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Sample records for energy grand junction

  1. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  2. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  3. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  4. 1980 Environmental monitoring report: US Department of Energy Facilities, Grand Junction, Colorado, and Monticello, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The effect the Grand Junction, Colorado and Monticello, Utah facilities have on the environment is reflected by the analyses of air, water, and sediment samples. The off-site water and sediment samples were taken to determine what effect the tailings and contaminated equipment buried on the sites may have on the air, water, and adjacent properties.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1995 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1995 were associated with mixed-waste treatment, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. As part of the GJPO Mixed-Waste Treatment Program, on-site treatability studies were conducted in 1995 that made use of pilot-scale evaporative-oxidation and thermal-desorption units and bench-scale stabilization. DOE-GJPO used some of its own mixed-waste as well as samples received from other DOE sites for these treatability studies. These studies are expected to conclude in 1996. Removal of radiologically contaminated materials from GJPO facility buildings was conducted under the provisions of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Remediation activities included the removal of 394 metric tons of contaminated material from Buildings 18 and 28 and revegetation activities on the GJPO site; remediation was conducted in compliance with applicable permits.

  6. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. RadNet Air Data From Grand Junction, CO

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Grand Junction, CO from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  8. 24. VIEW SHOWING WASTE GATES ON GRAND CANAL AT JUNCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW SHOWING WASTE GATES ON GRAND CANAL AT JUNCTION WITH OLD CROSSCUT NE/4, Sec. 7, TIN, R4E; LOOKING WEST. OLD CROSSCUT CANAL ENTERS FROM RIGHT. WASTE GATE ON LEFT EMPTIES INTO SALT RIVER BED Photographer: Kevin Kreisel-Coons, May 1990 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-04-25

    The scope of this environmental assessment (EA) is to analyze the potential consequences of the Proposed Action on human health and the environment. Accordingly, this EA contains an introduction to the site and the history of the Grand Junction Office (Chapter One), a description of the Purpose and Need for Agency Action (Chapter Two), a description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives (Chapter Three), and the description of the Affected Environment and the Environmental Consequences (Chapter Four). Resource categories addressed in this EA include geology, soils and topography, groundwater and surface water, floodplains and wetlands, land use and infrastructure, human health, ecological resources, cultural resources, air quality, noise, visual resources, solid and hazardous waste management, transportation, and socioeconomic and environmental justice.

  10. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this initial site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Grand Junction, Colorado. This SOWP is one of the first UMTRA Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards (40 CFR Part 192, as amended by 60 FR 2854) for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The DOE goal is to use the observational method to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation based on the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards.

  11. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Surface remedial action will be completed at the Grand Junction processing site during the summer of 1994. Results of 1993 water sampling indicate that ground water flow conditions and ground water quality at the processing site have remained relatively constant with time. Uranium concentrations in ground water continue to exceed the maximum concentration limits, providing the best indication of the extent of contaminated ground water. Evaluation of surface water quality of the Colorado River indicate no impact from uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring at the Cheney disposal site has been proposed because ground water in the Dakota Sandstone (uppermost aquifer) is classified as limited-use (Class 111) and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer. The following water sampling and water level monitoring activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (i) Semiannual (early summer and late fall) sampling of six existing monitor wells at the former Grand Junction processing site. Analytical results from this sampling will be used to continue characterizing hydrogeochemical trends in background ground water quality and in the contaminated ground water area resulting from source term (tailings) removal. (ii) Water level monitoring of approximately three proposed monitor wells projected to be installed in the alluvium at the processing site in September 1994. Data loggers will be installed in these wells, and water levels will be electronically monitored six times a day. These long-term, continuous ground water level data will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site. Water level and water quality data eventually will be used in future ground water modeling to establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site. Modeling results will be used to help demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing.

  12. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 54 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 54 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated, and can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual release report for each GJO building.

  13. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This site observational work plan (SOWP) is one of the first Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement. This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards. The conceptual model demonstrates that the uranium processing-related contamination at the site has affected the unconfined alluvial aquifer, but not the deeper confined aquifer.

  14. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Bibliographic index of Grand Junction office uranium reports

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    In October 1978, Mesa College entered into subcontract with Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) to prepare a bibliographic index of the uranium raw materials reports issued by the Grand Junction Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Bendix, prime contractor to the Grand Junction Office, operates the Technical Library at the DOE facility. Since the early 1950s, approximately 2700 reports have been issued by the Grand Junction Office. These reports were the results of uranium investigations conducted by federal agencies and their subcontractors. The majority of the reports cover geology, mineralogy, and metallurgy of uranium and/or thorium. No single, complete list of these reports existed. The purpose of this subcontract was to compile a comprehensive index to these reports. The Mesa College geology faculty worked with the BFEC and DOE staffs to develop the format for the index. Undergraduate geology students from Mesa compiled a master record sheet for each report. All reports issued up to January 1, 1979 were included in the bibliography. The bibliography is in preliminary, unedited form. It is being open-filed at this time, on microfiche, to make the information available to the public on a timely basis. The bibliography is divided into a master record list arranged in alpha-numeric order by report identification number, with separate indices arranged by title, author, state and county, 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangle, key words, and exploration area.

  15. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project, Grand Junction, Colorado, processing site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This final audit report (FAR) for remedial action at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project processing site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/ audits, the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and the QA final close-out inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). The FAR also summarizes other surveillances performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). To summarize, a total of one finding and 127 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. The NRC noted general site-related observations during the OSCRs. Follow-up to responses required from MK-Ferguson for the DOE/TAC finding and observations indicated that all issues related to the Grand Junction processing site were resolved and closed out to the DOE`s satisfaction. The NRC OSCRs resulted in no issues related to the Grand Junction processing site requiring a response from MK-Ferguson.

  16. Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney Disposal Site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  17. Interim long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    This interim long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  18. 76 FR 40293 - Proposed Amendment of Class D and Modification of Class E Airspace; Grand Junction, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... Airspace; Grand Junction, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Grand Junction Regional Airport, Grand Junction, CO. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to facilitate vectoring...

  19. Environmental Audit, Rifle, Gunnison and Grand Junction UMTRA Project Sites

    SciTech Connect

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the results of the comprehensive baseline Environmental Audit completed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites at Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. Included in the Audit were the actual abandoned mill sites, associated transportation and disposal cell facilities, and representative examples of the more than 4,000 known vicinity properties. Sites investigated include: Climax Mill Site, Truck/Train Haul Route, Cotter Transfer Station, Cheney Disposal Cell, Rifle Mill Sites (Old and New Rifle), Gunnison Mill Site, Vicinity Properties, and Estes Gulch and Proposed Landfill Site No. 1 Disposal Cells. The UMTRA Audit was a comprehensive baseline audit which considered all environmental programs and the activities associated with ongoing and planned remediation at the UMTRA sites listed above. Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was not considered during this investigation. The Audit Team looked at the following technical disciplines: air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, soil/sediment/biota, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 2, dose assessment supporting data

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The second volume of the Grand Junction Office Action Program Technical Basis for Radiological Release of Grand Junction Office Building 2 report includes the data quality objectives (DQO), sampling plan, collected data, and analysis used to model future radiation doses to members of the public occupying Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site. This volume was assembled by extracting relevant components of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 Public Dose Evaluation (DOE 1996) and inserting recent additional data that was gathered and dose pathway modeling that was performed. The intent of this document is to provide all derived guidance decisions, assumptions, measured data, testing results, and pathway modeling software input and output data that supports the discussion and determinations presented in Volume 1 of this report. For constructive employment of this document, the reader is encouraged to closely follow Volume 1 for proper association with the segment of information being examined.

  1. Geologic map of the Grand Junction Quadrangle, Mesa County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Robert B.; Carrara, Paul E.; Hood, William C.; Murray, Kyle E.

    2002-01-01

    This 1:24,000-scale geologic map of the Grand Junction 7.5' quadrangle, in support of the USGS Western Colorado I-70 Corridor Cooperative Geologic Mapping Project, provides new interpretations of the stratigraphy, structure, and geologic hazards in the area of the junction of the Colorado River and the Gunnison River. Bedrock strata include the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale through the Lower Jurassic Wingate Sandstone units. Below the Mancos Shale, which floors the Grand Valley, the Upper and Lower(?)Cretaceous Dakota Formation and the Lower Cretaceous Burro Canyon Formation hold up much of the resistant northeast- dipping monocline along the northeast side of the Uncompahgre uplift. The impressive sequence of Jurassic strata below include the Brushy Basin, Salt Wash, and Tidwell Members of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, the Middle Jurassic Wanakah Formation and informal 'board beds' unit and Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Formation, and the Lower Jurassic Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone. The Upper Triassic Chinle Formation and Early Proterozoic meta-igneous gneiss and migmatitic meta- sedimentary rocks, which are exposed in the Colorado National Monument quadrangle to the west, do not crop out here. The monoclinal dip slope of the northeastern margin of the Uncompahgre uplift is apparently a Laramide structural feature. Unlike the southwest-dipping, high-angle reverse faults in the Proterozoic basement and s-shaped fault- propagation folds in the overlying strata found in the Colorado National Monument 7.5' quadrangle along the front of the uplift to the west, the monocline in the map area is unbroken except at two localities. One locality displays a small asymmetrical graben that drops strata to the southwest. This faulted character of the structure dies out to the northwest into an asymmetric fault-propagation fold that also drops strata to the southwest. Probably both parts of this structure are underlain by a northeast-dipping high

  2. Lessons Learned: The Grand Junction Office Site Transfer to Private Ownership

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2001-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE-GJO) in Grand Junction, Colorado, has played an integral role within the DOE complex for many years. GJO has a reputation for outstanding quality in the performance of complex environmental restoration projects, utilizing state-of-the-art technology. Many of the GJO missions have been completed in recent years. In 1998, DOE Headquarters directed GJO to reduce its mortgage costs by transferring ownership of the site and to lease space at a reasonable rate for its ongoing work. A local community group and GJO have entered into a sales contract; signing of the Quitclaim Deed is planned for February 16, 2001. Site transfer tasks were organized as a project with a critical-path schedule to track activities and a Site Transition Decision Plan was prepared that included a decision process flow chart, key tasks, and responsibilities. Specifically, GJO identified the end state with affected parties early on, successfully dealt with site contamination issues, and negotiated a lease-back arrangement, resulting in an estimated savings of more than 60 percent of facility maintenance costs annually. Lessons learned regarding these transition activities could be beneficial to many other sites.

  3. Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) facility in Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1992 included those associated with environmental compliance, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. Four phases of the on-site Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project were completed in 1992. Remediation activities, which included the removal of 161,589 tons of uranium-mill-tailings-contaminated material from the facility, were conducted in compliance with all applicable permits. Off-site dose modeling for the GJPO was conducted to determine compliance with current National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, and applicable DOE Orders (5400.1 and 5400.5). The total off-site EDE to the public from all sources of radiation emanating from the facility (radon, air particulates, gamma) was calculated as 9 mrem/yr, which is well below the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr above background. The radiological and nonradiological monitoring program at the GJPO facility included monitoring of activities that generate potentially hazardous or toxic wastes and monitoring of ambient air, surface water, and ground water.

  4. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years.

  5. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the exterior land areas at the Grand Junction Projects Office facility

    SciTech Connect

    Widdop, M.R.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility occupies approximately 56.4 acres (22.8 hectares) along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. The site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium-refining activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot-milling experiments conducted for the US Atomic Energy Commission`s (AEC`s) domestic uranium procurement program. The GJPO facility was the collection and assay point for AEC uranium and vanadium oxide purchases until the early 1970s. The DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program sponsored the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to remediate the facility lands, site improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor, Rust Geotech, was the Remedial Action Contractor for GJPORAP. The exterior land areas of the facility assessed as contaminated have been remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unrestricted use. Restoration of the aquifer will be accomplished through the natural flushing action of the aquifer during the next 50 to 80 years. The remediation of the DOE-GJPO facility buildings is ongoing and will be described in a separate report.

  6. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  7. The Grand Junction Report: Issues of Equality in the Mesa Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Civil Rights, Washington, DC.

    The Grand Junction Metropolitan Statistical Area is the fifth largest metropolitan area in Colorado and the 12th fastest-growing in the Southwest. Latinos make up approximately 8 percent of total population and 15 percent of school enrollment; these numbers are increased by migrant farmworkers and their families. In May 2001, a public forum was…

  8. Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney disposal site. The site is in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site may be licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Cheney disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete and the NRC formally accepts this plan. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Cheney disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  9. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  10. Work plan for ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well injection at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-18

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work that will be performed and the procedures that will be followed during installation of ground water monitor wells and ground water elevation data recorders (data loggers) at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. The monitor wells and data loggers will be used to gather required time-dependent data to investigate the interaction between the shallow aquifer and the Colorado River. Data collection objectives (DCO) identify reasons for collecting data. The following are DCOs for the Grand Junction ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well installation project: long-term continuous ground water level data and periodic ground water samples will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site; water level and water quality data will eventually be used in future ground water modeling to more firmly establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site; modeling results will be used to demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing.

  11. 75 FR 57024 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Grand Junction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Program Act of 2000. The initial proposed definition for the class being evaluated, subject to revision as warranted by the evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Grand Junction Operations Office. Location: Grand... personnel, and Fire Chief. Period of Employment: January 1, 1943 through July 31, 2010. FOR...

  12. PCB usage at the Grand Junction Area Office Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.E.; Donivan, S.

    1982-06-01

    The development, implementation, and results of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) identification project at the Grand Junction Area Office (GJAO) are summarized. Methodology for the PCB analysis is described, and results are tabulated. Of the 51 transformers and disconnects in use at GJAO, 15 unites were determined to be PCB-contaminated or filled with PCBs. This number falls within EPA's estimate of 25 to 40 percent of all transformers in use being at least contaminated. Approximately 324 gallons of PCBs and 515 gallons of PCB-contaminated fluids are being used currently. No contaminated transformers or disconnects are in a position to contaminate food or feed products at the facility.

  13. Neutrino dark energy in grand unified theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Gu, Pei-Hong; Sarkar, Utpal; Singh, Santosh K.

    2009-10-01

    We studied a left-right symmetric model that can accommodate the neutrino dark energy (νDE) proposal. The type-III seesaw mechanism is implemented to give masses to the neutrinos. After explaining the model, we study the consistency of the model by minimizing the scalar potential and obtaining the conditions for the required vacuum expectation values of the different scalar fields. This model is then embedded in an SO(10) grand unified theory and the allowed symmetry breaking scales are determined by the condition of the gauge coupling unification. Although SU(2)R breaking is required to be high, its Abelian subgroup U(1)R is broken in the TeV range, which can then give the required neutrino masses and predicts new gauge bosons that could be detected at LHC. The neutrino masses are studied in detail in this model, which shows that at least 3 singlet fermions are required.

  14. Neutrino dark energy in grand unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Sarkar, Utpal; Singh, Santosh K.; Gu, P.-H.

    2009-10-01

    We studied a left-right symmetric model that can accommodate the neutrino dark energy ({nu}DE) proposal. The type-III seesaw mechanism is implemented to give masses to the neutrinos. After explaining the model, we study the consistency of the model by minimizing the scalar potential and obtaining the conditions for the required vacuum expectation values of the different scalar fields. This model is then embedded in an SO(10) grand unified theory and the allowed symmetry breaking scales are determined by the condition of the gauge coupling unification. Although SU(2){sub R} breaking is required to be high, its Abelian subgroup U(1){sub R} is broken in the TeV range, which can then give the required neutrino masses and predicts new gauge bosons that could be detected at LHC. The neutrino masses are studied in detail in this model, which shows that at least 3 singlet fermions are required.

