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Sample records for energy electron-neutrino scattering

  1. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, J.

    2015-12-31

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter for electron neutrino appearance oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically begin with the muon neutrino cross section and apply theoretical corrections to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section. However, at present no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments exists. We present the cross sections for a CCQE-like process determined using the MINERvA detector, which are the first measurements of any exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^{2}$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^{2}$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between these measurements and the predictions of the GENIE generator. We furthermore report on a photon-like background unpredicted by the generator which we interpret as neutral-coherent diffractive scattering from hydrogen.

  2. Measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon at $$\\langle E_{\

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wolcott, J.

    2016-02-25

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q2 are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q2 for νe with that of similarly selected νμ-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current νe interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, the data are found tomore » be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.« less

  3. Electron-neutrino scattering off nuclei from two different theoretical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Jachowicz, N.; Ericson, M.; Pandey, V.; Van Cuyck, T.; Van Dessel, N.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze charged-current electron-neutrino cross sections on carbon. We consider two different theoretical approaches, on one hand the continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) which allows a description of giant resonances and quasielastic excitations, on the other hand the RPA-based calculations which are able to describe multinucleon emission and coherent and incoherent pion production as well as quasielastic excitations. We compare the two approaches in the genuine quasielastic channel, and find a satisfactory agreement between them at large energies while at low energies the collective giant resonances show up only in the CRPA approach. We also compare electron-neutrino cross sections with the corresponding muon-neutrino ones in order to investigate the impact of the different charged-lepton masses. Finally, restricting to the RPA-based approach, we compare the sum of quasielastic, multinucleon emission, coherent, and incoherent one-pion production cross sections (folded with the electron-neutrino T2K flux) with the charged-current inclusive electron-neutrino differential cross sections on carbon measured by T2K. We find a good agreement with the data. The multinucleon component is needed in order to reproduce the T2K electron-neutrino inclusive cross sections.

  4. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-10-28

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross section for a CCQE-like process, made using the MINERvA detector. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^2$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^2$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between this measurement and the predictions of the GENIE generator.

  5. Measurement of Electron Neutrino Quasielastic and Quasielasticlike Scattering on Hydrocarbon at ⟨Eν⟩=3.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Salazar, G.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zegarra, A.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q2 are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q2 for νe with that of similarly selected νμ-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current νe interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The data are found to be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.

  6. Measurement of Electron Neutrino Quasielastic and Quasielasticlike Scattering on Hydrocarbon at ⟨E_{ν}⟩=3.6  GeV.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, J; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Salazar, G; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Solano Salinas, C J; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zegarra, A; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2016-02-26

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q^{2} are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q^{2} for ν_{e} with that of similarly selected ν_{μ}-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current ν_{e} interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The data are found to be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.

  7. Measurement of Electron Neutrino Quasielastic and Quasielasticlike Scattering on Hydrocarbon at ⟨E_{ν}⟩=3.6  GeV.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, J; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Salazar, G; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Solano Salinas, C J; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zegarra, A; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2016-02-26

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q^{2} are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q^{2} for ν_{e} with that of similarly selected ν_{μ}-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current ν_{e} interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The data are found to be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE. PMID:26967410

  8. New Prospects for Real-Time Spectroscopy of Low Energy Electron Neutrinos from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, R. S.

    1997-05-01

    Flavor-specific real-time spectroscopy of solar electron neutrinos \\(νe\\) from the p+p, 7Be+e-, and CNO reactions in the Sun may become practical for the first time via a newly discovered class of νe reactions. Highly specific signatures of νe capture by the targets 176Yb, 160Gd, or 82Se can discriminate against a background ~107 times larger than the νe signals. A high-quality liquid scintillator containing up to ~15 wt % Yb has been developed for observing these νe reactions. Experiments based on the new approach can, in principle, resolve basic puzzles set by current solar neutrino results and the underlying question of νe-flavor conversion.

  9. Energy Estimation for the NOvA Electron Neutrino Appearance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psihas, Fernanda

    2016-03-01

    The NOvA experiment measures long baseline νμ -->νe oscillations in Fermilab's NuMI beam. Measurement of this oscillation probability enables determination of the neutrino mass ordering and opens a window to observation of charge-parity violation in the neutrino sector. NOvA started taking data in 2014 and has already observed νe appearance at the 3.3 σ level with the first 7 % of the total projected dataset last year. Future analyses will exploit the expected energy dependence of oscillation to improve sensitivity. A new method to estimate energy for νe events and its impact on the next analysis will be discussed.

  10. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments, which observe the transition from muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos, promise to help answer some of the fundamental questions surrounding physics in the post-Standard-Model era. Because they wish to observe the interactions of electron neutrinos in their detectors, and because the power of current results is typically limited by their systematic uncertainties, these experiments require precise estimates of the cross-section for electron neutrino interactions. Of particular interest is the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) process, which gures signi cantly in the composition of the reactions observed at the far detector. However, no experimental measurements of this crosssection currently exist for electron neutrinos; instead, current experiments typically work from the abundance of muon neutrino CCQE cross-section data and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for electron neutrinos. Veri cation of these predictions is challenging due to the di culty of constructing an electron neutrino beam, but the advent of modern high-intensity muon neutrino beams|together with the percent-level electron neutrino impurity inherent in these beams| nally presents the opportunity to make such a measurement. We report herein the rst-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering, which was made using the MINER A detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE di erential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: nal-state electron angle, nal-state electron energy, and the square of the fourmomentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino , Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE

  11. Observation of electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F D M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Floetotto, L; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Gaudin, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Licciardi, C; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L J; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-02-14

    The T2K experiment has observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam produced 295 km from the Super-Kamiokande detector with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. A total of 28 electron neutrino events were detected with an energy distribution consistent with an appearance signal, corresponding to a significance of 7.3σ when compared to 4.92±0.55 expected background events. In the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing model, the electron neutrino appearance signal depends on several parameters including three mixing angles θ12, θ23, θ13, a mass difference Δm(32)(2) and a CP violating phase δ(CP). In this neutrino oscillation scenario, assuming |Δm(32)(2)|=2.4×10(-3)  eV(2), sin(2)θ(23)=0.5, and Δm322>0 (Δm(32)(2)<0), a best-fit value of sin(2)2θ(13)=0.140(-0.032)(+0.038) (0.170(-0.037)(+0.045)) is obtained at δ(CP)=0. When combining the result with the current best knowledge of oscillation parameters including the world average value of θ(13) from reactor experiments, some values of δ(CP) are disfavored at the 90% C.L. PMID:24580687

  12. Observation of electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F D M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Floetotto, L; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Gaudin, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Licciardi, C; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L J; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-02-14

    The T2K experiment has observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam produced 295 km from the Super-Kamiokande detector with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. A total of 28 electron neutrino events were detected with an energy distribution consistent with an appearance signal, corresponding to a significance of 7.3σ when compared to 4.92±0.55 expected background events. In the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing model, the electron neutrino appearance signal depends on several parameters including three mixing angles θ12, θ23, θ13, a mass difference Δm(32)(2) and a CP violating phase δ(CP). In this neutrino oscillation scenario, assuming |Δm(32)(2)|=2.4×10(-3)  eV(2), sin(2)θ(23)=0.5, and Δm322>0 (Δm(32)(2)<0), a best-fit value of sin(2)2θ(13)=0.140(-0.032)(+0.038) (0.170(-0.037)(+0.045)) is obtained at δ(CP)=0. When combining the result with the current best knowledge of oscillation parameters including the world average value of θ(13) from reactor experiments, some values of δ(CP) are disfavored at the 90% C.L.

  13. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in a Muon Neutrino Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Floetotto, L.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L. J.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    The T2K experiment has observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam produced 295 km from the Super-Kamiokande detector with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. A total of 28 electron neutrino events were detected with an energy distribution consistent with an appearance signal, corresponding to a significance of 7.3σ when compared to 4.92±0.55 expected background events. In the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing model, the electron neutrino appearance signal depends on several parameters including three mixing angles θ12, θ23, θ13, a mass difference Δm322 and a CP violating phase δCP. In this neutrino oscillation scenario, assuming |Δm322|=2.4×10-3 eV2, sin2θ23=0.5, and Δm322>0 (Δm322<0), a best-fit value of sin22θ13=0.140-0.032+0.038 (0.170-0.037+0.045) is obtained at δCP=0. When combining the result with the current best knowledge of oscillation parameters including the world average value of θ13 from reactor experiments, some values of δCP are disfavored at the 90% C.L.

  14. Evidence of electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abgrall, N.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Albert, J. B.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Beznosko, D.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Boyd, S.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Brook-Roberge, D. G.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Curioni, A.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dobson, J.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziomba, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Frank, E.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khanam, F.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, S. B.; Kirby, B.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Kogan, G.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Laing, A.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, G. D.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marchionni, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Masliah, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; McLachlan, T.; Messina, M.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nicholls, T. C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Obayashi, Y.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Scully, D. I.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Szeptycka, M.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, I. J.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Zalewska, A.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2013-08-01

    The T2K Collaboration reports evidence for electron neutrino appearance at the atmospheric mass splitting, |Δm322|≈2.4×10-3eV2. An excess of electron neutrino interactions over background is observed from a muon neutrino beam with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV at the Super-Kamiokande (SK) detector 295 km from the beam’s origin. Signal and background predictions are constrained by data from near detectors located 280 m from the neutrino production target. We observe 11 electron neutrino candidate events at the SK detector when a background of 3.3±0.4(syst) events is expected. The background-only hypothesis is rejected with a p value of 0.0009 (3.1σ), and a fit assuming νμ→νe oscillations with sin⁡22θ23=1, δCP=0 and |Δm322|=2.4×10-3eV2 yields sin⁡22θ13=0.088-0.039+0.049(stat+syst).

  15. Experimental bound on the charge radius of the electron neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Hausamann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Lu, X.; Mahler, H.J.; Potter, M.E.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Frank, J.S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A limit on the electron-neutrino charge radius {vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar} is derived from a measurement of the weak-neutral-current vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital V}} obtained in electron-neutrino electron elastic scattering. The 90%-confidence interval for {ital g}{sub {ital V}} is {minus}0.177{lt}{ital g}{sub {ital V}}{lt}0.187, which for sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub {ital W}}=0.227 implies that the {nu}{sub {ital e}} mean-square charge radius is in the range {minus}2.74{times}10{sup {minus}32}{lt}{l angle}{ital r}{sup 2}{r angle}{lt}4.88{times}10{sup {minus}32} cm{sup 2}, or simply {vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar}{lt}2.2{times}10{sup {minus}16} cm. This is the first experimental bound on the {nu}{sub {ital e}} charge radius, and is the same order of magnitude as bounds for {nu}{sub {mu}} structure.

  16. Interaction of electron neutrino with LSD detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Semenov, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of electron neutrino flux, originating in the rotational collapse mechanism on the first stage of Supernova burst, with the LSD detector components, such as 56Fe (a large amount of this metal is included in as shielding material) and liquid scintillator barNnH2n+2, is being investigated. Both charged and neutral channels of neutrino reaction with 12barN and 56Fe are considered. Experimental data, giving the possibility to extract information for nuclear matrix elements calculation are used. The number of signals, produced in LSD by the neutrino pulse of Supernova 1987A is determined. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Reines-Cowan team discovery of the electron neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Herald W.

    2011-12-01

    Personal perspective and recollections by the author discuss the Reines-Cowan team discovery of the electron neutrino at a Savannah River reactor in 1956. First presented at the Neutrino Santa Fe 2006 Conference.

  18. Measurement of the inclusive electron neutrino charged current cross section on carbon with the T2K near detector.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2014-12-12

    The T2K off-axis near detector ND280 is used to make the first differential cross-section measurements of electron neutrino charged current interactions at energies ∼1  GeV as a function of electron momentum, electron scattering angle, and four-momentum transfer of the interaction. The total flux-averaged ν(e) charged current cross section on carbon is measured to be ⟨σ⟩(ϕ)=1.11±0.10(stat)±0.18(syst)×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon. The differential and total cross-section measurements agree with the predictions of two leading neutrino interaction generators, NEUT and GENIE. The NEUT prediction is 1.23×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon and the GENIE prediction is 1.08×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon. The total ν(e) charged current cross-section result is also in agreement with data from the Gargamelle experiment. PMID:25541766

  19. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the NuMI Beam with the NOvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Niner, Evan David

    2015-01-01

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment that uses two functionally identical detectors separated by 810 kilometers at locations 14 milliradians off-axis from the NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab. At these locations the beam energy peaks at 2 GeV. This baseline is the longest in the world for an accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment, which enhances the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering. The experiment studies oscillations of the muon neutrino and anti-neutrino beam that is produced. Both detectors completed commissioning in the summer of 2014 and continue to collect data. One of the primary physics goals of the experiment is the measurement of electron neutrino appearance in the muon neutrino beam which yields measurements of the oscillation parameters sin213, δ , and the neutrino mass ordering within the standard model of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents the analysis of data collected between February 2014 and May 2015, corresponding to 3.52 X 1020 protons-on-target. In this first analysis NOvA recorded 6 electron neutrino candidates, which is a 3.3σ observation of electron neutrino appearance. The T2K experiment performs the same measurement on a baseline of 295 kilometers and has a 1 σ preference for the normal mass ordering over the inverted ordering over the phase space of the CP violating parameter δ, which is also weakly seen in the NOvA result. By the summer of 2016 NOvA will triple its statistics due to increased beam power and a completed detector. If electron neutrinos continue to be observed at the current rate NOvA will be able to establish a mass ordering preference at a similar confidence level to T2K.

  20. Short-baseline electron neutrino oscillation length after the Troitsk experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Long, H. W.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the implications for short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance in the 3+1 mixing scheme of the recent Troitsk bounds on the mixing of a neutrino with mass between 2 and 100 eV. Considering the Troitsk data in combination with the results of short-baseline νe and ν¯e disappearance experiments, which include the reactor and Gallium anomalies, we derive a 2σ allowed range for the effective neutrino squared-mass difference between 0.85 and 43eV2. The upper bound implies that it is likely that oscillations in distance and/or energy can be observed in radioactive source experiments. It is also favorable for the ICARUS@CERN experiment, in which it is likely that oscillations are not washed out in the near detector. We discuss also the implications for neutrinoless double-β decay.

  1. Detecting electron neutrinos from solar dark matter annihilation by JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wan-Lei

    2016-01-01

    We explore the electron neutrino signals from light dark matter (DM) annihilation in the Sun for the large liquid scintillator detector JUNO. In terms of the spectrum features of three typical DM annihilation channels χχ → νbar nu, τ+τ-, bbar b, we take two sets of selection conditions to calculate the expected signals and atmospheric neutrino backgrounds based on the Monte Carlo simulation data. Then the JUNO sensitivities to the spin independent DM-nucleon and spin dependent DM-proton cross sections are presented. It is found that the JUNO projected sensitivities are much better than the current spin dependent direct detection experimental limits for the νbar nu and τ+τ- channels. In the spin independent case, the JUNO will give the better sensitivity to the DM-nucleon cross section than the LUX and CDMSlite limits for the νbar nu channel with the DM mass lighter than 6.5 GeV . If the νbar nu or τ+τ- channel is dominant, the future JUNO results are very helpful for us to understand the tension between the DAMA annual modulation signal and other direct detection exclusions.

  2. Detecting electron neutrinos from solar dark matter annihilation by JUNO

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wan-Lei

    2016-01-01

    We explore the electron neutrino signals from light dark matter (DM) annihilation in the Sun for the large liquid scintillator detector JUNO. In terms of the spectrum features of three typical DM annihilation channels χχ → νν-bar , τ{sup +}τ{sup −}, b b-bar , we take two sets of selection conditions to calculate the expected signals and atmospheric neutrino backgrounds based on the Monte Carlo simulation data. Then the JUNO sensitivities to the spin independent DM-nucleon and spin dependent DM-proton cross sections are presented. It is found that the JUNO projected sensitivities are much better than the current spin dependent direct detection experimental limits for the νν-bar and τ{sup +}τ{sup −} channels. In the spin independent case, the JUNO will give the better sensitivity to the DM-nucleon cross section than the LUX and CDMSlite limits for the νν-bar channel with the DM mass lighter than 6.5 GeV . If the νν-bar or τ{sup +}τ{sup −} channel is dominant, the future JUNO results are very helpful for us to understand the tension between the DAMA annual modulation signal and other direct detection exclusions.

  3. Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillation in NOnuA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Kanika

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment optimized for electron neutrino (nue) appearance in the NuMI beam, a muon neutrino (numu) source at Fermilab. It consists of two functionally identical, nearly fully-active liquid-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector (ND) at Fermilab is used to study the neutrino beam spectrum and composition before oscillation, and measure background rate to the nu e appearance search. The far detector, 810 km away in Northern Minnesota, observes the oscillated beam and is used to extract oscillation parameters from the data. NOnuA's long baseline, combined with the ability of the NuMI beam to operate in the anti-neutrino mode, makes NOnuA sensitive to the last unmeasured parameters in neutrino oscillations- mass hierarchy, CP violation and the octant of mixing angle theta23. This thesis presents the search for nue appearance in the first data collected by the NOnuA detectors from October 2013 till May 2015. Studies of the NuMI neutrino data collected in the NOnuA near detector are also presented, which show large discrepancies between the ND simulation and data. Muon-removed electron (MRE) events, constructed by replacing the muon in numu charged current interactions by a simulated electron, are used to correct the far detector nue appearance prediction for these discrepancies. In the analysis of the first data, a total of 6 nue candidate events are observed in the far detector on a background of 1, a 3.46 sigma excess, which is interpreted as strong evidence for nue appearance. The results are consistent with our expectation, based on constraints from other neutrino oscillation experiments. The result presented here differs from the officially published nu e appearance result from the NOnuA experiment where the systematic error is assumed to cover the MRE correction.

  4. Next discoveries in neutrino mixing: Electron neutrino appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duyang, Hongyue

    The discovery of neutrino oscillation is a clear evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Measurements of electron neutrino (nu e) and electron anti-neutrino (nu e) appearances are the most important channels to complete the neutrino mixing matrix. In a nue/ nue appearance experiment, a near detector (ND) is used to constrain the neutrino flux and measure the backgrounds to the signal. Backgrounds to the nue appearance comes from Neutral Current Muon Neutrino Interactions (numu-NC), Charged Current Muon Neutrino Interactions (numu-CC), beam nu e events and outside backgrounds. The background components are then extrapolated to the far detector (FD). By looking for excess of signal nu e/nue-like events in FD, we measure the neutrino mixing angle, neutrino's mass hierarchy and the elusive CP-violation in the lepton sector. This dissertation focuses on the signals and backgrounds in nu e/nue appearance measurements. The first part of the dissertation presents an analysis of nue appearance in a large Water Cherenkov detector such as the one proposed by the LBNE collaboration. The analysis, including scanning thousands of events, aims to distinguish nu e signals from the NC backgrounds. The second part of the dissertation presents measurements of Resonance Neutrino Interactions using the NOMAD data. This process plays a critical role in not only neutrino-nuclear cross section but also in the precision analysis of the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments such as NOnuA and LBNE. The last part of the dissertation discusses the method of using low-nu fit method to measure relative neutrino flux and constrain beam nue background.

  5. Energy dependent 4-dimensional multiple scattering distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschalär, C.

    1984-12-01

    A complete analytic solution in Fourier space is presented of the four dimensional small angle, multiple scattering distribution MSD in angle and space, produced by an energy dependent single scattering cross section from an initial pencil beam of heavy particles. Independently, simple integrals are derived for the central moments of the energy dependent MSD in the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The distributions of the projections t and x of the scattering angle and displacement into a plane through the axis of propagation are evaluated numerically for a truncated Rutherford scattering cross section using a fast Fourier transform. The resulting MSDs for a wide range of particles, initial and final momenta, and scattering materials are found to be approximately represented by one-dimensional set of standard distributions symmetrized by a linear transformation in t- x-space.

  6. Evidence for electron neutrino flavor change through measurement of the (8)B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Mark Stephen

    2001-11-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water Cerenkov detector designed to study solar neutrinos. Using 1 kiloton of heavy water as the target and detection medium, SNO is able to separately determine the flux of electron neutrinos (νe) and the flux of all active neutrinos from the Sun by measuring the rate of charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) interactions with deuterons. A comparison of these interaction rates allows for direct observation of solar neutrino oscillations. SNO can also search for oscillations by comparing the rate of CC and neutrino- electron elastic scattering (ES) events, since ES has both charged current and neutral current sensitivity. In this thesis, we present measurement of the 8B solar ν e flux of 1.78+0.13-0.14 (stat+syst) × 106cm-2s -1 (35% BP2000 SSM) through measurement of the CC rate over 169.3 days of livetime. We have also measured the 8B flux from the ES reaction to be 2.56+0.48-0.45 (stat+syst), consistent with measurements by previous water Cerenkov experiments. A flavor analysis comparing the CC measured flux with that determined through ES by SuperKamiokande yields a non- νe active neutrino flux from 8B of 3.62+1.06-1.08 × 106cm-2s-1 , providing evidence for νe --> ν μ,τ oscillations as a solution to the solar neutrino problem. This result excludes pure solar νe --> ν s oscillations at greater than the 99.7% C.I. The total active 8B neutrino flux has been measured to be 5.39+1.07-1.09 × 106cm-2s-1 , consistent with BP2000 SSM predictions. First analyses of the CC (NHit) spectrum and hep flux in SNO are presented. The CC spectrum is found to be a good fit to expectations from an undistorted 8B spectrum, and global best fit vacuum oscillation solutions are disfavored over the other solutions by the data. Through observations near the 8B endpoint with consideration of energy systematics, hep flux limits of 4.1 (90% C.I.) and 6.9 (99% C.I.) times SSM expectations are obtained. A statistical fit for the

  7. Experimental evidence of electron neutrino oscillations and validation of MSW-LMA model with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzini, M. Buizza

    2011-04-01

    We report the real time measurements of 7Be and 8B solar neutrino fluxes performed with the Borexino experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The achievement of these measurements was possible thanks to the excellent levels of the radiopurity reached. The measurement of the 7Be in real time is the first direct measurements of the survival probability for solar electron neutrinos in the vacuum region. For 8B we reached a threshold energy of 3MeV which is the lowest achieved so far in real time. For the first time, the same apparatus can measure two different oscillation regions (vacuum-driven and matter-enhanced) predicted by the MSW-LMA model. Borexino also quotes the ratio between the survival probabilities, corresponding to 1.93 ± 0.75, and validates the presence of the transition region between the two oscillation regimes, according to the MSW-LMA solution.In addition, a preliminary result on the Day-Night Asymmetry (ADN) for the 7Be neutrino flux is presented and corresponds to 0.007 ± 0.073. This measurement makes Borexino able to give once more an independent confirmation of the MSW-LMA solution.

  8. Attenuation of Scattered Thermal Energy Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce a.; Seroka, Katelyn T.; McPhate, Jason B.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    The attenuation of scattered thermal energy atomic oxygen is relevant to the potential damage that can occur within a spacecraft which sweeps through atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO). Although there can be significant oxidation and resulting degradation of polymers and some metals on the external surfaces of spacecraft, there are often openings on a spacecraft such as telescope apertures, vents, and microwave cavities that can allow atomic oxygen to enter and scatter internally to the spacecraft. Atomic oxygen that enters a spacecraft can thermally accommodate and scatter to ultimately react or recombine on surfaces. The atomic oxygen that does enter a spacecraft can be scavenged by use of high erosion yield polymers to reduce its reaction on critical surfaces and materials. Polyoxymethylene and polyethylene can be used as effective atomic oxygen scavenging polymers.

  9. Entanglement creation in low-energy scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Weder, Ricardo

    2011-12-15

    We study the entanglement creation in the low-energy scattering of two particles in three dimensions, for a general class of interaction potentials that are not required to be spherically symmetric. The incoming asymptotic state, before the collision, is a product of two normalized Gaussian states. After the scattering, the particles are entangled. We take as a measure of the entanglement the purity of one of them. We provide a rigorous explicit computation, with error bound, of the leading order of the purity at low energy. The entanglement depends strongly on the difference of the masses. It takes its minimum when the masses are equal, and it increases rapidly with the difference of the masses. It is quite remarkable that the anisotropy of the potential gives no contribution to the leading order of the purity, in spite of the fact that entanglement is a second-order effect.

  10. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. C. A.; Silva, D. G. M.; Bettega, M. H. F.; da Costa, R. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand and optimize processes occurring during the ignition of plasma and its consequences in post-discharge for an internal combustion engine, especially considering the spark plug, we have produced in this work some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules in the energy range from 60 to 500 eV are reported, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Aditionally to that, measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also discussed, for impact energies of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV and for scattering angles of 5°-130°. The measurements were obtained using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons.

  11. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f{sup 2}=0.0756{plus_minus}0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P{sub 31} and P{sub 13} partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the {Sigma} term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, W. R.; Ai, Li; Kaufmann, W. B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π+/-p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f2=0.0756+/-0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P31 and P13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided.

  13. Low energy scattering with a nontrivial pion

    SciTech Connect

    Fariborz, Amir H.

    2007-12-01

    An earlier calculation in a generalized linear sigma model showed that the well-known current algebra formula for low energy pion-pion scattering held even though the massless Nambu Goldstone pion contained a small admixture of a two-quark two-antiquark field. Here we turn on the pion mass and note that the current algebra formula no longer holds exactly. We discuss this small deviation and also study the effects of a SU(3) symmetric quark mass type term on the masses and mixings of the eight SU(3) multiplets in the model. We calculate the s-wave scattering lengths, including the beyond current algebra theorem corrections due to the scalar mesons, and observe that the effect of the scalar mesons is to improve the agreement with experiment. In the process, we uncover the way in which linear sigma models give controlled corrections (due to the presence of scalar mesons) to the current algebra scattering formula. Such a feature is commonly thought to exist only in the nonlinear sigma model approach.

  14. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.

    2012-06-01

    We report an investigation of processes that occur during the ignition of the plasma and its consequences in post-discharge time for an internal combustion engine, in order to find the appropriate parameters to be used in cars that operate with lean mixtures air-fuel. The relevance of this theme has attracted much attention, and has been one of the subjects of collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. We have produced some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules were obtained, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also obtained, for scattering angles of 5 --130 . The measurements were taken using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons. Additionally to these, computer simulation studies of electronic discharge in mixtures of ethanol were performed, using a Zero-Dimensional Plasma Kinetic solver. Previous reported models for combustion of ethanol and cross sections data for momentum transfer of electron collisions with ethanol were used. The time evolutions of the main species densities are reported and the ignition time delay discussed.

  15. Measurement of interference between W and Z exchange in electron-neutrino electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Mahler, H.J.; Potter, M.E.; Lu, X.Q.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Frank, J.S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. )

    1990-03-19

    A measurement of the reaction {nu}{sub {ital e}}+{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{nu}{sub {ital e}}+{ital e}{sup {minus}} was performed using a beam-stop source of {nu}{sub {ital e}}. Based upon 234{plus minus}35 events, we obtain a cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {ital ee}})=(9.9{plus minus}1.5(stat){plus minus}1.0(syst)){times}10{sup {minus}42} cm{sup 2} {times}({ital E}{sub {nu}} (GeV)). This reaction is mediated by the exchange of {ital W} and {ital Z} bosons and is thus sensitive to the interference between them. This interference is measured to be {minus}1.07{plus minus}0.17(stat){plus minus}0.11(syst), consistent with the destructive interference ({minus}1.08) predicted by the standard model.

  16. New results for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Justin; Whitehead, Lisa; /Brookhaven

    2010-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment situated along Fermilab's high-intensity NuMI neutrino beam. MINOS has completed an updated search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino transitions, observation of which would indicate a non-zero value for the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The present 7 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target data set represents more than double the exposure used in the previous analysis. The new result and its implications are presented.

  17. Measurement of the intrinsic electron neutrino component in the T2K neutrino beam with the ND280 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Floetotto, L.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwai, E.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    The T2K experiment has reported the first observation of the appearance of electron neutrinos in a muon neutrino beam. The main and irreducible background to the appearance signal comes from the presence in the neutrino beam of a small intrinsic component of electron neutrinos originating from muon and kaon decays. In T2K, this component is expected to represent 1.2% of the total neutrino flux. A measurement of this component using the near detector (ND280), located 280 m from the target, is presented. The charged current interactions of electron neutrinos are selected by combining the particle identification capabilities of both the time projection chambers and electromagnetic calorimeters of ND280. The measured ratio between the observed electron neutrino beam component and the prediction is 1.01±0.10 providing a direct confirmation of the neutrino fluxes and neutrino cross section modeling used for T2K neutrino oscillation analyses. Electron neutrinos coming from muons and kaons decay are also separately measured, resulting in a ratio with respect to the prediction of 0.68±0.30 and 1.10±0.14, respectively.

  18. Deep Wavelet Scattering for Quantum Energy Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Matthew

    Physical functionals are usually computed as solutions of variational problems or from solutions of partial differential equations, which may require huge computations for complex systems. Quantum chemistry calculations of ground state molecular energies is such an example. Indeed, if x is a quantum molecular state, then the ground state energy E0 (x) is the minimum eigenvalue solution of the time independent Schrödinger Equation, which is computationally intensive for large systems. Machine learning algorithms do not simulate the physical system but estimate solutions by interpolating values provided by a training set of known examples {(xi ,E0 (xi) } i <= n . However, precise interpolations may require a number of examples that is exponential in the system dimension, and are thus intractable. This curse of dimensionality may be circumvented by computing interpolations in smaller approximation spaces, which take advantage of physical invariants. Linear regressions of E0 over a dictionary Φ ={ϕk } k compute an approximation E 0 as: E 0 (x) =∑kwkϕk (x) , where the weights {wk } k are selected to minimize the error between E0 and E 0 on the training set. The key to such a regression approach then lies in the design of the dictionary Φ. It must be intricate enough to capture the essential variability of E0 (x) over the molecular states x of interest, while simple enough so that evaluation of Φ (x) is significantly less intensive than a direct quantum mechanical computation (or approximation) of E0 (x) . In this talk we present a novel dictionary Φ for the regression of quantum mechanical energies based on the scattering transform of an intermediate, approximate electron density representation ρx of the state x. The scattering transform has the architecture of a deep convolutional network, composed of an alternating sequence of linear filters and nonlinear maps. Whereas in many deep learning tasks the linear filters are learned from the training data, here

  19. Low-energy electron scattering from cyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Guo, Shuangcheng; Meng, Ju; Huang, Xiaotian; Wang, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    The low-energy electron collisions with cyanamide molecule are investigated by using the UK molecular R -matrix codes for electron energies ranging from 0.01 eV to 10 eV. Three models including static-exchange, static-exchange plus polarization, and close-coupling (CC) approximations are employed to reveal the dynamic interaction. Elastic (integrated and differential), momentum-transfer, and excitation cross sections from the ground state to the three low-lying electron excited states have been presented. Two shape resonances, two core-excited resonances, and two Feshbach resonances are detected in the CC approximation. The role of active space in the target and scattering problem including the resonances is discussed. The precise resonance parameters are found to be sensitive to the treatment of polarization effects employed. These resonances may be responsible for the fragments observed in a recent experiment of the dissociative electron attachments to cyanamide. Since the cyanamide molecule has a large permanent dipole moment, a Born closure procedure is used to account for the contribution of partial waves higher than l =4 to obtain converged cross sections.

  20. Quasi-elastic nuclear scattering at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-elastic scattering of two nuclei is considered in the high-energy optical model. Energy loss and momentum transfer spectra for projectile ions are evaluated in terms of an inelastic multiple-scattering series corresponding to multiple knockout of target nucleons. The leading-order correction to the coherent projectile approximation is evaluated. Calculations are compared with experiments.

  1. Intermediate energy proton-deuteron elastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A fully symmetrized multiple scattering series is considered for the description of proton-deuteron elastic scattering. An off-shell continuation of the experimentally known twobody amplitudes that retains the exchange symmeteries required for the calculation is presented. The one boson exchange terms of the two body amplitudes are evaluated exactly in this off-shell prescription. The first two terms of the multiple scattering series are calculated explicitly whereas multiple scattering effects are obtained as minimum variance estimates from the 146-MeV data of Postma and Wilson. The multiple scattering corrections indeed consist of low order partial waves as suggested by Sloan based on model studies with separable interactions. The Hamada-Johnston wave function is shown consistent with the data for internucleon distances greater than about 0.84 fm.

  2. Algorithmic scatter correction in dual-energy digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Mou, Xuanqin; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Lau, Beverly A.; Chan, Suk-tak; Zhang, Lei

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Small calcifications are often the earliest and the main indicator of breast cancer. Dual-energy digital mammography (DEDM) has been considered as a promising technique to improve the detectability of calcifications since it can be used to suppress the contrast between adipose and glandular tissues of the breast. X-ray scatter leads to erroneous calculations of the DEDM image. Although the pinhole-array interpolation method can estimate scattered radiations, it requires extra exposures to measure the scatter and apply the correction. The purpose of this work is to design an algorithmic method for scatter correction in DEDM without extra exposures.Methods: In this paper, a scatter correction method for DEDM was developed based on the knowledge that scattered radiation has small spatial variation and that the majority of pixels in a mammogram are noncalcification pixels. The scatter fraction was estimated in the DEDM calculation and the measured scatter fraction was used to remove scatter from the image. The scatter correction method was implemented on a commercial full-field digital mammography system with breast tissue equivalent phantom and calcification phantom. The authors also implemented the pinhole-array interpolation scatter correction method on the system. Phantom results for both methods are presented and discussed. The authors compared the background DE calcification signals and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of calcifications in the three DE calcification images: image without scatter correction, image with scatter correction using pinhole-array interpolation method, and image with scatter correction using the authors' algorithmic method.Results: The authors' results show that the resultant background DE calcification signal can be reduced. The root-mean-square of background DE calcification signal of 1962 μm with scatter-uncorrected data was reduced to 194 μm after scatter correction using the authors' algorithmic method. The range of

  3. Scattered surface wave energy in the seismic coda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    One of the many important contributions that Aki has made to seismology pertains to the origin of coda waves (Aki, 1969; Aki and Chouet, 1975). In this paper, I revisit Aki's original idea of the role of scattered surface waves in the seismic coda. Based on the radiative transfer theory, I developed a new set of scattered wave energy equations by including scattered surface waves and body wave to surface wave scattering conversions. The work is an extended study of Zeng et al. (1991), Zeng (1993) and Sato (1994a) on multiple isotropic-scattering, and may shed new insight into the seismic coda wave interpretation. The scattering equations are solved numerically by first discretizing the model at regular grids and then solving the linear integral equations iteratively. The results show that scattered wave energy can be well approximated by body-wave to body wave scattering at earlier arrival times and short distances. At long distances from the source, scattered surface waves dominate scattered body waves at surface stations. Since surface waves are 2-D propagating waves, their scattered energies should in theory follow a common decay curve. The observed common decay trends on seismic coda of local earthquake recordings particular at long lapse times suggest that perhaps later seismic codas are dominated by scattered surface waves. When efficient body wave to surface wave conversion mechanisms are present in the shallow crustal layers, such as soft sediment layers, the scattered surface waves dominate the seismic coda at even early arrival times for shallow sources and at later arrival times for deeper events.

  4. Inelastic x-ray scattering at modest energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K. D.; Tischler, J. Z.; Larson, B. C.

    1997-07-01

    We report results from the development of an inelastic scattering spectrometer designed to take advantage of high energy synchrotron radiation available at CHESS. The device allows a large increase of the effective scattering volume in the sample by permitting measurements to be made in an energy range up to 25 KeV. The highest useable energy appears limited by the efficiency of the analyzers under consideration. At 20 KeV a novel 4-bounce, sagittal focusing monochromator passes 10e11 photons/second with Darwin width limited energy resolution. In the scattering plane, the monochromator images the electron beam producing a small scattering source for the analyzing optics. Analyzer systems under study include a cooled mosaic crystal in para-focusing geometry, and an adjustable spherically bent silicon crystal respectively for parallel and point-by-point collection of the energy loss spectrum. This paper discusses the optical configurations presents results from our early measurements and suggests directions for improvements.

  5. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro

    2009-01-01

    We perform a search for vμ → ve oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the θ13 mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of ve charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in θ13. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  6. Rashba scattering in the low-energy limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Joel; Maciejko, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    We study potential scattering in a two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling in the limit that the energy of the scattering electron approaches the bottom of the lower spin-split band. Focusing on two spin-independent circularly symmetric potentials, an infinite barrier and a delta-function shell, we show that scattering in this limit is qualitatively different from both scattering in the higher spin-split band and scattering of electrons without spin-orbit coupling. The scattering matrix is purely off-diagonal with both off-diagonal elements equal to one, and all angular momentum channels contribute equally; the differential cross section becomes increasingly peaked in the forward and backward scattering directions; the total cross section exhibits quantized plateaus. These features are independent of the details of the scattering potentials, and we conjecture them to be universal. Our results suggest that Rashba scattering in the low-energy limit becomes effectively one-dimensional.

  7. Energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons from double layer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; Varga, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical description of the spectra of electrons elastically scattered from thin double layered Au-C samples. The analysis is based on the Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects in reflection and transmission geometries of the scattering at a fixed angle of 44.3 ° and a primary energy of 40 keV. The relativistic correction is taken into account. Besides the experimentally measurable energy distributions the simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). Furthermore, we present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of the single scattering, taking into account both the ideal scattering geometry, i.e. infinitesimally small angular range, and the effect of the real, finite angular range used in the measurements. We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings for four cases of measurement geometries and layer thicknesses. While in the peak intensity ratios of gold and carbon for transmission geometries were found to be in good agreement with the results of the single scattering model, especially large deviations were obtained in reflection geometries. The separation of the peaks, depending on the geometry and the thickness, generally smaller, and the peak width generally larger than it can be expected from the nominal values of the primary energy, scattering angle, and mean kinetic energy of the atoms. We also show that the peaks are asymmetric even for the case of the single scattering due to the finite solid angle. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with recent measurements.

  8. Observing Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the NOνA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations offers an insight on new physics beyond the Standard Model. The three mixing angles (θ12, θ13 and θ23) and the two mass splittings (Δm2 and Αm2 ) have been measured by different neutrino oscillation experiments. Some other parameters including the mass ordering of different neutrino mass eigenstates and the CP violation phase are still unknown. NOνA is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment, using neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The experiment is equipped with two functionally identical detectors about 810 kilometers apart and 14 mrad off the beam axis. In this configuration, the muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam reach the disappearance maximum in the far detector and a small fraction of that oscillates into electron neutrinos. The sensitivity to the mass ordering and CP viola- tion phase determination is greately enhanced. This thesis presents the νeappearance analysis using the neutrino data collected with the NOνA experiment between February 2014 and May 2015, which corresponds to 3.45 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT). The νe appearance analysis is performed by comparing the observed νe CC-like events to the estimated background at the far detector. The total background is predicted to be 0.95 events with 0.89 originated from beam events and 0.06 from cosmic ray events. The beam background is obtained by extrapolating near detector data through different oscillation channels, while the cosmic ray background is calculated based on out-of-time NuMI trigger data. A total of 6 electron neutrino candidates are observed in the end at the far detector which represents 3.3 σ excess over the predicted background. The NOνA result disfavors inverted mass hierarchy for δcp ϵ [0, 0.6π] at 90% C.L.

  9. Kaon-nuclear scattering at medium energies

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of kaon-nucleus scattering is given. The discussion includes an account of recent theoretical interpretations of existing elastic and inelastic data, as well as possible directions for future study. The current experimental facility at Brookhaven is described, and an outline of future progress in this area is presented.

  10. Low-energy scattering of electrons and positrons in liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The scattering of low energy electrons and positrons is described for the liquid phase and compared and contrasted with that for the gas phase. Similarities as well as differences are noted. The loci of scattering sites, called spurs in the liquid phase, are considered in detail. In particular, their temporal and spatial evolution is considered from the point of view of scattering. Two emphases are made: one upon the stochastic calculation of the distribution of distances required for slowing down to thermal velocities, and the other upon the calculation of cross sections for energy loss by means of quantum mechanics.

  11. Elastic positron-cadmium scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2010-05-15

    The elastic and annihilation cross sections for positron-cadmium scattering are reported up to the positronium-formation threshold (at 2.2 eV). The low-energy phase shifts for the elastic scattering of positrons from cadmium were derived from the bound and pseudostate energies of a very large basis configuration-interaction calculation of the e{sup +}-Cd system. The s-wave binding energy is estimated to be 126{+-}42 meV, with a scattering length of A{sub scat}=(14.2{+-}2.1)a{sub 0}, while the threshold annihilation parameter, Z{sub eff}, was 93.9{+-}26.5. The p-wave phase shift exhibits a weak shape resonance that results in a peak Z{sub eff} of 91{+-}17 at a collision energy of about 490{+-}50 meV.

  12. Inferring mixture Gibbs free energies from static light scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Thurston, George

    We describe a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing that applies to connected, isotropic ternary and quaternary liquid composition domains, including restricted domains which may not touch all binary axes. For restricted domains, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns obtained at different wavelengths can correspond to the same underlying free energy, and supplement the available information. We discuss well-posed problems for this fully nonlinear, degenerate elliptic partial differential equation. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, and indicate how measurement time depends on instrument throughput. These methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain liquid domains. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  13. High-energy pion-nucleus scattering at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent data obtained for pion-nucleus interactions above the [triangle](1232) is presented. The expected long mean-free path at pion energies above the [3,3] resonance is demonstrated in elastic scattering. Evidence for unexpected nuclear transparency for outgoing pions at resonance energies is presented. A new technique measuring virtual [triangle] components of the nuclear wave function is suggested.

  14. High-energy pion-nucleus scattering at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.L.

    1993-02-01

    Recent data obtained for pion-nucleus interactions above the {triangle}(1232) is presented. The expected long mean-free path at pion energies above the [3,3] resonance is demonstrated in elastic scattering. Evidence for unexpected nuclear transparency for outgoing pions at resonance energies is presented. A new technique measuring virtual {triangle} components of the nuclear wave function is suggested.

  15. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Ruth B.

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  16. Deuteron-proton elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ladygina, N. B.

    2008-12-15

    The deuteron-proton elastic scattering has been studied in the multiple-scattering expansion formalism. Primary attention has been given to such relativistic problems as a deuteron wave function in a moving frame and transformation of spin states due to Wigner rotation. Parametrization of the nucleon-nucleon t matrix has been used to take the off-energy-shell effects into account. The vector, A{sub y}, and tensor, A{sub yy}, analyzing powers of the deuteron have been calculated at two deuteron kinetic energies: 395 and 1200 MeV. The obtained results are compared with the experimental data.

  17. Modeling seismic energy propagation in highly scattering environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchette-Guertin, J.-F.; Johnson, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Meteoroid impacts over millions to billions of years can produce a highly fractured and heterogeneous megaregolith layer on planetary bodies such as the Moon that lack effective surface recycling mechanisms. The energy from seismic events on these bodies undergoes scattering in the fractured layer(s) and generates extensive coda wave trains that follow major seismic wave arrivals. The decay properties of these codas are affected by the planetary body's interior structure. To understand the propagation of seismic waves in such media, we model the transmission of seismic energy in highly scattering environments using an adapted phonon method. In this Monte Carlo simulation approach, we track a large number of seismic wavelets as they leave a source and we record the resulting ground deformation each time a wavelet reaches a surface receiver. Our method provides the first numerical global modeling of 3-D scattering, with user-defined power law distributions of scatterer length scales and frequency-dependent intrinsic attenuation, under the assumption of 1-D background velocity models. We model synthetic signals for simple, but highly scattering interior models and vary the model parameters independently to assess their individual effects on the coda. Results show that the magnitude of the decay times is most affected by the background velocity model, in particular the presence of shallow low-velocity layers, the event source depth, and the intrinsic attenuation level. The decay times are also controlled to a lesser extent by the size-frequency distribution of scatterers, the thickness of the scattering layer, and the impedance contrast at the scatterers.

  18. Causality, renormalizability and ultra-high energy gravitational scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-05-01

    The amplitude { A }(s,t) for ultra-high energy scattering can be found in the leading eikonal approximation by considering propagation in an Aichelburg–Sexl gravitational shockwave background. Loop corrections in the QFT describing the scattered particles are encoded for energies below the Planck scale in an effective action which in general exhibits causality violation and Shapiro time advances. In this paper, we use Penrose limit techniques to calculate the full energy dependence of the scattering phase shift {{{\\Theta }}}{{scat}}(\\hat{s}), where the single variable \\hat{s}={Gs}/{m}2{b}d-2 contains both the CM energy s and impact parameter b, for a range of scalar QFTs in d dimensions with different renormalizability properties. We evaluate the high-energy limit of {{{\\Theta }}}{{scat}}(\\hat{s}) and show in detail how causality is related to the existence of a well-defined UV completion. Similarities with graviton scattering and the corresponding resolution of causality violation in the effective action by string theory are briefly discussed.

  19. Inelastic x-ray scattering at modest energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K.D.; Larson, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    We report results from the development of an inelastic scattering spectrometer designed to take advantage of high energy synchrotron radiation available at CHESS. The device allows a large increase of the effective scattering volume in the sample by permitting measurements to be made in an energy range up to 25 KeV. The highest useable energy appears limited by the efficiency of the analyzers under consideration. At 20 KeV a novel 4-bounce, sagittal focusing monochromator passes 10e11 photons/second with Darwin width limited energy resolution. In the scattering plane, the monochromator images the electron beam producing a small scattering source for the analyzing optics. Analyzer systems under study include a cooled mosaic crystal in para-focusing geometry, and an adjustable spherically bent silicon crystal respectively for parallel and point-by-point collection of the energy loss spectrum. This paper discusses the optical configurations presents results from our early measurements and suggests directions for improvements. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Scattering of high-energy magnons off a magnetic skyrmion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Sarah; Garst, Markus

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the scattering of high-energy magnons off a single magnetic skyrmion within the field-polarized ground state of a two-dimensional chiral magnet. For wavevectors larger than the inverse skyrmion radius, krs ≫ 1 the magnon scattering is dominated by an emerging magnetic field whose flux density is essentially determined by the topological charge density of the skyrmion texture. This leads to skew and rainbow scattering characterized by an asymmetric and oscillating differential cross section. We demonstrate that the transversal momentum transfer to the skyrmion is universal due to the quantization of the total emerging flux while the longitudinal momentum transfer is negligible in the high-energy limit. This results in a magnon-driven skyrmion motion approximately antiparallel to the incoming magnon current and a universal relation between current and skyrmion-velocity.

  1. Energy dependence of pion inelastic scattering from sup 208 Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, D.S. Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon ); Peterson, R.J. ); Seestrom, S.J.; Morris, C.L.; Plum, M.A. ); Zumbro, J.D. ); Williams, A.L.; Bryan, M.A.; McDonald, J.W.; Moore, C.F. )

    1991-11-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for pion elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 208}Pb at {ital T}{sub {pi}}=120 and 250 MeV. Energy-dependent neutron- and proton-transition matrix elements for a range of excited states were extracted and tested for consistency, using several structure models.

  2. High energy scattering of Dirac particles on smooth potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Nguyen Suan; Dung, Le Anh; Xuan, Nguyen Nhu; Thang, Vu Toan

    2016-08-01

    The derivation of the Glauber type representation for the high energy scattering amplitude of particles of spin 1/2 is given within the framework of the Dirac equation in the Foldy-Wouthuysen (FW) representation and two-component formalism. The differential cross-sections on the Yukawa and Gaussian potentials are also considered and discussed.

  3. Hadron dynamics in high-energy pion-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1992-12-31

    It is argued that pion-nucleus scattering at high energy (above 300 MeV) is likely to be easier to interpret than it has been at lower energies where the {Delta}{sub 33} resonance dominates. We establish this by examining the relative importance of various dynamic ingredients of scattering theory for high-energy pions and comparing different versions of the theory: a ``model-exact`` microscopic optical model and an eikonal approximation. For nuclei as heavy as Ca, the eikonal theory is an excellent approximation to the full theory for the angular distribution out to the position of the second minimum in the cross section. The prospects for using high-energy pions to examine modifications of nucleons and baryon resonances in nuclei, nuclear structure, exchange currents, short-range correlations, and to characterize pion propagation are discussed.

  4. A study of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingjun

    2009-03-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations (neutrino changing from one flavor to another) has provided compelling evidence that the neutrinos have non-zero masses and that leptons mix, which is not part of the original Standard Model of particle physics. The theoretical framework that describes neutrino oscillation involves two mass scales (Δmatm2 and Δmsol2), three mixing angles (θ12, θ23, and θ13) and one CP violating phase (δCP). Both mass scales and two of the mixing angles (θ12 and θ23) have been measured by many neutrino experiments. The mixing angle θ13, which is believed to be very small, remains unknown. The current best limit on θ13 comes from the CHOOZ experiment: θ13 < 11° at 90% C.L. at the atmospheric mass scale. δCP is also unknown today. MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino experiment based at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a muon neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far Detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can obtain parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. MINOS has published results on the precise measurement of Δmatm2 and θ23 through the disappearance of muon neutrinos in the Far Detector and on a search for sterile neutrinos by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far Detector. MINOS also has the potential to improve the limit on the neutrino mixing angle θ13 or make the first measurement of its value by searching for an electron neutrino appearance signal in the Far Detector. This is the focus of the study presented in this thesis. We developed a neural network based algorithm to

  5. Low-energy elastic differential scattering of He/++/ by He.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, S. K.; Doverspike, L. D.; Champion, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results are developed for the relative elastic differential scattering of He(++) by He for collision energies in the range 4 equal to or less than E equal to or less than 75 eV. In the analysis of the data, semiclassical considerations are utilized, assuming that the dynamics of the scattering is governed solely by the B and E states of He2(++). It is shown that existing ab initio calculations for the intermolecular potentials predict differential cross sections which are not in particularly good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Low-energy positron scattering by pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Pastega, Diego F.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2015-12-28

    This work reports elastic integral and differential cross sections for positron collisions with pyrimidine, for energies up to 20 eV. The cross sections were computed with the Schwinger multichannel method in the static plus polarization approximation. We also employed the Born closure procedure to account for the long range potential due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. Our results are compared with the experimental total cross section of Zecca et al. [J. Phys. B 43, 215204 (2010)], the experimental grand-total, quasi-elastic integral and differential cross section of Palihawadana et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 12717 (2013)]. We also compare our results with theoretical integral and differential cross sections obtained by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 62704 (2013)] with the R-matrix and the independent atom model with screening-corrected additivity rule methods, and with the results computed by Franz and Gianturco [Phys. Rev. A 88, 042711 (2013)] using model correlation-polarization potentials. The agreement between the theory and the experiment is encouraging.

  7. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  8. Signature for g bosons from medium energy proton scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyucak, S.

    1993-10-01

    We apply the recently developed algebraic (1/N expansion) scattering formalism to medium energy proton scattering from {sup 154}Sm and {sup 176}Yb. The nuclear structure effects in this formalism are described by the interacting boson model generalized to arbitrary interactions and types of bosons i.e. s,d,g, etc. We find that, in the sd boson model, a consistent description of cross sections is possible only for the 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} states. The failure of the model with regard to the 4{sup +} states indicates that the effective hexadecapole operator used in the sd model is inadequate. In contrast, the data for scattering to the 0{sup +}, 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} states could be consistently described in the sdg boson model. The spectroscopic data for the low-lying levels usually can not distinguish between the sd and sdg models due to renormalization of parameters, and one has to look at high spin or energy data for evidence of g bosons. The inelastic proton scattering experiments, on the other hand, directly probe the wave functions, and hence could provide a signature for g bosons even in the ground band states.

  9. Parity violation in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-01-15

    Parity-violating effects for low-energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory types of weak potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The resulting relation between physical observables and low-energy constants can be used to fix low-energy constants from experiments. Potential model dependencies of parity-violating effects are discussed.

  10. Theory of high-energy electron scattering by composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of these expository lectures is on the role of relativistic invariance and the unity of the theory for medium and high energies. Sec. 2 introduces the kinematic notation and provides an elementary derivation of the general cross section. The relevant properties of the Poincare group and the transformation properties of current operators and target states are described in Sec 3. In Sec. 4 representations of target states with kinematic light-front symmetry are briefly discussed. The focus is on two applications. An impulse approximation of inclusive electron nucleus scattering at both medium and high energies. A parton model of the proton applied to deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons by polarized protons. 19 refs.

