the unphysical long tail in the dose-point-kernel have been corrected owing to a different partitioning of the dielectric function.

  7. EPR dosimetry of cortical bone and tooth enamel irradiated with X and gamma rays: Study of energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Links, J.M. ); Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G.; Seltzer, S.M. )

    1994-04-01

    Previous investigators have reported that the radiation-induced EPR signal intensity in compact or cortical bone increases up to a factor of two with decreasing photon energy for a given absorbed dose. If the EPR signal intensity was dependent on energy, it could limit the application of EPR spectrometry and the additive reirradiation method to obtain dose estimates. We have recently shown that errors in the assumptions governing conversion of measured exposure to absorbed dose can lead to similar [open quotes]apparent[close quotes] energy-dependence results. We hypothesized that these previous results were due to errors in the estimated dose in bone, rather than the effects of energy dependence per se. To test this hypothesis we studied human adult cortical bone from male and female donors ranging in age from 23 to 95 years, and bovine tooth enamel, using 34 and 138 keV average energy X-ray beams and [sup 137]Cs (662 keV) and [sup 60]Co (1250 keV) [gamma] rays. In a femur from a 47-year-old male (subject 1), there was a difference of borderline significance at the [alpha] = 0.05 level in the mean radiation-induced hydroxyapatite signal intensities as a function of photon energy. No other statistically significant differences in EPR signal intensity as a function of photon energy were observed in this subject, or in the tibia from a 23-year-old male (subject 2) and the femur from a 75-year-old female (subject 3). However, there was a trend toward a decrease (12-15%) in signal intensity at the lowest energy compared with the highest energy in subjects 1 and 3. Further analysis of the data from subject 1 revealed that this trend, which is in the opposite direction of previous reports but is consistent with theory, is statistically significant. There were no efforts of energy dependence in the tooth samples. 16 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. The electronic properties of potassium doped copper-phthalocyanine studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flatz, K; Grobosch, M; Knupfer, M

    2007-06-01

    The authors have studied the electronic structure of potassium doped copper-phthalocyanine using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The evolution of the loss function indicates the formation of distinct KxCuPc phases. Taking into account the C1s and K2p core level excitations and recent results by Giovanelli et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 044709 (2007)], they conclude that these are K2CuPc and K4CuPc. They discuss the changes in the electronic excitations upon doping on the basis of the molecular electronic levels and the presence of electronic correlations.

  9. Enhanced production of low energy electrons by alpha particle impact.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Keun; Titze, Jasmin; Schöffler, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Waitz, Markus; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Sann, Hendrik; Meckel, Moritz; Stuck, Christian; Lenz, Ute; Odenweller, Matthias; Neumann, Nadine; Schössler, Sven; Ullmann-Pfleger, Klaus; Ulrich, Birte; Fraga, Rui Costa; Petridis, Nikos; Metz, Daniel; Jung, Annika; Grisenti, Robert; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Schmidt, Lothar; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2011-07-19

    Radiation damage to living tissue stems not only from primary ionizing particles but to a substantial fraction from the dissociative attachment of secondary electrons with energies below the ionization threshold. We show that the emission yield of those low energy electrons increases dramatically in ion-atom collisions depending on whether or not the target atoms are isolated or embedded in an environment. Only when the atom that has been ionized and excited by the primary particle impact is in immediate proximity of another atom is a fragmentation route known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) enabled. This leads to the emission of a low energy electron. Over the past decade ICD was explored in several experiments following photoionization. Most recent results show its observation even in water clusters. Here we show the quantitative role of ICD for the production of low energy electrons by ion impact, thus approaching a scenario closer to that of radiation damage by alpha particles: We choose ion energies on the maximum of the Bragg peak where energy is most efficiently deposited in tissue. We compare the electron production after colliding He(+) ions on isolated Ne atoms and on Ne dimers (Ne(2)). In the latter case the Ne atom impacted is surrounded by a most simple environment already opening ICD as a deexcitation channel. As a consequence, we find a dramatically enhanced low energy electron yield. The results suggest that ICD may have a significant influence on cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  10. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  11. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. PMID:20655679

  12. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  13. Software for evaluation of EPR-dosimetry performance.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, E A; Timofeev, Yu S; Ivanov, D V

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with tooth enamel is a method extensively used for retrospective external dosimetry. Different research groups apply different equipment, sample preparation procedures and spectrum processing algorithms for EPR dosimetry. A uniform algorithm for description and comparison of performances was designed and implemented in a new computer code. The aim of the paper is to introduce the new software 'EPR-dosimetry performance'. The computer code is a user-friendly tool for providing a full description of method-specific capabilities of EPR tooth dosimetry, from metrological characteristics to practical limitations in applications. The software designed for scientists and engineers has several applications, including support of method calibration by evaluation of calibration parameters, evaluation of critical value and detection limit for registration of radiation-induced signal amplitude, estimation of critical value and detection limit for dose evaluation, estimation of minimal detectable value for anthropogenic dose assessment and description of method uncertainty.

  14. Origin of high-energy electrons beyond the magnetosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. C.; Shen, C. S.

    1966-01-01

    Acceleration of high energy electrons by means of Parker-Wentzel version of Fermi mechanism due to geometry and distorted structure of interplanetary magnetic field near magnetopause in transition region

  15. Ultra high energy electrons powered by pulsar rotation.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swadesh; Machabeli, George; Osmanov, Zaza; Chkheidze, Nino

    2013-01-01

    A new mechanism of particle acceleration, driven by the rotational slow down of the Crab pulsar, is explored. The rotation, through the time dependent centrifugal force, can efficiently excite unstable Langmuir waves in the electron-positron (hereafter e(±)) plasma of the star magnetosphere. These waves, then, Landau damp on electrons accelerating them in the process. The net transfer of energy is optimal when the wave growth and the Landau damping times are comparable and are both very short compared to the star rotation time. We show, by detailed calculations, that these are precisely the conditions for the parameters of the Crab pulsar. This highly efficient route for energy transfer allows the electrons in the primary beam to be catapulted to multiple TeV (~ 100 TeV) and even PeV energy domain. It is expected that the proposed mechanism may, unravel the puzzle of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic ray electrons.

  16. Ultra high energy electrons powered by pulsar rotation.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swadesh; Machabeli, George; Osmanov, Zaza; Chkheidze, Nino

    2013-01-01

    A new mechanism of particle acceleration, driven by the rotational slow down of the Crab pulsar, is explored. The rotation, through the time dependent centrifugal force, can efficiently excite unstable Langmuir waves in the electron-positron (hereafter e(±)) plasma of the star magnetosphere. These waves, then, Landau damp on electrons accelerating them in the process. The net transfer of energy is optimal when the wave growth and the Landau damping times are comparable and are both very short compared to the star rotation time. We show, by detailed calculations, that these are precisely the conditions for the parameters of the Crab pulsar. This highly efficient route for energy transfer allows the electrons in the primary beam to be catapulted to multiple TeV (~ 100 TeV) and even PeV energy domain. It is expected that the proposed mechanism may, unravel the puzzle of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic ray electrons. PMID:23405276

  17. Ultra High Energy Electrons Powered by Pulsar Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Swadesh; Machabeli, George; Osmanov, Zaza; Chkheidze, Nino

    2013-02-01

    A new mechanism of particle acceleration, driven by the rotational slow down of the Crab pulsar, is explored. The rotation, through the time dependent centrifugal force, can efficiently excite unstable Langmuir waves in the electron-positron (hereafter e+/-) plasma of the star magnetosphere. These waves, then, Landau damp on electrons accelerating them in the process. The net transfer of energy is optimal when the wave growth and the Landau damping times are comparable and are both very short compared to the star rotation time. We show, by detailed calculations, that these are precisely the conditions for the parameters of the Crab pulsar. This highly efficient route for energy transfer allows the electrons in the primary beam to be catapulted to multiple TeV (~ 100 TeV) and even PeV energy domain. It is expected that the proposed mechanism may, unravel the puzzle of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic ray electrons.

  18. Diamond dosimetry: Outcomes of the CANDIDO and CONRAD INFN projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciolini, M.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Casati, M.; Cirrone, P.; Cuttone, G.; De Angelis, C.; Lovik, I.; Onori, S.; Raffaele, L.; Sciortino, S.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviews the main results of the study, carried out in the framework of the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) projects, namely CANDIDO and CONRAD, on natural and synthetic diamond-based dosimeters for clinical radiotherapy. Characteristics of diamond such as radiation hardness, high sensitivity, tissue equivalence, etc., make this material interesting for dosimetry applications. For some years, natural diamonds have been commercially available for on-line radiotherapy dosimetry. Nevertheless, recent developments in the "Chemical Vapour Deposition" (CVD) technique have addressed the attention on synthetic samples that potentially could be grown at low cost and with features suitable for dosimetric use. Several samples, differently grown and with different electrical contacts, have been compared by measuring their current response during irradiation with high-energy photon, electron and proton beams. Properties of dosimetric interest such as linearity, pre-irradiation dose, dose rate dependence, stability and rise time have been investigated. The results obtained so far within the INFN collaboration demonstrate the suitability of natural diamond detectors for many radiotherapy applications and the great potential of CVD diamond-based devices even though, at present, the commercial natural diamond dosimeters have a better behaviour with respect to the synthetic samples. Further efforts have to be made mainly to improve the dynamic of response and performance stability.

  19. Parametrization of ambient energy harvesters for complementary balanced electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbelen, Yannick; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2013-05-01

    The specific technical challenges associated with the design of an ambient energy powered electronic system currently requires thorough knowledge of the environment of deployment, energy harvester characteristics and power path management. In this work, a novel flexible model for ambient energy harvesters is presented that allows decoupling of the harvester's physical principles and electrical behavior using a three dimensional function. The model can be adapted to all existing harvesters, resulting in a design methodology for generic ambient energy powered systems using the presented model. Concrete examples are included to demonstrate the versatility of the presented design in the development of electronic appliances on system level.

  20. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  1. Electron injector for compact staged high energy accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, T. L.; Desforges, F. G.; Maitrallain, A.; Dufrénoy, S. Dobosz; Bougeard, M.; Maynard, G.; Lee, P.; Hansson, M.; Aurand, B.; Persson, A.; González, I. Gallardo; Monot, P.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.; Cros, B.

    2016-09-01

    An electron injector for multi-stage laser wakefield experiments is presented. It consists of a variable length gas cell of small longitudinal dimension (⩽ 10 mm). The gas filling process in this cell was characterized both experimentally and with fluid simulation. Electron acceleration experiments were performed at two different laser facilities. Results show low divergence and low pointing fluctuation electron bunches suitable for transport to a second stage, and a peaked energy distribution suitable for injection into the second stage wakefield accelerator.

  2. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  3. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-01

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials. PMID:26646862

  4. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Energy Interchange in the Electron Diffuse Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Glocer, Alex; Himwich, E. W.

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse aurora has recently been shown to be a major contributor of energy flux into the Earth's ionosphere. Therefore, a comprehensive theoretical analysis is required to understand its role in energy redistribution in the coupled ionosphere-magnetosphere system. In previous theoretical descriptions of precipitated magnetospheric electrons (E is approximately 1 keV), the major focus has been the ionization and excitation rates of the neutral atmosphere and the energy deposition rate to thermal ionospheric electrons. However, these precipitating electrons will also produce secondary electrons via impact ionization of the neutral atmosphere. This paper presents the solution of the Boltzman-Landau kinetic equation that uniformly describes the entire electron distribution function in the diffuse aurora, including the affiliated production of secondary electrons (E greater than 600 eV) and their ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling processes. In this article, we discuss for the first time how diffuse electron precipitation into the atmosphere and the associated secondary electron production participate in ionosphere-magnetosphere energy redistribution.

  5. The transfer between electron bulk kinetic energy and thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-15

    By performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the transfer between electron bulk kinetic and electron thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the vicinity of the X line, the electron bulk kinetic energy density is much larger than the electron thermal energy density. The evolution of the electron bulk kinetic energy is mainly determined by the work done by the electric field force and electron pressure gradient force. The work done by the electron gradient pressure force in the vicinity of the X line is changed to the electron enthalpy flux. In the magnetic island, the electron enthalpy flux is transferred to the electron thermal energy due to the compressibility of the plasma in the magnetic island. The compression of the plasma in the magnetic island is the consequence of the electromagnetic force acting on the plasma as the magnetic field lines release their tension after being reconnected. Therefore, we can observe that in the magnetic island the electron thermal energy density is much larger than the electron bulk kinetic energy density.

  6. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  7. Mapping unoccupied electronic states of freestanding graphene by angle-resolved low-energy electron transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicki, Flavio; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-08-01

    We report angle-resolved electron transmission measurements through freestanding graphene sheets in the energy range of 18 to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The measurements are carried out in a low-energy electron point source microscope, which allows simultaneously probing the transmission for a large angular range. The characteristics of low-energy electron transmission through graphene depend on its electronic structure above the vacuum level. The experimental technique described here allows mapping of the unoccupied band structure of freestanding two-dimensional materials as a function of the energy and probing angle, respectively, in-plane momentum. Our experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of a resonance in the band structure of graphene above the vacuum level [V. U. Nazarov, E. E. Krasovskii, and V. M. Silkin, Phys. Rev. B 87, 041405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.041405].

  8. MO-A-BRD-07: Feasibility of X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography as a Tool for Calibration and In Vivo Dosimetry of Radiotherapy Electron and Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hickling, S; Hobson, M; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work simulates radiation-induced acoustic waves to assess the feasibility of x-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) as a dosimeter. XACT exploits the phenomenon that acoustic waves with amplitude proportional to the dose deposited are induced following a radiation pulse. After detecting these acoustic waves with an ultrasound transducer, an image of the dose distribution can be reconstructed in realtime. Methods: Monte Carlo was used to simulate the dose distribution for monoenergetic 6 MeV photon and 9 MeV electron beams incident on a water tank. The dose distribution for a prostate patient planned with a photon 4-field box technique was calculated using clinical treatment planning software. All three dose distributions were converted into initial pressure distributions, and transportation of the induced acoustic waves was simulated using an open-source toolkit. Ideal transducers were placed around the circumference of the target to detect the acoustic waves, and a time reversal reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain an XACT image of the dose for each radiation pulse. Results: For the photon water tank relative dosimetry case, it was found that the normalized acoustic signal amplitude agreed with the normalized dose at depths from 0 cm to 10 cm, with an average percent difference of 0.5%. For the reconstructed in-plane dose distribution of an electron water tank irradiation, all pixels passed a 3%–3 mm 2D gamma test. The reconstructed prostate dose distribution closely resembled the plan, with 89% of pixels passing a 3%–3 mm 2D gamma test. For all situations, the amplitude of the induced acoustic waves ranged from 0.01 Pa to 1 Pa. Conclusion: Based on the amplitude of the radiation-induced acoustic waves and accuracy of the reconstructed dose distributions, XACT is a feasible technique for dosimetry in both calibration and in vivo environments for photon and electron beams and merits further investigation. Funding from NSERC, CIHR and Mc

  9. Controlling the Electron Energy Distribution Function Using an Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Barnat, Edward V.; Hopkins, Mathew M.

    2014-10-01

    Positively biased electrodes inserted into plasmas influence the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) by providing a sink for low energy electrons that would otherwise be trapped by ion sheaths at the chamber walls. We develop a model for the EEDF in a hot filament generated discharge in the presence of positively biased electrodes of various surface areas, and compare the model results with experimental Langmuir probe measurements and particle-in-cell simulations. In the absence of an anode, the EEDF is characterized by a cool trapped population at energies below the sheath energy, and a comparatively warm tail population associated with the filament primaries. Anodes that are small enough to collect a negligible fraction of the electrons exiting the plasma have little affect on the EEDF, but as the anode area approaches √{me /mi }Aw , where Aw is the chamber wall area, the anode collects most of the electrons leaving the plasma. This drastically reduces the density of the otherwise trapped population, causing an effective heating of the electrons and a corresponding density decrease. A global model is developed based on the EEDF model and current balance, which shows the interconnected nature of the electron temperature, density and the plasma potential. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94SL85000, and by the University of Iowa Old Gold Program.

  10. Correlation between excitation temperature and electron temperature with two groups of electron energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hoyong; Choe, Wonho; You, S. J.

    2010-10-15

    The relationship between the electron excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) determined by optical emission spectroscopy and the electron temperature (T{sub e}) using a rf-compensated Langmuir probe was investigated in argon capacitively coupled plasmas. In the experiment performed at the gas pressure range of 30 mTorr to 1 Torr and the rf power range of 5-37 W, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) obtained from the probe current versus voltage characteristic curve showed two energy groups of electrons. The measured EEPF demonstrated that the electron energy distribution changed from Druyvesteyn to single Maxwellian as the discharge current was increased and from bi-Maxwellian to Druyvesteyn as the pressure was increased. As a result, T{sub exc} showed a tendency identical to that of T{sub e} of the high energy part of electrons as pressure and rf power were varied. This suggests that electron temperature can be determined from the measured T{sub exc} through a calibration experiment by which the ratio between electron and excitation temperatures is measured.

  11. Evaluation of Miscellaneous and Electronic Device Energy Use in Hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Douglas R.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; Lai, Judy; Brown, Richard E.; Singer, Brett C.

    2012-09-01

    Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about one-thirdof the primary energy used in US buildings, and their energy use is increasing faster than other end-uses. In healthcare facilities, 30percent of the annual electricity was used by MELs in 2008. This paper presents methods and challenges for estimating medical MELs energy consumption along with estimates of energy use in a hospital by combining device-level metered data with inventories and usage information. An important finding is that common, small devices consume large amounts of energy in aggregate and should not be ignored when trying to address hospital energy use.