  15. Assessment of cover systems at the Grand Junction, Colorado, uranium mill tailings pile: 1987 field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Campbell, M.D.; Freeman, H.D.; Cline, J.F.

    1989-02-01

    Four Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientists and a technician conducted an onsite evaluation of radon gas exhalation, water content profiles, and plant and animal intrusion for a series of cover systems located on the uranium mill tailings pile at Grand Junction, Colorado. These six plots were sampled extensively down to the radon control layer (e.g., asphalt or wet clay) for soil moisture content and permeability. Radon gas emission through the surface was measured. Soil samples were collected and analyzed in the lab for particle-size distribution, particle density, bulk density, and ambient water content. Prairie dog burrows were excavated to discover the extent to which they penetrated the barriers. Plant type, density, and cover characteristics were measured.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  17. An Energy Management Programme for Grande Prairie Public School District. Energy Conservation: Energy Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calgary Univ. (Alberta).

    This report describes a pilot energy conservation project in Grande Prairie (Alberta) School District No. 2357. Extensive data collection and analysis were undertaken to provide a sound, quantitative basis for evaluation of the program. Energy conserving measures requiring capital outlays were not considered. During the project, electric demand…

  18. Length and energy gap dependences of thermoelectricity in nanostructured junctions.

    PubMed

    Asai, Yoshihiro

    2013-04-17

    The possibilities of an enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit value, ZT, in a nanostructured junction are examined for a wide range of parameter values in a theoretical model. Our research shows that the figure of merit can take a very large maximum, which depends both on the length and the energy gap values. The maximum of ZT is achieved when the Fermi level of the electrodes is aligned to the edge of the electronic transmission function of the junction, where both the conductance and the Seebeck constant are significantly enhanced. On the basis of our results, we conclude that nanowires and molecular junctions form a special class of systems where a large ZT can be expected in some cases.

  19. Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

  20. 78 FR 28005 - System Energy Resources, Inc.; Grand Gulf Nuclear Station; Order Approving Direct and Indirect...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... COMMISSION System Energy Resources, Inc.; Grand Gulf Nuclear Station; Order Approving Direct and Indirect Transfers of Early Site Permit and Approving Conforming Amendment I System Energy Resources, Inc. (SERI), is... direct transfer of Grand Gulf ESP Site, to a new limited liability company, System Energy Resource,...

  1. Work plan for phase 1A paleochannel studies at the Cheney disposal cell, Grand Junction, Colorado: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This document will serve as a Work Plan for continuing paleochannel characterization activities at the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado. Elevated levels of nitrate were encountered in ground water from two monitor wells installed in alluvial paleochannels near the Cheney disposal cell in 1994. This triggered a series of investigations (Phase 1) designed to determine the source of nitrate and other chemical constituents in ground water at the site. A comprehensive summary of the Phase 1 field investigations (limited to passive monitoring and modeling studies) conducted by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to date is provided in Section 2.0 of this document. Results of Phase 1 were inconclusive regarding the potential interaction between the disposal cell and the paleochannels, so additional Phase 1A investigations are planned. Recommendations for Phase 1A tasks and possible future activities are discussed in Section 3.0. Detailed information on the implementation of the proposed Phase 1A tasks appears in Section 4.0 and will provide the basis for Statements of Work (SOW) for each of these tasks. A detailed sampling plan is provided to ensure quality and a consistency with previous data collection efforts.

  2. Multiple-junction quantum cascade photodetectors for thermophotovoltaic energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Paiella, Roberto

    2010-01-18

    The use of intersubband transitions in quantum cascade structures for thermophotovoltaic energy conversion is investigated numerically. The intrinsic cascading scheme, spectral agility, and design flexibility of these structures make them ideally suited to the development of high efficiency multiple-junction thermophotovoltaic detectors. A specific implementation of this device concept is designed, based on bound-to-continuum intersubband transitions in large-conduction-band-offset In(0.7)Ga(0.3)As/AlAs(0.8)Sb(0.2) quantum wells. The device electrical characteristics in the presence of thermal radiation from a blackbody source at 1300 K are calculated, from which a maximum extracted power density of 1.4 W/cm(2) is determined. This value compares favorably with the present state-of-the-art in interband thermophotovoltaic energy conversion, indicating that quantum cascade photodetectors may provide a promising approach to improve energy extraction from thermal sources.

  3. Alt-Energy Grand Prix Inspires an "I Can" Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tessmer, Al; Trzeciak, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how a team comprised largely of high school students builds and races an E85-fueled car and takes first place at the Bowling Green (Ohio) State University (BGSU) Grand Prix. Free and open to the public, the event features student drivers and crews, racing go-karts powered by renewable, ethanol-based E85 fuel. The track is a…

  4. Probable effects of the proposed Sulphur Gulch Reservoir on Colorado River quantity and quality near Grand Junction, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    A 16,000 acre-foot reservoir is proposed to be located about 25 miles east of Grand Junction, Colorado, on a tributary of the Colorado River that drains the Sulphur Gulch watershed between De Beque and Cameo, Colorado. The Sulphur Gulch Reservoir, which would be filled by pumping water from the Colorado River, is intended to provide the Colorado River with at least 5,412.5 acre-feet of water during low-flow conditions to meet the East Slopes portion of the 10,825 acre-feet of water required under the December 20, 1999, Final Programmatic Biological Opinion for the Upper Colorado River. The reservoir also may provide additional water in the low-flow period and as much as 10,000 acre-feet of water to supplement peak flows when flows in the Colorado River are between 12,900 and 26,600 cubic feet per second. For this study, an annual stochastic mixing model with a daily time step and 1,500 Monte Carlo trials were used to evaluate the probable effect that reservoir operations may have on water quality in the Colorado River at the Government Highline Canal and the Grand Valley Irrigation Canal. Simulations of the divertible flow (ambient background streamflow), after taking into account demands of downstream water rights, indicate that divertible flow will range from 621,860 acre-feet of water in the driest year to 4,822,732 acrefeet of water in the wettest year. Because of pumping limitations, pumpable flow (amount of streamflow available after considering divertible flow and subsequent pumping constraints) will be less than divertible flow. Assuming a pumping capacity of 150 cubic feet per second and year round pumping, except during reservoir release periods, the simulations indicate that there is sufficient streamflow to fill a 16,000 acre-feet reservoir 100 percent of the time. Simulated pumpable flows in the driest year are 91,669 acre-feet and 109,500 acre-feet in the wettest year. Simulations of carryover storage together with year-round pumping indicate that

  5. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-07-26

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions.

  6. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions. PMID:27456200

  7. China’s Energy Security: The Grand "Hedging" Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    independent variables, cost, reliability, and security, China’s grand strategy is shown to be a hedging approach. The analysis consists of three case...shown to be a hedging approach. The analysis consists of three case studies. The first case study shows that as the Chinese National Oil...4Xencheng Liu, “China’s Energy Security and Its Grand Strategy,” (Policy Analysis Brief, The

  8. 78 FR 69410 - Grand Tower Energy Center, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Tower Energy Center, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding, of Grand Tower Energy Center, LLC's application for...

  9. Toward Net Energy Buildings: Design, Construction, and Performance of the Grand Canyon House

    SciTech Connect

    C. Edward Hancock; Greg Barker; J. Douglas Balcomb.

    1999-06-23

    The Grand Canyon house is a joint project of the DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. National Park Service and is part of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 13 (Advanced Solar Low-Energy Buildings). Energy consumption of the house, designed using a whole-building low-energy approach, was reduced by 75% compared to an equivalent house built in accordance with American Building Officials Model Energy Code and the Home Energy Rating System criteria.

  10. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovation in Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-04

    Under the Recovery Act, AMO provided cost-shared funding for early-stage, low-cost, "concept definition studies" of 47 promising innovations for next-generation manufacturing, energy-intensive processes, advanced materials, and greenhouse gas emissions reduction. The brochure provides information on each of these projects.

  11. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  12. Grand Valley State University Checks Out Energy Savings at New Mary Idema Pew Library

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-03-01

    Grand Valley State University (GVSU) partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  13. Gate-controlled energy barrier at a graphene/molecular semiconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, S.; Pietrobon, L.; Ciudad, D.; Velez, S.; Sun, X.; Stoliar, P.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    The formation of an energy barrier at a metal/molecular semiconductor junction is both a ubiquitous phenomenon as well as the subject of intense research in order to improve the performance of molecular semiconductor-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. For these devices, a junction with a large energy barrier provides rectification, leading to a diode behavior, whereas a relatively small energy barrier provides nearly-ohmic behavior, resulting in efficient carrier injection (extraction) into the molecular semiconductor. Typically, a specific metal/molecular semiconductor combination leads to a fixed energy barrier; therefore, the possibility of a gate-controlled energy barrier is very appealing for advanced applications. Here, we present a graphene/C60 junction-based vertical field-effect transistor in which we demonstrate control of the interfacial energy-barrier such that the junction switches from a highly rectifying diode at negative gate voltages to a nearly-ohmic behavior at positive gate voltages and at room temperature. We extract an energy-barrier modulation of up to 660 meV, a transconductance of up to five orders of magnitude and a gate-modulated photocurrent.

  14. Computational Approach to Explore the B/A Junction Free Energy in DNA.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mandar; Mukherjee, Arnab

    2016-01-04

    Protein-DNA interactions induce conformational changes in DNA such as B- to A-form transitions at a local level. Such transitions are associated with a junction free energy cost at the boundary of two different conformations in a DNA molecule. In this study, we performed umbrella sampling simulations to find the free energy values of the B-A transition at the dinucleotide and trinucleotide level of DNA. Using a combination of dinucleotide and trinucleotide free energy costs obtained from simulations, we calculated the B/A junction free energy. Our study shows that the B/A junction free energy is 0.52 kcal mol(-1) for the A-philic GG step and 1.59 kcal mol(-1) for the B-philic AA step. This observation is in agreement with experimentally derived values. After excluding junction effects, we obtained an absolute free energy cost for the B- to A-form conversion for all the dinucleotide steps. These absolute free energies may be used for predicting the propensity of structural transitions in DNA.

  15. The energy barrier at noble metal/TiO{sub 2} junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein-Babaei, F. E-mail: fhbabaei@yahoo.com; Lajvardi, Mehdi M. Alaei-Sheini, Navid

    2015-02-23

    Nobel metal/TiO{sub 2} structures are used as catalysts in chemical reactors, active components in TiO{sub 2}-based electronic devices, and connections between such devices and the outside circuitry. Here, we investigate the energy barrier at the junctions between vacuum-deposited Ag, Au, and Pt thin films and TiO{sub 2} layers by recording their electrical current vs. voltage diagrams and spectra of optical responses. Deposited Au/, Pt/, and Ag/TiO{sub 2} behave like contacts with zero junction energy barriers, but the thermal annealing of the reverse-biased devices for an hour at 523 K in air converts them to Schottky diodes with high junction energy barriers, decreasing their reverse electric currents up to 10{sup 6} times. Similar thermal processing in vacuum or pure argon proved ineffective. The highest energy barrier and the lowest reverse current among the devices examined belong to the annealed Ag/TiO{sub 2} contacts. The observed electronic features are described based on the physicochemical parameters of the constituting materials. The formation of higher junction barriers with rutile than with anatase is demonstrated.

  16. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  17. Beyond the Lorentzian Model in Quantum Transport: Energy-Dependent Resonance Broadening in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenfei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    In quantum transport calculations, transmission functions of molecular junctions, as well as spectral functions of metal-organic interfaces, often feature peaks originating from molecular resonances. These resonance peaks are often assumed to be Lorentzian, with an energy-independent broadening function Γ. However, in the general case, the wide-band-limit breaks down, and the Lorentzian approximation is no longer valid. Here, we develop a new energy-dependent broadening function Γ (E) , based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices within a non-equilbrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. As defined, Γ (E) can describe resonances of non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively; and it is particularly useful in understanding transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals in asymmetric junctions. We compute this quantity via an ab initio NEGF approach based on density functional theory and illustrate its utility with several junctions of experimental relevance, including recent work on rectification in Au-graphite junctions. This work is supported by the DOE, and computational resources are provided by NERSC.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  19. Building a Course on Global Sustainability using the grand challenges of Energy-Water-Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    GEOL1600: Global Sustainability: Managing the Earth's Resources is a lower division integrated science course at the University of Wyoming that fulfills the university's science requirement. Course content and context has been developed using the grand challenge nexus of energy-water-and climate (EWC). The interconnection of these issues, their social relevance and timeliness has provided a framework that gives students an opportunity to recognize why STEM is relevant to their lives regardless of their ultimate professional career choices. The EWC nexus provides the filter to sieve the course's STEM content. It also provides an ideal mechanism by which the non-STEM perspectives important in grand challenge solutions can be seamlessly incorporated in the course. Through a combination of content and context, the relevance of these issues engage students in their own learning. Development of the course followed the Grand Challenge Scientific Literacy (GCSL) model independently developed by the author and two colleagues at the University of Wyoming. This course model stresses science principles centered on the nature of science (e.g., fundamental premises, habits of mind, critical thinking) and unifying scientific concepts (e.g., methods and tools, experimentation, modeling). Grand challenge principles identify the STEM and non-STEM concepts needed to understand the grand challenges, drawing on multiple STEM and non-STEM disciplines and subjects (i.e., economics, politics, unintended consequences, roles of stakeholders). Using the EWC nexus filter and building on the Grand Challenge Principles, specific content included in the course is selected is that most relevant to understanding the Grand Challenges, thereby stressing content depth over breadth. Because quantitative data and reasoning is critical to effectively evaluating challenge solutions, QR is a component of nearly all class activities, while engineering and technology aspects of grand challenges are

  20. Grand Junction projects office mixed-waste treatment program, VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, R.R.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses an indirectly heated, batch vacuum dryer to thermally desorb organic compounds from mixed wastes. This process hazards analysis evaluated 102 potential hazards. The three significant hazards identified involved the inclusion of oxygen in a process that also included an ignition source and fuel. Changes to the design of the MTU were made concurrent with the hazard identification and analysis; all hazards with initial risk rankings of 1 or 2 were reduced to acceptable risk rankings of 3 or 4. The overall risk to any population group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

  1. Probing the Ion Binding Site in a DNA Holliday Junction Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)

    PubMed Central

    Litke, Jacob L.; Li, Yan; Nocka, Laura M.; Mukerji, Ishita

    2016-01-01

    Holliday Junctions are critical DNA intermediates central to double strand break repair and homologous recombination. The junctions can adopt two general forms: open and stacked-X, which are induced by protein or ion binding. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy, metal ion luminescence and thermodynamic measurements are used to elucidate the ion binding site and the mechanism of junction conformational change. Förster resonance energy transfer measurements of end-labeled junctions monitored junction conformation and ion binding affinity, and reported higher affinities for multi-valent ions. Thermodynamic measurements provided evidence for two classes of binding sites. The higher affinity ion-binding interaction is an enthalpy driven process with an apparent stoichiometry of 2.1 ± 0.2. As revealed by Eu3+ luminescence, this binding class is homogeneous, and results in slight dehydration of the ion with one direct coordination site to the junction. Luminescence resonance energy transfer experiments confirmed the presence of two ions and indicated they are 6–7 Å apart. These findings are in good agreement with previous molecular dynamics simulations, which identified two symmetrical regions of high ion density in the center of stacked junctions. These results support a model in which site-specific binding of two ions in close proximity is required for folding of DNA Holliday junctions into the stacked-X conformation. PMID:26978349