  11. Seismic energy transmission in an intensively scattering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1977-01-01

    In order to account for some special features of lunar seismograms, namely, the gradual build-up of the signal, the extremely prolonged tail, and the lack of apparent coherence among three orthogonal components of ground motion, a statistical approach is proposed for describing transmission of seismic energy through a medium in which strong scattering takes place. A seismic diffusion theory is presented for a medium with randomly distributed scatterers of a given size distribution. A solution of the resulting diffusion equation for an impulsive energy source gives a curve which fairly closely reproduces the envelope of typical lunar impact seismograms. Since the model is based on constant diffusivity, long-range transmission will require a combination of diffusion and wave propagation treatments for accurate description.

  12. Do we understand elastic scattering up to LHC energies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    The measurements of high energy ¯pp and pp elastic at ISR, SPS, and Tevatron colliders have provided usefull informations on the behavior of the scattering amplitude. A large step in energy domain is accomplished with the LHC collider presently running, giving a unique opportunity to improve our knowledge on the asymptotic regime of the elastic scattering amplitude and to verify the validity of our theoretical approach, to describe the total cross section σtot(s), the total elastic cross section σel(s), the ratio of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitude ρ(s) and the differential cross section dσ (s,t)/dt.

  13. Low-energy potential scattering in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Khuri, N. N.; Martin, Andre; Richard, J.-M.; Wu, T. T.

    2009-07-15

    Conditions are established for the existence of a scattering length and an effective range in the low-energy expansion of the S-wave phase shift of a central potential in two and three dimensions. The behavior of the phase shift as a function of the momentum is also derived for longer-range power-law potentials which do not fulfill these conditions.

  14. Real part of scattering amplitude at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Nikonov, V. A.; Nyiri, J.

    2015-10-01

    On the basis of requirements of unitarity and analyticity we analyze the real and imaginary parts of the scattering amplitude at recent ultrahigh energies, 1-100TeV. The predictions for the region s > 100TeV and q2 < 0.4GeV2 are given supposing the black disk asymptotic regime. It turns out that the real part of the amplitude is concentrated in the impact parameter space at the border of the black disk.

  15. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  16. Virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Korchin, A.Y.; Koch, J.H.

    1996-08-01

    We investigate the low-energy behavior of the four-point Green{close_quote}s function {Gamma}{sup {mu}{nu}} describing virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon. Using Lorentz invariance, gauge invariance, and crossing symmetry, we derive the leading terms of an expansion of the operator in the four-momenta {ital q} and {ital q}{sup {prime}} of the initial and final photon, respectively. The model-independent result is expressed in terms of the electromagnetic form factors of the free nucleon, i.e., on-shell information which one obtains from electron-nucleon scattering experiments. Model-dependent terms appear in the operator at {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}{sup {prime}}), whereas the orders {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}) and {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{sup {prime}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}{sup {prime}}) are contained in the low-energy theorem for {Gamma}{sup {mu}{nu}}, i.e., no new parameters appear. We discuss the leading terms of the matrix element and comment on the use of on-shell equivalent electromagnetic vertices in the calculation of {open_quote}{open_quote}Born terms{close_quote}{close_quote} for virtual Compton scattering. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Inverse scattering at fixed energy on asymptotically hyperbolic Liouville surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudé, Thierry; Kamran, Niky; Nicoleau, Francois

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study an inverse scattering problem on Liouville surfaces having two asymptotically hyperbolic ends. The main property of Liouville surfaces consists of the complete separability of the Hamilton-Jacobi equations for the geodesic flow. An important related consequence is the fact that the stationary wave equation can be separated into a system of radial and angular ODEs. The full scattering matrix at fixed energy associated to a scalar wave equation on asymptotically hyperbolic Liouville surfaces can be thus simplified by considering its restrictions onto the generalized harmonics corresponding to the angular separated ODE. The resulting partial scattering matrices consists in a countable set of 2 × 2 matrices whose coefficients are the so called transmission and reflection coefficients. It is shown that the reflection coefficients are nothing but generalized Weyl-Titchmarsh (WT) functions for the radial ODE in which the generalized angular momentum is seen as the spectral parameter. Using the complex angular momentum method and recent results on 1D inverse problem from generalized WT functions, we show that the knowledge of the reflection operators at a fixed non-zero energy is enough to determine uniquely the metric of the asymptotically hyperbolic Liouville surface under consideration.

  18. Endpoint behavior of high-energy scattering cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2010-11-01

    In high-energy processes near the endpoint, there emerge new contributions associated with spectator interactions. Away from the endpoint region, these new contributions are suppressed compared to the leading contribution, but the leading contribution becomes suppressed as we approach the endpoint and the new contributions become comparable. We present how the new contributions scale as we reach the endpoint and show that they are comparable to the suppressed leading contributions in deep inelastic scattering by employing a power-counting analysis. The hadronic tensor in deep inelastic scattering is shown to factorize including the spectator interactions, and it can be expressed in terms of the light cone distribution amplitudes of initial hadrons. We also consider the contribution of the spectator contributions in Drell-Yan processes. Here the spectator interactions are suppressed compared to double parton annihilation according to the power counting.

  19. Energy dissipation and scattering angle distribution analysis of the classical trajectory calculations of methane scattering from a Ni(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Robin; Kleyn, A. W.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2001-08-01

    We present classical trajectory calculations of the rotational vibrational scattering of a nonrigid methane molecule from a Ni(111) surface. Energy dissipation and scattering angles have been studied as a function of the translational kinetic energy, the incidence angle, the (rotational) nozzle temperature, and the surface temperature. Scattering angles are somewhat toward the surface for the incidence angles of 30°, 45°, and 60° at a translational energy of 96 kJ/mol. Energy loss is primarily from the normal component of the translational energy. It is transferred for somewhat more than half to the surface and the rest is transferred mostly to rotational motion. The spread in the change of translational energy has a basis in the spread of the transfer to rotational energy, and can be enhanced by raising of the surface temperature through the transfer process to the surface motion.

  20. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  1. A combined muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino oscillation search at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, Jocelyn Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    MiniBooNE seeks to corroborate or refute the unconfirmed oscillation result from the LSND experiment. If correct, the result implies that a new kind of massive neutrino, with no weak interactions, participates in neutrino oscillations. MiniBooNE searches for vμ → ve oscillations with the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 8 GeV beam line, which produces a vμ beam with an average energy of ~ 0.8 GeV and an intrinsic ve content of 0.4%. The neutrino detector is a 6.1 m radius sphere filled with CH2, viewed by 1540 photo-multiplier tubes, and located 541 m downstream from the source. This work focuses on the estimation of systematic errors associated with the neutrino flux and neutrino interaction cross section predictions, and in particular, on constraining these uncertainties using in-situ MiniBooNE vμ charged current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering data. A data set with ~ 100,000 events is identified, with 91% CCQE purity. This data set is used to measure several parameters of the CCQE cross section: the axial mass, the Fermi momentum, the binding energy, and the functional dependence of the axial form factor on four-momentum transfer squared. Constraints on the vμ and ve fluxes are derived using the vμ CCQE data set. A Monte Carlo study of a combined vμ disappearance and ve appearance oscillation fit is presented, which improves the vμ → ve oscillation sensitivity of MiniBooNE with respect to a ve appearance-only fit by 1.2-1.5σ, depending on the value of Δm2.

  2. Dirac Calculations for Proton Inelastic Scattering at Intermediate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nohy, N. A.; El-Hammamy, M. N.; Aly, N. E.; Abdel-Moneim, A. M.; Hamza, A. F.

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic proton inelastic scattering from different targets (16O, 24Mg, 28Si, 40Ca, 54Fe, 58Ni, 90Zr, 154Sm, 176Yb, and 208Pb) at intermediate energies is analyzed in the framework of phenomenological optical potentials based on the Dirac formalism. Parameters of the Dirac phenomenological potential with Woods Saxon (WS) shape are obtained. The first order vibrational collective model with one phonon is used to calculate the transition optical potentials to the first low-lying excited state (2+) of the investigated target nuclei. Also, the variation of deformation length (δ) with energy and mass number is studied. It is noticed that the deformation length increases slightly with energy at intermediate range.

  3. Low-Energy Elastic Electron Scattering by Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsarinny O.; Bartschat, K.; Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The B-spline R-matrix method is employed to investigate the low-energy elastic electron scattering by atomic oxygen. Flexible non-orthogonal sets of radial functions are used to construct the target description and to represent the scattering functions. A detailed investigation regarding the dependence of the predicted partial and total cross sections on the scattering model and the accuracy of the target description is presented. The predicted angle-integrated elastic cross sections are in good agreement with experiment, whereas significant discrepancies are found in the angle-differential elastic cross sections near the forward direction. .The near-threshold results are found to strongly depend on the treatment of inner-core short-range correlation effects in the target description, as well as on a proper account of the target polarizability. A sharp increase in the elastic cross sections below 1 eV found in some earlier calculations is judged to be an artifact of an unbalanced description of correlation in the N-electron target structure and the (N+l)-electron-collision problems.

  4. CT energy weighting in the presence of scatter and limited energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved CT has the potential to improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) through optimal weighting of photons detected in energy bins. In general, optimal weighting gives higher weight to the lower energy photons that contain the most contrast information. However, low-energy photons are generally most corrupted by scatter and spectrum tailing, an effect caused by the limited energy resolution of the detector. This article first quantifies the effects of spectrum tailing on energy-resolved data, which may also be beneficial for material decomposition applications. Subsequently, the combined effects of energy weighting, spectrum tailing, and scatter are investigated through simulations. Methods: The study first investigated the effects of spectrum tailing on the estimated attenuation coefficients of homogeneous slab objects. Next, the study compared the CNR and artifact performance of images simulated with varying levels of scatter and spectrum tailing effects, and reconstructed with energy integrating, photon-counting, and two optimal linear weighting methods: Projection-based and image-based weighting. Realistic detector energy-response functions were simulated based on a previously proposed model. The energy-response functions represent the probability that a photon incident on the detector at a particular energy will be detected at a different energy. Realistic scatter was simulated with Monte Carlo methods. Results: Spectrum tailing resulted in a negative shift in the estimated attenuation coefficient of slab objects compared to an ideal detector. The magnitude of the shift varied with material composition, increased with material thickness, and decreased with photon energy. Spectrum tailing caused cupping artifacts and CT number inaccuracies in images reconstructed with optimal energy weighting, and did not impact images reconstructed with photon counting weighting. Spectrum tailing did not significantly impact the CNR in reconstructed images

  5. Elastic Scattering of Low-Energy Electrons byTetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, Cynthia S.; Orel, Ann E.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2006-05-09

    We present the results of ab initio calculations for elasticelectron scattering by tetrahydrofuran (THF) using the complex Kohnvariational method. We carried out fixed-nuclei calculations at theequilibrium geometry of the target molecule for incident electronenergies up to 20 eV. The calculated momentum transfer cross sectionsclearly reveal the presence of broad shape resonance behavior in the 8-10eV energy range, in agreement with recent experiments. The calculateddifferential cross sections at 20 eV, which include the effects of thelong-range electron-dipole interaction, are alsofound to be in agreementwith the most recent experimental findings.

  6. Semiphenomenological method of analysis for intermediate-energy alpha-nucleus elastic scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Alvi, M.A.

    1983-12-01

    We propose a semiphenomenological method of analysis for intermediate energy ..cap alpha..-nucleus elastic scattering experiments and demonstrate its usefulness by analyzing available elastic ..cap alpha..-nucleus scattering data at 1.37 GeV.

  7. Electron scattering from HeII ions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.; Dahler, J. S.

    1997-04-01

    Electron collisional excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of HeII ions are of extreme interest in the modelling of astrophysical plasmas. They are required for reliable determination of the excitation and ionization in the solar corona, impulsive heating events in the solar transitions region, shock waves in the interstellar medium and in stellar atmospheres. Emission lines of HeII have been observed in a variety of solar and astrophysical objects at wavelengths below 350 ÅThe Extreme Ultra Violet Explorer (EUVE) spectra of Capella (HD 3402, G8 III + G0 III), the bright RS CVn binary system, is dominated by HeII (λ 303 Åand high ionization stages of iron. Accurate knowledge of the electron collisional excitation rates for the n = 2 and n = 3 levels of HeII are required in the modelling of the electron-ion equilibration in non-radiative shocks associated with SN 1006. Recently attention has focused on scattering at intermediate energies with emphasis on the n = 2 levels using the CCC formalism and the 2D-Rmatrix propagator method. In our work we have used the IERM approach of Burke, Scott and co-workers to obtain accurate cross sections for levels up to n = 3, as this has proved successful in dealing with electron - atomic hydrogen scattering at intermediate energies. A comprehensive set of results will be presented at the meeting.

  8. Interaction of Electron Neutrinos with {sup 56}Fe in the LSD for E{sub {nu}{sub e}} {<=} 50 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gaponov, Yu.V.; Ryazhskaya, O.G.; Semenov, S.V.

    2004-11-01

    The neutrino pulses detected by the LSD (Liquid Scintillator Detector) on February 23, 1987, are analyzed on the basis of a two-stage model of supernova explosion. The number of events due to the electron-neutrino interaction with {sup 56}Fe in the LSD is calculated. The obtained number of signals is in agreement with experimental data.

  9. Search for W-prime boson decaying to electron-neutrino pairs in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-11-01

    The authors present the results of a search for W{prime} boson decaying to electron-neutrino pairs in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using a data sample corresponding to 205 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab. They observe no evidence for this decay mode and set limits on the production cross section times branching fraction, assuming the neutrinos from W{prime} boson decays to be light. If they assume the manifest left-right symmetric model, they exclude a W{prime} boson with mass less than 788 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level.

  10. Low energy elastic electron scattering from CF3Br molecules.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, L R; Brunton, J R; Maddern, T M; Brunger, M J

    2015-03-28

    CF3Br is a potentially valuable precursor molecule for generating beams of gas phase Br radicals suitable for electron collisions studies. However, the utility of CF3Br for this purpose depends critically on the availability of sound scattering cross sections to allow the contribution of the precursor to be isolated within the total scattering signal. To this end, here we present elastic differential cross section (DCS) measurements for CF3Br at incident energies between 15 and 50 eV. Comparison of these DCSs to those from the only other available experimental study [Sunohara et al., J. Phys. B: At., Mol. Opt. Phys. 36, 1843 (2003)] and a Schwinger multichannel with pseudo potentials (SMCPPs) calculation [Bettega et al., J. Phys. B: At., Mol. Opt. Phys. 36, 1263 (2003)] shows generally a very good accord. Integral elastic and momentum transfer cross sections, derived from our DCSs, are also found to be in quite good agreement with the SMCPP results. PMID:25833582

  11. High energy asymptotics of scattering processes in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Enberg, R.; Golec-Biernat, K.; Munier, S.

    2005-10-01

    High energy scattering in the QCD parton model was recently shown to be a reaction-diffusion process and, thus, to lie in the universality class of the stochastic Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov equation. We recall that the latter appears naturally in the context of the parton model. We provide a thorough numerical analysis of the mean-field approximation, given in QCD by the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. In the framework of a simple stochastic toy model that captures the relevant features of QCD, we discuss and illustrate the universal properties of such stochastic models. We investigate, in particular, the validity of the mean-field approximation and how it is broken by fluctuations. We find that the mean-field approximation is a good approximation in the initial stages of the evolution in rapidity.

  12. The High Energy Asymptotics of Scattering Processes in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Enberg, Rikard; Golec-Biernat, K.; Munier, S.

    2005-05-12

    High energy scattering in the QCD parton model was recently shown to be a reaction-diffusion process, and thus to lie in the universality class of the stochastic Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov equation. We recall that the latter appears naturally in the context of the parton model. We provide a thorough numerical analysis of the mean field approximation, given in QCD by the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. In the framework of a simple stochastic toy model that captures the relevant features of QCD, we discuss and illustrate the universal properties of such stochastic models. We investigate in particular the validity of the mean field approximation and how it is broken by fluctuations. We find that the mean field approximation is a good approximation in the initial stages of the evolution in rapidity.

  13. Novel scatter compensation of list-mode PET data using spatial and energy dependent corrections.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Bastien; El Fakhri, Georges

    2011-03-01

    With the widespread use of positron emission tomography (PET) crystals with greatly improved energy resolution (e.g., 11.5% with LYSO as compared to 20% with BGO) and of list-mode acquisitions, the use of the energy of individual events in scatter correction schemes becomes feasible. We propose a novel scatter approach that incorporates the energy of individual photons in the scatter correction and reconstruction of list-mode PET data in addition to the spatial information presently used in clinical scanners. First, we rewrite the Poisson likelihood function of list-mode PET data including the energy distributions of primary and scatter coincidences and show that this expression yields an MLEM reconstruction algorithm containing both energy and spatial dependent corrections. To estimate the spatial distribution of scatter coincidences we use the single scatter simulation (SSS). Next, we derive two new formulae which allow estimation of the 2-D (coincidences) energy probability density functions (E-PDF) of primary and scatter coincidences from the 1-D (photons) E-PDFs associated with each photon. We also describe an accurate and robust object-specific method for estimating these 1-D E-PDFs based on a decomposition of the total energy spectra detected across the scanner into primary and scattered components. Finally, we show that the energy information can be used to accurately normalize the scatter sinogram to the data. We compared the performance of this novel scatter correction incorporating both the position and energy of detected coincidences to that of the traditional approach modeling only the spatial distribution of scatter coincidences in 3-D Monte Carlo simulations of a medium cylindrical phantom and a large, nonuniform NCAT phantom. Incorporating the energy information in the scatter correction decreased bias in the activity distribution estimation by ~20% and ~40% in the cold regions of the large NCAT phantom at energy resolutions 11.5% and 20% at 511 ke

  14. Low-Energy Electron Scattering by Sugarcane Lignocellulosic Biomass Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Eliane; Sanchez, Sergio; Bettega, Marcio; Lima, Marco; Varella, Marcio

    2012-06-01

    The use of second generation (SG) bioethanol instead of fossil fuels could be a good strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the efficient production of SG bioethanol has being a challenge to researchers around the world. The main barrier one must overcome is the pretreatment, a very important step in SG bioethanol aimed at breaking down the biomass and facilitates the extraction of sugars from the biomass. Plasma-based treatment, which can generate reactive species, could be an interesting possibility since involves low-cost atmospheric-pressure plasma. In order to offer theoretical support to this technique, the interaction of low-energy electrons from the plasma with biomass is investigated. This study was motived by several works developed by Sanche et al., in which they understood that DNA damage arises from dissociative electron attachment, a mechanism in which electrons are resonantly trapped by DNA subunits. We will present elastic cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by sugarcane biomass molecules, obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method. Our calculations indicate the formation of π* shape resonances in the lignin subunits, while a series of broad and overlapping σ* resonances are found in cellulose and hemicellulose subunits. The presence of π* and σ* resonances could give rise to direct and indirect dissociation pathways in biomass. Then, theoretical resonance energies can be useful to guide the plasma-based pretreatment to break down specific linkages of interest in biomass.

  15. An ultra-efficient energy transfer beyond plasmonic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Sze-Ming; Zhong, Yan-Kai; Lin, Albert

    2014-11-14

    The energy transfer between nano-particles is of great importance for, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, nano-particle waveguides, and other photonic devices. This study shows through novel design and algorithm optimization, the energy transfer efficiency between plasmonic and dielectric nano-particles can be greatly improved. Using versatile designs including core-shell wrapping, supercells and dielectric mediated plasmonic scattering, 0.05 dB/μm attenuation can be achieved, which is 20-fold reduction over the baseline plasmonic nano-particle chain, and 8-fold reduction over the baseline dielectric nano-particle chain. In addition, it is also found that the dielectric nano-particle chains can actually be more efficient than the plasmonic ones, at their respective optimized geometry. The underlying physics is that although plasmonic nano-particles provide stronger coupling and field emission, the effect of plasmonic absorption loss is actually more dominant resulting in high attenuation. Finally, the group velocity for all design schemes proposed in this work is shown to be maintained above 0.4c, and it is found that the geometry optimization for transmission also boosts the group velocity.

  16. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 about equals 1-eV2 region

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, David W.

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 ~ 1 eV2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  17. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  18. Energy and angular distributions of hyperthermal-energy Li{sup +} scattered from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Behringer, E.R.; McLean, J.G.; Cooper, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured the in-plane energy and angular distributions of scattered Li{sup +} ions that result when Li{sup +} ion beams with incident energies {ital E}{sub {ital i}}=100 and 400 eV impinge on Cu(001) with an incident angle {theta}{sub {ital i}}=65{degree} and along the {l_angle}100{r_angle} azimuth. By comparing the energy and angular distributions with those generated by classical trajectory simulations, we extract information about the ion-surface interaction potential. A model ion-surface potential consisting of a sum of Hartree-Fock pair potentials and an attractive term produces good agreement with the measured distributions at both incident energies, while the universal potential of Ziegler, Biersack, and Littmarck does so only for {ital E}{sub {ital i}} = 400 eV. Analysis of the simulated distributions enables us to correlate different types of scattering events with features of the measured distributions (e.g., rainbows) and so obtain a detailed understanding of the scattering of Li{sup +}, which is more complex than has been previously observed for heavier alkali ions (e.g., Na{sup +} and K{sup +}). We find that the energy loss of the Li{sup +} ions can be mostly accounted for by momentum transfer to the surface atoms and that inelastic losses are small but significant for this system at these incident energies. We also find that the thermal vibrations of the surface atoms have dramatic effects on the simulated energy and angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Study of Low Energy Electron Inelastic Scattering Mechanisms Using Spin Sensitive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hongbing

    1995-01-01

    Spin sensitive electron spectroscopies were used to study low energy electron inelastic scattering from metal surfaces and thin films. In these experiments, a beam of spin polarized electrons from a GaAs source is directed on the sample surface, and the spin polarization and intensity are measured as a function of energy loss and scattering angle by a Mott electron polarimeter coupled with a concentric hemispherical energy analyzer. Systematic studies of the angular dependence of inelastically scattered electrons were conducted on a Cu(100) surface, and Mo/Cu(100), non-magnetized Fe/Cu(100), and Co/Cu(100) films. The polarization and intensity of scattered electrons were measured as function of energy loss and scattering angle. Further studies were also conducted on Ag(100) surface and amorphous Cu/Ag(100) films. From the experimental results, the angular distributions of dipole and impact scattered electrons can be determined individually and both are found to peak in the specular scattering direction. Preliminary studies were conducted on magnetized Co/Cu(100) films. The spin dependent scattering intensity asymmetry was measured, with a clearly observable peak at energy loss of ~1 eV, which coincides with the band splitting. The polarizations of secondary electrons produced by an unpolarized primary beam were also measured. The polarizations can be related to the band polarization of magnetized cobalt films.

  20. High energy QCD from Planckian scattering in AdS space and the Froissart bound

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsik; Nastase, Horatiu

    2005-11-15

    We reanalyze high-energy QCD scattering regimes from scattering in cutoff AdS space via gravity-gauge dualities (a la Polchinski-Strassler). We look at 't Hooft scattering, Regge behavior, and black hole creation in AdS space. Black hole creation in the gravity dual is analyzed via gravitational shockwave collisions. We prove the saturation of the QCD Froissart unitarity bound, corresponding to the creation of black holes of AdS size, as suggested by Giddings.

  1. Positron scattering and annihilation from the hydrogen molecule at zero energy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-Y; Mitroy, J; Varga, K

    2009-11-27

    The confined variational method is used to generate a basis of correlated Gaussians to describe the interaction region wave function for positron scattering from the H2 molecule. The scattering length was approximately = -2.7a(0) while the zero energy Z(eff) of 15.7 is compatible with experimental values. The variation of the scattering length and Z(eff) with internuclear distance was surprisingly rapid due to virtual state formation at R approximately = 3.4a(0).

  2. Optical theorem for electromagnetic field scattering by dielectric structures and energy emission from the evanescent wave.

    PubMed

    Gulyaev, Yu V; Barabanenkov, Yu N; Barabanenkov, M Yu; Nikitov, S A

    2005-08-01

    We present an optical theorem for evanescent (near field) electromagnetic wave scattering by a dielectric structure. The derivation is based on the formalism of angular spectrum wave amplitudes and block scattering matrix. The optical theorem shows that an energy flux is emitted in the direction of the evanescent wave decay upon scattering. The energy emission effect from an evanescent wave is illustrated in two examples of evanescent wave scattering, first, by the electrical dipole and, second, one-dimensional grating with line-like rulings. Within the latter example, we show that an emitted energy flux upon evanescent wave scattering can travel through a dielectric structure even if the structure has a forbidden gap in the transmission spectrum of incident propagating waves.

  3. Measurement of high energy resolution inelastic proton scattering at and close to zero degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, A.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Adachi, T.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Itahashi, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Popescu, L.; Rubio, B.; Saito, T.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Sasamoto, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Smit, F. D.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Zenhiro, J.

    2009-07-01

    Measurements of inelastic proton scattering with high energy resolution at forward scattering angles including 0∘ are described. High-resolution halo-free beams were accelerated by the cyclotron complex at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics. Instrumental background events were minimized using the high-quality beam. The remaining instrumental background events were eliminated by applying a background subtraction method. As a result, clean spectra were obtained even for a heavy target nucleus such as Pb208. A high energy resolution of 20 keV (FWHM) and a scattering angle resolution of ±0.6∘ were achieved at an incident proton energy of 295 MeV.

  4. Friction-induced energy-loss rainbows in atom surface scattering.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Pollak, Eli; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2010-03-19

    The rainbow is due to extrema of the angular deflection function of light impinging on water drops. Generically, extrema of suitably defined deflection functions lead to rainbows. These include angular and rotational rainbows in surface scattering and more. Here we introduce the concept of an "energy-loss deflection function" for scattering of particles from a periodic surface whose extrema lead to a new form-the "energy-loss rainbow" which appears as multiple maxima in the final energy distribution of the scattered particle. Energy-loss rainbows are caused by frictional phonon effects which induce structure in the energy-loss distribution instead of "washing it out." We provide evidence that they have been observed in Ne scattering on self-assembled monolayers. PMID:20366489

  5. Neutrino mass hierarchy and electron neutrino oscillation parameters with one hundred thousand reactor events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, F.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed medium-baseline reactor neutrino experiments offer unprecedented opportunities to probe, at the same time, the mass-mixing parameters which govern νe oscillations both at long wavelength (δm2 and θ12) and at short wavelength (Δm2 and θ13), as well as their tiny interference effects related to the mass hierarchy (i.e., the relative sign of Δm2 and δm2). In order to take full advantage of these opportunities, precision calculations and refined statistical analyses of event spectra are required. In such a context, we revisit several input ingredients, including nucleon recoil in inverse beta decay and its impact on energy reconstruction and resolution, hierarchy and matter effects in the oscillation probability, spread of reactor distances, irreducible backgrounds from geoneutrinos and from far reactors, and degeneracies between energy scale and spectrum shape uncertainties. We also introduce a continuous parameter α, which interpolates smoothly between normal hierarchy (α =+1) and inverted hierarchy (α =-1). The determination of the hierarchy is then transformed from a test of hypothesis to a parameter estimation, with a sensitivity given by the distance of the true case (either α=+1 or α =-1) from the "undecidable" case (α=0). Numerical experiments are performed for the specific setup envisaged for the JUNO project, assuming a realistic sample of O(105) reactor events. We find a typical sensitivity of ˜2σ to the hierarchy in JUNO, which, however, can be challenged by energy scale and spectrum shape systematics, whose possible conspiracy effects are investigated. The prospective accuracy reachable for the other mass-mixing parameters is also discussed.

  6. Parton-parton elastic scattering and rapidity gaps at SSC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Duca, V.D.

    1993-08-01

    The theory of the perturbative pomeron, due to Lipatov and collaborators, is used to compute the probability of observing parton-parton elastic scattering and rapidity gaps between jets in hadron collisions at SSC and LHC energies.

  7. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Braicovich, L. Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Le Tacon, M.; Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B.; Supruangnet, R.

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  8. Nonlinear inelastic electron scattering revealed by plasmon-enhanced electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chun Kai; Liu, Wen Jie; Zhang, Pan Ke; Li, Meng; Zhang, Han Jun; Xu, Ke Zun; Luo, Yi; Chen, Xiang Jun

    2014-10-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy is a powerful tool for identifying the chemical composition of materials. It relies mostly on the measurement of inelastic electrons, which carry specific atomic or molecular information. Inelastic electron scattering, however, has a very low intensity, often orders of magnitude weaker than that of elastically scattered electrons. Here, we report the observation of enhanced inelastic electron scattering from silver nanostructures, the intensity of which can reach up to 60% of its elastic counterpart. A home-made scanning probe electron energy-loss spectrometer was used to produce highly localized plasmonic excitations, significantly enhancing the strength of the local electric field of silver nanostructures. The intensity of inelastic electron scattering was found to increase nonlinearly with respect to the electric field generated by the tip-sample bias, providing direct evidence of nonlinear electron scattering processes.

  9. Review of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, P. C.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of solution of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics are presented. Scattering experiments of a beam of particles at a nonrelativisitic energy by a target made up of particles are analyzed. The Schroedinger equation is used to develop the quantum mechanical description of the system and one of several functions depending on the relative distance of the particles. The inverse problem is the construction of the potentials from experimental measurements.

  10. A Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment After Four Years of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanaugh, Steven

    2010-05-01

    This work attempts to measure or set a limit on sin2(2θ13), the parameter which describes vμ → ve oscillations. The MINOS detectors at Fermilab are used to perform a search for the oscillations utilizing a beam of vμ neutrinos created in the NuMI beamline by the collisions of 120 GeV protons with a carbon target. These collisions create π± and K± which are focused with magnetic horns, are allowed to decay, and result in a beam of vμ in the energy range of 1 to 30 GeV. Two functionally identical steel-scintillator calorimetric detectors are utilized to measure the interactions of the generated neutrinos. A detector close to the NuMI beam, located 104 m underground and 1040 m from the target, is used to measure the properties of the neutrino beam, including the flux, composition, and energy spectrum. This information is used in part to generate a predicted spectrum of neutrinos in absence of vμ → ve oscillations in the detector located far from the target, at a distance of 705 m underground and 735.5 km from the target. An excess of predicted ve charged current events in this far detector will be interpreted as vμ → ve oscillations, and a measurement of sin2(2θ13) will be made using a Feldman-Cousins analysis. The measurement of vμ → ve requires the separation of ve candidates from background events. New reconstruction software was developed with a focus on identifying ve candidate events in order to reduce systematic errors. The event parameters measured by this software were used as an input to an artificial neutral network event discriminator. The details of this reconstruction software and the other steps of the analysis necessary to making the measurement will be discussed. This work builds on a previous measurement made with this

  11. An energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera design for in vivo medical imaging of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Rohe, R.C.; Valentine, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    A Compton scatter camera (CSC) design is proposed for imaging radioisotopes used as biotracers. A clinical version may increase sensitivity by a factor of over 100, while maintaining or improving spatial resolution, as compared with existing Anger cameras that use lead collimators. This novel approach is based on using energy subtraction ({Delta}E = E{sub 0} {minus} E{sub SC}, where E{sub 0}, {Delta}E, and E{sub SC} are the energy of the emitted gamma ray, the energy deposited by the initial Compton scatter, and the energy of the Compton scattered photon) to determine the amount of energy deposited in the primary system. The energy subtraction approach allows the requirement of high energy resolution to be placed on a secondary detector system instead of the primary detector system. Requiring primary system high energy resolution has significantly limited previous CSC designs for medical imaging applications. Furthermore, this approach is dependent on optimizing the camera design for data acquisition of gamma rays that undergo only one Compton scatter in a low-Z primary detector system followed by a total absorption of the Compton scattered photon in a high-Z secondary detector system. The proposed approach allows for a more compact primary detector system, a more simplified pulse processing interface, and a much less complicated detector cooling scheme as compared with previous CSC designs. Analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation results for some specific detector materials and geometries are presented.

  12. Elastic electron scattering in krypton in the energy range from 5 to 10 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Linert, Ireneusz; Mielewska, Brygida; Zubek, Mariusz; King, George C.

    2010-01-15

    Differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering in krypton have been measured at the energies of 5,7.5, and 10 eV over the scattering angle range from 30 deg. to 180 deg. The measurements for backward scattering employed the magnetic angle-changing technique. These differential cross sections have been integrated to yield the elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections at the above energies. These new results are compared with the most recent measurements and calculations of the respective cross sections in krypton. The dependence of the differential cross sections on atomic polarizability of the heavier rare gas atoms argon, krypton, and xenon has also been investigated over the electron energy range 5-30 eV and for forward, backward, and intermediate scattering angles.

  13. cap alpha. /sup 4/He elastic scattering at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.; Ahmad, I.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1989-03-01

    Differential cross sections for ..cap alpha.. /sup 4/He elastic scattering have been calculated at incident ..cap alpha..-particle momenta of 4.32, 5.07, and 7.0 GeV/c within the framework of Glauber multiple scattering theory. The full Glauber amplitude has been calculated using the Monte Carlo method for evaluating multidimensional integrals. We found that, in general, the more realistic double-Gaussian model for the density brings theory closer to experiment as compared to the generally used single-Gaussian model in some momentum transfer regions. Our results with the double-Gaussian model and an acceptable set of NN parameters are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data at 4.32 and 5.07 GeV/c.

  14. Six observations consistent with the electron neutrino being a m2 = - 0.11 ± 0.02eV2 tachyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Six observations involving cosmology, particle physics and cosmic rays are consistent with the hypothesis that the electron neutrino is a mν,e2 = - 0.11 ± 0.02eV2 tachyon. The observations consist of interpretations of published primary data and fits to those data, and in each case it is possible to compute a value for mν,e2. It is found that the six values are remarkably consistent with the above cited νe mass (χ2 = 2.73) .

  15. Comprehensive study of the surface peak in charge-integrated low-energy ion scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, M.; Gruber, R.; Bauer, P.; Beikler, R.; Taglauer, E.; Schmid, K.; Ermolov, S. N.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy ion scattering is very surface sensitive if scattered ions are analyzed. By time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, the neutral and the charge-integrated spectra (ions plus neutrals) are obtained, which yield information about deeper layers. It is well known that charge integrated spectra may exhibit a surface peak which is more pronounced for heavier projectiles, e.g., Ne ions. Aiming at a more profound physical understanding of this surface peak, we performed TOF experiments and computer simulations for H, He, and Ne projectiles scattered from a polycrystalline copper target. Measurements were done in the range of 1-9 keV for a scattering angle of 129 degree sign under UHV conditions. The simulations were performed using the MARLOWE code for the given experimental parameters and a polycrystalline target. In the experiments, a pronounced surface peak was observed at low energies, which fades away at higher energies. This peak is quantitatively reproduced by the simulation. Several atomic layers may contribute to the surface peak, depending on the energy. Analyzing the contributions of the individual outermost atomic layers, one finds that the binary collisions of the projectiles with atoms in the first and the second layer yield a narrow energy distribution, while the contribution from the deeper layers is dominated by multiple scattering and therefore exhibits a very broad energy spectrum. It is shown that the appearance of a more or less pronounced surface peak is due to the relative contributions of single scattering and multiple scattering and thus depends on the projectile energy and mass.

  16. Patterns of high energy massive string scatterings in the Regge regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sheng-Lan; Lee, Jen-Chi; Yang, Yi

    2009-06-01

    We calculate high energy massive string scattering amplitudes of open bosonic string in the Regge regime (RR). We found that the number of high energy amplitudes for each fixed mass level in the RR is much more numerous than that of Gross regime (GR) calculated previously. Moreover, we discover that the leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. In particular, based on a summation algorithm for Stirling number identities developed recently, we discover that the ratios calculated previously among scattering amplitudes in the GR can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. We conjecture and give evidences that the existence of these GR ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all string scattering amplitudes. Finally, we demonstrate the universal power-law behavior for all massive string scattering amplitudes in the RR.

  17. Low-energy Scattering of Positronium by Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Hasi

    2007-01-01

    The survey reports theoretical studies involving positronium (Ps) - atom scattering. Investigations carried out in last few decades have been briefly reviewed in this article. A brief description of close-coupling approximation (CCA), the first-Born approximation (FBA) and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) for Ps-Atom systems are made. The CCA codes of Ray et a1 [1-6] are reinvestigated using very fine mesh-points to search for resonances. The article advocates the need for an extended basis set & a systematic study using CCAs.

  18. Compton scattering imaging of a working battery using synchrotron high-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Itou, Masayoshi; Orikasa, Yuki; Gogyo, Yuma; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Results of studies on Compton scattering imaging using synchrotron high-energy X-rays are reported. The technique is applied to a discharging coin cell, and the intensity of Compton scattered X-rays from the inside of the cell has been measured as a function of position and time. The position-time intensity map captures the migration of lithium ions in the positive electrode and reveals the structural change due to the volume expansion of the electrode. This experiment is a critical step in developing synchrotron-based Compton scattering imaging for electrochemical cells at a product level.

  19. Absolute Beam Energy Measurement using Elastic ep Scattering at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Alexandre

    1999-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab beam energy measurement in Hall A using the elastic ep scattering will be described. This new, non-magnetic, energy measurement method allows a ( triangle E/E=10-4 ) precision. First-order corrections are canceled by the measurements of the electron and proton scattering angles for two symmetric kinematics. The measurement principle will be presented as well as the device and measurement results. Comparison with independent magnetic energy measurements of the same accuracy will be shown. This project is the result of a collaboration between the LPC: université Blaise Pascal/in2p3), Saclay and Jefferson Lab.

  20. Rainbows in energy- and angle-resolved ion scattering from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tenner, A.D.; Gillen, K.T.; Horn, T.C.M.; Los, J.; Kleyn, A.W.

    1984-06-11

    The angular and energy distributions of K/sup +/ ions scattered at normal incidence with an initial energy of 35 eV on a W(110) surface were measured for various crystal orientations. The complex distributions show rainbows, which are due to both to extrema in the deflection functions for the two scattering angles as well as to an extremum in the final energy as a function of the impact parameter. With use of computer simulations with a nonadditive model potential all observed structures can be explained.

  1. Medium-energy hadron-nucleus scattering in the 1/[ital N] expansion formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyucak, S. ); Morrison, I. )

    1993-08-01

    The algebraic-eikonal approach to the medium-energy hadron-nucleus scattering is generalized to arbitrary interactions and boson types using the 1/[ital N] expansion technique for the interacting boson model. The results are used in a comparative study of proton scattering from deformed nuclei in the [ital sd] and [ital sdg] boson models. The two models give almost identical results for a pure quadrupole interaction but widely differ when a hexadecapole interaction is included.

  2. Review of total cross sections and forward scattering parameters at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M.; White, A.R.

    1991-10-01

    We review the field of the elastic scattering of pp and {bar p}p at the ultra-high energies. The recent total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}, and {rho}-value results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider experiments presented at the 4th `Blois` Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering (Elba, Italy, in May, 1991), allow us a comprehensive overview of the field. 24 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Review of total cross sections and forward scattering parameters at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); White, A.R. . High Energy Physics Div.)

    1991-10-01

    We review the field of the elastic scattering of pp and {bar p}p at the ultra-high energies. The recent total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}, and {rho}-value results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider experiments presented at the 4th Blois' Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering (Elba, Italy, in May, 1991), allow us a comprehensive overview of the field. 24 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  5. Surface analysis of zeolites: An XPS, variable kinetic energy XPS, and low energy ion scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bare, Simon R.; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Teschner, Detre; Hävacker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Rocha, Tulio; Schlögl, Robert; Chan, Ally S. Y.; Blackwell, N.; Charochak, M. E.; ter Veen, Rik; Brongersma, Hidde H.

    2016-06-01

    The surface Si/Al ratio in a series of zeolite Y samples has been obtained using laboratory XPS, synchrotron (variable kinetic energy) XPS, and low energy ion scattering (LEIS) spectroscopy. The non-destructive depth profile obtained using variable kinetic energy XPS is compared to that from the destructive argon ion bombardment depth profile from the lab XPS instrument. All of the data indicate that the near surface region of both the ammonium form and steamed Y zeolites is strongly enriched in aluminum. It is shown that when the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons is taken into account the laboratory XPS of aluminosilicates zeolites does not provide a true measurement of the surface stoichiometry, while variable kinetic energy XPS results in a more surface sensitive measurement. A comprehensive Si/Al concentration profile as a function of depth is developed by combining the data from the three surface characterization techniques. The LEIS spectroscopy reveals that the topmost atomic layer is further enriched in Al compared to subsequent layers.

  6. Mathematical methods for restricted domain ternary liquid mixture free energy determination using light scattering.

    PubMed

    Wahle, Chris W; Ross, David S; Thurston, George M

    2013-09-28

    We extend methods of solution of a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing to apply to connected, isotropic ternary liquid composition domains that do not touch all three binary axes. To do so we mathematically analyze the problem of inferring needed Dirichlet boundary data, and solving for the free energy, with use of hypothetical static light scattering measurements that correspond to dielectric composition gradient vectors that have distinct directions. The physical idea behind the technique is that contrasting absorption properties of mixture components can result in such distinctly directed dielectric composition gradient vectors, due to their differing wavelength dependences of dielectric response. At suitably chosen wavelengths, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns in the ternary composition triangle can then correspond to the same underlying free energy, and enlarge the scope of available information about the free energy, as shown here. We show how to use distinctly directed dielectric gradients to measure the free energy on both straight lines and curves within the ternary composition triangle, so as to provide needed Dirichlet conditions for light scattering partial differential equation solution. With use of Monte Carlo simulations of noisy light scattering data, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, for various angles between the assumed dielectric gradient vectors, and indicate how the measurement time depends on instrumental throughput parameters. The present analysis methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain such restricted liquid domains, including aqueous solutions of biological macromolecules, micellar mixtures and microemulsions, and many small molecule systems that are important in separation technology.

  7. Mathematical methods for restricted domain ternary liquid mixture free energy determination using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Chris W.; Ross, David S.; Thurston, George M.

    2013-09-01

    We extend methods of solution of a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing to apply to connected, isotropic ternary liquid composition domains that do not touch all three binary axes. To do so we mathematically analyze the problem of inferring needed Dirichlet boundary data, and solving for the free energy, with use of hypothetical static light scattering measurements that correspond to dielectric composition gradient vectors that have distinct directions. The physical idea behind the technique is that contrasting absorption properties of mixture components can result in such distinctly directed dielectric composition gradient vectors, due to their differing wavelength dependences of dielectric response. At suitably chosen wavelengths, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns in the ternary composition triangle can then correspond to the same underlying free energy, and enlarge the scope of available information about the free energy, as shown here. We show how to use distinctly directed dielectric gradients to measure the free energy on both straight lines and curves within the ternary composition triangle, so as to provide needed Dirichlet conditions for light scattering partial differential equation solution. With use of Monte Carlo simulations of noisy light scattering data, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, for various angles between the assumed dielectric gradient vectors, and indicate how the measurement time depends on instrumental throughput parameters. The present analysis methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain such restricted liquid domains, including aqueous solutions of biological macromolecules, micellar mixtures and microemulsions, and many small molecule systems that are important in separation technology.

  8. Comparative analysis of characteristic electron energy loss spectra and inelastic scattering cross-section spectra of Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, A. S.; Igumenov, A. Yu.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Pchelyakov, O. P.; Zhigalov, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra of Fe have been calculated based on experimental spectra of characteristic reflection electron energy loss as dependences of the product of the inelastic mean free path by the differential inelastic electron scattering cross section on the electron energy loss. It has been shown that the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra have certain advantages over the electron energy loss spectra in the analysis of the interaction of electrons with substance. The peaks of energy loss in the spectra of characteristic electron energy loss and inelastic electron scattering cross sections have been determined from the integral and differential spectra. It has been shown that the energy of the bulk plasmon is practically independent of the energy of primary electrons in the characteristic electron energy loss spectra and monotonically increases with increasing energy of primary electrons in the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra. The variation in the maximum energy of the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra is caused by the redistribution of intensities over the peaks of losses due to various excitations. The inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra have been analyzed using the decomposition of the spectra into peaks of the energy loss. This method has been used for the quantitative estimation of the contributions from different energy loss processes to the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra of Fe and for the determination of the nature of the energy loss peaks.

  9. Effects of bonding on the energy distribution of electrons scattered elastically at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, M.; Went, M. R.

    2006-11-15

    High-resolution measurements of 40-keV electrons scattered over 44.3 deg. from evaporated carbon films are presented. The observed width of the energy distribution of electrons scattered from carbon is significantly larger than the experimental energy resolution, and its position is shifted to lower energy. Measurements were done for transmission and reflection geometries for thin films with thicknesses varying from 90 A ring to 1400 A ring . The observed peak shape is largely independent of the thickness and measurement geometry. The peak shape deviates from Gaussian in all cases, in a way consistent with theories that describe these processes beyond the impulse approximation. The energy shift of the carbon peak is measured by evaporating a small amount of Au on these films. Separation of the Au and C peak is somewhat smaller than calculated assuming scattering from free C and Au atoms, but independent of measurement geometry. Finally spectra were measured from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) films. Now different widths are observed in reflection geometry and transmission geometry. This is attributed to the anisotropy of the motion of the C atoms in HOPG. Also the Au-C separation is slightly orientation dependent for HOPG. All observations agree at least semiquantitatively with neutron Compton scattering results, a related scattering experiment that studies neutron-atom collisions at similar momentum transfers.

  10. Fast scattering simulation tool for multi-energy x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossin, A.; Tabary, J.; Rebuffel, V.; Létang, J. M.; Freud, N.; Verger, L.

    2015-12-01

    A combination of Monte Carlo (MC) and deterministic approaches was employed as a means of creating a simulation tool capable of providing energy resolved x-ray primary and scatter images within a reasonable time interval. Libraries of Sindbad, a previously developed x-ray simulation software, were used in the development. The scatter simulation capabilities of the tool were validated through simulation with the aid of GATE and through experimentation by using a spectrometric CdTe detector. A simple cylindrical phantom with cavities and an aluminum insert was used. Cross-validation with GATE showed good agreement with a global spatial error of 1.5% and a maximum scatter spectrum error of around 6%. Experimental validation also supported the accuracy of the simulations obtained from the developed software with a global spatial error of 1.8% and a maximum error of around 8.5% in the scatter spectra.

  11. Low-energy scattering of antihydrogen by helium and molecular hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Armour, E. A. G.; Todd, A. C.; Liu, Y.; Gregory, M. R.; Jonsell, S.; Plummer, M.

    2008-08-08

    In this paper, we describe in detail calculations that we have carried out of cross sections for rearrangement processes in very low-energy helium+antihydrogen (H-bar) scattering that result in He{sup +}p-bar+Ps or Hep-bar+e{sup +} or {alpha}p-bar+Ps{sup -}. The interaction between the leptons is taken into account very accurately. Results are presented for all three processes. A description is also given of a preliminary calculation of elastic and antiproton annihilation cross sections for very low-energy H{sub 2}+H-bar scattering.

  12. Direct observation of resonant scattering phase shifts and their energy dependence.

    PubMed

    Gensemer, Stephen D; Martin-Wells, Ross B; Bennett, Aaron W; Gibble, Kurt

    2012-12-28

    We scan the collision energy of two clouds of cesium atoms between 12 and 50  μK in an atomic fountain clock. By directly detecting the difference of s-wave scattering phase shifts, we observe a rapid variation of a scattering phase shift through a series of Feshbach resonances. At the energies we use, resonances that overlap at threshold become resolved. Our statistical phase uncertainty of 8 mrad can be improved in future precision measurements of Feshbach resonances to accurately determine the Cs-Cs interactions, which may provide stringent limits on the time variation of fundamental constants.

  13. Double electron ionization in Compton scattering of high energy photons by helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1995-08-01

    The cross section for double-electron ionization of two-electron atoms and ions in Compton scattering of high energy photons is calculated. It is demonstrated that its dependence on the incoming photon frequency is the same as that for single-electron ionization. The ratio of {open_quotes}double-to-single{close_quotes} ionization in Compton scattering was found to be energy independent and almost identical with the corresponding value for photoionization. For the He atom it is 1.68%. This surprising result deserves experimental verification.

  14. Computer simulation program for medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki

    2016-03-01

    A computer simulation program for ion scattering and its graphical user interface (MEISwin) has been developed. Using this program, researchers have analyzed medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at Ritsumeikan University since 1998, and at Rutgers University since 2007. The main features of the program are as follows: (1) stopping power can be chosen from five datasets spanning several decades (from 1977 to 2011), (2) straggling can be chosen from two datasets, (3) spectral shape can be selected as Gaussian or exponentially modified Gaussian, (4) scattering cross sections can be selected as Coulomb or screened, (5) simulations adopt the resonant elastic scattering cross section of 16O(4He, 4He)16O, (6) pileup simulation for RBS spectra is supported, (7) natural and specific isotope abundances are supported, and (8) the charge fraction can be chosen from three patterns (fixed, energy-dependent, and ion fraction with charge-exchange parameters for medium-energy ion scattering). This study demonstrates and discusses the simulations and their results.

  15. Coupling of multiple coulomb scattering and energy loss and straggling in HZETRN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Walker, S. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.; Tweed, J.

    Current developments in HZETRN are focused towards a full three-dimensional and computationally efficient deterministic transport code capable of simulating radiation transport with either space or laboratory boundary conditions One aspect of the new version of HZETRN is the inclusion of small-angle multiple Coulomb scattering of incident ions by target nuclei While the effects of multiple scattering are negligible in the space radiation environment multiple scattering must be included in laboratory transport code simulations to accurately model ion beam experiments to simulate the physical and biological-effective radiation dose and to develop new methods and strategies for light ion radiation therapy In this paper we present the theoretical formalism and computation procedures for incorporating multiple scattering into HZETRN and coupling the ion-nuclear scattering interactions with energy loss and straggling Simulations of the effects of multiple scattering on ion beam characterization will be compared with results from laboratory measurements which include path-length corrections angular and lateral broadening and absorbed dose

  16. Two-loop Bhabha scattering at high energy beyond leading power approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penin, Alexander A.; Zerf, Nikolai

    2016-09-01

    We evaluate the two-loop O (me2/ s) contribution to the wide-angle high-energy electron-positron scattering in the double-logarithmic approximation. The origin and the general structure of the power-suppressed double logarithmic corrections are discussed in detail.

  17. Vanishing rainbows near orbiting and the energy dependence of rainbow scattering - Relation to properties of the potential. [molecular beam scattering cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, E. F.; Hall, R. B.; Mason, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    The energy threshold behavior of elastic rainbow scattering near the transition to orbiting is derived. Analysis of the energy dependence of the rainbow angle shows that the full range from high energies down to orbiting can be fitted with two parameters. Thus, measurements of the rainbow angle can give essentially only two pieces of information about the potential. For potentials of common shapes, such measurements are sensitive to regions of the potential just beyond the minimum and give information about the shape of the potential in this range. However, neither a minimum nor a point of inflection in the potential is necessary for rainbow scattering.

  18. Design and operation of a gas scattering energy spectrometer for the ISIS RFQ accelerator test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, J. P.; Findlay, D. J. S.; Letchford, A. P.; Murdoch, G. R.; Thomason, J. W. G.

    2005-02-01

    The design and operation of an apparatus to measure the beam energy of a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) particle accelerator, based on multiple scattering of H - ions in xenon gas, is described. The purpose of the apparatus is to confirm the mean energy and energy spread of the nominal 665 keV beam of H - ions from the ISIS RFQ. This RFQ, after comprehensive testing, is intended to replace the existing Cockcroft-Walton pre-injector on the ISIS spallation neutron source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The basis of the apparatus is a set of two cascaded assemblies each consisting of a gas scattering cell, a drift length and three small apertures, which together reduce the peak intensity of the beam current sufficiently to allow a semiconductor charged particle detector to be used to detect individual H - ions and measure their energies.

  19. Features of spectra of low-energy neon ions scattered from gallium phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoguzov, A. B.; Belykh, S. F.; Gololobov, G. P.; Suvorov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    Using mass-resolved ion scattering spectrometry, spectra of Ne+ ions scattered at an angle of 120° from the surface of GaP in the energy range of 0.4-1.96 keV have been studied in detail. In the spectra, in addition to the peaks of elastic binary Ne+/P and Ne+/Ga collisions, the peak of sputtered neon ions has been found, as well as the wide peak (a "hump"), the energy of which slightly depends on the energy of primary ions and the intensity considerably increases with an increase in this energy. In our opinion, the main contribution to this peak is made by neon ions that undergo multiple collisions with gallium and phosphorus atoms on the surface and deeper layers of the sample and keep their charge due to reionization processes.

  20. An investigation into electron scattering from pyrazine at intermediate and high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, A. G.; Fuss, M. C.; Blanco, F.; Gorfinkiel, J. D.; Almeida, D.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.; García, G.