  12. Energy and angular anisotropy optimisation of a p-type diode for in vivo dosimetry in photon-beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, Simon; Price, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    We present simulation work using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX that shows that there is a possibility of improving the silicon p-type diode as a radiation dosemeter, by altering the construction of the diode. Altering the diode die thickness can reduce the inherent angular anisotropy of the diode, with little effect on its energy response. Conversely, the contact material and geometry have a large impact on the energy response with little effect on the inherent angular anisotropy. By correct choice of contact material, the typical over-response -100 keV relative to the response at 60Co energy can be reduced from approximately 20 to 4. It is expected that further enhancements may be made with different geometries and materials.

  13. Electron beam energy QA - a note on measurement tolerances.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Juergen; Nyflot, Matthew J; Smith, Wade P; Wottoon, Landon S; Young, Lori; Yang, Fei; Kim, Minsun; Hendrickson, Kristi R G; Ford, Eric; Kalet, Alan M; Cao, Ning; Dempsey, Claire; Sandison, George A

    2016-01-01

    Monthly QA is recommended to verify the constancy of high-energy electron beams generated for clinical use by linear accelerators. The tolerances are defined as 2%/2 mm in beam penetration according to AAPM task group report 142. The practical implementation is typically achieved by measuring the ratio of readings at two different depths, preferably near the depth of maximum dose and at the depth corresponding to half the dose maximum. Based on beam commissioning data, we show that the relationship between the ranges of energy ratios for different electron energies is highly nonlinear. We provide a formalism that translates measurement deviations in the reference ratios into change in beam penetration for electron energies for six Elekta (6-18 MeV) and eight Varian (6-22 MeV) electron beams. Experimental checks were conducted for each Elekta energy to compare calculated values with measurements, and it was shown that they are in agreement. For example, for a 6 MeV beam a deviation in the measured ionization ratio of ± 15% might still be acceptable (i.e., be within ± 2 mm), whereas for an 18 MeV beam the corresponding tolerance might be ± 6%. These values strongly depend on the initial ratio chosen. In summary, the relationship between differences of the ionization ratio and the corresponding beam energy are derived. The findings can be translated into acceptable tolerance values for monthly QA of electron beam energies. PMID:27074488

  14. An electron energy loss spectrometer designed for studies of electronic energy losses and spin waves in the large momentum regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ibach, H.; Rajeswari, J.; Schneider, C. M.

    2011-12-15

    Based on 143 deg. electrostatic deflectors we have realized a new spectrometer for electron energy loss spectroscopy which is particularly suitable for studies on surface spin waves and other low energy electronic energy losses. Contrary to previous designs high resolution is maintained even for diffuse inelastic scattering due to a specific management of the angular aberrations in combination with an angle aperture. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated with high resolution energy loss spectra of surface spin waves on a cobalt film deposited on the Cu(100) surface.

  15. An electron energy loss spectrometer designed for studies of electronic energy losses and spin waves in the large momentum regime.

    PubMed

    Ibach, H; Rajeswari, J; Schneider, C M

    2011-12-01

    Based on 143° electrostatic deflectors we have realized a new spectrometer for electron energy loss spectroscopy which is particularly suitable for studies on surface spin waves and other low energy electronic energy losses. Contrary to previous designs high resolution is maintained even for diffuse inelastic scattering due to a specific management of the angular aberrations in combination with an angle aperture. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated with high resolution energy loss spectra of surface spin waves on a cobalt film deposited on the Cu(100) surface. PMID:22225228

  16. Effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the radiation dose to internal organs is essential for the assessment of radiation risks and benefits to patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures including PET. Respiratory motion induces notable internal organ displacement, which influences the absorbed dose for external exposure to radiation. However, to their knowledge, the effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry has never been reported before. Methods: Thirteen computational models representing the adult male at different respiratory phases corresponding to the normal respiratory cycle were generated from the 4D dynamic XCAT phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the MCNP transport code to estimate the specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of monoenergetic photons/electrons, the S-values of common positron-emitting radionuclides (C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, Cu-64, Ga-68, Rb-82, Y-86, and I-124), and the absorbed dose of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in 28 target regions for both the static (average of dynamic frames) and dynamic phantoms. Results: The self-absorbed dose for most organs/tissues is only slightly influenced by respiratory motion. However, for the lung, the self-absorbed SAF is about 11.5% higher at the peak exhale phase than the peak inhale phase for photon energies above 50 keV. The cross-absorbed dose is obviously affected by respiratory motion for many combinations of source-target pairs. The cross-absorbed S-values for the heart contents irradiating the lung are about 7.5% higher in the peak exhale phase than the peak inhale phase for different positron-emitting radionuclides. For {sup 18}F-FDG, organ absorbed doses are less influenced by respiratory motion. Conclusions: Respiration-induced volume variations of the lungs and the repositioning of internal organs affect the self-absorbed dose of the lungs and cross-absorbed dose between organs in internal radiation dosimetry. The dynamic

  17. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-01-01

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance. PMID:27074452

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition by low-energy electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Furman, D. R.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of detailed atomic cross sections has been used to obtain the spatial deposition of energy by 1-20-eV electrons in molecular hydrogen by a Monte Carlo simulation of the actual trajectories. The energy deposition curve (energy per distance traversed) is quite peaked in the forward direction about the entry point for electrons with energies above the threshold of the electronic states, but the peak decreases and broadens noticeably as the electron energy decreases below 10 eV (threshold for the lowest excitable electronic state of H2). The curve also assumes a very symmetrical shape for energies below 10 eV, indicating the increasing importance of elastic collisions in determining the shape of the curve, although not the mode of energy deposition.

  19. Hybrid Imaging for Patient-Specific Dosimetry in Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy aims to treat malignant diseases by systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals, often using carrier molecules such as peptides and antibodies. The radionuclides used emit electrons or alpha particles as a consequence of radioactive decay, thus leading to local energy deposition. Administration to individual patients can be tailored with regards to the risk of toxicity in normal organs by using absorbed dose planning. The scintillation camera, employed in planar imaging or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), generates images of the spatially and temporally varying activity distribution. Recent commercially available combined SPECT and computed tomography (CT) systems have dramatically increased the possibility of performing accurate dose planning by using the CT information in several steps of the dose-planning calculation chain. This paper discusses the dosimetry chain used for individual absorbed-dose planning and highlights the areas where hybrid imaging makes significant contributions. PMID:26854156

  20. Rotational And Rovibrational Energy Transfer In Electron Collisions With Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Air flows around a hypervelocity reentry vehicle undergo dissociation, rovibrational excitation and ionization. More specifically the air, initially 80% N2 and 20% O2, in the shock layer consists of species such as N, O, N2, O2, NO, N+, O+, N+, O+, NO+ and 2 free electrons. It was pointed out in multi temperature models'' that the temperature of the rotational energy modes and the gas-kinetic translational temperature are quickly equilibrated by a few collisions and rise rapidly to high temperatures as 50000K before falling off to equilibrium value of 10000K. Contrary, the electronic and vibrational temperatures state energy distributions remain low (less than 15000K) because of the slow equilibration. Electron vibrational energy transfer is thought to play a crucial role in such a ionizing flow regime since chemical reaction rates and dissociation depend strongly on the vibrational temperatures. Modeling of these flowfields in principle require the rovibrational excitation and de-excitation cross section data for average electron energies from threshold up to several eV (leV=11605.4 K). In this lecture we focus on theoretical description of rotational effects i.e. energy transfer of electrons to molecules such that the molecular rotational (vojo goes to voj) or vibrational and rotational (v(sub 0)j(sub 0) goes to vj) states are changed. Excitation and de-excitation of electronic states was discussed in a previous talk at this conference.

  1. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  2. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  3. Energy and electron transfer in bifunctional non-conjugated dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Justin Thomas, K R; Thompson, Alexis L; Sivakumar, Aathimanikandan V; Bardeen, Christopher J; Thayumanavan, S

    2005-01-12

    Nonconjugated dendrimers, which are capable of funneling energy from the periphery to the core followed by a charge-transfer process from the core to the periphery, have been synthesized. The energy and electron donors involve a diarylaminopyrene unit and are incorporated at the periphery of these dendrimers. The energy and electron acceptor is at the core of the dendrimer, which involves a chromophore based on a benzthiadiazole moiety. The backbone of the dendrimers is benzyl ether based. A direct electron-transfer quenching of the excited state of the periphery or a sequential energy transfer-electron-transfer pathway are the two limiting mechanisms of the observed photophysical properties. We find that the latter mechanism is prevalent in these dendrimers. The energy transfer occurs on a picosecond time scale, while the charge-transfer process occurs on a nanosecond time scale. The lifetime of the charge separated species was found to be in the range of microseconds. Energy transfer efficiencies ranging from 80% to 90% were determined using both steady-state and time-resolved measurements, while charge-transfer efficiencies ranging from 70% to 80% were deduced from fluorescence quenching of the core chromophore. The dependence of the energy and charge-transfer processes on dendrimer generation is analyzed in terms of the backfolding of the flexible benzyl ether backbone, which leads to a weaker dependence of the energy and charge-transfer efficiencies on dendrimer size than would be expected for a rigid system.

  4. An energy recovery electron linac-on-ring collider

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, L.; Krafft, G.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2000-09-14

    We present the design of high-luminosity electron-proton/ion colliders in which the electrons are produced by an Energy Recovering Linac (ERL). Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33}(per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at currents of a few hundred mA and multi-GeV energies. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  5. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  6. Energy Dependence of SEP Electron and Proton Onset Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, P. A.; Xie, H.; Gopalswamy, N.; St Cyr, O. C.

    2015-12-01

    We study the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events that were detected by GOES in the > 10 MeV energy channel during December 2006 to March 2014. Using multi-spacecraft observations from STEREO A, B and SOHO, we are able to determine accurately the solar particle release (SPR) time of SEP electrons and protons. We first compute connection angles (CA) between the solar events and magnetic foot-points connecting to each spacecraft. By choosing the smallest CA, we derive the electron and proton SPRs using electron fluxes from the SOHO Electron Proton and Helium Instrument (EPHIN), proton fluxes from the SOHO Energetic and Relativistic Nuclei and Electron instrument (ERNE), and from the High Energy Telescope (HET) on STEREO. It is found that: 1) the 0.25 MeV-0.7 MeV electron SPRs are ~10 min earlier than 2.64 MeV - 10.4 Mev electron SPRs; 2) the proton SPRs inferred from high-energy channels (> 50 MeV) are similar to electron SPRs; 3) the proton SPRs inferred from lower energy channel (10 - 16.9 MeV) can be either ~ 7 min earlier than or delayed from the electron SPRs for tens of minutes to hours, especially for SEPs with large pre-event background flux levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of large scattering and high background levels on SPRs and made suggested corrections for the background effect on SPR times. We also find that for some large SEP events, the observed EPHIN electron and ERNE proton intensity profiles show a double-peak feature. The onset of the first peak corresponds well to the associated Type III and metric Type II onset and tends to be nearly scattering-free.

  7. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-05

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  8. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  9. Develop real-time dosimetry concepts and instrumentation for long term missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a rugged portable dosimetry system, based on microdosimetry techniques, which will measure dose and evaluate dose equivalent in a mixed radiation field is described. Progress in the desired dosimetry system can be divided into three distinct areas: development of the radiation detector, and electron system are presented. The mathematical techniques required are investigated.

  10. Electron energy spectra in helium observed in a microplasma collisional electron spectroscopy detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Mustafaev, A. S.; Tsyganov, A. B.; Chirtsov, A. S.; Yakovleva, V. I.

    2012-10-01

    The energy spectra of fast electrons resulting from pair collisions between metastable atoms and from collisions of the second kind with electrons are observed in the afterglow of a helium-filled microplasma collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) detector at a pressure of 5-40 Torr. It is demonstrated that impurities present in the main inert gas can be detected and their composition can be determined using a planar double-electrode detector in which the cathode simultaneously serves as an analyzer of electrons in the afterglow.

  11. Electron energy transport in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scime, Earl; Gary, S. Peter; Phillips, J. L.; Corniileau-Wehrlin, N.; Solomon, J.

    1995-01-01

    The electron heat flux in the solar wind has been measured by the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment in the ecliptic from 1 to 5 AU and out of the ecliptic during the recently completed pass over the solar south pole and the ongoing pass over the solar north pole. Although the electron heat flux contains only a fraction of the kinetic energy of the solar wind. the available energy is sufficient to account for the non-adiabatic expansion of the solar wind electrons. The Ulysses measurements indicate that the electron heat flux is actively dissipated in the solar wind. The exact mechanism or mechanisms is unknown. but a model based on the whistler heat flux instability predicts radial gradients for the electron heat flux in good agreement with the data. We will present measurements of the correlation between wave activity measured by the unified radio and plasma experiment (URAP) and the electron heat flux throughout the Ulysses mission. The goal is to determine if whistler waves are a good candidate for the observed electron heat flux dissipation. The latitudinal gradients of the electron heat flux. wave activity. and electron pressure will be discussed in light of the changes in the magnetic field geometry from equator to poles.

  12. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios.

  13. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. PMID:27337649

  14. High Energy Electron and Gamma - Ray Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons, and at very high energies gamma-ray photons as well. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well. ATIC has had its first 16 day balloon flight at the turn of the year over Antarctica, and first results obtained using the analysis methods derived from simulations and calibrations will be reported.

  15. Energy of auroral electrons and Z mode generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of Z-mode radiation generation, in light of observational results indicating that the O mode and second-harmonic X-mode emissions can prevail over the X-mode fundamental radiation when suprathermal electron energy is low, gives attention to whether the thermal effect on the Z-mode dispersion can be equally important, and whether the Z-mode can compete for the available free-energy source. It is found that, under suitable circumstances, the growth rate of the Z-mode can be substantial even for low suprathermal auroral electron energies. Growth is generally maximized for propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  16. Feasibility of Electron Cooling for Low-Energy RHIC Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-04-01

    A concrete interest in running RHIC at low energies in a range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon total energy of a single beam has recently emerged. Providing collisions in this energy range, which in the RHIC case is termed 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with electron cooling applied directly in RHIC at low energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvement with electron cooling, possible technical approaches and various limitations.

  17. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  18. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  19. Quantitative imaging for clinical dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardiès, Manuel; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Monsieurs, Myriam; Savolainen, Sauli; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2006-12-01

    Patient-specific dosimetry in nuclear medicine is now a legal requirement in many countries throughout the EU for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) applications. In order to achieve that goal, an increased level of accuracy in dosimetry procedures is needed. Current research in nuclear medicine dosimetry should not only aim at developing new methods to assess the delivered radiation absorbed dose at the patient level, but also to ensure that the proposed methods can be put into practice in a sufficient number of institutions. A unified dosimetry methodology is required for making clinical outcome comparisons possible.

  20. The CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility for dosimetry at commercial flight altitudes and in space.

    PubMed

    Mitaroff, A; Cern, M Silari

    2002-01-01

    A reference facility for the calibration and intercomparison of active and passive detectors in broad neutron fields has been available at CERN since 1992. A positively charged hadron beam (a mixture of protons and pions) with momentum of 120 GeV/c hits a copper target, 50 cm thick and 7 cm in diameter. The secondary particles produced in the interaction traverse a shield, at 90 degrees with respect to the direction of the incoming beam. made of either 80 to 160 cm of concrete or 40 cm of iron. Behind the iron shield, the resulting neutron spectrum has a maximum at about 1 MeV, with an additional high-energy component. Behind the 80 cm concrete shield, the neutron spectrum has a second pronounced maximum at about 70 MeV and resembles the high-energy component of the radiation field created by cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. This paper describes the facility, reports on the latest neutron spectral measurements, gives an overview of the most important experiments performed by the various collaborating institutions over recent years and briefly addresses the possible application of the facility to measurements related to the space programme.

  1. The CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility for dosimetry at commercial flight altitudes and in space.

    PubMed

    Mitaroff, A; Cern, M Silari

    2002-01-01

    A reference facility for the calibration and intercomparison of active and passive detectors in broad neutron fields has been available at CERN since 1992. A positively charged hadron beam (a mixture of protons and pions) with momentum of 120 GeV/c hits a copper target, 50 cm thick and 7 cm in diameter. The secondary particles produced in the interaction traverse a shield, at 90 degrees with respect to the direction of the incoming beam. made of either 80 to 160 cm of concrete or 40 cm of iron. Behind the iron shield, the resulting neutron spectrum has a maximum at about 1 MeV, with an additional high-energy component. Behind the 80 cm concrete shield, the neutron spectrum has a second pronounced maximum at about 70 MeV and resembles the high-energy component of the radiation field created by cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. This paper describes the facility, reports on the latest neutron spectral measurements, gives an overview of the most important experiments performed by the various collaborating institutions over recent years and briefly addresses the possible application of the facility to measurements related to the space programme. PMID:12212904

  2. Low Energy Electrons in the Mars Plasma Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The ionosphere of Mars is rather poorly understood. The only direct measurements were performed by the Viking 1 and 2 landers in 1976, both of which carried a Retarding Potential Analyzer. The RPA was designed to measure ion properties during the descent, although electron fluxes were estimated from changes in the ion currents. Using these derived low-energy electron fluxes, Mantas and Hanson studied the photoelectron and the solar wind electron interactions with the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. Unanswered questions remain regarding the origin of the low-energy electron fluxes in the vicinity of the Mars plasma boundary. Crider, in an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer measurements, has attributed the formation of the magnetic pile-up boundary to electron impact ionization of exospheric neutral species by solar wind electrons. However, the role of photoelectrons escaping from the lower ionosphere was not determined. In the proposed work, we will examine the role of solar wind and ionospheric photoelectrons in producing ionization in the upper ionosphere of Mars. Low-energy (< 4 keV) electrons will be modeled using the two-stream electron transport code of Link. The code models both external (solar wind) and internal (photoelectron) sources of ionization, and accounts for Auger electron production. The code will be used to analyze Mars Global Surveyor measurements of solar wind and photoelectrons down to altitudes below 200 km in the Mars ionosphere, in order to determine the relative roles of solar wind and escaping photoelectrons in maintaining plasma densities in the region of the Mars plasma boundary.