  2. Voltage tuning of vibrational mode energies in single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yajing; Doak, Peter; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Natelson, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Vibrational modes of molecules are fundamental properties determined by intramolecular bonding, atomic masses, and molecular geometry, and often serve as important channels for dissipation in nanoscale processes. Although single-molecule junctions have been used to manipulate electronic structure and related functional properties of molecules, electrical control of vibrational mode energies has remained elusive. Here we use simultaneous transport and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements to demonstrate large, reversible, voltage-driven shifts of vibrational mode energies of C60 molecules in gold junctions. C60 mode energies are found to vary approximately quadratically with bias, but in a manner inconsistent with a simple vibrational Stark effect. Our theoretical model instead suggests that the mode shifts are a signature of bias-driven addition of electronic charge to the molecule. These results imply that voltage-controlled tuning of vibrational modes is a general phenomenon at metal–molecule interfaces and is a means of achieving significant shifts in vibrational energies relative to a pure Stark effect. PMID:24474749

  3. Flow-adjusted trends in dissolved selenium load and concentration in the Gunnison and Colorado Rivers near Grand Junction, Colorado, water years 1986--2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayo, John W.; Leib, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    As a result of elevated selenium concentrations, many western Colorado rivers and streams are on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2010 Colorado 303(d) list, including the main stem of the Colorado River from the Gunnison River confluence to the Utah border. Selenium is a trace metal that bioaccumulates in aquatic food chains and can cause reproductive failure, deformities, and other adverse impacts in birds and fish, including several threatened and endangered fish species. Salinity in the upper Colorado River has been the focus of source-control efforts for many years. Although salinity loads and concentrations have been previously characterized at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations at the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colo., and at the Colorado River near the Colorado-Utah State line, trends in selenium load and concentration at these two stations have not been studied. The USGS, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation and the Colorado River Water Conservation District, evaluated dissolved selenium (herein referred to as "selenium") load and concentration trends at these two sites to inform decision makers on the status and trends of selenium. This report presents results of the evaluation of trends in selenium load and concentration for two USGS streamflow-gaging stations: the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colo. ("Gunnison River site"), USGS site 09152500, and the Colorado River near Colorado-Utah State line ("Colorado River site"), USGS site 09163500. Flow-adjusted selenium loads were estimated for the beginning water year (WY) of the study, 1986, and the ending WY of the study, 2008. The difference between flow-adjusted selenium loads for WY 1986 and WY 2008 was selected as the method of analysis because flow adjustment removes the natural variations in load caused by changes in mean-daily streamflow, emphasizing human-caused changes in selenium load and concentration. Overall changes in human-caused effects

  4. Evaluation of Streamflow Losses Along the Gunnison River from Whitewater Downstream to the Redlands Canal Diversion Dam, near Grand Junction, Colorado, Water Years 1995-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuhn, Gerhard; Williams, Cory A.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program, Colorado River Water Conservation District, Colorado Division of Water Resources, and Bureau of Reclamation, initiated a study to characterize streamflow losses along a reach of the Gunnison River from the town of Whitewater downstream to the Redlands Canal diversion dam. This describes the methods and results of the study that include: (1) a detailed mass-balance analysis of historical discharge records that were available for the three streamflow-gaging stations along the study reach; and (2) two sets of discharge measurements that were made at the three stations and at four additional locations. Data for these existing streamflow-gaging stations were compiled and analyzed: (1) Gunnison River near Grand Junction (Whitewater station); (2) Gunnison River below Redlands Canal diversion dam (below-Redlands-dam station); and (3) Redlands Canal near Grand Junction (Redlands-Canal station). Data for water years 1995-2003 were used for the mass-balance analysis. Four intermediate sites (M1, M2, M3, and M4) were selected for discharge measurements in addition to the existing stations. The study reach is the approximate 12-mile reach of the Gunnison River from the Whitewater station downstream to the Redlands Canal diversion dam, which is about 3 miles upstream from the confluence with the Colorado River. For the mass-balance analysis, differences between the sum of the annual cumulative daily mean discharge at the two downstream stations and the annual cumulative daily mean discharges at the upstream station ranged from about -8,700 to -69,800 acre-feet (about -.8 to -1.1 percent), indicating that the downstream discharges generally were less than the upstream discharges. Moving 3-day daily mean discharge averages also were computed for each of the three stations to smooth out some of the abrupt differences between the

  5. HU Binding to a DNA Four-Way Junction Probed by Főrster Resonance Energy Transfer‡

    PubMed Central

    Vitoc, Codruta Iulia; Mukerji, Ishita

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli protein, HU, is a non sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that interacts with DNA primarily through electrostatic interactions. In addition to non-specific binding to linear DNA, HU has been shown to bind with nanomolar affinity to discontinuous DNA substrates, such as repair and recombination intermediates. This work specifically examines the HU-four way junction (4WJ) interaction using fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The conformation of the junction in the presence of different counterions was investigated by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, which revealed an ion-type conformational dependence, where Na+ yields the most stacked conformation followed by K+ and Mg2+. HU binding induces a greater degree of stacking in the Na+-stabilized and Mg2+-stabilized junctions but not the K+-stabilized junction, which is attributed to differences in the size of the ionic radii and potential differences in ion binding sites. Interestingly, junction conformation modulates binding affinity, where HU exhibits the lowest affinity for the Mg2+-stabilized form (24 μM−1), which is the least stacked conformation. Protein binding to a mixed population of open and stacked forms of the junction leads to near complete formation of a protein-stabilized stacked-X junction. These results strongly support a model in which HU binds to and stabilizes the stacked-X conformation. PMID:21230005

  6. Energy from renewable sources for rural communities of the state of Rio Grande Do Sul, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Bristotti, A.; Sadhu, D.

    1983-12-01

    Rural communities of the state of Rio Grande do Sul developed on the basis of various ethenic origin, and distinctly took root in the regions of different topography. On the south and the west nearly half of the state is mainly flat land, where the inhabitants are racially heterogenous and live pricipally in small towns with large farm lands around. The rest of the state consists of high lands that gradually rise from the northwest to maximum 1200m altitude at the northeast. In the foothills, industrial base was developed by the German settelers, whereas the Italian immigrants settled on the hills. The hilly region is composed of small rural properties with area varying from 10 to 50 hectares. They are scattered all over the region, which make it economically unfeasable to distribute electricity from the main grid, due to high investment cost unlikely to be paid off by the energy consumption rate of the rural properietors. It could be verified from the fact that till to-date the local federation of the cooperatives of rural electrification achieved to supply electricity to only 15% of the total area and its future expansion is getting limited. This paper describes a pilot project initiated in the county 'Tres Coroa' of this region, that is being developed under the guidance of the energy group of the Federal University of RGS, coordinated with balanced technical, agronomical, economical and ecilogical activities to meet its energy demand, that could be supplied with the locally available resources. It is aimed in this project to provide the rural habitants adequate energy for a decent living i.e., electricity for lights, TV and small domestic appliances, thermal energy for hot water supply and fuel to run the agricultural machineries. In future, other nearby counties could follow this experiment with proper and adequate modifications to suite the need and the type of resources available there.

  7. Electrical determination of the bandgap energies of the emitter and base regions of bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimila-Arroyo, J.

    2016-10-01

    A pure electrical method is presented to extract emitter and base bandgaps of a bipolar junction transistor (BJT) at the locations where the minority carrier injection takes place. It is based on the simultaneous measurement of the collector and base currents as a function of the emitter-base forward bias (Gummer plot) and the corresponding current gain. From the obtained saturation currents as a function of temperature, we extract the bandgap energies. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated for InGaP-GaAs, Si, and Ge commercial devices. For InGaP-GaAs transistors, the results can be understood if the emitter-base heterojunction is not an abrupt but a gradual one. The presented method is a reliable tool that can aid in the development of new compound semiconductor based BJTs whose bandgap energies are highly sensitive to their composition.

  8. Low energy gauge couplings in grand unified theories and high precision physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, B.W. |

    1993-09-01

    I generalize the leading log relations between low energy SU(3){sub QCD}, SU(2){sub {rvec I}} and U(l){sub Y} effective gauge couplings to include all one-loop threshold effects of matter fields in oblique vector self energy quantum corrections for both supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theories. These always involve an exactly conserved current from the unbroken SU(3){sub QCD} {times} U(L){sub QED} subgroup; this fact strongly constrains any non-decoupling of heavy states as well as the generic character of threshold effects. Relations between low energy gauge couplings depend on the details of the spectra of both the superheavy and low mass sectors; I display the common origin of the logs appropriate to superheavy matter states, which can be found with well known renormalization group techniques, and the combination of logs and polynomials appropriate for light matter states, which cannot. Relations between any two or all three low energy effective gauge couplings do not depend on the top quark or standard model Higgs` masses. Neither do they depend on neutral color singlet states such as other neutral color singlet Higgs` or higgsinos, neutrinos, zinos or photinos. Further, they do not depend on degenerate SU(5) matter representations, of either spin 0 or spin 1/2 of any mass; matter representations of SU(5) can affect such relations only if there is mass splitting within them. The b quark splitting from the {tau} and {nu}{sub {tau}} can affect the relation between gauge couplings for {vert_bar}q{sub 2}{vert_bar} {yields} m{sub b}{sup 2} as can hadronic resonances and multi-hadron states for lower {vert_bar}q{sub 2}{vert_bar}. New mass-split representations of light states, such as occur in supersymmetric theories, can also affect such relations.

  9. Radiation effects on bipolar junction transistors and integrated circuits produced by different energy Br ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingji; Geng, Hongbin; Liu, Chaoming; Zhao, Zhiming; Lan, Mujie; Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu

    2009-12-01

    The radiation responses of the NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and the TTL bipolar integrated circuits (ICs) have been examined using 20, 40 and 60 MeV Br ions. Key electric parameter was measured and compared after each energy irradiation. Experimental results demonstrate that the degradation in electric parameters caused by the Br ions shows a common feature for the NPN BJTs and TTL ICs, in which the degradation is strengthened with decreasing the Br ions energy. The ionizing dose ( D i) and displacement dose ( D d) as a function of the chip depth in the bipolar devices were calculated using the SRIM code, in order to analyze the radiation effects on the NPN BJTs and the Bipolar ICs. From the experiment and calculation results, it could be deduced that the Br ions mainly cause displacement damage to both the NPN BJTs and the TTL ICs, and the higher the ratio of D d/( D d+D i), the larger the degradation in electric parameters at a given total dose.

  10. Stress-energy distribution for a cylindrical artificial gravity field via the Darmois-Israel junction conditions of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istrate, Nicolae; Lindner, John

    2014-03-01

    We design an Earth-like artificial gravity field using the Darmois-Israel junction conditions of general relativity to connect the flat spacetime outside an infinitesimally thin cylinder to the curved spacetime inside. In the calculation of extrinsic curvature, our construction exploits Earth's weak gravity, which implies similar inside and outside curvatures, to approximate the unit normal inside by the negative unit normal outside. The stress-energy distribution on the cylinder's sides includes negative energy density.

  11. Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation Report from the Workshop Held July 31-August 2, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Larzelere, Alex R.; Ashby, Steven F.; Christensen, Dana C.; Crawford, Dona L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; John, Grosh; Stults, B. Ray; Lee, Steven L.; Hammond, Steven W.; Grover, Benjamin T.; Neely, Rob; Dudney, Lee Ann; Goldstein, Noah C.; Wells, Jack; Peltz, Jim

    2013-03-06

    On July 31-August 2 of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop entitled Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation. This workshop built on three earlier workshops that clearly identified the potential for the Department and its national laboratories to enable energy innovation. The specific goal of the workshop was to identify the key challenges that the nation must overcome to apply the full benefit of taxpayer-funded advanced computing technologies to U.S. energy innovation in the ways that the country produces, moves, stores, and uses energy. Perhaps more importantly, the workshop also developed a set of recommendations to help the Department overcome those challenges. These recommendations provide an action plan for what the Department can do in the coming years to improve the nation’s energy future.

  12. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Liang; Xiang, Li; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian; Li, D. L.; Yuan, Z. H.; Feng, J. F. Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the low frequency (LF) noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlO{sub x}/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlO{sub x}-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN) is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  13. Nano-welding and junction formation in hydrogen titanate nanowires by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, Satyanarayan; Chatterjee, Shyamal; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Bapat, Rudheer; Ayyub, Pushan

    2015-06-01

    Crystalline hydrogen titanate (H2Ti3O7) nanowires were irradiated with N+ ions of different energies and fluences. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that at relatively lower fluence the nanowires are bent and start to adhere strongly to one another as well as to the silicon substrate. At higher fluence, the nanowires show large-scale welding and form a network of mainly ‘X’ and ‘Y’ junctions. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering studies confirm a high degree of amorphization of the nanowire surface after irradiation. We suggest that while ion-irradiation induced defect formation and dangling bonds may lead to chemical bonding between nanowires, the large scale nano-welding and junction network formation can be ascribed to localized surface melting due to heat spike. Our results demonstrate that low energy ion irradiation with suitable choice of fluence may provide an attractive route to the formation and manipulation of large-area nanowire-based devices.

  14. THE "MUD VOLCANO," A STINKY THERMAL FEATURE ON THE GRAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THE "MUD VOLCANO," A STINKY THERMAL FEATURE ON THE GRAND LOOP ROAD. ACIDIC HOT SPRINGS HAVE REDUCED THE UNDERLYING LAVA TO A FINE CLAY, PRODUCING AN AREA OF BOILING MUD. THE ODOR OF ROTTEN EGGS IS FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE GAS. - Grand Loop Road, Forming circuit between Mammoth Hot Springs, Norris Junction, Madison Junction, Old Faithful, Mammoth, Park County, WY

  15. Energy Decay in Superconducting Josephson-Junction Qubits from Nonequilibrium Quasiparticle Excitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-26

    Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS superconducting qubits, quasiparticles, coherence John ...ARO 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER John Martinis 805-893-3910 3. DATES...Junction Qubits from Nonequilibrium Quasiparticle Excitations John M. Martinis,1 M. Ansmann,1 and J. Aumentado2 1Department of Physics, University of

  16. Environmental assessment of remedial action at vicinity properties associated with the former Climax Uranium Company Uranium Mill Site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1986-07-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the UMTRA Project vicinity properties in Mesa County, Colorado. Vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as a building material or as fill material before the hazards associated with this material were known. It is estimated that 3585 contaminated properties remain to be formally included on the vicinity property list and thereby require remedial action. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy to perform remedial action at these properties. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulqated standards for remedial action (40 CRF Part 192). The alternatives addressed in this environmental assessment (EA) including taking no action toward remedial action at the vicinity properties, conducting remedial action at a rate of 500 properties per year, and conducting remedial action at a rate of 800 properties per year. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Petit Grand Tour: Mission Concepts to Outer Planet Satellites Using Non-Conic Low Energy Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    Our Solar System is connected by a vast Interplanetary Superhighway System (ISSys) providing low energy transport throughout. The Outer Planets with their satellites and rings are smaller replicas of the Solar System with their own ISSys, also providing low energy transport within their own satellite systems. This low energy transport system is generated by all of the Lagrange points of the planets and satellites within the Solar System. Figures show the tubular passage-ways near L1 of Jupiter and the ISSys of Jupiter schematically. These delicate and resilient dynamics may be used to great effect to produce free temporary captures of a spacecraft by a planet or satellite, low energy interplanetary and inter-satellite transfers, as well as precision impact orbits onto the surface of the satellites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Basic aspects for improving the energy conversion efficiency of hetero-junction organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Onoe, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Hetero-junction organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells consisting of donor (D) and acceptor (A) layers have been regarded as next-generation PV cells, because of their fascinating advantages, such as lightweight, low fabrication cost, resource free, and flexibility, when compared to those of conventional PV cells based on silicon and semiconductor compounds. However, the power conversion efficiency (η) of the OPV cells has been still around 8%, though more than 10% efficiency has been required for their practical use. To fully optimize these OPV cells, it is necessary that the low mobility of carriers/excitons in the OPV cells and the open circuit voltage (V OC), of which origin has not been understood well, should be improved. In this review, we address an improvement of the mobility of carriers/excitons by controlling the crystal structure of a donor layer and address how to increase the V OC for zinc octaethylporphyrin [Zn(OEP)]/C60 hetero-junction OPV cells [ITO/Zn(OEP)/C60/Al]. It was found that crystallization of Zn(OEP) films increases the number of inter-molecular charge transfer (IMCT) excitons and enlarges the mobility of carriers and IMCT excitons, thus significantly improving the external quantum efficiency (EQE) under illumination of the photoabsorption band due to the IMCT excitons. Conversely, charge accumulation of photo-generated carriers in the vicinity of the donor/acceptor (D/A) interface was found to play a key role in determining the V OC for the OPV cells.