    2013-11-14

    Total electron scattering cross sections for pyrazine in the energy range 10–500 eV have been measured with a new magnetically confined electron transmission-beam apparatus. Theoretical differential and integral elastic, as well as integral inelastic, cross sections have been calculated by means of a screening-corrected form of the independent-atom representation (IAM-SCAR) from 10 to 1000 eV incident electron energies. The present experimental and theoretical total cross sections show a good level of agreement, to within 10%, in the overlapping energy range. Consistency of these results with previous calculations (i.e., the R-matrix and Schwinger Multichannel methods) and elastic scattering measurements at lower energies, below 10 eV, is also discussed.

  1. Interatomic scattering in energy dependent photoelectron spectra of Ar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Patanen, M.; Benkoula, S.; Nicolas, C.; Goel, A.; Antonsson, E.; Neville, J. J.; Miron, C.

    2015-09-28

    Soft X-ray photoelectron spectra of Ar 2p levels of atomic argon and argon clusters are recorded over an extended range of photon energies. The Ar 2p intensity ratios between atomic argon and clusters’ surface and bulk components reveal oscillations similar to photoelectron extended X-ray absorption fine structure signal (PEXAFS). We demonstrate here that this technique allows us to analyze separately the PEXAFS signals from surface and bulk sites of free-standing, neutral clusters, revealing a bond contraction at the surface.

  2. A triple energy window scatter subtraction approach for quantitative anger camera imaging of iodine-131

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, E.J.; Macey, D.J.; Bayouth, J.E.

    1994-05-01

    Dose estimates for organs and tumor volumes in radioimmunotherapy with I-131 frequently depend on in-vivo quantitation methods using planar Anger camera images. Compton scatter and collimator septal penetration result in overestimation of activity and dose. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a triple energy window subtraction method for quantitative imaging of I-131. The energy spectrum of I-131 was modeled as a superposition of the spectra of Cr-51 (320 keV) and Cs-137 (662 keV). Images were acquired with three adjacent 15% energy windows--photopeak(PP), upper scatter(US), and lower scatter(LS)--for small sources of these radionuclides. The PP window was centered at 364 keV for I-131 and Cs-137 and 320 keV for Cr-51. Three scatter multipliers were derived from analysis of count profiles of the Cs-137 and Cr-51 images, and used to sequentially remove septal penetration and scatter events included in the 364 keV photopeak of I-131. This method was tested by acquiring images of an abdominal phantom containing a liver, spleen and spherical {open_quotes}tumor{close_quotes} filled with different concentrations of I-131, both with and without background activity in the surrounding phantom. A body thickness attenuation compensation factor was applied to the geometric mean of the conjugate view counts using a narrow beam linear attenuation coefficient of 0.11 cm{sup -1}. With scatter subtraction, the accuracy and reproducibility of activity quantitation was improved because the background count density was more uniformly scored. Also, the influence of different activity concentrations in source organs relative to background on the accuracy of quantitation was removed, and the perimeters of organs were more clearly defined. This method has been used to provide improved dose estimates for I-131 labeled antibody therapy in breast cancer patients.

  3. A simple scatter correction method for dual energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yihuan; Lau, Beverly; Hu, Yue-Houng; Zhao, Wei; Gindi, Gene

    2014-03-01

    Dual-Energy Contrast Enhanced Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DE-CE-DBT) has the potential to deliver diagnostic information for vascularized breast pathology beyond that available from screening DBT. DE-CE-DBT involves a contrast (iodine) injection followed by a low energy (LE) and a high energy (HE) acquisitions. These undergo weighted subtraction then a reconstruction that ideally shows only the iodinated signal. Scatter in the projection data leads to "cupping" artifacts that can reduce the visibility and quantitative accuracy of the iodinated signal. The use of filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction ameliorates these types of artifacts, but the use of FBP precludes the advantages of iterative reconstructions. This motivates an effective and clinically practical scatter correction (SC) method for the projection data. We propose a simple SC method, applied at each acquisition angle. It uses scatter-only data at the edge of the image to interpolate a scatter estimate within the breast region. The interpolation has an approximately correct spatial profile but is quantitatively inaccurate. We further correct the interpolated scatter data with the aid of easily obtainable knowledge of SPR (scatter-to-primary ratio) at a single reference point. We validated the SC method using a CIRS breast phantom with iodine inserts. We evaluated its efficacy in terms of SDNR and iodine quantitative accuracy. We also applied our SC method to a patient DE-CE-DBT study and showed that the SC allowed detection of a previously confirmed tumor at the edge of the breast. The SC method is quick to use and may be useful in a clinical setting.

  4. Mathematical and computational aspects of quaternary liquid mixing free energy measurement using light scattering.

    PubMed

    Wahle, Chris W; Ross, David S; Thurston, George M

    2012-07-21

    We provide a mathematical and computational analysis of light scattering measurement of mixing free energies of quaternary isotropic liquids. In previous work, we analyzed mathematical and experimental design considerations for the ternary mixture case [D. Ross, G. Thurston, and C. Lutzer, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 064106 (2008); C. Wahle, D. Ross, and G. Thurston, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034201 (2012)]. Here, we review and introduce dimension-free general formulations of the fully nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) and its linearization, a basis for applying the method to composition spaces of any dimension, in principle. With numerical analysis of the PDE as applied to the light scattering implied by a test free energy and dielectric gradient combination, we show that values of the Rayleigh ratio within the quaternary composition tetrahedron can be used to correctly reconstruct the composition dependence of the free energy. We then extend the analysis to the case of a finite number of data points, measured with noise. In this context the linearized PDE describes the relevant diffusion of information from light scattering noise to the free energy. The fully nonlinear PDE creates a special set of curves in the composition tetrahedron, collections of which form characteristics of the nonlinear and linear PDEs, and we show that the information diffusion has a time-like direction along the positive normals to these curves. With use of Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering experiments, we find that for a modest laboratory light scattering setup, about 100-200 samples and 100 s of measurement time are enough to be able to measure the mixing free energy over the entire quaternary composition tetrahedron, to within an L(2) error norm of 10(-3). The present method can help quantify thermodynamics of quaternary isotropic liquid mixtures.

  5. Corrections to the eikonal approximation for nuclear scattering at medium energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buuck, Micah; Miller, Gerald A.

    2014-08-01

    The upcoming Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University has reemphasized the importance of accurate modeling of low energy nucleus-nucleus scattering. Such calculations have been simplified by using the eikonal approximation. As a high energy approximation, however, its accuracy suffers for the medium energy beams that are of current experimental interest. A prescription developed by Wallace [Phys. Rev. Lett. 27, 622 (1971), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.27.622 and Ann. Phys. (NY) 78, 190 (1973), 10.1016/0003-4916(73)90008-0] that obtains the scattering propagator as an expansion around the eikonal propagator (Glauber approach) has the potential to extend the range of validity of the approximation to lower energies. Here we examine the properties of this expansion, and calculate the first-, second-, and third-order corrections for the scattering of a spinless particle off of a Ca40 nucleus, and for nuclear breakup reactions involving Be11. We find that, including these corrections extends the lower bound of the range of validity down to energies as low as about 45 MeV. At that energy the corrections provide as much as a 15% correction to certain processes.

  6. Measurements of ultra-low-energy electron scattering cross sections of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kitajima, M.; Shigemura, K.; Kurokawa, M.; Odagiri, T.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, K.

    2014-03-05

    A new experimental technique for the total cross section measurements of ultra-low energy electron collisions with atoms and molecules utilizing the synchrotron radiation is presented. The technique employs a combination of the penetrating field technique and the threshold photoionization of rare gas atoms using the synchrotron radiation as an electron source in order to produce a high resolution electron beam at very low energy. Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering from He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in the energy region from extremely low electron energy to 20 eV are presented.

  7. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons in partially ionized dense semiclassical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N. Shalenov, E. O.; Ramazanov, T. S.

    2015-08-15

    Elastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in a dense semiclassical hydrogen plasma for low impact energies has been studied. Differential scattering cross sections were calculated within the effective model of electron-atom interaction taking into account the effect of screening as well as the quantum mechanical effect of diffraction. The calculations were carried out on the basis of the phase-function method. The influence of the diffraction effect on the Ramsauer–Townsend effect was studied on the basis of a comparison with results made within the effective polarization model of the Buckingham type.

  8. Bremsstrahlung from nuclear scattering at low energy near a resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, C. C.; Lesser, P. M. S.; Liou, M. K.

    1984-04-01

    A program to contribute to the general understanding of nuclear reactions by determining as many of the off-shell properties of the proton-nucleus interaction as possible through the study of the proton-nucleus bremsstrahlung process is discussed. The limits of validity of a model independent analysis of these reactions in the neighborhood of a resonance or a breakup threshold are sought. The differences between this analysis and the data is utilized to elucidate those off-shell constraints which any valid proton-nucleus model interaction must satisfy. The bremsstrahlung process provides a method for determining the off-shell properties of the proton-nucleus potential, and the Brooklyn College program offers a unique opportunity to measure these crucial aspects of the low energy proton-nucleus interaction.

  9. Scattering and anelastic attenuation of seismic energy in central and south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSweeney, T. J.; Biswas, N. N.; Mayeda, K.; Aki, K.

    1991-05-01

    The characteristics of seismic energy attenuation in central and south-central Alaska are described. The data analyzed are short-period seismograms of local earthquakes recorded digitally in 12 bit at 120-Hz sampling rate by permanent stations of the regional network in the study area. First, the coda amplitude decay rate was compared for two depth ranges, 0-22 km and 63-133 km, using the single-scattering model. The results show dependence of Qc-1 on earthquake focal depth in the frequency ( f) interval of 1 < f < 16 Hz; the deeper events yield consistently lower values for Qc-1 than the shallower events, similar to the results obtained by others for the Kanto district in Japan and for the Hindu-Kush region in Afghanistan. Next, the data were analyzed to separate the effects of intrinsic and multiple scattering on total S-wave energy, by applying the method of Wu to the hypocentral distance dependence of total seismic energy obtained from local earthquakes, which were normalized to a common source by the coda method of Aki. The results show the presence of strong scattering effects—the values of scattering attenuation ( Qs-1) are an order of magnitude greater than the intrinsic attenuation ( Qi-1) with the extinction distance in the range of 20-23 km. We found that Qc-1 is about a half of Qs-1 for the above frequency range, but is much larger than Qi-1.

  10. Heating due to momentum transfer in low-energy positronium-antiproton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, M.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the consequences of unexpectedly large elastic cross sections for the scattering of low-energy antiprotons from n ≤3 positronium (Ps) on the experimental implementation of antihydrogen formation via Ps-antiproton collisions. The integrated elastic cross sections, obtained using the two-center convergent close-coupling theory, can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than their counterparts for antihydrogen formation. The differential momentum transfer cross sections, which suppress the large cross sections at forward scattering angles, show remarkably rich behavior across all scattering angles. We discuss the implications of these findings for the heating, via momentum transfer, of clouds of trapped antiprotons that are typically used for the creation of antihydrogen.

  11. Antihydrogen-hydrogen elastic scattering at thermal energies using an atomic-orbital technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab; Ghosh, A.S.

    2003-05-01

    In view of the recent interest in the trapping of antihydrogen atom H(bar sign), at very low temperatures, H-bar-H scattering has been investigated at low incident energies using a close-coupling model with the basis set H-bar(1s,2s,2p-bar)+H(1s,2s,2p-bar). The predicted s-wave elastic phase shifts, scattering length, and effective range are in a good agreement with the other recent predictions of Jonsell et al. and of Armour and Chamberlain. The results indicate that the atomic orbital expansion model is suitable to study the H-bar-H scattering at ultracold temperatures.

  12. Corrections on energy spectrum and scatterings for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-Quan; Bücherl, Thomas; Li, Hang; Zou, Yu-Bin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Guo, Zhi-Yu

    2013-11-01

    Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM- II in Technische Universität München (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections.

  13. Oscillatory spin asymmetric scattering of low-energy He+ ions on Sn surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T. T.; Sakai, O.

    2016-09-01

    Spin-polarized He+ ion scattering spectroscopy (SP-ISS) study on a polycrystalline Sn target surface is reported. We observed substantial spin dependent He+ ion scattering on the non-magnetic Sn target. It is not due to He+ ion neutralization, but it is attributed to spin-orbit coupling (SOC) that acts transiently on the He+ 1 s electron spin in the He+-Sn atom binary collision. We found that the spin dependent scattering quantified as the spin asymmetry exhibits periodic oscillation with the reciprocal of the He+ ion velocity. The oscillation originates from the SOC induced-slight energy difference of the [He+-Sn] and [He0-Sn+] systems which are involved in the quasi-resonant charge transfer. The oscillatory spin asymmetry shows that SOC arises from collision induced intermediate state.

  14. Energy exchange during stimulated Raman scattering of a relativistic laser in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N.; Hur, M. S.; Suk, H.

    2006-11-15

    Energy exchange between pump and daughter waves during the stimulated Raman scattering process in a plasma is investigated, including the effect of a damping coefficient of electron-ion collision at different initial three-wave phases. To obey the energy and momentum conservations, the resonance conditions are satisfied at an optimal initial phase difference between the interacting waves. The amplitudes of the interacting waves exhibit behaviors such as a parametric oscillator. The variations in initial three-wave phase difference generate a phase mismatch, which enhances the rate of the amplitude variations of the interacting waves. The relativistic mass effect modifies the dispersion relations of the interacting waves, and consequently the energy exchange during the stimulated Raman scattering is affected. The collisional damping in the plasma is shown to have an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves.

  15. Elastic scattering of positrons on mercury: A negative-energy Dirac-Fock treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sienkiewicz, J.E.; Baylis, W.E. )

    1991-02-01

    In a new extension of the Dirac-Fock method, calculations have been performed on the 80 electrons of mercury (in 22 {ital nlj} orbitals) plus one continuum electron of negative energy less than {minus}{ital mc}{sup 2}. The asymptotic form of the numerical wave function of the negative-energy electron determines the phase shifts for the elastic scattering of positrons on Hg. The self-consistent-field calculations include the usual exchange interaction between electrons. The exchange between the bound Hg electrons and the negative-energy continuum electron represents the positron-electron annihilation-creation process. Such effects are usually computed in quantum electrodynamics to some order of approximation in a perturbation expansion. We believe ours is the first Dirac-Fock calculation of this effect, but we find its influence on the elastic positron scattering to be negligible.

  16. Scattering framework for two particles with isotropic spin-orbit coupling applicable to all energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Q.; Blume, D.

    2016-08-01

    Previous work developed a K -matrix formalism applicable to positive energies for the scattering between two s -wave interacting particles with two internal states, isotropic spin-orbit coupling and vanishing center-of-mass momentum [H. Duan, L. You, and B. Gao, Phys. Rev. A 87, 052708 (2013)., 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.052708]. This work extends the formalism to the entire energy regime. Explicit solutions are obtained for the total angular momentum J =0 and 1 channels. The behavior of the partial cross sections in the negative energy regime is analyzed in detail. We find that the leading contributions to the partial cross sections at the negative energy thresholds are governed by the spin-orbit coupling strength kso and the mass ratio. The fact that these contributions are independent of the two-body scattering length as is a direct consequence of the effective reduction of the dimensionality, and hence of the density of states, near the scattering thresholds due to the single-particle spin-orbit coupling terms. The results are analytically continued to the energy regime where bound states exist. It is shown that our results are consistent with results obtained by alternative approaches. Our formulation, which can be regarded as an extension of the standard textbook partial wave decomposition, can be generalized to two-body systems with other types of spin-orbit coupling, including cases where the center-of-mass momentum does not vanish.

  17. Impact of Phonon Surface Scattering on Thermal Energy Distribution of Si and SiGe Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Abhinav; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Thermal transport in nanostructures has attracted considerable attention in the last decade but the precise effects of surfaces on heat conduction have remained unclear due to a limited accuracy in the treatment of phonon surface scattering phenomena. Here, we investigate the impact of phonon-surface scattering on the distribution of thermal energy across phonon wavelengths and mean free paths in Si and SiGe nanowires. We present a rigorous and accurate description of phonon scattering at surfaces and predict and analyse nanowire heat spectra for different diameters and surface conditions. We show that the decrease in the diameter and increased roughness and correlation lengths makes the heat phonon spectra significantly shift towards short wavelengths and mean free paths. We also investigate the emergence of phonon confinement effects for small diameter nanowires and different surface scattering properties. Computed results for bulk materials show excellent agreement with recent experimentally-based approaches that reconstruct the mean-free-path heat spectra. Our phonon surface scattering model allows for an accurate theoretical extraction of heat spectra in nanowires and contributes to elucidate the development of critical phonon transport modes such as phonon confinement and coherent interference effects. PMID:27174699

  18. Impact of Phonon Surface Scattering on Thermal Energy Distribution of Si and SiGe Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Abhinav; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Thermal transport in nanostructures has attracted considerable attention in the last decade but the precise effects of surfaces on heat conduction have remained unclear due to a limited accuracy in the treatment of phonon surface scattering phenomena. Here, we investigate the impact of phonon-surface scattering on the distribution of thermal energy across phonon wavelengths and mean free paths in Si and SiGe nanowires. We present a rigorous and accurate description of phonon scattering at surfaces and predict and analyse nanowire heat spectra for different diameters and surface conditions. We show that the decrease in the diameter and increased roughness and correlation lengths makes the heat phonon spectra significantly shift towards short wavelengths and mean free paths. We also investigate the emergence of phonon confinement effects for small diameter nanowires and different surface scattering properties. Computed results for bulk materials show excellent agreement with recent experimentally-based approaches that reconstruct the mean-free-path heat spectra. Our phonon surface scattering model allows for an accurate theoretical extraction of heat spectra in nanowires and contributes to elucidate the development of critical phonon transport modes such as phonon confinement and coherent interference effects. PMID:27174699

  19. Precision Determination of Electron Scattering Angle by Differential Nuclear Recoil Energy Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liyanage, Nilanga; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2015-09-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this article, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  20. Impact of Phonon Surface Scattering on Thermal Energy Distribution of Si and SiGe Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Abhinav; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Thermal transport in nanostructures has attracted considerable attention in the last decade but the precise effects of surfaces on heat conduction have remained unclear due to a limited accuracy in the treatment of phonon surface scattering phenomena. Here, we investigate the impact of phonon-surface scattering on the distribution of thermal energy across phonon wavelengths and mean free paths in Si and SiGe nanowires. We present a rigorous and accurate description of phonon scattering at surfaces and predict and analyse nanowire heat spectra for different diameters and surface conditions. We show that the decrease in the diameter and increased roughness and correlation lengths makes the heat phonon spectra significantly shift towards short wavelengths and mean free paths. We also investigate the emergence of phonon confinement effects for small diameter nanowires and different surface scattering properties. Computed results for bulk materials show excellent agreement with recent experimentally-based approaches that reconstruct the mean-free-path heat spectra. Our phonon surface scattering model allows for an accurate theoretical extraction of heat spectra in nanowires and contributes to elucidate the development of critical phonon transport modes such as phonon confinement and coherent interference effects.

  1. Precision determination of electron scattering angle by differential nuclear recoil energy method

    SciTech Connect

    Liyanage, N.; Saenboonruang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this article, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  2. Pole structure from energy-dependent and single-energy fits to GWU-SAID π N elastic scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švarc, Alfred; Hadžimehmedović, Mirza; Osmanović, Hedim; Stahov, Jugoslav; Workman, Ron L.

    2015-01-01

    The pole structure of the current George Washington University (GWU-SAID) partial-wave analysis of elastic π N scattering and η N production data is studied. Pole positions and residues are extracted from both the energy-dependent and single-energy fits, using two different methods. For the energy-dependent fits, both contour integration and a Laurent + Pietarinen approach are used. In the case of single-energy fits, the Laurent+Pietarinen approach is used. Errors are estimated and the two sets of results are compared to other fits to data.

  3. On the importance of full-dimensionality in low-energy molecular scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Faure, Alexandre; Jankowski, Piotr; Stoecklin, Thierry; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Scattering of H2 on CO is of great importance in astrophysics and also is a benchmark system for comparing theory to experiment. We present here a new 6-dimensional potential energy surface for the ground electronic state of H2-CO with an estimated uncertainty of about 0.6 cm(-1) in the global minimum region, several times smaller than achieved earlier. This potential has been used in nearly exact 6-dimensional quantum scattering calculations to compute state-to-state cross-sections measured in low-energy crossed-beam experiments. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment has been achieved in all cases. We also show that the fully 6-dimensional approach is not needed with the current accuracy of experimental data since an equally good agreement with experiment was obtained using only a 4-dimensional treatment, which validates the rigid-rotor approach widely used in scattering calculations. This finding, which disagrees with some literature statements, is important since for larger systems full-dimensional scattering calculations are currently not possible. PMID:27333870

  4. On the importance of full-dimensionality in low-energy molecular scattering calculations

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Alexandre; Jankowski, Piotr; Stoecklin, Thierry; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Scattering of H2 on CO is of great importance in astrophysics and also is a benchmark system for comparing theory to experiment. We present here a new 6-dimensional potential energy surface for the ground electronic state of H2-CO with an estimated uncertainty of about 0.6 cm−1 in the global minimum region, several times smaller than achieved earlier. This potential has been used in nearly exact 6-dimensional quantum scattering calculations to compute state-to-state cross-sections measured in low-energy crossed-beam experiments. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment has been achieved in all cases. We also show that the fully 6-dimensional approach is not needed with the current accuracy of experimental data since an equally good agreement with experiment was obtained using only a 4-dimensional treatment, which validates the rigid-rotor approach widely used in scattering calculations. This finding, which disagrees with some literature statements, is important since for larger systems full-dimensional scattering calculations are currently not possible. PMID:27333870

  5. Beam energy spread in FERMI@elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A; Zholents, Alexander A; Zolotorev, Max S.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2008-07-11

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of electrons in the pre-cathode area in the electron guns know in the literature as Boersh effect is responsible for a growth of the electron beam energy spread there. Albeit most visible within the electron gun where the electron beam density is large and the energy spread is small, the IBS acts all along the entire electron beam pass through the Linac. In this report we calculate the energy spread induced by IBS in the FERMI@elettra electron gun.

  6. Scattering of H(1s) off metastable helium atom at thermal energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-06-15

    Quantal calculations for scattering of ground-state antihydrogen by metastable (n=2S) helium atoms have been performed using the nonadiabatic, atomic orbital expansion technique at thermal energies. The zero-energy elastic cross sections of the present systems are much greater than the corresponding value for the ground-state helium target. The low-energy elastic cross section for the singlet metastable helium [He(2 {sup 1}S)] target is higher than the corresponding value when the target is in the metastable triplet state [He(2 {sup 3}S)].

  7. Universality of entanglement creation in low-energy two-dimensional scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Weder, Ricardo

    2013-10-15

    We prove that the entanglement created in the low-energy scattering of two particles in two dimensions is given by a universal coefficient that is independent of the interaction potential. This is strikingly different from the three dimensional case, where it is proportional to the total scattering cross section. Before the collision the state is a product of two normalized Gaussians. We take the purity as the measure of the entanglement after the scattering. We give a rigorous computation, with error bound, of the leading order of the purity at low-energy. For a large class of potentials, that are not-necessarily spherically symmetric, we prove that the low-energy behavior of the purity, P, is universal. It is given by P=1−1/((ln(σ/ħ)){sup 2}) E, where σ is the variance of the Gaussians and the entanglement coefficient, E, depends only on the masses of the particles and not on the interaction potential. There is a strong dependence of the entanglement in the difference of the masses. The minimum is when the masses are equal, and it increases strongly with the difference of the masses. -- Highlights: •The entanglement in low-energy scattering in two dimensions is universal. It is independent of the potential. •We take the purity as the measure of entanglement. •We give a rigorous computation of the leading order of the purity at low energy. •The created entanglement depends strongly on the masses of the particles. •It takes its minimum for equal masses and it increases strongly with the difference of the masses.

  8. Low-energy electron scattering from CO. 2: Ab-initio study using the frame-transformation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1976-01-01

    The Wigner-Eisenbud R matrix method has been combined with the frame transformation theory to study electron scattering from molecular systems. The R matrix, calculated at the boundary point of the molecular core radius, has been transformed to the space frame in order to continue the solution of the scattering equations in the outer region where rotational motion of the nuclei is taken into account. This procedure has been applied to a model calculation of thermal energy electron scattering from CO.

  9. Information stored in high-Q space: Role of high energy scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, T.; Dmowski, W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Kycia, S.; Eberhardt, A. S.

    1997-07-01

    Much of crystallographic diffraction measurements are focused on obtaining information with Q (=4{pi} sin {theta}/{lambda}) below 17 A{sup -1} or d>0.35 A, with the implicit assumption that no useful information is stored in the Q space above. However, this assumption is valid only with respect to the periodic lattice structure. Actually, high-Q space is full of information on the local atomic structure that could be of major importance in some cases. We discuss high energy x-ray or neutron scattering as the methods of obtaining the data from the high-Q space, and the atomic pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis as the means of extracting information from such data. Preliminary data of our recent high-energy x-ray scattering measurement on a MX compound are shown for which this type of analysis is likely to play a significant role in understanding the properties.

  10. Charge exchange processes in He+/Cu scattering at low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalal-Kouache, K.; Bruckner, B.; Roth, D.; Goebl, D.; Bauer, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present results on charge exchange of He+ ions at a polycrystalline Cu surface. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the trajectories of projectiles scattered by an angle Θ = 136 ° . By including Auger neutralization and charge exchange in close collisions, energy spectra of the scattered ions as well as ion fraction values were calculated for primary energies in the range 0.5-5 keV and compared to experimental results. In the simulations, the Auger neutralization rate Γ and the probabilities of resonant neutralization (PRN) and reionization (PRI) are treated as free parameters. Using well accepted values from literature for these quantities very good agreement between simulations and experimental data was achieved.

  11. Total scattering investigation of materials for clean energy applications: the importance of the local structure.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2011-04-21

    In this Perspective article we give an account of the application of total scattering methods and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to the investigation of materials for clean energy applications such as materials for solid oxide fuel cells and lithium batteries, in order to show the power of this technique in providing new insights into the structure-property correlation in this class of materials. PMID:21403941

  12. Total scattering investigation of materials for clean energy applications: the importance of the local structure.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2011-04-21

    In this Perspective article we give an account of the application of total scattering methods and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to the investigation of materials for clean energy applications such as materials for solid oxide fuel cells and lithium batteries, in order to show the power of this technique in providing new insights into the structure-property correlation in this class of materials.

  13. Two-dimensional Coulomb scattering of a quantum particle: Low-energy asymptotic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupyshev, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a charged quantum particle moving in a two-dimensional plane in the three-dimensional coordinate space and scattering on an immovable Coulomb center in the same plane. We derive and investigate expansions of the wave function and of all radial wave functions of the particle in integer powers of the wave number and in Bessel functions of a real order. We prove that finite sums of such expansions are asymptotic in the low-energy limit.

  14. Internal spin structure of the proton from high energy polarized e-p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, V.W.; Baum, G.; Bergstroem, M.R.

    1981-02-01

    A review is given of experimental knowledge of the spin dependent structure functions of the proton, which is based on inclusive high energy scattering of longitudinal polarized electrons by longitudinally polarized protons in both the deep inelastic and resonance regions, and includes preliminary results from our most recent SLAC experiment. Implications for scaling, sum rules, models of proton structure, and the hyperfine structure interval in hydrogen are given. Possible future directions of research are indicated.

  15. A scatter correction method for contrast-enhanced dual-energy digital breast tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yihuan; Peng, Boyu; Lau, Beverly A.; Hu, Yue-Houng; Scaduto, David A.; Zhao, Wei; Gindi, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced dual energy digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DE-DBT) is designed to image iodinated masses while suppressing breast anatomical background. Scatter is a problem, especially for high energy acquisition, in that it causes severe cupping artifact and iodine quantitation errors. We propose a patient specific scatter correction (SC) algorithm for CE-DE-DBT. The empirical algorithm works by interpolating scatter data outside the breast shadow into an estimate within the breast shadow. The interpolated estimate is further improved by operations that use an easily obtainable (from phantoms) table of scatter-to-primary-ratios (SPR) - a single SPR value for each breast thickness and acquisition angle. We validated our SC algorithm for two breast emulating phantoms by comparing SPR from our SC algorithm to that measured using a beam-passing pinhole array plate. The error in our SC computed SPR, averaged over acquisition angle and image location, was about 5%, with slightly worse errors for thicker phantoms. The SC projection data, reconstructed using OS-SART, showed a large degree of decupping. We also observed that SC removed the dependence of iodine quantitation on phantom thickness. We applied the SC algorithm to a CE-DE-mammographic patient image with a biopsy confirmed tumor at the breast periphery. In the image without SC, the contrast enhanced tumor was masked by the cupping artifact. With our SC, the tumor was easily visible. An interpolation-based SC was proposed by (Siewerdsen et al., 2006) for cone-beam CT (CBCT), but our algorithm and application differ in several respects. Other relevant SC techniques include Monte-Carlo and convolution-based methods for CBCT, storage of a precomputed library of scatter maps for DBT, and patient acquisition with a beam-passing pinhole array for breast CT. Our SC algorithm can be accomplished in clinically acceptable times, requires no additional imaging hardware or extra patient dose and is easily transportable

  16. A scatter correction method for contrast-enhanced dual-energy digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yihuan; Peng, Boyu; Lau, Beverly A.; Hu, Yue-Houng; Scaduto, David A.; Zhao, Wei; Gindi, Gene

    2015-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced dual energy digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DE-DBT) is designed to image iodinated masses while suppressing breast anatomical background. Scatter is a problem, especially for high energy acquisition, in that it causes severe cupping artifact and iodine quantitation errors. We propose a patient specific scatter correction (SC) algorithm for CE-DE-DBT. The empirical algorithm works by interpolating scatter data outside the breast shadow into an estimate within the breast shadow. The interpolated estimate is further improved by operations that use an easily obtainable (from phantoms) table of scatter-to-primary-ratios (SPR)—a single SPR value for each breast thickness and acquisition angle. We validated our SC algorithm for two breast emulating phantoms by comparing SPR from our SC algorithm to that measured using a beam-passing pinhole array plate. The error in our SC computed SPR, averaged over acquisition angle and image location, was about 5%, with slightly worse errors for thicker phantoms. The SC projection data, reconstructed using OS-SART, showed a large degree of decupping. We also observed that SC removed the dependence of iodine quantitation on phantom thickness. We applied the SC algorithm to a CE-DE-mammographic patient image with a biopsy confirmed tumor at the breast periphery. In the image without SC, the contrast enhanced tumor was masked by the cupping artifact. With our SC, the tumor was easily visible. An interpolation-based SC was proposed by (Siewerdsen et al 2006 Med. Phys. 33 187-97) for cone-beam CT (CBCT), but our algorithm and application differ in several respects. Other relevant SC techniques include Monte-Carlo and convolution-based methods for CBCT, storage of a precomputed library of scatter maps for DBT, and patient acquisition with a beam-passing pinhole array for breast CT. Our SC algorithm can be accomplished in clinically acceptable times, requires no additional imaging hardware or extra patient dose and is

  17. Elastic scattering of 17O+208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Strano, E.; Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Toniolo, N.; Filipescu, D.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lay, J. A.; Miyatake, H.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Stroe, L.; Vitturi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Zerva, K.

    2016-05-01

    Within the frame of the commissioning of a new experimental apparatus EXPADES we undertook the measurement of the elastic scattering angular distribution for the system 17O+208Pb at energy around the Coulomb barrier. The reaction dynamics induced by loosely bound Radioactive Ion Beams is currently being extensively studied [4]. In particular the study of the elastic scattering process allows to obtain direct information on the total reaction cross section of the exotic nuclei. In order to understand the effect of the low binding energy on the reaction mechanism it is important to compare radioactive weakly bound nuclei with stable strongly-bound nuclei. In this framework the study of the 17O+208Pb elastic scattering can be considered to be complementary to a previous measurement of the total reaction cross section for the system 17F+208Pb at energies of 86, 90.4 MeV [5, 6]. The data will be compared with those obtained for the neighboring systems 16,18O+208Pb and others available in literature.

  18. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  19. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  20. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  1. Teasing apart the effects of seed size and energy content on rodent scatter-hoarding behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are known to play a crucial role in the seed dispersal of many plant species. Numerous studies have indicated that both seed size and the energy content of seeds can affect rodent foraging behavior. However, seed size is usually associated with energy content per seed, making it difficult to isolate how seed size and energy affect rodent foraging preferences. This study used 99 treatments of artificial seeds (11 seed sizes×9 levels of energy content) to tease apart the effect of seed size and energy content on rodent seed-caching behavior. Both seed traits showed significant effects, but their details depended on the stage of the rodent foraging process. Seeds with higher energy content were harvested more rapidly while seed size only had a modest effect on harvest rate. However, after harvesting, seed size showed a much stronger effect on rodent foraging behavior. Rodents' choice of which seeds to remove and cache, as well as seed dispersal distance, seemed to reflect an optimal seed size. Our findings could be adapted in future studies to gain a better understanding of scatter-hoarding rodent foraging behavior, and the co-evolutionary dynamics between plant seed production and seed dispersers.

  2. Teasing apart the effects of seed size and energy content on rodent scatter-hoarding behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are known to play a crucial role in the seed dispersal of many plant species. Numerous studies have indicated that both seed size and the energy content of seeds can affect rodent foraging behavior. However, seed size is usually associated with energy content per seed, making it difficult to isolate how seed size and energy affect rodent foraging preferences. This study used 99 treatments of artificial seeds (11 seed sizes×9 levels of energy content) to tease apart the effect of seed size and energy content on rodent seed-caching behavior. Both seed traits showed significant effects, but their details depended on the stage of the rodent foraging process. Seeds with higher energy content were harvested more rapidly while seed size only had a modest effect on harvest rate. However, after harvesting, seed size showed a much stronger effect on rodent foraging behavior. Rodents' choice of which seeds to remove and cache, as well as seed dispersal distance, seemed to reflect an optimal seed size. Our findings could be adapted in future studies to gain a better understanding of scatter-hoarding rodent foraging behavior, and the co-evolutionary dynamics between plant seed production and seed dispersers. PMID:25350369

  3. Refutation of a propensity rule in low-energy electron scattering by neon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Leigh; Campbell, Colin; Khakoo, Murtadha A.; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2012-06-01

    Since the work of Kohmoto and Fano [1] there has been considerable interest in the sign of the `orientation' parameter Lperp, which describes the angular momentum of an excited electronic state perpendicular to the scattering plane imparted by the projectile electron. In a polarization-correlation experiment, Lperp can be related to the measurable Stokes parameter P3 (Lperp = -P3), which describes the circular polarization of the photon emitted perpendicular to the scattering plane. Of particular interest is the empirical observation that, for S to P transitions, P3 universally trends to negative values for small scattering angles, regardless of the target or incident energy. A number of studies (e.g. [1-3]) have therefore considered the generality of this `propensity rule' and its theoretical basis. Here, a recent joint experimental and theoretical study of electronic excitation of the resonant transition in neon by 25eV electrons is presented. In both the theoretical and experimental data it is observed that P3 is positive at small scattering angles, demonstrating a refutation of this propensity rule, in disagreement with the classical arguments of Kohomoto and Fano [1]. [4pt] [1] M. Kohmoto and U. Fano, J. Phys. B 14, L447 (1981)[0pt] [2] D. H. Madison and K. H. Winters, Phys. Rev. Lett. 47, 1885 (1981)[0pt] [3] K. Bartschat, N. Andersen and D. Loveall, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 5254 (1999)

  4. Low-energy theorems for nucleon-nucleon scattering at Mπ=450 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Filin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We apply the low-energy theorems to analyze the recent lattice QCD results for the two-nucleon system at a pion mass of Mπ≃450 MeV obtained by the NPLQCD Collaboration. We find that the binding energies of the deuteron and dineutron are inconsistent with the low-energy behavior of the corresponding phase shifts within the quoted uncertainties and vice versa. Using the binding energies of the deuteron and dineutron as input, we employ the low-energy theorems to predict the phase shifts and extract the scattering length and the effective range in the S31 and S10 channels. Our results for these quantities are consistent with those obtained by the NPLQCD Collaboration from effective field theory analyses but are in conflict with their determination based on the effective-range approximation.

  5. Elastic scattering of {sup 9}Li on {sup 208}Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cubero, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Lay, J. A.; Moro, A. M.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O.; Buchmann, L.; Shotter, A.; Walden, P.; Diget, D. G.; Fulton, B.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Mukha, I.

    2011-10-28

    We have studied the dynamical effects of the halo structure of {sup 11}Li on the scattering on heavy targets at energies around the Coulomb barrier. This experiment was performed at ISAC-II at TRIUMF with a world record in production of the post-accelerated {sup 11}Li beam. As part of this study we report here on the first measurement of the elastic cross section of the core nucleus, i.e. {sup 9}Li on {sup 208}Pb, at energies around the Coulomb barrier. A preliminary optical model analysis has been performed in order to extract a global optical potential to describe the measured angular distributions.

  6. H-He elastic scattering at low energies: Contribution of nonzero partial waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    The present study reports the nonzero partial wave elastic cross sections together with s-wave results for the scattering of an antihydrogen atom off a gaseous helium target at thermal energies (up to 10{sup -2} a.u.). We have used a nonadiabatic atomic orbital method having different basis sets to investigate the system. The consideration of all the significant partial waves (up to J=24) reduces the oscillatory nature present in the individual partial wave cross section. The added elastic cross section is almost constant up to 10{sup -7} a.u. and then decreases steadily and very slowly with increasing energy.

  7. A phenomenological study of photon production in low energy neutrino nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James P; Goldman, Terry J

    2009-01-01

    Low energy photon production is an important background to many current and future precision neutrino experiments. We present a phenomenological study of t-channel radiative corrections to neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering. After introducing the relevant processes and phenomenological coupling constants, we will explore the derived energy and angular distributions as well as total cross-section predictions along with their estimated uncertainties. This is supplemented throughout with comments on possible experimental signatures and implications. We conclude with a general discussion of the analysis in the context of complimentary methodologies. This is based on a talk presented at the DPF 2009 meeting in Detroit MI.

  8. Elastic scattering for the system {sup 6}Li+p at near barrier energies with MAGNEX

    SciTech Connect

    Soukeras, V.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bondi, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Acosta, L.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Alamanos, N.; De Napoli, M.; Foti, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    Elastic scattering measurements have been performed for the {sup 6}Li+p system in inverse kinematics at the energies of 16, 20, 25 and 29 MeV. The heavy ejectile was detected by the large acceptance MAGNEX spectrometer at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania, in the angular range between ∼2{sup 0} and 12{sup 0} in the laboratory system, giving us the possibility to span almost a full angular range in the center of mass system. Results will be presented and discussed for one of the energies.

  9. QED radiative corrections to low-energy Møller and Bhabha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Charles S.; Milner, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    We present a treatment of the next-to-leading-order radiative corrections to unpolarized Møller and Bhabha scattering without resorting to ultrarelativistic approximations. We extend existing soft-photon radiative corrections with new hard-photon bremsstrahlung calculations so that the effect of photon emission is taken into account for any photon energy. This formulation is intended for application in the OLYMPUS experiment and the upcoming DarkLight experiment but is applicable to a broad range of experiments at energies where QED is a sufficient description.

  10. Combining dynamic and static depth profiling in low energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, Rik ter; Fartmann, Michael; Kersting, Reinhard; Hagenhoff, Birgit

    2013-01-15

    The advantages of combining dynamic and static depth profiling in low energy ion scattering are demonstrated for an Si/SiO{sub x}/W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD stack. Dynamic depth profiling can be used to calibrate static depth profiling. Energy losses of 152 and 215 eV/nm were found for 3 keV {sup 4}He{sup +} and 5 keV {sup 4}He{sup +} primary ions, respectively, for the experimental configuration used. This is in good agreement with the values used in the field. Static depth profiling can be used to recognize sputter artifacts in dynamic depth profiles.

  11. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-15

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%.

  12. Optical depth of the Universe to ultrahigh energy cosmic ray scattering in the magnetized large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Kumiko; Lemoine, Martin

    2008-06-01

    This paper provides an analytical description of the transport of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in an inhomogeneously magnetized intergalactic medium. The latter is modeled as a collection of magnetized scattering centers, such as radio cocoons, magnetized galactic winds, clusters or magnetized filaments of large scale structure, with negligible magnetic fields in between. Magnetic deflection is no longer a continuous process, it is rather dominated by scattering events. We study the interaction between high-energy cosmic rays and the scattering agents. We then compute the optical depth of the Universe to cosmic ray scattering and discuss the phenomenological consequences for various source scenarios. For typical parameters of the scattering centers, the optical depth is greater than unity at 5×1019eV, but the total angular deflection is smaller than unity. One important consequence of this scenario is the possibility that the last scattering center encountered by a cosmic ray be mistaken with the source of this cosmic ray. In particular, we suggest that part of the correlation recently reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory may be affected by such delusion: this experiment may be observing in part the last scattering surface of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays rather than their source population. Since the optical depth falls rapidly with increasing energy, one should probe the arrival directions of the highest energy events beyond 1020eV on an event by event basis to circumvent this effect.

  13. A novel scatter separation method for multi-energy x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossin, A.; Rebuffel, V.; Tabary, J.; Létang, J. M.; Freud, N.; Verger, L.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray imaging coupled with recently emerged energy-resolved photon counting detectors provides the ability to differentiate material components and to estimate their respective thicknesses. However, such techniques require highly accurate images. The presence of scattered radiation leads to a loss of spatial contrast and, more importantly, a bias in radiographic material imaging and artefacts in computed tomography (CT). The aim of the present study was to introduce and evaluate a partial attenuation spectral scatter separation approach (PASSSA) adapted for multi-energy imaging. This evaluation was carried out with the aid of numerical simulations provided by an internal simulation tool, Sindbad-SFFD. A simplified numerical thorax phantom placed in a CT geometry was used. The attenuation images and CT slices obtained from corrected data showed a remarkable increase in local contrast and internal structure detectability when compared to uncorrected images. Scatter induced bias was also substantially decreased. In terms of quantitative performance, the developed approach proved to be quite accurate as well. The average normalized root-mean-square error between the uncorrected projections and the reference primary projections was around 23%. The application of PASSSA reduced this error to around 5%. Finally, in terms of voxel value accuracy, an increase by a factor  >10 was observed for most inspected volumes-of-interest, when comparing the corrected and uncorrected total volumes.

  14. Experimental characterization of a prototype secondary spectrometer for vertically scattering multiple energy analysis at cold-neutron triple axis spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Groitl, Felix; Kure, Mathias; Lim, Joshua; Čermák, Petr; Alimov, Svyatoslav; Wilpert, Thomas; Le, Manh Duc; Quintero-Castro, Diana; Niedermayer, Christof; Schneidewind, Astrid; Habicht, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    A thorough experimental characterization of a multiplexing backend with multiple energy analysis on a cold-neutron triple axis spectrometer (cTAS) is presented. The prototype employs two angular segments (2 θ -segments) each containing five vertically scattering analyzers (energy channels), which simultaneously probe an energy transfer range of 2 meV at the corresponding two scattering angles. The feasibility and strength of such a vertically scattering multiple energy analysis setup is clearly demonstrated. It is shown, that the energy resolution near the elastic line is comparable to the energy resolution of a standard cTAS. The dispersion relation of the antiferromagnetic excitations in MnF2 has been mapped out by performing constant energy transfer maps. These results show that the tested setup is virtually spurion free. In addition, focusing effects due to (mis)matching of the instrumental resolution ellipsoid to the excitation branch are clearly evident.

  15. Quantum random bit generation using energy fluctuations in stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; England, Duncan G; Nunn, Josh; Moffatt, Doug; Spanner, Michael; Lausten, Rune; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2013-12-01

    Random number sequences are a critical resource in modern information processing systems, with applications in cryptography, numerical simulation, and data sampling. We introduce a quantum random number generator based on the measurement of pulse energy quantum fluctuations in Stokes light generated by spontaneously-initiated stimulated Raman scattering. Bright Stokes pulse energy fluctuations up to five times the mean energy are measured with fast photodiodes and converted to unbiased random binary strings. Since the pulse energy is a continuous variable, multiple bits can be extracted from a single measurement. Our approach can be generalized to a wide range of Raman active materials; here we demonstrate a prototype using the optical phonon line in bulk diamond. PMID:24514488

  16. Quantum random bit generation using energy fluctuations in stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; England, Duncan G; Nunn, Josh; Moffatt, Doug; Spanner, Michael; Lausten, Rune; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2013-12-01

    Random number sequences are a critical resource in modern information processing systems, with applications in cryptography, numerical simulation, and data sampling. We introduce a quantum random number generator based on the measurement of pulse energy quantum fluctuations in Stokes light generated by spontaneously-initiated stimulated Raman scattering. Bright Stokes pulse energy fluctuations up to five times the mean energy are measured with fast photodiodes and converted to unbiased random binary strings. Since the pulse energy is a continuous variable, multiple bits can be extracted from a single measurement. Our approach can be generalized to a wide range of Raman active materials; here we demonstrate a prototype using the optical phonon line in bulk diamond.

  17. Low-energy electron elastic scattering cross sections for excited Au and Pt atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Zineb; Eure, Amanda R.; Msezane, Alfred Z.; Sokolovski, Dmitri

    2010-05-01

    Electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs) and differential cross sections (DCSs) in both impact energy and scattering angle for the excited Au and Pt atoms are calculated in the electron impact energy range 0 ⩽ E ⩽ 4.0 eV. The cross sections are found to be characterized by very sharp long-lived resonances whose positions are identified with the binding energies of the excited anions formed during the collisions. The recent novel Regge-pole methodology wherein is embedded through the Mulholland formula the electron-electron correlations is used together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential incorporating the crucial core-polarization interaction for the calculations of the TCSs. The DCSs are evaluated using a partial wave expansion. The Ramsauer-Townsend minima, the shape resonances and the binding energies of the excited Au - and Pt - anions are extracted from the cross sections, while the critical minima are determined from the DCSs.

  18. Coupling of Multiple Coulomb Scattering with Energy Loss and Straggling in HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Wilson, John W.; Walker, Steven A.; Tweed, John

    2007-01-01

    The new version of the HZETRN deterministic transport code based on Green's function methods, and the incorporation of ground-based laboratory boundary conditions, has lead to the development of analytical and numerical procedures to include off-axis dispersion of primary ion beams due to small-angle multiple Coulomb scattering. In this paper we present the theoretical formulation and computational procedures to compute ion beam broadening and a methodology towards achieving a self-consistent approach to coupling multiple scattering interactions with ionization energy loss and straggling. Our initial benchmark case is a 60 MeV proton beam on muscle tissue, for which we can compare various attributes of beam broadening with Monte Carlo simulations reported in the open literature.

  19. High-energy pp and pp-bar forward elastic scattering and total cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M.; Cahn, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    The present status of elastic pp and pp-bar scattering in the high-energy domain is reviewed, with emphasis on the forward and near-forward regions. The experimental techniques for measuring sigma/sub tot/, rho, and B are discussed, emphasizing the importance of the region in which the nuclear and Coulomb scattering interfere. The impact-parameter representation is exploited to give simple didactic demonstrations of important rigorous theorems based on analyticity, and to illuminate the significance of the slope parameter B and the curvature parameter C. Models of elastic scattering are discussed, and a criterion for the onset of ''asymptopia'' is given. A critique of dispersion relations is presented. Simple analytic functions are used to fit simultaneously the real and imaginary parts of forward scattering amplitudes for both pp and pp-bar, obtained from experimental data for sigma/sub tot/ and rho. It is found that a good fit can be obtained using only five parameters (with a cross section rising as ln/sup 2/s), over the energy range 5 < ..sqrt..s < 62 GeV. The possibilities that (a) the cross section rises only as lns, (b) the cross section rises only locally as ln/sup 2/s, and eventually goes to a constant value, and (c) the cross-section difference between pp and pp-bar does not vanish as s..-->..infinity are examined critically. The nuclear slope parameters B are also fitted in a model-independent fashion. Examination of the fits reveals a new regularity of the pp-bar and the pp systems.

  20. Bounds on new light particles from high-energy and very small momentum transfer np elastic scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Kamyshkov, Yuri; Tithof, Jeffrey; Vysotsky, Mikhail

    2008-12-01

    We found that spin-one new light particle exchanges are strongly bounded by high-energy and small momentum transfer np elastic scattering data; the analogous bound for a scalar particle is considerably weaker, while for a pseudoscalar particle no bounds can be set. These bounds are compared with the bounds extracted from low-energy n-Pb scattering experiments and from the bounds of {pi}{sup 0} and K{sup +} meson decays.

  1. Inverse Compton Scattering as a Diagnostic Tool for the Measurement of Electron Beam Energies in Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critchley, A. D. J.

    2003-10-01

    The main emphasis of the diode research project at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) UK is to produce small diameter radiographic spot sizes at high dose to improve the resolution of the transmission radiographs taken during hydrodynamic experiments. Experimental measurements of conditions within the diodes of Pulsed Power driven flash x-ray machines are vital to provide a benchmark for electromagnetic PIC codes such as LSP which are used to develop new diode designs. The potential use of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) as a diagnostic technique in the determination of electron energies within the diode has been investigated. The interaction of a laser beam with a beam of high-energy electrons will create an ICS spectrum of photons. Theoretically, one should be able to glean information on the energies and positions of the electrons from the energy spectrum and differential cross section of the scattered photons. The feasibility of fielding this technique on various diode designs has been explored, and an experimental setup with the greatest likelihood of success is proposed.

  2. High energy proton-proton elastic scattering at the Large Hadron Collider and nucleon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luddy, Richard Joseph

    To gain insight into the structure of the nucleon, we pursue the development of the phenomenological model of Islam et al. (IIFS model) for high energy elastic pp and p¯p scattering. We determine the energy dependence of the parameters of the IIFS model using the available elastic differential cross section data from SPS Collider and Tevatron and the known asymptotic behavior of sigmatot (s) and rho(s) from dispersion relation calculations and more recent analyses of Cudell et al. (COMPETE Collaboration). Next, we incorporate a high energy elastic valence quark-quark scattering amplitude into the model based on BFKL pomeron to describe small impact parameter (large | t|) pp collisions. Finally, we predict the pp elastic differential cross section at the unprecedented c.m. energy of s = 14.0 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This prediction assumes crucial significance---because of an approved experiment at LHC: TOTal and Elastic Measurement (TOTEM). The TOTEM group plans to measure pp elastic dsigma/dt at 14.0 TeV all the way from momentum transfer |t| = 0 to |t| ≃ 10 GeV 2. Their measurement will stringently test not only the diffraction and o-exchange descriptions of the original IIFS model, but also the additional valence quark-quark scattering contribution that we find to be dominant for large |t|. Successful quantitative verification of the predicted dsigma/dt will mean that our picture of the nucleon with an outer cloud of qq¯ condensed ground state, an inner core of topological baryonic charge, and a still smaller core of massless valence quarks provides a realistic description of nucleon structure.

  3. Multiple scattering of low energy H+ ions in matter: Approximation of mean energy on the Sigmund and Winterbon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhtiche, A.; Khalal-Kouache, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, angular distributions of slow H+ ions transmitted through different targets (Al, Ag and Au) are calculated using the model of Sigmund and Winterbon (SW) in the multiple scattering theory. Valdés and Arista (VA) developed a method extending the SW model by including the effect of energy loss in the calculation of angular distributions of transmitted ions. Another method has been proposed for such calculations: one can consider the SW model by using an average value for the energy of the ions inside the target. In this contribution, a new expression is proposed for the mean energy which gives a better agreement with the VA model than the precedent one at low energy. Different potentials have been considered to describe the interaction projectile-target atom in this study and the new expression is found to be independent of the interaction potential.

  4. An accurate method for energy spectrum reconstruction of Linac beams based on EPID measurements of scatter radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste, B.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Santos, A.

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a methodology to reconstruct a Linac high energy photon spectrum beam. The method is based on EPID scatter images generated when the incident photon beam impinges onto a plastic block. The distribution of scatter radiation produced by this scattering object placed on the external EPID surface and centered at the beam field size was measured. The scatter distribution was also simulated for a series of monoenergetic identical geometry photon beams. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the scattered photons for monoenergetic photon beams at 92 different locations, with 0.5 cm increments and at 8.5 cm from the centre of the scattering material. Measurements were performed with the same geometry using a 6 MeV photon beam produced by the linear accelerator. A system of linear equations was generated to combine the polyenergetic EPID measurements with the monoenergetic simulation results. Regularization techniques were applied to solve the system for the incident photon spectrum. A linear matrix system, A×S=E, was developed to describe the scattering interactions and their relationship to the primary spectrum (S). A is the monoenergetic scatter matrix determined from the Monte Carlo simulations, S is the incident photon spectrum, and E represents the scatter distribution characterized by EPID measurement. Direct matrix inversion methods produce results that are not physically consistent due to errors inherent in the system, therefore Tikhonov regularization methods were applied to address the effects of these errors and to solve the system for obtaining a consistent bremsstrahlung spectrum.