  3. Application of jade samples for high-dose dosimetry using the EPR technique.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Maria Inês; Melo, Adeilson P; Ferraz, Gilberto M; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    The dosimeter characteristics of jade samples were studied for application in high-dose dosimetry. Jade is the common denomination of two silicates: jadeite and actinolite. The EPR spectra of different jade samples were obtained after irradiation with absorbed doses of 100 Gy up to 20 kGy. The jade samples present signals that increase with the absorbed dose (g-factors around 2.00); they can be attributed to electron centers. The EPR spectra obtained for the USA jade samples and their main dosimetric properties as reproducibility, calibration curves and energy dependence were investigated.

  4. Thermoluminescence dosimetry features of DY and Cu doped SrF2 nanoparticles under gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zahedifar, M; Sadeghi, E; Kashefi biroon, M; Harooni, S; Almasifard, F

    2015-11-01

    Dy and Cu-doped SrF2 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using co-precipitation method and their possible application to solid state dosimetry were studied and compared to that of pure SrF2 NPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) were used for sample characterization. The highest thermoluminescence (TL) response of SrF2:Dy and SrF2:Cu NPs were found respectively at 0.5 and 0.7mol% of Dy and Cu impurities. Seven overlapping glow peaks at 384, 406, 421, 449, 569, 495, 508K and three component glow peaks at 381, 421 and 467K were identified respectively for SrF2:Dy and SrF2:Cu NPs employing Tm-Tstop and computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) methods. The TL sensitivity of SrF2:Dy is approximately the same as that of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) cheeps. Linear dose response were observed for the SrF2:Dy and SrF2:Cu NPs up to the absorbed doses of 1kGy and 10kGy correspondingly. Regarding other dosimetry characteristics of the produced NPs such as fading, reproducibility and thermal treatment, Dy and Cu doped SrF2 NPs recommend for high dose TL dosimetry applications.

  5. Calibration of imaging plate for high energy electron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuo A.; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Sato, Takashi; Kodama, Ryosuke; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Takahashi, Teruyoshi; Ikeda, Toshiji; Honda, Yoshihide; Okuda, Shuuichi

    2005-01-01

    A high energy electron spectrometer has been designed and tested using imaging plate (IP). The measurable energy range extends from 1to100MeV or even higher. The IP response in this energy range is calibrated using electrons from L-band and S-band LINAC accelerator at energies 11.5, 30, and 100MeV. The calibration has been extended to 0.2MeV using an existing data and Monte Carlo simulation Electron Gamma Shower code. The calibration results cover the energy from 0.2to100MeV and show almost a constant sensitivity for electrons over 1MeV energy. The temperature fading of the IP shows a 40% reduction after 80min of the data taken at 22.5°C. Since the fading is not significant after this time we set the waiting time to be 80min. The oblique incidence effect has been studied to show that there is a 1/cosθ relation when the incidence angle is θ.

  6. Steering continuum electron dynamics by low-energy attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ji-Wei; Xiong, Wei-Hao; Xiao, Xiang-Ru; Gong, Qihuang; Peng, Liang-You

    2016-08-01

    A semiclassical model is developed to understand the electronic dynamics in the low-energy attosecond streaking. Under a relatively strong infrared (IR) pulse, the low-energy part of photoelectrons initialized by a single attosecond pulse (SAP) can either rescatter with the ionic core and induce interferences structures in the momentum spectra of the ionized electrons or be recaptured into the Rydberg states. The Coulomb potential plays essential roles in both the electron rescattering and recapturing processes. We find that by changing the time delay between the SAP and the IR pulse, the photoelectrons yield or the population of the Rydberg states can be effectively controlled. The present study demonstrates a fascinating way to steer the electron motion in the continuum.

  7. Numerical simulation of electron energy loss near inhomogeneous dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    The nonrelativistic energy loss suffered by fast electrons passing near dielectric interfaces of arbitrary shape is calculated by solving Poisson{close_quote}s equation using the boundary-charge method. The potential induced by a moving electron is expressed in terms of surface-charge distributions placed at the interfaces. These surface charges, obtained by self-consistently solving the resulting integral equation, act back on the electron producing a retarding force and hence energy loss. The dielectrics are described by frequency-dependent dielectric functions. Two particular cases are discussed in further detail: interfaces invariant under translation along one particular direction and axially symmetric interfaces. Previous results for simple geometries, such as planes, spheres, and cylinders, based upon analytical solutions, are fully reproduced within this approach. Calculations are presented for electrons moving near wedges, coupled parallel cylinders, coupled spheres, and toroidal surfaces. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Sustainably powering wearable electronics solely by biomechanical energy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Li, Shengming; Yi, Fang; Zi, Yunlong; Lin, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Youlong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    Harvesting biomechanical energy is an important route for providing electricity to sustainably drive wearable electronics, which currently still use batteries and therefore need to be charged or replaced/disposed frequently. Here we report an approach that can continuously power wearable electronics only by human motion, realized through a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) with optimized materials and structural design. Fabricated by elastomeric materials and a helix inner electrode sticking on a tube with the dielectric layer and outer electrode, the TENG has desirable features including flexibility, stretchability, isotropy, weavability, water-resistance and a high surface charge density of 250 μC m−2. With only the energy extracted from walking or jogging by the TENG that is built in outsoles, wearable electronics such as an electronic watch and fitness tracker can be immediately and continuously powered. PMID:27677971

  9. Developments in low energy electron beam machinery and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, S. V.; Chrusciel, J.; Cleghorn, D. A.; Rangwalla, I.

    2003-08-01

    The engineering and development of a new generation of low energy, high power electron beam equipment is presented. Operating voltages range from 80 to 125 kV at widths to 1.65 m. At 110 kV these systems deliver 1000 Mrad m min -1 at 110 kV. Equipment operating power levels and their impact on reducing equipment size and cost are reviewed. The advantages of electron curing at these reduced operating voltages are described. The principles of the electron beam fluidized bed process for the treatment of powders and particulates in high-speed pneumatic transport are discussed. Typical system performances for polymer dissociation and crosslinking, or for agroproduct disinfestation and disinfection are presented. A process for the sterilization of polymer food containers employing the injection of low energy electrons through the open mouth has been developed. Some of its sterilization capabilities for bottles up to 2 l capacity are described.

  10. Optical and electronic properties of some semiconductors from energy gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil K.; Pattanaik, Anup

    2016-03-01

    II-VI and III-V tetrahedral semiconductors have significant potential for novel optoelectronic applications. In the present work, some of the optical and electronic properties of these groups of semiconductors have been studied using a recently proposed empirical relationship for refractive index from energy gap. The calculated values of these properties are also compared with those calculated from some well known relationships. From an analysis of the calculated electronic polarisability of these tetrahedral binary semiconductors from different formulations, we have proposed an empirical relation for its calculation. The predicted values of electronic polarisability of these semiconductors agree fairly well with the known values over a wide range of energy gap. The proposed empirical relation has also been used to calculate the electronic polarisability of some ternary compounds.

  11. Theoretical interpretation of electron energy-loss spectroscopic images

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, L. J.; D'Alfonso, Adrian J.; Findlay, Scott D.; Oxley, Mark P.; Bosman, M.; Keast, V. J.; Cossgriff, E. C.; Behan, G.; Nellist, P. D.; Kirkland, Angus I.

    2008-04-10

    In this paper, we discuss the theory of electron energy-loss spectroscopic images in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Three case studies are presented which have as common themes issues of inelastic scattering, coherence and image interpretation. The first is a state-by-state inelastic transitions analysis of a spectroscopic image which does not admit direct visual interpretation. The second compares theory and experiment for two-dimensional mapping. Finally, the third considers imaging in three dimensions via depth sectioning.

  12. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  13. The Role of Resonant Vibrations in Electronic Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, Oscar J. G.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear vibrations play a prominent role in the spectroscopy and dynamics of electronic systems. As recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest, this may be even more so when vibrational frequencies are resonant with transitions between the electronic states. Herein, a vibronic multilevel Redfield model is reported for excitonically coupled electronic two‐level systems with a few explicitly included vibrational modes and interacting with a phonon bath. With numerical simulations the effects of the quantized vibrations on the dynamics of energy transfer and coherence in a model dimer are illustrated. The resonance between the vibrational frequency and energy gap between the sites leads to a large delocalization of vibronic states, which then results in faster energy transfer and longer‐lived mixed coherences. PMID:26910485

  14. Flexible Nanogenerators for Energy Harvesting and Self-Powered Electronics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Feng Ru; Tang, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-01

    Flexible nanogenerators that efficiently convert mechanical energy into electrical energy have been extensively studied because of their great potential for driving low-power personal electronics and self-powered sensors. Integration of flexibility and stretchability to nanogenerator has important research significance that enables applications in flexible/stretchable electronics, organic optoelectronics, and wearable electronics. Progress in nanogenerators for mechanical energy harvesting is reviewed, mainly including two key technologies: flexible piezoelectric nanogenerators (PENGs) and flexible triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). By means of material classification, various approaches of PENGs based on ZnO nanowires, lead zirconate titanate (PZT), poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), 2D materials, and composite materials are introduced. For flexible TENG, its structural designs and factors determining its output performance are discussed, as well as its integration, fabrication and applications. The latest representative achievements regarding the hybrid nanogenerator are also summarized. Finally, some perspectives and challenges in this field are discussed.

  15. Comparison of CREME (cosmic-ray effects on microelectronics) model LET (linear energy transfer) spaceflight dosimetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Letaw, J.R.; Adams, J.H.

    1986-07-15

    The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) component of space radiation is the dominant cause of single-event phenomena in microelectronic circuits when Earth's magnetic shielding is low. Spaceflights outside the magnetosphere and in high inclination orbits are examples of such circumstances. In high-inclination orbits, low-energy (high LET) particles are transmitted through the field only at extreme latitudes, but can dominate the orbit-averaged dose. GCR is an important part of the radiation dose to astronauts under the same conditions. As a test of the CREME environmental model and particle transport codes used to estimate single event upsets, we have compiled existing measurements of HZE doses were compiled where GCR is expected to be important: Apollo 16 and 17, Skylab, Apollo Soyuz Test Project, and Kosmos 782. The LET spectra, due to direct ionization from GCR, for each of these missions has been estimated. The resulting comparisons with data validate the CREME model predictions of high-LET galactic cosmic-ray fluxes to within a factor of two. Some systematic differences between the model and data are identified.

  16. Superconductor digital electronics: Scalability and energy efficiency issues (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpygo, Sergey K.

    2016-05-01

    Superconductor digital electronics using Josephson junctions as ultrafast switches and magnetic-flux encoding of information was proposed over 30 years ago as a sub-terahertz clock frequency alternative to semiconductor electronics based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Recently, interest in developing superconductor electronics has been renewed due to a search for energy saving solutions in applications related to high-performance computing. The current state of superconductor electronics and fabrication processes are reviewed in order to evaluate whether this electronics is scalable to a very large scale integration (VLSI) required to achieve computation complexities comparable to CMOS processors. A fully planarized process at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, perhaps the most advanced process developed so far for superconductor electronics, is used as an example. The process has nine superconducting layers: eight Nb wiring layers with the minimum feature size of 350 nm, and a thin superconducting layer for making compact high-kinetic-inductance bias inductors. All circuit layers are fully planarized using chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of SiO2 interlayer dielectric. The physical limitations imposed on the circuit density by Josephson junctions, circuit inductors, shunt and bias resistors, etc., are discussed. Energy dissipation in superconducting circuits is also reviewed in order to estimate whether this technology, which requires cryogenic refrigeration, can be energy efficient. Fabrication process development required for increasing the density of superconductor digital circuits by a factor of ten and achieving densities above 107 Josephson junctions per cm2 is described.

  17. Collective electron driven linac for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1983-08-01

    A linac design is presented in which an intense ultrarelativistic electron bunch is used to excite fields in a series of cavities and accelerate charged particles. The intense electron bunch is generated in a simple storage ring to have the required transverse and longitudinal dimensions. The bunch is then transferred to the linac. The linac structure can be inexpensively constructed of spacers and washers. The fields in the cells resulting from the bunch passage are calculated using the program BCI. The results show that certain particles within the driving bunch and also trailing particles of any sign charge can be accelerated. With existing electron storage rings, accelerating gradients greater than 16 MV/m are possible. Examples of two accelerators are given: a 30 GeV electron/positron accelerator useful as an injector for a high energy storage ring and 2) a 110 GeV per beam electron-positron collider.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Advances in the determination of absorbed dose to water in clinical high-energy photon and electron beams using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiful Huq, M.; Andreo, Pedro

    2004-02-01

    During the last two decades, absorbed dose to water in clinical photon and electron beams was determined using dosimetry protocols and codes of practice based on radiation metrology standards of air kerma. It is now recommended that clinical reference dosimetry be based on standards of absorbed dose to water. Newer protocols for the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, based on the use of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, ND,w, in a standards laboratory's reference quality beam, have been published by several national or regional scientific societies and international organizations. Since the publication of these protocols multiple theoretical and experimental dosimetry comparisons between the various ND,w based recommendations, and between the ND,w and the former air kerma (NK) based protocols, have been published. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the dosimetry protocols based on these standards and of the intercomparisons of the different protocols published in the literature, discussing the reasons for the observed discrepancies between them. A summary of the various types of standards of absorbed dose to water, together with an analysis of the uncertainties along the various steps of the dosimetry chain for the two types of formalism, is also included. It is emphasized that the NK-ND,air and ND,w formalisms have very similar uncertainty when the same criteria are used for both procedures. Arguments are provided in support of the recommendation for a change in reference dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water.

  19. In situ electron energy-loss spectroscopy in liquids.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Megan E; Yu, Yingchao; Gao, Jie; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2013-08-01

    In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the liquid cell holder shadows the detector and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS in the study of chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap, and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio regime as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in an aqueous solution. The potential for the use of valence EELS to understand in situ STEM reactions is demonstrated for beam-induced deposition of metallic copper: as copper clusters grow, EELS develops low-loss peaks corresponding to metallic copper. From these techniques, in situ imaging and valence EELS offer insights into the local electronic structure of nanoparticles and chemical reactions. PMID:23721691

  20. Electron energy transport and magnetic curvature driven modes

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Tang, W.M.

    1984-10-01

    A transport coefficient for anomalous electron thermal conduction is constructed on the basis of the so-called Principle of Profile Consistency. It is assumed that the relevant modes in plasma where a substantial fraction of the electron population is magnetically trapped produce magnetic reconnection at a microscopic level and are driven by the combined effects of the plasma pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature. Consequently, the scaling for the electron energy confinement time exhibits a strongly favorable dependence on the radius of magnetic curvature.

  1. Numerically fitting the electron Fermi energy and the electron fraction in a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xing Hu; Gao, Zhi Fu; Li, Xiang Dong; Xu, Yan; Wang, Pei; Wang, Na; Peng, Qiu He

    2016-10-01

    Based on the basic definition of the Fermi energy of degenerate and relativistic electrons, we obtain a special solution to the electron Fermi energy, EF(e), and express EF(e) as a function of the electron fraction, Ye, and matter density, ρ. We obtain several useful analytical formula for Ye and ρ within classical models and the work of Dutra et al. (2014) (Type-2) in relativistic mean-field theory are obtained using numerically fitting. When describing the mean-field Lagrangian, density, we adopt the TMA parameter set, which is remarkably consistent with the updated astrophysical observations of neutron stars (NSs). Due to the importance of the density dependence of the symmetry energy, J, in nuclear astrophysics, a brief discussion on J and its slop is presented. Combining these fitting formula with boundary conditions for different density regions, we can evaluate the value of EF(e) in any given matter density, and obtain a schematic diagram of EF(e) as a continuous function of ρ. Compared with previous studies on the electron Fermi energy in other studies models, our methods of calculating EF(e) are more simple and convenient, and can be universally suitable for the relativistic electron regions in the circumstances of common neutron stars. We have deduced a general expression of EF(e) and ne, which could be used to indirectly test whether one equation of state of a NS is correct in our future studies on neutron star matter properties. Since URCA reactions are expected in the center of a massive star due to high-value electron Fermi energy and electron fraction, this study could be useful in the future studies on the NS thermal evolution.

  2. Energy Spectrum of Cosmic-Ray Electrons at TeV Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Sahakian, V.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Chadwick, P. M.; Cheesebrough, A.; Dickinson, H. J.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Keogh, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Nolan, S. J.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Rayner, S. M.; Rulten, C. B.; Spangler, D.; Ward, M.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Borrel, V.; Olive, J-F.

    2008-12-31

    The very large collection area of ground-based {gamma}-ray telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon or satellite based instruments in the detection of very-high-energy (>600 GeV) cosmic-ray electrons. Here we present the electron spectrum derived from data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. In this measurement, the first of this type, we are able to extend the measurement of the electron spectrum beyond the range accessible to direct measurements. We find evidence for a substantial steepening in the energy spectrum above 600 GeV compared to lower energies.