  19. Grand unified theories, topological defects and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani; Hill, Christopher T.; Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    The ultrahigh-energy (UHE) proton and neutrino spectra resulting from collapse or annihilations of topological defects surviving from the GUT era are calculated. Irrespective of the specific process under consideration (which determines the overall normalization of the spectrum), the UHE proton spectrum always 'recovers' at approximately 1.8 x 10 exp 11 GeV after a partial Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min 'cutoff' at approximately 5 x 10 exp 10 GeV and continues to a GUT-scale energy with a universal shape determined by the physics of hadronic jet fragmentation. Implications of our results are discussed.

  20. Basic aspects for improving the energy conversion efficiency of hetero-junction organic photovoltaic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Onoe, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Hetero-junction organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells consisting of donor (D) and acceptor (A) layers have been regarded as next-generation PV cells, because of their fascinating advantages, such as lightweight, low fabrication cost, resource free, and flexibility, when compared to those of conventional PV cells based on silicon and semiconductor compounds. However, the power conversion efficiency (η) of the OPV cells has been still around 8%, though more than 10% efficiency has been required for their practical use. To fully optimize these OPV cells, it is necessary that the low mobility of carriers/excitons in the OPV cells and the open circuit voltage (V OC), of which origin has not been understood well, should be improved. In this review, we address an improvement of the mobility of carriers/excitons by controlling the crystal structure of a donor layer and address how to increase the V OC for zinc octaethylporphyrin [Zn(OEP)]/C60 hetero-junction OPV cells [ITO/Zn(OEP)/C60/Al]. It was found that crystallization of Zn(OEP) films increases the number of inter-molecular charge transfer (IMCT) excitons and enlarges the mobility of carriers and IMCT excitons, thus significantly improving the external quantum efficiency (EQE) under illumination of the photoabsorption band due to the IMCT excitons. Conversely, charge accumulation of photo-generated carriers in the vicinity of the donor/acceptor (D/A) interface was found to play a key role in determining the V OC for the OPV cells. PMID:23853702

  1. Energy level alignment and quantum conductance of functionalized metal-molecule junctions: Density functional theory versus GW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Chengjun; Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian S.; Strange, Mikkel; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2013-11-14

    We study the effect of functional groups (CH{sub 3}*4, OCH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}, Cl, CN, F*4) on the electronic transport properties of 1,4-benzenediamine molecular junctions using the non-equilibrium Green function method. Exchange and correlation effects are included at various levels of theory, namely density functional theory (DFT), energy level-corrected DFT (DFT+Σ), Hartree-Fock and the many-body GW approximation. All methods reproduce the expected trends for the energy of the frontier orbitals according to the electron donating or withdrawing character of the substituent group. However, only the GW method predicts the correct ordering of the conductance amongst the molecules. The absolute GW (DFT) conductance is within a factor of two (three) of the experimental values. Correcting the DFT orbital energies by a simple physically motivated scissors operator, Σ, can bring the DFT conductances close to experiments, but does not improve on the relative ordering. We ascribe this to a too strong pinning of the molecular energy levels to the metal Fermi level by DFT which suppresses the variation in orbital energy with functional group.

  2. Communication: Energy-dependent resonance broadening in symmetric and asymmetric molecular junctions from an ab initio non-equilibrium Green's function approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2014-10-07

    The electronic structure of organic-inorganic interfaces often features resonances originating from discrete molecular orbitals coupled to continuum lead states. An example is molecular junction, individual molecules bridging electrodes, where the shape and peak energy of such resonances dictate junction conductance, thermopower, I-V characteristics, and related transport properties. In molecular junctions where off-resonance coherent tunneling dominates transport, resonance peaks in the transmission function are often assumed to be Lorentzian functions with an energy-independent broadening parameter Γ. Here we define a new energy-dependent resonance broadening function, Γ(E), based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices, which can describe resonances of a more complex, non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively. We compute this quantity via an ab initio non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach based on density functional theory (DFT) for both symmetric and asymmetric molecular junctions, and show that our definition of Γ(E), when combined with Breit-Wigner formula, reproduces the transmission calculated from DFT-NEGF. Through a series of examples, we illustrate how this approach can shed new light on experiments and understanding of junction transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals.

  3. Communication: Energy-dependent resonance broadening in symmetric and asymmetric molecular junctions from an ab initio non-equilibrium Green's function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2014-10-01

    The electronic structure of organic-inorganic interfaces often features resonances originating from discrete molecular orbitals coupled to continuum lead states. An example is molecular junction, individual molecules bridging electrodes, where the shape and peak energy of such resonances dictate junction conductance, thermopower, I-V characteristics, and related transport properties. In molecular junctions where off-resonance coherent tunneling dominates transport, resonance peaks in the transmission function are often assumed to be Lorentzian functions with an energy-independent broadening parameter Γ. Here we define a new energy-dependent resonance broadening function, Γ(E), based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices, which can describe resonances of a more complex, non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively. We compute this quantity via an ab initio non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach based on density functional theory (DFT) for both symmetric and asymmetric molecular junctions, and show that our definition of Γ(E), when combined with Breit-Wigner formula, reproduces the transmission calculated from DFT-NEGF. Through a series of examples, we illustrate how this approach can shed new light on experiments and understanding of junction transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals.

  4. Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    The next generation of sustainable energy technologies will revolve around transformational new materials and chemical processes that convert energy efficiently among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds. New materials that tap sunlight, store electricity, or make fuel from splitting water or recycling carbon dioxide will need to be much smarter and more functional than today's commodity-based energy materials. To control and catalyze chemical reactions or to convert a solar photon to an electron requires coordination of multiple steps, each carried out by customized materials and interfaces with designed nanoscale structures. Such advanced materials are not found in nature the way we find fossil fuels; they must be designed and fabricated to exacting standards, using principles revealed by basic science. Success in this endeavor requires probing, and ultimately controlling, the interactions among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds on their natural length and time scales. Control science - the application of knowledge at the frontier of science to control phenomena and create new functionality - realized through the next generation of ultraviolet and X-ray photon sources, has the potential to be transformational for the life sciences and information technology, as well as for sustainable energy. Current synchrotron-based light sources have revolutionized macromolecular crystallography. The insights thus obtained are largely in the domain of static structure. The opportunity is for next generation light sources to extend these insights to the control of dynamic phenomena through ultrafast pump-probe experiments, time-resolved coherent imaging, and high-resolution spectroscopic imaging. Similarly, control of spin and charge degrees of freedom in complex functional materials has the potential not only to reveal the fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity, but also to lay the foundation for future generations of information science. This

  5. The importance of surface recombination and energy-bandgap narrowing in p-n-junction silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, J. G.; Lindholm, F. A.; Shibib, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data demonstrating the sensitivity of open-circuit voltage to front-surface conditions are presented for a variety of p-n-junction silicon solar cells. Analytical models accounting for the data are defined and supported by additional experiments. The models and the data imply that a) surface recombination significantly limits the open-circuit voltage (and the short-circuit current) of typical silicon cells, and b) energy-bandgap narrowing is important in the manifestation of these limitations. The models suggest modifications in both the structural design and the fabrication processing of the cells that would result in substantial improvements in cell performance. The benefits of one such modification - the addition of a thin thermal silicon-dioxide layer on the front surface - are indicated experimentally.

  6. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F.; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R. S. K.; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  7. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R S K; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  8. Self-assembled molecular p/n junctions for applications in dye-sensitized solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Farnum, Byron H; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Meyer, Thomas J

    2016-09-01

    The achievement of long-lived photoinduced redox separation lifetimes has long been a central goal of molecular-based solar energy conversion strategies. The longer the redox-separation lifetime, the more time available for useful work to be extracted from the absorbed photon energy. Here we describe a novel strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy applications in which redox-separated lifetimes on the order of milliseconds to seconds can be achieved based on a simple toolkit of molecular components. Specifically, molecular chromophores (C), electron acceptors (A) and electron donors (D) were self-assembled on the surfaces of mesoporous, transparent conducting indium tin oxide nanoparticle (nanoITO) electrodes to prepare both photoanode (nanoITO|-A-C-D) and photocathode (nanoITO|-D-C-A) assemblies. Nanosecond transient-absorption and steady-state photolysis measurements show that the electrodes function microscopically as molecular analogues of semiconductor p/n junctions. These results point to a new chemical strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy conversion based on molecular excited states and electron acceptors/donors on the surfaces of transparent conducting oxide nanoparticle electrodes.

  9. Simulation of energy and fluence dependence of heavy ion induced displacement damage factor in bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Ravindra, M.; Joshi, G. R.; Damle, R.

    2004-05-01

    This article presents the theoretical calculation of the variation of displacement damage factors as a function of energy and rad equivalent fluence in bipolar junction transistor for various particulate radiation viz ., He, Si, Cl, Ti, Ni, Br, Ag, I, and Au. The calculation is based on the experimental data on gamma-ray induced gain degradation in a commercial space borne BJT (2N3019). The method involves the calculation of gamma-ray dose (rad(Si)) equivalent of effective particle fluence. The linear energy transfer (LET) in silicon for different particle radiation obtained from TRIM calculation has been used for the conversion of gamma-dose into fluence of various particles. The estimation predicts a smooth increase in the displacement damage factor as the mass of the ion increases. Further, the displacement damage factor reaches a maximum at the same value of energy, which corresponds to maximum LET for all heavy ions. The maximum value of damage factor marginally decreases with increasing ion fluence for an ion of given energy. The results are compared with the data available in the literature for proton, deuteron, and helium induced displacement damage.

  10. Self-assembled molecular p/n junctions for applications in dye-sensitized solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnum, Byron H.; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2016-09-01

    The achievement of long-lived photoinduced redox separation lifetimes has long been a central goal of molecular-based solar energy conversion strategies. The longer the redox-separation lifetime, the more time available for useful work to be extracted from the absorbed photon energy. Here we describe a novel strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy applications in which redox-separated lifetimes on the order of milliseconds to seconds can be achieved based on a simple toolkit of molecular components. Specifically, molecular chromophores (C), electron acceptors (A) and electron donors (D) were self-assembled on the surfaces of mesoporous, transparent conducting indium tin oxide nanoparticle (nanoITO) electrodes to prepare both photoanode (nanoITO|-A-C-D) and photocathode (nanoITO|-D-C-A) assemblies. Nanosecond transient-absorption and steady-state photolysis measurements show that the electrodes function microscopically as molecular analogues of semiconductor p/n junctions. These results point to a new chemical strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy conversion based on molecular excited states and electron acceptors/donors on the surfaces of transparent conducting oxide nanoparticle electrodes.

  11. Synaptic Plasticity Selectively Activated by Polarization-Dependent Energy-Efficient Ion Migration in an Ultrathin Ferroelectric Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Chansoo; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Sangik; Jeon, Ji Hoon; Jang, Jun Tae; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Young Heon; Park, Bae Ho

    2017-03-08

    Selectively activated inorganic synaptic devices, showing a high on/off ratio, ultrasmall dimensions, low power consumption, and short programming time, are required to emulate the functions of high-capacity and energy-efficient reconfigurable human neural systems combining information storage and processing ( Li et al. Sci. Rep. 2014 , 4 , 4096 ). Here, we demonstrate that such a synaptic device is realized using a Ag/PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT)/La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 (LSMO) ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) with ultrathin PZT (thickness of ∼4 nm). Ag ion migration through the very thin FTJ enables a large on/off ratio (10(7)) and low energy consumption (potentiation energy consumption = ∼22 aJ and depression energy consumption = ∼2.5 pJ). In addition, the simple alignment of the downward polarization in PZT selectively activates the synaptic plasticity of the FTJ and the transition from short-term plasticity to long-term potentiation.

  12. Compositional variability on the surface of 4 Vesta revealed through GRaND measurements of high-energy gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, Patrick N.; Lawrence, David J.; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Bazell, Dave; Feldman, William C.; Le Corre, Lucille; McCoy, Timothy J.; Reddy, Vishnu; Reedy, Robert C.; Russell, Chris T.; Toplis, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of the high-energy gamma-ray flux emanating from asteroid 4 Vesta by the Dawn Gamma-Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) have revealed variability in the near-surface elemental composition of the Vestan surface. These observations are consistent with the presence of large (≥8 × 104 km2) regions with distinct, HED-like elemental compositions. The results agree broadly with other global measurements, such as the macroscopic neutron absorption cross section and spectral reflectance-derived mineralogic maps. Two distinct regions with eucrite-like elemental compositions have been identified, the first located primarily within the Lucaria and Marcia quadrangles and the second within Oppia quadrangle. The former region is collocated with some of the oldest, most heavily cratered terrain on Vesta. The interior of the 500 km diameter Rheasilvia impact basin is found to have a composition that is consistent with diogenite-like material. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that Vesta's original crust was composed of basaltic outflows in the form of eucritic-like material and that the Rheasilvia-basin-forming impact exposed lower-crustal, diogenite-like material. These measurements also constrain the maximum amount of mesosiderite-like material to <10% for each 15 × 15° surface element.

  13. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  14. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  15. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  16. Comparison of evapotranspiration estimates from the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm (SEBAL) and flux tower data, middle Rio Grande Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H.; Hendrickx, J.; Kurc, S.; Small, E.