  5. Low-energy extensions of the eikonal approximation to heavy-ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, C.E.; Aguiar, C.E.; Zardi, F.; Vitturi, A.

    1997-09-01

    We discuss different schemes devised to extend the eikonal approximation to the regime of low bombarding energies (below 50 MeV per nucleon) in heavy-ion collisions. From one side we consider the first- and second-order corrections derived from Wallace{close_quote}s expansion. As an alternative approach we examine the procedure of accounting for the distortion of the eikonal straight-line trajectory by shifting the impact parameter to the corresponding classical turning point. The two methods are tested for different combinations of colliding systems and bombarding energies, by comparing the angular distributions they provide with the exact solution of the scattering problem. We find that the best results are obtained with the shifted trajectories, the Wallace expansion showing a slow convergence at low energies, in particular for heavy systems characterized by a strong Coulomb field. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Energy Confinement and Helicity Dissipation Studies Using Thomson Scattering on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Dowd, A. S.; Fonck, R. J.; Schoenbeck, N. L.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment provides several unique operating regimes that require characterization of plasma density and temperature by Thomson scattering. High-β, high Ip/ITF regimes at low BT present discharges that require accurate plasma profiles for equilibrium reconstructions. Investigations of non-solenoidal startup using point-source DC helicity injection necessitate characterizing resistive helicity dissipation, accessible via measurement of Te and ne profiles. Furthermore, the usefulness of this method for startup of future fusion devices hinges on confinement scaling during helicity injection. By measuring temperature and density profiles before, during, and after Taylor relaxation, the dominant energy confinement scalings and related helicity dissipation rates for this startup technique can be evaluated. To address these issues, a new multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic has been deployed on Pegasus. It will provide 12--24 spatial points radially across the plasma with a high degree of flexibility to provide measurements within the varied plasma regimes. First results from the newly installed Thomson scattering system will be shown for some of these regimes.

  7. Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment:. NuSOnG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Batra, P.; Bugel, L.; Camilleri, L.; Conrad, J. M.; de Gouvêa, A.; Fisher, P. H.; Formaggio, J. A.; Jenkins, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kobilarcik, T. R.; Kopp, S.; Kyle, G.; Loinaz, W. A.; Mason, D. A.; Milner, R.; Moore, R.; Morfín, J. G.; Nakamura, M.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Pate, S. F.; Pronin, A.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Schellman, H.; Schienbein, I.; Syphers, M. J.; Tait, T. M. P.; Takeuchi, T.; Tan, C. Y.; van de Water, R. G.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yu, J. Y.

    This paper presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering on Glass). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain over an order of magnitude higher statistics than presently available for the purely weak processes νμ + e- → νμ + e- and νμ + e- → νe + μ-. A sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples will also be obtained. As a result, NuSOnG will be unique among present and planned experiments for its ability to probe neutrino couplings to Beyond the Standard Model physics. Many Beyond Standard Model theories physics predict a rich hierarchy of TeV-scale new states that can correct neutrino cross-sections, through modifications of Zνν couplings, tree-level exchanges of new particles such as Z‧'s, or through loop-level oblique corrections to gauge boson propagators. These corrections are generic in theories of extra dimensions, extended gauge symmetries, supersymmetry, and more. The sensitivity of NuSOnG to this new physics extends beyond 5 TeV mass scales. This paper reviews these physics opportunities.

  8. Phonon wave-packet scattering and energy dissipation dynamics in carbon nanotube oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Matukumilli V. D.; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2015-12-01

    Friction in carbon nanotube (CNT) oscillators can be explained in terms of the interplay between low frequency mechanical motions and high frequency vibrational modes of the sliding surfaces. We analyze single mode phonon wave packet dynamics of CNT based mechanical oscillators, with cores either stationary or sliding with moderate velocities, and study how various individual phonons travel through the outer CNT, interact with the inner nanostructure, and undergo scattering. Two acoustic modes (longitudinal and transverse) and one optical mode (flexural optical) are found to be responsible for the major portion of friction in these oscillators: the transmission functions display a significant dip in the rather narrow frequency range of 5-15 meV. We also find that the profile of the dip is characteristic of the inner core. In contrast, radial breathing and twisting modes, which are dominant in thermal transport, display ideal transmission at all frequencies. We also observe polarization dependent scattering and find that the scattering dynamics comprises of an oscillating decay of localized energy inside the inner CNT. This work provides a way towards engineering CNT linear oscillators with better tribological properties.

  9. Diffractive limit approach to elastic scattering and inelastic diffraction of high-energy hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małecki, Andrzej

    1996-09-01

    An approach to inelastic diffraction based on the concept of equivalence of diffractive states is developed. In the classical description of Good and Walker, the inelastic diffraction originates from the diversity of elastic scattering amplitudes in the initial and final state Δt. We consider a multichannel correction, accounting for intermediate transitions inside the equivalence class. This correction can be factorized yielding the diffraction amplitude in the form NΔt, to be taken in the ``diffractive limit'' N-->∞, Δt-->0 such that NΔt is finite. We analyze elastic scattering and the inclusive inelastic diffraction cross sections for p-p and p-p>¯ collisions, in the range of c.m. energy √s=20-1800 GeV. We claim that the angular distribution of the inclusive inelastic diffraction at small momentum transfers is determined by elastic scattering in the transition region between the forward peak and the minimum. This is successfully verified in experiment. The detailed comparison with the Good-Walker description, with emphasis on the advantages of our approach, is presented.

  10. THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM PULSARS: A CASE FOR INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Otte, Nepomuk; McCann, Andrew

    2012-07-20

    The observations of gamma-ray emission from pulsars with the Fermi-LAT detector and the detection of the Crab pulsar with the VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes at energies above 100 GeV make it unlikely that curvature radiation is the main source of photons above GeV energies in the Crab and many other pulsars. We outline a model in which the broad UV-X-ray component and the very high energy {gamma}-ray emission of pulsars are explained within the synchrotron self-Compton framework. We argue that the bulk of the observed radiation is generated by the secondary plasma, which is produced in cascades in the outer gaps of the magnetosphere. We find that the inverse Compton (IC) scattering occurs in the Klein-Nishina regime, which favors synchrotron photons in the UV band as target field for the scattering process. The primary beam is accelerated in a modest electric field, with a field strength that is of the order of a few percent of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Overall, for IC scattering occurring in the Klein-Nishina regime, the particle distribution in the gap does not evolve toward a stationary distribution and thus is intrinsically time-dependent. We point out that in a radiation reaction-limited regime of particle acceleration the gamma-ray luminosity L{sub {gamma}} scales linearly with the pulsar spin-down power E-dot , L{sub {gamma}}{proportional_to} E-dot , and not proportional to {radical}( E-dot ) as expected from potential-limited acceleration.

  11. High-energy photon radiography system using laser-Compton scattering for inspection of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Mikado, Tomohisa; Yamada, Kawakatsu

    2002-09-01

    Transmission radiography of bulk materials using continuously energy-tunable quasimonochromatic photon beams has been performed with the photons of a few tens MeV. The photon beam is generated with the laser-Compton scattering of the 300-800 MeV electrons in the electron storage ring "TERAS" with laser lights. The present radiography system is applicable to an inspection of bulk materials and to nondestructive testing of large industrial products. The effectiveness of the method has been examined using metals, ceramics, and concrete blocks. The spatial resolution of the radiography system was measured to be 650 mum using a 1 mm collimator system.

  12. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2005-07-01

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines - infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  13. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2005-05-15

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines - infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  14. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2005-10-25

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines--infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to the projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  15. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2007-01-01

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines--infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  16. Excitation of the 3p states in electron-sodium scattering at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kamali, M. Z. M.; Wong, B. R.; Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    A coupled-channel-optical method (CCOM), to investigate the excitation of the 3p states for e{sup −}-Na scattering at intermediate energies, is reported. Nine atomic states( Na(3s), Na(3p), Na(4s), Na(3d), Na(4p), Na(5s), Na(4d), Na(5p), Na(5d) ) together with three optical potentials are used in this work. The inelastic differential cross sections (DCS) as well as the reduced Stokes parameters are compared with latest theoretical data and experimental measurements.

  17. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2005-06-16

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines - infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  18. A Search for electron neutrino appearance at the Delta m**2 ~ 1- eV**2 scale

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; Djurcic, Z.; /Columbia U. /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The MiniBooNE Collaboration reports first results of a search for {upsilon}{sub e} appearance in a {upsilon}{sub {mu}} beam. With two largely independent analyses, we observe no significant excess of events above background for reconstructed neutrino energies above 475 MeV. The data are consistent with no oscillations within a two neutrino appearance-only oscillation model.

  19. Tomographic imaging of flourescence resonance energy transfer in highly light scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.; McGinty, James; Tahir, Khadija B.; Laine, Romain; Stuckey, Daniel W.; Mohan, P. Surya; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Sardini, Alessandro; French, Paul M. W.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2010-02-01

    Three-dimensional localization of protein conformation changes in turbid media using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) was investigated by tomographic fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). FRET occurs when a donor fluorophore, initially in its electronic excited state, transfers energy to an acceptor fluorophore in close proximity through non-radiative dipole-dipole coupling. An acceptor effectively behaves as a quencher of the donor's fluorescence. The quenching process is accompanied by a reduction in the quantum yield and lifetime of the donor fluorophore. Therefore, FRET can be localized by imaging changes in the quantum yield and the fluorescence lifetime of the donor fluorophore. Extending FRET to diffuse optical tomography has potentially important applications such as in vivo studies in small animal. We show that FRET can be localized by reconstructing the quantum yield and lifetime distribution from time-resolved non-invasive boundary measurements of fluorescence and transmitted excitation radiation. Image reconstruction was obtained by an inverse scattering algorithm. Thus we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first tomographic FLIM-FRET imaging in turbid media. The approach is demonstrated by imaging a highly scattering cylindrical phantom concealing two thin wells containing cytosol preparations of HEK293 cells expressing TN-L15, a cytosolic genetically-encoded calcium FRET sensor. A 10mM calcium chloride solution was added to one of the wells to induce a protein conformation change upon binding to TN-L15, resulting in FRET and a corresponding decrease in the donor fluorescence lifetime. The resulting fluorescence lifetime distribution, the quantum efficiency, absorption and scattering coefficients were reconstructed.

  20. Search for Electron Neutrino Appearance at the {delta}m{sup 2}{approx}1 eV{sup 2} Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Bugel, L.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Djurcic, Z.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Monroe, J.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Tanaka, H. A.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Finley, D. A.

    2007-06-08

    The MiniBooNE Collaboration reports first results of a search for {nu}{sub e} appearance in a {nu}{sub {mu}} beam. With two largely independent analyses, we observe no significant excess of events above the background for reconstructed neutrino energies above 475 MeV. The data are consistent with no oscillations within a two-neutrino appearance-only oscillation model.

  1. Review of the Lujan neutron scattering center: basic energy sciences prereport February 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Alan J; Rhyne, James J; Lewis, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) at LANSCE is a designated National User Facility for neutron scattering and nuclear physics studies with pulsed beams of moderated neutrons (cold, thermal, and epithermal). As one of five experimental areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), the Lujan Center hosts engineers, scientists, and students from around the world. The Lujan Center consists of Experimental Room (ER) 1 (ERl) built by the Laboratory in 1977, ER2 built by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in 1989, and the Office Building (622) also built by BES in 1989, along with a chem-bio lab, a shop, and other out-buildings. According to a 1996 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Defense Programs (DP) Office of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) and the Office of Science (SC, then the Office of Energy Research), the Lujan Center flight paths were transferred from DP to SC, including those in ERI. That MOA was updated in 2001. Under the MOA, NNSA-DP delivers neutron beam to the windows of the target crypt, outside of which BES becomes the 'landlord.' The leveraging nature of the Lujan Center on the LANSCE accelerator is a substantial annual leverage to the $11 M BES operating fund worth approximately $56 M operating cost of the linear accelerator (LINAC)-in beam delivery.

  2. High-energy hadron-hadron (dipole-dipole) scattering from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, Matteo; Meggiolaro, Enrico

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the problem of high-energy hadron-hadron (dipole-dipole) scattering is approached (for the first time) from the point of view of lattice QCD, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations. In the first part, we give a brief review of how high-energy scattering amplitudes can be reconstructed, using a functional-integral approach, in terms of certain correlation functions of two Wilson loops, and we also briefly recall some relevant analyticity and crossing-symmetry properties of these loop-loop correlation functions, when going from Euclidean to Minkowskian theory. In the second part, we shall see how these (Euclidean) loop-loop correlation functions can be evaluated in lattice QCD, and we shall compare our numerical results with some nonperturbative analytical estimates that appeared in the literature, discussing, in particular, the question of the analytic continuation from Euclidean to Minkowskian theory and its relation to the still unsolved problem of the asymptotic s dependence of the hadron-hadron total cross sections.

  3. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. IV - CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, H.; Srivastava, S. K.; Chutjian, A.

    1978-01-01

    Using a crossed electron beam-molecular beam scattering geometry and a relative-flow technique, ratios of elastic differential cross sections of CO to those of He have been measured at electron impact energies of 3, 5, 7.5, 9.9, 15, 20, 30, 50, 75, and 100 eV. At each energy, an angular range of 15 to 130 deg has been covered. These ratios have been multiplied by previously known He elastic differential cross sections to obtain elastic differential cross sections for CO. Since pure rotational excitations were not resolved, the elastic differential cross sections are a sum of elastic and pure rotational excitations at room temperature. From a knowledge of differential cross sections (DCS), integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been calculated. Both the DCS and integral cross sections are compared at 50, 75, and 100 eV to a recent two-potential theory of e-molecule scattering. Present results show that the isoelectronic molecules CO and N2 have very similar magnitudes and shapes of their differential cross sections.

  4. Information stored in high-Q space: Role of high energy scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, T.; Dmowski, W. Billinge, S.J.L. Kycia, S. Eberhardt, A.S.

    1997-07-01

    Much of crystallographic diffraction measurements are focused on obtaining information with Q(=4{pi}sin{theta}/{lambda}) below 17{Angstrom}{sup {minus}1} or d{gt}0.35{Angstrom}, with the implicit assumption that no useful information is stored in the Q space above. However, this assumption is valid only with respect to the periodic lattice structure. Actually, high-Q space is full of information on the local atomic structure that could be of major importance in some cases. We discuss high energy x-ray or neutron scattering as the methods of obtaining the data from the high-Q space, and the atomic pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis as the means of extracting information from such data. Preliminary data of our recent high-energy x-ray scattering measurement on a MX compound are shown for which this type of analysis is likely to play a significant role in understanding the properties. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  6. An experimental study of energy dependence of saturation thickness of multiply scattered gamma rays in binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Gurvinderjit; Singh, Bhajan Sandhu, B. S.

    2015-08-28

    The present measurements are carried out to investigate the multiple scattering of 662 keV gamma photons emerging from targets of binary alloys (brass and soldering material). The scattered photons are detected by 51 mm × 51 mm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector whose response unscrambling converting the observed pulse–height distribution to a true photon energy spectrum, is obtained with the help of 10 × 10 inverse response matrix. The numbers of multiply scattered events, having same energy as in the singly scattered distribution, first increases with target thickness and then saturate. The application of response function of scintillation detector does not result in any change of measured saturation thickness. Monte Carlo calculation supports the present experimental results.

  7. A comparison of phantom scatter from flattened and flattening filter free high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Neil; Allen, Vince; Daniel, Jim; Dacey, Rob; Walker, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams have different dosimetric properties from those of flattened beams. The aim of this work was to characterize the collimator scatter (S{sub c}) and total scatter (S{sub cp}) from 3 FFF beams of differing quality indices and use the resulting mathematical fits to generate phantom scatter (S{sub p}) data. The similarities and differences between S{sub p} of flattened and FFF beams are described. S{sub c} and S{sub cp} data were measured for 3 flattened and 3 FFF high-energy photon beams (Varian 6 and 10 MV and Elekta 6 MV). These data were fitted to logarithmic power law functions with 4 numerical coefficients. The agreement between our experimentally determined flattened beam S{sub p} and published data was within ± 1.2% for all 3 beams investigated and all field sizes from 4 × 4 to 40 × 40 cm{sup 2}. For the FFF beams, S{sub p} was only within 1% of the same flattened beam published data for field sizes between 6 × 6 and 14 × 14 cm{sup 2}. Outside this range, the differences were much greater, reaching − 3.2%, − 4.5%, and − 4.3% for the fields of 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} for the Varian 6-MV, Varian 10-MV, and Elekta 6-MV FFF beams, respectively. The FFF beam S{sub p} increased more slowly with increasing field size than that of the published and measured flattened beam of a similar reference field size quality index, i.e., there is less Phantom Scatter than that found with flattened beams for a given field size. This difference can be explained when the fluence profiles of the flattened and FFF beams are considered. The FFF beam has greatly reduced fluence off axis, especially as field size increases, compared with the flattened beam profile; hence, less scatter is generated in the phantom reaching the central axis.

  8. Virtual Compton Scattering at low energy and the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Helene Fonvieille

    2003-05-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) {gamma}*p {yields} {gamma}p at low CM energy gives access to the Generalized Polarizabilities of the nucleon. These observables generalize the concept of electromagnetic polarizabilities to the case of a virtual photon. Dedicated VCS experiments have been performed at MAMI, Jefferson Lab and MIT-Bates. The experimental status is reviewed, including analysis methods and physics results. The measurement of absolute (ep {yields} ep{gamma}) cross sections allows the extraction of the two unpolarized VCS structure functions P{sub LL}-P{sub TT}/{epsilon} and P{sub LT}, which are combinations of the Generalized Polarizabilities of the proton. Future prospects in the field of VCS at low energy are also presented.

  9. N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills scattering amplitudes at high energies: the Regge cut contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, J.; Lipatov, L. N.; Sabio Vera, A.

    2010-02-01

    We further investigate, in the planar limit of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories, the high energy Regge behavior of six-point MHV scattering amplitudes. In particular, for the new Regge cut contribution found in our previous paper, we compute in the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA) the energy spectrum of the BFKL equation in the color octet channel, and we calculate explicitly the two-loop corrections to the discontinuities of the amplitudes for the transitions 2→4 and 3→3. We find an explicit solution of the BFKL equation for the octet channel for arbitrary momentum transfers and investigate the intercepts of the Regge singularities in this channel. As an important result we find that the universal collinear and infrared singularities of the BDS formula are not affected by this Regge-cut contribution. Any improvement of the BDS formula should reproduce this cut to all orders in the coupling.

  10. Cross sections for elastic electron scattering by tetramethylsilane in the intermediate-energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Sugohara, R. T.; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Souza, G. L. C. de; Homem, M. G. P.

    2011-12-15

    Organosilicon compounds are of current interest due to the numerous applications of these species in industries. Some of these applications require the knowledge of electron collision cross sections, which are scarce for such compounds. In this work, we report absolute values of differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic electron scattering by tetramethylsilane (TMS) measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range. The relative-flow technique is used to normalize our data. In addition, the independent-atom-model (IAM) and the additivity rule (AR), widely used to model electron collisions with light hydrocarbons, are also applied for e{sup -}-TMS interaction. The comparison of our measured results of cross sections and the calculated data shows good agreement, particularly near the higher-end of incident energies.

  11. Carrier scattering processes and low energy phonon spectroscopy in hybrid perovskites crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Even, Jacky; Paofai, Serge; Bourges, Philippe; Letoublon, Antoine; Cordier, Stéphane; Durand, Olivier; Katan, Claudine

    2016-03-01

    Despite the wealth of research conducted the last three years on hybrid organic perovskites (HOP), several questions remain open including: to what extend the organic moiety changes the properties of the material as compared to allinorganic (AIP) related perovskite structures. To ultimately reach an answer to this question, we have recently introduced two approaches that were designed to take the stochastic molecular degrees of freedom into account, and suggested that the high temperature cubic phase of HOP and AIP is an appropriate reference phase to rationalize HOP's properties. In this paper, we recall the main concepts and discuss more specifically the various possible couplings between charge carriers and low energy excitations such as acoustic and optical phonons. As available experimental or simulated data on low energy excitations are limited, we also present preliminary neutron scattering and ultrasonic measurements obtained and freshly prepared single crystals of CH3NH3PbBr3.

  12. Neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering with nuclei in low and high neutrino energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Yang, Ghil-Seok; Kim, K. S.; Kajino, T.

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed present status regarding theoretical approaches for neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering. With a short introduction of relevant data, our recent calculations by distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) for quasielastic region are presented for MiniBooNE data. We also discussed that one step-process estimated by the DWBA is comparable to the two-step process, which has been usually used in the neutrino-nucleosynthesis. For much higher energy neutrino data, such as NOMAD data, elementary process approach was shown to be useful instead of using complicated nuclear models. But, in the low energy region, detailed nuclear structure model, such as QRPA and shell model, turn out to be inescapable to explain the reaction data.

  13. A model for soft high-energy scattering: Tensor pomeron and vector odderon

    SciTech Connect

    Ewerz, Carlo; Maniatis, Markos

    2014-03-15

    A model for soft high-energy scattering is developed. The model is formulated in terms of effective propagators and vertices for the exchange objects: the pomeron, the odderon, and the reggeons. The vertices are required to respect standard rules of QFT. The propagators are constructed taking into account the crossing properties of amplitudes in QFT and the power-law ansätze from the Regge model. We propose to describe the pomeron as an effective spin 2 exchange. This tensor pomeron gives, at high energies, the same results for the pp and pp{sup -bar} elastic amplitudes as the standard Donnachie–Landshoff pomeron. But with our tensor pomeron it is much more natural to write down effective vertices of all kinds which respect the rules of QFT. This is particularly clear for the coupling of the pomeron to particles carrying spin, for instance vector mesons. We describe the odderon as an effective vector exchange. We emphasise that with a tensor pomeron and a vector odderon the corresponding charge-conjugation relations are automatically fulfilled. We compare the model to some experimental data, in particular to data for the total cross sections, in order to determine the model parameters. The model should provide a starting point for a general framework for describing soft high-energy reactions. It should give to experimentalists an easily manageable tool for calculating amplitudes for such reactions and for obtaining predictions which can be compared in detail with data. -- Highlights: •A general model for soft high-energy hadron scattering is developed. •The pomeron is described as effective tensor exchange. •Explicit expressions for effective reggeon–particle vertices are given. •Reggeon–particle and particle–particle vertices are related. •All vertices respect the standard C parity and crossing rules of QFT.

  14. Incoherent $J/\\psi$ electroproduction from the deuteron at energies available at Jefferson Laboratory and the elastic$J/\\psi$-nucleon scattering amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Gary T.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2013-07-01

    Calculations are presented for incoherent $J/\\psi$ electroproduction from the deuteron at JLab energies, including the effects of $J/\\psi$-nucleon rescattering in the final state, in order to determine the feasibility of measuring the $J/\\psi$-nucleon scattering length, or the $J/\\psi$-nucleon scattering amplitude at lower relative energies than in previous measurements. It is shown that for a scattering length of the size predicted by existing theoretical calculations, it would not be possible to determine the scattering length. However, it may be possible to determine the scattering amplitude at significantly lower relative energies than the only previous measurements.

  15. Low energy scattering cross section ratios of 14N(p ,p ) 14N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deBoer, R. J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Görres, J.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Manukyan, K. V.; Moran, M. T.; Smith, K.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Champagne, A. E.; Islam, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    Background: The slowest reaction in the first CNO cycle is 14N(p ,γ ) 15O , therefore its rate determines the overall energy production efficiency of the entire cycle. The cross section presents several strong resonance contributions, especially for the ground-state transition. Some of the properties of the corresponding levels in the 15O compound nucleus remain uncertain, which affects the uncertainty in extrapolating the capture cross section to the low energy range of astrophysical interest. Purpose: The 14N(p ,γ ) 15O cross section can be described by using the phenomenological R matrix. Over the energy range of interest, only the proton and γ -ray channels are open. Since resonance capture makes significant contributions to the 14N(p ,γ ) 15O cross section, resonant proton scattering data can be used to provide additional constraints on the R -matrix fit of the capture data. Methods: A 4 MV KN Van de Graaff accelerator was used to bombard protons onto a windowless gas target containing enriched 14N gas over the proton energy range from Ep=1.0 to 3.0 MeV. Scattered protons were detected at θlab=90 , 120∘, 135∘, 150∘, and 160∘ using ruggedized silicon detectors. In addition, a 10 MV FN Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator was used to accelerate protons onto a solid Adenine (C5H5N5 ) target, of natural isotopic abundance, evaporated onto a thin self-supporting carbon backing, over the energy range from Ep=1.8 to 4.0 MeV. Scattered protons were detected at 28 angles between θlab=30 .4∘ and 167 .7∘ by using silicon photodiode detectors. Results: Relative cross sections were extracted from both measurements. While the relative cross sections do not provide as much constraint as absolute measurements, they greatly reduce the dependence of the data on otherwise significant systematic uncertainties, which are more difficult to quantify. The data are fit simultaneously using an R -matrix analysis and level energies and proton widths are extracted. Even

  16. Low-energy density of states in d-wave superconductors with extended scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adagideli, I.; Sheehy, D. E.; Goldbart, P. M.

    2002-03-01

    We investigate a novel contribution to the low-energy quasiparticle density of states (DOS) of a disordered d-wave superconductor. Related work (C. Pépin and P. A. Lee, Phys. Rev. B 63), 054502 (2001). found that the DOS is singular at zero energy, but it was later argued (A.G. Yashenkin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86), 5982 (2001); A. Altland, cond-mat/0108079 (unpublished). that the results of Ref. [1] are valid only in special cases requiring fine-tuning of the parameters, and that the DOS vanishes at E=0 except in these cases. A common feature of these approaches is the assumption that the disorder potential is due to pointlike scatterers. However, previous work (I. Adagideli et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83) 5571 (1999). showed that the presence of extended impurities in d-wave superconductors gives rise to additional low-energy quasiparticle states. Motivated by this fact, we focus on the (previously neglected) contribution to the low-energy DOS arising from a disorder potential that consists of a random collection of extended impurities. We find that the DOS is singular at zero energy, diverging as ρ_ext(E) ~ 1/\\vert E(ln \\vert E\\vert)^3 \\vert. Our calculation neglects the role of nodal quasiparticles; indeed, we expect that they will merely furnish a subdominant additive contribution to ρ_ ext. This work was supported by D.O.E.

  17. Relativistic off-mass-shell and off-energy-shell scattering theories: an application of the rotation and Lorentz groups

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    A relativistic, phenomenological scattering theory for particles with arbitrary spin is presented, and the relation between off-mass-shell and off-energy-shell theories is discussed. The theory is formulated from the Hilbert-space representation of particles with spin in relativistic quantum mechanics. This topic is reviewed in a basis-independent manner by appealing to the properties of the rotation and Lorentz groups and their representations. Spin is discussed and a set of basis state vectors for the single-particle Hilbert space is derived from this perspective. Two- and three-particle Hilbert-space bases are then constructed, and angular momentum is discussed. The z-circumflex and helicity bases are presented as examples of the general procedure. These foundations allow the on-shell scattering amplitude to be defined. The space-inversion and time-reversal properties of this amplitude suggest that a new scattering function be defined such that a continuation of that function to negative energies can be considered. Antiparticle scattering events are associated with the continued function, and the CPT theorem arises as a natural consequence of this association. Moreover, these considerations lead to the definition of an off-mass-shell scattering function. The resulting off-mass-shell scattering theory has a number of very appealing properties. The off-energy-shell theory is dependent on fewer variables than the off-mass-shell theory, and is more susceptible to a phenomenological treatment.

  18. Rotationally inelastic scattering of ND3 with H2 as a probe of the intermolecular potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkáč, Ondřej; Saha, Ashim K.; Loreau, Jérôme; Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Parker, David H.; van der Avoird, Ad; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) are reported for rotationally inelastic scattering of ND3 with H2, measured using a crossed molecular beam apparatus with velocity map imaging (VMI). ND3 molecules were quantum-state selected in the ground electronic and vibrational levels and, optionally, in the j±k = 11- rotation-inversion level prior to collisions. Inelastic scattering of state-selected ND3 with H2 was measured at the mean collision energy of 580 cm-1 by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation spectroscopy and VMI of ND3 in selected single final j'±k' levels. Comparison of experimental DCSs with close-coupling quantum-mechanical scattering calculations serves as a test of a recently reported ab initio potential energy surface. Calculated integral cross sections reveal the propensities for scattering into various final j'±k' levels of ND3 and differences between scattering by ortho and para H2. Integral and differential cross sections are also computed at a mean collision energy of 430 cm-1 and compared to our recent results for inelastic scattering of state-selected ND3 with He.

  19. SciNOvA: A Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering in a Narrow-Band Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Paley, J.; Djurcic, Z.; Harris, D.; Tesarek, R.; Feldman, G.; Corwin, L.; Messier, M.D.; Mayer, N.; Musser, J.; Paley, J.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Iowa State U. /Minnesota U. /South Carolina U. /Wichita State U. /William-Mary Coll.

    2010-10-15

    We propose to construct and deploy a fine-grained detector in the Fermilab NOvA 2 GeV narrow-band neutrino beam. In this beam, the detector can make unique contributions to the measurement of quasi-elastic scattering, neutral-current elastic scattering, neutral-current {pi}{sup 0} production, and enhance the NOvA measurements of electron neutrino appearance. To minimize cost and risks, the proposed detector is a copy of the SciBar detector originally built for the K2K long baseline experiment and used recently in the SciBooNE experiment.

  20. Full dimension Rb2He ground triplet potential energy surface and quantum scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Grégoire; Viel, Alexandra; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional potential energy surface for the lowest triplet state of the Rb(2)He complex. A global analytic fit is provided as in the supplementary material [see supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4709433 for the corresponding Fortran code]. This surface is used to perform quantum scattering calculations of (4)He and (3)He colliding with (87)Rb(2) in the partial wave J = 0 at low and ultralow energies. For the heavier helium isotope, the computed vibrational relaxation probabilities show a broad and strong shape resonance for a collisional energy of 0.15 K and a narrow Feshbach resonance at about 17 K for all initial Rb(2) vibrational states studied. The broad resonance corresponds to an efficient relaxation mechanism that does not occur when (3)He is the colliding partner. The Feshbach resonance observed at higher collisional energy is robust with respect to the isotopic substitution. However, its effect on the vibrational relaxation mechanism is faint for both isotopes. PMID:22583230

  1. Low energy elastic electron scattering from CF{sub 3}Br molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, L. R.; Brunton, J. R.; Maddern, T. M.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-03-28

    CF{sub 3}Br is a potentially valuable precursor molecule for generating beams of gas phase Br radicals suitable for electron collisions studies. However, the utility of CF{sub 3}Br for this purpose depends critically on the availability of sound scattering cross sections to allow the contribution of the precursor to be isolated within the total scattering signal. To this end, here we present elastic differential cross section (DCS) measurements for CF{sub 3}Br at incident energies between 15 and 50 eV. Comparison of these DCSs to those from the only other available experimental study [Sunohara et al., J. Phys. B: At., Mol. Opt. Phys. 36, 1843 (2003)] and a Schwinger multichannel with pseudo potentials (SMCPPs) calculation [Bettega et al., J. Phys. B: At., Mol. Opt. Phys. 36, 1263 (2003)] shows generally a very good accord. Integral elastic and momentum transfer cross sections, derived from our DCSs, are also found to be in quite good agreement with the SMCPP results.

  2. Elastic alpha scattering experiments and the alpha-nucleus optical potential at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.; Kiss, G.G.; Fülöp, Zs.; Galaviz, D.; Gyürky, Gy.; Somorjai, E.

    2013-11-15

    High precision angular distribution data of (α,α) elastic scattering are presented for the nuclei {sup 89}Y, {sup 92}Mo, {sup 106,110,116}Cd, {sup 112,124}Sn, and {sup 144}Sm at energies around the Coulomb barrier. Such data with small experimental uncertainties over the full angular range (20–170°) are the indispensable prerequisite for the extraction of local optical potentials and for the determination of the total reaction cross section σ{sub reac}. A systematic fitting procedure was applied to the experimental scattering data presented to obtain comprehensive local potential parameter sets that are composed of a real folding potential and an imaginary potential of Woods–Saxon surface type. The potential parameters obtained were used in turn to construct a new systematic α-nucleus potential with very few parameters. Although this new potential cannot reproduce the angular distributions with the same small deviations as the local potential, the new potential is able to predict the total reaction cross sections for all cases under study.

  3. Determination of actinide speciation in solution using high-energy X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Soderholm, L; Skanthakumar, S; Neuefeind, J

    2005-09-01

    High-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) has been used to understand the coordination environment of the uranyl ion in a perchlorate solution. Assuming the two coordinating oxo ligands bound to U(VI) are represented in a peak in the pair distribution function (PDF) at 1.766(1) A, integration of the peak intensity is used to quantify the charge located on the oxygens. The dioxo ligands are essentially neutral, as predicted by numerous published calculations, with a charge of -16.4(8) electrons. The peak in the PDF at 2.420(1) A is consistent with equatorial ligating waters. The intensity of this peak is inconsistent with an integral coordination number and is used to propose a solution equilibrium of five and four waters coordinating to the uranyl(VI) ion favoring the five-coordinate species. This equilibrium is then used to experimentally determine that five-coordinate uranyl is 1.19+/-0.42 kcal/mol more stable than its four-coordinate counterpart under the conditions of the experiment. Further peaks in the Fourier transform of the scattering data at 4.50, 7, and 8.7 A are attributed to uranium-solvent correlations.

  4. Data acquisition and analysis for the energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamzin, Murat Kamilevich

    In response to the shortcomings of the Anger camera currently being used in conventional SPECT, particularly the trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution, a novel energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera, or the ESCSC, has been proposed. A successful clinical implementation of the ESCSC could revolutionize the field of SPECT. Features of this camera include utilization of silicon and CdZnTe detectors in primary and secondary detector systems, list-mode time stamping data acquisition, modular architecture, and post-acquisition data analysis. Previous ESCSC studies were based on Monte Carlo modeling. The objective of this work is to test the theoretical framework developed in previous studies by developing the data acquisition and analysis techniques necessary to implement the ESCSC. The camera model working in list-mode with time stamping was successfully built and tested thus confirming potential of the ESCSC that was predicted in previous simulation studies. The obtained data were processed during the post-acquisition data analysis based on preferred event selection criteria. Along with the construction of a camera model and proving the approach, the post-acquisition data analysis was further extended to include preferred event weighting based on the likelihood of a preferred event to be a true preferred event. While formulated to show ESCSC capabilities, the results of this study are important for any Compton scatter camera implementation as well as for coincidence data acquisition systems in general.

  5. Implications of optical properties of ocean, lake, and ice for ultrahigh-energy neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.B.

    1997-03-01

    The collecting power and imaging ability of planned ultrahigh-energy neutrino observatories depend on wavelength-dependent absorption and scattering coefficients for the detector medium. Published data are compiled for deep ice at the South Pole, for deep fresh water at Lake Baikal, and for deep seawater. The effective scattering coefficient is smallest for the clearest deep ocean sites, whereas the absorption coefficient is an order of magnitude smaller for deep ice than for the ocean and lake sites. The effective volume per detector element as a function of energy is calculated for electromagnetic cascades produced by electron neutrinos interacting at the various sites. It is largest for deep bubble-free ice, smallest for shallow bubbly ice, and intermediate for lake and seawater. The effective volume per element is calculated for detection of positrons resulting from the capture of a few megaelectron volt supernova neutrinos by protons in the medium. This volume is proportional to the absorption length and independent of the scattering length; it is larger for ice than for seawater or lake water. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  6. Low-energy photodetachment of Ga- and elastic electron scattering from neutral Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the photodetachment of the negative gallium ion and elastic electron scattering from neutral Ga for photon and electron energies ranging from threshold to 12 eV. The calculations are carried out with the B -spline R -matrix method. A multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal term-dependent orbitals is employed to generate accurate initial- and final-state wave functions. The close-coupling expansions include the 4 s 24 p n l (k l ) bound and continuum states of Ga and the 4 s -excited autoionizing states 4 s 4 p2 . The calculated photodetachment and elastic cross sections exhibit prominent resonance features. In order to clarify the origin of these resonances, the contributions of the major ionization channels to the partial cross sections are analyzed in detail.

  7. Curve crossing for low-energy elastic scattering of He/+/ by Ne.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbio, S. M.; Doverspike, L. D.; Champion, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The perturbation seen in the experimental differential elastic-scattering cross section for the 40-eV He/+/ + Ne system has been attributed to a single crossing of two intermolecular potential-energy curves. A new theoretical treatment of the curve-crossing problem, namely, that of Delos and Thorson, is employed to obtain the crossing probabilities and phases associated with the crossing. These are determined by utilizing ab initio potentials involved in the crossing and are further used in a partial-wave calculation of the cross section, which is compared with our experiment. The origin of the oscillatory structure observed in the differential cross section is discussed in semiclassical terms by defining the problem in terms of two pseudo-deflection-functions. A rainbow effect is shown to be related to a particular feature (a maximum rather than a minimum) of these deflection functions.

  8. Scattering of NH3 and ND3 with rare gas atoms at low collision energy.

    PubMed

    Loreau, J; van der Avoird, A

    2015-11-14

    We present a theoretical study of elastic and rotationally inelastic collisions of NH3 and ND3 with rare gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) at low energy. Quantum close-coupling calculations have been performed for energies between 0.001 and 300 cm(-1). We focus on collisions in which NH3 is initially in the upper state of the inversion doublet with j = 1, k = 1, which is the most relevant in an experimental context as it can be trapped electrostatically and Stark-decelerated. We discuss the presence of resonances in the elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as the trends in the inelastic cross sections along the rare gas series and the differences between NH3 and ND3 as a colliding partner. We also demonstrate the importance of explicitly taking into account the umbrella (inversion) motion of NH3 in order to obtain accurate scattering cross sections at low collision energy. Finally, we investigate the possibility of sympathetic cooling of ammonia using cold or ultracold rare gas atoms. We show that some systems exhibit a large ratio of elastic to inelastic cross sections in the cold regime, which is promising for sympathetic cooling experiments. The close-coupling calculations are based on previously reported ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH3-He and NH3-Ar, as well as on new, four-dimensional, potential energy surfaces for the interaction of ammonia with Ne, Kr, and Xe, which were computed using the coupled-cluster method and large basis sets. We compare the properties of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to the interaction of ammonia with the various rare gas atoms.

  9. Compton scattering for spectroscopic detection of ultra-fast, high flux, broad energy range X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Brunetti, E.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Montgomery, R.; Smith, G.; Hoek, M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Shea, V. O.; Issac, R. C.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Dias, J. M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Compton side-scattering has been used to simultaneously downshift the energy of keV to MeV energy range photons while attenuating their flux to enable single-shot, spectrally resolved, measurements of high flux X-ray sources to be undertaken. To demonstrate the technique a 1 mm thick pixelated cadmium telluride detector has been used to measure spectra of Compton side-scattered radiation from a Cobalt-60 laboratory source and a high flux, high peak brilliance X-ray source of betatron radiation from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

  10. Energy evolution of the large-t elastic scattering and its correlation with multiparticle production

    SciTech Connect

    Troshin, S. M.

    2013-04-15

    It is emphasized that the collective dynamics associated with color confinement is dominating over a point-like mechanism related to a scattering of the proton constituents at the currently available values of the momentum transferred in proton elastic scattering at the LHC. Deep-elastic scattering and its role in the dissimilation of the absorptive and reflective asymptotic scattering mechanisms are discussed with emphasis on the experimental signatures associated with the multiparticle production processes.

  11. Measurement of electron beam polarization from the energy asymmetry of Compton scattered photons

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.C.; Woods, M.; Zhou, J.; Frey, R.; Arodzero, A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors describe a new method for precision measurement ({approximately} 1%) of the longitudinal polarization of high-energy electron beams. The method relies on measuring the energy asymmetry of Compton scattered photons which result from collisions between the electron beam and a polarized laser beam. The measurement takes place near the electron-positron interaction point at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The detector described here (PGC) is a threshold gas Cherenkov device which follows a lead radiator. The Cherenkov threshold (14 MeV) is essential for eliminating enormous synchrotron radiation-induced backgrounds at the position of interest in the SLC. They also describe the calibration of the PGC energy response in a test beam and its performance as a working polarimeter for the SLC/SLD physics program. Preliminary results from the 1996 run indicate that PGC measurement with total error at or below the 1% level is indeed achievable, and hence serves as a valuable crosscheck of the polarization scale.

  12. Inclusive neutrino scattering off deuteron from threshold to GeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gang Shen, Laura E. Marcucci, Joseph Carlson, Stefano Gandolfi, Rocco Schiavilla

    2012-09-01

    Cross sections for inclusive neutrino scattering off deuteron induced by neutral and charge-changing weak currents are calculated from threshold up to GeV energies, using the Argonne v{sub 18} potential and consistent nuclear electroweak currents with one- and two-body terms. Two-body contributions are found to be small, and increase the cross sections obtained with one-body currents by less than 10% over the whole range of energies. Total cross sections obtained by describing the final two-nucleon states with plane waves differ negligibly, for neutrino energies {approx}> 500 MeV, from those in which interaction effects in these states are fully accounted for. The sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to different models for the two-nucleon potential and/or two-body terms in the weak current is found to be weak. In order to illustrate nuclear structure effects, the cross sections are compared to those obtained in a naive model in which the deuteron is taken to consist of a free proton and neutron at rest.

  13. Surface structure and composition determination by low-energy electron scattering and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiebing

    This thesis reports on surface and surface alloy structural and compositional determination with low-energy electron scattering and Monte Carlo simulations. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) technique and the newly developed low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) IV technique are used to measure the electron scattering intensity spectra and dynamical multiple scattering analysis is performed to optimize the surface structural and non-structural parameters via comparison between the experimental spectra and calculated ones. My work focuses on the following four surface systems. (111), (110) and (001) surface structures of the semimetal bismuth are determined with LEED. The unreconstructed (1x1) structure is revealed for all three surfaces. The interlayer spacings for several outermost layers are resolved. All results agree with those obtained by first-principles calculations. The Debye temperatures for the Bi(111) and Bi(110) surface are found to be lower than that of the Bi bulk. In conjunction with the LEED technique, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation is performed on the Bi(001) surface. Surface topology images show dominant bilayer steps and no single layer step. The newly developed LEEM-IV technique is used to investigate the PdCu surface alloy on the substrate Cu(001). Studies include quantifying the temporal evolution of Pd concentration on the Cu(001) terrace, mapping the 3D heterogeneous surface chemical composition, and identifying a step-overgrowth thin film growth mechanism. It is found that, at the initial deposition stages, Pd atoms reside in the second layer at the sample temperature of 473 K, and the Pd concentration increases exponentially with time. The heterogeneous structure and composition near the steps are found to be a result of the step-overgrowth. We highlight the LEEM-IV technique which provides a high lateral resolution at surfaces. We demonstrate a 3D profile of Pd concentration in the surface region by using the LEEM

  14. Search for a new charged heavy vector boson decaying to an electron-neutrino pair in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jieun

    2005-06-01

    We present results on a search for a heavy charged vector boson, W', decaying to an electron-neutrino pair in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 205 pb{sup -1}. We found no evidence of this decay channel, and set 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section times branching fraction assuming the light neutrino. We also set the limit on the W' boson mass at M{sub W'} > 788 GeV/c{sup 2}, assuming the standard model strength couplings.

  15. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Batra, P.; Bugel, Leonard G.; Camilleri, Leslie Loris; Conrad, Janet Marie; de Gouvea, A.; Fisher, Peter H.; Formaggio, Joseph Angelo; Jenkins, J.; Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; Kobilarcik, T.R.; /Fermilab /Texas U.

    2009-06-01

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parameterized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of 'Beyond the Standard Model' physics.

  16. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment:. NuSOnG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Batra, P.; Bugel, L.; Camilleri, L.; Conrad, J. M.; de Gouvêa, A.; Fisher, P. H.; Formaggio, J. A.; Jenkins, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kobilarcik, T. R.; Kopp, S.; Kyle, G.; Loinaz, W. A.; Mason, D. A.; Milner, R.; Moore, R.; Morfín, J. G.; Nakamura, M.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Pate, S. F.; Pronin, A.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Schellman, H.; Schienbein, I.; Syphers, M. J.; Tait, T. M. P.; Takeuchi, T.; Tan, C. Y.; van de Water, R. G.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yu, J. Y.

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDF's). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parametrized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of "Beyond the Standard Model" physics.

  17. Electron hole pair mediated vibrational excitation in CO scattering from Au(111): Incidence energy and surface temperature dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Werdecker, Jörn; Golibrzuch, Kai; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bartels, Christof

    2014-09-28

    We investigated the translational incidence energy (E{sub i}) and surface temperature (T{sub s}) dependence of CO vibrational excitation upon scattering from a clean Au(111) surface. We report absolute v = 0 → 1 excitation probabilities for E{sub i} between 0.16 and 0.84 eV and T{sub s} between 473 and 973 K. This is now only the second collision system where such comprehensive measurements are available – the first is NO on Au(111). For CO on Au(111), vibrational excitation occurs via direct inelastic scattering through electron hole pair mediated energy transfer – it is enhanced by incidence translation and the electronically non-adiabatic coupling is about 5 times weaker than in NO scattering from Au(111). Vibrational excitation via the trapping desorption channel dominates at E{sub i} = 0.16 eV and quickly disappears at higher E{sub i}.

  18. High-energy scatterings in infinite-derivative field theory and ghost-free gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaganis, Spyridon; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we will consider scattering diagrams in the context of infinite-derivative theories. First, we examine a finite-order, higher-derivative scalar field theory and find that we cannot eliminate the growth of scattering diagrams for large external momenta. Then, we employ an infinite-derivative scalar toy model and obtain that the external momentum dependence of scattering diagrams is convergent as the external momenta become very large. In order to eliminate the external momentum growth, one has to dress the bare vertices of the scattering diagrams by considering renormalised propagator and vertex loop corrections to the bare vertices. Finally, we investigate scattering diagrams in the context of a scalar toy model which is inspired by a ghost-free and singularity-free infinite-derivative theory of gravity, where we conclude that infinite derivatives can eliminate the external momentum growth of scattering diagrams and make the scattering diagrams convergent in the ultraviolet.

  19. X-ray scatter correction for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry: compensation of patient's lean/fat composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinten, Jean-Marc; Darboux, Michel; Bordy, Thomas; Robert-Coutant, Christine; Gonon, Georges

    2004-05-01

    At CEA-LETI, a DEXA approach for systems using a digital 2D radiographic detector has been developed. It relies on an original X-rays scatter management method, based on a combined use of an analytical model and of scatter calibration data acquired through different thicknesses of Lucite slabs. Since Lucite X-rays interaction properties are equivalent to fat, the approach leads to a scatter flux map representative of a 100% fat region. However, patients" soft tissues are composed of lean and fat. Therefore, the obtained scatter map has to be refined in order to take into account the various fat ratios that can present patients. This refinement consists in establishing a formula relating the fat ratio to the thicknesses of Low and High Energy Lucite slabs leading to same signal level. This proportion is then used to compute, on the basis of X-rays/matter interaction equations, correction factors to apply to Lucite equivalent X-rays scatter map. Influence of fat ratio correction has been evaluated, on a digital 2D bone densitometer, with phantoms composed of a PVC step (simulating bone) and different Lucite/water thicknesses as well as on patients. The results show that our X-rays scatter determination approach can take into account variations of body composition.

  20. A new approach to detect congestive heart failure using Teager energy nonlinear scatter plot of R-R interval series.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Chandrakar

    2012-09-01

    A novel approach to distinguish congestive heart failure (CHF) subjects from healthy subjects is proposed. Heart rate variability (HRV) is impaired in CHF subjects. In this work hypothesizing that capturing moment to moment nonlinear dynamics of HRV will reveal cardiac patterning, we construct the nonlinear scatter plot for Teager energy of R-R interval series. The key feature of Teager energy is that it models the energy of the source that generated the signal rather than the energy of the signal itself. Hence, any deviations in the genesis of HRV, by complex interactions of hemodynamic, electrophysiological, and humoral variables, as well as by the autonomic and central nervous regulations, get manifested in the Teager energy function. Comparison of the Teager energy scatter plot with the second-order difference plot (SODP) for normal and CHF subjects reveals significant differences qualitatively and quantitatively. We introduce the concept of curvilinearity for central tendency measures of the plots and define a radial distance index that reveals the efficacy of the Teager energy scatter plot over SODP in separating CHF subjects from healthy subjects. The k-nearest neighbor classifier with RDI as feature showed almost 100% classification rate.

  1. High energy-resolution zero-degree facility for light-ion scattering and reactions at iThemba LABS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveling, R.; Fujita, H.; Smit, F. D.; Adachi, T.; Berg, G. P. A.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Carter, J.; Conradie, J. L.; Couder, M.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fourie, D. T.; Fujita, Y.; Görres, J.; Hatanaka, K.; Jingo, M.; Krumbholz, A. M.; Kureba, C. O.; Mira, J. P.; Murray, S. H. T.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; O'Brien, S.; Papka, P.; Poltoratska, I.; Richter, A.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Swartz, J. A.; Tamii, A.; Usman, I. T.; van Zyl, J. J.

    2011-10-01

    The setup and experimental techniques for measurements of zero-degree inelastic scattering and reactions involving light ions with the K=600 magnetic spectrometer at iThemba LABS are described. Measurements were performed for inelastic proton scattering at an incident energy of 200 MeV for targets ranging from 27Al to 208Pb. An energy-resolution of 45 keV (FWHM) was achieved by utilizing the faint-beam dispersion-matching technique. A background subtraction procedure was applied and allowed for the extraction of excitation energy spectra with low background. Measurements of the (p,t) reaction at zero degrees for Ep=100 and 200 MeV benefited from the difference in magnetic rigidity between the reaction products and the beam particles, resulting in background-free spectra with an excitation energy-resolution of 32 and 48 keV (FWHM), respectively, and a scattering angle resolution of 0.55° (FWHM). The addition of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSD) at backward scattering angles allowed for coincident measurements of particle-decay of states excited in the (p,t) reaction at Ep=200 MeV.

  2. Multiple photon Monte Carlo simulation for polarized Mo/ller scattering with Yennie-Fraustchi-Suura exponentiation at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadach, S.; Ward, B. F. L.

    1996-07-01

    We present the theoretical basis and sample Monte Carlo data for the YFS exponentiated O(α) calculation of polarized Mo/ller scattering at c.m.s. energies large compared to 2me. Both longitudinal and transverse polarizations are discussed. Possible applications to Mo/ller polarimetry at the SLD are thus illustrated.

  3. Ultrahigh-Energy Neutrino-Nucleon Deep-Inelastic Scattering and the Froissart Bound

    SciTech Connect

    Illarionov, Alexey Yu.; Kniehl, Bernd A.; Kotikov, Anatoly V.

    2011-06-10

    We present a simple formula for the total cross section {sigma}{sup {nu}}N of neutral- and charged-current deep-inelastic scattering of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos on isoscalar nuclear targets, which is proportional to the structure function F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N(M{sub V}{sup 2}/s,M{sub V}{sup 2}), where M{sub V} is the intermediate-boson mass and s is the square of the center-of-mass energy. The coefficient in front of F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N(x,Q{sup 2}) depends on the asymptotic low-x behavior of F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N. It contains an additional lns term if F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N scales with a power of ln(1/x). Hence, an asymptotic low-x behavior F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N{proportional_to}ln{sup 2}(1/x), which is frequently assumed in the literature, already leads to a violation of the Froissart bound on {sigma}{sup {nu}}N.

  4. A computational analysis of low-energy electron scattering from gaseous cyclopropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curík, R.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2002-02-01

    Absolute elastic cross sections, integral and differential, are computed for electron-cyclopropane collisions at energies from 1.0 up to 15.0 eV, spanning the region where possible shape resonance structures were detected by earlier experiments and calculations. The present results confirm the above findings and locate a resonance of A2' symmetry around 6.0 eV and a broader, weaker resonance of A2'' symmetry around 8 eV. The calculations are further shown to be in good agreement with the existing measurements of the angular distributions of the scattered electrons at energies from 2.0 up to 10.0 eV. The presently computed cross sections also agree with earlier R-matrix calculations (Beyer T, Nestmann B M, Sarpal B K and Peyerimhoff S D 1997 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30 3431) and with the available integral cross section measurements. A model local exchange potential of very simple usage is shown to provide quite good accord with the exact calculations at the static-exchange level.