  3. High time resolution electron measurement by Fast Electron energy Spectrum Analyzer (FESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Fujimoto, Masaki; Maezawa, Kiyoshi; Shinohara, Iku; Tsuda, Yuichi; Sasaki, Shintaro; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2009-06-16

    We have newly developed an electron energy analyzer FESA (Fast Electron energy Spectrum Analyzer) for a future magnetospheric satellite mission SCOPE. The SCOPE mission is designed in order that observational studies from the cross-scale coupling viewpoint are enabled. One of the key observations necessary for the SCOPE mission is high-time resolution electron measurement. Eight FESAs on a spinning spacecraft are capable of measuring three dimensional electron distribution function with time resolution of 8 msec. FESA consists of two electrostatic analyzers that are composed of three nested hemispherical deflectors. Single FESA functions as four top-hat type electrostatic analyzers that can measure electrons with four different energies simultaneously. By measuring the characteristics of the test model FESA, we proved the validity of the design concept of FESA. Based on the measured characteristics, we designed FESA optimized for the SCOPE mission. This optimized analyzer has good enough performance to measure three dimensional electron distribution functions around the magnetic reconnection region in the Earth's magnetotail.

  4. Study of energy delivery and mean free path of low energy electrons in EUV resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Suchit; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2016-03-01

    The relative importance of secondary electrons in delivering energy in photoresist films was assessed by performing large area exposures and by quantifying the inelastic mean free path of electrons in a leading chemically amplified positive tone EUV resist. A low energy electron microscope was used to directly pattern large (~15μm x 20μm) features with 15-80 eV electrons followed by analyzing the resulting dissolution rate contrast curve data. In the 40 to 80 eV regime the energy delivery was found to scale roughly proportionally with electron energy. In 15 to 30 eV regime however, this energy scaling did not explain the resist thickness loss data. The dose required to lower the resist thickness down to 20 nm was found to be 2-5X larger for 15 eV electrons than for 20, 25 and 30 eV electrons. Using scattering models from the literature including phonon scattering and optical data deduced electron energy loss spectroscopy and optical reflectometry, the inelastic mean free path values at energies between 10 eV and 92 eV range between about 2.8 and 0.6 nm respectively.

  5. Equation satisfied by the energy-density functional for electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that the electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy-density functional V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}] satisfies the equationV{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]-V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}]={integral}d{sup 3}r({delta}V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]/{delta}{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r))[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r)-{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r)], where {rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r) and {rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r) are N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential of the N-electron system at coupling strength {gamma}.

  6. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  7. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ε{sub T} from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ε{sub T} from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ε{sub T}.

  8. The International Reactor Dosimetry File.

    1994-01-19

    Version 01 The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-90) contains recommended neutron cross-section data to be used for reactor neutron dosimetry by foil activation. It also contains selected recommended values for radiation damage cross-sections and benchmark neutron spectra. This library supersedes all earlier versions of IRDF.

  9. High energy primary electron spectrum observed by the emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Aizu, H.; Hiraiwa, N.; Taira, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Niu, K.; Koss, T. A.; Lord, J. J.; Golden, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector of the emulsion chamber type is used to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons. Two large emulsion chambers, each having an area of 40 by 50 sq cm, are exposed for about 25.5 hr at an average pressure altitude of 3.9 mbar. About 500 high-energy cascades (no less than about 600 GeV) are detected by searching for dark spots on the X-ray films. A power-law energy dependence formula is derived for the spectrum of primary cosmic-ray electrons in the energy region over 100 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the transition curves obtained previously by theoretical and Monte Carlo calculations.

  10. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  11. A Three Dimensional Calculation of Electron Energy Loss in a Variable Parameter Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.; Pellegrini, C.

    1980-03-01

    A single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) using a wiggler magnet with either the period, and/or the magnetic field, varying along the magnet axis has been proposed. The main advantage of this system over a conventional free-electron laser, having a constant period and magnetic field wiggler, is in the higher efficiency of the energy transfer from the electron beam to the laser radiation field. This efficiency, which is of the order of 1% in a conventional FEL, can be of the order of 30% in a variable wiggler FEL. The theory of the variable wiggler FEL is based on a one dimensional model, in which the electron motion transverse to the laser axis is assumed to be given and only the motion parallel to the axis is studied. In this paper, the effect on the laser efficiency of the electron transverse motion is studied and the electron energy loss is evaluated for a beam having a spread in angle and in the transverse position at the wiggler entrance. The complete three dimensional equations of motion for an electron interacting with the laser field and the wiggler field are integrated numerically. Only the case of a small gain regime, assuming that the laser field intensity remains constant, is considered. Also, this study is limited to the case of a helical wiggler. The results are compared with the one dimensional model. The effect of the initial position and angular spread can, to a good approximation, be considered equivalent to an increase in the energy spread. The limits for this increased energy spread that must not be exceeded in order to avoid a loss in efficiency are nearly the same as in the one dimensional model.

  12. Interaction Determined Electron Energy Levels in One-Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Michael; Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, Kalarikad; Smith, Luke; Creeth, Graham; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David; Jones, Geraint; Jonathan, Griffiths; UCL Collaboration; Cavendish Laboratory Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated electron transport in a quasi-one dimensional electron gas in the GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructure designed so that the confinement potential can be progressively weakened. This causes the energy levels to decrease in energy relative to each other, however this decrease occurs at different rates, a feature attributed to the energy being determined by both confinement and the electron-electron repulsion which varies with the shape of the wavefunction. It is found that the initial ground state crosses the higher levels so resulting in missing plateaux of quantised conductance. A change in the nature of the ground state to a more extended form causes an increase in the capacitance between the confining gates and the electrons. Both crossings and anti-crossings of the levels are found and these will be discussed along with other consequences of the form of the level interactions. The effects of level crossing on the spin dependent 0.7 structure will be presented. Supported by EPSRC (UK).

  13. The beta-SiC(100) surface studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayan, M.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-SiC(100) surface has been studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, high resolution electron energy loss spectra (HREELS), and core level excitation EELS. Two new Si-terminated phases have been discovered, one with (3 x 2) symmetry, and the other with (2 x 1) symmetry. Models are presented to describe these phases. New results, for the C-rich surface, are presented and discussed. In addition, core level excitation EELS results are given and compared with theory.

  14. Low energy electron diffraction using an electronic delay-line detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Human, D.; Hu, X. F.; Hirschmugl, C. J.; Ociepa, J.; Hall, G.; Jagutzki, O.; Ullmann-Pfleger, K.

    2006-02-01

    A low energy electron diffraction (LEED) instrument incorporating a delay line detector has been constructed to rapidly collect high-quality digital LEED images with low total electron exposures. The system uses a position-sensitive pulse-counting detector with high bias current microchannel plates. This delay-line detector combined with a femtoampere electron gun offers a wide range of flexibility, with electron dosing currents ranging from 0.15pAto0.3fA. Using the highest current setting and collecting 1×106 counts per image, individual LEED images can be completed in 4s with an acquisition rate of 250kHz and a total electron exposure of 5×106 electrons. Under the latter conditions, images can be collected in 20min with an acquisition rate of 1kHz with a total electron exposure of 2×106 electrons. An angular width of 0.13° at 108eV is demonstrated, which means that domain sizes as large as 600Å can be resolved, depending on the surface quality of the crystal. The system electronics collect 2048×2048pixel images with a spatial resolution of about 75μm. The dynamic range of this system is 32bits/pixel (limited only by physical memory). The construction of the detector results in a "plus"-shaped artifact, which requires that, for a given sample orientation, two images be taken at a relative angle of 45°. Identical current-voltage curves from an MgO(111)1×1H terminated sample, taken during several hours of exposure to the low current electron beam, demonstrate minimal electron induced H desorption.

  15. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  16. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  17. Electronic correlation in magnetic contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    For interacting electrons the density of transitions [see http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288] replaces the density of states in calculations of structural energies. Extending previous work on paramagnetic metals, this approach is applied to correlation effects on the structural stability of magnetic transition metals. Supported by the H. V. Snyder Gift to the University of Oregon.

  18. Energy spectrum and wavefunction of electrons in hybrid superconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruchinin, S. P.

    2016-03-01

    Recent experiments have fabricated structured arrays. We study hybrid nanowires, in which normal and superconducting regions are in close proximity, by using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for superconductivity in a cylindrical nanowire. We succeed to obtain the quantum energy levels and wavefunctions of a superconducting nanowire. The obtained spectra of electrons remind Hofstadter’s butterfly.

  19. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  20. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for applicationmore » to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.« less

  1. Development of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in the Biological Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Aronova, M.A.; Leapman, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The high sensitivity of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for detecting light elements at the nanoscale makes it a valuable technique for application to biological systems. In particular, EELS provides quantitative information about elemental distributions within subcellular compartments, specific atoms bound to individual macromolecular assemblies, and the composition of bionanoparticles. The EELS data can be acquired either in the fixed beam energy-filtered transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) or in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), and recent progress in the development of both approaches has greatly expanded the range of applications for EELS analysis. Near single atom sensitivity is now achievable for certain elements bound to isolated macromolecules, and it becomes possible to obtain three-dimensional compositional distributions from sectioned cells through EFTEM tomography. PMID:23049161

  2. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Nordlund, Kai; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Weber, William J.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2015-01-01

    Even though the effects of the electronic excitations during high-energy radiation damage processes are not currently understood, it is shown that their role in the interaction of radiation with matter is important. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in bcc-tungsten using the coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron–phonon interaction. We compare the combination of these effects on the induced damage with only the effect of electronic stopping, and conclude in several novel insights. In the 2T-MD model, the electron–phonon coupling results in less damage production in themore » molten region and in faster relaxation of the damage at short times. We show these two effects lead to a significantly smaller amount of the final damage at longer times.« less

  3. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Nordlund, Kai; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Weber, William J.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2015-01-01

    Even though the effects of the electronic excitations during high-energy radiation damage processes are not currently understood, it is shown that their role in the interaction of radiation with matter is important. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in bcc-tungsten using the coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron–phonon interaction. We compare the combination of these effects on the induced damage with only the effect of electronic stopping, and conclude in several novel insights. In the 2T-MD model, the electron–phonon coupling results in less damage production in the molten region and in faster relaxation of the damage at short times. We show these two effects lead to a significantly smaller amount of the final damage at longer times.

  4. Low-energy dissociative electron attachment to CF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourou, S. T.; Larson, Ã.; Orel, A. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a theoretical study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) of low-energy electrons to CF2. We carried out electron scattering calculations using the complex Kohn variational method at the static-exchange and relaxed self-consistent field (SCF) level at the equilibrium geometry and compare our differential cross sections to other results. We then repeated these calculations as a function of the three internal degrees of freedom to obtain the resonance energy surfaces and autoionization widths. We use this data as input to form the Hamiltonian relevant to the nuclear dynamics. The multidimensional wave equation is solved using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach within the local approximation.

  5. Curing Composite Materials Using Lower-Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Catherine A.; Bykanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In an improved method of fabricating composite-material structures by laying up prepreg tapes (tapes of fiber reinforcement impregnated by uncured matrix materials) and then curing them, one cures the layups by use of beams of electrons having kinetic energies in the range of 200 to 300 keV. In contrast, in a prior method, one used electron beams characterized by kinetic energies up to 20 MeV. The improved method was first suggested by an Italian group in 1993, but had not been demonstrated until recently. With respect to both the prior method and the present improved method, the impetus for the use of electron- beam curing is a desire to avoid the high costs of autoclaves large enough to effect thermal curing of large composite-material structures. Unfortunately, in the prior method, the advantages of electron-beam curing are offset by the need for special walls and ceilings on curing chambers to shield personnel from x rays generated by impacts of energetic electrons. These shields must be thick [typically 2 to 3 ft (about 0.6 to 0.9 m) if made of concrete] and are therefore expensive. They also make it difficult to bring large structures into and out of the curing chambers. Currently, all major companies that fabricate composite-material spacecraft and aircraft structures form their layups by use of automated tape placement (ATP) machines. In the present improved method, an electron-beam gun is attached to an ATP head and used to irradiate the tape as it is pressed onto the workpiece. The electron kinetic energy between 200 and 300 keV is sufficient for penetration of the ply being laid plus one or two of the plies underneath it. Provided that the electron-beam gun is properly positioned, it is possible to administer the required electron dose and, at the same time, to protect personnel with less shielding than is needed in the prior method. Adequate shielding can be provided by concrete walls 6 ft (approximately equal to 1.8 m) high and 16 in. (approximately

  6. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  7. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-08-09

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  8. Characterizing Localized Surface Plasmons Using Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherqui, Charles; Thakkar, Niket; Li, Guoliang; Camden, Jon P.; Masiello, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) offers a window to view nanoscale properties and processes. When performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope, EELS can simultaneously render images of nanoscale objects with subnanometer spatial resolution and correlate them with spectroscopic information at a spectral resolution of ˜10-100 meV. Consequently, EELS is a near-perfect tool for understanding the optical and electronic properties of individual plasmonic metal nanoparticles and few-nanoparticle assemblies, which are significant in a wide range of fields. This review presents an overview of basic plasmonics and EELS theory and highlights several recent noteworthy experiments involving the interrogation of plasmonic metal nanoparticle systems using electron beams.

  9. Plasma Jet Braking: Energy Dissipation and Nonadiabatic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Cully, C. M.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Owen, C. J.

    2011-04-22

    We report in situ observations by the Cluster spacecraft of wave-particle interactions in a magnetic flux pileup region created by a magnetic reconnection outflow jet in Earth's magnetotail. Two distinct regions of wave activity are identified: lower-hybrid drift waves at the front edge and whistler-mode waves inside the pileup region. The whistler-mode waves are locally generated by the electron temperature anisotropy, and provide evidence for ongoing betatron energization caused by magnetic flux pileup. The whistler-mode waves cause fast pitch-angle scattering of electrons and isotropization of the electron distribution, thus making the flow braking process nonadiabatic. The waves strongly affect the electron dynamics and thus play an important role in the energy conversion chain during plasma jet braking.

  10. Excitation of the lowest electronic transitions in ethanol by low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, L. R.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2016-09-01

    We report absolute differential and integral cross sections for electronic excitation of ethanol, by low-energy electron impact. Cross sections for low-lying excited states were measured at incident electron energies from 9 to 20 eV and at scattering angles from {5}\\circ through {130}\\circ . Our results include cross sections for excitation of the 1{}3A\\prime \\prime and 1{}1A\\prime \\prime states as well as for the 2{}3A\\prime \\prime + 1{}3A\\prime and 2{}1A\\prime \\prime + 2{}1A\\prime cross section sums. Corresponding calculations were also performed using the Schwinger multichannel method, within an 11-channel close-coupling scheme.

  11. An accurate dynamical electron diffraction algorithm for reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Cai, C. Y.; Lv, C. L.; Zhou, G. W.; Wang, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    The conventional multislice method (CMS) method, one of the most popular dynamical electron diffraction calculation procedures in transmission electron microscopy, was introduced to calculate reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as it is well adapted to deal with the deviations from the periodicity in the direction parallel to the surface. However, in the present work, we show that the CMS method is no longer sufficiently accurate for simulating RHEED with the accelerating voltage 3-100 kV because of the high-energy approximation. An accurate multislice (AMS) method can be an alternative for more accurate RHEED calculations with reasonable computing time. A detailed comparison of the numerical calculation of the AMS method and the CMS method is carried out with respect to different accelerating voltages, surface structure models, Debye-Waller factors and glancing angles.

  12. Low energy electron microscopy and photoemission electron microscopy investigation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, K. L.; Altman, M. S.

    2012-08-01

    Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) are two powerful techniques for the investigation of surfaces, thin films and surface supported nanostructures. In this review, we examine the contributions of these microscopy techniques to our understanding of graphene in recent years. These contributions have been made in studies of graphene on various metal and SiC surfaces and free-standing graphene. We discuss how the real-time imaging capability of LEEM facilitates a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of dynamic processes, such as growth and intercalation. Numerous examples also demonstrate how imaging and the various available complementary measurement capabilities, such as selected area or micro low energy electron diffraction (μLEED) and micro angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (μARPES), allow the investigation of local properties in spatially inhomogeneous graphene samples.

  13. High energy electron processing of icy regoliths on Saturn's moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaible, Micah; Johnson, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    A unique space weathering phenomenon has been identified on several icy Saturnian moons. Cassini revealed anomalous lens shaped regions in both optical and thermal wavelengths, colloquially known as the 'PacMan' feature, which are centered on the leading hemispheres and approximately symmetric about the equators. In particular, the Cassini InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) measurements of thermal emission in the mid-IR showed that surface temperature variations during a diurnal cycle were smaller inside the anomalous regions. The locations of the anomalies were shown to closely match the expected deposition profile of high energy (~ MeV) electrons moving counter rotational to the moons, suggesting an energetic source to drive their formation. However, the mechanisms by which thermal conductivity enhancement occur lack quantitative comparison with theoretical and experimental results.Electron interactions with the grains can excite molecules, which, if near enough to an intergrain contact, can cause atoms or molecules to migrate into the contact region, thus increasing the contact volume or 'sintering' the grains. Sintering improves the thermal contact between grains, leading to increased effective thermal conductivity of the regolith. Equations previously developed to describe material behavior in nuclear reactor were used to estimate the timescale for the energetic electrons to increase the contact volume sufficiently to describe the enhanced thermal conductivity of the anomalous regions. In order to properly constrain the sintering calculations, the unique electron energy distribution measured in the vicinity of each of the moons was used in the calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations of excited electrons in water ice were carried out to determine the length scale for an average electron excitation or ionization event. This length scale determines the distance from the primary reaction at which electrons can still be mobilized to move into the contact region

  14. Energy of the quasifree electron in argon and krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.M.; Findley, G.L.