    2002-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the most important components of the water balance, but also one of the most difficult to measure. Field techniques such as soil water balances and Bowen ratio or eddy covariance techniques are local, ranging from point to field scale. SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land) is an image-processing model that calculates ET and other energy exchanges at the earth's surface. SEBAL uses satellite image data (TM/ETM+, MODIS, AVHRR, ASTER, and so on) measuring visible, near-infrared, and thermal infrared radiation. SEBAL algorithms predict a complete radiation and energy balance for the surface along with fluxes of sensible heat and aerodynamic surface roughness (Bastiaanssen et al, 1998; and Allen et al. 2001). We are constructing a GIS based database that includes spatially-distributed estimates of ET from remote-sensed data at a resolution of about 30 m. The SEBAL code will be optimized for this region via comparison of surface based observations of ET, reference ET (from windspeed, solar radiation, humidity, air temperature, and rainfall records), surface temperature, albedo, and so on. The observed data is collected at a series of tower in the middle Rio Grande Basin. The satellite image provides the instantaneous ET (ET_inst) only. Therefore, estimating 24 hour ET (ET_24) requires some assumptions. Two of these assumptions, which are (1) by assuming the instantaneous evaporative fraction (EF) is equal to the 24-hour averaged value, and (2) by assuming the instantaneous ETrF (same as `crop coefficient', and equal to instantaneous ET divided by instantaneous reference ET) is equal to the 24 hour averaged value, will be evaluated for the study area. Seasonal ET will be estimated by expanding the 24-hour ET proportionally to a reference ET that is derived from weather data. References: Bastiaanssen,W.G.M., M.Menenti, R.A. Feddes, and A.A.M. Holtslag, 1998, A remote sensing surface energy balance algorithm for land (SEBAL): 1

  17. Compact-device model development for the energy-delay analysis of magneto-electric magnetic tunnel junction structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, N.; Bird, J. P.; Dowben, P. A.; Marshall, A.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the application of a novel class of device, the magneto-electric magnetic tunnel junction (ME-MTJ) to realize a variety of computational functions, including majority logic and the XNOR/XOR gate. We also develop a compact model to describe the operation of these devices, which function by utilizing the phenomenon of ‘voltage-controlled magnetism’ to switch the operational state of MTJs. The model breaks down the switching process into three key stages of operation: electrical-to-magnetic conversion, magnetization transfer, and final-state readout. Estimates for the switching energy and delay of these devices, obtained from this compact model, reveal significant improvements in both of these parameters when compared to conventional MTJs switched by spin-transfer-torque. In fact, the capacity to use the ME-MTJ to implement complex logical operations within a single device allows its energy costs to even approach those of low-power CMOS. The added benefits of non-volatility and compact circuit footprint, combined with their potential for heterogeneous integration with CMOS, make the ME devices of considerable interest for post-CMOS technology.

  18. Superconducting tunneling-junction detectors of X-ray radiation. Issues concerning the energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, V. A. Gor'kov, V. P. Koshelets, V. P. Filippenko, L. V.

    2007-02-15

    The effect of the recombination-and edge-related losses of nonequilibrium quasiparticles on the energy resolution of superconducting tunneling detectors is studied. The dependence of the signal on the energy of X-ray photons is measured and the shape of instrument-related lines is studied for the Ti/Nb/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al/Nb/NbN detectors with the Ti/Nb passive electrode. Experimental data are analyzed using the diffusion-based model of tunneling detectors.

  19. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  20. A comparison of the cosmic-ray energy scales of Tunka-133 and KASCADE-Grande via their radio extensions Tunka-Rex and LOPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Bähren, L.; Bezyazeekov, P. A.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Budnev, N. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Fedorov, O.; Fuchs, B.; Gemmeke, H.; Gress, O. A.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hiller, R.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kazarina, Y.; Kleifges, M.; Korosteleva, E. E.; Kostunin, D.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Link, K.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Mirgazov, R. R.; Monkhoev, R.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Osipova, E. A.; Pakhorukov, A.; Palmieri, N.; Pankov, L.; Pierog, T.; Prosin, V. V.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Rubtsov, G. I.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schoo, S.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Weindl, A.; Wischnewski, R.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.; Zagorodnikov, A.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The radio technique is a promising method for detection of cosmic-ray air showers of energies around 100PeV and higher with an array of radio antennas. Since the amplitude of the radio signal can be measured absolutely and increases with the shower energy, radio measurements can be used to determine the air-shower energy on an absolute scale. We show that calibrated measurements of radio detectors operated in coincidence with host experiments measuring air showers based on other techniques can be used for comparing the energy scales of these host experiments. Using two approaches, first via direct amplitude measurements, and second via comparison of measurements with air shower simulations, we compare the energy scales of the air-shower experiments Tunka-133 and KASCADE-Grande, using their radio extensions, Tunka-Rex and LOPES, respectively. Due to the consistent amplitude calibration for Tunka-Rex and LOPES achieved by using the same reference source, this comparison reaches an accuracy of approximately 10% - limited by some shortcomings of LOPES, which was a prototype experiment for the digital radio technique for air showers. In particular we show that the energy scales of cosmic-ray measurements by the independently calibrated experiments KASCADE-Grande and Tunka-133 are consistent with each other on this level.

  1. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  2. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  3. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  4. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  5. Rationally designed graphene-nanotube 3D architectures with a seamless nodal junction for efficient energy conversion and storage

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuhua; Ding, Yong; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai; Roy, Ajit; Chen, Hao; Qu, Jia; Wang, Zhong Lin; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and 2D single-atomic layer graphene have superior thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties. However, these nanomaterials exhibit poor out-of-plane properties due to the weak van der Waals interaction in the transverse direction between graphitic layers. Recent theoretical studies indicate that rationally designed 3D architectures could have desirable out-of-plane properties while maintaining in-plane properties by growing CNTs and graphene into 3D architectures with a seamless nodal junction. However, the experimental realization of seamlessly-bonded architectures remains a challenge. We developed a strategy of creating 3D graphene-CNT hollow fibers with radially aligned CNTs (RACNTs) seamlessly sheathed by a cylindrical graphene layer through a one-step chemical vapor deposition using an anodized aluminum wire template. By controlling the aluminum wire diameter and anodization time, the length of the RACNTs and diameter of the graphene hollow fiber can be tuned, enabling efficient energy conversion and storage. These fibers, with a controllable surface area, meso-/micropores, and superior electrical properties, are excellent electrode materials for all-solid-state wire-shaped supercapacitors with poly(vinyl alcohol)/H2SO4 as the electrolyte and binder, exhibiting a surface-specific capacitance of 89.4 mF/cm2 and length-specific capacitance up to 23.9 mF/cm, — one to four times the corresponding record-high capacities reported for other fiber-like supercapacitors. Dye-sensitized solar cells, fabricated using the fiber as a counter electrode, showed a power conversion efficiency of 6.8% and outperformed their counterparts with an expensive Pt wire counter electrode by a factor of 2.5. These novel fiber-shaped graphene-RACNT energy conversion and storage devices are so flexible they can be woven into fabrics as power sources. PMID:26601246

  6. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  7. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions: Beyond energy level alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2014-01-01

    When an electron tunnels between two metal contacts it temporarily induces an image charge (IC) in the electrodes which acts back on the tunneling electron. It is usually assumed that the IC forms instantaneously such that a static model for the image potential applies. Here we investigate how the finite IC formation time affects charge transport through a molecule suspended between two electrodes. For a single-level model, an analytical treatment shows that the conductance is suppressed by a factor Z2, where Z is the quasiparticle renormalization factor, compared to the static IC approximation. We show that Z can be expressed either in terms of the plasma frequency of the electrode or as the overlap between electrode wave functions corresponding to an empty and filled level, respectively. First-principles GW calculations for benzene-diamine connected to gold electrodes show that the dynamical corrections can reduce the conductance by more than a factor of two when compared to static GW or density functional theory where the molecular energy levels have been shifted to match the exact quasiparticle levels.

  8. Ultra-low switching energy and scaling in electric-field-controlled nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions with high resistance-area product

    SciTech Connect

    Grezes, C.; Alzate, J. G.; Cai, X.; Wang, K. L.; Ebrahimi, F.; Khalili Amiri, P.; Katine, J. A.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.

    2016-01-04

    We report electric-field-induced switching with write energies down to 6 fJ/bit for switching times of 0.5 ns, in nanoscale perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with high resistance-area product and diameters down to 50 nm. The ultra-low switching energy is made possible by a thick MgO barrier that ensures negligible spin-transfer torque contributions, along with a reduction of the Ohmic dissipation. We find that the switching voltage and time are insensitive to the junction diameter for high-resistance MTJs, a result accounted for by a macrospin model of purely voltage-induced switching. The measured performance enables integration with same-size CMOS transistors in compact memory and logic integrated circuits.

  9. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    ScienceCinema

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2016-07-12

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Comparative life-cycle energy payback analysis of multi-junction a-SiGe and nanocrystalline/a-Si modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

    2010-07-15

    Despite the publicity of nanotechnologies in high tech industries including the photovoltaic sector, their life-cycle energy use and related environmental impacts are understood only to a limited degree as their production is mostly immature. We investigated the life-cycle energy implications of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV designs using a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) bottom layer in the context of a comparative, prospective life-cycle analysis framework. Three R and D options using nc-Si bottom layer were evaluated and compared to the current triple-junction a-Si design, i.e., a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe. The life-cycle energy demand to deposit nc-Si was estimated from parametric analyses of film thickness, deposition rate, precursor gas usage, and power for generating gas plasma. We found that extended deposition time and increased gas usages associated to the relatively high thickness of nc-Si lead to a larger primary energy demand for the nc-Si bottom layer designs, than the current triple-junction a-Si. Assuming an 8% conversion efficiency, the energy payback time of those R and D designs will be 0.7-0.9 years, close to that of currently commercial triple-junction a-Si design, 0.8 years. Future scenario analyses show that if nc-Si film is deposited at a higher rate (i.e., 2-3 nm/s), and at the same time the conversion efficiency reaches 10%, the energy-payback time could drop by 30%.

  12. Grand River/Grand Rapids (Michigan)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Grand River/Grand Rapids (Michigan) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts

  13. Low-energy spectra of differential conductivity and shot noise in tunnel junctions based on superconductors with suppression of the order parameter at the S-N interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Egorov, O.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of an anomalous structure in the differential conductivity of tunnel junctions based on high-temperature superconductors as a result of degradation of their surface layer is analyzed. This feature is in the form of two peaks near an energy gap separated by a region of suppressed conductivity. One peak is usually high and sharp, while the other is much more spread out. Differential conductivity and shot noise spectra in contacts of a normal injector with s- and d-type superconductors are calculated and compared. It is shown that combined measurements of these two characteristics can provide new information on the kinetics of transport processes in these structures.

  14. Peculiarities of the capacitance-voltage characteristic of a photoelectric solar energy convertor based on a silicon p- n junction with a porous silicon antireflection coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregulov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental results on the high-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristic of a photoelectric solar energy converter based on the n +- p junction with a thin porous silicon film on the frontal surface are considered. It is shown that the capacitance-voltage characteristic is determined by the surface metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure formed as a result of growing of a porous silicon layer by electrochemical anode etching. The effective thickness of the insulator layer of the MIS structure, the impurity concentration in its semiconductor region, and the density of surface states are determined.

  15. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  16. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  17. Simple Floquet-Wannier-Stark-Andreev viewpoint and emergence of low-energy scales in a voltage-biased three-terminal Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélin, Régis; Caputo, Jean-Guy; Yang, Kang; Douçot, Benoît

    2017-02-01

    A three-terminal Josephson junction consists of three superconductors coupled coherently to a small nonsuperconducting island, such as a diffusive metal, a single or double quantum dot. A specific resonant single quantum dot three-terminal Josephson junction (Sa,Sb,Sc) biased with voltages (V ,-V ,0 ) is considered, but the conclusions hold more generally for resonant semiconducting quantum wire setups. A simple physical picture of the steady state is developed, using Floquet theory. It is shown that the equilibrium Andreev bound states (for V =0 ) evolve into nonequilibrium Floquet-Wannier-Stark-Andreev (FWS-Andreev) ladders of resonances (for V ≠0 ). These resonances acquire a finite width due to multiple Andreev reflection (MAR) processes. We also consider the effect of an extrinsic linewidth broadening on the quantum dot, introduced through a Dynes phenomenological parameter. The dc-quartet current manifests a crossover between the extrinsic relaxation dominated regime at low voltage to an intrinsic relaxation due to MAR processes at higher voltage. Finally, we study the coupling between the two FWS-Andreev ladders due to Landau-Zener-Stückelberg transitions, and its effect on the crossover in the relaxation mechanism. Three important low-energy scales are identified, and a perspective is to relate those low-energy scales to a recent noise cross-correlation experiment (Y. Cohen et al., arXiv:1606.08436).

  18. Solar energy conversion through the interaction of plasmons with tunnel junctions. Part A: Solar cell analysis. Part B: Photoconductor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, P. E.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A solar cell utilizing guided optical waves and tunnel junctions was analyzed to determine its feasibility. From this analysis, it appears that the limits imposed upon conventional multiple cell systems also limit this solar cell. Due to this limitation, it appears that the relative simplicity of the conventional multiple cell systems over the solar cell make the conventional multiple cell systems the more promising candidate for improvement. It was discovered that some superlattice structures studied could be incorporated into an infrared photodetector. This photoconductor appears to be promising as a high speed, sensitive (high D sup star sub BLIP) detector in the wavelength range from 15 to over 100 micrometers.

  19. Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation of transition probabilities from local grand canonical partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szarecka, Agnieszka; White, Ronald P.; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2003-12-01

    The hypothetical scanning (HS) method provides the absolute entropy and free energy from a Boltzmann sample generated by Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics or any other exact simulation procedure. Thus far HS has been applied successfully to magnetic and polymer chain models; in this paper and the following one it is extended to fluid systems by treating a Lennard-Jones model of argon. With HS a probability Pi approximating the Boltzmann probability of system configuration i is calculated with a stepwise reconstruction procedure, based on adding atoms gradually layer-by-layer to an initially empty volume, where they are replaced in their positions at i. At each step a transition probability (TP) is obtained from local grand canonical partition functions calculated over a limited space of the still unvisited (future) volume, the larger this space the better the approximation. Pi is the product of the step TPs, where ln Pi is an upper bound of the absolute entropy, which leads to upper and lower bounds for the free energy. We demonstrate that very good results for the entropy and the free energy can be obtained for a wide range of densities of the argon system by calculating TPs that are based on only a very limited future volume.

  20. Star junctions and watermelons of pure or random quantum Ising chains: finite-size properties of the energy gap at criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2015-06-01

    We consider M  ⩾  2 pure or random quantum Ising chains of N spins when they are coupled via a single star junction at their origins or when they are coupled via two star junctions at the their two ends leading to the watermelon geometry. The energy gap is studied via a sequential self-dual real-space renormalization procedure that can be explicitly solved in terms of Kesten variables containing the initial couplings and and the initial transverse fields. In the pure case at criticality, the gap is found to decay as a power-law {ΔM}\\propto {{N}-z(M)} with the dynamical exponent z(M)=\\frac{M}{2} for the single star junction (the case M   =   2 corresponds to z   =   1 for a single chain with free boundary conditions) and z(M)   =   M  -  1 for the watermelon (the case M   =   2 corresponds to z   =   1 for a single chain with periodic boundary conditions). In the random case at criticality, the gap follows the Infinite Disorder Fixed Point scaling \\ln {ΔM}=-{{N}\\psi}g with the same activated exponent \\psi =\\frac{1}{2} as the single chain corresponding to M   =   2, and where g is an O(1) random positive variable, whose distribution depends upon the number M of chains and upon the geometry (star or watermelon).

  1. Nanoscience Research for Energy Needs. Report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Grand Challenge Workshop, March 16-18, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, P.; Cummings, P.; De Yoreo, J.; Fichthorn, K.; Gates, B.; Hwang, R.; Lowndes, D.; Majumdar, A.; Makowski, L.; Michalske, T.; Misewich, J.; Murray, C.; Sibener, S.; Teague, C.; Williams, E.

    2004-03-18

    This document is the report of a workshop held under NSET auspices in March 2004 aimed at identifying and articulating the relationship of nanoscale science and technology to the Nation's energy future.