  5. Silver sulphide growth on Ag(111): A medium energy ion scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Window, A. J.; Hentz, A.; Sheppard, D. C.; Parkinson, G. S.; Woodruff, D. P.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Bailey, P.

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of S 2 with Ag(111) under ultra-high vacuum conditions has been investigated by medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). 100 keV He + MEIS measurements provide a direct confirmation of a previous report, based on thermal desorption, that the growth of multilayer films of Ag 2S occurs through a continuous corrosion process. These films show a commensurate (√7 × √7)R19° unit mesh in low energy electron diffraction, consistent with the epitaxial growth of (111) layers of the high-temperature F-cubic phase of Ag 2S. The substantial range of co-existing film thicknesses found indicates that the growth must be in the form of variable-thickness islands. The use of 100 keV H + incident ions leads to a very rapid decrease in the sulphide film thickness with increasing exposure that we attribute to an unusual chemical leaching, with implanted H atoms interacting with S atoms and desorption of H 2S from the surface.

  6. Spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate energy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus reactions for incident proton energies near 1 GeV. At this energy, the dominant reaction mechanisms are (1) quasi-free knockout of one or more nucleons, and (2) pion production through the resonance. The cross section due to quasi-free knockout can be reasonably well understood theoretically in a multiple scattering picture, which uses measured NN amplitudes as input. Calculations of this sort were carried out in reference (10) using scalar NN amplitudes parameterized as Gaussians. The author has extended this picture to include spin dependent NN amplitudes. This allows calculation of all the spin observables, Ay, DLL, DSS, DNN, DLS, and DSL, as well as the cross section dsigma/dOmegadp due to quasi-free knockout of one or more particles. The cross section and polarization Ay have been measured at the LAMPF High Resolution Spectrometer at T/sub L/ = 800 MeV on SC. The theoretical results agree well with the data in the quasi-free region. The results for the remaining spin observables provide predictions for experiments which can be performed at LAMPF. By comparing the calculations with the data, it may be possible to separate the contribution due to a quasi-free knockout, and see a signature of quasi-free production in the spin observables.

  7. Incident-energy-dependent spectral weight of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in doped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Kenji; Tohyama, Takami

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the incident-photon energy ωi dependence of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) tuned for the Cu L edge in cuprate superconductors by using the exact diagonalization technique for a single-band Hubbard model. Depending on the value of core-hole Coulomb interaction in the intermediate state, RIXS for non-spin-flip channel shows either a ωi-dependent fluorescencelike or ωi-independent Raman-like behavior for hole doping. An analysis of x-ray absorption suggests that the core-hole Coulomb interaction is larger than on-site Coulomb interaction in the Hubbard model, resulting in a fluorescencelike behavior in RIXS consistent with recent RIXS experiments. A shift on the high-energy side of the center of spectral distribution is also predicted for electron-doped systems though spectral weight is small. Main structures in the spin-flip channel exhibit a Raman-like behavior as expected, accompanied with a fluorescencelike behavior with small intensity.

  8. Electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections at low electron energies using a photoelectron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Subramanian, K. P.; Krishnakumar, E.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections have been measured at low electron energies using the powerful technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. The measurements have been carried out at 17 electron energies varying from 0.7 to 10 eV with an accuracy of + or - 2.7 percent. The results obtained in the present work have been compared with other recent measurement and calculations.

  9. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  10. Analyticity of the scattering amplitude, causality, and high-energy bounds in quantum field theory on noncommutative space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Tureanu, Anca

    2006-09-15

    In the framework of quantum field theory on noncommutative space-time with the symmetry group O(1,1)xSO(2), we prove that the Jost-Lehmann-Dyson representation, based on the causality condition taken in connection with this symmetry, leads to the mere impossibility of drawing any conclusion on the analyticity of the 2{yields}2-scattering amplitude in cos {theta}, {theta} being the scattering angle. Discussions on the possible ways of obtaining high-energy bounds analogous to the Froissart-Martin bound on the total cross section are also presented.

  11. Observations of the scatter-free solar-flare electrons in the energy range 20-1000 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Fisk, L. A.; Lin, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Observations of the scatter-free electron events from solar active region McMath No. 8905 are presented. The measurements were made on Explorer 33 satellite. The data show that more than 80% of the electrons from these events undergo no or little scattering and that these electrons travel only approximately 1.5 a.u. between the sun and the earth. The duration of these events cannot be accounted fully by velocity dispersion alone. It is suggested that these electrons could be continuously injected into interplanetary medium for a time interval of approximately 2 to 3 minutes. Energy spectra of these electrons are discussed.

  12. Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering with cone collimation using X-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-09-01

    Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering (ED-SAXS) with an innovative design of cone collimation based on an ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) had been explored. Using this new cone collimation system, scattering angle 2θ has a theoretical minimum angle related to the mean half-opening angle of the hollow cone beam of 1.42 mrad, and with the usable X-ray energy ranging from 4 to 30 keV, the resulting observable scattering vector q is down to a minimum value of about 0.003 Å-1 (or a Bragg spacing of about 2100 Å). However, the absorption of lower energies by X-ray capillary optics, sample transmission, and detector response function limits the application range to lower energy. Cone collimation ED-SAXS experiments carried out on pure water, Lupolen, and in situ temperature-dependent measurement of diacetylenic acid/melamine micelle solid were presented at three different scattering angles 2θ of 0.18°, 0.70° and 1.18° to illustrate the new opportunities offered by this technique as well as its limitations. Also, a comparison has been made by replacing the PPXRL with a pinhole, and the result shows that cone collimation ED-SAXS based on ESBC with PPXRL was helpful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (i.e., reducing the parasitic background scattering) than ESBC with a pinhole. The cone collimation instrument based on X-ray capillary optics could be considered as a promising tool to perform SAXS experiments, especially cone collimation ED-SAXS has potential application for the in situ temperature-dependent studying on the kinetics of phase transitions.

  13. The Intermediate Energy Elastic Scattering of Protons by α-CLUSTER 20Ne and 24Mg Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnoy, Yu. A.; Mikhailyuk, V. P.; Pilipenko, V. V.

    The multiple diffraction scattering theory and the α-cluster model with dispersion have been applied for calculations of the observables for the elastic scattering of intermediate energy protons by 20Ne and 24Mg nuclei. The target nuclei are considered as composed of the core (16O nucleus) and additional α-clusters (one α-cluster for 20Ne nucleus and a dumb-bell α-cluster configuration for 24Mg nucleus). Taking into account the α-cluster configuration of the core, it was supposed that the additional α-cluster or center of mass of the dumb-bell are arranged with the most probability inside or outside of the core. The calculated observables for the elastic p-20Ne and p-24Mg scattering are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The influence of the deformed core contribution on the behavior of the calculated observables also is tested.

  14. The influence of triple energy window scatter correction on activity quantification for 1 7 7Lu molecular radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Andrew P.; Tipping, Jill; Cullen, David M.; Hamilton, David

    2016-07-01

    Accurate activity quantification is the foundation for all methods of radiation dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy (MRT). The requirements for patient-specific dosimetry using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are challenging, particularly with respect to scatter correction. In this paper data from phantom studies, combined with results from a fully validated Monte Carlo (MC) SPECT camera simulation, are used to investigate the influence of the triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction on SPECT activity quantification for {{}1 7 7} Lu MRT. Results from phantom data show that; (1) activity quantification for the total counts in the SPECT field-of-view demonstrates a significant overestimation in total activity recovery when TEW scatter correction is applied at low activities (≤slant 200 MBq). (2) Applying the TEW scatter correction to activity quantification within a volume-of-interest with no background activity provides minimal benefit. (3) In the case of activity distributions with background activity, an overestimation of recovered activity of up to 30% is observed when using the TEW scatter correction. Data from MC simulation were used to perform a full analysis of the composition of events in a clinically reconstructed volume of interest. This allowed, for the first time, the separation of the relative contributions of partial volume effects (PVE) and inaccuracies in TEW scatter compensation to the observed overestimation of activity recovery. It is shown, that even with perfect partial volume compensation, TEW scatter correction can overestimate activity recovery by up to 11%. MC data is used to demonstrate that even a localized and optimized isotope-specific TEW correction cannot reflect a patient specific activity distribution without prior knowledge of the complete activity distribution. This highlights the important role of MC simulation in SPECT activity quantification.

  15. Threshold photoelectron source for the study of low-energy electron scattering: Total cross section for electron scattering from krypton in the energy range from 14 meV to 20 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, M.; Kitajima, M.; Toyoshima, K.; Odagiri, T.; Kato, H.; Kawahara, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, K.

    2010-12-15

    An experimental technique for the measurement of the total cross section for electron scattering from atoms and molecules at high resolution is described. The total cross sections for electron scattering from Kr in the energy range from 14 meV to 20 eV obtained with the technique are also reported. The present technique employs a combination of the penetrating field technique and the threshold photoionization of rare-gas atoms using synchrotron radiation as an electron source in order to produce a high-resolution electron beam at very low energy. The characteristics of the electron sources were determined by measuring the ionizing photon energy dependence of photoelectron yield. Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering are obtained by the attenuation method. The measured absolute values of the total cross sections for electron scattering from Kr agree with those obtained by other groups down to 175 meV, above which several experimental works have been reported. Below 175 meV, the present results generally agree with theoretical cross sections down to 14 meV. The resonant structures in the total cross sections due to Kr{sup -} (4p{sup 5}5s{sup 2} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and the Kr{sup -} (4p{sup 5}5s{sup 2} {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) Feshbach resonances are also reported. The resolution of the present setup has been estimated from a fit of the measured profile of the Kr{sup -} (4p{sup 5}5s{sup 2} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) resonance by the theoretical curve obtained from the resonant scattering theory.

  16. Communication: Energy transfer and reaction dynamics for DCl scattering on Au(111): An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Brian; Guo, Hua

    2016-07-01

    Scattering and dissociative chemisorption of DCl on Au(111) are investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics with a slab model, in which the top two layers of Au are mobile. Substantial kinetic energy loss in the scattered DCl is found, but the amount of energy transfer is notably smaller than that observed in the experiment. On the other hand, the dissociative chemisorption probability reproduces the experimental trend with respect to the initial kinetic energy, but is about one order of magnitude larger than the reported initial sticking probability. While the theory-experiment agreement is significantly improved from the previous rigid surface model, the remaining discrepancies are still substantial, calling for further scrutiny in both theory and experiment.

  17. Geometries and focal properties of two electron-lens systems useful in low-energy electron or ion scattering.

    PubMed

    Chutjian, A

    1979-03-01

    Geometries and focal properties are given for two types of electron-lens systems commonly needed in electron scattering. One is an electron gun which focuses electrons from a thermionic emitter onto a fixed point (target) over a wide range of final energies. The other is an electron analyzer system which focuses scattered electrons of variable energy onto a fixed position (e.g., the entrance plane of an analyzer) at fixed energy with a zero final beam angle. Analyzer-system focusing properties are given for superelastic, elastic, and inelastically-scattered electrons. Computer calculations using recent, accurate tube-lens focal properties are used to compute lens voltages, locations and diameters of all pupils and windows, and filling factors and asymptotic rays throughout each lens system. Focus voltages as a function of electron energy and energy change are given, and limits of operation of each system discussed. Both lens systems have been in routine use for several years, and good agreement has been consistently found between calculated and operating lens voltages.

  18. Analysis of experimental data on neutron-proton scattering in the energy range between 0 and 150 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental data on neutron-proton scattering in the energy range between 0 and 150 keV are analyzed by using various sets of effective-range parameters. It is shown that, in contrast to the parameters corresponding to the phase shifts of a Nijmegen group, the parameters corresponding to the experimental phase shifts reported by a group from George Washington University (GWU group) lead to very good agreement between the calculated cross sections and their experimental counterparts in the energy region under consideration. On the basis of the experimental value of the cross section for neutron—proton scattering at an energy of 2 keV, the total cross section for neutron-proton scattering at zero energy was found to be σ 0 = 20.428(16) b, which is in very good agreement with a value of σ 0 = 20.423(9) b, which was obtained as the weighted mean of the cross sections presented by Houke and Hurst. It is shown that, in the energy region around several tens of keV units, the effective-range parameters matched with Dilg’s cross-section value of σ 0 = 20.491(14) b lead to calculated cross sections whose values are in excess of their experimental counterparts.

  19. Strain relaxation of CdTe on Ge studied by medium energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillet, J. C.; Pierre, F.; Jalabert, D.

    2016-10-01

    We have used the medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) technique to assess the strain relaxation in molecular-beam epitaxial (MBE) grown CdTe (2 1 1)/Ge (2 1 1) system. A previous X-ray diffraction study, on 10 samples of the same heterostructure having thicknesses ranging from 25 nm to 10 μm has allowed the measurement of the strain relaxation on a large scale. However, the X-ray diffraction measurements cannot achieve a stress measurement in close proximity to the CdTe/Ge interface at the nanometer scale. Due to the huge lattice misfit between the CdTe and Ge, a high degree of disorder is expected at the interface. The MEIS in channeling mode is a good alternative in order to profile defects with a high depth resolution. For a 21 nm thick CdTe layer, we observed, at the interface, a high density of Cd and/or Te atoms moved from their expected crystallographic positions followed by a rapid recombination of defects. Strain relaxation mechanisms in the vicinity of the interface are discussed

  20. A silver nanorod resonance rayleigh scattering-energy transfer analytical platform for trace tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Liang, Aihui; Wang, Yaohui; Wen, Guiqing; Zhang, Xinghui; Luo, Yanghe; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2016-04-15

    The stable silver nanorod (AgNR) sol in red was prepared by the two-step procedure of NaBH4-H2O2 and citrate heating reduction, and it exhibited a strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) peak at 346 nm. In pH 3.8 HAc-NaAc buffer solution, tea polyphenols (TP) reacted with ammonium molybdate (AM) to form yellow organic molybdate (OM) as receptor that was closed to the donor of AgNR, the RRS energy transfer (RRS-ET) takes place, owing to the overlapping between the AgNR RRS spectra and OM absorption spectra. When TP concentration increased, the RRS intensity decreased due to the RRS-ET increasing. So, a simple and sensitive AgNR surface plasmon RRS-ET analytical platform was fabricated to detect trace TP in the range of 0.05-0.85 μg/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 μg/mL TP. The TP in tea samples was analyzed by this RRS-ET analysis platform, with satisfactory results.

  1. Drift velocity and the rate of carrier scattering energy in Sb-containing heterostructure lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dommelen, Paphavee

    2016-10-01

    Using the Monte Carlo method, I theoretically investigated drift velocity as a function of electric field in Sb-containing heterostructure lasers of In0.545Ga0.455As0.238Sb0.762/AlxGa1-xAszSb1-z and In0.545Ga0.455As0.255Sb0.745/InxAlyGa1-x-yAszSb1-z. In the case of the quaternary alloy barriers of AlxGa1-xAszSb1-z,, effects were predicted of modeled variations in the Aluminum fraction on the relationship between drift velocity and the applied electric field. The calculations indicated that drift velocity and electron mobility should decrease if the fraction increases. In the case of quinary alloy InxAlyGa1-x-yAszSb1-z barriers, the mathematical models predicted that electron drift velocity should increase linearly as the Indium fraction increases. This may be because the Indium fraction determines the depth of the quantum well, which influences Auger recombination lifetime and the probability of inducing the resonant Auger process of carriers. In considering the rate of carrier scattering energy, I explored the changing rate of LO phonon response in quinary barriers as a function of phonon wavevectors with the temperatures of hot electrons.

  2. Low-energy electron elastic scattering from Os atom: New electron affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Z.; Kiros, F.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-05-01

    Bilodeau and Haugan measured the binding energies (BEs) of the ground state and the excited state of the Os- ion to be 1.07780(12) eV and 0.553(3) eV, respectively. These values are consistent with those calculated in. Here our investigation, using the recent complex angular momentum methodology wherein is embedded the crucial electron-electron correlations and the vital core polarization interaction, has found that the near threshold electron-Os elastic scattering total cross section (TCS) is characterized by three stable bound states of the Os- ion formed as resonances during the slow electron collision, with BEs of 1.910 eV, 1.230 eV and 0.224 eV. The new extracted electron affinity (EA) value from the TCS of 1.910 eV for the Os atom is significantly different from that measured in. Our calculated elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) also yield the relevant BEs for the ground and the two excited states of the Os- ion. The complex characteristic resonance structure in the TCS for the Os atom is ideal for catalysis, but makes it difficult to execute the Wigner threshold law in describing the threshold detachment behavior of complex atoms and extracting the reliable attendant EAs. Supported by U.S. DOE, AFOSR and CAU CFNM, NSF-CREST Program.

  3. Low-energy positron scattering from DNA nucleobases: the effects from permanent dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Jan; Gianturco, Francesco Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Ab initio quantum calculations for low-energy positron scattering from gas-phase isolated molecular nucleobases which are part of the DNA structure are presented and discussed over the range of 1 eV to 25 eV. The calculations report the integral cross sections (ICSs) and the momentum-transfer cross sections (MTCSs) for Adenine, Guanine, Thymine and Cytosine. The calculations show very clearly the important role of the dominant long-range interaction between the positron projectile and the permanent dipole-moments of the target molecules in deciding the relative sizes of the ICSs and MTCSs for the present series of molecules. Such results confirm the largely repulsive interaction between positron and DNA bases, which is nevertheless producing very large cross sections and marked deflection functions from the latter molecules. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Nano-scale Insights into Ion-beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Paulo Limão-Vieira and Malgorzata Smialek-Telega.

  4. Nuclear and partonic dynamics in high energy elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małecki, Andrzej

    1991-10-01

    A hybrid description of diffraction which combines a geometrical modeling of multiple scattering with many-channel effects resulting from intrinsic dynamics on the nuclear and subnuclear level is presented. The application to 4-4He elastic scattering is satisfactory. Our analysis suggests that, at large momentum transfers, the parton constituents of nucleons immersed in nuclei are deconfined.

  5. Nuclear and partonic dynamics in high energy elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Malecki, A. )

    1991-10-01

    A hybrid description of diffraction which combines a geometrical modeling of multiple scattering with many-channel effects resulting from intrinsic dynamics on the nuclear and subnuclear level is presented. The application to {sup 4}He-{sup 4}He elastic scattering is satisfactory. Our analysis suggests that, at large momentum transfers, the parton constituents of nucleons immersed in nuclei are deconfined.

  6. Approximations for photoelectron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, V.

    1989-04-01

    The errors of several approximations in the theoretical approach of photoelectron scattering are systematically studied, in tungsten, for electron energies ranging from 10 to 1000 eV. The large inaccuracies of the plane-wave approximation (PWA) are substantially reduced by means of effective scattering amplitudes in the modified small-scattering-centre approximation (MSSCA). The reduced angular momentum expansion (RAME) is so accurate that it allows reliable calculations of multiple-scattering contributions for all the energies considered.

  7. Molecular target and projectile angular scattering effects in stopping power and charge exchange at low-to-intermediate projectile energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Öhrn, Y.; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, E.

    2002-02-01

    We analyze the implications of the molecular structure of a target and the angular scattering effects on projectile-target collisions within the Electron-Nuclear Dynamics (END) approach. We show the suitability of the END method for the analysis of molecular scattering processes such as differential cross sections, charge exchange, and energy loss as required for the study of the stopping cross section. As a consequence of these effects, we show that the rovibronic energy loss becomes of greatest importance at low projectile energies. Furthermore, we find that the Bragg additivity rule and the linear-velocity dependence of the stopping cross section are not fulfilled at low projectile energies. Finally, we analyze the differences in the scattering processes for molecular and atomic targets, and show that in a transmission experiment with small exit window, the acceptance angle corresponds to different impact parameter selection for molecular targets than for atomic ones. Thus, the measured stopping cross section becomes a function of the acceptance angle of the experimental setup. We present results for hydrogen beams on H2 and N2 gas targets.

  8. Global analysis of the source and detector nonstandard interactions using the short baseline ν -e and ν ¯ -e scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amir N.

    2016-05-01

    We present a global analysis of the semileptonic and purely leptonic nonuniversal and flavor-changing nonstandard neutrino interactions in all the known short-baseline neutrino—and antineutrino—electron scattering experiments. The nonstandard effects at the source and at the detector can be more transparent in these experiments because of the negligibly small ratio between the baselines and neutrino energies, which is not enough for the neutrinos to oscillate, and thus can be sensitive to the new physics at both ends. We use data from two electron-neutrino electron scattering experiments and six electron-antineutrino electron scattering experiments, combine them to find the best fits on the nonstandard parameters using the source-only, detector-only analyses, and then find the interplay between the two cases. The bounds obtained in some cases are stronger and new, in some cases comparable to the current ones, and in other cases weaker. For instance, the bound obtained from the interplay between the source and detector nonstandard physics on the nonstandard parameter ɛee u d L at the source is much stronger and is comparable with the indirect bound, but the bounds on the parameters ɛμe u d L and ɛτe u d L are weaker in this study in comparison with the indirect bounds. We also find a global fit on the standard weak mixing angle sin2θW=0.249 ±0.020 with 2% improvement in its precision in comparison with the previous studies.

  9. Scattering-layer-induced energy storage function in polymer-based quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Jiang, Hongrui

    2015-03-01

    Photo-self-charging cells (PSCs) are compact devices with dual functions of photoelectric conversion and energy storage. By introducing a scattering layer in polymer-based quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells, two-electrode PSCs with highly compact structure were obtained. The charge storage function stems from the formed ion channel network in the scattering layer/polymer electrolyte system. Both the photoelectric conversion and the energy storage functions are integrated in only the photoelectrode of such PSCs. This design of PSC could continuously output power as a solar cell with considerable efficiency after being photo-charged. Such PSCs could be applied in highly-compact mini power devices.

  10. Possibilities of studying the structure of halo nuclei in reactions of quasifree proton scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zuyev, S. V. Kasparov, A. A.; Konobeevski, E. S.

    2015-07-15

    The possibility of experimentally studying the structure of halo nuclei in reactions induced by quasifree proton scattering on clusters of these nuclei is considered. Quasifree proton scattering on {sup 6}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 4}n, {sup 2}n, and n clusters in inverse kinematics is considered for the example of the {sup 8}He nucleus. Angular and energy distributions of secondaries are obtained for various representations of the cluster structure of the {sup 8}He nucleus. It is clearly shown that, in the angular and energy distributions of secondaries, one can single out regions that receive dominant contributions from reactions on specific clusters and which correspond to concrete cluster configurations of halo nuclei. Possible relevant experiments are proposed.

  11. Measurement of energy spectra of small-angle scattering and distribution of optical microinhomogeneities in laser ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Tverdokhleb, P E; Shepetkin, Yu A; Steinberg, I Sh; Belikov, A Yu; Vatnik, S M; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F

    2014-06-30

    The energy spectra of small-angle light scattering from the samples of Nd:YAG ceramics and the spatial distributions of optical microinhomogeneities in them are measured. The spatial profiles of microinhomogeneities are found using the collinear heterodyne microprobe technique. Based on the obtained data, the comparison of noise and lasing characteristics of foreign and domestic samples of laser ceramics is carried out. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  12. Improved description of the πN-scattering phenomenology at low energies in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcón, J.M.; Martin Camalich, J.; Oller, J.A.

    2013-09-15

    We present a novel analysis of the πN scattering amplitude in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory up to O(p{sup 3}) within the extended-on-mass-shell renormalization scheme and including the Δ(1232) explicitly in the δ-counting. We take the hadronic phase shifts provided by partial wave analyses as basic experimental information to fix the low-energy constants. Subsequently, we study in detail the various observables and low-energy theorems related to the πN scattering amplitude. In particular, we discuss the results and chiral expansion of the phase shifts, the threshold coefficients, the Goldberger–Treiman relation, the pion–nucleon sigma term and the extrapolation onto the subthreshold region. The chiral representation of the amplitude in the theory with the Δ presents a good convergence from very low energies in the subthreshold region up to energies above threshold and below the Δ(1232) peak, leading also to a phenomenological description perfectly consistent with the one reported by the respective partial wave analyses and independent determinations. We conclude that a model-independent and systematic framework to analyze πN-scattering observables using directly experimental data shall be possible in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. -- Highlights: •The chiral series shows a better convergence than previous analyses. •Improved prediction of the πN scattering phenomenology. •This analysis connects reliably the subthreshold and physical regions for the first time using ChPT. •Extraction of an accurate value of σ{sub πN} from experimental data. •σ{sub πN} extracted is compatible with related phenomenology.

  13. Scattering and anelastic attenuation of seismic energy in Northeast India using the multiple lapse time window analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padhy, S.

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the intrinsic dissipation and scattering properties of the lithosphere beneath the northeast India by using the seismic waves recorded by a network of ten broadband stations in the region with hypocentral distances ranging from 31 to 200 km. First, we determined coda Q from the amplitude decay rate of the S-wave coda envelopes in five frequency bands from 1.5 to 24 Hz based on single scattering theory and QS by means of the coda normalization method. Assuming a frequency dependent power-law of the form , we found a low Q0 (Q0 < 200) and a high frequency dependent parameter n (n ~ 1) for the whole study area, which indicates that the lithosphere beneath NE India is seismically active and heterogeneous. Then we applied the multiple lapse time window (MLTW) analysis in the hypothesis of velocity and scattering coefficients constant with depth. We calculated the variation of integrated spectral energy with hypocentral distance for three consecutive lapse time windows (0-15, 15-30, 30-45 sec), starting from the onset of the S-wave arrival. The spectral energies over an octave bandwidth with central frequencies at 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 Hz were calculated to obtain the frequency dependence of attenuation parameters. The results show that intrinsic absorption dominates over scattering in the attenuation process at high frequencies. However, in the hypothesis of uniform medium, the estimates of scattering attenuations obtained by MLTW analysis are overestimated. So the present results are correct to a first order approximation. To obtain more reliable and unbiased estimates of the attenuation parameters and their frequency dependences by considering the probable influence of crustal-mantel heterogeneities, we analyze the events by using the depth dependent MLTW method.

  14. Optimization of energy window and evaluation of scatter compensation methods in MPS using the ideal observer with model mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we used the ideal observer (IO) and IO with model mismatch (IO-MM) applied in the projection domain and an anthropomorphic Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO) applied to reconstructed images to optimize the acquisition energy window width and evaluate various scatter compensation methods in the context of a myocardial perfusion SPECT defect detection task. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process and thus reflects performance with perfect compensation for image-degrading factors. Thus, using the IO to optimize imaging systems could lead to suboptimal parameters compared to those optimized for humans interpreting SPECT images reconstructed with imperfect or no compensation. The IO-MM allows incorporating imperfect system models into the IO optimization process. We found that with near-perfect scatter compensation, the optimal energy window for the IO and CHO were similar; in its absence the IO-MM gave a better prediction of the optimal energy window for the CHO using different scatter compensation methods. These data suggest that the IO-MM may be useful for projection-domain optimization when model mismatch is significant, and that the IO is useful when followed by reconstruction with good models of the image formation process.

  15. Validity of the relativistic impulse approximation for elastic proton-nucleus scattering at energies lower than 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Hillhouse, G. C.; Meng, J.

    2008-07-15

    We present the first study to examine the validity of the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) for describing elastic proton-nucleus scattering at incident laboratory kinetic energies lower than 200 MeV. For simplicity we choose a {sup 208}Pb target, which is a spin-saturated spherical nucleus for which reliable nuclear structure models exist. Microscopic scalar and vector optical potentials are generated by folding invariant scalar and vector scattering nucleon-nucleon (NN) amplitudes, based on our recently developed relativistic meson-exchange model, with Lorentz scalar and vector densities resulting from the accurately calibrated PK1 relativistic mean field model of nuclear structure. It is seen that phenomenological Pauli blocking (PB) effects and density-dependent corrections to {sigma}N and {omega}N meson-nucleon coupling constants modify the RIA microscopic scalar and vector optical potentials so as to provide a consistent and quantitative description of all elastic scattering observables, namely, total reaction cross sections, differential cross sections, analyzing powers and spin rotation functions. In particular, the effect of PB becomes more significant at energies lower than 200 MeV, whereas phenomenological density-dependent corrections to the NN interaction also play an increasingly important role at energies lower than 100 MeV.

  16. Low energy excitations in iridates studied with Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuerong

    2013-03-01

    In the iridium oxides, the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of the 5d iridium electrons entangles the orbital and spin degrees of freedom, providing opportunities for exotic magnetic states with highly anisotropic exchange interactions. At the same time, the spatially extended 5d electrons are expected to have much stronger hybridization with the oxygen 2p orbitals, comparing with that in 3d transition element compounds. Both factors make crystal symmetry and local environment crucial in determining the electronic and magnetic properties of the iridates. We present here our resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of a number of octahedrally coordinated iridates with special structures, exploring these effects. In particular, for the 1-D spin 1/2 chain compound, Sr3CuIrO6, the wavefunction of the hole in the t2g manifold was reconstructed based on the RIXS spectra. Our results show that it is significantly modified from the isotropic shape expected for Jeff = 1 / 2 states in the strong SOC limit, due to the distortion of the oxygen octahedral cage. This distortion is comparable to, or smaller than, that present in most iridates and thus this work emphasizes the importance of local symmetry for the iridate families. Further, the magnetic excitations of this material were also measured. A large gap of ~30 meV, was found, comparable to the magnetic dispersion bandwidth. This is in contrast to the gapless dispersion expected for linear chain with isotropic Heisenberg exchange interaction. We also studied Na4Ir3O8 which has a hyperkagome lattice, and is a candidate quantum spin liquid. Here, a low energy continuum is observed below the d-d excitations. Optical conductivity measurements performed on the same sample and polarization dependence of the RIXS signal suggest that these excitations are magnetic in origin, agreeing with the spin-liquid state prediction. The work at Brookhaven was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Materials Science

  17. Detailed study and mean field interpretation of {sup 16}O+{sup 12}C elastic scattering at seven medium energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, M. P.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R. M.; Szilner, S.; Basrak, Z.; Morsad, A.; Satchler, G. R.; Brandan, M. E.

    2000-03-01

    Detailed measurements of the elastic scattering of {sup 16}O ions from {sup 12}C have been carried out at seven energies from 62 to 124 MeV, at center-of-mass angles from about 10 degree sign to about 145 degree sign . A coherent optical model analysis of these data has been performed using both the Woods-Saxon and the folding-model potentials. The extracted results are consistent with analyses of data at higher energies for this and similar light heavy-ion systems. Some model-independent spline forms for the real potentials were also investigated. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Energy conservation of the scattering from one-dimensional random rough surfaces in the high-frequency limit.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe; Saillard, Joseph

    2005-08-01

    Energy conservation of the scattering from one-dimensional strongly rough dielectric surfaces is investigated using the Kirchhoff approximation with single reflection and by taking the shadowing phenomenon into account, both in reflection and transmission. In addition, because no shadowing function in transmission exists in the literature, this function is presented here in detail. The model is reduced to the high-frequency limit (or geometric optics). The energy conservation criterion is investigated versus the incidence angle, the permittivity of the lower medium, and the surface rms slope. PMID:16092248

  19. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: High order correlation-polarization potential for vibrational excitation scattering of diatomic molecules by low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hao; Sun, Wei-Guo; Zeng, Yang-Yang

    2009-11-01

    This paper introduces a correlation-polarization potential with high order terms for vibrational excitation in electron-molecule scattering. The new polarization potential generalizes the two-term approximation so that it can better reflect the dependence of correlation and polarization effects on the position coordinate of the scattering electron. It applies the new potential on the vibrational excitation scattering from N2 in an energy range which includes the 2Πg shape resonance. The good agreement of theoretical resonant peaks with experiments shows that polarization potentials with high order terms are important and should be included in vibrational excitation scattering.

  20. Theoretical Studies of Energy and Momentum Exchange in Atomic and Molecular Scattering from Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph R. Manson

    2005-06-30

    The contributions that we have made during the grant period of DE-FG02-98ER45704 can be placed into six different categories: (1) advances in the Theory of Molecule-Surface Scattering, (2) advances in the Theory of Atom-Surface Scattering, (3) utilization of scattering theory to Extract Physical Information about Surfaces, (4) Gas-Surface Interactions, (5) Ion Scattering from surfaces and (6) Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). These six topics are discussed below as individual listings under the title 'IV. Detailed description of research accomplishments'. These advances show that we have made significant progress on several scientific problems in atomic and molecular surface scattering during the course of this grant as well as contributions to other areas. It is also noted that this work, although fundamentally theoretical, is marked by its strong motivation to explain current experimental measurements. This was an important secondary goal in the proposed work. We have developed theory that is useful to experimentalists in the explanation and analysis of their experimental data.

  1. Importance of resonance widths in low-energy scattering of weakly bound light-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, P. R.; Massen-Hane, K.; Amos, K.; Bray, I.; Canton, L.; Fossión, R.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Karataglidis, S.; Svenne, J. P.; van der Knijff, D.

    2016-09-01

    What effect do particle-emitting resonances have on the scattering cross section? What physical considerations are necessary when modeling these resonances? These questions are important when theoretically describing scattering experiments with radioactive ion beams which investigate the frontiers of the table of nuclides, far from stability. Herein, a novel method is developed that describes resonant nuclear scattering from which centroids and widths in the compound nucleus are obtained when one of the interacting bodies has particle unstable resonances. The method gives cross sections without unphysical behavior that is found if simple Lorentzian forms are used to describe resonant target states. The resultant cross sections differ significantly from those obtained when the states in the coupled channel calculations are taken to have zero width, and compound-system resonances are better matched to observed values.

  2. Initial evaluation of a modified dual-energy window scatter correction method for CZT-based gamma cameras for breast SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-03-01

    Solid state Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma cameras for SPECT imaging offer significantly improved energy resolution compared to traditional scintillation detectors. However, the photopeak resolution is often asymmetric due to incomplete charge collection within the detector, resulting in many photopeak events incorrectly sorted into lower energy bins ("tailing"). These misplaced events contaminate the true scatter signal, which may negatively impact scatter correction methods that rely on estimates of scatter from the spectra. Additionally, because CZT detectors are organized into arrays, each individual detector element may exhibit different degrees of tailing. Here, we present a modified dualenergy window scatter correction method for emission detection and imaging that attempts to account for positiondependent effects of incomplete charge collection in the CZT gamma camera of our dedicated breast SPECT-CT system. Point source measurements and geometric phantoms were used to estimate the impact of tailing on the scatter signal and extract a better estimate of the ratio of scatter within two energy windows. To evaluate the method, cylindrical phantoms with and without a separate fillable chamber were scanned to determine the impact on quantification in hot, cold, and uniform background regions. Projections were reconstructed using OSEM, and the results for the traditional and modified scatter correction methods were compared. Results show that while modest reduced quantification accuracy was observed in hot and cold regions of the multi-chamber phantoms, the modified scatter correction method yields up to 8% improved quantification accuracy with 4% less added noise than the traditional DEW method within uniform background regions.

  3. Neutron inelastic scattering measurements of low-energy phonons in the multiferroic BiFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Schneeloch, John A.; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Gehring, P. M.; Stock, C.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Winn, Barry L.; Gu, Genda; Shapiro, Stephen M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Ushiyama, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Tomioka, Y.; Ito, T.; Xu, Guangyong

    2015-02-10

    In this study, we present neutron inelastic scattering measurements of the low-energy phonons in single crystal BiFeO3. The dispersions of the three acoustic phonon modes (LA along [100], TA1 along [010], and TA2 along [110]) and two low-energy optic phonon modes (LO and TO1) have been mapped out between 300 and 700 K. Elastic constants are extracted from the phonon measurements. The energy linewidths of both TA phonons at the zone boundary clearly broaden when the system is warmed toward the magnetic ordering temperature TN=640 K. In conclusion, this suggests that the magnetic order and low-energy lattice dynamics in this multiferroic material are coupled.

  4. Neutron inelastic scattering measurements of low-energy phonons in the multiferroic BiFeO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneeloch, John A.; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Gehring, P. M.; Stock, C.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Winn, Barry L.; Gu, Genda; Shapiro, Stephen M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; et al

    2015-02-10

    In this study, we present neutron inelastic scattering measurements of the low-energy phonons in single crystal BiFeO3. The dispersions of the three acoustic phonon modes (LA along [100], TA1 along [010], and TA2 along [110]) and two low-energy optic phonon modes (LO and TO1) have been mapped out between 300 and 700 K. Elastic constants are extracted from the phonon measurements. The energy linewidths of both TA phonons at the zone boundary clearly broaden when the system is warmed toward the magnetic ordering temperature TN=640 K. In conclusion, this suggests that the magnetic order and low-energy lattice dynamics in thismore » multiferroic material are coupled.« less

  5. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuschareon, S.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of γ-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  6. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tuschareon, S. Limkitjaroenporn, P. Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-03-24

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of γ-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  7. Dyes at Ag colloids: The role of energy transfer processes for surface fluorescence and surface enhanced resonance raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinger, B.; Gerolymatou, A.

    1985-06-01

    The comparison of Raman spectra of a pure water solution with those of an aqueous AG colloid reveals only very weak differences. This indicates, not unexpectedly, a low electromagnetic (EM) enhancement factor ( F ≈ 100) for the Raman scattering of water. Just in opposite to these weak effects, the addition of Ag sol to a {10 -10 M }/{l} rhodamine 6G solution causes the replacement of the former solution fluorescence by a similar intense surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS). At higher dye concentrations (up to {10 -8 M }/{l}) it is replaced by both, by SERRS and surface fluorescence. The SERRS cross section is generally higher than 10 -20 cm 2 sr -1 molecule -1 photon -1. This indicates that a model based on a combination of weak EM resonances with molecular resonance Raman effects cannot explain a total enhancement by more than 10 orders of magnitude. An energy-transfer model seems to be more suitable.

  8. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  9. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. III - SF6 and UF6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, W.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed technique has been used to measure the ratios of elastic differential electron scattering cross sections (DCS) for SF6 and UF6 to those of He at electron impact energies of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 75 eV and at scattering angles of 20 to 135 deg. In order to obtain the absolute values of DCS from these ratios, He DCS of McConkey and Preston have been employed in the 20 to 90 deg range. At angles in the 90 to 135 deg range the recently determined cross sections of Srivastava and Trajmar have been utilized. From these DCS, elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been obtained.

  10. Low-Energy Parameters of the Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering and Deuteron Properties, Electromagnetic Interactions with Bound Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, A.; Dubovik, E.

    2013-08-01

    One more application of the method of unitary clothing transformations (UCT's) in the theory of nucleon-nucleon ( N - N) interaction has been presented. We have extended our previous analysis (Dubovik and Shebeko in Few-Body Syst 48:109-142, 2010) of the N - N scattering below the pion production threshold to treat the neutron-proton ( n - p) scattering at low energies and the deuteron static properties. Our calculations of deuteron magnetic and quadrupole moments have been carried out in the framework of a gauge independent description of electromagnetic (EM) interactions with nuclei (bound systems) using the clothed particle representation of the Hamiltonian, the boost and EM current density operators for the n-p system.

  11. High-Energy Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction for In Situ Diffuse Scattering Studies of Bulk Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, John E.; Jo, Wook; Donner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron x-ray scattering offers a powerful technique for investigation of single-crystal material structures. Large, mm-sized crystals can be used, allowing complex in situ sample environments to be employed. Here, we demonstrate how this technique can be applied for the collection of single-crystal diffuse scattering volumes from the electro-active material 96%Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-4%BaTiO3 while electric fields are applied in situ. The data obtained allow correlation of the atomic and nanoscale structures with the observed macroscopic electro-active properties of interest. This article presents a recent study relating the nanoscale stacking fault structure in BNT-BT to the relaxor-ferroelectric nature of the material [Daniels et al. in Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 252904 (2011)], and extends this study with further experimental description and analysis.

  12. Electric dipole response of nuclei studied by proton inelastic scattering: neutron thickness, symmetry energy, and pygmy dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, Atsushi; RCNP E282/E316/E326/E350/E376/E377 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. JSPS No. 25105509.

  13. Mapping the energy density of shaped waves in scattering media onto a complete set of diffusion modes.

    PubMed

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi S; Mosk, Allard P; Vellekoop, Ivo M; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L

    2016-08-01

    We study the energy density of shaped waves inside a quasi-1D disordered waveguide. We find that the spatial energy density of optimally shaped waves, when expanded in the complete set of eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation, is well described by considering only a few of the lowest eigenfunctions. Taking into account only the fundamental eigenfunction, the total internal energy inside the sample is underestimated by only 2%. The spatial distribution of the shaped energy density is very similar to the fundamental eigenfunction, up to a cosine distance of about 0.01. We obtain the energy density of transmission eigenchannels inside the sample by numerical simulation of the scattering matrix. Computing the transmission-averaged energy density over all transmission channels yields the ensemble averaged energy density of shaped waves. From the averaged energy density, we reconstruct its spatial distribution using the eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. The results of our study have exciting applications in controlled biomedical imaging, efficient light harvesting in solar cells, enhanced energy conversion in solid-state lighting, and low threshold random lasers. PMID:27505816

  14. Mapping the energy density of shaped waves in scattering media onto a complete set of diffusion modes.

    PubMed

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi S; Mosk, Allard P; Vellekoop, Ivo M; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L

    2016-08-01

    We study the energy density of shaped waves inside a quasi-1D disordered waveguide. We find that the spatial energy density of optimally shaped waves, when expanded in the complete set of eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation, is well described by considering only a few of the lowest eigenfunctions. Taking into account only the fundamental eigenfunction, the total internal energy inside the sample is underestimated by only 2%. The spatial distribution of the shaped energy density is very similar to the fundamental eigenfunction, up to a cosine distance of about 0.01. We obtain the energy density of transmission eigenchannels inside the sample by numerical simulation of the scattering matrix. Computing the transmission-averaged energy density over all transmission channels yields the ensemble averaged energy density of shaped waves. From the averaged energy density, we reconstruct its spatial distribution using the eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. The results of our study have exciting applications in controlled biomedical imaging, efficient light harvesting in solar cells, enhanced energy conversion in solid-state lighting, and low threshold random lasers.

  15. Sharp low-energy feature in single-particle spectra due to forward scattering in d-wave cuprate superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Hwan; Bok, Jin Mo; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhou, X J; Varma, C M; Choi, Han-Yong

    2014-08-01

    There is an enormous interest in the renormalization of the quasiparticle (qp) dispersion relation of cuprate superconductors both below and above the critical temperature T_{c} because it enables the determination of the fluctuation spectrum to which the qp's are coupled. A remarkable discovery by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a sharp low-energy feature (LEF) in qp spectra well below the superconducting energy gap but with its energy increasing in proportion to T_{c} and its intensity increasing sharply below T_{c}. This unexpected feature needs to be reconciled with d-wave superconductivity. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of ARPES data from Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} (Bi2212) using Eliashberg equations to show that the qp scattering rate due to the forward scattering impurities far from the Cu-O planes is modified by the energy gap below T_{c} and shows up as the LEF. This is also a necessary step to analyze ARPES data to reveal the spectrum of fluctuations promoting superconductivity. PMID:25126930

  16. Sharp low-energy feature in single-particle spectra due to forward scattering in d-wave cuprate superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Hwan; Bok, Jin Mo; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhou, X J; Varma, C M; Choi, Han-Yong

    2014-08-01

    There is an enormous interest in the renormalization of the quasiparticle (qp) dispersion relation of cuprate superconductors both below and above the critical temperature T_{c} because it enables the determination of the fluctuation spectrum to which the qp's are coupled. A remarkable discovery by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a sharp low-energy feature (LEF) in qp spectra well below the superconducting energy gap but with its energy increasing in proportion to T_{c} and its intensity increasing sharply below T_{c}. This unexpected feature needs to be reconciled with d-wave superconductivity. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of ARPES data from Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} (Bi2212) using Eliashberg equations to show that the qp scattering rate due to the forward scattering impurities far from the Cu-O planes is modified by the energy gap below T_{c} and shows up as the LEF. This is also a necessary step to analyze ARPES data to reveal the spectrum of fluctuations promoting superconductivity.

  17. Very low-energy total cross sections and the experimental scattering length for the positron-xenon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecca, Antonio; Chiari, Luca; Trainotti, Emanuele; Brunger, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    We report total cross-section (TCS) results for low-energy positron scattering from the noble gas xenon. A comparison with previous measurements shows a good level of accord with the recent results of the ANU group (2011 New J. Phys. 13 125004). Very good qualitative agreement is also found with the convergent close-coupling (CCC) calculation of Fursa and Bray (2012 New J. Phys. 14 035002) over most of the common energies. By using the shape of the CCC results as a guide, we also extrapolate our measured cross sections to very low energy. With the aid of the CCC theory, we therefore derive the first experimental estimate for the positron-xenon scattering length of a = -99.2 ± 18.4 au. This value is found to be consistent with the CCC-based estimate and also with those of some other theories. This result supports the existence of a positron-xenon virtual state at a positron energy ɛ = (1.4 ± 0.6) × 10-3 eV.

  18. Single-collision approximation for p{sup 3}-He elastic scattering at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Abusini, M.

    2009-06-15

    A theoretical approach to studying four-body reactions of p{sup 3}-He elastic scattering that takes consistently into account the single-collision mechanism is reported. The theoretical results obtained by this method were compared with experimental data, and the agreement is found to be quite satisfactory.

  19. [Determination of Trace Boron Based on Gold Nanorod Plasmonic Resonance Rayleigh Scattering Energy Transfer to the Coordinate].

    PubMed

    Ye, Ling-ling; Li, Ting-sheng; Luo, Yang-he; Wen, Gui-qing; Liang, Ai-hui; Jiang, Zhi-liang

    2015-05-01

    B is a necessary trace element for human and animals, but the excess intake of B caused poison. Thus, it is very important to determination of B in foods and water. The target of this study is development of a new, sensitive and selective resonance Rayleigh scattering energy transfer (RRS-ET) for the determination of B. The combination of energy transfer with resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) has developed a new technology called RRS-ET, which can realize selective and sensitive detection of boric acid. The gold nanorods in diameter of 12 nm and length of 37 nm were prepared by the seed growth procedure. In pH 5. 6 NH4 Ac-HAc buffer solution and in the presence of azomethine-H (AMH), the gold nanorod particles exhibited a strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) peak at 404 nm. In the presence of boric acid, it reacts with AMH to form AMH-boric acid (AMH-B) complexes. When the complexe as a receptor close to the gold nanorod as a donor, the resonance Rayleigh scattering energy transfer (RRS-ET) take placed that resulted in the Rayleigh scattering signal quenching. With the increase of the concentration of boric acid, the formed complexes increased, the scattering light energy of gold nanorod transfer to the complexes increased, resulting in the Rayleigh scattering intensity linearly reduced at 404 nrn. The decreased RRS intensity responds linearly to the concentration of boron over 10~750 ng . mL-1 B, with a regress equation of ΔI404 nm =3. 53c+24 and a detection of 5 ng mL-1 B. The influence of coexistence substances on the RRS-ET determination of 2. 3 X 10(-7) mol . L-1 B was considered in details. Results showed that this new RRS-ET method is of high selectivity, that is, 4 X 10(-4) mol . L-1 Mn2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Bi+, Na+, Al3+, glucose, Hg2+, IO3-, F-, SO(2-)3, SiO3-, NO3-, CIO4-, H2O2, mannitol, glycerol, and ethylene glycol, 4X 10(-5) mol . L-1 L-tyrosine, and 2 X 10(-4) mol . L-1 L-glutamic acid do not interfere with the determination. Based on this, a new

  20. 3d-shell contribution to the energy loss of protons during grazing scattering from Cu(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gravielle, M. S.; Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Silkin, V. M.

    2007-10-15

    Motivated by a recent experimental work [S. Lederer and H. Winter, Phys. Rev. A 73, 054901 (2006)] we study the contribution of the 3d shell electrons to the energy loss of 100 keV protons scattered off from the Cu(111) surface. To describe this process we use a multiple collision formalism, where the interaction of the projectile with 3d electrons is described by means of a sequence of single encounters with atoms belonging to the first atomic layer. In order to compare the theoretical energy loss with the experimental data, we add the contribution of valence electrons, which is evaluated in linear response theory using a response function that incorporates information on the surface band structure. For completeness, the energy lost by protons is also calculated within a jellium model that includes 3d and valence electrons with equal footing. Fair agreement between theory and experiment exists when the 3d shell is taken into account in the calculation.

  1. Multiple-scattering distributions and angular dependence of the energy loss of slow protons in copper and silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, E. D.; Lantschner, G. H.; Eckardt, J. C.; Lovey, F. C.; Arista, N. R.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of angular distributions and of the angular dependence of the energy loss of 4-, 6-, and 9-keV protons transmitted through thin Cu and Ag polycrystalline foils are presented. By means of standard multiple-scattering model calculations it is found that a V(r)∝r-2.8 potential leads to significantly better fits of the angular distributions than the standard Thomas Fermi, Lenz-Jensen, or Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potentials. A theoretical model for the angular dependence of the energy loss based on considering geometric effects on a frictional inelastic energy loss plus an angular-dependent elastic contribution and the effects of foil roughness reproduces the experimental data. This agrees with previous results in Au and Al, therefore extending the applicability of the model to other metallic elements.

  2. Precise measurement of Bhabha scattering at a center-of-mass energy of 57.77 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    VENUS Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Bhabha scattering at a center-of-mass energy of 57.77 GeV has been measured using the VENUS detector at KEK TRISTAN. The precision is better than 1{percent} in scattering angle regions of {vert_bar}cos{theta}{vert_bar}{le}0.743 and 0.822{le}cos{theta}{le}0.968. A model-independent scattering-angle distribution is extracted from the measurement. The distribution is in good agreement with the prediction of the standard electroweak theory. The sensitivity to underlying theories is examined, after unfolding the photon-radiation effect. The q{sup 2} dependence of the photon vacuum polarization, frequently interpreted as a running of the QED fine-structure constant, is directly observed with a significance of three standard deviations. The Z{sup 0} exchange effect is clearly seen when the distribution is compared with the prediction from QED (photon exchanges only). The agreement with the standard theory leads us to constraints on extensions of the standard theory. In all quantitative discussions, correlations in the systematic error between angular bins are taken into account by employing an error matrix technique. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Unusual impact of electron-phonon scattering in Si nanowire field-effect-transistors: A possible route for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag Chowdhury, Basudev; Chattopadhyay, Sanatan

    2016-09-01

    In the current work, the impact of electron-phonon scattering phenomena on the transport behaviour of silicon nanowire field-effect-transistors with sub-mean free path channel length has been investigated by developing a theoretical model that incorporates the responses of carrier effective mass mismatch between the channel and source/drain. For this purpose, a set of relevant quantum field equations has been solved by non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The obtained device current for a particular set of biases is found to decrease due to phonon scattering below a certain doping level of source/drain, above which it is observed to enhance anomalously. Analyses of the quantified scattering lifetime and power dissipation at various confinement modes of the device indicates that such unusual enhancement of current is originated from the power served by phonons instead of associated decay processes. The power generation has been observed to improve by using high-k materials as gate insulator. Such results may contribute significantly to the future nano-electronic applications for energy harvesting.

  4. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  5. Mode- and Direction-Dependent Mechanical Energy Dissipation in Single-Crystal Resonators due to Anharmonic Phonon-Phonon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Srikanth S.; Candler, Robert N.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we determine the intrinsic mechanical energy dissipation limit for single-crystal resonators due to anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering in the Akhiezer (Ω τ ≪1 ) regime. The energy loss is derived using perturbation theory and the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, and includes the direction- and polarization-dependent mode-Grüneisen parameters in order to capture the strain-induced anharmonicity among phonon branches. This expression reveals the fundamental differences among the internal friction limits for different types of bulk-mode elastic waves. For cubic crystals, 2D-extensional modes have increased dissipation compared to width-extensional modes because the biaxial deformation opposes the natural Poisson contraction of the solid. Additionally, we show that shear-mode vibrations, which preserve volume, have significantly reduced energy loss because dissipative phonon-phonon scattering is restricted to pure-shear phonon branches, indicating that Lamé- or wineglass-mode resonators will have the highest upper limit on mechanical efficiency. Finally, we employ key simplifications to evaluate the quality factor limits for common mode shapes in single-crystal silicon devices, explicitly including the correct effective elastic storage moduli for different vibration modes and crystal orientations. Our expression satisfies the pressing need for a reliable analytical model that can predict the phonon-phonon dissipation limits for modern resonant microelectromechanical systems, where precise manufacturing techniques and accurate finite-element methods can be used to select particular vibrational mode shapes and crystal orientations.

  6. High-energy Electron Scattering and the Charge Distributions of Selected Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hahn, B.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Hofstadter, R.