    2005-08-15

    Field ionization measurements of CH{sub 3}I and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I dopant high-n molecular Rydberg states in argon and krypton perturbers are presented as a function of perturber number density along various isotherms up to the density of the triple point liquid. Using these data, a new local Wigner-Seitz model for the density-dependent energy V{sub 0}({rho}{sub P}) of a quasifree electron in argon and krypton is developed. This model, which contains only one adjustable parameter, uses a local Wigner-Seitz radius derived from the local number density rather than from the bulk number density, includes a statistical mechanical calculation of both the ion/medium polarization energy and the electron/medium polarization energy, and includes the thermal kinetic energy of the quasifree electron. Using this model, V{sub 0}({rho}{sub P}) and the perturber-induced energy shift of the dopant ionization potential {delta}{sub D}({rho}{sub P}) are calculated to within {+-}0.1% of experiment. Previously reported V{sub 0}({rho}{sub P}) data for xenon are also shown to be interpretable within this new model.

  15. Functional Materials characterizations by Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscopy and Electron Energy Loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    Along with the fast development of science and technology, the studied materials are becoming more complicated and smaller. All these achievements have advanced with the fast development of powerful tools currently, such as Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Focused Ion Beam (FIB), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and so on. SiTiO3 thin film, which is grown on Si (100) single crystals, attracts a lot of interest in its structural and electronic properties close to its interface. Valence EELS is used to investigate the Plasmon excitations of the ultrathin SrTiO3 thin film which is sandwiched between amorphous Si and crystalline Si layers. On the other hand, theoretical simulations based on dielectric functions have been done to interpret the experimental results. Our findings demonstrate the value of valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in detecting a local change in the effective electron mass. Recently it is reported that ZnO-LiYbO2 hybrid phosphor is an efficient UV-infrared convertor for silicon solar cell but the mechanism is still not very clear. The microstructure of Li and Yb co-doped ZnO has been studied by SEM and EDX, and our results suggest that a reaction (or diffusion) zone is very likely to exist between LiYbO2 and ZnO. Such diffusion regions may be responsible for the enhanced infrared emission in the Yb and Li co-doped ZnO. Furthermore, to help us study the diffusion zone under TEM in future, the radiation damage on synthesized LiYbO2 has been studied at first, and then the electronic structure of the synthesized LiYbO2 is compared with Yb2O 3 experimentally and theoretically, by EELS and FEFF8 respectively.

  16. Low-energy electron-impact ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Schow, E.; Hazlett, K.; Childers, J. G.; Medina, C.; Vitug, G.; Khakoo, M. A.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.

    2005-12-15

    Normalized doubly differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of helium at low energies are presented. The data are taken at the incident electron energies of 26.3, 28.3, 30.3, 32.5, 34.3, 36.5, and 40.7 eV and for scattering angles of 10 deg. -130 deg. The measurements involve the use of the moveable target method developed at California State University Fullerton to accurately determine the continuum background in the energy-loss spectra. Normalization of experimental data is made on a relative scale to well-established experimental differential cross sections for excitation of the n=2 manifold of helium and then on an absolute scale to the well-established total ionization cross sections of Shah et al. [J. Phys. B 21, 2751 (1988)]. Comparisons are made with available experimental data and the results of the convergent close-coupling theory.

  17. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  18. Twenty new ISO standards on dosimetry for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, H., IV

    2000-03-01

    Twenty standards on essentially all aspects of dosimetry for radiation processing were published as new ISO standards in December 1998. The standards are based on 20 standard practices and guides developed over the past 14 years by Subcommittee E10.01 of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The transformation to ISO standards using the 'fast track' process under ISO Technical Committee 85 (ISO/TC85) commenced in 1995 and resulted in some overlap of technical information between three of the new standards and the existing ISO Standard 11137 Sterilization of health care products — Requirements for validation and routine control — Radiation sterilization. Although the technical information in these four standards was consistent, compromise wording in the scopes of the three new ISO standards to establish precedence for use were adopted. Two of the new ISO standards are specifically for food irradiation applications, but the majority apply to all forms of gamma, X-ray, and electron beam radiation processing, including dosimetry for sterilization of health care products and the radiation processing of fruit, vegetables, meats, spices, processed foods, plastics, inks, medical wastes, and paper. Most of the standards provide exact procedures for using individual dosimetry systems or for characterizing various types of irradiation facilities, but one covers the selection and calibration of dosimetry systems, and another covers the treatment of uncertainties using the new ISO Type A and Type B evaluations. Unfortunately, nine of the 20 standards just adopted by the ISO are not the most recent versions of these standards and are therefore already out of date. To help solve this problem, efforts are being made to develop procedures to coordinate the ASTM and ISO development and revision processes for these and future ASTM-originating dosimetry standards. In the meantime, an additional four dosimetry standards have recently been published by the ASTM but

  19. Advances in Photon and Neutronskeletal Dosimetry Through NMR Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Welsey Bolch

    2002-11-26

    The long-term goals of this project are to: (1) develop detailed 3D models of electron and charged particle transport within trabecular bone taken from various skeletal sites, subject ages, and both sexes, and (2) to extend current Reference Man skeletal dosimetry models to more clinically relevant patient populations.

  20. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  1. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Valverde, N.J.; Da Silva, F.C.A.

    2015-01-01

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. PMID:26445332

  2. Low-Energy Electron Interactions with Complex Targets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    We have examined low-energy electron collisions with complex targets such as pristine nanoscale ice films and water/DNA interfaces by monitoring the reactive scattering processes leading to the formation of H (H^+), H2 (H2^+), O ^3PJ, O ^1D, OH^+, H^+(H2O)n and DNA fragments. This work has shown that temperature-induced changes in the yields are due to subtle geometric and electronic structure changes brought about by changes in the interfacial hydrogen bonding structure. We have then exploited the fact that the two-hole localized states governing cation production and excitations involving a1 levels are good probes of subtle structural changes in the water network. Since low-energy electrons can cause lethal damage to DNA, understanding the role of water and the DNA constituents in the damage event has recently received wide-spread attention. We have modified our multiple scattering ``path approach'' used to describe diffraction effects in stimulated desorption to calculate the diffraction and incident electron intensity at particular sections within a DNA double-strand. This approach assumes hypothetical electron scattering paths inside the target and calculates the interference of all elastically scattered components with the initial incoming wave. Constructive interference at zones localized within the DNA may locally enhance the dissociation probability.

  3. Energy level control: toward an efficient hot electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiao; Li, Qinghua; Li, Yue; Chen, Zihan; Wei, Tai-Huei; He, Xingdao; Sun, Weifu

    2014-08-01

    Highly efficient hot electron transport represents one of the most important properties required for applications in photovoltaic devices. Whereas the fabrication of efficient hot electron capture and lost-cost devices remains a technological challenge, regulating the energy level of acceptor-donor system through the incorporation of foreign ions using the solution-processed technique is one of the most promising strategies to overcome this obstacle. Here we present a versatile acceptor-donor system by incorporating MoO3:Eu nanophosphors, which reduces both the `excess' energy offset between the conduction band of acceptor and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of donor, and that between the valence band and highest occupied molecular orbital. Strikingly, the hot electron transfer time has been shortened. This work demonstrates that suitable energy level alignment can be tuned to gain the higher hot electron/hole transport efficiency in a simple approach without the need for complicated architectures. This work builds up the foundation of engineering building blocks for third-generation solar cells.

  4. Energy level control: toward an efficient hot electron transport.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao; Li, Qinghua; Li, Yue; Chen, Zihan; Wei, Tai-Huei; He, Xingdao; Sun, Weifu

    2014-08-07

    Highly efficient hot electron transport represents one of the most important properties required for applications in photovoltaic devices. Whereas the fabrication of efficient hot electron capture and lost-cost devices remains a technological challenge, regulating the energy level of acceptor-donor system through the incorporation of foreign ions using the solution-processed technique is one of the most promising strategies to overcome this obstacle. Here we present a versatile acceptor-donor system by incorporating MoO3:Eu nanophosphors, which reduces both the 'excess' energy offset between the conduction band of acceptor and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of donor, and that between the valence band and highest occupied molecular orbital. Strikingly, the hot electron transfer time has been shortened. This work demonstrates that suitable energy level alignment can be tuned to gain the higher hot electron/hole transport efficiency in a simple approach without the need for complicated architectures. This work builds up the foundation of engineering building blocks for third-generation solar cells.

  5. Low-Energy Electron Scattering by Sugarcane Lignocellulosic Biomass Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Eliane; Sanchez, Sergio; Bettega, Marcio; Lima, Marco; Varella, Marcio

    2012-06-01

    The use of second generation (SG) bioethanol instead of fossil fuels could be a good strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the efficient production of SG bioethanol has being a challenge to researchers around the world. The main barrier one must overcome is the pretreatment, a very important step in SG bioethanol aimed at breaking down the biomass and facilitates the extraction of sugars from the biomass. Plasma-based treatment, which can generate reactive species, could be an interesting possibility since involves low-cost atmospheric-pressure plasma. In order to offer theoretical support to this technique, the interaction of low-energy electrons from the plasma with biomass is investigated. This study was motived by several works developed by Sanche et al., in which they understood that DNA damage arises from dissociative electron attachment, a mechanism in which electrons are resonantly trapped by DNA subunits. We will present elastic cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by sugarcane biomass molecules, obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method. Our calculations indicate the formation of π* shape resonances in the lignin subunits, while a series of broad and overlapping σ* resonances are found in cellulose and hemicellulose subunits. The presence of π* and σ* resonances could give rise to direct and indirect dissociation pathways in biomass. Then, theoretical resonance energies can be useful to guide the plasma-based pretreatment to break down specific linkages of interest in biomass.

  6. a Generalized Program for Internal Radionuclide Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Timothy Karl

    The development of monoclonal antibodies specific for tumor surface antigens promises a highly specific carrier medium for delivering a tumorcidal radiation dose. Dosimetry calculations of monoclonal antibodies are made difficult, however, precisely because the focus of radioactivity is targeted for a nonstandard volume in a nonstandard geometry. This precludes straightforward application of the formalism developed for internal radionuclide dosimetry by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee. A software program was written to account for the perturbations introduced by the inclusion of a tumor mass as an additional source of, and target for, radiation. The program allows the interactive development of a mathematical model to account for observed biodistribution data. The model describes the time dependence of radioactivity in each organ system that retains radiolabeled antibody, including tumor. Integration of these "time-activity" curves yield cumulative activity for each organ system identified as a 'source' of radioactivity. A Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport is then executed for each source organ to obtain the fraction of radiation energy absorbed by various 'target' organs. When combined with the cumulative activity, this absorbed fraction allows an estimate of dose to be made for each target organ. The program has been validated against ten analytic models designed to span a range of common input data types. Additionally, a performance benchmark has been defined to assess the practicality of implementing the program on different computing hardware platforms. Sources of error in the computation are elaborated on, and future directions and improvements discussed. The software presents an integrated modeling/dosimetry environment particularly suited for performing Monoclonal Antibody dosimetry. It offers a viable methodology for performing prospective treatment planning, based on extrapolation of tracer kinetic data to therapeutic levels.

  7. Extraction of electron plasma energy distribution function using distortion meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azooz, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    A new method for direct evaluation of the electron energy distribution function in plasmas is suggested, which involves the use of audio frequencies distortion factor meters. The amount of distortion suffered by a Langmuir probe AC current produced by superimposing a clean AC voltage on the DC probe voltage is measured. Although such distortions are proportional to the second derivative of the probe characteristic at any point when its neighborhood can be approximated by a second-degree polynomial, the instrument function is always sharper than that of harmonic differentiation. The method is analyzed theoretically, and tested experimentally. It is also shown that distortion additionally provides a direct measure of the electron temperature.

  8. Weissenberg reflection high-energy electron diffraction for surface crystallography.

    PubMed

    Abukawa, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Yajima, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Koji

    2006-12-15

    The principle of a Weissenberg camera is applied to surface crystallographic analysis by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. By removing inelastic electrons and measuring hundreds of patterns as a function of sample rotation angle phi, kinematical analysis can be performed over a large volume of reciprocal space. The data set is equivalent to a three-dimensional stack of Weissenberg photographs. The method is applied to analysis of an Si(111)-square root of 3 x square root of 3-Ag surface, and the structural data obtained are in excellent agreement with the known atomic structure.

  9. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loïc; Veith, Gabriel M; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Unocic, Kinga A; Sacci, Robert L; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. This is significant as the use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. We discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  10. Probing Battery Chemistry with Liquid Cell Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. The use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, we discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  11. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  12. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loïc; Veith, Gabriel M; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Unocic, Kinga A; Sacci, Robert L; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. This is significant as the use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. We discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies. PMID:26404766

  13. Downfolded Self-Energy of Many-Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryasetiawan, F.; Tomczak, J. M.; Miyake, T.; Sakuma, R.

    2009-05-01

    Starting from the full many-body Hamiltonian of interacting electrons the effective self-energy acting on electrons residing in a subspace of the full Hilbert space is derived. This subspace may correspond to, for example, partially filled narrow bands, which often characterize strongly correlated materials. The formalism delivers naturally the frequency-dependent effective interaction (the Hubbard U) and provides a general framework for constructing theoretical models based on the Green’s function language. It also furnishes a general scheme for first-principles calculations of complex systems in which the main correlation effects are concentrated on a small subspace of the full Hilbert space.

  14. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  15. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions

  16. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate themore » slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions« less

  17. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Oliver, Thomas A A; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-05-01

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  18. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  19. Sample thickness determination by scanning transmission electron microscopy at low electron energies.

    PubMed

    Volkenandt, Tobias; Müller, Erich; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2014-02-01

    Sample thickness is a decisive parameter for any quantification of image information and composition in transmission electron microscopy. In this context, we present a method to determine the local sample thickness by scanning transmission electron microscopy at primary energies below 30 keV. The image intensity is measured with respect to the intensity of the incident electron beam and can be directly compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Screened Rutherford and Mott scattering cross-sections are evaluated with respect to fitting experimental data with simulated image intensities as a function of the atomic number of the sample material and primary electron energy. The presented method is tested for sample materials covering a wide range of atomic numbers Z, that is, fluorenyl hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (Z = 3.5), carbon (Z = 6), silicon (Z = 14), gallium nitride (Z = 19), and tungsten (Z = 74). Investigations were conducted for two primary energies (15 and 30 keV) and a sample thickness range between 50 and 400 nm.

  20. Inverse planning of energy-modulated electron beams in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, John R. . E-mail: gentryj@gmh.org; Steeves, Richard; Paliwal, Bhudatt A.

    2006-01-01

    The use of megavoltage electron beams often poses a clinical challenge in that the planning target volume (PTV) is anterior to other radiosensitive structures and has variable depth. To ensure that skin as well as the deepest extent of the PTV receives the prescribed dose entails prescribing to a point beyond the depth of peak dose for a single electron energy. This causes dose inhomogeneities and heightened potential for tissue fibrosis, scarring, and possible soft tissue necrosis. Use of bolus on the skin improves the entrant dose at the cost of decreasing the therapeutic depth that can be treated. Selection of a higher energy to improve dose homogeneity results in increased dose to structures beyond the PTV, as well as enlargement of the volume receiving heightened dose. Measured electron data from a linear accelerator was used as input to create an inverse planning tool employing energy and intensity modulation using bolus (e-IMRT{sup TM}). Using tools readily available in a radiotherapy department, the applications of energy and intensity modulation on the central axis makes it possible to remove hot spots of 115% or more over the depths clinically encountered. The e-IMRT{sup TM} algorithm enables the development of patient-specific dose distributions with user-defined positions of peak dose, range, and reduced dose to points beyond the prescription point.

  1. Structural surface investigations with low-energy backscattered electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    The development of electron spectroscopies based on inelastic scattering fine structure is driven mainly by the need for structural methods which allow the investigation of the geometrical environment of different atomic species of the surface region of the sample. The EELFS (Extended Energy Loss Fine Structure) technique, using low-kinetic-energy electrons (1000-2000 eV) in reflection geometry, has been proven a useful tool for local structural investigation of clean surfaces, thin films and chemisorbed species. The main appeal of this technique, besides its experimental accessibility, is that the data analysis follows the procedure used for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy to obtain the atomic selectivity, the radial distribution function, the coordination number and the thermal and anisotropic effects. The near-edge energy-loss feature has been used to investigate the density of empty states close to EF and it appeeal particularly sensitive for following the structural changes and for discriminating among various phases and compound formations which occur in the surface region. In this work I review some recent developments, applications and theoretical considerations of the EELFS technique to give local structural parameters and to assess the basic mechanisms which dominate the low-energy electron-surface interaction.

  2. Reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy and imaging for surface studies in transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z L; Bentley, J

    1992-02-15

    A review is given on the techniques and applications of high-energy reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) and reflection electron microscopy (REM) for surface studies in scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) and conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM). A diffraction method is introduced to identify a surface orientation in the geometry of REM. The surface dielectric response theory is presented and applied for studying alpha-alumina surfaces. Domains of the alpha-alumina (012) surface initially terminated with oxygen can be reduced by an intense electron beam to produce Al metal; the resistance to beam damage of surface domains initially terminated with Al+3 ions is attributed to the screening effect of adsorbed oxygen. Surface energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS), and microanalysis using REELS are illustrated based on the studies of TiO2 and MgO. Effects of surface resonances (or channeling) on the REELS signal-to-background ratio are described. The REELS detection of a monolayer of oxygen adsorption on diamond (111) surfaces is reported. It is shown that phase contrast REM image content can be significantly increased with the use of a field emission gun (FEG). Phase contrast effects close to the core of a screw dislocation are discussed and the associated Fresnel fringes around a surface step are observed. Finally, an in situ REM experiment is described for studying atomic desorption and diffusion processes on alpha-alumina surfaces at temperatures of 1,300-1,400 degrees C.