  2. Binding-affinity predictions of HSP90 in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 with docking, MM/GBSA, QM/MM, and free-energy simulations.

    PubMed

    Misini Ignjatović, Majda; Caldararu, Octav; Dong, Geng; Muñoz-Gutierrez, Camila; Adasme-Carreño, Francisco; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-09-01

    We have estimated the binding affinity of three sets of ligands of the heat-shock protein 90 in the D3R grand challenge blind test competition. We have employed four different methods, based on five different crystal structures: first, we docked the ligands to the proteins with induced-fit docking with the Glide software and calculated binding affinities with three energy functions. Second, the docked structures were minimised in a continuum solvent and binding affinities were calculated with the MM/GBSA method (molecular mechanics combined with generalised Born and solvent-accessible surface area solvation). Third, the docked structures were re-optimised by combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. Then, interaction energies were calculated with quantum mechanical calculations employing 970-1160 atoms in a continuum solvent, combined with energy corrections for dispersion, zero-point energy and entropy, ligand distortion, ligand solvation, and an increase of the basis set to quadruple-zeta quality. Fourth, relative binding affinities were estimated by free-energy simulations, using the multi-state Bennett acceptance-ratio approach. Unfortunately, the results were varying and rather poor, with only one calculation giving a correlation to the experimental affinities larger than 0.7, and with no consistent difference in the quality of the predictions from the various methods. For one set of ligands, the results could be strongly improved (after experimental data were revealed) if it was recognised that one of the ligands displaced one or two water molecules. For the other two sets, the problem is probably that the ligands bind in different modes than in the crystal structures employed or that the conformation of the ligand-binding site or the whole protein changes.

  3. Binding-affinity predictions of HSP90 in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 with docking, MM/GBSA, QM/MM, and free-energy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misini Ignjatović, Majda; Caldararu, Octav; Dong, Geng; Muñoz-Gutierrez, Camila; Adasme-Carreño, Francisco; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-09-01

    We have estimated the binding affinity of three sets of ligands of the heat-shock protein 90 in the D3R grand challenge blind test competition. We have employed four different methods, based on five different crystal structures: first, we docked the ligands to the proteins with induced-fit docking with the Glide software and calculated binding affinities with three energy functions. Second, the docked structures were minimised in a continuum solvent and binding affinities were calculated with the MM/GBSA method (molecular mechanics combined with generalised Born and solvent-accessible surface area solvation). Third, the docked structures were re-optimised by combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. Then, interaction energies were calculated with quantum mechanical calculations employing 970-1160 atoms in a continuum solvent, combined with energy corrections for dispersion, zero-point energy and entropy, ligand distortion, ligand solvation, and an increase of the basis set to quadruple-zeta quality. Fourth, relative binding affinities were estimated by free-energy simulations, using the multi-state Bennett acceptance-ratio approach. Unfortunately, the results were varying and rather poor, with only one calculation giving a correlation to the experimental affinities larger than 0.7, and with no consistent difference in the quality of the predictions from the various methods. For one set of ligands, the results could be strongly improved (after experimental data were revealed) if it was recognised that one of the ligands displaced one or two water molecules. For the other two sets, the problem is probably that the ligands bind in different modes than in the crystal structures employed or that the conformation of the ligand-binding site or the whole protein changes.

  4. OBSIDIAN CLIFF OVERLOOKS THE EAST SIDE OF THE GRAND LOOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBSIDIAN CLIFF OVERLOOKS THE EAST SIDE OF THE GRAND LOOP ROAD. THE OBSIDIAN, A BLACK VOLCANIC GLASS, FORMED WHEN A LAVA FLOW CONTACTED GLACIAL ICE. IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE ROAD BY THE U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, WORKERS CREATED THE LEDGE FOR THE ROAD BY BUILDING LARGE BONFIRES AGAINST THE CLIFF, THEN DASHING THE HEATED ROCK WITH COLD WATER, CAUSING IT TO SHATTER. - Grand Loop Road, Forming circuit between Mammoth Hot Springs, Norris Junction, Madison Junction, Old Faithful, Mammoth, Park County, WY

  5. A new method for polychromatic X-ray μLaue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device.

    PubMed

    Abboud, A; Kirchlechner, C; Send, S; Micha, J S; Ulrich, O; Pashniak, N; Strüder, L; Keckes, J; Pietsch, U

    2014-11-01

    μLaue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots' energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 μm × 0.5 μm. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the "3D detector method" as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  6. High-energy x-ray scattering quantification of in-situ-loading-related strain gradients spanning the dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) in bovine tooth specimens.

    SciTech Connect

    Almer, J. D.; Stock, S. R.; Northeastern Univ.

    2010-08-26

    High energy X-ray scattering (80.7keV photons) at station 1-ID of the Advanced Photon Source quantified internal strains as a function of applied stress in mature bovine tooth. These strains were mapped from dentin through the dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) into enamel as a function of applied compressive stress in two small parallelepiped specimens. One specimen was loaded perpendicular to the DEJ and the second parallel to the DEJ. Internal strains in enamel and dentin increased and, as expected from the relative values of the Young's modulus, the observed strains were much higher in dentin than in enamel. Large strain gradients were observed across the DEJ, and the data suggest that the mantle dentin-DEJ-aprismatic enamel structure may shield the near-surface volume of the enamel from large strains. In the enamel, drops in internal strain for applied stresses above 40MPa also suggest that this structure had cracked.

  7. State transition analysis of spontaneous branch migration of the Holliday junction by photon-based single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenji; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Branch migration of Holliday junction (HJ) DNA in solution is a spontaneous conformational change between multiple discrete states. We applied single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurement to three-state branch migration. The photon-based variational Bayes-hidden Markov model (VB-HMM) method was applied to fluorescence signals to reproduce the state transition trajectories and evaluate the transition parameters, such as transition rate. The upper limit of time resolution suggested in simulation was nearly achieved for the state dynamics with relatively small FRET changes, and the distinctions in the populations of different states were successfully retrieved. We also discuss the suitability of the HJ as a standard sample for smFRET dynamics measurements and data analysis.

  8. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  9. Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the Long Junction Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzenets, I. V.; Amet, F.; Ke, C. T.; Draelos, A. W.; Wei, M. T.; Seredinski, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Bomze, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Tarucha, S.; Finkelstein, G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the critical current IC of ballistic Josephson junctions made of encapsulated graphene-boron-nitride heterostructures. We observe a crossover from the short to the long junction regimes as the length of the device increases. In long ballistic junctions, IC is found to scale as ∝exp (-kBT /δ E ). The extracted energies δ E are independent of the carrier density and proportional to the level spacing of the ballistic cavity. As T →0 the critical current of a long (or short) junction saturates at a level determined by the product of δ E (or Δ ) and the number of the junction's transversal modes.

  10. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion.

  11. Dressed fluxon in a Josephson window junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Jean Guy; Flytzanis, Nikos; Devoret, Michel

    1994-09-01

    The static fluxon solutions of a Josephson window junction have been studied numerically. We show that the effect of the idle region surrounding the junction is to ``dress'' the fluxon causing its energy to increase. This effect can be predicted accurately by a simple model.

  12. Energy level alignment in polymer organic solar cells at donor-acceptor planar junction formed by electrospray vacuum deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hong, Jong-Am; Kwon, Dae-Gyeon; Seo, Jaewon; Park, Yongsup

    2014-04-21

    Using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), we have measured the energy level offset at the planar interface between poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and C{sub 61}-butyric acid methylester (PCBM). Gradual deposition of PCBM onto spin-coated P3HT in high vacuum was made possible by using electrospray vacuum deposition (EVD). The UPS measurement of EVD-prepared planar interface resulted in the energy level offset of 0.91 eV between P3HT HOMO and PCBM LUMO, which is considered as the upper limit of V{sub oc} of the organic photovoltaic cells.

  13. Perfect spin filtering controlled by an electric field in a bilayer graphene junction: Effect of layer-dependent exchange energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitakorn, Jatiyanon; I-Ming, Tang; Bumned, Soodchomshom

    2016-07-01

    Magneto transport of carriers with a spin-dependent gap in a ferromagnetic-gated bilayer of graphene is investigated. We focus on the effect of an energy gap induced by the mismatch of the exchange fields in the top and bottom layers of an AB-stacked graphene bilayer. The interplay of the electric and exchange fields causes the electron to acquire a spin-dependent energy gap. We find that, only in the case of the anti-parallel configuration, the effect of a magnetic-induced gap will give rise to perfect spin filtering controlled by the electric field. The resolution of the spin filter may be enhanced by varying the bias voltage. Perfect switching of the spin polarization from + 100% to -100% by reversing the direction of electric field is predicted. Giant magnetoresistance is predicted to be easily realized when the applied electric field is smaller than the magnetic energy gap. It should be pointed out that the perfect spin filter is due to the layer-dependent exchange energy. This work points to the potential application of bilayer graphene in spintronics. Project supported by the Kasetsart University Research and Development Institute (KURDI) and Thailand Research Fund (TRF) (Grant No. TRG5780274).

  14. Giant voltage manipulation of MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions via localized anisotropic strain: A potential pathway to ultra-energy-efficient memory technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhengyang; Jamali, Mahdi; D'Souza, Noel; Zhang, Delin; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Voltage control of magnetization via strain in piezoelectric/magnetostrictive systems is a promising mechanism to implement energy-efficient straintronic memory devices. Here, we demonstrate giant voltage manipulation of MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) on a Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 piezoelectric substrate with (001) orientation. It is found that the magnetic easy axis, switching field, and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of the MTJ can be efficiently controlled by strain from the underlying piezoelectric layer upon the application of a gate voltage. Repeatable voltage controlled MTJ toggling between high/low-resistance states is demonstrated. More importantly, instead of relying on the intrinsic anisotropy of the piezoelectric substrate to generate the required strain, we utilize anisotropic strain produced using a local gating scheme, which is scalable and amenable to practical memory applications. Additionally, the adoption of crystalline MgO-based MTJ on piezoelectric layer lends itself to high TMR in the strain-mediated MRAM devices.

  15. Nanosecond-Timescale Low Energy Switching of In-Plane Magnetic Tunnel Junctions through Dynamic Oersted-Field-Assisted Spin Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, S V; Rowlands, G E; Oh, J; Ralph, D C; Buhrman, R A

    2016-10-12

    We investigate fast-pulse switching of in-plane-magnetized magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) within 3-terminal devices in which spin-transfer torque is applied to the MTJ by the giant spin Hall effect. We measure reliable switching, with write error rates down to 10(-5), using current pulses as short as just 2 ns in duration. This represents the fastest reliable switching reported to date for any spin-torque-driven magnetic memory geometry and corresponds to a characteristic time scale that is significantly shorter than predicted possible within a macrospin model for in-plane MTJs subject to thermal fluctuations at room temperature. Using micromagnetic simulations, we show that in the three-terminal spin-Hall devices the Oersted magnetic field generated by the pulse current strongly modifies the magnetic dynamics excited by the spin-Hall torque, enabling this unanticipated performance improvement. Our results suggest that in-plane MTJs controlled by Oersted-field-assisted spin-Hall torque are a promising candidate for both cache memory applications requiring high speed and for cryogenic memories requiring low write energies.

  16. High-performance giant-magnetoresistance junctions based on the all-Heusler architecture with matched energy bands and Fermi surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhaoqiang; Cai, Yongqing; Shen, Lei; Han, Guchang; Feng, Yuanping

    2013-04-01

    We present an all-Heusler architecture which could be used as a rational design scheme for achieving high spin-filter efficiency in the current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) devices. A Co2MnSi/Ni2NiSi/Co2MnSi trilayer stack is chosen as the prototype of such an architecture, of which the electronic structure and magnetotransport properties are systematically investigated by first principles approaches. Well matched energy bands and Fermi surfaces between the all-Heusler electrode-spacer pair are found, which, in combination with the electrode half-metallicity, indicate large bulk and interfacial spin-asymmetry, high spin-filter efficiency, and consequently good magnetoresistance performance. Transport calculations further confirm the superiority of the all-Heusler architecture over the conventional Heusler/transition-metal structure by comparing their transmission coefficients and interfacial resistances of parallel conduction electrons, as well as the macroscopic current-voltage characteristics. We suggest future theoretical and experimental efforts in developing high-performance all-Heusler CPP-GMR junctions for the read heads of the next generation high-density hard disk drives.

  17. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  18. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  19. Direct characterization of the energy level alignments and molecular components in an organic hetero-junction by integrated photoemission spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Shin, Weon-Ho; Bulliard, Xavier; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seyun; Chung, Jae Gwan; Kim, Yongsu; Heo, Sung; Kim, Seong Heon

    2016-08-01

    A novel, direct method for the characterization of the energy level alignments at bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)/electrode interfaces on the basis of electronic spectroscopy measurements is proposed. The home-made in situ photoemission system is used to perform x-ray/ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of organic-semiconductors (OSCs) deposited onto a Au substrate. Through this analysis system, we are able to obtain the electronic structures of a boron subphthalocyanine chloride:fullerene (SubPC:C60) BHJ and those of the separate OSC/electrode structures (SubPC/Au and C60/Au). Morphology and chemical composition analyses confirm that the original SubPC and C60 electronic structures remain unchanged in the electrodes prepared. Using this technique, we ascertain that the position and area of the nearest peak to the Fermi energy (EF = 0 eV) in the UPS (REELS) spectra of SubPC:C60 BHJ provide information on the highest occupied molecular orbital level (optical band gap) and combination ratio of the materials, respectively. Thus, extracting the adjusted spectrum from the corresponding SubPC:C60 BHJ UPS (REELS) spectrum reveals its electronic structure, equivalent to that of the C60 materials. This novel analytical approach allows complete energy-level determination for each combination ratio by separating its electronic structure information from the BHJ spectrum.

  20. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions.

  1. Circuit Theory of Unconventional Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Kashiwaya, S.

    2003-04-01

    We extend the circuit theory of superconductivity to cover transport and proximity effect in mesoscopic systems that contain unconventional superconductor junctions. The approach fully accounts for zero-energy Andreev bound states forming at the surface of unconventional superconductors. As a simple application, we investigate the transport properties of a diffusive normal metal in series with a d-wave superconductor junction. We reveal the competition between the formation of Andreev bound states and proximity effect that depends on the crystal orientation of the junction interface.

  2. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  3. Heat dissipation in atomic-scale junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woochul; Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Zotti, Linda Angela; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Reddy, Pramod

    2013-06-13

    Atomic and single-molecule junctions represent the ultimate limit to the miniaturization of electrical circuits. They are also ideal platforms for testing quantum transport theories that are required to describe charge and energy transfer in novel functional nanometre-scale devices. Recent work has successfully probed electric and thermoelectric phenomena in atomic-scale junctions. However, heat dissipation and transport in atomic-scale devices remain poorly characterized owing to experimental challenges. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with integrated nanoscale thermocouples to investigate heat dissipation in the electrodes of single-molecule ('molecular') junctions. We find that if the junctions have transmission characteristics that are strongly energy dependent, this heat dissipation is asymmetric--that is, unequal between the electrodes--and also dependent on both the bias polarity and the identity of the majority charge carriers (electrons versus holes). In contrast, junctions consisting of only a few gold atoms ('atomic junctions') whose transmission characteristics show weak energy dependence do not exhibit appreciable asymmetry. Our results unambiguously relate the electronic transmission characteristics of atomic-scale junctions to their heat dissipation properties, establishing a framework for understanding heat dissipation in a range of mesoscopic systems where transport is elastic--that is, without exchange of energy in the contact region. We anticipate that the techniques established here will enable the study of Peltier effects at the atomic scale, a field that has been barely explored experimentally despite interesting theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the experimental advances described here are also expected to enable the study of heat transport in atomic and molecular junctions--an important and challenging scientific and technological goal that has remained elusive.