    1955-10-01

    Experimental results are presented of electron scattering by Ca, V, Co, In, Sb, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Bi, Th, and U, at 183 Mev and (for some of the elements) at 153 Mev. For those nuclei for which asphericity and inelastic scattering are absent or unimportant, i.e., Ca, V, Co, In, Sb, Au, and Bi, a partial wave analysis of the Dirac equation has been performed in which the nuclei are represented by static, spherically symmetric charge distributions. Smoothed uniform charge distributions have been assumed; these are characterized by a constant charge density in the central region of the nucleus, with a smoothed-our surface. Essentially two parameters can be determined, related to the radium and to the surface thickness. An examination of the Au experiments show that the functional forms of the surface are not important, and that the charge density in the central regions is probably fairly flat, although it cannot be determined very accurately.

  7. Complete Set of Deuteron Analyzing Powers for dp Elastic Scattering at Intermediate Energies and Three Nucleon Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, K.; Wada, Y.; Miyazaki, J.; Taguchi, T.; Gebauer, U.; Dozono, M.; Kawase, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, C. S.; Maeda, Y.; Mashiko, T.; Miki, K.; Okamura, H.; Sakaguchi, S.; Sakai, H.; Sakamoto, N.; Sasano, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Tang, T. L.; Uesaka, T.; Wakasa, T.; Yako, K.

    With the aim of clarifying roles of the 3NFs in nuclei experimental programs with polarized deuterons beams at intermediate energies are in progress at RIKEN RI Beam Factory. As the first step, we have measured a complete set of deuteron analyzing powers in deuteron-proton elastic scattering at 250 and 294 MeV/nucleon. The obtained data are compared with the Faddeev calculations based on the modern nucleon-nucleon forces together with the Tucson-Melbourne'99, and UrbanaIX three nucleon forces.

  8. Complete Set of Deuteron Analyzing Powers for dp Elastic Scattering at Intermediate Energies and Three Nucleon Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, K.; Okamura, H.; Wada, Y.; Miyazaki, J.; Taguchi, T.; Gebauer, U.; Dozono, M.; Kawase, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, C. S.; Maeda, Y.; Mashiko, T.; Miki, K.; Sakaguchi, S.; Sakai, H.; Sakamoto, N.; Sasano, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Tang, R.; Uesaka, T.; Wakasa, T.; Yako, K.

    2014-08-01

    With the aim of clarifying roles of the 3NFs in nuclei experimental programs with the polarized deuteron beam at intermediate energies are in progress at RIKEN RI Beam Factory. As the first step, we have measured a complete set of deuteron analyzing powers in deuteron-proton elastic scattering at 250 and 294 MeV/nucleon. The obtained data are compared with the Faddeev calculations based on the modern nucleon-nucleon forces together with the Tucson-Melbourne'99, and UrbanaIX three nucleon forces.

  9. Evolution Operator and Energy Spectrum of a Quasiclassical Particle Interacting with Bosons:. Application to Atom Surface Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumhalter, Branko; Kieron, Burke; Langreth, David C.

    We investigate the properties of the interaction of a particle with a boson field describing the response of a solid in the limit in which the interaction matrix elements may be considered as quasiclassical and the particle-boson coupling linear but not necessarily weak. We start by expressing the evolution operator of the system in a convenient form of an exponentiated nested commutator expansion in powers of the interaction potential. From this we are able to estimate under which conditions on the particle motion the contributions of the higher order expansion terms become small, irrespective of the coupling strength. Neglecting such small terms in the exponent of the evolution operator, we can calculate the energy excitation spectrum characteristic of the coupled system or of any of its constituents (particle or boson field). These spectra have the appearance of an exponentiated Born approximation (EBA) which contains and interpolates smoothly between the more frequently used distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) and the trajectory approximation (TA), thereby covering a wide range of the parameter space for the description of the particle-boson interaction dynamics. The shape of the spectra and their characteristics (the weight of the elastic line or the Debye-Waller factor (DWF), the mean number of excited bosons, and the mean energy transfer in the course of the interaction) are discussed and shown to be very sensitive to the (non)adiabaticity of the switching of the interaction and the magnitude of the particle mass M. In the case of nonadiabatic switching on (as e.g. in photoemission) and linear bosonic density of states, we retrieve in the limit M→∞ the familiar infrared threshold divergences in the spectrum of the system. In the opposite case of adiabatic switching rates typical of scattering, the spectra exhibit a well-defined elastic line and a finite DWF. The case of surface scattering is discussed in more detail for the example of neutral atom

  10. Scattering process for the system 7Be + 58Ni at 23.2 MeV beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Torresi, D.; Fierro, N.; Acosta, L.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Glodariu, T.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Pakou, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Parker, V. V.; Patronis, N.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Romoli, M.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Stroe, L.; Zerva, K.

    2013-03-01

    We measured for the first time the scattering process of 7Be nuclei from a 58Ni target at 23.2 MeV beam energy. The experiment was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL, Italy), where the 7Be Radioactive Ion Beam was in-flight produced with the facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of the detector array DINEX, arranged in a cylindrical configuration around the target to ensure a polar angle coverage in the ranges θcm = 40°-80° and 110°-150°. The scattering differential cross section was analyzed within the optical model formalism with the coupled-channel code FRESCO to extract the total reaction cross section. The result was compared with those obtained at lower beam energies in an earlier experiment performed at the University of Notre Dame (USA). At the present stage of our analysis, the two data sets were found to be not fully consistent each other.

  11. Low-energy excitations and the fast process of polystyrene thin supported films studied by inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Rintaro; Kanaya, Toshiji; Nishida, Koji; Tsukushi, Itaru; Shibata, Kaoru

    2006-08-15

    We studied the low-energy excitations in the meV region as well as the picosecond fast process in polystyrene thin supported films using inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering in a temperature range from 11 to 430 K, covering the bulk glass transition temperature T{sub g}. It was found that the mean square displacement decreased with the film thickness below and above the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, suggesting that the hardening occurs with decreasing the film thickness. Corresponding to the decrease in , it was also found that the density of phonon states G({omega}) decreased with film thickness. This decrease occurs mainly in the Debye mode while the contribution of the boson peak mode also decreases with the film thickness without changing the boson peak energy. As for the fast process, which appeared above at about 150 K as a quasielastic scattering, the fraction A{sub fast}(Q) decreased with the film thickness in a similar manner with the boson peak without changing the relaxation rate, suggesting a common origin for the boson peak and the fast process. These observations showing the hardening were well explained by assuming a hard dense layer at the interface, where the numbers of the boson peak mode as well as the fast process are less than the bulk state.

  12. Two-potential approach for electron-molecular collisions at intermediate and high energies - Application to e-N2 scatterings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, B. H.; Poe, R. T.; Sun, J. C.; Shan, Y.

    1979-01-01

    A general theoretical approach is proposed for the calculation of elastic, vibrational, and rotational transitions for electron-molecule scattering at intermediate and high-electron-impact energies. In this formulation, contributions to the scattering process come from the incoherent sum of two dominant potentials: a short-range shielded nuclear Coulomb potential from individual atomic centers, and a permanent/induced long-range potential. Application to e-N2 scattering from 50-500 eV incident electron energies has yielded good agreement with absolutely calibrated experiments. Comparisons with other theoretical approaches are made. The physical picture as well as the general features of electron-molecule scattering process are discussed within the framework of the two-potential approach.

  13. Energy-related atomic and molecular structure and scattering studies. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bederson, B.

    1980-03-01

    The basic goals of this program concern the experimental determination of properties of atoms and simple molecules that are important in a wide range of energy-related processes. In particular we have initiated measurements of polarizabilities of highly polar molecules and dimers, and of a number of atoms distributed through the periodic table, and, of the scattering of low energy electrons by highly polar molecules. For this latter series of measurements an entirely new apparatus has been designed and its external components have been completed. A new electron optics assembly has also been designed and is currently under construction. Details of all these projects are presented; analysis and data of the polarizability measurements are also given.

  14. Elastic Nd scattering at intermediate energies as a tool for probing the short-range deuteron structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shikhalev, M. A.

    2009-04-15

    A calculation of the deuteron polarization observables A{sub y}{sup d}, A{sub yy}, A{sub xx}, A{sub xz} and the differential cross section for elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering at incident deuteron energies 270 and 880 MeV in lab is presented. A comparison of the calculations with two different deuteron wave functions derived from the Bonn-CD NN-potential model and the dressed-quark-bag model is carried out. A model-independent approach, based on an optical-potential framework, is used in which a nucleon-nucleon T matrix is assumed to be local and taken on the energy shell, but still depends on the internal nucleon momentum in a deuteron.

  15. Energy loss in medium-energy ion scattering: A combined theoretical and experimental study of the model system Y on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Marquez, M.A.; Parkinson, G.S.; Woodruff, D.P.; Hentz, A.; Grande, P.L.; Schiwietz, G.; Wood, T.J.; Bonet, C.; Tear, S.P.; Bailey, P.; Noakes, T.C.Q.

    2005-08-15

    The energy-loss spectrum associated with scattering of 100 keV H{sup +} ions from Y atoms on Si(111) has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Measurements were made from Y overlayers, and from the Si(111)(1x1) two-dimensional silicide phase formed by Y on this surface, in various scattering geometries and with different surface preparations. Theoretical simulations were conducted based on calculations of the energy loss experienced in specific ion trajectories through the surface, using coupled-channel calculations to describe inner-shell ionization and excitation as a function of impact parameter. The experimental results indicate that additional broadening contributions arise from surface inhomogeneity and roughness, but for near-normal incident and outgoing trajectories the theory and experiment agree quite well. The calculations show that, even for the ideal two-dimensional silicide phase in which the Y atoms lie just below the surface, significant energy loss arises from interaction of the ions with surrounding Si atoms, leading to a complete loss of intensity at zero energy loss.

  16. Muon Energy Reconstruction Through the Multiple Scattering Method in the NO$\\mathrm{\

    SciTech Connect

    Psihas Olmedo, Silvia Fernanda

    2013-06-01

    Neutrino energy measurements are a crucial component in the experimental study of neutrino oscillations. These measurements are done through the reconstruction of neutrino interactions and energy measurements of their products. This thesis presents the development of a technique to reconstruct the energy of muons from neutrino interactions in the NO$\\mathrm{\

  17. Muon Energy Reconstruction Through the Multiple Scattering Method in the NO$\\mathrm{\

    SciTech Connect

    Psihas Olmedo, Silvia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino energy measurements are a crucial component in the experimental study of neutrino oscillations. These measurements are done through the reconstruction of neutrino interactions and energy measurements of their products. This thesis presents the development of a technique to reconstruct the energy of muons from neutrino interactions in the NO$\\mathrm{\

  18. Electron elastic back-scattering from aligned CO_2^+ molecular ions in the 15-30 eV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaggia, C.

    2013-10-01

    Angular distributions of electrons elastically back-scattered from aligned CO_2^+ ions are extracted in the 15-30 eV energy range from electron spectra recorded in field-free-aligned CO2 molecules using a femtosecond pump-probe scheme. The angular distributions are found to exhibit a steeper increase as the scattering angle goes from 150° to 180° for molecular ions aligned with the incident electron momentum.

  19. Near-field Light Scattering Techniques for Measuring Nanoparticle-Surface Interaction Energies and Forces

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Dakota; Adam, Ian S.; DiPaolo, Brian; Sabharwal, Manit; Shi, Ce; Hart, Robert; Earhart, Christopher; Erickson, David

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are quickly becoming commonplace in many commercial and industrial products, ranging from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals to medical diagnostics. Predicting the stability of the engineered nanoparticles within these products a priori remains an important and difficult challenge. Here we describe our techniques for measuring the mechanical interactions between nanoparticles and surfaces using near-field light scattering. Particle-surface interfacial forces are measured by optically “pushing” a particle against a reference surface and observing its motion using scattered near-field light. Unlike atomic force microscopy, this technique is not limited by thermal noise, but instead takes advantage of it. The integrated waveguide and microfluidic architecture allow for high-throughput measurements of about 1000 particles per hour. We characterize the reproducibility of and experimental uncertainty in the measurements made using the NanoTweezer surface instrument. We report surface interaction studies on gold nanoparticles with 50 nm diameters, smaller than previously reported in the literature using similar techniques. PMID:26855473

  20. Low energy scatter due to in-situ irradiation of solid tumors in laboratory rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ritenour, E.R. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the pattern of scattered radiation in laboratory rat cadavers during irradiation of solid tumors on the animals' flanks was performed. The animals were wrapped in a lead shield having a circular cutout through which the tumor protruded. Irradiations were performed with a 250 kVp 15ma X-ray machine with a measured half value layer of 1.39 mmCu. Lead shielding was of sufficient thickness to attenuate essentially all of the beam. The absorbed dose measured in the animal was then due to internal scatter from the tumor. Arrays of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed beneath the skin of 17 animals bearing a solid tumor (hepatoma H-4-II-E). Absorbed dose was seen to vary isotropically, decreasing as the inverse distance squared from the tumor. Analysis of experimental error played a major role in this study. A pilot study resulted in standard errors that were 35% of the mean absorbed dose measurements. A careful reassessment of methods of manipulating the animals and the dosimetry system resulted in a reduction in standard error to 14% of the mean for small groups (less than 10 animals).

  1. Experimental study of {sup 6}He+{sup 9}Be elastic scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, K. C. C.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Barioni, A.; Mendes Junior, D. R.; Morcelle, V.; Pampa Condori, R.; Morais, M. C.; Zamora, J. C.; Crema, E.; Moro, A. M.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Assuncao, M.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Mukherjee, S.

    2011-06-15

    New data for the {sup 6}He+{sup 9}Be reaction at E{sub lab}=16.2 and 21.3 MeV have been taken and analyzed. The effect of the collective couplings to the excited states of the target has been studied by means of coupled-channels calculations, using a double-folding potential for the bare interaction between the colliding nuclei, supplemented with a phenomenological imaginary part of Woods-Saxon type. In addition, three- and four-body continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations have been performed to investigate the effect of the projectile breakup on the elastic scattering. Both effects, the coupling to target and projectile excited states, are found to affect significantly the elastic scattering. The trivial local polarization potential extracted from the continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations indicates that continuum couplings produce a repulsive real part and a long-range imaginary part in the projectile-target interaction.

  2. Simultaneous observation of small- and large-energy-transfer electron-electron scattering in three-dimensional indium oxide thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Xin-Dian; Li, Zhi-Qing

    2016-05-01

    In three-dimensional (3D) disordered metals, the electron-phonon (e-ph) scattering is the sole significant inelastic process. Thus the theoretical prediction concerning the electron-electron (e\\text-e) scattering rate 1/τ_\\varphi as a function of temperature T in 3D disordered metal has not been fully tested thus far, though it was proposed 40 years ago (Schmid A., Z. Phys., 271 (1974) 251). We report here the simultaneous observation of small- and large-energy-transfer e\\text-e scattering in 3D indium oxide thick films. In the temperature region T≳100 \\text{K} , the temperature dependence of resistivity of each film obeys Bloch-Grüneisen law, indicating that the films possess degenerate-semiconductor characteristics in electrical transport property. In the low-temperature regime, 1/τ_\\varphi as a function of T for each film can not be ascribed to e-ph scattering. To quantitatively describe the temperature behavior of 1/τ_\\varphi , both the 3D small- and large-energy-transfer e\\text-e scattering processes should be considered. (The small- and large-energy-transfer e\\text-e scattering rates are proportional to T3/2 and T 2, respectively.) In addition, the experimental prefactors of T3/2 and T 2 are proportional to k_F-5/2 \\ell-3/2 and E_F-1 (k F is the Fermi wave number, ℓ is the electron elastic mean free path, and E F is the Fermi energy), respectively, which are completely consistent with the theoretical predictions. Our experimental results fully demonstrate the validity of the theoretical predictions concerning both small- and large-energy-transfer e\\text-e scattering rates.

  3. Determination of the gluon distribution function of the nucleon using energy-energy angular pattern in deep-inelastic muon-deuteron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T. J.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H. J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1996-03-01

    We have used the energy-energy angular pattern of hadrons in inelastic muon-deuteron scattering to study perturbative QCD effects and to extract the gluon distribution function ηG( η) of the nucleon, where η is the fractional momentum carried by the gluon. The data were taken with the E665 spectrometer using the Fermilab Tevatron muon beam with a mean beam energy of 490 GeV. We present ηG( η) for 0.005< η<0.05 and at an average Q 2 of 8 GeV2 using this new technique. We find that ηG( η) in this region can be described by ηG( η) α ηλ with λ=-0.87±0.09( stat.)±{0.37/0.32}( sys.). We compare our results to expectations from various parametrizations of the parton distribution function and also to results from HERA.

  4. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  5. The inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of chromous acid at high energy transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkinson, J.; Taylor, A. D.; Howard, J.; Eckert, J.; Goldstone, J. A.

    1985-02-01

    The inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectrum of chromous acid, at 77 K, is presented. It is dominated by the intense bending mode at 1254 cm-1 with some modes at lower frequencies showing indications of dispersion. The antisymmetric stretch νas(OHS) {‖1>-‖2>} was assigned to a broad band centered at ˜2050 cm-1, significantly displaced for the IR assignment (1650 cm-1). The breadth of the band is due to the dispersion, and kinematic coupling, that is anticipated for this compound. These new data allows us to fit chromous acid more clearly into the general trend of hydrogen bonded compounds. Chromous acid compares very well in its overall INS spectrum with the isomorphous sodium bifluoride, except that the kinematic coupling between νas(OHO) and the symmetric stretch does not occur in this compound.

  6. Microscopic optical model potentials for p-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hemalatha, M.; Gambhir, Y. K.; Kailas, S.; Haider, W.

    2007-03-15

    A comparative study of the microscopic optical potentials viz., semimicroscopic with extended Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux interaction and microscopic Brueckner theory using Hamada-Johnston as well as Urbana V14 soft-core internucleon interactions, has been carried out. These microscopic optical potentials are compared with that of Dirac phenomenology (DP) for the polarized proton-{sup 40}Ca elastic scattering at 35 MeV and 200 MeV. These potentials have different shapes for 200 MeV below 4 fm. In particular, for the real part of the central potential, only the Dirac phenomenology and the microscopic optical potential calculated with the Hamada-Johnston interaction exhibit the well known wine-bottle-bottom shape. It is found that the calculated observables (cross section, analyzing power and spin rotation function) using these potentials having different shapes, compare well with the experiment.

  7. Response to ``Comment on `Elastic incoherent neutron scattering operating by varying instrumental energy resolution: Principle, simulations, and experiments of the resolution elastic neutron scattering (RENS)''' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 107101 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magazó, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Benedetto, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Recently [S. Magazù et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 105115 (2011), 10.1063/1.3641870] we have proposed a new method for characterizing, by neutron scattering, the dynamical properties of complex material systems, such as, the ones of interest in the biophysical field. This approach called Resolution Elastic Neutron Scattering, in short RENS, is based on the detection of the elastically scattered neutron intensity as a function of the instrumental energy resolution. By experimental, theoretical, and numerical findings, we have pointed out that an inflection point occurs in the elastic intensity when the system relaxation time approaches the instrumental energy resolution time. This approach, differently from quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS), gives the chance to evaluate the system relaxation times without using pre-defined models that can be wrong and/or misleading. Here, we reply to a Comment on the above-mentioned main paper in which Wuttke proposes a different approach to evaluate the above-mentioned inflection point; on this regard, it should be noticed that the existence of the inflection point, which is the main topic of our work, is not questioned and that the approach proposed by Wuttke in the Comment, although valid for a class of dynamical processes, is not applicable when different and distinct processes occur simultaneously at different time scale.

  8. Higher lying resonances in low-energy electron scattering with carbon monoxide*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dora, Amar; Tennyson, Jonathan; Chakrabarti, Kalyan

    2016-10-01

    R-matrix calculations on electron collisions with CO are reported whose aim is to identify any higher-lying resonances above the well-reported and lowest 2Π resonance at about 1.6 eV. Extensive tests with respect to basis sets, target models and scattering models are performed. The final results are reported for the larger cc-pVTZ basis set using a 50 state close-coupling (CC) calculation. The Breit-Wigner eigenphase sum and the time-delay methods are used to detect and fit any resonances. Both these methods find a very narrow 2Σ+ symmetry Feshbach-type resonance very close to the target excitation threshold of the b 3Σ+ state which lies at 12.9 eV in the calculations. This resonance is seen in the CC calculation using cc-pVTZ basis set while a CC calculation using the cc-pVDZ basis set does not produce this feature. The electronic structure of CO- is analysed in the asymptotic region; 45 molecular states are found to correlate with states dissociating to an anion and an atom. Electronic structure calculations are used to study the behaviour of these states at large internuclear separation. Quantitative results for the total, elastic and electronic excitation cross sections are also presented. The significance of these results for models of the observed dissociative electron attachment of CO in the 10 eV region is discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limão-Vieira, Gustavo García, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrović.

  9. Analysis of the high energy behavior of the forward scattering parameters -- {sigma}{sub tot}, {rho}, and B

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M.; Halzen, F.; Margolis, B.; White, A.R.

    1993-12-31

    Recent experimental results, namely, the remeasurement of the {rho} value by UA4/2 at {radical}s = 546 GeV, together with a new analysis by the E710 group of {sigma}{sub tot}, {rho} and B at {radical}s = 1800 GeV, as well as their measurement of {sigma}{sub tot} and B at {radical}s = 1020 GeV, have provided important anchor points for the high energy behavior of {anti p}p scattering. The authors analyze high energy {anti p}p and pp data, using two distinct (and dissimilar) analysis techniques: (1) asymptotic amplitude analysis, under the assumption that they have reached {open_quotes}asymptopia{close_quotes}, and (2) an eikonal model whose amplitudes are designed to mimic real QCD amplitudes. The former gives strong evidence for a log (s/s{sub 0}) dependence at current energies and not log{sup 2}(s/s{sub 0}), and demonstrates that odderons are not necessary to explain the experimental data. The latter gives a unitary model for extrapolation into true {open_quote}asymptopia{close_quote} from current energies, allowing them to predict the values of the total cross section at future supercolliders. Using their QCD-model, the authors obtain {sigma}{sub tot}(16 TeV)= 106 {+-} 4 mb and {sigma}{sub tot}(40 TeV) = 120 {+-} 5 mb.

  10. Three energy scales in the superconducting state of hole-doped cuprates detected by electronic Raman scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Benhabib, S.; Gu, G. D.; Gallais, Y.; Cazayous, M.; Measson, M. -A.; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Sacuto, A.

    2015-10-06

    We explore by electronic Raman scattering the superconducting state of the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) crystal by performing a fine-tuned doping study. We find three distinct energy scales in A1g, B1g, and B2g symmetries which show three distinct doping dependencies. Above p=0.22, the three energies merge; below p=0.12, the A1g scale is no longer detectable, while the B1g and B2g scales become constant in energy. In between, the A1g and B1g scales increase monotonically with underdoping, while the B2g one exhibits a maximum at p=0.16. The three superconducting energy scales appear to be a universal feature of hole-doped cuprates. Furthermore, we proposemore » that the nontrivial doping dependencies of the three scales originate from the Fermi-surface changes and reveal competing orders inside the superconducting dome.« less

  11. Three energy scales in the superconducting state of hole-doped cuprates detected by electronic Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Benhabib, S.; Gu, G. D.; Gallais, Y.; Cazayous, M.; Measson, M. -A.; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Sacuto, A.

    2015-10-06

    We explore by electronic Raman scattering the superconducting state of the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) crystal by performing a fine-tuned doping study. We find three distinct energy scales in A1g, B1g, and B2g symmetries which show three distinct doping dependencies. Above p=0.22, the three energies merge; below p=0.12, the A1g scale is no longer detectable, while the B1g and B2g scales become constant in energy. In between, the A1g and B1g scales increase monotonically with underdoping, while the B2g one exhibits a maximum at p=0.16. The three superconducting energy scales appear to be a universal feature of hole-doped cuprates. Furthermore, we propose that the nontrivial doping dependencies of the three scales originate from the Fermi-surface changes and reveal competing orders inside the superconducting dome.

  12. Highly sensitive determination of antimony in food by resonance Rayleigh scattering-energy transfer between grapheme oxide and I3(.).

    PubMed

    Wen, Guiqing; Zhang, Xinghui; Li, Yuan; Luo, Yanghe; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    Sb(III) was reduced to SbH3 gas and introduced to the I3(-)-grapheme oxide (GO) or I3(-)-silver nanorod (AgNR)-Victoria blue B (VBB) solutions. Resonance Rayleigh scattering energy transfer (RRS-ET) occurred between the donor GO and the acceptor I3(-) due to the overlap between the absorption peak of I3(-) and RRS peak of GO. When I3(-) was reduced by SbH3, RRS-ET weakened and the RRS intensity enhanced. The increased RRS intensity was linear to Sb concentration in the range of 2.1-376.6μg/L. In the I3(-)-AgNR-VBB solution, I3(-) combined with VBB to form VBB-I3 and there was a weak surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. When SbH3 reduced I3(-), the SERS intensity increased due to the release of SERS active VBB. The enhanced SERS intensity was linear for Sb concentration in the range of 8.4-292.9μg/L. The RRS-ET method was applied for determination of Sb in food with satisfactory results. PMID:27507443

  13. Light-by-light scattering in ultraperipheral Pb-Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Lebiedowicz, Piotr; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    We calculate cross sections for diphoton production in (semi)exclusive PbPb collisions, relevant for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The calculation is based on the equivalent photon approximation in the impact parameter space. The cross sections for the elementary γ γ →γ γ subprocess are calculated including two different mechanisms. We take into account box diagrams with leptons and quarks in the loops. In addition, we consider a vector-meson dominance (VDM-Regge) contribution with virtual intermediate hadronic (vector-like) excitations of the photons. We get measurable cross sections in PbPb collisions. This opens a possibility to study the γ γ →γ γ (quasi)elastic scattering at the LHC. We present many interesting differential distributions which could be measured by the ALICE, CMS, or ATLAS Collaborations at the LHC. We study whether a separation or identification of different components (boxes, VDM-Regge) is possible. We find that the cross section for elastic γ γ scattering could be measured in the heavy-ion collisions for subprocess energies smaller than Wγ γ≈15 -20 GeV.

  14. Low-energy electron scattering in carbon-based materials analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and its application to sample thickness determination.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, M; Müller, E; Klein, M F G; Colsmann, A; Lemmer, U; Krzyzanek, V; Reichelt, R; Gerthsen, D

    2011-07-01

    High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) at low energies (≤30 keV) was used to study quantitatively electron scattering in amorphous carbon and carbon-based materials. Experimental HAADF STEM intensities from samples with well-known composition and thickness are compared with results of Monte Carlo simulations and semiempirical equations describing multiple electron scattering. A well-defined relationship is found between the maximum HAADF STEM intensity and sample thickness which is exploited (a) to derive a quantitative description for the mean quadratic scattering angle and (b) to calculate the transmitted HAADF STEM intensity as a function of the relevant materials parameters and electron energy. The formalism can be also applied to determine TEM sample thicknesses by minimizing the contrast of the sample as a function of the electron energy.

  15. Ultrahigh energy resolution focusing monochromator for inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Suvorov, Alexey; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Chubar, Oleg; Cai, Yong Q

    2015-11-30

    A further development of a focusing monochromator concept for X-ray energy resolution of 0.1 meV and below is presented. Theoretical analysis of several optical layouts based on this concept was supported by numerical simulations performed in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" software package using the physical-optics approach and careful modeling of partially-coherent synchrotron (undulator) radiation. Along with the energy resolution, the spectral shape of the energy resolution function was investigated. It was shown that under certain conditions the decay of the resolution function tails can be faster than that of the Gaussian function.

  16. Energy Distributions of Neutrons Scattered from Graphite, Light and Heavy Water, Ice, Zirconium Hydride, Lithium Hydride, Sodium Hydride and Ammonium Chloride by the Beryllium Detector Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Woods, A. D. B.; Brockhouse, Bertram N.; Sakamoto, M.; Sinclair, R. N.

    1960-09-12

    Energy distributions of neutrons scattered from various moderators and from several hydrogenous substances were measured at energy transfers of 0.02 to 0.24 ev. Results from experiments on graphite, light and heavy water, ice, ZrH, LiH, NaH, and NH4Cl are included. It is noted that the results are of a preliminary character; however, they are probably the most accurate measurements of high-energy transfers yet made. (J.R.D.)

  17. Nonsymmetrized noise in a quantum dot: Interpretation in terms of energy transfer and coherent superposition of scattering paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamoum, R.; Lavagna, M.; Crépieux, A.

    2016-06-01

    We calculate the nonsymmetrized current noise in a quantum dot connected to two reservoirs by using the nonequilibrium Green function technique. We show that both the current autocorrelator (inside a single reservoir) and the current cross-correlator (between the two reservoirs) are expressed in terms of transmission amplitude and coefficient through the barriers. We identify the different energy-transfer processes involved in each contribution to the autocorrelator, and we highlight the fact that when there are several physical processes, the contribution results from a coherent superposition of scattering paths. Varying the gate and bias voltages, we discuss the profile of the differential Fano factor in light of recent experiments, and we identify the conditions for having a distinct value for the autocorrelator in the left and right reservoirs.

  18. Measurement of the beam-recoil polarization in low-energy virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, L.; Janssens, P.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Bensafa, I.; Benali, M.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; D'Hose, N.; Defaÿ, X.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Laveissière, G.; Makek, M.; Marroncle, J.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pasquini, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Postavaru, O.; Potokar, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Seimetz, M.; Širca, S.; Tamas, G.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van Overloop, A.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; A1 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Double-polarization observables in the reaction e ⃗p →e'p ⃗'γ have been measured at Q2=0.33 (GeV/c ) 2 . The experiment was performed at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration using the 855 MeV polarized electron beam provided by the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) and a recoil proton polarimeter. From the double-polarization observables the structure function PLT ⊥ is extracted for the first time, with the value (-15.4 ±3 .3(stat .)-2.4+1.5(syst.)) GeV-2 , using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering. This structure function provides a hitherto unmeasured linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  19. Real-space multiple scattering theory calculations of LEED (low-energy electron diffraction) intensities for stepped surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.-G.; Rous, P.J.; Van Hove, M.A. ); MacLaren, J.M. ); Gonis, A. ); Somorjai, G.A. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-07-25

    We use a newly developed real-space multiple scattering theory (RS-MST) to calculate low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) intensities from stepped surfaces. In this calculation the electron wavefunctions are expanded in terms of an angular momentum basis, utilizing the property of removal invariance of systems with semi-infinite periodicity. This strongly reduces the dependence of the calculation on the interlayer spacing and thus opens up the possibility of treating more open surfaces. This includes in particular stepped surfaces, to which conventional methods cannot be applied. Applications of the formalism to various stepped surfaces are presented. In particular, the results for Cu(311) and (331) surfaces obtained from both the layer doubling and RS-MST methods are compared. In addition, numerical techniques which can improve the convergence as well as the speed of the RS-MST approach are discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Scattering of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} with rare gas atoms at low collision energy

    SciTech Connect

    Loreau, J.

    2015-11-14

    We present a theoretical study of elastic and rotationally inelastic collisions of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} with rare gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) at low energy. Quantum close-coupling calculations have been performed for energies between 0.001 and 300 cm{sup −1}. We focus on collisions in which NH{sub 3} is initially in the upper state of the inversion doublet with j = 1, k = 1, which is the most relevant in an experimental context as it can be trapped electrostatically and Stark-decelerated. We discuss the presence of resonances in the elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as the trends in the inelastic cross sections along the rare gas series and the differences between NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} as a colliding partner. We also demonstrate the importance of explicitly taking into account the umbrella (inversion) motion of NH{sub 3} in order to obtain accurate scattering cross sections at low collision energy. Finally, we investigate the possibility of sympathetic cooling of ammonia using cold or ultracold rare gas atoms. We show that some systems exhibit a large ratio of elastic to inelastic cross sections in the cold regime, which is promising for sympathetic cooling experiments. The close-coupling calculations are based on previously reported ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH{sub 3}–He and NH{sub 3}–Ar, as well as on new, four-dimensional, potential energy surfaces for the interaction of ammonia with Ne, Kr, and Xe, which were computed using the coupled-cluster method and large basis sets. We compare the properties of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to the interaction of ammonia with the various rare gas atoms.

  1. Resonant scattering and charm showers in ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos with energy of about 7 x 10 to the 6th GeV have much-enhanced cross sections due to W-boson production off electrons. Possible signals due to cosmic-ray sources are estimated. Higher-energy antineutrinos can efficiently produce a W accompanied by radiation. Another possibility, which could lead to shadowing at modest depths, is resonant production of a charged Higgs particle. The importance of muon production by charm showers in rock is pointed out.

  2. Spectrally-selective all-inorganic scattering luminophores for solar energy-harvesting clear glass windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghamedi, Ramzy; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-10-01

    All-inorganic visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear laminated glass windows are the most practical solution to boosting building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) energy outputs significantly while reducing cooling- and heating-related energy consumption in buildings. By incorporating luminophore materials into lamination interlayers and using spectrally-selective thin-film coatings in conjunction with CuInSe2 solar cells, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass window with minimum attenuation while ultraviolet (UV) radiation is down-converted and routed together with a significant part of infrared radiation to the edges for collection by solar cells. Experimental results demonstrate a 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed energy-harvesting clear glass panel of transparency exceeding 60%, invisible solar energy attenuation greater than 90% and electrical power output near 30 Wp/m2 mainly generated by infrared (IR) and UV radiations. These results open the way for the realization of large-area visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear glass windows for BIPV systems.

  3. Spectrally-selective all-inorganic scattering luminophores for solar energy-harvesting clear glass windows.

    PubMed

    Alghamedi, Ramzy; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-10-16

    All-inorganic visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear laminated glass windows are the most practical solution to boosting building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) energy outputs significantly while reducing cooling- and heating-related energy consumption in buildings. By incorporating luminophore materials into lamination interlayers and using spectrally-selective thin-film coatings in conjunction with CuInSe2 solar cells, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass window with minimum attenuation while ultraviolet (UV) radiation is down-converted and routed together with a significant part of infrared radiation to the edges for collection by solar cells. Experimental results demonstrate a 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed energy-harvesting clear glass panel of transparency exceeding 60%, invisible solar energy attenuation greater than 90% and electrical power output near 30 Wp/m(2) mainly generated by infrared (IR) and UV radiations. These results open the way for the realization of large-area visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear glass windows for BIPV systems.

  4. Spectrally-selective all-inorganic scattering luminophores for solar energy-harvesting clear glass windows.

    PubMed

    Alghamedi, Ramzy; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    All-inorganic visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear laminated glass windows are the most practical solution to boosting building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) energy outputs significantly while reducing cooling- and heating-related energy consumption in buildings. By incorporating luminophore materials into lamination interlayers and using spectrally-selective thin-film coatings in conjunction with CuInSe2 solar cells, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass window with minimum attenuation while ultraviolet (UV) radiation is down-converted and routed together with a significant part of infrared radiation to the edges for collection by solar cells. Experimental results demonstrate a 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed energy-harvesting clear glass panel of transparency exceeding 60%, invisible solar energy attenuation greater than 90% and electrical power output near 30 Wp/m(2) mainly generated by infrared (IR) and UV radiations. These results open the way for the realization of large-area visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear glass windows for BIPV systems. PMID:25321890

  5. Numerical simulations for width fluctuations in compound elastic and inelastic scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick

    2012-09-18

    The statistical theories - the Hauser-Feshbach model with the width fluctuation correction - play a central role in studying nuclear reactions in the fast energy region, hence the statistical model codes are essential for the nuclear data evaluations nowadays. In this paper, we revisit issues regarding the statistical model calculations in the fast energy range, such as the inclusion of the direct channels, and the energy averaged cross sections using different statistical assumptions. Although they have been discussed for a long time, we need more precise quantitative investigations to understand uncertainties coming from the models deficiencies in the fast energy range. For example, the partition of compound formation cross section into the elastic and inelastic channels depends on the elastic enhancement factor calculated from the statistical models. In addition, unitarity of S-matrix constrains this partition when the direct reactions are involved. Practically some simple assumptions, which many nuclear reaction model codes adopt, may work reasonably for the nuclear data evaluations. However, the uncertainties on the evaluated cross sections cannot go lower than the model uncertainty itself. We perform numerical simulations by generating the resonances using the R-matrix theory, and compare the energy (ensemble) averaged cross sections with the statistical theories, such as the theories of Moldauer, HRTW (Hofmann, Richert, Tepel, and Weidenmueller), KKM (Kawai-Kerman-McVoy), and GOE (Gaussian orthogonal ensemble).

  6. The high energy behavior of the forward scattering parameters -- {sigma}{sub tot}, {rho}, and B

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M.; Halzen, F.; Margolis, B.; White, A.R.

    1994-10-01

    Utilizing the most recent experimental data, the authors reanalyze high energy {anti p}p and pp data, using, two distinct (and dissimilar) analysis techniques: (1) asymptotic amplitude analysis, under the assumption that they have reached ``asymptopia``, and (2) an eikonal model whose amplitudes are designed to mimic real QCD amplitudes. The former gives strong evidence for a log(s/s{sub o}) dependence at current energies and not log{sup 2}(s/s{sub o}), and demonstrates that odderons are not necessary to explain the experimental data. The latter gives a unitary model for extrapolation into true ``asymptopia`` from current energies, allowing the authors to predict the values of the total cross section at future supercolliders. Using the QCD-model, they obtain {sigma}{sub tot}(16 TeV) = 109 {+-} 4mb and {sigma}{sub tot}(40 TeV) = 124 {+-} 4 mb.

  7. Measurements and calculations of neutron scattering angular distributions over a wide mass and energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-05-01

    Neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for targets between /sup 9/Be and /sup 239/Pu at energies, E > 14 MeV have been measured using the Livermore and Ohio University neutron time-of-flight facilities. We review here the data and the analyses based on two local microscopic optical potentials: that of Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux, and that of Brieva and Rook. The results are also compared with calculations using global potentials. Coupled channel formalism has been used in the analysis of targets with strong deformations, such as Be, C, Ta, and actinides. The value of the microscopic optical potentials as a tool to predict elastic and inelastic neutron cross sections over a wide mass and energy range is discussed. The need for neutron measurements up to higher energies and their analysis in conjunction with (p,p) and charge exchange (p,n) data is addressed. 17 refs.

  8. Modelization For Electromagnetic Electron Scattering at Low Energies for Radiotherapy applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaryan, Vahagn; Gueye, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Since release of the GEANT4 particle simulation toolkit in 2003, there has been a growing interest in its applications to medical physics. The applicability of GEANT4 to radiotherapy has been a subject of several investigations in recent years, and it was found to be of great use. Its low-energy model allows for electromagnetic interaction simulations down to 250 eV. The electron physics data are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL). At very lower energies (below 10 MeV), some of the tabulated data in EEDL have big uncertainties (more than 50%), and rely on various extrapolations to energy regions where there is no experimental data. We have investigated the variations of these cross-section data to radiotherapy applications. Our study suggests a strong need for better theoretical models of electron interactions with matter at these energies, and the necessity of new and more reliable experimental data. The progress towards such theoretical model will be presented.

  9. New opportunities for quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering at steady-state sources using mechanical selection of the incident and final neutron energy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mamantov, Eugene

    2015-06-12

    We propose a modification of the neutron wide-angle velocity selector (WAVES) device that enables inelastic (in particular, quasielastic) scattering measurements not relying on the neutron time-of-flight. The proposed device is highly suitable for a steady-state neutron source, somewhat similar to a triple-axis spectrometer, but with simultaneous selection of the incident and final neutron energy over a broad range of scattering momentum transfer. Both the incident and final neutron velocities are defined by the WAVES geometry and rotation frequency. The variable energy transfer is achieved through the natural variation of the velocity of the transmitted neutrons as a function of themore » scattering angle component out of the equatorial plane.« less

  10. New opportunities for quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering at steady-state sources using mechanical selection of the incident and final neutron energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, Eugene

    2015-06-12

    We propose a modification of the neutron wide-angle velocity selector (WAVES) device that enables inelastic (in particular, quasielastic) scattering measurements not relying on the neutron time-of-flight. The proposed device is highly suitable for a steady-state neutron source, somewhat similar to a triple-axis spectrometer, but with simultaneous selection of the incident and final neutron energy over a broad range of scattering momentum transfer. Both the incident and final neutron velocities are defined by the WAVES geometry and rotation frequency. The variable energy transfer is achieved through the natural variation of the velocity of the transmitted neutrons as a function of the scattering angle component out of the equatorial plane.

  11. Wetting transition in liquid Ga Bi alloys: light scattering study of surface energy and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyad, A. H.; Freyland, W.

    2002-05-01

    We have studied the surface energy, surface entropy and, partly, have received an estimate of the viscosity of liquid Ga-Bi alloys at compositions mainly in the Ga-rich phase region and at temperatures up to 620 K. Measurements have been performed by the noninvasive method of capillary wave spectroscopy which has been applied for the first time to investigate the surface properties of a liquid alloy at high temperatures. Analysis of the concentration dependence of the surface energy according to the Gibbs adsorption equation yields that in the composition range of 10 -2≲ xBi≲10 -1 and at temperatures of 450 K≲ T≲500 K a surface excess of ΓBi˜1.36×10 -5 mol m -2 resides at the liquid-vapour interface corresponding to pure Bi. At lower xBi a reduction of ΓBi occurs which is indicative of a prewetting transition. The variations of surface energy and entropy with composition are not consistent with a description by a simple monolayer model as was deduced from X-ray reflectivity results. Instead it is found that a multilayer model qualitatively accounts for the characteristic change of the surface quantities. The thickness of the multilayer interfacial region is estimated from the change of the relative surface entropy. This yields values between 10 and 20 Å with a trend for an increasing number of surface layers towards the complete wetting transition at the monotectic point. All isopleths of the surface energy exhibit clear kinks at temperatures 10-20 K above the liquidus curve for compositions below the monotectic point. The corresponding discontinuity of the surface entropy is consistent with a first order transition of surface freezing reported recently for the Ga-Bi system.

  12. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  13. (A neutron scattering experiment to study the high-energy spin dynamics of the itinerant antiferromagnet Mn sub 90 Cu sub 10 )

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1990-10-26

    The traveler performed a neutron scattering experiment to study the high-energy spin dynamics of the itinerant antiferromagnet. This experiment was conducted at a unique instrument located at the hot-neutron source at the ILL. The traveler also held various scientific discussions with ILL research staff members and visiting scientists.

  14. Mapping the deformation in the "island of inversion": Inelastic scattering of 30Ne and 36Mg at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornenbal, P.; Scheit, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Aoi, N.; Li, K.; Matsushita, M.; Steppenbeck, D.; Wang, H.; Baba, H.; Ideguchi, E.; Kobayashi, N.; Kondo, Y.; Lee, J.; Michimasa, S.; Motobayashi, T.; Poves, A.; Sakurai, H.; Takechi, M.; Togano, Y.; Yoneda, K.

    2016-04-01

    The transition strengths of the first-excited 2+ states and deformation lengths of the nuclei 30Ne and 36Mg were determined via Coulomb- and nuclear-force-dominated inelastic scattering at intermediate energies. Beams of these exotic nuclei were produced at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory and were incident on lead and carbon targets at energies above 200 MeV/u . Absolute excitation cross sections on the lead target yielded reduced transition probabilities of 0.0277(79) and 0.0528(121) e2b2 , while the measurements with the carbon target revealed nuclear deformation lengths of δN=1.98 (11) and 1.93(11) fm for 30Ne and 36Mg, respectively. Corresponding quadrupole deformation parameters of β2˜0.5 from the two probes were found comparable in magnitude, showing no indication for a reduction in deformation along isotopic and isotonic chains from 32Mg towards the neutron drip-line. Comparisons to shell-model calculations illustrate the importance of neutron excitations across the N =20 shell for 30Ne and suggest that shallow maximums of collectivity may occur around N =22 and 24 along the neon and magnesium isotopic chains, respectively.

  15. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) detection or hot atom reaction product internal energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Moore, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is being utilized to investigate the rovibrational energy distributions produced by reactive and nonreactive collisions of translationally hot atoms with simple molecules. Translationally hot H atoms are produced by ArF laser photolysis of HBr. Using CARS we have monitored, in a state-specific and time-resolved manner, rotational excitation of HBr (v = 0), vibrational excitation of HBr and H/sub 2/, rovibrational excitation of H/sub 2/ produced by the reaction H + HBr ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + Br, and Br atom production by photolysis of HBr.

  16. High-energy diffuse scattering on the 1-ID beamline at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Welberry, T. R.; Goossens, D. J.; Haeffner, D. R.; Lee, P. L.; Almer, J.; Australian National Univ.

    2003-05-01

    This paper reports on experiments in which high-energy (65.35 keV) X-rays were used to record the detailed diffuse diffraction patterns of a number of ceramic materials. The methodology has enabled a greater q-range to be explored (up to sintheta/lambda approximately 0.97) than is possible with laboratory-based experiments, with better q-space resolution and increased sensitivity, thus allowing previously unseen detail in diffraction patterns to be recorded. In all, 11 sections of data have been collected for Ca-CSZ, eight for Y-CSZ and six for wuestite.

  17. High-energy diffuse scattering on the 1-ID beamline at the advanced photon source.

    PubMed

    Welberry, T R; Goossens, D J; Haeffner, D R; Lee, P L; Almer, J

    2003-05-01

    This paper reports on experiments in which high-energy (65.35 keV) X-rays were used to record the detailed diffuse diffraction patterns of a number of ceramic materials. The methodology has enabled a greater q-range to be explored (up to sintheta/lambda approximately 0.97) than is possible with laboratory-based experiments, with better q-space resolution and increased sensitivity, thus allowing previously unseen detail in diffraction patterns to be recorded. In all, 11 sections of data have been collected for Ca-CSZ, eight for Y-CSZ and six for wüstite.

  18. [ital Q][sup 2] dependence of the average squared transverse energy of jets in deep-inelastic muon-nucleon scattering with comparison to perturbative QCD predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.; Arndotied, S.; Anthony, P.L.; Baker, M.D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A.A.; Braun, H.M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J.M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S.K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H.J.; Geesaman, D.F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M.C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V.W.; Jackson, H.E.; Jaffe, D.E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D.M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H.G.E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lubatti, H.J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D.G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H.E.; Morfin, J.G.; Nickerson, R.B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F.M.; Ramberg, E.J.; Roeser, A.; Ryan, J.J.; Salgado, C.W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schueler, K.P.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.A.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P.H.; Stier, H.E.; Stopa, P.; S

    1994-01-24

    The average squared transverse energy of jets in deep-inelastic muon-nucleon scattering is measured as a function of the momentum transfer squared ([ital Q][sup 2]), in the range 3[lt][ital Q][sup 2][lt]25 GeV[sup 2]. Perturbative QCD predicts that the average squared parton transverse energy will depend upon the strong coupling constant ([alpha][sub [ital S

  19. On the design of experiments for determining ternary mixture free energies from static light scattering data using a nonlinear partial differential equation

    PubMed Central

    Wahle, Chris W.; Ross, David S.; Thurston, George M.

    2012-01-01

    We mathematically design sets of static light scattering experiments to provide for model-independent measurements of ternary liquid mixing free energies to a desired level of accuracy. A parabolic partial differential equation (PDE), linearized from the full nonlinear PDE [D. Ross, G. Thurston, and C. Lutzer, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 064106 (2008)10.1063/1.2937902], describes how data noise affects the free energies to be inferred. The linearized PDE creates a net of spacelike characteristic curves and orthogonal, timelike curves in the composition triangle, and this net governs diffusion of information coming from light scattering measurements to the free energy. Free energy perturbations induced by a light scattering perturbation diffuse along the characteristic curves and towards their concave sides, with a diffusivity that is proportional to the local characteristic curvature radius. Consequently, static light scattering can determine mixing free energies in regions with convex characteristic curve boundaries, given suitable boundary data. The dielectric coefficient is a Lyapunov function for the dynamical system whose trajectories are PDE characteristics. Information diffusion is heterogeneous and system-dependent in the composition triangle, since the characteristics depend on molecular interactions and are tangent to liquid-liquid phase separation coexistence loci at critical points. We find scaling relations that link free energy accuracy, total measurement time, the number of samples, and the interpolation method, and identify the key quantitative tradeoffs between devoting time to measuring more samples, or fewer samples more accurately. For each total measurement time there are optimal sample numbers beyond which more will not improve free energy accuracy. We estimate the degree to which many-point interpolation and optimized measurement concentrations can improve accuracy and save time. For a modest light scattering setup, a sample calculation shows that

  20. On the design of experiments for determining ternary mixture free energies from static light scattering data using a nonlinear partial differential equation.

    PubMed

    Wahle, Chris W; Ross, David S; Thurston, George M

    2012-07-21

    We mathematically design sets of static light scattering experiments to provide for model-independent measurements of ternary liquid mixing free energies to a desired level of accuracy. A parabolic partial differential equation (PDE), linearized from the full nonlinear PDE [D. Ross, G. Thurston, and C. Lutzer, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 064106 (2008)], describes how data noise affects the free energies to be inferred. The linearized PDE creates a net of spacelike characteristic curves and orthogonal, timelike curves in the composition triangle, and this net governs diffusion of information coming from light scattering measurements to the free energy. Free energy perturbations induced by a light scattering perturbation diffuse along the characteristic curves and towards their concave sides, with a diffusivity that is proportional to the local characteristic curvature radius. Consequently, static light scattering can determine mixing free energies in regions with convex characteristic curve boundaries, given suitable boundary data. The dielectric coefficient is a Lyapunov function for the dynamical system whose trajectories are PDE characteristics. Information diffusion is heterogeneous and system-dependent in the composition triangle, since the characteristics depend on molecular interactions and are tangent to liquid-liquid phase separation coexistence loci at critical points. We find scaling relations that link free energy accuracy, total measurement time, the number of samples, and the interpolation method, and identify the key quantitative tradeoffs between devoting time to measuring more samples, or fewer samples more accurately. For each total measurement time there are optimal sample numbers beyond which more will not improve free energy accuracy. We estimate the degree to which many-point interpolation and optimized measurement concentrations can improve accuracy and save time. For a modest light scattering setup, a sample calculation shows that less than two

  1. High-Energy-Resolution Inelastic Electron and Proton Scattering and the Multiphonon Nature of Mixed-Symmetry 2{sup +} States in {sup 94}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Burda, O.; Kuhar, M.; Lenhardt, A.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Botha, N.; Fearick, R. W.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fransen, C.; Fujita, H.; Holt, J. D.; Pietralla, N.; Scholten, O.

    2007-08-31

    High-energy-resolution inelastic electron scattering (at the S-DALINAC) and proton scattering (at iThemba LABS) experiments permit a thorough test of the nature of proposed one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} states of the nucleus {sup 94}Mo. The combined analysis reveals the one-phonon content of the mixed-symmetry state and its isovector character suggested by microscopic nuclear model calculations. The purity of two-phonon 2{sup +} states is extracted.

  2. Energy dissipation in heavy systems: the transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; van den Berg, A.; Kolata, J.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Kutschera, W.; Rosner, G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Yntema, J.L.; Lee, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of medium mass projectiles (A = 28 - 64) with /sup 208/Pb has been studied using a split-pole spectrograph which allows single mass and charge identification. The reaction process in all systems studied so far is dominated by quasi-elastic neutron transfer reactions, especially at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition to the quasi-elastic component deep inelastic contributions are present in all reaction channels. The good mass and charge separation allows to generate Wilczynski plots for individual channels; for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb we observe that the transition between the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic reactions occurs around Q = -(30 to 35) MeV.

  3. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F(2P) + HCl and F(2P) + H2 reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  4. Limits on light-speed anisotropies from Compton scattering of high-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Bocquet, J-P; Moricciani, D; Bellini, V; Beretta, M; Casano, L; D'Angelo, A; Di Salvo, R; Fantini, A; Franco, D; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Giardina, G; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A; Knyazyan, S; Lapik, A; Lehnert, R; Levi Sandri, P; Lleres, A; Mammoliti, F; Mandaglio, G; Manganaro, M; Margarian, A; Mehrabyan, S; Messi, R; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Randieri, C; Rebreyend, D; Rudnev, N; Russo, G; Schaerf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A; Vegna, V

    2010-06-18

    The possibility of anisotropies in the speed of light relative to the limiting speed of electrons is considered. The absence of sidereal variations in the energy of Compton-edge photons at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility's GRAAL facility constrains such anisotropies representing the first nonthreshold collision-kinematics study of Lorentz violation. When interpreted within the minimal standard-model extension, this result yields the two-sided limit of 1.6×10(-14) at 95% confidence level on a combination of the parity-violating photon and electron coefficients (κ(o+))(YZ), (κ(o+))(ZX), c(TX), and c(TY). This new constraint provides an improvement over previous bounds by 1 order of magnitude.