  3. Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lenards, Nishele

    2011-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled students in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs.

  4. Student perceptions of an online medical dosimetry program.

    PubMed

    Lenards, Nishele

    2011-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled students in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs.

  5. Relative optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C dosimeters to heavy charged particles with energies relevant to space and radiotherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sawakuchi, G. O.; Yukihara, E. G.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Benton, E. R.; Gaza, R.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Kitamura, H.

    2008-12-15

    This article presents a comprehensive characterization of the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) relative luminescence efficiencies of carbon-doped aluminum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) for heavy charged particles (HCPs) with atomic numbers ranging from 1 (proton) to 54 (xenon) and energies ranging from 7 to 1000 MeV/u, and investigates the dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C response on experimental conditions. Relative luminescence efficiency values are presented for 19 primary charge/energy combinations, plus 31 additional charge/energy combinations obtained by introducing absorbers in the primary beam. Our results show that for energies of hundreds of MeV/u the data can be described by a single curve of relative luminescence efficiency versus linear energy transfer (LET). This information is needed to compensate for the reduced OSL efficiency to high-LET particles in such applications as space dosimetry. For lower energies, the relative luminescence efficiency as function of LET cannot be described by a single curve; instead, it separates into different components corresponding to different particles. We also present data on the low-LET dose response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, measured under the same experimental conditions in which the relative luminescence efficiencies to HCPs were obtained, providing information relevant to future theoretical investigations of HCP energy deposition and luminescence production in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C.

  6. Energy fluctuations of a finite free-electron Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Pekola, Jukka P; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo; Kupiainen, Antti; Galperin, Yuri M

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the energy distribution of free-electron Fermi-gas, a problem with a textbook solution of Gaussian energy fluctuations in the limit of a large system. We find that for a small system, characterized solely by its heat capacity C, the distribution can be solved analytically, and it is both skewed and it vanishes at low energies, exhibiting a sharp drop to zero at the energy corresponding to the filled Fermi sea. The results are relevant from the experimental point of view, since the predicted non-Gaussian effects become pronounced when C/k_{B}≲10^{3} (k_{B} is the Boltzmann constant), a regime that can be easily achieved for instance in mesoscopic metallic conductors at sub-kelvin temperatures.

  7. Energy fluctuations of a finite free-electron Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekola, Jukka P.; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo; Kupiainen, Antti; Galperin, Yuri M.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the energy distribution of free-electron Fermi-gas, a problem with a textbook solution of Gaussian energy fluctuations in the limit of a large system. We find that for a small system, characterized solely by its heat capacity C , the distribution can be solved analytically, and it is both skewed and it vanishes at low energies, exhibiting a sharp drop to zero at the energy corresponding to the filled Fermi sea. The results are relevant from the experimental point of view, since the predicted non-Gaussian effects become pronounced when C /kB≲103 (kB is the Boltzmann constant), a regime that can be easily achieved for instance in mesoscopic metallic conductors at sub-kelvin temperatures.

  8. Energy fluctuations of a finite free-electron Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Pekola, Jukka P; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo; Kupiainen, Antti; Galperin, Yuri M

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the energy distribution of free-electron Fermi-gas, a problem with a textbook solution of Gaussian energy fluctuations in the limit of a large system. We find that for a small system, characterized solely by its heat capacity C, the distribution can be solved analytically, and it is both skewed and it vanishes at low energies, exhibiting a sharp drop to zero at the energy corresponding to the filled Fermi sea. The results are relevant from the experimental point of view, since the predicted non-Gaussian effects become pronounced when C/k_{B}≲10^{3} (k_{B} is the Boltzmann constant), a regime that can be easily achieved for instance in mesoscopic metallic conductors at sub-kelvin temperatures. PMID:27627262

  9. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    PubMed Central

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons. In this method, we demonstrate the single-atom detection of lithium, fluorine, sodium and chlorine with near-atomic precision, which is limited by the incident probe size, signal delocalization and atomic movement in nanospace. Moreover, chemical shifts of lithium K-edge have been successfully identified with various atomic configurations in one-dimensional lithium compounds. PMID:26228378

  10. National energy use of consumer electronics in 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Karen; Meier, Alan; Zandelin, Stefan

    2000-02-15

    The major consumer electronics in U.S. homes accounted for nearly 7 percent of U.S. residential electricity consumption in 1999. We attribute more than half of this figure (3.6 percent) to televisions, videocassette recorders, and DVD players, and nearly one-third (1.8 percent) to audio products. Set-top boxes currently account for a relatively small fraction of residential electricity use (0.7 percent), but we expect this end-use to grow quickly with the proliferation of digital set-top boxes, which currently use 40 percent more energy per unit than the average TV set. In all, these consumer electronics plus telephone products consumed 75 TWh in the U.S. in 1999, half of which was consumed while the products were not in use. This energy use is expected to grow as products with new or advanced functionality hit the market.

  11. Theory of high-energy electron scattering by composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of these expository lectures is on the role of relativistic invariance and the unity of the theory for medium and high energies. Sec. 2 introduces the kinematic notation and provides an elementary derivation of the general cross section. The relevant properties of the Poincare group and the transformation properties of current operators and target states are described in Sec 3. In Sec. 4 representations of target states with kinematic light-front symmetry are briefly discussed. The focus is on two applications. An impulse approximation of inclusive electron nucleus scattering at both medium and high energies. A parton model of the proton applied to deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons by polarized protons. 19 refs.

  12. Low-Energy Electron Beam Direct Writing Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Takashi; Ando, Atsushi; Kotsugi, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Hidetoshi; Sugihara, Kazuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    We proposed an electron beam direct writing (EBDW) system capable of high throughput and maskless operation based on a novel concept of using both low-energy electron beam (EB) and character projection (CP) system. We fabricated an EB optical column of low-energy EBDW equipment and obtained a resist pattern. We also investigated the beam blur and line width roughness (LWR) of lines and spaces (L/S) formed on a resist to change various EB current densities and convergence half angles. The obtained results show that a Coulomb interaction effect markedly affects the beam blur in our EB optical column. Thus, we reduce the number of sources caused by LWR and developed photoresists to obtain small LWR L/S patterns for achieving a high throughput.

  13. Ultrafast electronic energy redistribution in hollow gold nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappenberger, Kenneth; Schwartzberg, Adam

    2009-03-01

    Nanostructured materials offer great potential for novel ways to generate, utilize, store and transport energy. These unique opportunities arise because nanoclusters often portray strikingly different chemical and physical properties than their bulk counterparts, and, perhaps more intriguingly, these vary widely with cluster size and shape. Here we report on the redistribution of electronic energy to thermal phonons in a series of hollow gold nanoparticles using femtosecond transient absorption. Qualitatively, the relaxation processes are similar to those of solid nanoparticles, however distinct differences are observed, likely owing to the unique properties of the hollow structures. In particular, a larger excitation power density is required to observe coherent vibrational oscillations in hollow gold nanoparticles than is needed for solid particles following electronic excitation. This effect is systematically studied over a range of hollow and solid particles, including multiple diameters and wall thicknesses. Models will be presented to account for the different relaxation mechanism observed for hollow and solid gold nanoparticles.

  14. Low-energy scattering of electrons and positrons in liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The scattering of low energy electrons and positrons is described for the liquid phase and compared and contrasted with that for the gas phase. Similarities as well as differences are noted. The loci of scattering sites, called spurs in the liquid phase, are considered in detail. In particular, their temporal and spatial evolution is considered from the point of view of scattering. Two emphases are made: one upon the stochastic calculation of the distribution of distances required for slowing down to thermal velocities, and the other upon the calculation of cross sections for energy loss by means of quantum mechanics.

  15. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  16. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  17. Improving the energy response of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} dosimetry films at low energies (≤100 keV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bekerat, H. Devic, S.; DeBlois, F.; Singh, K.; Sarfehnia, A.; Seuntjens, J.; Shih, Shelley; Yu, Xiang; Lewis, D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of varying the active layer composition of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} films on the energy dependence of the film, as well as try to develop a new prototype with more uniform energy response at low photon energies (⩽100 keV). Methods: First, the overall energy response (S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q)) of different commercial EBT type film models that represent the three different generations produced to date, i.e., EBT, EBT2, and EBT3, was investigated. Pieces of each film model were irradiated to a fixed dose of 2 Gy to water for a wide range of beam qualities and the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) was measured using a flatbed document scanner. Furthermore, the DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose to water energy dependence of the film, f(Q). Moreover, the intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}(Q), for each film model was evaluated using the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) and f(Q). In the second part of this study, the authors investigated the effects of changing the chemical composition of the active layer on S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Finally, based on these results, the film manufacturer fabricated several film prototypes and the authors evaluated their S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Results: The commercial EBT film model shows an under response at all energies below 100 keV reaching 39% ± 4% at about 20 keV. The commercial EBT2 and EBT3 film models show an under response of about 27% ± 4% at 20 keV and an over response of about 16% ± 4% at 40 keV.S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) of the three commercial film models at low energies show strong correlation with the corresponding f{sup −1}(Q) curves. The commercial EBT3 model with 4% Cl in the active layer shows under response of 22% ± 4% at 20 keV and 6% ± 4% at about 40 keV. However, increasing the mass percent of chlorine makes the film more hygroscopic which may affect the stability of the film's readout. The

  18. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  19. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, Maarten L. J. Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kao, Yung H.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Iagaru, Andre H.; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  20. Electron scattering from HeII ions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.; Dahler, J. S.

    1997-04-01

    Electron collisional excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of HeII ions are of extreme interest in the modelling of astrophysical plasmas. They are required for reliable determination of the excitation and ionization in the solar corona, impulsive heating events in the solar transitions region, shock waves in the interstellar medium and in stellar atmospheres. Emission lines of HeII have been observed in a variety of solar and astrophysical objects at wavelengths below 350 ÅThe Extreme Ultra Violet Explorer (EUVE) spectra of Capella (HD 3402, G8 III + G0 III), the bright RS CVn binary system, is dominated by HeII (λ 303 Åand high ionization stages of iron. Accurate knowledge of the electron collisional excitation rates for the n = 2 and n = 3 levels of HeII are required in the modelling of the electron-ion equilibration in non-radiative shocks associated with SN 1006. Recently attention has focused on scattering at intermediate energies with emphasis on the n = 2 levels using the CCC formalism and the 2D-Rmatrix propagator method. In our work we have used the IERM approach of Burke, Scott and co-workers to obtain accurate cross sections for levels up to n = 3, as this has proved successful in dealing with electron - atomic hydrogen scattering at intermediate energies. A comprehensive set of results will be presented at the meeting.

  1. Uranium trioxide behavior during electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2015-03-01

    A sample of uranium trioxide (UO3) was produced by focused ion beam (~10 μm×~10 μm×<0.5 μm) for transmission electron and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy examinations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The EEL spectra were recorded as a function of the thickness for the P and O edges in the low energy range 0-350 eV and were compared to spectra of UO3 small grains attached to a TEM grid. The EEL spectrum was studied through a range of thicknesses going from ~60 to ~260 nm. The EEL spectra recorded for UO3 are compared with those recorded for UO2. The reduction of UO3 into U4O9 and/or UO2 is readily observed apparently during the TEM investigations and as confirmed by electron diffraction (eD). This redox effect is similar to that known for other redox sensitive oxides. Recommendations are suggested to avoid sample decomposition.

  2. Nanocellulose as Material Building Block for Energy and Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liangbing

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I will discuss the fabrications, properties and device applications of functional nanostructured paper based on nanocellulose. Nanostructures with tunable optical, electrical, ionic and mechanical properties will be discussed. Lab-scale demonstration devices, including low-cost Na-ion batteries, microbial fuel cells, solar cells, transparent transistors, actuators and touch screens will be briefly mentioned. These studies show that nanocellulose is a promising green material for electronics and energy devices.

  3. Low energy Mott polarimetry of electrons from negative electron affinity photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccacci, F.; De Rossi, S.; Campbell, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    We present data on the spin polarization {ital P} and quantum yield {ital Y} of electrons photoemitted from negative electron affinity semiconductors, including GaAs(100), GaAsP(100) alloy, and strained GaAs layer epitaxially grown on a GaAsP(100) buffer. Near photothreshold the following values for {ital P}({ital Y}) are, respectively, obtained: 26% (2.5{times}10{sup {minus}2}), 40% (1{times}10{sup {minus}3}), and 60% (1.5{times}10{sup {minus}4}). We describe in detail the apparatus used containing a low energy (10--25 keV) Mott polarimeter. The system, completely fitted in a small volume ({similar_to}10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}) ultrahigh vacuum chamber, is intended as a test facility for characterizing candidate photocathode materials for spin polarized electron sources. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Sensitizing DNA Towards Low-Energy Electrons with 2-Fluoroadenine.

    PubMed

    Rackwitz, Jenny; Kopyra, Janina; Dąbkowska, Iwona; Ebel, Kenny; Ranković, MiloŠ Lj; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Bald, Ilko

    2016-08-22

    2-Fluoroadenine ((2F) A) is a therapeutic agent, which is suggested for application in cancer radiotherapy. The molecular mechanism of DNA radiation damage can be ascribed to a significant extent to the action of low-energy (<20 eV) electrons (LEEs), which damage DNA by dissociative electron attachment. LEE induced reactions in (2F) A are characterized both isolated in the gas phase and in the condensed phase when it is incorporated into DNA. Information about negative ion resonances and anion-mediated fragmentation reactions is combined with an absolute quantification of DNA strand breaks in (2F) A-containing oligonucleotides upon irradiation with LEEs. The incorporation of (2F) A into DNA results in an enhanced strand breakage. The strand-break cross sections are clearly energy dependent, whereas the strand-break enhancements by (2F) A at 5.5, 10, and 15 eV are very similar. Thus, (2F) A can be considered an effective radiosensitizer operative at a wide range of electron energies. PMID:27481662

  5. Superthermal Electron Energy Interchange in the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Glocer, A.; Liemohn, M. W.; Himwich, E. W.

    2013-01-01

    A self-consistent approach to superthermal electron (SE) transport along closed field lines in the inner magnetosphere is used to examine the concept of plasmaspheric transparency, magnetospheric trapping, and SE energy deposition to the thermal electrons. The dayside SE population is generated both by photoionization of the thermosphere and by secondary electron production from impact ionization when the photoelectrons collide with upper atmospheric neutral particles. It is shown that a self-consistent approach to this problem produces significant changes, in comparison with other approaches, in the SE energy exchange between the plasmasphere and the two magnetically conjugate ionospheres. In particular, plasmaspheric transparency can vary by a factor of two depending on the thermal plasma content along the field line and the illumination conditions of the two conjugate ionospheres. This variation in plasmaspheric transparency as a function of thermal plasma and ionospheric conditions increases with L-shell, as the field line gets longer and the equatorial pitch angle extent of the fly-through zone gets smaller. The inference drawn from these results is that such a self-consistent approach to SE transport and energy deposition should be included to ensure robustness in ionosphere-magnetosphere modeling networks.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: RBE of low energy electrons and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Lindborg, Lennart

    2010-05-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compares the severity of damage induced by a radiation under test at a dose D relative to the reference radiation Dx for the same biological endpoint. RBE is an important parameter in estimation of risk from exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The present work provides a review of the recently published data and the knowledge of the RBE of low energy electrons and photons. The review presents RBE values derived from experimental data and model calculations including cell inactivation, chromosome aberration, cell transformation, micronuclei formation and induction of double-strand breaks. Biophysical models, including physical features of radiation track, and microdosimetry parameters are presented, analysed and compared with experimental data. The biological effects of low energy electrons and photons are of particular interest in radiation biology as these are strongly absorbed in micrometer and sub-micrometer layers of tissue. RBE values not only depend on the electron and photon energies but also on the irradiation condition, cell type and experimental conditions.

  7. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  8. The International Reactor Dosimetry File.

    2008-08-07

    Version 01 The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-2002) contains recommended neutron cross-section data to be used for reactor neutron dosimetry by foil activation and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. It also contains selected recom�mended values for radiation damage cross-sections and benchmark neutron spectra. Two related programs available from NEADB and RSICC are: SPECTER-ANL (PSR-263) & STAY’SL (PSR-113).

  9. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.E.; Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.

    1992-05-01

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  10. ELECTRON POLARIZATION IN THE MEDIUM-ENERGY ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Fanglei Lin, Yaroslav Derbenev, Vasiliy Morozov, Yuhong Zhang, Desmond Barber

    2012-07-01

    A key feature of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is high polarization (over 80%) of the electron beam at all collision points for the particle physics program. The equilibrium electron polarization is arranged to be vertical in the arcs of the figure-8 collider ring of the MEIC and anti-parallel to the arc dipole magnetic fields, in order to take advantage of the preservation of polarization by the Sokolov-Ternov (S-T) effect. Longitudinal polarization is achieved at collision points by utilizing energy-independent universal spin rotators each of which consists of a set of solenoids and dipoles placed at the end of an arc. The equilibrium beam polarization and its lifetime depend on competition between the S-T effect and radiative depolarization. The latter must be suppressed by spin matching. This paper reports on investigations of polarization in the MEIC electron collider ring and a preliminary estimate of beam polarization from calculations using the code SLICK.