  4. Gamma ray and neutrino detector facility (GRANDE), Task C

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, H.W.; Yodh, G.B.

    1991-08-01

    GRANDE is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. We proposed that the detector be constructed in phases, beginning with an active detector area of 31,000 m{sup 2} (GRANDE-I){sup 2} and expanding to a final size of 100,000--150,00 m{sup 2}. Some of the characteristics of GRANDE-I are discussed in this paper.

  5. 76 FR 76153 - Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit... Coulee Project Hydropower Authority (Grand Coulee Authority) filed an application for a preliminary... the Scooteney Inlet Drop Hydroelectric Project (Scooteney Inlet Project or project) to be located...

  6. Squeezed States in Josephson Junctions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied quantum fluctuation properties of Josephson junctions in the limit of large Josephson coupling energy and small charging energy, when the eigenstates of the system can be treated as being nearly localized. We have considered(X. Hu and F. Nori, preprints.) a Josephson junction in a variety of situations, e.g., coupled to one or several of the following elements: a capacitor, an inductor (in a superconducting ring), and an applied current source. By solving an effective Shrödinger equation, we have obtained squeezed vacuum (coherent) states as the ground states of a ``free-oscillating'' (linearly-driven) Josephson junction, and calculated the uncertainties of its canonical momentum, charge, and coordinate, phase. We have also shown that the excited states of the various systems we consider are similar to the number states of a simple harmonic oscillator but with different fluctuation properties. Furthermore, we have obtained the time-evolution operators for these systems. These operators can make it easier to calculate the time-dependence of the expectation values and fluctuations of various quantities starting from an arbitrary initial state.

  7. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.

  8. Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms of James H. Windrim and George Summers’s neoclassical competition design for the New Masonic Temple, Philadelphia, 1867 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. A GRAND affair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    tima2014; tomandersen; mugundhan; toadgreen

    2015-10-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “GRAND plans for new neutrino observatory”, which called for a new detector made up of hundreds of thousands of antennas spread over an area slightly smaller than the UK (18 August, http://owl.ly/R5N6u).

  10. Democracy and "Grand" Corruption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose-Ackerman, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Defines "grand" corruption as that occurring at the higher levels of a political system and involving large sums of money. Discusses the impact and incentives for this level of corruption as well as various government responses. Identifies multinational corporations as the major malefactors. (MJP)

  11. Grand and Semigrand Canonical Basin-Hopping

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce grand and semigrand canonical global optimization approaches using basin-hopping with an acceptance criterion based on the local contribution of each potential energy minimum to the (semi)grand potential. The method is tested using local harmonic vibrational densities of states for atomic clusters as a function of temperature and chemical potential. The predicted global minima switch from dissociated states to clusters for larger values of the chemical potential and lower temperatures, in agreement with the predictions of a model fitted to heat capacity data for selected clusters. Semigrand canonical optimization allows us to identify particularly stable compositions in multicomponent nanoalloys as a function of increasing temperature, whereas the grand canonical potential can produce a useful survey of favorable structures as a byproduct of the global optimization search. PMID:26669731

  12. Asymptotically safe grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajc, Borut; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Phenomenologically appealing supersymmetric grand unified theories have large gauge representations and thus are not asymptotically free. Their ultraviolet validity is limited by the appearance of a Landau pole well before the Planck scale. One could hope that these theories save themselves, before the inclusion of gravity, by generating an interacting ultraviolet fixed point, similar to the one recently discovered in non-supersymmetric gauge-Yukawa theories. Employing a-maximization, a-theorem, unitarity bounds, as well as positivity of other central charges we nonperturbatively rule out this possibility for a broad class of prime candidates of phenomenologically relevant supersymmetric grand unified theories. We also uncover candidates passing these tests, which have either exotic matter or contain one field decoupled from the superpotential. The latter class of theories contains a model with the minimal matter content required by phenomenology.

  13. 76 FR 76156 - Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary..., 2011, Grand Coulee Project Hydropower Authority (Grand Coulee Authority) filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study...

  14. 77 FR 58820 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing.... Applicant: Grand River Dam Authority. e. Name of Project: Pensacola Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The.... Jahnke, Assistant General Counsel, Grand River Dam Authority, P.O. Box 409, Vinita, Oklahoma......

  15. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics.

  16. Observing Holliday junction branch migration one step at a time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Taekjip

    2004-03-01

    During genetic recombination, two homologous DNA molecules undergo strand exchange to form a four-way DNA (Holliday) junction and the recognition and processing of this species by branch migration and junction resolving enzymes determine the outcome. We have used single molecule fluorescence techniques to study two intrinsic structural dynamics of the Holliday junction, stacking conformer transitions and spontaneous branch migration. Our studies show that the dynamics of branch migration, resolved with one base pair resolution, is determined by the stability of conformers which in turn depends on the local DNA sequences. Therefore, the energy landscape of Holliday junction branch migation is not uniform, but is rugged.

  17. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions.

  18. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-09

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 10(9) kW(-1). Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design.

  19. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-01

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 109 kW-1. Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design.

  20. Gravity and grand unified theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L.; Toms, D. J.

    1985-02-01

    Curvature-dependent consequences of grand unified theories (GUTs) for the evolution of the very early universe are investigated, considering the possibility that at high curvature and particle energies of 10 to the 24th eV the effective values of the coupling constants governing the strength of the curvature-matter interaction are largely determined by the elementary-particle content defined by the particular GUT. The GUTs examined include those of Georgi and Glashow (1974) and Chang et al. (1980), and the coupling constants studied are the cosmological Lambda, Newtonian G, xi(phi) and xi(H) linking curvature and the scalar Higgs bosons, and alpha(i) (coefficients of action terms quadratically dependent on the curvature tensor).

  1. Mixing Hot and Cold Water Streams at a T-Junction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, David; Zhang, Mingqian; Xu, Zhenghe; Ryan, Jim; Wanke, Sieghard; Afacan, Artin

    2008-01-01

    A simple mixing of a hot- and cold-water stream at a T-junction was investigated. The main objective was to use mass and energy balance equations to predict mass low rates and the temperature of the mixed stream after the T-junction, and then compare these with the measured values. Furthermore, the thermocouple location after the T-junction and…

  2. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  3. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  4. Dot junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1986-01-01

    A design of solar cells with reduced junction area on the cell surface is investigated for reduction of saturation current and increase in open-circuit voltage. Equidiameter dot junctions distributed across the surface of the cell offer an efficient alternative, with variations in dot diameter and in the spacing between dots giving the required variations in the ratio of junction area to total surface area. A simplified analysis for short-circuit current and other cell parameters, which enables cell design optimization, is presented. Experimental solar-cell performance results, as functions of different area ratios, are presented and compared with the model. It is shown that saturation current reduction is possible for achieving efficiencies as high as 18 percent in flat-plate terrestrial applications.

  5. Imaging snake orbits at graphene n -p junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasiński, K.; Mreńca-Kolasińska, A.; Szafran, B.

    2017-01-01

    We consider conductance mapping of the snake orbits confined along the n -p junction defined in graphene by the electrostatic doping in the quantum Hall regime. We explain the periodicity of conductance oscillations at the magnetic field and the Fermi energy scales by the properties of the n -p junction as a conducting channel. We evaluate the conductance maps for a floating gate scanning the surface of the device. In the quantum Hall conditions the currents flow near the edges of the sample and along the n -p junction. The conductance mapping resolves only the n -p junction and not the edges. The conductance oscillations along the junction are found in the maps with periodicity related to the cyclotron orbits of the scattering current. Stronger probe potentials provide support to localized resonances at one of the sides of the junction with current loops that interfere with the n -p junction currents. The interference results in a series of narrow lines parallel to the junction with positions that strongly depend on the magnetic field through the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The consequences of a limited transparency of finite-width n -p junctions are also discussed.

  6. Plasma nanoscience: setting directions, tackling grand challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya; Cvelbar, Uros; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2011-05-01

    This review paper presents historical perspectives, recent advances and future directions in the multidisciplinary research field of plasma nanoscience. The current status and future challenges are presented using a three-dimensional framework. The first and the largest dimension covers the most important classes of nanoscale objects (nanostructures, nanofeatures and nanoassemblies/nanoarchitectures) and materials systems, namely carbon nanotubes, nanofibres, graphene, graphene nanoribbons, graphene nanoflakes, nanodiamond and related carbon-based nanostructures; metal, silicon and other inorganic nanoparticles and nanostructures; soft organic nanomaterials; nano-biomaterials; biological objects and nanoscale plasma etching. In the second dimension, we discuss the most common types of plasmas and plasma reactors used in nanoscale plasma synthesis and processing. These include low-temperature non-equilibrium plasmas at low and high pressures, thermal plasmas, high-pressure microplasmas, plasmas in liquids and plasma-liquid interactions, high-energy-density plasmas, and ionized physical vapour deposition as well as some other plasma-enhanced nanofabrication techniques. In the third dimension, we outline some of the 'Grand Science Challenges' and 'Grand Socio-economic Challenges' to which significant contributions from plasma nanoscience-related research can be expected in the near future. The urgent need for a stronger focus on practical, outcome-oriented research to tackle the grand challenges is emphasized and concisely formulated as from controlled complexity to practical simplicity in solving grand challenges.

  7. The Cambrian eustatic signal: Not so grand

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.A.; James, N.P. )

    1990-05-01

    Efforts to decipher potential high-frequency (fourth- and fifth-order) eustatic signals within third-order grand cycles in Cambrian strata of western Newfoundland have yielded a surprising result: the conspicuous, large-scale stratigraphic rhythms, grand cycles, were not principally a bathymetric phenomenon, grand cycles, i.e., the stratigraphic repetition of tens-of-meters-thick lithosomes, which are alternately carbonate and terrigenous clastic rich, are widely cited as evidence for lower Paleozoic third-order eustatic fluctuations. Evidence from Middle to Upper Cambrian platform strata in western Newfoundland indicates that grand cyclicity in this area was not simply a response to sea level change. Instead, the stratigraphic signal of eustasy is marked by the presence of terrigenous clastics in an otherwise carbonate-prone succession. Detailed facies analysis reveals that both terrigenous and carbonate lithosomes are locally constructed of predictable, meter-scale, coarsening-upward cycles. Lithofacies constituting meter-scale cycles in both lithosomes are bathymetrically indistinguishable with respect to environmental energy, ichnofauna, and exposure index. Meter-scale cycles in either lithosome are typically capped by the same lithology, precluding contemporaneous generation of carbonate vs. terrigenous cycles along some presumed bathymetric gradient. Obvious lithologic differences between carbonate and terrigenous meter-scale cycles obscure their common origin. Terrigenous cycles are best explained by the incursion of siliciclastic fines into a shallow-water carbonate environment irrespective of sea level change.

  8. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  9. 77 FR 22569 - Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt County, NE

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Prairie Wind, LLC (Grande Prairie Wind), a majority- owned subsidiary of Midwest Wind Energy, LLC, has applied to Western to interconnect their proposed wind energy generation project to Western's power... interconnect their proposed wind energy generation Project to Western's Fort Thompson- Grand...

  10. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  11. Scientific Grand Challenges: Discovery In Basic Energy Sciences: The Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale - August 13-15, 2009, Washington, D.C.

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Giulia; Dunning, Thom

    2009-08-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) workshop in August 2009 on extreme-scale computing provided a forum for more than 130 researchers to explore the needs and opportunities that will arise due to expected dramatic advances in computing power over the next decade. This scientific community firmly believes that the development of advanced theoretical tools within chemistry, physics, and materials science—combined with the development of efficient computational techniques and algorithms—has the potential to revolutionize the discovery process for materials and molecules with desirable properties. Doing so is necessary to meet the energy and environmental challenges of the 21st century as described in various DOE BES Basic Research Needs reports. Furthermore, computational modeling and simulation are a crucial complement to experimental studies, particularly when quantum mechanical processes controlling energy production, transformations, and storage are not directly observable and/or controllable. Many processes related to the Earth’s climate and subsurface need better modeling capabilities at the molecular level, which will be enabled by extreme-scale computing.

  12. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  13. Introduction to Grand Unified Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Antonio

    The following sections are included: * THE STANDARD MODEL: A CRITICAL APPRAISAL * The "Low Energy" Limit of Renormalizable Gauge Theories * The Standard Model: its purity * The Standard Model: its impurity * Vices and Virtues of the Standard Model * INTRODUCTION TO GRAND UNIFIED THEORIES * When "Strong" and "Weak" Merge Together * The "Big Desert" Picture of the World * A Persistent Cloud: the hierarchy problem * PHENOMENOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF GUTs * What is New in GUTs * General Features of the B and L Violating Processes * A FIRST GLIMPSE AT THE SU(5) MODEL * Why SU(5)? * The Higgs Sector and the Hierarchy Nightmare * LOW ENERGY PHENOMENOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF SU(5) * The Successful sin2θW Prediction of SU(5) * Fermion Masses in SU(5) * Mixing Angles and Phases * Proton Lifetime: A Death Blow to the SU(5) Model? * B-L and Neutrino Masses in SU(5) * SU(5): A Final Score * NEW PHYSICS NOT FAR FROM THE FERMI SCALE? * L-Right Symmetry: A Fundamental Symmetry? * Massive Majorana Neutrinos * Neutron -Antineutron Oscillations * Lepton Number as a Fourth Colour * THE SO(10) MODEL * Few Generalities on the Orthogonal Groups * The SO(10) Gauge Interactions * Patterns of Symmetry Breaking in the SO(10) Model * The Fermion Mass Spectrum * The Question of the Neutrino Mass * PHENOMENOLOGY OF THE INTERMEDIATE MASS SCALES * Renormalization Group Equations in the Presence of IMS * MI and MX in IMS models * Higgs Contributions to the β-Functions * Phenomenological Consequences of IMS * A GENERAL OUTLOOK ON GUTs * General Constraints on GUTs * Major Unsolved Questions in GUTs * Bibliography * References

  14. Intercellular junctions in myriapods.

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Bigliardi, E; Lane, N J

    1990-01-01

    Tissue from the intestinal tract of myriapods, including millipedes, centipedes and pauropods were examined in tracer-impregnated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The foregut and hindgut of all three classes exhibit pleated septate junctions; these display undulating intercellular ribbons in thin sections. In replicas they show discrete intramembranous particle (IMP) arrays aligned in rows in parallel; with one another. The tissues of the hindgut also possess scalariform junctions, characterized by cross-striated intercellular clefts in sections and IMP-enriched membranes in replicas. Gap junctions occur in all groups, but they are atypical in replicas in that their component IMPs do not always fracture onto the E face, as is characteristic of other arthropods; some IMPs cleave to the P face and others to the E face. The midgut of these organisms exhibits smooth septate junctions with conventional straight septal ribbons and occasional interseptal columns. However the intramembranous appearance in replicas is variable, particularly in centipedes, in that the rows of IMPs in chemically-unfixed propanecryofixed tissues, are prominent and adhere preferentially to the E face, with complementary P face grooves, while in fixed tissues the IMPs are much less distinct and fracture to either P face or E face. They tend not to protrude far beyond the mid-plane of the membrane bilayer and lie in rows which commonly take on the form of a network. Individual rows of the network sometimes curve to run beside a second row, over a short distance, before bending away into another part of the network. The aligned particle rows, which are much more prominent in millipedes, where they frequently lie in close parallel appositions, do not fuse into ridges as often occurs in insect tissues. The myriapod junctions, therefore, are of the same general kind as are found in the gut tract of other arthropod groups, but differ with respect to the subtleties of their intramembranous

  15. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  16. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  17. 75 FR 4363 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License..., 2009. d. Applicant: Grand River Dam Authority. e. Name of Project: Markham Ferry Hydroelectric Project... Contact: D. Casey Davis, Grand River Dam Authority, P.O. Box 409, 226 West Dwain Willis Avenue,......