  5. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2015-01-21

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F({sup 2}P) + HCl and F({sup 2}P) + H{sub 2} reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  6. An energy dispersive x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics study of liquid dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontrani, Lorenzo; Russina, Olga; Marincola, Flaminia Cesare; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we report on the first x-ray diffraction study on liquid dimethyl carbonate. Diffraction spectra were collected with an energy-dispersive instrument, whose wide Q-range allows the structure determination of weakly ordered systems (such as liquids). The structural correlation in this liquid ranges up to about 20 Å. The observed patterns are interpreted with a structural model derived from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were run using OPLS force field, only slightly modified to restrain bond distances to the experimental values. The model structure function and radial distribution functions, averaged among the productive trajectory frames, are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental ones. Molecular dynamics results show that the deviations from C2v cis-cis structure, predicted by ab initio calculations and observed by electron diffraction in the gas phase, are small. By analyzing the intra- and intermolecular pair distribution functions, it was possible to assign the peaks of the experimental radial distribution function to specific structural correlations, and to compute the different average intermolecular coordination numbers. The intermolecular methyl-carbonyl oxygen distance is thoroughly discussed to assess the presence of weak C-H⋯ṡO hydrogen bonds.

  7. Neutron Scattering Study of Low Energy Magnetic Excitation in superconducting Te-vapor annealed under-doped FeTeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijun; Yi, Ming; Xu, Guangyong; Shneeloch, J. A.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chi, Songxue; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    To study the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, we have performed neutron scattering and magnetization measurements on a Te vapor annealed single crystal Fe1 +yTe0.8Se0.2 (Tc~13K) sample. Te vapor annealed process is found to reduce/remove the excess Fe in the as-grown sample and make the under-doped originally non-superconducting sample become good superconducting sample. Our neutron scattering studies show both spin gap and spin resonance found in the Te vapor annealed superconducting sample. Comparing to commensurate spin resonance in as-grown optimal-doped sample, the spin resonance of Te annealed sample only shows up at the clearly incommensurate positions. The temperature and energy dependence of low energy magnetic excitations are also measured in the sample. This work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE.

  8. High-Intensity Scattering Processes of Relativistic Electrons in Vacuum and Their Relevance to High-Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Troha, Anthony L.; Baldis, Hector A.; Gupta, Atul; Kerman, Arthur K.; Landahl, Eric C.; Luhmann, Neville C. Jr.; Van Meter, James R.

    2000-04-01

    The recent advent of ultra-short pulse, high-intensity lasers, together with advances in other novel technologies, such as high-gradient radiofrequency photoinjectors, have afforded researchers the possibility to simulate astrophysical conditions in the laboratory. Laser-produced plasmas have been successfully used to simulate astrophysical plasmas and supernovae in the laboratory for several years. Now, femtosecond laser systems operating in the terawatt to petawatt range are available, as are synchronized relativistic electron bunches with subpicosecond durations and terahertz bandwidths. With these tools, experiments have been conducted to study phenomena related to supernova explosions, stellar winds, solar coronae, cosmic rays, planetary and celestial matter, and interstellar plasmas. Other experiments have been proposed to investigate Unruh radiation, as well as ponderomotive scattering, which can accelerate electrons in vacuum to relativistic energies using the extremely high gradients in a three-dimensional laser focus. The nonlinear Doppler shift induced by ultrarelativistic radiation pressure is shown to yield complex nonlinear Compton backscattered spectra. Finally, strong radiative corrections are expected when the Doppler-upshifted laser wavelength approaches the Compton scale. These are discussed within the context of high-field classical electrodynamics, a new discipline borne out of the aforementioned innovations. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  9. Understanding double-resonant Raman scattering in chiral carbon nanotubes: Diameter and energy dependence of the D mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herziger, Felix; Vierck, Asmus; Laudenbach, Jan; Maultzsch, Janina

    2015-12-01

    We present a theoretical model to describe the double-resonant scattering process in arbitrary carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We use this approach to investigate the defect-induced D mode in CNTs and unravel the dependence of the D -mode frequency on the CNT diameter and on the energy of the resonant optical transition. Our approach is based on the symmetry of the hexagonal lattice and geometric considerations; hence the method is independent of the exact model that is chosen to describe the electronic band structure or the phonon dispersion. We finally clarify the diameter dependence of this Raman mode that has been under discussion in the past and demonstrate that, depending on the experimental conditions, in general two different dependencies can be measured. We also prove that CNTs with an arbitrary chiral index can exhibit a D mode in their Raman spectrum, in contrast to previous symmetry-based arguments. Furthermore, we give a direct quantification of the curvature-induced phonon frequency corrections of the D mode in CNTs with respect to graphite.

  10. Feasibility of Parity-Violating Electron Scattering Experiments Below 1 GeV Beam Energy with a Toroidal Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Kurtis

    2015-10-01

    The next generation of high precision parity-violating electron scattering experiments could potentially make use of a toroidal spectrometer to perform additional measurements of the proton's weak charge (Qwp) using a hydrogen target, a test of the Standard Model using a carbon target as well as possibly studying the neutron skin of heavier nuclei. I will present the results of recent Geant4 Monte-Carlo studies performed to test the feasibility of such a toroidal spectrometer at beam energies below 1 GeV employing a concept similar to that used by the recent JLab Qweak measurement. It appears that given sufficient beam time such a measurement could be complementary to the JLab measurement, but at a significantly lower Q2. The feasibility of measuring the neutron skin using such a spectrometer will also be discussed. The key issue for this latter type of measurement is the ability to achieve the necessary resolution to separate the elastic and first excited state. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1206053.

  11. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    SciTech Connect

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z.; Duque, H. V.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Duflot, D.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  12. Low-energy reactive ion scattering as a probe of surface femtochemical reaction: H+ and H- formation on ionic compound surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souda, R.; Suzuki, T.; Kawanowa, H.; Asari, E.

    1999-01-01

    Capture and loss of valence electrons during low-energy (50-500 eV) proton scattering from some alkali-halide surfaces such as LiCl, NaCl, and KF have been investigated in comparison with those from the TiO2(110) and Cs-adsorbed Si(100) surfaces. The primary H+ ion survives neutralization when scattered from the highly ionized target species existing on the surface. For H- ion formation, a close atomic encounter with individual target ions is found to be important; the H- ion is formed more efficiently on the cationic site than on the anionic site despite the fact that the valence electron is spacially localized on the latter. This is because the charge state of scattered hydrogen is determined during a transient chemisorption state and amphoteric hydrogen tends to be coordinated negatively (positively) on the cationic site (the anionic site). The final charge state of scattered hydrogen is fixed at a certain bond-breaking distance (˜5.0 a.u.) from the surface where the well-defined atomic orbital of hydrogen evolves. The competing nonlocal resonance tunneling is suppressed at the ionic-compound surfaces due to the existence of a large band gap, so that hydrogen is scattered without losing the memory of such a transient chemisorption state.

  13. Elastic scattering of hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2013-01-01

    Colliding high-energy hadrons either produce new particles or scatter elastically with their quantum numbers conserved and no other particles produced. We consider the latter case here. Although inelastic processes dominate at high energies, elastic scattering contributes considerably (18-25%) to the total cross section. Its share first decreases and then increases at higher energies. Small-angle scattering prevails at all energies. Some characteristic features can be seen that provide information on the geometrical structure of the colliding particles and the relevant dynamical mechanisms. The steep Gaussian peak at small angles is followed by the exponential (Orear) regime with some shoulders and dips, and then by a power-law decrease. Results from various theoretical approaches are compared with experimental data. Phenomenological models claiming to describe this process are reviewed. The unitarity condition predicts an exponential fall for the differential cross section with an additional substructure to occur exactly between the low momentum transfer diffraction cone and a power-law, hard parton scattering regime under high momentum transfer. Data on the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear parts of amplitudes at extremely small angles provide the value of the real part of the forward scattering amplitude. The real part of the elastic scattering amplitude and the contribution of inelastic processes to the imaginary part of this amplitude (the so-called overlap function) are also discussed. Problems related to the scaling behavior of the differential cross section are considered. The power-law regime at highest momentum transfer is briefly described.

  14. Medium energy ion scattering for the high depth resolution characterisation of high-k dielectric layers of nanometer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. A.; Reading, M. A.; Bailey, P.; Noakes, T. Q. C.; Adelmann, C.; Popovici, M.; Tielens, H.; Conard, T.; de Gendt, S.; van Elshocht, S.

    2013-09-01

    Medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) using, typically, 100-200 keV H+ or He+ ions derives it ability to characterise nanolayers from the fact that the energy after backscattering depends (i) on the elastic energy loss suffered in a single collision with a target atom and (ii) on the inelastic energy losses on its incoming and outgoing trajectories. From the former the mass of the atom can be determined and from the latter its depth. Thus MEIS yields depth dependent compositional and structural information, with high depth resolution (sub-nm near the surface) and good sensitivity for all but the lighter masses. It is particularly well suited for the depth analysis of high-k multilayers of nanometer thickness. Accurate quantification of the depth distributions of atomic species can be obtained using suitable spectrum simulation. In the present paper, important aspects of MEIS including quantification, depth resolution and spectrum simulation are briefly discussed. The capabilities of the technique in terms of the high depth resolution layer compositional and structural information it yields, is illustrated with reference to the detailed characterisation of a range of high-k nanolayer and multilayer structures for current microelectronic devices or those still under development: (i) HfO2 and HfSiOx for gate dielectric applications, including a TiN/Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2/Si structure, (ii) TiN/SrTiO3/TiN and (iii) TiO2/Ru/TiN multilayer structures for metal-insulator-metal capacitors (MIMcaps) in DRAM applications. The unique information provided by the technique is highlighted by its clear capability to accurately quantify the composition profiles and thickness of nanolayers and complex multilayers as grown, and to identify the nature and extent of atom redistribution (e.g. intermixing, segregation) during layer deposition, annealing and plasma processing. The ability makes it a valuable tool in the development of the nanostructures that will become increasingly important as

  15. Effects of image lag and scatter for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis using a CsI flat-panel based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, Razvan; Muller, Serge

    2011-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DBT) using an iodinated contrast agent is an imaging technique providing 3D functional images of breast lesion vascularity and tissue perfusion. The iodine uptake in the breast is very small and causes only small changes in x-ray transmission; typically less than 5%. This presents significant technical challenges on the imaging system performance. The purpose of this paper was to characterize image lag and scattered radiation and their effects on image quality for dual-energy CE-DBT using a CsI(Tl) phosphor-based detector. Lag was tested using typical clinical acquisition sequences and exposure parameters and under various detector read-out modes. The performance of a prototype anti-scatter grid and its potential benefit on the magnitude and range of the cupping artifact were investigated. Analyses were performed through phantom experiments. Our results illustrate that the magnitude of image lag is negligible and breast texture cancelation is almost perfect when the detector is read out several times between x-ray exposures. The anti-scatter grid effectively reduces scatter and the cupping artifact.

  16. Q2 dependence of the average squared transverse energy of jets in deep-inelastic muon-nucleon scattering with comparison to perturbative QCD predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Arndotïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-01-01

    The average squared transverse energy of jets in deep-inelastic muon-nucleon scattering is measured as a function of the momentum transfer squared (Q2), in the range 3energy will depend upon the strong coupling constant (αS). Identifying the transverse energy of the jets with those of the corresponding partons, αS is found to vary with Q2 as predicted by QCD.

  17. Identifying regions of strong scattering at the core-mantle boundary from analysis of PKKP precursor energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rost, S.; Earle, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    We detect seismic scattering from the core-mantle boundary related to the phase PKKP (PK. KP) in data from small aperture seismic arrays in India and Canada. The detection of these scattered waves in data from small aperture arrays is new and allows a better characterization of the fine-scale structure of the deep Earth especially in the southern hemisphere. Their slowness vector is determined from array processing allowing location of the heterogeneities at the core-mantle boundary using back-projection techniques through 1D Earth models. We identify strong scattering at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) beneath the Caribbean, Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula as well as beneath southern Africa. An analysis of the scattering regions relative to sources and receivers indicates that these regions represent areas of increased scattering likely due to increased heterogeneities close to the CMB. The 1. Hz array data used in this study is most sensitive to heterogeneity with scale lengths of about 10. km. Given the small size of the scatterers, a chemical origin of the heterogeneities is likely. By comparing the location of the fine-scale heterogeneity to geodynamical models and tomographic images, we identify different scattering mechanisms in regions related to subduction (Caribbean and Patagonia) and dense thermo chemical piles (Southern Africa). ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Accuracy of recent potential energy surfaces for the He-N2 interaction. II. Molecular beam scattering and bulk gas relaxation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Fortún Stoker, Jamie; Dham, Ashok K.; McCourt, Frederick R. W.; Dickinson, Alan S.

    2008-06-01

    A new semiempirical exchange-Coulomb model potential energy surface for the N2-He interaction was reported recently [A. K. Dham et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 054302 (2007)] and, using it, the temperature dependence of bulk gas properties of N2-He mixtures, such as the second virial coefficient and traditional transport phenomena, most of which depend primarily on the isotropic component of the interaction potential energy surface, was determined. Values of these properties, along with values calculated using two high-quality ab initio potential energy surfaces [C.-H. Hu and A. J. Thakkar, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 2541 (1996); K. Patel et al., ibid 119, 909 (2003)] were compared critically to available experimental data. The present paper reports on the ability of the same three potential energy surfaces to predict state-to-state and total differential cross sections, total integral cross sections, and the temperature dependence of bulk gas relaxation phenomena (including magnetic field effects on transport coefficients). While all three potential energy surfaces give total differential and higher speed integral scattering results that fall within the experimental uncertainties, integral scattering results and state-to-state differential cross section measurements consistently exceed the calculated values. All three surfaces give similar agreement with the relaxation properties of N2-He binary mixtures, with the semiempirical exchange-Coulomb model potential energy surface giving slightly better overall agreement with experiment than the two ab initio potential energy surfaces.

  19. Determination of {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O sensitivity factors and charge-exchange processes in low-energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tellez, H.; Chater, R. J.; Fearn, S.; Symianakis, E.; Kilner, J. A.; Brongersma, H. H.

    2012-10-08

    Quantitative analysis in low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) requires an understanding of the charge-exchange processes to estimate the elemental sensitivity factors. In this work, the neutralization of He{sup +} scattered by {sup 18}O-exchanged silica at energies between 0.6 and 7 keV was studied. The process is dominated by Auger neutralization for E{sub i} < 0.8 keV. An additional mechanism starts above the reionization threshold. This collision-induced neutralization becomes the dominant mechanism for E{sub i} > 2 keV. The ion fractions P{sup +} were determined for Si and O using the characteristic velocity method to quantify the surface density. The {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O sensitivity ratio indicates an 18% higher sensitivity for the heavier O isotope.

  20. Angular and charge state distributions of highly charged ions scattered during low energy surface-channeling interactions with Au(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.W.; Folkerts, L.; Schippers, S.

    1994-10-01

    The authors have measured scattered projectile angular and charge state distributions for 3.75 keV/amu O{sup q+} (3 {le} q {le} 8) and 1.2 keV/amu Ar{sup 1+} (3 {le} q {le} 14) ions grazingly incident along the [110] and [100] directions of a Au(110) single crystal target. Scattered projectile angular distribution characteristic of surface channeling are observed. For both incident species, the dominant scattered charge fraction is neutral, which varies only by a few percent as a function of incident charge state. Significant O{sup {minus}} formation is observed, which manifests a distinct velocity threshold. For incident Ar projectiles with open L-shells, the positive scattered charge fractions, while always less than about 10%, increase linearly with increasing number of initial L-shell vacancies.

  1. Probing ultrathin film continuity and interface abruptness with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenyu; Nahm, Rambert K.; Engstrom, James R.; Ma, Paul F.

    2013-11-15

    The authors have examined ultrathin (≤10 Å) tantalum nitride (TaN{sub x}) thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on three surfaces relevant to interconnect layers in microelectronic devices: thermally grown SiO{sub 2}; a Cu thin film grown by physical vapor deposition, and a carbon-doped SiO{sub 2} porous low-κ thin film. The authors have employed ex situ angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS), low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the continuity of these thin films, and by implication, the abruptness of the thin film/substrate interface. On SiO{sub 2} and low-κ, the authors find similar results: both ARXPS and AFM indicate that smooth, uniform thin films are deposited, consistent with nearly layer-by-layer growth of TaN{sub x} on these surfaces. Examination of these films using LEISS reveals that while the 10 Å TaN{sub x} thin films are continuous, the 5 Å TaN{sub x} thin films are not continuous and may possess on the order of ∼10% exposed substrate in the form of small subnanometer inclusions. On Cu, the situation is quite different. The TaN{sub x} thin films on these surfaces are not continuous, and our results point to a mixed layer of TaN{sub x} and Cu forming during ALD. In all cases, if one were to rely solely on results from ARXPS, the picture would be incomplete as the results from LEISS are ultimately decisive concerning thin film continuity.

  2. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-06-01

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of 1 /pTn at high pT . The power index n is 4-5 for jet production and is 6-10 for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest pT region in p p collisions at the LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the possible dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole pT region at central rapidity in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power indices of UA1 and ATLAS jet spectra over an extended pT region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX collaborations in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that may be cast into a single-particle nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution. Because of such a connection, the nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution may be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions.

  3. Search for Electron Neutrino Appearance in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Orchanian, Mhair; /Caltech

    2011-09-01

    The MINOS Collaboration continues its search for {nu}{sub e} appearance in the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) beam at Fermilab. Neutrinos in the beam interact in the Near Detector, located 1 km from the beam source, allowing us to characterize the backgrounds present in our analysis. In particular, we can estimate the number of {nu}{sub e} candidate events we expect to see in the Far Detector (735 km away, in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota) in the presence or absence of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillation. Recent efforts to improve the sensitivity of the analysis, including upgrades to the event identification algorithm and fitting procedure, are discussed, and the latest results from the search are presented.

  4. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Holin, Anna Maria

    2010-02-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which sends a high intensity muon neutrino beam through two functionally identical detectors, a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, 1km from the beam source, and a Far detector, 734km away, in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. MINOS may be able to measure the neutrino mixing angle parameter sin213 for the rst time. Detector granularity, however, makes it very hard to distinguish any e appearance signal events characteristic of a non-zero value of θ 13 from background neutral current (NC) and short-track vμ charged current (CC) events. Also, uncertainties in the hadronic shower modeling in the kinematic region characteristic of this analysis are relatively large. A new data-driven background decomposition method designed to address those issues is developed and its results presented. By removing the long muon tracks from vμ-CC events, the Muon Removed Charge Current (MRCC) method creates independent pseudo-NC samples that can be used to correct the MINOS Monte Carlo to agree with the high-statistics Near detector data and to decompose the latter into components so as to predict the expected Far detector background. The MRCC method also provides an important cross-check in the Far detector to test the background in the signal selected region. MINOS finds a 1.0-1.5 σ ve-CC excess above background in the Far detector data, depending on method used, for a total exposure of 3.14 x 1020 protons-on-target. Interpreting this excess as signal, MINOS can set limits on sin213. Using the MRCC method, MINOS sets a limit of sin2 2 θ 13 < 0.265 at the 90% confidence limit for a CP-violating phase δ = 0.

  5. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Orchanian, Mhair-armen Hagop

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for ve appearance in the two-detector long-baseline MINOS neutrino experiment at Fermilab, based on a data set representing an exposure of 8.2×1020 protons on the NuMI target. The analysis detailed herein represents an increase in sensitivity to the θ13 mixing angle of approximately 25% over previous analyses, due to improvements in the event discriminant and fitting technique. Based on our observation, we constrain the value of θ13 further, finding 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13< 0.12(0.20) at the 90% confidence level for δCP = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The best-fit value is 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13 = 0.041+0.047 -0.031(0.079+0.071 -0.053) under the same assumptions. We exclude the θ 13 = 0 hypothesis at the 89% confidence level.

  6. Experimental verification of a method to create a variable energy neutron beam from a monoenergetic, isotropic source using neutron elastic scatter and time of flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Flaska, Marek; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    An experiment was performed to determine the neutron energy of near-monoergetic deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutrons that elastically scatter in a hydrogenous target. The experiment used two liquid scintillators to perform time of flight (TOF) measurements to determine neutron energy, with the start detector also serving as the scatter target. The stop detector was placed 1.0 m away and at scatter angles of π/6, π/4, and π/3 rad, and 1.5 m at a scatter angle of π/4 rad. When discrete 1 ns increments were implemented, the TOF peaks had estimated errors between -21.2 and 3.6% relative to their expected locations. Full widths at half-maximum (FWHM) ranged between 9.6 and 20.9 ns, or approximately 0.56-0.66 MeV. Monte Carlo simulations were also conducted that approximated the experimental setup and had both D-D and deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. The simulated results had errors between -17.2 and 0.0% relative to their expected TOF peaks when 1 ns increments were applied. The largest D-D and D-T FWHMs were 26.7 and 13.7 ns, or approximately 0.85 and 4.98 MeV, respectively. These values, however, can be reduced through manipulation of the dimensions of the system components. The results encourage further study of the neutron elastic scatter TOF system with particular interest in application to active neutron interrogation to search for conventional explosives.

  7. Rainbow scattering in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoi-breve, Y.A.; Kuznichenko, A.V.; Onishchenko, G.M.; Pilipenko, V.V.

    1987-03-01

    The evolution of ideas about the rainbow phenomenon resulting from the refraction and reflection of light in water drops is briefly reviewed. The rainbow scattering of particles in quantum mechanics is treated on the basis of the semiclassical approximation, and the nuclear and Coulomb ''rainbows'' are discussed. Rainbow scattering of light ions by nuclei at energies Eapprox. >25--30 MeV/nucleon is considered. The results of theoretical analysis of experimental data on rainbow scattering are presented. The behavior of the nuclear part of the scattering phase shift deduced from experiment is discussed. The manifestation of rainbow scattering in quasielastic nuclear processes is considered.

  8. Net electron-phonon scattering rates in InN/GaN multiple quantum wells: The effects of an energy dependent acoustic deformation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, H. Patterson, R.; Feng, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Conibeer, G.

    2014-08-11

    The rates of charge carrier relaxation by phonon emission are of substantial importance in the field of hot carrier solar cell, primarily in investigation of mechanisms to slow down hot carrier cooling. In this work, energy and momentum resolved deformation potentials relevant to electron-phonon scattering are computed for wurtzite InN and GaN as well as an InN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) superlattice using ab-initio methods. These deformation potentials reveal important features such as discontinuities across the electronic bandgap of the materials and variations over tens of eV. The energy dependence of the deformation potential is found to be very similar for wurtzite nitrides despite differences between the In and Ga pseudopotentials and their corresponding electronic band structures. Charge carrier relaxation by this mechanism is expected to be minimal for electrons within a few eV of the conduction band edge. However, hole scattering at energies more accessible to excitation by solar radiation is possible between heavy and light hole states. Moderate reductions in overall scattering rates are observed in MQW relative to the bulk nitride materials.

  9. Optimization of energy window and evaluation of scatter compensation methods in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We used the ideal observer (IO) and IO with model mismatch (IO-MM) applied in the projection domain and an anthropomorphic channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) applied to reconstructed images to optimize the acquisition energy window width and to evaluate various scatter compensation methods in the context of a myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) defect detection task. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process and thus reflects the performance with perfect compensation for image-degrading factors. Thus, using the IO to optimize imaging systems could lead to suboptimal parameters compared with those optimized for humans interpreting SPECT images reconstructed with imperfect or no compensation. The IO-MM allows incorporating imperfect system models into the IO optimization process. We found that with near-perfect scatter compensation, the optimal energy window for the IO and CHO was similar; in its absence, the IO-MM gave a better prediction of the optimal energy window for the CHO using different scatter compensation methods. These data suggest that the IO-MM may be useful for projection-domain optimization when MM is significant and that the IO is useful when followed by reconstruction with good models of the image formation process. PMID:26029730

  10. On a partial differential equation method for determining the free energies and coexisting phase compositions of ternary mixtures from light scattering data.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S; Thurston, George M; Lutzer, Carl V

    2008-08-14

    In this paper we present a method for determining the free energies of ternary mixtures from light scattering data. We use an approximation that is appropriate for liquid mixtures, which we formulate as a second-order nonlinear partial differential equation. This partial differential equation (PDE) relates the Hessian of the intensive free energy to the efficiency of light scattering in the forward direction. This basic equation applies in regions of the phase diagram in which the mixtures are thermodynamically stable. In regions in which the mixtures are unstable or metastable, the appropriate PDE is the nonlinear equation for the convex hull. We formulate this equation along with continuity conditions for the transition between the two equations at cloud point loci. We show how to discretize this problem to obtain a finite-difference approximation to it, and we present an iterative method for solving the discretized problem. We present the results of calculations that were done with a computer program that implements our method. These calculations show that our method is capable of reconstructing test free energy functions from simulated light scattering data. If the cloud point loci are known, the method also finds the tie lines and tie triangles that describe thermodynamic equilibrium between two or among three liquid phases. A robust method for solving this PDE problem, such as the one presented here, can be a basis for optical, noninvasive means of characterizing the thermodynamics of multicomponent mixtures.

  11. Simple model of bulk and surface excitation effects to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2011-09-01

    The effect of bulk and surface excitations to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is studied using the dielectric formalism. Calculations are based on a semiempirical dielectric response function for MWCNTs determined by means of a many-pole plasmon model with parameters adjusted to available experimental spectroscopic data under theoretical sum-rule constrains. Finite-size effects are considered in the context of electron gas theory via a boundary correction term in the plasmon dispersion relations, thus, allowing a more realistic extrapolation of the electronic excitation spectrum over the whole energy-momentum plane. Energy-loss differential and total inelastic scattering cross sections as a function of electron energy and distance from the surface, valid over the energy range {approx}50-30,000 eV, are calculated with the individual contribution of bulk and surface excitations separated and analyzed for the case of normally incident and escaping electrons. The sensitivity of the results to the various approximations for the spatial dispersion of the electronic excitations is quantified. Surface excitations are shown to have a strong influence upon the shape and intensity of the energy-loss differential cross section in the near surface region whereas the general notion of a spatially invariant inelastic mean free path inside the material is found to be of good approximation.

  12. Adsorption of Iodine and Potassium on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Investigated by Low Energy Alkali Ion Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, G.D.; Gann, R.D.; Cao, J.X.; Wu, R.Q.; Wen, J.; Xu, Z.; Gu, G.D.; Yarmoff, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of K and I on the surface of the high-T{sub c} cuprate BSCCO-2212 is investigated with low-energy (0.8 to 2 keV) Na{sup +} ion scattering and density functional theory (DFT). Samples were cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum and charge-resolved spectra of the scattered ions were collected with time-of-flight. The spectra contain a single peak representing Na scattered from Bi, as the clean surfaces are terminated by BiO. The neutralization of scattered Na depends on the local potential above the target site, and the angular dependence indicates that the clean surface has an inhomogeneous potential. Neutralization is dependent on the coverage of I, but independent of K adsorption. DFT suggests high-symmetry sites for the adsorption of both I and K, and that the potential above the Bi sites is altered by I by an amount consistent with the experimental findings, while the potential is not affected by K adsorption. DFT also enables an experimental determination of the 'freezing distance,' which is the effective point beyond which charge exchange does not occur, to be 1.6 {+-} 0.1 {angstrom} from the outermost Bi layer.

  13. Crossover from inelastic magnetic scattering of Cooper pairs to spin-wave dispersion produces the low-energy kink structure in the spectra of cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmoy; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present GW-based-self-energy calculations for the state of the coexisting spin-density-wave and d-wave superconductivity in a series of cuprate superconductors. The spin-resonance spectrum is found to exhibit the typical “hourglass” form whose upward and downward dispersion branches come from the gapped-spin-wave and magnetic scattering, of Cooper pairs, respectively. We show that the crossover between these two different dispersion features leads to an abrupt change of slope in the quasiparticle self-energy, and hence, the low-energy kink commences in the single-particle quasiparticle spectrum. The calculated electron-boson-coupling strength agrees well with experimental data as a function of temperature, doping, and material. The results demonstrate that electronic correlations dominate the quasiparticle spectra of cuprates near the low-energy kink, suggesting a relatively smaller role for phonons in this energy range.

  14. Low-energy elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons from SO{sub 2} using the R-matrix method

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Monika; Baluja, K. L.

    2006-04-15

    R-matrix method is used to calculate elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections for electron-SO{sub 2} collision. The electron-impact excitation cross sections for first seven low-lying electronic excited states of SO{sub 2} molecule from the ground state of SO{sub 2} molecule have been calculated for the first time. Sixteen low-lying electronic states of SO{sub 2} molecule are included in the close coupling expansion of the wave function of the entire scattering system, which have vertical excitation energies up to 10.51 eV. Configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions are used to calculate these excitation energies. In our CI model, we keep the core 14 electrons frozen in doubly occupied molecular orbitals 1a{sub 1}, 2a{sub 1}, 3a{sub 1}, 4a{sub 1}, 1b{sub 1}, 1b{sub 2}, 2b{sub 2} and the remaining 18 electrons span the relevant active space: 5a{sub 1}, 6a{sub 1}, 7a{sub 1}, 8a{sub 1}, 9a{sub 1}, 2b{sub 1}, 3b{sub 1}, 3b{sub 2}, 4b{sub 2}, 5b{sub 2}, 6b{sub 2}, and 1a{sub 2}. Our calculated dipole moment of the ground state of SO{sub 2} at its equilibrium geometry is 0.79 a.u., which is in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental value 0.64 a.u. Our calculations detect one bound SO{sub 2}{sup -} state ({sup 2}B{sub 1}) at the equilibrium geometry of SO{sub 2} molecule. Both shape as well as core-excited shape resonances have been identified in the present work and are correlated with the experimental results on dissociative electron attachment study. A detailed analysis of resonances is provided. Cross sections are reported for the electron impact energy range 0-15 eV. All cross section calculations are performed in the fixed-nuclei approximation at the experimental equilibrium geometry of the ground state of SO{sub 2} molecule. We have also investigated dependence of resonances on the geometry of SO{sub 2} molecule to probe the possible pathways for dissociation of resulting negative ion upon electron attachment. We

  15. A method for measuring coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering at a far off-axis high-energy neutrino beam target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brice, S. J.; Cooper, R. L.; DeJongh, F.; Empl, A.; Garrison, L. M.; Hime, A.; Hungerford, E.; Kobilarcik, T.; Loer, B.; Mariani, C.; Mocko, M.; Muhrer, G.; Pattie, R.; Pavlovic, Z.; Ramberg, E.; Scholberg, K.; Tayloe, R.; Thornton, R. T.; Yoo, J.; Young, A.

    2014-04-01

    We present an experimental method for measuring the process of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS). This method uses a detector situated transverse to a high-energy neutrino beam production target. This detector would be sensitive to the low-energy neutrinos arising from decay-at-rest pions in the target. We discuss the physics motivation for making this measurement and outline the predicted backgrounds and sensitivities using this approach. We report a measurement of neutron backgrounds as found in an off-axis surface location of the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) target. The results indicate that the Fermilab BNB target is a favorable location for a CENNS experiment.

  16. The calculation of the contributions to low energy e+H2 scattering from sigma u+ and Pion u symmetries using the Kohn variational method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, E. A. G.; Baker, D. J.; Plummer, M.

    1990-01-01

    Above incident energies of about 2 eV, the contribution to the total cross section in positron+H2 scattering from the sigma g+ symmetry is insufficient to account for the experimental value. Calculations carried out of the lowest partial waves of sigma u+ symmetry and Pion u symmetry using the Kohn variational method are described. The contributions to the total cross section from the two equivalent partial waves of Pion u symmetry significantly reduce the discrepancy with experiment up to incident energies of 4 to 5 eV. Comparisons are made with recent R-matrix calculations performed by Danby and Tennyson.

  17. Heavy-Higgs-boson production and W/sup -/W/sup +/ scattering processes in e/sup -/e/sup +/ collisions at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.F.; Tofighi-Niaki, A.

    1987-11-01

    We employ exact matrix elements for the reactions e/sup -/e/sup +/..--> nu..nu-barW/sup -/W/sup +/ and e/sup -/e/sup +/..-->..e/sup -/e/sup +/W/sup -/W/sup +/ to explore the observability of a standard-model Higgs boson and of W/sup -/W/sup +/ scattering processes at a high-energy e/sup -/e/sup +/ collider. We consider representative e/sup -/e/sup +/ center-of-mass energies of ..sqrt..s = 0.5, 1, and 2 TeV.

  18. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M.; Granroth, Garrett E.

    2015-05-21

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L3 edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2₋xSrxCuO4 with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (π,π) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La2CuO4 (LCO), which is consistent with themore » previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L3 edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (π,π) and (π,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (π,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (π,π) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (π/2,π/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (π,π) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. Lastly, we find a possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (π,π) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.« less

  19. State-to-state time-of-flight measurements of NO scattering from Au(111): direct observation of translation-to-vibration coupling in electronically nonadiabatic energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Altschäffel, Jan; Rahinov, Igor; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Bartels, Christof

    2013-09-12

    Translational motion is believed to be a spectator degree of freedom in electronically nonadiabatic vibrational energy transfer between molecules and metal surfaces, but the experimental evidence available to support this view is limited. In this work, we have experimentally determined the translational inelasticity in collisions of NO molecules with a single-crystal Au(111) surface-a system with strong electronic nonadiabaticity. State-to-state molecular beam surface scattering was combined with an IR-UV double resonance scheme to obtain high-resolution time-of-flight data. The measurements include vibrationally elastic collisions (v = 3→3, 2→2) as well as collisions where one or two quanta of molecular vibration are excited (2→3, 2→4) or de-excited (2→1, 3→2, 3→1). In addition, we have carried out comprehensive measurements of the effects of rotational excitation on the translational energy of the scattered molecules. We find that under all conditions of this work, the NO molecules lose a large fraction (∼0.45) of their incidence translational energy to the surface. Those molecules that undergo vibrational excitation (relaxation) during the collision recoil slightly slower (faster) than vibrationally elastically scattered molecules. The amount of translational energy change depends on the surface temperature. The translation-to-rotation coupling, which is well-known for v = 0→0 collisions, is found to be significantly weaker for vibrationally inelastic than elastic channels. Our results clearly show that the spectator view of the translational motion in electronically nonadiabatic vibrational energy transfer between NO and Au(111) is only approximately correct.

  20. Contribution of Delbrück scattering to the refractive index of substances at mega-electronvolt photon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, Sergey F.; Kravets, Ekaterina M.

    2016-10-01

    Recent work by Habs et al. [1] posits that for MeV photons, the contribution of Delbrück scattering to the refractive index of a substance δD becomes dominant as compared with the ordinary polarization contribution due to free electrons. Using the same method suggested Habs et al., we have calculated the contribution of Delbrück scattering using the dispersion relation between δD and the pair creation cross section in the nuclear Coulomb field σp. We have also considered the corrections related to the near-threshold behavior of σp and estimated the contribution of higher-order Delbrück scattering corrections. Our results indicate that δD for MeV photons is small and cannot be responsible for making the index of refraction for silicon larger than unity.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of soft fermion excitations in hot QCD plasma II: Soft-quark hard-particle scattering and energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Yu. A.; Markova, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    In general line with our first work [Yu.A. Markov, M.A. Markova, Nucl. Phys. A 770 (2006) 162] within the framework of semiclassical approximation a general theory for the scattering processes of soft (anti)quark excitations off hard thermal particles in hot QCD-medium is thoroughly considered. The dynamical equations describing evolution for the usual classical color charge Q(t) and Grassmann color charges θ(t),θ(t) of hard particle taking into account the soft fermion degree of freedom of the system are suggested. On the basis of these equations and the Blaizot-Iancu equations iterative procedure of calculation of effective currents and sources generating the scattering processes under consideration is defined and their form up to third order in powers of free soft quark field, soft gluon one, and initial values of the color charges of hard particle is explicitly calculated. With use of the generalized Tsytovich principle a connection between matrix elements of the scattering processes and the effective currents and sources is established. In the context of the effective theory suggested for soft and hard fermion excitations new mechanisms of energy losses of high-energy parton propagating through QCD-medium are considered.

  2. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy pp and pp¯ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-06-22

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energymore » $pp$ and $$p\\bar p $$ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $$p \\bar p$$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Lastly, because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions.« less

  3. Coherent scattering of cosmic neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opher, R.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that cosmic neutrino scattering can be non-negligible when coherence effects previously neglected are taken into account. The coherent neutrino scattering cross section is derived and the neutrino index of refraction evaluated. As an example of coherent neutrino scattering, a detector using critical reflection is described which in principle can detect the low energy cosmic neutrino background allowed by the measured cosmological red shift.

  4. Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Wong, Eric W. (Inventor); von Allmen, Paul (Inventor); Oyafuso, Fabiano A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and devices for spectroscopic identification of molecules using nanoscale wires are disclosed. According to one of the methods, nanoscale wires are provided, electrons are injected into the nanoscale wire; and inelastic electron scattering is measured via excitation of low-lying vibrational energy levels of molecules bound to the nanoscale wire.

  5. Theory of Multiple Coulomb Scattering from Extended Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, L. N.; Rainwater, J.

    1954-08-01

    Two independent methods are described for calculating the multiple scattering distribution for projected angle scattering resulting when very high energy charged particles traverse a thick scatterer. The results are compared with the theories of Moliere and Olbert.

  6. Elastic scattering measurement for the system 17O + 58Ni at Coulomb barrier energies with silicon strip detectors exploiting ASIC electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorini, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Molini, P.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, C.; Manea, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Di Meo, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Boiano, A.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Parascandolo, L.; Sandoli, M.; Soramel, F.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Veronese, F.

    2013-03-01

    The quasi elastic scattering of a 17O projectile from a 58Ni target has been studied at beam energies ranging from 42.5 to 55.0 MeV in 2.5 MeV steps. The total reaction cross sections were derived from the measured angular distributions by using an optical model fit within the coupled-channel code FRESCO. These cross sections are very similar to those measured for 17F (loosely bound by 0.6 MeV), mirror nucleus of 17O (tightly bound by 4.14 MeV). This outcome points out that, in this energy range, the small binding energy of the 17F valence proton has negligible influence onto the reactivity of such a loosely bound projectile, contrary to simple expectations, and to what observed for other loosely bound nuclei. The reaction dynamics seems to be influenced mainly by the Coulomb interaction which is similar for both mirror projectiles.

  7. Global scale observations of scattered energy near the inner-core boundary: Seismic constraints on the base of the outer-core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J. M.-C.; Romanowicz, B.

    2015-08-01

    We have collected a global dataset of several thousands of high quality records of PKPdf, PKPbc, PKPbc-diff and PKPab phase arrivals in the distance range [149-178°]. Within this collection, we have identified an energy packet that arrives 5-20 s after the PKPbc (or PKPbc-diff) and represents a phase that is not predicted by 1D reference seismic models. We use array analysis techniques to enhance the signal of these scattered phases and show that they originate along the great-circle path in a consistent range of arrival times and narrow range of ray parameters. We therefore refer to this scattered energy the "M" phase. Using the cross-correlation technique to detect and measure the scattered energy arrival times, we compiled a dataset of 1116 records of this M phase. There are no obvious variations with source or station location, nor with the depth of the source. After exploration of possible location for this M phase, we show that its origin is most likely in the vicinity of the inner-core boundary. A tentative model is found that predicts an M-like phase, and produces good fits to its travel times as well as those of the main core phases. In this model, the P velocity profile with depth exhibits an increased gradient from about 400 km to 50 km above the ICB (i.e. slightly faster velocities than in AK135 or PREM), and a ∼ 50 km thick lower velocity layer right above the ICB.

  8. Low-energy dispersion of dynamic charge stripes in La1.75Sr0.25NiO4 observed with inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ruidan; Tranquada, John; Gu, Genda; Reznik, Dmitry; Winn, Barry

    The dynamic stripe correlations have been the subject of intense research, owing to the possible links with high-Tc superconductivity. In light of a recently published, direct observation of charge-stripe fluctuations in La2-xSrxNiO4 using inelastic neutron scattering, we did a follow-up neutron experiment on a x=0.25 sample to characterize the low-energy dispersion of these dynamic charge stripes using the HYSPEC instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source. The scattering signals are collected in the vicinity of a charge-order peak with a large wave vector (4.4, 3, 0), where dynamic spin-stripe correlations are negligible. Mapping the low-energy charge-stripe fluctuations in a wide temperature range, we observe a finite dispersion along the stripe-modulation direction at T >=160K where the charge stripes become disordered, while the steep dispersion in the orthogonal direction is not resolved. Work at BNL supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-SC00112704.

  9. Scaled energy (z) distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV from xenon and deuterium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H. J.; Venkataramania, H.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-08-01

    Fermilab Experiment-665 measured deep-inelastic scattering of 490 GeV muons off deuterium and xenon targets. Events were selected with a range of energy exchange ν from 100 GeV to 500 GeV and with large ranges of Q2 and xBj: 0.1 GeV2/c2energy (z) distributions of forward-produced hadrons from the two targets have been compared as a function of the kinematics of the scattering; specifically, the kinematic region of ``shadowing'' has been compared to that of nonshadowing. The dependence of the distributions upon the order of the hadrons, determined by the fractional energies, has been examined as well; a strong degree of similarity has been observed in the shapes of the distributions of the different order hadrons. These z distributions, however, show no nuclear dependence, even in the kinematic region of shadowing.

  10. Scaled energy ([ital z]) distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV from xenon and deuterium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.; Aied, S.; Anthony, P.L.; Baker, M.D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A.A.; Braun, H.M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T.; Conrad, J.M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S.K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H.J.; Geesaman, D.F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M.C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V.W.; Jackson, H.E.; Jaffe, D.E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D.M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H.G.E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lubatti, H.J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D.G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H.E.; Morfin, J.G.; Nickerson, R.B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F.M.; Ramberg, E.J.; Roeser, A.; Ryan, J.J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schueler, K.P.; Seyerlein, H.J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.A.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P.H.; Stier, H.E.; St

    1994-08-01

    Fermilab Experiment-665 measured deep-inelastic scattering of 490 GeV muons off deuterium and xenon targets. Events were selected with a range of energy exchange [nu] from 100 GeV to 500 GeV and with large ranges of [ital Q][sup 2] and [ital x][sub Bj]: 0.1 GeV[sup 2]/[ital c][sup 2][lt][ital Q][sup 2][lt]150 GeV[sup 2]/[ital c][sup 2] and 0.001[lt][ital x][sub Bj][lt]0.5. The fractional energy ([ital z]) distributions of forward-produced hadrons from the two targets have been compared as a function of the kinematics of the scattering; specifically, the kinematic region of shadowing'' has been compared to that of nonshadowing. The dependence of the distributions upon the [ital order] of the hadrons, determined by the fractional energies, has been examined as well; a strong degree of similarity has been observed in the shapes of the distributions of the different order hadrons. These [ital z] distributions, however, show no nuclear dependence, even in the kinematic region of shadowing.

  11. The energy spectrum of scattered particles in the K-shell ionization of medium heavy atoms by relativistic electrons and positrons with exchange effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, S.

    2008-08-01

    The energy spectrum of scattered particles in the K-shell ionization of medium to heavy atoms by relativistic electrons and positrons with exchange effects has been calculated for various kinematic conditions. In this calculation, the final state is described by a non-relativistic multiple-scattering wavefunction of Das and Seal (1993a Phys. Rev. A 47 2978; 1998 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 31 2355) multiplied by suitable spinors. Exchange effects in the atomic K-shell ionization of 47Ag atoms by relativistic electrons show better agreement with the available experimental data. The peaks are very similar to those observed in the relativistic K-shell ionization of 47Ag atoms by electrons at 500 keV energy (Schule and Nakel 1982 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 15 L639). Some other theoretical computational results are also presented here for comparison. Experimental verification of the present results for higher incident energies and other theoretical calculations by similar wavefunction theories will be interesting.

  12. A new Stark decelerator based surface scattering instrument for studying energy transfer at the gas-surface interface

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Grätz, Fabian; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim; Haak, Henrik; Meijer, Gerard

    2015-04-15

    We report on the design and characterization of a new apparatus for performing quantum-state resolved surface scattering experiments. The apparatus combines optical state-specific molecule preparation with a compact hexapole and a Stark decelerator to prepare carrier gas-free pulses of quantum-state pure CO molecules with velocities controllable between 33 and 1000 m/s with extremely narrow velocity distributions. The ultrahigh vacuum surface scattering chamber includes homebuilt ion and electron detectors, a closed-cycle helium cooled single crystal sample mount capable of tuning surface temperature between 19 and 1337 K, a Kelvin probe for non-destructive work function measurements, a precision leak valve manifold for targeted adsorbate deposition, an inexpensive quadrupole mass spectrometer modified to perform high resolution temperature programmed desorption experiments and facilities to clean and characterize the surface.

  13. How low-energy weak reactions can constrain three-nucleon forces and the neutron-neutron scattering length.

    PubMed

    Gårdestig, A; Phillips, D R

    2006-06-16

    We show that chiral symmetry and gauge invariance enforce relations between the short-distance physics that occurs in a number of electroweak and pionic reactions on light nuclei. Within chiral perturbation theory, this is manifested via the appearance of the same axial isovector two-body contact term in pi(-)d --> nngamma, p-wave pion production in NN collisions, tritium beta decay, pp fusion, nud scattering, and the hep reaction. Using a Gamow-Teller matrix element obtained from calculations of pp fusion as input, we compute the neutron spectrum obtained in pi(-)d --> nngamma. With the short-distance physics in this process controlled from pp --> de(=)nu(e), the theoretical uncertainty in the nn scattering length extracted from pi(-)d --> nngamma is reduced by a factor larger than 3, to approximately < or = 0.05 fm. PMID:16803373

  14. Complementary low energy ion scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of polystyrene submitted to N 2/H 2 glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatto, F.; Rovani, S.; Kaufmann, I. R.; Soares, G. V.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Krug, C.

    2012-02-01

    Low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to access the elemental composition and chemical bonding characteristics of polystyrene (PS) surfaces sequentially treated by corona and glow discharge (plasma) processing in N 2/H 2 ambient. The latter has shown activity as suppressor of pathogenic Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. LEIS indicated that oxygen from the corona discharge process is progressively replaced by nitrogen at the PS surface. XPS shows C dbnd N and N sbnd C dbnd O chemical groups as significant inhibitors of bacterial adhesion, suggesting application in medical devices.

  15. High-energy laser-summator based on Raman scattering principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugeniy Mikhalovich, Zemskov; Zarubin, Peter Vasilievich; Cook, Joung

    2013-02-01

    This paper is a summary of the history, theory, and development efforts of summator, an all-in-one device that coherently combines multiple high-power laser beams, lowers the beam divergence, and shifts the wavelength based on stimulated Raman scattering principle in USSR from early 1960s to late 1970s. This was a part of the Terra-3 program, which was an umbrella program of highly classified high-energy laser weapons development efforts. Some parts of the Terra-3 program, specifically the terminal missile defense portion, were declassified recently, including the information on summator development efforts.

  16. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth.

  17. SMALL-ANGLE NEUTRON SCATTERING CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STRUCTURE OF NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR ENERGY-RELATED APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lilin; Mavila Chathoth, Suresh; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Presser, Volker; Mcdonough, John; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2011-01-01

    We used small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron contrast variation to study the structure of four nanoporouscarbons prepared by thermo-chemical etching of titanium carbide TiC in chlorine at 300, 400, 600, and 800 C with pore diameters ranging between -4 and -11 {angstrom}. SANS patterns were obtained from dry samples and samples saturated with deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O) in order to delineate origin of the power law scattering in the low Q domain as well as to evaluate pore accessibility for D{sub 2}O molecules. SANS cross section of all samples was fitted to Debye-Anderson-Brumberger (DAB), DAB-Kirste-Porod models as well as to the Guinier and modified Guinier formulae for cylindrical objects, which allowed for evaluating the radii of gyration as well as the radii and lengths of the pores under cylindrical shape approximation. SANS data from D{sub 2}O-saturated samples indicate that strong upturn in the low Q limit usually observed in the scattering patterns from microporous carbon powders is due to the scattering from outer surface of the powder particles. Micropores are only partially filled with D{sub 2}O molecules due to geometrical constraints and or partial hydrophobicity of the carbon matrix. Structural parameters of the dry carbons obtained using SANS are compared with the results of the gas sorption measurements and the values agree for carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) obtained at high chlorination temperatures (>600 C). For lower chlorination temperatures, pore radii obtained from gas sorption overestimate the actual pore size as calculated from SANS for two reasons: inaccessible small pores are present and the model-dependent fitting based on density functional theory models assumes non-spherical pores, whereas SANS clearly indicates that the pore shape in microporous CDC obtained at low chlorination temperatures is nearly spherical.

  18. Born approximation, scattering, and algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Alex; Hu, Mengqi; Gu, Haicheng; Qiao, Zhijun

    2015-05-01

    In the past few decades, there were many imaging algorithms designed in the case of the absence of multiple scattering. Recently, we discussed an algorithm for removing high order scattering components from collected data. This paper is a continuation of our previous work. First, we investigate the current state of multiple scattering in SAR. Then, we revise our method and test it. Given an estimate of our target reflectivity, we compute the multi scattering effects in the target region for various frequencies. Furthermore, we propagate this energy through free space towards our antenna, and remove it from the collected data.

  19. Direct rapid analysis of trace bioavailable soil macronutrients by chemometrics-assisted energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaniu, M I; Angeyo, K H; Mwala, A K; Mangala, M J

    2012-06-01

    Precision agriculture depends on the knowledge and management of soil quality (SQ), which calls for affordable, simple and rapid but accurate analysis of bioavailable soil nutrients. Conventional SQ analysis methods are tedious and expensive. We demonstrate the utility of a new chemometrics-assisted energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering (EDXRFS) spectroscopy method we have developed for direct rapid analysis of trace 'bioavailable' macronutrients (i.e. C, N, Na, Mg, P) in soils. The method exploits, in addition to X-ray fluorescence, the scatter peaks detected from soil pellets to develop a model for SQ analysis. Spectra were acquired from soil samples held in a Teflon holder analyzed using (109)Cd isotope source EDXRF spectrometer for 200 s. Chemometric techniques namely principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were utilized for pattern recognition based on fluorescence and Compton scatter peaks regions, and to develop multivariate quantitative calibration models based on Compton scatter peak respectively. SQ analyses were realized with high CMD (R(2)>0.9) and low SEP (0.01% for N and Na, 0.05% for C, 0.08% for Mg and 1.98 μg g(-1) for P). Comparison of predicted macronutrients with reference standards using a one-way ANOVA test showed no statistical difference at 95% confidence level. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that an XRF method has demonstrated utility in trace analysis of macronutrients in soil or related matrices.

  20. An adaptive-in-temperature method for on-the-fly sampling of thermal neutron scattering data in continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlou, Andrew Theodore

    The Monte Carlo simulation of full-core neutron transport requires high fidelity data to represent not only the various types of possible interactions that can occur, but also the temperature and energy regimes for which these data are relevant. For isothermal conditions, nuclear cross section data are processed in advance of running a simulation. In reality, the temperatures in a neutronics simulation are not fixed, but change with respect to the temperatures computed from an associated heat transfer or thermal hydraulic (TH) code. To account for the temperature change, a code user must either 1) compute new data at the problem temperature inline during the Monte Carlo simulation or 2) pre-compute data at a variety of temperatures over the range of possible values. Inline data processing is computationally inefficient while pre-computing data at many temperatures can be memory expensive. An alternative on-the-fly approach to handle the temperature component of nuclear data is desired. By on-the-fly we mean a procedure that adjusts cross section data to the correct temperature adaptively during the Monte Carlo random walk instead of before the running of a simulation. The on-the-fly procedure should also preserve simulation runtime efficiency. While on-the-fly methods have recently been developed for higher energy regimes, the double differential scattering of thermal neutrons has not been examined in detail until now. In this dissertation, an on-the-fly sampling method is developed by investigating the temperature dependence of the thermal double differential scattering distributions. The temperature dependence is analyzed with a linear least squares regression test to develop fit coefficients that are used to sample thermal scattering data at any temperature. The amount of pre-stored thermal scattering data has been drastically reduced from around 25 megabytes per temperature per nuclide to only a few megabytes per nuclide by eliminating the need to compute data

  1. Atom scattering from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, W. W.

    In the initial portion of this dissertation studies of Ar scattering from Ru(0001) at thermal and hyperthermal energies are compared to calculations with classical scattering theory. These data exhibited a number of characteristics that are unusual in comparison to other systems for which atomic beam experiments have been carried out under similar conditions. The measured energy losses were unusually small. Some of the angular distributions exhibited an anomalous shoulder feature in addition to a broad peak near the specular direction and quantum mechanical diffraction was observed under conditions for which it was not expected. Many of the unusual features observed in the measurements are explained, but only upon using an effective surface mass of 2.3 Ru atomic masses, which implies collective effects in the Ru crystal. The large effective mass, because it leads to substantially larger Debye-Waller factors, explains and confirms the observations of diffraction features. It also leads to the interesting conclusion that Ru is a metal for which atomic beam scattering measurements in the purely quantum mechanical regime, where diffraction and single-phonon creation are dominant, should be possible not only with He atoms, but with many other atomic species with larger masses. A useful theoretical expression for interpreting and analyzing observed scattering intensity spectra for atomic and molecular collisions with surfaces is the differential reflection coefficient for a smooth, vibrating surface. This differential reflection coefficient depends on a parameter, usually expressed in dimensions of velocity, that arises due to correlated motions of neighboring regions of the surface and can be evaluated if the polarization vectors of the phonons near the surface are known. As a part of this dissertation experimental conditions are suggested under which this velocity paramenter may be more precisely measured than it has been in the past. Experimental data for scattering

  2. Elastic scattering of {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O at energies E/A between 5 and 8 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, M. P.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R. M.; Aissaoui, N.; Beck, C.; Elanique, A.; Nouicer, R.; Morsad, A.; Szilner, S.; Basrak, Z.