  11. Electronic structure and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of ZrO2 zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, L. K.; Vast, Nathalie; Baranek, Philippe; Cheynet, Marie-Claude; Reining, Lucia

    2004-12-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of zirconia are calculated within density functional theory, and their evolution is analyzed as the crystal-field symmetry changes from tetrahedral [cubic (c-ZrO2) and tetragonal (t-ZrO2) phases] to octahedral (hypothetical rutile ZrO2 ), to a mixing of these symmetries (monoclinic phase, m-ZrO2 ). We find that the theoretical bulk modulus in c-ZrO2 is 30% larger than the experimental value, showing that the introduction of yttria in zirconia has a significant effect. Electronic structure fingerprints which characterize each phase from their electronic spectra are identified. We have carried out electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments at low momentum transfer and compared these results to the theoretical spectra calculated within the random phase approximation. We show a dependence of the valence and 4p ( N2,3 edge) plasmons on the crystal structure, the dependence of the latter being brought into the spectra by local-field effects. Last, we attribute low energy excitations observed in EELS of m-ZrO2 to defect states 2eV above the top of the intrinsic valence band, and the EELS fundamental band gap value is reconciled with the 5.2 or 5.8eV gaps determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy.

  12. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Sang-Heon E-mail: Sang-Heon.Song@us.tel.com; Yang, Yang; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-15

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics.

  13. Variably spaced superlattice energy filter, a new device design concept for high-energy electron injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, C. J.; Brennan, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    A new variably spaced superlattice energy filter is proposed which provides high-energy injection of electrons into a bulk semiconductor layer based on resonant tunneling between adjacent quantum well levels which are brought into alignment by an applied bias. Applications of this concept to a variety of optoelectronic devices and to thin-film electroluminescent devices and photodetectors are discussed.

  14. Simulating electron energy loss spectroscopy with the MNPBEM toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Within the MNPBEM toolbox, we show how to simulate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of plasmonic nanoparticles using a boundary element method approach. The methodology underlying our approach closely follows the concepts developed by García de Abajo and coworkers (Garcia de Abajo, 2010). We introduce two classes eelsret and eelsstat that allow in combination with our recently developed MNPBEM toolbox for a simple, robust, and efficient computation of EEL spectra and maps. The classes are accompanied by a number of demo programs for EELS simulation of metallic nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanotriangles, and for electron trajectories passing by or penetrating through the metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss how to compute electric fields induced by the electron beam and cathodoluminescence. Catalogue identifier: AEKJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 38886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1222650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Computer: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Operating system: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). RAM:≥1 GB Classification: 18. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 370 External routines: MESH2D available at www.mathworks.com Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for plasmonic nanoparticles. Solution method: Boundary element method using electromagnetic potentials. Reasons for new version: The new version of the toolbox includes two additional classes for the simulation of electron energy

  15. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2007-03-12

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Minor

  16. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy with Simultaneous Energy and Momentum Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Kesmodel, Larry; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, Ward; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-03-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) has been demonstrated as a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic surface excitations of solids. The dispersion relation of the surface excitations, i.e. energy as a function of momentum, can be obtained via the angle resolved measurements by rotating the sample or the analyzer in a conventional HREELS measurement. The sampling density in the momentum space and the detecting efficiency are restricted by the mechanical rotation. Here we introduce a new design of the HREELS system, by combining the traditional Ibach-type electron source with the mainstream hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which could simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons without any mechanical rotation. The new system possesses higher efficiency and sampling density of momentum-resolved measurements by at least one order of magnitude than conventional spectrometers without deteriorating the resolution of energy and momentum. Using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ as an example, we show that an energy loss spectrum can be scanned throughout the first Brillouin zone and a momentum-dependent spectral intensity distribution could be obtained in one measurement.

  17. Low-energy electron elastic scattering from Os atom: New electron affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Z.; Kiros, F.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-05-01

    Bilodeau and Haugan measured the binding energies (BEs) of the ground state and the excited state of the Os- ion to be 1.07780(12) eV and 0.553(3) eV, respectively. These values are consistent with those calculated in. Here our investigation, using the recent complex angular momentum methodology wherein is embedded the crucial electron-electron correlations and the vital core polarization interaction, has found that the near threshold electron-Os elastic scattering total cross section (TCS) is characterized by three stable bound states of the Os- ion formed as resonances during the slow electron collision, with BEs of 1.910 eV, 1.230 eV and 0.224 eV. The new extracted electron affinity (EA) value from the TCS of 1.910 eV for the Os atom is significantly different from that measured in. Our calculated elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) also yield the relevant BEs for the ground and the two excited states of the Os- ion. The complex characteristic resonance structure in the TCS for the Os atom is ideal for catalysis, but makes it difficult to execute the Wigner threshold law in describing the threshold detachment behavior of complex atoms and extracting the reliable attendant EAs. Supported by U.S. DOE, AFOSR and CAU CFNM, NSF-CREST Program.

  18. Breast dosimetry in clinical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis Alberto Do Rego

    The objective of this study was show that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. In the study, AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The protocol proposes the use of a fiber-optic coupled (FOCD) or Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter to measure the entrance skin exposure at the time of the mammogram without interfering with diagnostic information of the mammogram. The study showed that FOCD had sensitivity with less than 7% energy dependence, linear in all tube current-time product stations, and was reproducible within 2%. FOCD was superior to MOSFET dosimeter in sensitivity, reusability, and reproducibility. The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. In addition, the study population anthropometric

  19. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: application to electronic energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Markland, Thomas E; Reichman, David R

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  20. SU-E-J-17: A Study of Accelerator-Induced Cerenkov Radiation as a Beam Diagnostic and Dosimetry Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, F; Tosh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate accelerator-induced Cerenkov radiation imaging as a possible beam diagnostic and medical dosimetry tool. Methods: Cerenkov emission produced by clinical accelerator beams in a water phantom was imaged using a camera system comprised of a high-sensitivity thermoelectrically-cooled CCD camera coupled to a large aperture (f/0.75) objective lens with 16:1 magnification. This large format lens allows a significant amount of the available Cerenkov light to be collected and focused onto the CCD camera to form the image. Preliminary images, obtained with 6 MV photon beams, used an unshielded camera mounted horizontally with the beam normal to the water surface, and confirmed the detection of Cerenkov radiation. Several improvements were subsequently made including the addition of radiation shielding around the camera, and altering of the beam and camera angles to give a more favorable geometry for Cerenkov light collection. A detailed study was then undertaken over a range of electron and photon beam energies and dose rates to investigate the possibility of using this technique for beam diagnostics and dosimetry. Results: A series of images were obtained at a fixed dose rate over a range of electron energies from 6 to 20 MeV. The location of maximum intensity was found to vary linearly with the energy of the beam. A linear relationship was also found between the light observed from a fixed point on the central axis and the dose rate for both photon and electron beams. Conclusion: We have found that the analysis of images of beam-induced Cerenkov light in a water phantom has potential for use as a beam diagnostic and medical dosimetry tool. Our future goals include the calibration of the light output in terms of radiation dose and development of a tomographic system for 3D Cerenkov imaging in water phantoms and other media.

  1. Evaluation of the Gafchromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT2 film for the dosimetry of radiosurgical beams

    SciTech Connect

    Larraga-Gutierrez, Jose M.; Garcia-Hernandez, Diana; Garcia-Garduno, Olivia A.; Galvan de la Cruz, Olga O.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, Paola; Esparza-Moreno, Karina P.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Radiosurgery uses small fields and high-radiation doses to treat intra- and extracranial lesions in a single session. The lack of a lateral electronic equilibrium and the presence of high-dose gradients in these fields are challenges for adequate measurements. The availability of radiation detectors with the high spatial resolution required is restricted to only a few. Stereotactic diodes and EBT radiochromic films have been demonstrated to be good detectors for small-beam dosimetry. Because the stereotactic diode is the standard measurement for the dosimetry of radiosurgical beams, the goal of this work was to perform measurements with the radiochromic film Gafchromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT2 and compare its results with a stereotactic diode. Methods: Total scatter factors, tissue maximum, and off-axis ratios from a 6 MV small photon beams were measured using EBT2 radiochromic film in a water phantom. The film-measured data were evaluated by comparing it with the data measured with a stereotactic field diode (IBA-Dosimetry). Results: The film and diode measurements had excellent agreement. The differences between the detectors were less than or equal to 2.0% for the tissue maximum and the off-axis ratios. However, for the total scatter factors, there were significant differences, up to 4.9% (relative to the reference field), for field sizes less than 1.0 cm. Conclusions: This work found that the Gafchromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT2 film is adequate for small photon beam measurements, particularly for tissue maximum and off-axis ratios. However, careful attention must be taken when measuring output factors of small beams below 1.0 cm due to the film's energy dependence. The measurement differences may be attributable to the film's active layer composition because EBT2 incorporates higher Z elements (i.e., bromide and potassium), hence revealing a potential energy dependence for the dosimetry of small photon beams.

  2. Radiation effects on MOS devices - dosimetry, annealing, irradiation sequence, and sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Brucker, G. J.; Van Gunten, O.; Knudson, A. R.; Jordan, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on some investigations of dosimetry, annealing, irradiation sequences, and radioactive sources, involved in the determination of radiation effects on MOS devices. Results show that agreement in the experimental and theoretical surface to average doses support the use of thermo-luminescent dosimeters (manganese activated calcium fluoride) in specifying the surface dose delivered to thin gate insulators of MOS devices. Annealing measurements indicate the existence of at least two energy levels,,s or a activation energies, for recovery of soft oxide MOS devices after irradiation by electrons, protons, and gammas. Damage sensitivities of MOS devices were found to be independent of combinations and sequences of radiation type or energies. Comparison of various gamma sources indicated a small dependence of damage sensitivity on the Cobalt facility, but a more significant dependence in the case of the Cesium source. These results were attributed to differences in the spectral content of the several sources.

  3. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    The complexity of molecules found in space varies widely. On one end of the scale of molecular complexity is the hydrogen molecule H2 . Its formation from H atoms is if not understood than at least thoroughly investigated[1]. On the other side of said spectrum the precursors to biopolymers can be found, such as amino acids[2,3], sugars[4], lipids, cofactors[5], etc, and the kerogen-like organic polymer material in carbonaceous meteorites called "black stuff" [6]. These have also received broad attention in the last decades. Sitting in the middle between these two extremes are simple molecules that are observed by radio astronomy throughout the Universe. These are molecules like methane (CH4 ), methanol (CH3 OH), formaldehyde (CH2 O), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and many many others. So far more than 40 such species have been identified.[7] They are often used in laboratory experiments to create larger complex molecules on the surface of simulated interstellar dust grains.[2,8] The mechanisms of formation of these observed starting materials for prebiotic chemistry is however not always clear. Also the exact mechanisms of formation of larger molecules in photochemical experiments are largely unclear. This is mostly due to the very complex chemistry going on which involves many different radicals and ions. The creation of radicals and ions can be studied in detail in laboratory simulations. They can be created in a setup mimicking interstellar grain chemistry using slow electrons. There is no free electron radiation in space. What can be found though is a lot of radiation of different sorts. There is electromagnetic radiation (UV light, X-Rays, rays, etc.) and there is particulate radiation as well in the form of high energy ions. This radiation can provide energy that drives chemical reactions in the ice mantles of interstellar dust grains. And while the multitude of different kinds of radiation might be a little confusing, they all have one thing in common: Upon

  4. Electronic and optical properties of selected polymers studied by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Tougaard, Sven

    2012-03-01

    We have determined the electronic and optical properties of six polymers: Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyester (PET), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyamide (PA6) for energy losses from 0 to 70 eV by analysis of reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. We found that the surface was easily damaged by the incident electron beam, in particular for energies above 500 eV. The damage results in new peaks in the bandgap region and the polymers become metallic. Great care was exerted to determine experimental conditions under which these effects are minimized. The REELS spectra were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons with the QUASES-XS-REELS software to determine the effective inelastic-scattering cross sections. From these cross sections, we found that the band gaps for PMMA, PE, PVC, PET, PPY, and PA6 are 5.0 eV, 7.5 eV, 7.0 eV, 3.0 eV, 3.5 eV, and 5.1 eV, respectively. Quantitative analysis of the experimental cross sections was carried out by using the QUEELS-ɛ(k,ω)-REELS software to determine the dielectric function and optical properties. This is done by comparing the experimental REELS inelastic electron-scattering cross-section with a simulated cross section in which the only input is Im(-1/ɛ). The dielectric function is expressed as a sum of oscillators and the oscillator parameters are determined. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical cross section is achieved for all polymers. From Im(-1/ɛ), the real and imaginary parts of ɛ (ω), the refractive index, and the extinction coefficient were determined for all polymers in the energy range ћω = 0 to 70 eV. An oscillator is clearly observed for PPY, PET, and PA6 at ˜ 6.7 eV, which corresponds to the π plasmon. This oscillator is not found for PMMA, PE, and PVC. A set of oscillators in the 20-30 eV energy range corresponding to the σ+π plasmon is found for all polymers.

  5. Benefits of Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.; DeBlasio, R.; Thomas, H.; Simoes, M.; Sen, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    Optimization of overall electrical system performance is important for the long-term economic viability of distributed energy (DE) systems. With the increasing use of DE systems in industry and its technological advancement, it is becoming more important to understand the integration of these systems with the electric power systems. New markets and benefits for distributed energy applications include the ability to provide ancillary services, improve energy efficiency, enhance power system reliability, and allow customer choice. Advanced power electronic (PE) interfaces will allow DE systems to provide increased functionality through improved power quality and voltage/VAR support, increase electrical system compatibility by reducing the fault contributions, and flexibility in operations with various other DE sources, while reducing overall interconnection costs. This paper examines the system integration and optimization issues associated with DE systems and show the benefits of using PE interfaces for such applications.

  6. NEUTRON AND NON-NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    1999-09-10

    NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA THAT IS USED IN REACTOR DOSIMETRY INCLUDE THERMAL NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS AND NEUTRON RESONANCE INTEGRALS, FISSION SPECTRUM AVERAGED CROSS SECTIONS FOR REACTIONS ON A TARGET NUCLEUS. NON-NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA USED IN REACTOR DOSIMETRY INCLUDE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF TARGET NUCLIDES AND RADIOACTIVE HALF-LIVES, GAMMA-RAY ENERGIES AND INTENSITIES OF REACTION PRODUCT NUCLIDES. ALL OF THESE DATA ARE PERIODICALLY EVALUATED AND RECOMMENDED VALUES ARE PROVIDED IN THE HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS. THE LATEST RECOMMENDED VALUES ARE DISCUSSED AND THEY ARE CONTRASTED WITH SOME EARLIER NUCLEAR DATA, WHICH WAS PROVIDED WITH NEUTRON DETECTOR FOILS.

  7. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Manual, PNL-MA-552

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.

    2009-09-24

    This manual is a guide to the services provided by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP), which is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.( ) for the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Office of River Protection and their Hanford Site contractors. The manual describes the roles of and relationships between the IDP and the radiation protection programs of the Hanford Site contractors. Recommendations and guidance are also provided for consideration in implementing bioassay monitoring and internal dosimetry elements of radiation protection programs.

  8. Report from the dosimetry working group to CEDR project management

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J J

    1994-08-01

    On August 2, 1989, Admiral Watkins, Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE), presented a four-point program designed to enhance the DOE epidemiology program. One part of this program was the establishment of a Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) to facilitate independent research to validate and supplement DOE research on human health effects. A Dosimetry Working Group was formed during May 1991 to evaluate radiation dose variables and associated documentation that would be most useful to researchers for retrospective and prospective studies. The Working Group consisted of thirteen individuals with expertise and experience in health physics, epidemiology, dosimetry, computing, and industrial hygiene. A final report was delivered to CEDR Project Management during February 1992. The report contains a number of major recommendations concerning collection, interpretation, and documentation of dosimetry data to maximize their usefulness to researchers using CEDR for examining possible health effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation.

  9. Electron Thermionic Emission from Graphene and a Thermionic Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shi-Jun; Ang, L. K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a model to investigate the electron thermionic emission from single-layer graphene (ignoring the effects of the substrate) and to explore its application as the emitter of a thermionic energy converter (TIC). An analytical formula is derived, which is a function of the temperature, work function, and Fermi energy level. The formula is significantly different from the traditional Richardson-Dushman (RD) law for which it is independent of mass to account for the supply function of the electrons in the graphene behaving like massless fermion quasiparticles. By comparing with a recent experiment [K. Jiang et al., Nano Res. 7, 553 (2014)] measuring electron thermionic emission from suspended single-layer graphene, our model predicts that the intrinsic work function of single-layer graphene is about 4.514 eV with a Fermi energy level of 0.083 eV. For a given work function, a scaling of T3 is predicted, which is different from the traditional RD scaling of T2. If the work function of the graphene is lowered to 2.5-3 eV and the Fermi energy level is increased to 0.8-0.9 eV, it is possible to design a graphene-cathode-based TIC operating at around 900 K or lower, as compared with the metal-based cathode TIC (operating at about 1500 K). With a graphene-based cathode (work function=4.514 eV ) at 900 K and a metallic-based anode (work function=2.5 eV ) like LaB6 at 425 K, the efficiency of our proposed TIC is about 45%.

  10. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    DOE PAGES

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particularmore » incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.« less

  11. Ultralow Energy Electron Attachment at Sub-Millielectron Volt Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Kortyna, A.; Darrach, M. R.; Howe, P. -T.