    1999-12-01

    The elastic scattering of {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O has been measured at nine energies between E{sub lab}=75 and 124 MeV. The data cover up to 100 degree sign in the c.m. and can be described in terms of phenomenological and folding model potentials which reproduce the main features observed. In agreement with studies at higher energies in this and similar systems, refractive effects are present in the angular distributions at all energies. In particular, the passage of Airy minima through 90 degree sign at E{sub c.m.}=40, 47.5, and 62 MeV explains the deep minima observed in the excitation function. The real part of the optical potential is found to vary very little with energy over the studied interval, but the imaginary part shows a rapid change in its shape at incident energy about 90 MeV. Nonetheless, the energy dependence of the volume integral of the real and imaginary parts is in agreement with dispersion relation predictions. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  3. Momentum-transfer, differential and spin-exchange cross sections in the elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by heavy alkali-metal atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrim, Cristian; Thumm, Uwe; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2000-06-01

    Based on the relativistic Dirac R-matrix method, we analyze various angle-dependent cross sections for electron scattering by Rb, Cs and Fr targets at energies below 3 eV. We show our angle-dependent and total spin-exchange cross sections for scattering of non-polarized (or polarized) electrons by polarized (or non-polarized) Rb, Cs and Fr targets, and we compare them with available experimental data (B. Jaduszliwer, N.D. Bhaskar, and B. Bederson Phys.Rev. A 14), 162 (1976).. The influence of relativistic effects is discussed. From the energy and angular dependence analysis of the differential cross section, we obtain clear evidence of the Cs^-(^3F^o) shape resonance at 1.528 eV, in excellent agreement with accurate experiments (W. Gehenn and E. Reichert, J.Phys. B 10), 3105 (1977).. We compare our electron momentum-transfer cross section with available data obtained in swarm experiments for Rb (Y. Nakamura, Trans. IEE of Japan 102-A), 23 (1982). and Cs (H.T. Saelee and J. Lucas, J.Phys. D 12), 1275 (1979)..

  4. A high-energy, high-flux source of gamma-rays from all-optical non-linear Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvan, D. J.; Zepf, M.; Sarri, G.

    2016-09-01

    γ-Ray sources are among the most fundamental experimental tools currently available to modern physics. As well as the obvious benefits to fundamental research, an ultra-bright source of γ-rays could form the foundation of scanning of shipping containers for special nuclear materials and provide the bases for new types of cancer therapy. However, for these applications to prove viable, γ-ray sources must become compact and relatively cheap to manufacture. In recent years, advances in laser technology have formed the cornerstone of optical sources of high energy electrons which already have been used to generate synchrotron radiation on a compact scale. Exploiting the scattering induced by a second laser, one can further enhance the energy and number of photons produced provided the problems of synchronisation and compact γ-ray detection are solved. Here, we report on the work that has been done in developing an all-optical and hence, compact non-linear Thomson scattering source, including the new methods of synchronisation and compact γ-ray detection. We present evidence of the generation of multi-MeV (maximum 16-18 MeV) and ultra-high brilliance (exceeding 1020 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 0.1% BW at 15 MeV) γ-ray beams. These characteristics are appealing for the paramount practical applications mentioned above.

  5. Study of low-frequency dynamics of short peptides by Brillouin light scattering and Monte-Carlo global energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchenkov, V. E.; Fedoseev, A. I.; Petukhov, M. G.; Khavinson, V. Kh; Savvateeva-Popova, E. V.; Lushnikov, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Brillouin light scattering studies of the behavior of hypersound velocity in solutions of short peptides Asp-Ser, Glu-Asp-Arg, Ala-Glu-Asp-Leu with widely varying concentrations at temperatures ranging from 295 to 360K are presented. As shown by analysis of experimental data and molecular simulation, the dipeptide Asp-Ser is characterized by formation of dimers which decompose at high temperatures. High-concentration solutions of tri- and tetrapeptides form aggregates at high temperatures which are preserved on cooling.

  6. Medium-energy ion-scattering study of the structure of clean TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1x1)

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, G. S.; Munoz-Marquez, M. A.; Quinn, P. D.; Gladys, M. J.; Tanner, R. E.; Woodruff, D. P.; Bailey, P.; Noakes, T. C. Q.

    2006-06-15

    100 keV H{sup +} medium-energy ion scattering has been applied to investigate the surface relaxations of the clean rutile TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1x1) surface structure. A set of blocking curves in four different incident directions show clear differences between the surface and bulk attributable to surface relaxation. Optimized values of the surface relaxation parameters to give the best fit to the surface structure are generally in quite good agreement with a recent experimental determination of this structure using quantitative low-energy electron diffraction. In particular, both solutions favor an outward relaxation of the bridging O atoms on the surface rather than the strong inward displacement favored by the only previous experimental structure determination based on surface x-ray diffraction.

  7. Dynamics and the free-energy landscape of proteins, explored with the Mössbauer effect and quasi-elastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Young, Robert D; Fenimore, Paul W

    2013-10-24

    The Mössbauer effect and quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) from hydrated proteins yield sharp elastic lines that are accompanied by broad wings. Conventionally, the elastic line and the broad wings are treated as separate phenomena. We show that there is no separation; the entire spectrum consists of Lorentzians with the natural line width. In protein crystals, the shifts of the individual lines from the elastic center above about 150 K are caused by beta fluctuations in the hydration shell. Vibrations cause shifts in the entire temperature range but are best seen below about 150 K. We construct a microscopic model for the dynamics that is based on a random walk of the proteins in their free-energy landscape. The model yields approximate values for the steps in the energy landscape. Remarkably, the quantum electrodynamic concept of gamma rays is needed to justify the model. PMID:23962200

  8. A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, Christopher M; Liu, C; Stone, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  9. Stochastic approximation to multiple scattering in clouds.

    PubMed

    Zahavi, E

    1979-05-15

    The problem of multiple radiation scattering in a 3-D cloud is considered. The radiation is considered as energy bundles that impinge on the cloud's particles and are scattered around. The probabilistic expressions for bundle distribution are developed. An expression for radiation diffusivity for the nonisotropic scatter is presented. Two numerical examples show the application of the present theory.

  10. Reactive scattering of O and H2 and quenching of OH at collision energies up to 4.4 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gacesa, Marko; Kharchenko, Vasili

    2016-05-01

    We report new cross sections for the O(3 P) + H2 reactive scattering as well as quenching rates for rotationally and vibrationally excited OH by H atoms for a range of collision energies from 0.4 and 4.4 eV. These processes are important for understanding non-local thermal equilibrium (non-LTE) regime in astrophysical environment such as photon-dominated regions (PDRs) and evolution of planetary atmospheres in time, including the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. The cross sections were calculated quantum mechanically using coupled-channel formalism implemented in MOLSCAT and ABC computer codes on refitted recent potential energy surfaces for 3A' and 3A'' , while the surface-hopping effects were estimated from models and similar atom-molecule reactions. A large basis set was used to ensure the convergence at higher energies. Our results agree well with the published data at lower energies and indicate that reduced-dimensionality approach at collision energies higher than about 1.5 eV may not be adequate. Differential cross sections and diffusion cross sections, of interest in transport calculations, are also reported. This work was been supported by NASA grant NNX10AB88G.

  11. O(3P) + CO2 collisions at hyperthermal energies: dynamics of nonreactive scattering, oxygen isotope exchange, and oxygen-atom abstraction.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Okumura, Mitchio; Zhang, Jianming; Minton, Timothy K; Paci, Jeffrey T; Karton, Amir; Martin, Jan M L; Camden, Jon P; Schatz, George C

    2012-01-12

    The dynamics of O((3)P) + CO(2) collisions at hyperthermal energies were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Crossed-molecular-beams experiments at = 98.8 kcal mol(-1) were performed with isotopically labeled (12)C(18)O(2) to distinguish products of nonreactive scattering from those of reactive scattering. The following product channels were observed: elastic and inelastic scattering ((16)O((3)P) + (12)C(18)O(2)), isotope exchange ((18)O + (16)O(12)C(18)O), and oxygen-atom abstraction ((18)O(16)O + (12)C(18)O). Stationary points on the two lowest triplet potential energy surfaces of the O((3)P) + CO(2) system were characterized at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory and by means of W4 theory, which represents an approximation to the relativistic basis set limit, full-configuration-interaction (FCI) energy. The calculations predict a planar CO(3)(C(2v), (3)A'') intermediate that lies 16.3 kcal mol(-1) (W4 FCI excluding zero point energy) above reactants and is approached by a C(2v) transition state with energy 24.08 kcal mol(-1). Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations with collision energies in the range 23-150 kcal mol(-1) were performed at the B3LYP/6-311G(d) and BMK/6-311G(d) levels. Both reactive channels observed in the experiment were predicted by these calculations. In the isotope exchange reaction, the experimental center-of-mass (c.m.) angular distribution, T(θ(c.m.)), of the (16)O(12)C(18)O products peaked along the initial CO(2) direction (backward relative to the direction of the reagent O atoms), with a smaller isotropic component. The product translational energy distribution, P(E(T)), had a relatively low average of = 35 kcal mol(-1), indicating that the (16)O(12)C(18)O products were formed with substantial internal energy. The QCT calculations give c.m. P(E(T)) and T(θ(c.m.)) distributions and a relative product yield that agree qualitatively with the experimental results, and the trajectories indicate that

  12. Electromagnetic wave scattering by an external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannikov, S. S.

    1995-08-01

    The quantum electrodynamics of bilocal fields is used to calculate the triangular Feynman diagrams describing the elastic scattering of a classical electromagnetic wave by an external Coulomb field. The total contribution of the diagrams is nonzero because of the violation of both the Furry theorem (CP or T symmetries) and the Ward identities. The cross section for this scattering process is found for low and high energies. A comparison with Compton scattering and Euler—Heisenberg scattering is given.

  13. Fingerprinting analysis of non-crystalline pharmaceutical compounds using high energy X-rays and the total scattering pair distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timur D.

    2011-12-01

    In the development of new medicinal products, poor oral bioavailability, due to the low solubilities of many active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), is increasingly a barrier for treatments to be administered using tablet or capsule formulations and one of the main challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry. Non-crystalline phases such as the amorphous and nanostructured states can confer increased solubility to a drug, and therefore, have recently garnered a lot of interest from pharmaceutical researchers. However, little is known about local ordering in non-crystalline pharmaceuticals due to the lack of reliable experimental probes, hindering the clinical application of these compounds. The powerful tools of crystallography begin to lose their potency for structures on the nanoscale; conventional X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) patterns become broad and featureless in these cases and are not useful for differentiating between different local molecular packing arrangements. In this thesis, we introduce the use of high energy X-rays coupled with total scattering pair distribution function (TSPDF) and fingerprinting analysis to investigate the local structures of non-crystalline pharmaceutical compounds. The high energy X-rays allow us to experimentally collect diffuse scattering intensities, which contain information about a sample's local ordering, in addition to the Bragg scattering available in conventional XRPD experiments, while the TSPDF allows us to view the intra- and inter-molecular correlations in real space. The goal of this study was to address some fundamental problems involving fingerprinting non-crystalline APIs using TSPDF in order to lay the groundwork for the proper use of the technique by the pharmaceutical community. We achieved this by developing the methodology as well as the exploring the scientific implications. On the methodology side, we introduced PDFGetX3, a new software program for calculating TSPDFs that simplifies the procedure

  14. Combined experimental and theoretical study on the differential elastic scattering cross sections for acetone by electron impact energy of 7.0-50 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastega, D. F.; Lange, E.; Ameixa, J.; Barbosa, A. S.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Ferreira da Silva, F.

    2016-03-01

    We report elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron interactions with acetone, C3H6O . The incident electron energy range was 7.0-50 eV, and the scattered electron angular range for the differential measurements varied from 10° to 120°. The calculated cross sections were obtained with two different methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP), and the independent-atom method with screening-corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR). The present elastic DCSs have been found to agree well with the results of IAM-SCAR calculations above 20 eV, and also with the SMC calculations below 30 eV. Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. Comparison with previous DCSs shows good agreement albeit the present data is extended down to lower electron impact energies. We find a low-lying π* shape resonance located at 2.6 eV, in agreement with recent results on electron collisions with acetone [M. G. P. Homem et al., Phys. Rev. A 92, 032711 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.032711]. The presence of a σ* resonance is also discussed.

  15. Pressure-driven variations of hydrogen bonding energy in ammonium azide (NH4N3): IR absorption and Raman scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoxin; Ma, Fengxian; Ma, Chunli; Cui, Hang; Liu, Zhenxian; Zhu, Hongyang; Wang, Xiaoli; Cui, Qiliang

    2014-07-14

    In this study, high pressure infrared (IR) absorption and Raman scattering studies for ammonium azide (NH4N3) were carried out at room temperature up to 20 GPa and 22 GPa, respectively. For comparison and further assignment, the vibrational spectra at ambient conditions were calculated using CASTEP code, particularly for the far- and mid-IR modes. The recorded vibrational data consistently indicated a pressure-induced phase transition at 2.9 GPa. All observed vibrational modes maintained their identities at the high pressure phase, indicating that NH4N3 was still presented in the form of ammonium cations and azide anions linked by the hydrogen bond (N-H⋯N). Above 2.9 GPa, the relative magnitude of the torsional mode weakened and the N-H symmetric stretch displayed a redshift, indicating strengthened hydrogen bonding energy. The opposite effects were observed above 12 GPa, where the relative magnitude of the torsional mode strengthened and the N-H symmetric stretch reverted to a blueshift, indicating weakened hydrogen bonding energy. It can be concluded that the hydrogen bonding energy exhibited a weakening (0-2.9 GPa), strengthening (2.9-12 GPa), and then again weakening (12-22 GPa) phenomena with the increasing of compression. The hydrogen bonding energy changing with the increase of pressure can be ascribed to a phase transition at 2.9 GPa and a rotational or bending behavior of azide ions at 12 GPa.

  16. Theoretical approach to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in iron-based superconductors at the energy scale of the superconducting gap

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Pasquale; van den Brink, Jeroen; Sykora, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    We develop a phenomenological theory to predict the characteristic features of the momentum-dependent scattering amplitude in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the energy scale of the superconducting gap in iron-based super-conductors. Taking into account all relevant orbital states as well as their specific content along the Fermi surface we evaluate the charge and spin dynamical structure factors for the compounds LaOFeAs and LiFeAs, based on tight-binding models which are fully consistent with recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data. We find a characteristic intensity redistribution between charge and spin dynamical structure factors which discriminates between sign-reversing and sign-preserving quasiparticle excitations. Consequently, our results show that RIXS spectra can distinguish between s± and s++ wave gap functions in the singlet pairing case. In addition, we find that an analogous intensity redistribution at small momenta can reveal the presence of a chiral p-wave triplet pairing. PMID:27151253

  17. Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Lepton Scattering: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gehrmann, T; Roberts, R. G.; Whalley, M. R.; Durham HEP Database Group

    Gehrmann, Roberts, and Whalley in their 1999 paper, A Compilation of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Scattering, published in volume 25 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) note that these data will continue to be relevant to the next generation of hadron colliders. They present data on the unpolarized structure functions F2 and xF3, R D ._L=_T /, the virtual photon asymmetries A1 and A2 and the polarized structure functions g1 and g2, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical format and include predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functionsö as well. The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOE's Fermilab, SLAC, and JLAB are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN and DESY. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also include in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  18. Theoretical approach to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in iron-based superconductors at the energy scale of the superconducting gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Pasquale; van den Brink, Jeroen; Sykora, Steffen

    2016-05-01

    We develop a phenomenological theory to predict the characteristic features of the momentum-dependent scattering amplitude in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the energy scale of the superconducting gap in iron-based super-conductors. Taking into account all relevant orbital states as well as their specific content along the Fermi surface we evaluate the charge and spin dynamical structure factors for the compounds LaOFeAs and LiFeAs, based on tight-binding models which are fully consistent with recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data. We find a characteristic intensity redistribution between charge and spin dynamical structure factors which discriminates between sign-reversing and sign-preserving quasiparticle excitations. Consequently, our results show that RIXS spectra can distinguish between s± and s++ wave gap functions in the singlet pairing case. In addition, we find that an analogous intensity redistribution at small momenta can reveal the presence of a chiral p-wave triplet pairing.

  19. Collisions of No(x2ii) with a Ag(111) surface: New quantum scattering studies based on a semiempirical potential energy surface. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M.H.

    1991-06-15

    The authors report the results of fully quantum close coupled studies of collisions of nitrogen oxide with a silver surface. The recent corrected effective medium potential energy surfaces (PES) of DePristo and Alexander were used. The final state rotational distributions show evidence of at least four rotational rainbows, corresponding to scattering on (and interference between) the two PES which arise when the degeneracy of the NO molecule is lifted upon approach to the surface. A strong tendency is seen to populate the lower spin-orbit manifold at low to moderate final J, which disappears as J rises beyond 30.5 and the final states are better described in Hund`s case (b). Simultaneously, there exists a propensity to populate those A-doublet levels in which the electronic-rotational wave function is antisymmetric with respect to reflection of the electronic coordinates in the plane of rotation of the scattered NO molecule. This feature is opposite to what has been seen experimentally. An approximate averaging over the lateral position of the NO molecule above the surface that although the rainbow oscillations are strongly sensitive to surface corrugation, the fine-structure propensities are not.

  20. Measurement of W-Z interference from neutrino-electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, R.L.; Bowles, T.J.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Doe, P.J.; Frank, J.S.; Potter, M.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. |; Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Lu, X.Q.; Mahler, H.J.; Wang, K.C.; Piasetzky, E.

    1993-04-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering was observed at LAMPF with a 15-ton fine-grained tracking calorimeter exposed to electron-neutrinos from muon decay at rest. The measured {nu}{sub e}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub e}e{sup {minus}} elastic scattering cross section, 10.0 {plus_minus} 1.5(stat) {plus_minus} 0.9(syst) {times} 10{sup {minus}45} cm{sup 2} {times} (E{sub {nu}}(MeV)), gives a model independent measurement of the strength of the destructive interference between the charged and neutral currents, I = {minus}1.07 {plus_minus} 0.21, that agrees well with the standard model (SM) prediction I = {minus}1.08. The agreement between the measured electroweak parameters and SM expectations is used to place limits on neutrino properties, such as neutrino flavor-changing neutral currents and neutrino electromagnetic moments, and on the masses of hypothetical new bosons that would interact with leptons.

  1. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  2. Molecular-beam scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, M. F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N2 from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HC1 (FEMALE) NAC1 + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2(2)P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3(2)P/sub 3/2) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  3. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  4. Solution Structures of Highly Active Molecular Ir Water-Oxidation Catalysts from Density Functional Theory Combined with High-Energy X-ray Scattering and EXAFS Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke R; Matula, Adam J; Kwon, Gihan; Hong, Jiyun; Sheehan, Stafford W; Thomsen, Julianne M; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H; Tiede, David M; Chen, Lin X; Batista, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    The solution structures of highly active Ir water-oxidation catalysts are elucidated by combining density functional theory, high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We find that the catalysts are Ir dimers with mono-μ-O cores and terminal anionic ligands, generated in situ through partial oxidation of a common catalyst precursor. The proposed structures are supported by (1)H and (17)O NMR, EPR, resonance Raman and UV-vis spectra, electrophoresis, etc. Our findings are particularly valuable to understand the mechanism of water oxidation by highly reactive Ir catalysts. Importantly, our DFT-EXAFS-HEXS methodology provides a new in situ technique for characterization of active species in catalytic systems. PMID:27087202

  5. Highly sensitive and selective determination of fluorine ion by graphene oxide/nanogold resonance Rayleigh scattering-energy transfer analytical platform.

    PubMed

    Liang, Aihui; Peng, Jing; Liu, Qingye; Wen, Guiqing; Lu, Zhujun; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2015-08-15

    In pH 4.0 acetate buffer solution, fluorine ions react with fluorine reagent (FR) and La(III) to generate blue ternary complex that exhibited strong absorption at about 370 nm. Upon addition of graphene oxide/nanogold (GO/NG) as resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectral probe with strong RRS peak at 370 nm, the color changed to gray, and the RRS intensity decreased with the increase of fluorine ion concentration due to the RRS energy transfer (RRSET) from GO/NG to the complex. Under the selected condition, the decreased RRS peak ΔI370 nm was linear to fluorine ion concentration in the range of 6.0 × 10(-8)-1.3 × 10(-5)mol/L, with a detection limit of 3.0 × 10(-8)mol/L F(-). This RRSET method was applied to the analysis of fluorine in toothpaste and water samples, with satisfactory results.

  6. High-energy x-ray scattering quantification of in-situ-loading-related strain gradients spanning the dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) in bovine tooth specimens.

    SciTech Connect

    Almer, J. D.; Stock, S. R.; Northeastern Univ.

    2010-08-26

    High energy X-ray scattering (80.7keV photons) at station 1-ID of the Advanced Photon Source quantified internal strains as a function of applied stress in mature bovine tooth. These strains were mapped from dentin through the dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) into enamel as a function of applied compressive stress in two small parallelepiped specimens. One specimen was loaded perpendicular to the DEJ and the second parallel to the DEJ. Internal strains in enamel and dentin increased and, as expected from the relative values of the Young's modulus, the observed strains were much higher in dentin than in enamel. Large strain gradients were observed across the DEJ, and the data suggest that the mantle dentin-DEJ-aprismatic enamel structure may shield the near-surface volume of the enamel from large strains. In the enamel, drops in internal strain for applied stresses above 40MPa also suggest that this structure had cracked.

  7. Nuclear-plus-interference-scattering effect on the energy deposition of multi-MeV protons in a dense Be plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhigang; Fu, Zhenguo; He, Bin; Hu, Zehua; Zhang, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear plus interference scattering (NIS) effect on the stopping power of hot dense beryllium (Be) plasma for multi-MeV protons is theoretically investigated by using the generalized Brown-Preston-Singleton (BPS) model, in which a NIS term is taken into account. The analytical formula of the NIS term is detailedly derived. By using this formula, the density and temperature dependence of the NIS effect is numerically studied, and the results show that the NIS effect becomes more and more important with increasing the plasma temperature or density. Different from the cases of protons traveling through the deuterium-tritium plasmas, for a Be plasma, a prominent oscillation valley structure is observed in the NIS term when the proton's energy is close to Ep=7 MeV . Furthermore, the penetration distance is remarkably reduced when the NIS term is considered.

  8. Local structure and lattice dynamics study of low dimensional materials using atomic pair distribution function and high energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chenyang

    Structure and dynamics lie at the heart of the materials science. A detailed knowledge of both subjects would be foundational in understanding the materials' properties and predicting their potential applications. However, the task becomes increasingly dicult as the particle size is reduced to the nanometer scale. For nanostructured materials their laboratory x-ray scattering patterns are overlapped and broadened, making structure determination impossible. Atomic pair distribution function technique based on either synchrotron x-ray or neutron scattering data is known as the tool of choice for probing local structures. However, to solve the "structure problem" in low-dimensional materials with PDF is still challenging. For example for 2D materials of interest in this thesis the crystallographic modeling approach often yields unphysical thermal factors along stacking direction where new chemical intuitions about their actual structures and new modeling methodology/program are needed. Beyond this, lattice dynamical investigations on nanosized particles are extremely dicult. Laboratory tools such as Raman and infra-red only probe phonons at Brillouin zone center. Although in literature there are a great number of theoretical studies of their vibrational properties based on either empirical force elds or density functional theory, various approximations made in theories make the theoretical predictions less reliable. Also, there lacks the direct experiment result to validate the theory against. In this thesis, we studied the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of technologically relevant low-dimensional materials through synchrotron based x-ray PDF and high energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HERIX) techniques. By collecting PDF data and employing advanced modeling program such as DiPy-CMI, we successfully determined the atomic structures of (i) emerging Ti3C2, Nb4C3 MXenes (transition metal carbides and/or nitrides) that are promising for energy storage

  9. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    PubMed

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  10. Separating Scattering from Intrinsic Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, K.; Scales, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The subsurface appears disordered at all length-scales. Therefore, wave propatation at seismic or ultrasonic frequencies is subject to complicated scatterings. A pulse propagating in the subsurface loses energy at each scattering off an impedance contrast, but also decreases in amplitude as the impulse interacts with fluids in the rock. We call the latter non-elastic effect "intrinsic Q", while the former is "scattering Q". It is often the fluids in the rocks that are of interest, but conventional reflection and transmission of the incident pulse only cannot deceipher the individual components of Q due to scattering and fluid movement in the pore-space. We present an approach that can unravel these two mechanisms, allowing a separate estimate of absorption. This method treats the propagation of the average intensity in the framework of radiative transfer (RT); the arrival of (what is left of) the incident pulse is modeled as the coherent energy, whereas the later arriving multiply scattered events form the incoherent intensity. The coherent pulse decays exponentially due to a combination of scattering and absorption, and so does the incoherent intensity. However, multiple scattering can re-direct energy back to the receiver, supplying a gain-term at later times that makes up the incoherent intensity. Strictly speaking, one can invert for scattering and absorption from the intensity at late times only, often modeled with the late-time equivalent of RT, diffusion. However, we will show that fitting both early- and late-time signal with RT constrains absorption and scattering constants more rigorously. These ideas are illustrated by laboratory and sonic-logging measurements.

  11. Charge-transfer energy in the water-hydrogen molecular aggregate revealed by molecular-beam scattering experiments, charge displacement analysis, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Belpassi, Leonardo; Reca, Michael L; Tarantelli, Francesco; Roncaratti, Luiz F; Pirani, Fernando; Cappelletti, David; Faure, Alexandre; Scribano, Yohann

    2010-09-22

    Integral cross-section measurements for the system water-H(2) in molecular-beam scattering experiments are reported. Their analysis demonstrates that the average attractive component of the water-H(2) intermolecular potential in the well region is about 30% stronger than dispersion and induction forces would imply. An extensive and detailed theoretical analysis of the electron charge displacement accompanying the interaction, over several crucial sections of the potential energy surface (PES), shows that water-H(2) interaction is accompanied by charge transfer (CT) and that the observed stabilization energy correlates quantitatively with CT magnitude at all distances. Based on the experimentally determined potential and the calculated CT, a general theoretical model is devised which reproduces very accurately PES sections obtained at the CCSD(T) level with large basis sets. The energy stabilization associated with CT is calculated to be 2.5 eV per electron transferred. Thus, CT is shown to be a significant, strongly stereospecific component of the interaction, with water functioning as electron donor or acceptor in different orientations. The general relevance of these findings for water's chemistry is discussed.

  12. Simultaneous optical model analysis of elastic scattering, fusion, and breakup for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm system at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Camacho, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Padron, I.

    2008-05-15

    A simultaneous optical model calculation of elastic scattering, complete fusion, and breakup cross sections for energies around the Coulomb barrier is presented for reactions involving the weakly bound projectile {sup 9}Be on the medium size target {sup 144}Sm. In the calculations, the nuclear polarization potential U is split into a volume part U{sub F}, which is responsible for fusion reactions, and a surface part U{sub DR}, which accounts for direct reactions. A simultaneous {chi}{sup 2} analysis of elastic and complete fusion data shows that the extracted optical potential parameters of the real V{sub F} and imaginary W{sub F} parts of U{sub F} and the corresponding parts V{sub DR} and W{sub DR} of U{sub DR} satisfy separately the dispersion relation. Energy-dependent forms for the fusion and direct reaction potentials indicate that, at the strong absorption radius, the direct reaction potentials dominate over the fusion potentials. Moreover, the imaginary direct reaction potential results in a rather smooth function of E around the barrier energy. These findings show that the threshold anomaly, usually present in reactions with tightly bound projectiles, is not exhibited for the system {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm. Within this formalism, the effect of breakup reactions on complete fusion is studied by turning on and off the potentials responsible for breakup reactions.

  13. Geologic Applications of Seismic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revenaugh, Justin

    Once disregarded as noise, scattered seismic waves are finding increasing application in subsurface imaging. This sea change is driven by the increasing density and quality of seismic recordings and advances in waveform modeling which, together, are allowing seismologists to exploit their unique properties. In addition to extensive application in the energy exploration industry, seismic scattering is now used to characterize heterogeneity in the lower continental crust and subcrustal lithosphere, to examine the relationship between crustal structure and seismogenesis, and to probe the plumbing of active volcanoes. In each application, the study of seismic scattering brings wavelength-scale structure into sharper focus and characterizes the short scale-length fabric of geology.

  14. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  15. Reexamination of the Energy Levels of 15F by 14O + 1H ElasticResonance Scattering with BEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.Q.; Powell, J.; Lee, D.W.; Leitner, D.; McMahan, M.A.; Moltz, D.M.; O'Neil, J.P.; Perajarvi, K.; Phair, L.; Ramsey, C.A.; Xu,X.J.; Cerny, Joseph

    2005-05-30

    The energy levels of 15F have been measured by the p(14O,p)14O reaction. The 120 MeV 14O radioactive ion beam was produced by the BEARS coupled cyclotron system at an intensity averaging 1x104 particles/second on target. Energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction. The two lowest resonances in 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. The fit to the ground state had Jp = 1/2+ at 1.23+-0.05 MeV (width 0.5-0.84 MeV), and the first excited state was Jp=5/2+ at 2.81+-0.02 MeV (width 0.30+-0.06 MeV), both relative to the mass-energy of the proton and 14O. The 15F ground state energy supports the disappearance of the Z=8 proton magic number for odd Z, Tz=-3/2 nuclei.

  16. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  17. Quantifying the Nucleation and Growth Kinetics of Microwave Nanochemistry Enabled by in Situ High-Energy X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Gao, Min-Rui; Liu, Yuzi; Okasinski, John S; Ren, Yang; Sun, Yugang

    2016-01-13

    The fast reaction kinetics presented in the microwave synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles was quantitatively studied, for the first time, by integrating a microwave reactor with in situ X-ray diffraction at a high-energy synchrotron beamline. Comprehensive data analysis reveals two different types of reaction kinetics corresponding to the nucleation and growth of the Ag nanoparticles. The formation of seeds (nucleation) follows typical first-order reaction kinetics with activation energy of 20.34 kJ/mol, while the growth of seeds (growth) follows typical self-catalytic reaction kinetics. Varying the synthesis conditions indicates that the microwave colloidal chemistry is independent of concentration of surfactant. These discoveries reveal that the microwave synthesis of Ag nanoparticles proceeds with reaction kinetics significantly different from the synthesis present in conventional oil bath heating. The in situ X-ray diffraction technique reported in this work is promising to enable further understanding of crystalline nanomaterials formed through microwave synthesis.

  18. Back-Influence of Molecular Motion on Energy Transfer in the Landau-Teller Model of Atom Molecule Scattering.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Eli

    2016-07-21

    This year we celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Landau-Teller model for energy exchange in a collinear collision of an atom with a harmonic diatomic molecule. Even after 80 years though, the analytic theory to date has not included in it the back-influence of the oscillator's motion on the energy transfer between the approaching particle and the molecule. This is the topic of the present paper. The back-influence can be obtained by employing classical second-order perturbation theory. The second-order theory is used in both a classical and semiclassical context. Classically, analytic expressions are derived for the final phase and action of the diatom, after the collision. The energy loss of the atom is shown to decrease linearly with the increasing energy of the oscillator. The magnitude of this decrease is a direct consequence of the back-reaction of the oscillator on the translational motion. The qualitative result is universal, in the sense that it is not dependent on the details of the interaction of the atom with the oscillator. A numerical application to a model collision of an Ar atom with a Br2 diatom demonstrates the importance and accuracy of the second-order perturbation theory. The same results are then used to derive a second-order perturbation theory semiclassical expression for the quantum transition probability from initial vibrational state ni to final vibrational state nf of the oscillator. A comparison of the theory with exact quantum data is presented for a model collision of Br2 with a hydrogen molecule, where the hydrogen molecule is considered as a single approaching particle. PMID:27309793

  19. Back-Influence of Molecular Motion on Energy Transfer in the Landau-Teller Model of Atom Molecule Scattering.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Eli

    2016-07-21

    This year we celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Landau-Teller model for energy exchange in a collinear collision of an atom with a harmonic diatomic molecule. Even after 80 years though, the analytic theory to date has not included in it the back-influence of the oscillator's motion on the energy transfer between the approaching particle and the molecule. This is the topic of the present paper. The back-influence can be obtained by employing classical second-order perturbation theory. The second-order theory is used in both a classical and semiclassical context. Classically, analytic expressions are derived for the final phase and action of the diatom, after the collision. The energy loss of the atom is shown to decrease linearly with the increasing energy of the oscillator. The magnitude of this decrease is a direct consequence of the back-reaction of the oscillator on the translational motion. The qualitative result is universal, in the sense that it is not dependent on the details of the interaction of the atom with the oscillator. A numerical application to a model collision of an Ar atom with a Br2 diatom demonstrates the importance and accuracy of the second-order perturbation theory. The same results are then used to derive a second-order perturbation theory semiclassical expression for the quantum transition probability from initial vibrational state ni to final vibrational state nf of the oscillator. A comparison of the theory with exact quantum data is presented for a model collision of Br2 with a hydrogen molecule, where the hydrogen molecule is considered as a single approaching particle.

  20. Quantum scattering studies of the Λ doublet resolved rotational energy transfer of OH(X 2Π) in collisions with He and Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposti, Alessandra Degli; Berning, Andreas; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    1995-08-01

    Three dimensional potential energy surfaces for the collision systems OH(X 2Π)+He and OH(X 2Π)+Ar have been calculated using the coupled electron pair approximation (CEPA) and large basis sets. The asymptotically degenerate 2Πx and 2Πy states split into two states of 2A' and 2A″ symmetry, respectively, when the C∞v symmetry is lifted by the approach of the noble gas atom. The average and half difference of the calculated points on the A″ and A' potential energy surfaces were fitted to analytical functions, which were then vibrationally averaged. These potential energy surfaces have been used in quantum scattering calculations of cross sections for collision induced rotationally inelastic transitions. Test calculations showed that the cross sections obtained from exact close-coupling calculations (CC) and within the coupled states approximation (CS) are in close agreement for these systems, and therefore the CS approximation has been used in all further calculations. Rotational transitions with Λ doublet resolution show, within the same spin-orbit manifold and at low collision energies, a propensity to populate preferentially the e final levels in the F1(2Π3/2) state and an e/f conserving propensity in the F2(2Π1/2) state, while transitions between the two spin-orbit manifolds show a parity conserving propensity. For the v=2 vibrational level kinetic rate coefficients were calculated for a large range of temperatures. The calculated cross sections are in excellent agreement with recent measurements of Schreel, Schleipen, Epping, and ter Meulen.

  1. Modeling of the performance of a liquid-gallium-cooled silicon monochromator for a high-energy-resolution scattering beamline: comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Quast, K.W.; Nian, H.L.T.

    1996-09-01

    A finite element analysis method (FEA) was used to predict the performance of a silicon monochromator for a high-energy-resolution scattering beamline at sector 3 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The monochromator is internally cooled through 17 rectangular channels with liquid gallium and is designed to operate at photon energies near 14 keV, under beam from a 2.7 cm period undulator. The atomic planes of the monochromator have a (1 1 1) orientation with an asymmetric cut angle of 4.5{degrees}. The displacement profile calculated from the structural FEA was used to compute the double- crystal rocking curves at 14.41 keV. Both the simulations and the experiment show that this monochromator will operate at about 40 mA with rocking-curve broadening of only about 0.5 arcsec. This corresponds to a surface heat flux of 1.2 W/mm{sup 2} (i.e., 20 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence) and a total absorbed power of about 86 watts. The monochromator was used for the commissioning of the beamline and to perform the first series of experiments up to 100 mA. In this paper, we give the results of the FEA calculations and diffraction simulations and compare these to the experimental data.

  2. Determination of the total electron scattering cross sections of the noble gases by a linear transmission technique in the intermediate energy range 0.3 keV to 2.0 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goains, Christopher P.

    Total electron scattering cross sections for the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe have been determined by the linear transmission technique in the intermediate energy range 0.3 keV to 2.0 keV with a random experimental error of +/-3.0%. The total electron scattering cross sections were compared to other total cross sections determined by the linear transmission technique and the Ramsauer technique previously reported in the literature. In general, the total electron scattering cross sections determined in the present agree with the previously-reported total electron scattering cross sections determined by other experimental groups using the linear transmission technique, especially with those that report relatively large random errors of +/-6. Deviations of up to 11% are, however, seen in the cross sections for He and deviations of up to 15% can be seen with experiments citing large corrections for small-angle elastically- and inelastically-scattered electrons. The total cross sections determined by the Ramsauer technique agree with the present ones to within 7% for Ne and Ar, but show deviations of up to nearly 20% for He, Kr and Xe at energies above 1000 eV.

  3. Measurement of the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton in Virtual Scattering at Q2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2: I. Low Energy Expansion Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie Jaminion; Natalie Degrande; Geraud Laveissiere; Christophe Jutier; Luminita Todor; Rachele Di Salvo; L. Van Hoorebeke

    2003-12-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering is studied at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility at low Center-of-Mass energies, below pion threshold. Following the Low Energy Theorem for the ep {yields} ep gamma process, we obtain values for the two structure functions Pll-Ptt/epsilon and Plt at four-momentum transfer squared Q2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2.

  4. Energy transfer and light yield properties of a new highly loaded indium(III) β-diketonate organic scintillator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C.; Hartmann, F. X.; Motta, D.; Schoenert, S.

    2007-02-01

    We present combined experimental and model studies of the light yield and energy transfer properties of a newly developed high light yield scintillator based on indium(III)-tris(2,4-pentanedionate) in a 2-(4-biphenyl)-5-phenyloxazole (BPO), methoxybenzene organic liquid; of interest to the detection of solar electron neutrino oscillations. Optical measurements are made to understand the energy transfer properties and a model is advanced to treat the unusual conditions of high metal and fluor loadings. Such scintillator types are of interest to the exploration of novel luminescent materials and the development of large-scale detectors for studying fundamental properties of naturally occurring neutrinos.

  5. Collisional excitation of NH(X{sup 3}Σ{sup −}) by Ne: Potential energy surface, scattering calculations, and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhafs, Nezha; Lique, François

    2015-11-14

    We present a new three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the NH(X{sup 3}Σ{sup −})–Ne van der Waals system, which explicitly takes into account the NH vibrational motion. Ab initio calculations of the NH–Ne PES were carried out using the open-shell single- and double-excitation coupled cluster approach with non-iterative perturbational treatment of triple excitations [RCCSD(T)]. The augmented correlation-consistent quadruple zeta (aug-cc-pVQZ) basis set was employed. Mid-bond functions were also included in order to improve the accuracy in the van der Waals well. Using this new PES, we have studied the collisional excitation of NH(X{sup 3}Σ{sup −}) by Ne. Close-coupling calculations of the collisional excitation cross sections of the fine-structure levels of NH by Ne are performed for energies up to 3000 cm{sup −1}, which yield, after thermal average, rate coefficients up to 350 K. The propensity rules between fine-structure levels are reported, and it is found that F-conserving cross sections are larger than F-changing cross sections even if the propensity rules are not as strong as for the NH–He system. The calculated rate coefficients are compared with available experimental measurements at room temperature and a fairly good agreement is found between experimental and theoretical data, confirming the good quality of the scattering calculations and also the accuracy of the potential energy surface used in this work.

  6. Nanowire Electron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian; Bronikowsky, Michael; Wong, Eric; VonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fablano

    2009-01-01

    Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy (NESS) has been proposed as the basis of a class of ultra-small, ultralow-power sensors that could be used to detect and identify chemical compounds present in extremely small quantities. State-of-the-art nanowire chemical sensors have already been demonstrated to be capable of detecting a variety of compounds in femtomolar quantities. However, to date, chemically specific sensing of molecules using these sensors has required the use of chemically functionalized nanowires with receptors tailored to individual molecules of interest. While potentially effective, this functionalization requires labor-intensive treatment of many nanowires to sense a broad spectrum of molecules. In contrast, NESS would eliminate the need for chemical functionalization of nanowires and would enable the use of the same sensor to detect and identify multiple compounds. NESS is analogous to Raman spectroscopy, the main difference being that in NESS, one would utilize inelastic scattering of electrons instead of photons to determine molecular vibrational energy levels. More specifically, in NESS, one would exploit inelastic scattering of electrons by low-lying vibrational quantum states of molecules attached to a nanowire or nanotube.

  7. Collisional excitation of CH(X²Π) by He: new ab initio potential energy surfaces and scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Marinakis, Sarantos; Dean, Indigo Lily; Kłos, Jacek; Lique, François

    2015-09-01

    We present a new set of potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the CH(X(2)Π)-He van der Waals system. Ab initio calculations of the CH-He PES were carried out using the open-shell single- and double-excitation coupled cluster approach with non-iterative perturbational treatment of triple excitations [RCCSD(T)]. The augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta (aug-cc-pVQZ) basis set was employed augmented by mid-bond functions. Integral cross sections for the rotational excitation in CH-He collisions were calculated using the new PES and compared with available experimental results. The newly constructed PES reproduces the available experimental results for CH(X(2)Π, v = 0)-He collisions better than any previously available PES. Differential cross sections (DCS) are presented for the first time for this system and discussed within the context of rotational rainbows. Finally, our work provides the first rate thermal coefficients for this system that are crucially needed for astrochemical modelling and future anticipated experiments in CH(X(2)Π)-He collisions. PMID:26220835

  8. In vacuo growth studies of Ru thin films on Si, SiN, and SiO2 by high-sensitivity low energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; Sturm, J. M.; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2016-08-01

    In vacuo high-sensitivity low energy ion scattering (HS-LEIS) has been used to investigate the initial growth stages of DC sputtered Ru on top of Si, SiN, and SiO2. The high surface sensitivity of this technique allowed an accurate determination of surface coverages and thicknesses required for closing the Ru layer on all three substrates. The Ru layer closes (100% Ru surface signal) at about 2.0, 3.2, and 4.7 nm on top of SiO2, SiN, and Si, respectively. In-depth Ru concentration profiles can be reconstructed from the Ru surface coverages when considering an error function like model. The large intermixing (4.7 nm) for the Ru-on-Si system is compared to the reverse system (Si-on-Ru), where only 0.9 nm intermixing occurs. The difference is predominantly explained by the strong Si surface segregation that is observed for Ru-on-Si. This surface segregation effect is also observed for Ru-on-SiN but is absent for Ru-on-SiO2. For this last system, in vacuo HS-LEIS analysis revealed surface oxygen directly after deposition, which suggests an oxygen surface segregation effect for Ru-on-SiO2. In vacuo XPS measurements confirmed this hypothesis based on the reaction of Ru with oxygen from the SiO2, followed by oxygen surface segregation.

  9. High-energy X-ray diffuse scattering studies on deformation-induced spatially confined martensitic transformations in multifunctional Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. P.; Wang, Y. D.; Hao, Y. L.; Wang, H. L.; Wang, Y.; Nie, Z. H.; Su, R.; Wang, D.; Ren, Y.; Lu, Z. P.; Wang, J. G.; Hui, X. D.; Yang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Two main explanations exist for the deformation mechanisms in Ti-Nb-based gum metals, i.e. the formation of reversible nanodisturbance and reversible stress-induced martensitic transformation. In this work, we used the in situ synchrotron-based high-energy X-ray diffuse-scattering technique to reveal the existence of a specific deformation mechanism, i.e. deformation-induced spatially confined martensitic transformations, in Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn-0.10O single crystals with cubic 13 parent phase, which explains well some anomalous mechanical properties of the alloy such as low elastic modulus and nonlinear superelasticity. Two kinds of nanosized martensites with different crystal structures were found during uniaxial tensile loading along the [11 0](beta) axis at room temperature and 190 K, respectively. The detailed changes in the martensitic phase transformation characteristics and the transformation kinetics were experimentally observed at different temperatures. The domain switch from non-modulated martensite to a modulated one occurred at 190 K, with its physical origin attributed to the heterogeneity of local phonon softening depending on temperature and inhomogeneous composition in the parent phase. An in-depth understanding of the formation of stress-induced spatially confined nanosized martensites with a large gradient in chemical composition may benefit designs of high-strength and high-ductility alloys. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. SCF treatment of charge polarization effects in intermediate-energy electron scattering calculations with applications to N2. [Self Consistent Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onda, K.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Converged rotational close coupling calculations of differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections are obtained for seven model potentials for electron-N2 scattering at an impact energy of 30 eV. The model potentials involve a static potential calculated by the INDO/1s or INDOXI/1s method, and exchange potential calculated by the semiclassical exchange approximation from the INDO/1s or INDOXI/1s unperturbed electron density and a polarization potential. The polarization potentials used include the Buckley-Burke semiempirical one and various modifications of the INDOXI and INDO SCF (self-consistent-field) adiabatic polarization potentials. Without adjustment of parameters, good agreement is obtained with the angle dependence of the experimentally measured sum of the elastic and rotational excitation differential cross sections; however, the absolute value of the calculated cross sections is about 20-30% larger than the measured values in the best case, perhaps indicating that the model potentials are too strong or should have a nonzero imaginary part.

  11. Identification of donor deactivation centers in heavily As-doped Si using time-of-flight medium-energy ion scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Won Ja; Park, Kyungsu; Yu, Kyu-Sang; Joo, Sungjung; Kim, Yong-Sung; Moon, Dae Won

    2015-10-07

    Electrically-inactive arsenic (As) complexes in silicon are investigated using time-of-flight medium-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. In heavily As-doped Si, the As atoms that are segregated in the Si interface region just below the SiO{sub 2} are found to be in interstitial forms (As{sub i}), while the As atoms in the bulk Si region are found to be in the substitutional form (As{sub Si}). Despite the substitutional form of As, most of the As are found to be electrically inactive in the bulk region, and we identify the As to be in the form of a 〈111〉-oriented As{sub Si}-Si-vacancy (As{sub Si}-V{sub Si}) complex. The As{sub i} atoms in the interface Si region are found to exist together with Si-interstitial atoms (Si{sub i}), suggesting that the As{sub i} atoms in the interface Si region accompany the Si{sub i} atoms.

  12. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  13. Theory of low energy excitations in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for rare-earth systems: Yb compounds as typical examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, A.

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical predictions are given for low energy excitations, such as crystal field excitations and Kondo resonance excitations, to be detected by high-resolution measurements of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) of rare-earth materials with Yb compounds as typical examples. Crystal field excitations in the Yb 3d RIXS of a Yb3+ ion in the cubic crystal field are formulated, and the calculation of RIXS spectra for YbN is done. Kondo resonance excitations revealed in the Yb 3d RIXS spectra are calculated for mixed-valence Yb compounds, Yb1-xLuxAl3, in the leading term approximation of the 1/Nf expansion method with a single impurity Anderson model. It is emphasized that the high-resolution RIXS with polarization dependence is a powerful tool to study the crystal field levels together with their symmetry and also the Kondo bound state in rare-earth compounds. Some in-depth discussions are given on the polarization effects of RIXS, including 4d and 2p RIXS spectra, the coherence effect of the Kondo bound states, and the importance of the high-resolution RIXS spectra for condensed matter physics under extreme conditions.

  14. Deposition of mass-selected clusters studied by thermal energy atom scattering and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy: An experimental setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jödicke, Harald; Schaub, Renald; Bhowmick, Ashok; Monot, René; Buttet, Jean; Harbich, Wolfgang

    2000-07-01

    We present an experimental setup for the investigation of the processes occurring during the deposition of mass-selected clusters on a well-defined surface. The sample is analyzed in situ by two complementary methods: thermal energy atom scattering (TEAS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). TEAS is used to study the dynamical processes during the deposition and to gather statistical information about the resulting structures on the surface. Subsequent STM measurements allow us to investigate the collision outcome on an atomic scale. The setup is highly versatile and guarantees ultra-high-vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures (≈30 K) of the sample at all times even during sample transfer. Clusters are produced in a CORDIS-type cluster source. A new compact multichannel effusive He source in combination with a new Wien-filter-based He detector are used for TEAS measurements. The new low-temperature STM allows measurements in a temperature range between 8 and 450 K. Atomic resolution on the Pt(111) surface is regularly observed at Tsample=8 K. The performances of the setup are illustrated by STM images obtained after the deposition of Ag7+ clusters with Ekin=95 and 1000 eV on bare Pt(111) and by measurements made of the deposition of Ag7+ clusters with Ekin=20 eV in a Xe-rare-gas matrix adsorbed on Pt(111).

  15. Comment on "Elastic incoherent neutron scattering operating by varying instrumental energy resolution: Principle, simulations, and experiments of the resolution elastic neutron scattering (RENS)" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 105115 (2011)].

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Joachim

    2012-10-01

    In a recent contribution to this journal, Magazù, Migliardo, and Benedetto suggest to determine relaxation times from inflection points in the elastic neutron scattering intensity as function of (1) resolution time or (2) temperature. Method (1) can be generalized into a scaling law. Method (2) is only approximately valid; its application to protein data does not back a wavenumber-independent dynamic transition.

  16. Induced Compton-scattering effects in radiation-transport approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.R. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions.

  17. Elastic differential cross sections for C₄F₆ isomers in the 1.5-200 eV energy electron impact: similarities with six fluorine containing molecules and evidence of F-atom like scattering.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, M; Limão-Vieira, P; Anzai, K; Kato, H; Cho, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Blanco, F; García, G; Ingólfsson, O; Tanaka, H

    2014-09-28

    We report absolute elastic differential cross sections for electron interactions with the C4F6 isomers, hexafluoro-1,3-butadiene (1,3-C4F6), hexafluoro-2-butyne (2-C4F6), and hexafluorocyclobutene (c-C4F6). The incident electron energy range is 1.5-200 eV, and the scattered electron angular range for the differential measurements varies from 15° to 150°. In all cases the absolute scale of the differential cross section was set using the relative flow technique, with helium as the reference species. Atomic-like behaviour in these scattering systems is shown here for the first time, and is further investigated by comparing the elastic cross sections for the C4F6 isomers with other fluorinated molecules, such as SF6 and CnF6 (n = 2, 3, and 6). We note that for all the six-F containing molecules, the scattering process for electron energies above 30 eV is indistinguishable. Finally, we report results for calculations of elastic differential cross sections for electron scattering from each of these isomers, within an optical potential method and assuming a screened corrected independent atom representation. The level of agreement between these calculations and our measurements is found to be quite remarkable in all cases.

  18. Intrabeam scattering in the HEB

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    A study of Intrabeam Scattering (IBS) in the High Energy Booster (HEB) is presented. Piwinski`s formulas for IBS are presented and evaluated for the HEB. A computer code written to evaluate Piwinski`s formulas is discussed. The result of the study is that IBS should not be a problem for the HEB, although the safety factor is not enormous.

  19. Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. 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R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between jet production in the central region and the underlying-event activity in a pseudorapidity-separated region is studied in 4.0 pb-1 of √{ s} = 2.76 TeVpp collision data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The underlying event is characterised through measurements of the average value of the sum of the transverse energy at large pseudorapidity downstream of one of the protons, which are reported here as a function of hard-scattering kinematic variables. The hard scattering is characterised by the average transverse momentum and pseudorapidity of the two highest transverse momentum jets in the event. The dijet kinematics are used to estimate, on an event-by-event basis, the scaled longitudinal momenta of the hard-scattered partons in the target and projectile beam-protons moving toward and away from the region measuring transverse energy, respectively. Transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity is observed to decrease with a linear dependence on the longitudinal momentum fraction in the target proton and to depend only weakly on that in the projectile proton. The results are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generators, which qualitatively reproduce the trends observed in data but generally underpredict the overall level of transverse energy at forward pseudorapidity.

  20. Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. 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R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. 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