    1999-01-01

    The technique of rare-gas photoionization has been extended by use of direct laser ionization to electron energies epsilon in the range 0-100 meV, with a resolution Delta(epsilon) of 0.4-0.5 meV (FWHM). Tunable UV light at (Lambda)276 nm is produced using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and nonlinear mixing techniques. The beam is frequency tripled in a pulsed jet of xenon. The VUV radiation, tunable at (Lambda)92 nm, is then used to photoionize Xe at its 2P(sub 1/2) threshold (single-photon ionization). The photoelectrons produced interact with admixed target gas to generate negative ions through the s-wave capture process. Recent results in electron attachment to SF(sub 6) will be reported which show resonance structure at the opening of the ground-state vibrational channels. This structure corresponds to the process of vibrational excitation + attachment, which is superimposed on the underlying s-wave (direct) capture process. It should be a general phenomenon, present in a wide variety of zero-energy electron attaching molecules.

  12. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.

  13. Automatic neutron dosimetry system based on fluorescent nuclear track detector technology.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, M S; Fomenko, V V; Bartz, J A; Haslett, T L

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, the authors are describing an automatic fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) reader for neutron dosimetry. FNTD is a luminescent integrating type of detector made of aluminium oxide crystals that does not require electronics or batteries during irradiation. Non-destructive optical readout of the detector is performed using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence imaging with near-diffraction limited resolution. The fully automatic table-top reader allows one to load up to 216 detectors on a tray, read their engraved IDs using a CCD camera and optical character recognition, scan and process simultaneously two types of images in fluorescent and reflected laser light contrast to eliminate false-positive tracks related to surface and volume crystal imperfections. The FNTD dosimetry system allows one to measure neutron doses from 0.1 mSv to 20 Sv and covers neutron energies from thermal to 20 MeV. The reader is characterised by a robust, compact optical design, fast data processing electronics and user-friendly software.

  14. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine–C{sub 60} bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Friedrich; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-11-14

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C{sub 60} (MnPc:C{sub 60}) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C{sub 60}. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C{sub 60} bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C{sub 60} to MnPc thin films.

  15. Cellular dosimetry of diagnostic radionuclides for spherical and ellipsoidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, Jo S.; Lawson, Richard S.

    1996-09-01

    Radionuclides which emit Auger electrons are widely used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Studies have shown possible uptake of these in developing germ cells within the testes. In addition, mature sperm within the reproductive tract may be subject to uptake of radionuclides from the circulating blood pool. Though much work has been carried out concerning cellular dosimetry applied to spherical sources, such an approach may lead to significant errors when considering spermatids and spermatozoa, which are almost ellipsoidal in shape (with the long axis twice the short). A numerical method for determining geometrical reduction factors has been developed and used in conjunction with experimentally determined range - energy relationships for electrons, to determine dose gradients and S factors for homogeneous distributions of four commonly used diagnostic radionuclides (, , and ) throughout source regions of both spherical and ellipsoidal geometry at typical cellular dimensions. The results indicate that assumption of spherical geometry is acceptable when determining S factors for late-type germ cells, but introduces error into calculations of dose distribution towards the edge of the cell.

  16. Practical spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shah, A B; Ramasse, Q M; Wen, J G; Bhattacharya, A; Zuo, J M

    2011-08-01

    The resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited by delocalization of inelastic electron scattering rather than probe size in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). In this study, we present an experimental quantification of EELS spatial resolution using chemically modulated 2×(LaMnO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) and 2×(SrVO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) superlattices by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of integrated Ti M(2,3), Ti L(2,3), V L(2,3), Mn L(2,3), La N(4,5), La N(2,3) La M(4,5) and Sr L(3) edges over the superlattices. The EELS signals recorded using large collection angles are peaked at atomic columns. The FWHM of the EELS profile, obtained by curve-fitting, reveals a systematic trend with the energy loss for the Ti, V, and Mn edges. However, the experimental FWHM of the Sr and La edges deviates significantly from the observed experimental tendency.

  17. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution. PMID:26329206

  18. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  19. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  20. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  1. Composite electron propagator methods for calculating ionization energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ionization energies of molecules may be determined efficiently with composite electron-propagator (CEP) techniques. These methods estimate the results of a calculation with an advanced correlation method and a large basis set by performing a series of more tractable calculations in which large basis sets are used with simpler approximations and small basis sets are paired with more demanding correlation techniques. The performance of several CEP methods, in which diagonal, second-order electron propagator results with large basis sets are combined with higher-order results obtained with smaller basis sets, has been tested for the ionization energies of closed-shell molecules from the G2 set. Useful compromises of accuracy and computational efficiency employ complete-basis-set extrapolation for second-order results and small basis sets in third-order, partial third-order, renormalized partial-third order, or outer valence Green's function calculations. Analysis of results for vertical as well as adiabatic ionization energies leads to specific recommendations on the best use of regular and composite methods. Results for 22 organic molecules of interest in the design of photovoltaic devices, benzo[a]pyrene, Mg-octaethylporphyrin, and C60 illustrate the capabilities of CEP methods for calculations on large molecules.

  2. Composite electron propagator methods for calculating ionization energies.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Dolgounitcheva, O; Zakrzewski, V G; Ortiz, J V

    2016-06-14

    Accurate ionization energies of molecules may be determined efficiently with composite electron-propagator (CEP) techniques. These methods estimate the results of a calculation with an advanced correlation method and a large basis set by performing a series of more tractable calculations in which large basis sets are used with simpler approximations and small basis sets are paired with more demanding correlation techniques. The performance of several CEP methods, in which diagonal, second-order electron propagator results with large basis sets are combined with higher-order results obtained with smaller basis sets, has been tested for the ionization energies of closed-shell molecules from the G2 set. Useful compromises of accuracy and computational efficiency employ complete-basis-set extrapolation for second-order results and small basis sets in third-order, partial third-order, renormalized partial-third order, or outer valence Green's function calculations. Analysis of results for vertical as well as adiabatic ionization energies leads to specific recommendations on the best use of regular and composite methods. Results for 22 organic molecules of interest in the design of photovoltaic devices, benzo[a]pyrene, Mg-octaethylporphyrin, and C60 illustrate the capabilities of CEP methods for calculations on large molecules. PMID:27305999

  3. Stable topological insulators achieved using high energy electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lukas; Konczykowski, Marcin; Deng, Haiming; Korzhovska, Inna; Begliarbekov, Milan; Chen, Zhiyi; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Marsi, Marino; Perfetti, Luca; Hruban, Andrzej; Wołoś, Agnieszka; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators are potentially transformative quantum solids with metallic surface states which have Dirac band structure and are immune to disorder. Ubiquitous charged bulk defects, however, pull the Fermi energy into the bulk bands, denying access to surface charge transport. Here we demonstrate that irradiation with swift (∼2.5 MeV energy) electron beams allows to compensate these defects, bring the Fermi level back into the bulk gap and reach the charge neutrality point (CNP). Controlling the beam fluence, we tune bulk conductivity from p- (hole-like) to n-type (electron-like), crossing the Dirac point and back, while preserving the Dirac energy dispersion. The CNP conductance has a two-dimensional character on the order of ten conductance quanta and reveals, both in Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3, the presence of only two quantum channels corresponding to two topological surfaces. The intrinsic quantum transport of the topological states is accessible disregarding the bulk size. PMID:26961901

  4. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons from double layer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; Varga, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical description of the spectra of electrons elastically scattered from thin double layered Au-C samples. The analysis is based on the Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects in reflection and transmission geometries of the scattering at a fixed angle of 44.3 ° and a primary energy of 40 keV. The relativistic correction is taken into account. Besides the experimentally measurable energy distributions the simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). Furthermore, we present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of the single scattering, taking into account both the ideal scattering geometry, i.e. infinitesimally small angular range, and the effect of the real, finite angular range used in the measurements. We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings for four cases of measurement geometries and layer thicknesses. While in the peak intensity ratios of gold and carbon for transmission geometries were found to be in good agreement with the results of the single scattering model, especially large deviations were obtained in reflection geometries. The separation of the peaks, depending on the geometry and the thickness, generally smaller, and the peak width generally larger than it can be expected from the nominal values of the primary energy, scattering angle, and mean kinetic energy of the atoms. We also show that the peaks are asymmetric even for the case of the single scattering due to the finite solid angle. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with recent measurements.

  6. Electron inelastic mean free path theory and density functional theory resolving discrepancies for low-energy electrons in copper.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2014-02-01

    We develop the many-pole dielectric theory of UV plasmon interactions and electron energy losses, and couple our advances with recent developments of Kohn-Sham density functional theory to address observed discrepancies between high-precision measurements and tabulated data for electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs). Recent publications have demonstrated that a five standard error difference exists between longstanding theoretical calculations and measurements of electron IMFPs for elemental solids at energies below 120 eV, a critical region for analysis of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and related technologies. Our implementation of improved optical loss spectra and a physical treatment of second-order excitation lifetimes resolves this problem in copper for the first time for energies in excess of 80 eV and substantially improves agreement for lower energy electrons.

  7. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie

    2010-09-15

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40{+-}1 eV.

  8. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  9. High energy electron beam joining of ceramic components

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately}1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of critical components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. Because of transient heating, higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, a pulsed high power beam can melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons as well as ceramic and glass tubes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF Linac accelerator at 10-13 MV. The repetition rate of the pulsed beam was varied between 8 and 120 Hz, the average beam current was varied between 8 and 120 microamps, and the power was varied up to 1.5 kW. These beam parameters gave a beam power density between 0.2 to 2 kW/cm{sup 2}. The duration of the joining runs varied from 5 to 600 sec. Joining experiments have provided high strength between alumina - alumina and alumina - cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals. A series of tests was conducted to determine the minimum beam power and exposure time for producing, a hermetic seal.

  10. Molecular mimicry of photosynthetic energy and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Proper application of reaction design considerations can yield artificial photosynthetic devices which credibility mimic the three natural photochemical processes. One approach is to use pigments and electron donors and acceptors related to those found in natural photosynthesis (and thus presumably optimal for that system), but to replace the protein with covalent bonds as an organizing precept. Molecular pentads described herein exemplify the success of this approach. At the heart of these molecules, are two covalently linked synthetic porphyrin moieties (P-P). One of these models for chlorophyll is attached to a carotenoid polyene (C), whereas the other is linked to a rigid diquinone (Q-Q). As discussed later in this paper, excitation of such a pentad is followed by photoinitiated electron transfer steps which ultimately give a C[sup [center dot]+]-P-P-Q-Q[sup [center dot]-] charge-separated state. Depending upon the structure of the pentad and the conditions, these states are formed with quantum yields of up to 0.83, have lifetimes approaching 0.5 ms, and store about one-half of the energy of the exciting singlet state. Related photosynthesis mimics display singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to porphyrins and among porphyrin chromophores, and rapid quenching of porphyrin triplet states by attached carotenoids. How have the structures of these and other successful artificial reaction centers evolved, and what will be the next steps in their development The authors will address these questions from the point of view of photoinitiated electron transfer, and then singlet and triplet energy transfer will briefly be considered. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Characterising an aluminium oxide dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Conheady, Clement F; Gagliardi, Frank M; Ackerly, Trevor

    2015-09-01

    In vivo dosimetry is recommended as a defence-in-depth strategy in radiotherapy treatments and is currently employed by clinics around the world. The characteristics of a new optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry system were investigated for the purpose of replacing an aging thermoluminescence dosimetry system for in vivo dosimetry. The stability of the system was not sufficient to satisfy commissioning requirements and therefore it has not been released into clinical service at this time. PMID:26224358

  12. Tomography of Particle Plasmon Fields from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörl, Anton; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2013-08-01

    We theoretically investigate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of metallic nanoparticles in the optical frequency domain. Using a quasistatic approximation scheme together with a plasmon eigenmode expansion, we show that EELS can be rephrased in terms of a tomography problem. For selected single and coupled nanoparticles we extract the three-dimensional plasmon fields from a collection of rotated EELS maps. Our results pave the way for a fully three-dimensional plasmon-field tomography and establish EELS as a quantitative measurement device for plasmonics.

  13. Electron Emission Sites on Carbon Nanotubes and the Energy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Chuhei; Matsuda, Kohei; Kona, Takayuki; Mogami, Yuhta; Komaki, Masashi; Murata, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Tetsutane; Saito, Yahachi; Hata, Koichi; Takakura, Akihiro

    2001-11-01

    Two kinds of electron emission sites on carbon nanotubes have been clarified; one is a nanoprotrusion exhibiting deformed honeycomb structures composed of carbon hexagons,pentagons and possibly heptagons. The other is either an edged species or adsorbates. The emission spectra show two characteristic features; a broad main peak as compared with theoretical curves based on Fowler-Nordheim theory, and an additional shoulder at about 0.5 eV from EF, of which the features are observed independent of the emission direction. The broad main peak may indicate that energy band bending occurs near the emission sites.

  14. Low power electronic interface for electrostatic energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Phan, Tra; Azadmehr, Mehdi; Phu Le, Cuong; Halvorsen, Einar

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents design and simulation of a power electronic interface circuit for MEMS electrostatic energy harvesters. The designed circuit is applicable to highly miniaturized electrostatic harvesters with small transducer capacitances below 10 pF. It is based on comb- drive harvesters with two anti-phase capacitors that are connected as charge pumps and uses a flyback-path scheme. Controlled activation and deactivation of sub-circuits, some by help of clocking, were exploited to reduce power consumption down to 1.03 μW. Net power generation can be achieved with as low initial voltage as 3.0 V.

  15. Diffraction and electron energy loss to plasmons in silicon slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary H.

    2008-03-01

    Dynamical diffraction patterns were calculated for 25nm slabs of silicon with [001], [111], and [110] faces for a 120keV electron beam. The calculation used the mixed dynamical form factor in the dielectric formulation. Dielectric matrices with wave vector and frequency dependence were calculated within the local density approximation using the random phase approximation. The energy losses, 10-25eV , span the plasmon peak. Near the zone axes, the results show the preservation of elastic contrast and both excess and deficit Kikuchi lines.

  16. Modulation of low energy electrons and protons near solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lheureux, J.; Meyer, P.

    1975-01-01

    The intensities of cosmic-ray electrons in the energy range from 24 to 235 MeV and of protons in the ranges 40 to 150 MeV and greater than 700 MeV are compared with the neutron intensity data over the period 1968 to 1972. Correlation plots between these various components show a marked break following the June 9, 1969 Forbush decrease. The resulting hysteresis curve is best explained as a sudden change in the rigidity dependence of solar modulation. A variation in the size of the solar cavity is also possible but not likely.

  17. Above-threshold ionization for very low electron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, W.; Milošević, D. B.

    2015-08-01

    The rescattering term of the ionization amplitude in the strong-field approximation is analyzed for very low electron energy and emission in arbitrary direction, first in terms of the classical simple-man model and then in the quantum-mechanical quantum-orbit expansion of the strong-field-approximation amplitude. Particular orbits can be associated with particular patterns in the velocity map. The different roles of forward and backscattering are investigated. In addition to known features such as the LES and the fork, a characteristic and pronounced V structure in the velocity map is identified, which has been observed in recent experiments (2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 063424).

  18. Elastic Scattering of Low-Energy Electrons byTetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, Cynthia S.; Orel, Ann E.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2006-05-09

    We present the results of ab initio calculations for elasticelectron scattering by tetrahydrofuran (THF) using the complex Kohnvariational method. We carried out fixed-nuclei calculations at theequilibrium geometry of the target molecule for incident electronenergies up to 20 eV. The calculated momentum transfer cross sectionsclearly reveal the presence of broad shape resonance behavior in the 8-10eV energy range, in agreement with recent experiments. The calculateddifferential cross sections at 20 eV, which include the effects of thelong-range electron-dipole interaction, are alsofound to be in agreementwith the most recent experimental findings.

  19. SU-D-19A-05: The Dosimetric Impact of Using Xoft Axxent® Electronic Brachytherapy Source TG-43 Dosimetry Parameters for Treatment with the Xoft 30 Mm Diameter Vaginal Applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Simiele, S; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A full TG-43 dosimetric characterization has not been performed for the Xoft Axxent ® electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft, a subsidiary of iCAD, San Jose, CA) within the Xoft 30 mm diameter vaginal applicator. Currently, dose calculations are performed using the bare-source TG-43 parameters and do not account for the presence of the applicator. This work focuses on determining the difference between the bare-source and sourcein- applicator TG-43 parameters. Both the radial dose function (RDF) and polar anisotropy function (PAF) were computationally determined for the source-in-applicator and bare-source models to determine the impact of using the bare-source dosimetry data. Methods: MCNP5 was used to model the source and the Xoft 30 mm diameter vaginal applicator. All simulations were performed using 0.84p and 0.03e cross section libraries. All models were developed based on specifications provided by Xoft. The applicator is made of a proprietary polymer material and simulations were performed using the most conservative chemical composition. An F6 collision-kerma tally was used to determine the RDF and PAF values in water at various dwell positions. The RDF values were normalized to 2.0 cm from the source to accommodate the applicator radius. Source-in-applicator results were compared with bare-source results from this work as well as published baresource results. Results: For a 0 mm source pullback distance, the updated bare-source model and source-in-applicator RDF values differ by 2% at 3 cm and 4% at 5 cm. The largest PAF disagreements were observed at the distal end of the source and applicator with up to 17% disagreement at 2 cm and 8% at 8 cm. The bare-source model had RDF values within 2.6% of the published TG-43 data and PAF results within 7.2% at 2 cm. Conclusion: Results indicate that notable differences exist between the bare-source and source-in-applicator TG-43 simulated parameters. Xoft Inc. provided partial funding for this work.

  20. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed. (ACR)