  18. 76 FR 4649 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing of Pre...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Intent To File License Application...: Grand River Dam Authority. e. Name of Project: Salina Pumped Storage Project. f. Location: In Mayes..., and Mr. Charles Atkins, Superintendent of Hydro Operations, Grand River Dam Authority, P.O. Box...

  19. 78 FR 76604 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With.... Date Filed: November 27, 2013. d. Applicant: Grand River Dam Authority. e. Name of Project: Salina... Lake Hudson (the lower reservoir), which is the reservoir for the Grand River Dam Authority's......

  20. 76 FR 7831 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License...: Grand River Dam Authority. e. Name of Project: Markham Ferry Project. f. Location: The project is..., Grand River Dam Authority, P.O. Box 409, Vinita, OK 73401-0409. Tel: (918) 256-5545. i. FERC...

  1. 75 FR 61458 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License.... Date Filed: May 27, 2010, supplemented on August 12 and August 16, 2010. d. Applicant: Grand River Dam Authority. e. Name of Project: Pensacola Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: Grand Lake in Ottawa...

  2. 75 FR 16090 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License.... Date Filed: March 11, 2010, supplemented on March 17, 2010. d. Applicant: Grand River Dam Authority. e.... 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Ms. Tamara E. Jahnke, Assistant General Council, Grand Dam...

  3. Single molecule junction conductance and binding geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetska, Maria

    This Thesis addresses the fundamental problem of controlling transport through a metal-organic interface by studying electronic and mechanical properties of single organic molecule-metal junctions. Using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) we image, probe energy-level alignment and perform STM-based break junction (BJ) measurements on molecules bound to a gold surface. Using Scanning Tunneling Microscope-based break-junction (STM-BJ) techniques, we explore the effect of binding geometry on single-molecule conductance by varying the structure of the molecules, metal-molecule binding chemistry and by applying sub-nanometer manipulation control to the junction. These experiments are performed both in ambient conditions and in ultra high vacuum (UHV) at cryogenic temperatures. First, using STM imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements we explore binding configurations and electronic properties of an amine-terminated benzene derivative on gold. We find that details of metal-molecule binding affect energy-level alignment at the interface. Next, using the STM-BJ technique, we form and rupture metal-molecule-metal junctions ˜104 times to obtain conductance-vs-extension curves and extract most likely conductance values for each molecule. With these measurements, we demonstrated that the control of junction conductance is possible through a choice of metal-molecule binding chemistry and sub-nanometer positioning. First, we show that molecules terminated with amines, sulfides and phosphines bind selectively on gold and therefore demonstrate constant conductance levels even as the junction is elongated and the metal-molecule attachment point is modified. Such well-defined conductance is also obtained with paracyclophane molecules which bind to gold directly through the pi system. Next, we are able to create metal-molecule-metal junctions with more than one reproducible conductance signatures that can be accessed by changing junction geometry. In the

  4. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-21

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a π-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  5. Transport Imaging of Multi-Junction and CIGS Solar Cell Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    solar energy. Indium Gallium Phosphide (InGaP) is commonly used as the top cell in multi-junction cells grown on... solar energy. Indium Gallium Phosphide (InGaP) is commonly used as the top cell in multi-junction cells grown on Germanium (Ge) or Gallium Arsenide...mobility of several Indium Gallium Phosphide (InGaP) materials for use in multi-junction solar cells . This will be done through transport imaging,

  6. Flux Cloning Anomalities in Josephson Nano-Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hanaa Farhan; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2010-12-01

    The propagation of single flux quanta in T-shaped Josephson junctions gives rise to the flux cloning phenomenon. We have studied numerically the dynamics of flux cloning in cases of extended Josephson junctions. The changing thicknesses of T-junctions lead to new and interesting effects in terms of their dynamics. We have found out that when an additional Josephson transmission line is larger than the main Josephson transmission line, numerical simulations do not show the cloning phenomenon and soliton is reflected when it approaches the T junction. This strange result may be happened because the soliton losses more energy in the sharp edge. Although the vortex is moving very highly and it has huge energy but it still does not give birth to a new vortex. We have investigated conditions at which flux cloning occurs when both widths, W and W0, are changing.

  7. Flux Cloning Anomalities in Josephson Nano-Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hanaa Farhan; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    The propagation of single flux quanta in T-shaped Josephson junctions gives rise to the flux cloning phenomenon. We have studied numerically the dynamics of flux cloning in cases of extended Josephson junctions. The changing thicknesses of T-junctions lead to new and interesting effects in terms of their dynamics. We have found out that when an additional Josephson transmission line is larger than the main Josephson transmission line, numerical simulations do not show the cloning phenomenon and soliton is reflected when it approaches the T junction. This strange result may be happened because the soliton losses more energy in the sharp edge. Although the vortex is moving very highly and it has huge energy but it still does not give birth to a new vortex. We have investigated conditions at which flux cloning occurs when both widths, W and W0, are changing.

  8. Memory cell operation based on small Josephson junctions arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiman, Y.; Nair, N.; Rezac, J.; Imam, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a cryogenic memory cell circuit based on a small coupled array of Josephson junctions. All the basic memory operations (e.g., write, read, and reset) are implemented on the same circuit and different junctions in the array can in principle be utilized for these operations. The presented memory operation paradigm is fundamentally different from conventional single quantum flux operation logics (SFQ). As an example, we demonstrate memory operation driven by a SFQ pulse employing an inductively coupled array of three Josephson junctions. We have chosen realistic Josephson junction parameters based on state-of-the-art fabrication capabilities and have calculated access times and access energies for basic memory cell operations. We also implemented an optimization procedure based on the simulated annealing algorithm to calculate the optimized and typical values of access times and access energies.

  9. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  10. Evidence for a minigap in YBCO grain boundary Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Lucignano, P; Stornaiuolo, D; Tafuri, F; Altshuler, B L; Tagliacozzo, A

    2010-10-01

    Self-assembled YBaCuO diffusive grain boundary submicron Josephson junctions offer a realization of a special regime of the proximity effect, where normal state coherence prevails on the superconducting coherence in the barrier region. Resistance oscillations from the current-voltage characteristic encode mesoscopic information on the junction and more specifically on the minigap induced in the barrier. Their persistence at large voltages is evidence of the long lifetime of the antinodal (high energy) quasiparticles.

  11. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  12. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  13. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    Also, CaRuO 3 is chemically compatible with YBa2Cu30 7 and its conductivity does not appear to be strongly dependent on doping or oxygen concentration...barrier conductivity is quite high. The first YBa2Cu30 7 layer and the SrTiO3 layer are deposited first and then patterned with ion milling (to help form...the edge junction will dominate any leakage through the SrTiO3 , thus the integrity of that dielectric will not be a concern here. The integrity of the

  14. Gamma ray and neutrino detector facility (GRANDE), Task C. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, H.W.; Yodh, G.B.

    1991-08-01

    GRANDE is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. We proposed that the detector be constructed in phases, beginning with an active detector area of 31,000 m{sup 2} (GRANDE-I){sup 2} and expanding to a final size of 100,000--150,00 m{sup 2}. Some of the characteristics of GRANDE-I are discussed in this paper.

  15. Plasmon resonance energy transfer and hot electron injection induced high photocurrent density in liquid junction Ag@Ag2S sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dapeng; Wang, Fujuan; Wang, Hongju; Cao, Kun; Gao, Zhiyong; Xu, Fang; Jiang, Kai

    2016-10-18

    An in situ technique was developed to deposit Ag@Ag2S core-shell quantum dots on a SnO2 mesoporous film for solar energy conversion. When adopted as a photoanode, an impressive high photocurrent density of ∼25.6 mA cm(-2) was demonstrated in a cell configuration using polysulfide S(2-)/Sn(2-) as an electrolyte and Cu2S/brass as a counter electrode, which leads to a power conversion efficiency of ∼0.784% for this environmentally benign device. Optical measurements showed that Ag nanoparticles could be employed as plasmon resonance centers to enhance the harvesting efficiency of incident light at the visible and near-infrared range. Moreover, photoluminescence spectra demonstrated fast charge transfer at Ag@Ag2S/SnO2 interfaces, which facilitates direct hot electron injection from sensitizers to the SnO2 matrix and finally gives rise to the high photocurrent density.

  16. Primary thermometry with nanoscale tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvi, K.P.; Kauppinen, J.P.; Paalanen, M.A.; Pekola, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    We have found current-voltage (I-V) and conductance (dI/dV) characteristics of arrays of nanoscale tunnel junctions between normal metal electrodes to exhibit suitable features for primary thermometry. The current through a uniform array depends on the ratio of the thermal energy k{sub B}T and the electrostatic charging energy E{sub c} of the islands between the junctions and is completely blocked by Coulomb repulsion at T=0 and at small voltages eV/2 {<=} Ec. In the opposite limit, k{sub B}T {much_gt} E{sub c}, the width of the conductance minimum scales linearly and universally with T and N, the number of tunnel junctions, and qualifies as a primary thermometer. The zero bias drop in the conductance is proportional to T{sup -1} and can be used as a secondary thermometer. We will show with Monte Carlo simulations how background charge and nonuniformities of the array will affect the thermometer.

  17. Nonintrusive Measurement Of Temperature Of LED Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Powers, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Temperature inferred from spectrum of emitted light. Method of determining temperature of junction based on two relevant characteristics of LED. Gap between valence and conduction electron-energy bands in LED material decreases with increasing temperature, causing wavelength of emitted photon to increase with temperature. Other, as temperature increases, non-radiative processes dissipate more of input electrical energy as heat and less as photons in band-gap wavelenth region; optical and quantum efficiencies decrease with increasing temperature. In principal, either characteristic alone used to determine temperature. However, desirable to use both to obtain indication of uncertainty.

  18. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  19. Cusps on cosmic superstrings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Rajamanoharan, Senthooran; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: william.nelson@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The existence of cusps on non-periodic strings ending on D-branes is demonstrated and the conditions for which such cusps are generic are derived. The dynamics of F-strings, D-strings and FD-string junctions are investigated. It is shown that pairs of FD-string junctions, such as would form after intercommutations of F-strings and D-strings, generically contain cusps. This new feature of cosmic superstrings opens up the possibility of extra channels of energy loss from a string network. The phenomenology of cusps on such cosmic superstring networks is compared to that of cusps formed on networks of their field theory analogues, the standard cosmic strings.

  20. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  1. Energy at the Junction of the Rivers Negro and Solimões, Contributors of the Amazon River, in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Beluco, Alexandre; de Souza, Paulo Kroeff

    2014-01-01

    The Negro and Solimoes rivers join in front of the Brazilian city of Manaus to form the Amazon River. This "meeting of the waters" is a natural phenomenon of great aesthetic beauty that has been the focus of attention of researchers all over the world in various scientific fields. The waters of the Negro are darker and warmer, while the waters of the Solimoes are lighter and cooler. These waters have very different characteristics and remain without mixing, flowing side by side for several miles. Some reports indicate a temperature gradient between the waters of the order of 6°C, which can be used in conjunction with very high flow rates delivered by the two rivers, with a heat engine operating on a thermodynamic cycle to provide electricity. This review paper identifies this energy resource and presents a preliminary assessment of the potential for power generation. A realistic assessment of the potential points to an available power of about 1 GW. It is clear that further studies are needed to accurately assess the available thermal gradient and its variation over time, to move forward in the design of the power converter, and to establish an appropriate location for a power plant.

  2. Energy at the Junction of the Rivers Negro and Solimões, Contributors of the Amazon River, in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paulo Kroeff

    2014-01-01

    The Negro and Solimoes rivers join in front of the Brazilian city of Manaus to form the Amazon River. This “meeting of the waters” is a natural phenomenon of great aesthetic beauty that has been the focus of attention of researchers all over the world in various scientific fields. The waters of the Negro are darker and warmer, while the waters of the Solimoes are lighter and cooler. These waters have very different characteristics and remain without mixing, flowing side by side for several miles. Some reports indicate a temperature gradient between the waters of the order of 6°C, which can be used in conjunction with very high flow rates delivered by the two rivers, with a heat engine operating on a thermodynamic cycle to provide electricity. This review paper identifies this energy resource and presents a preliminary assessment of the potential for power generation. A realistic assessment of the potential points to an available power of about 1 GW. It is clear that further studies are needed to accurately assess the available thermal gradient and its variation over time, to move forward in the design of the power converter, and to establish an appropriate location for a power plant. PMID:27437451

  3. Perspective: Thermal and thermoelectric transport in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Longji; Miao, Ruijiao; Jiang, Chang; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2017-03-01

    With the advent of molecular electronics, tremendous attention has been paid towards understanding the structure-function relationship of molecular junctions. Understanding how heat is transported, dissipated, and converted into electricity in molecular junctions is of great importance for designing thermally robust molecular circuits and high-performance energy conversion devices. Further, the study of thermal and thermoelectric phenomena in molecular junctions provides novel insights into the limits of applicability of classical laws. Here, we present a review of the computational and experimental progress made in probing thermoelectric effects, thermal conduction, heat dissipation, and local heating/cooling in self-assembled monolayer and single molecule junctions. We also discuss some outstanding challenges and potential future directions.

  4. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  5. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated.

  6. Quantum computing with Josephson junction circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huizhong

    This work concerns the study of Josephson junction circuits in the context of their usability for quantum computing. The zero-voltage state of a current-biased Josephson junction has a set of metastable quantum energy levels. If a junction is well isolated from its environment, it will be possible to use the two lowest states as a qubit in a quantum computer. I first examine the meaning of isolation theoretically. Using a master equation, I analyzed the effect of dissipation on escape rates and suggested a simple method, population depletion technique, to measure the relaxation time (T1). Using a stochastic Bloch equation to analyze the dependence of microwave resonance peak width on current noise, I found decoherence due to current noise depends on the noise spectrum. For high frequency noise with a cutoff frequency fc much larger than 1/T1, I found decoherence due to noise can be described by a dephasing rate that is proportional to the noise spectral density. However, for low frequency noise such that its cutoff frequency fc is much smaller than 1/T 1, decoherence due to noise depends on the total rms current noise. I then analyze and test a few qubit isolation schemes, including resistive isolation, inductor-capacitor (LC) isolation, half-wavelength resonant isolation and inductor-junction (LJ) isolation. I found the resistive isolation scheme has a severe heating problem. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and energy level quantization were observed in the LC isolated Nb/AlOx/Nb and AL/ALOx/Al junction qubits at 25 mK. Relaxation times of 4--12 ns and spectroscopic coherence times of 1--3 ns were obtained for these LC isolated qubits. I found the half-wavelength isolated junction qubit has a relaxation time of about 20 ns measured by the population-depletion techniques, but no energy levels were observed in this qubit. Experimental results suggest the LJ isolated qubit has a longer relaxation and coherence times than all my previously examined samples. Using a

  7. 77 FR 38793 - Grand Valley Rural Power Lines, Inc., Yampa Valley Electric Association, Inc., Intermountain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Valley Rural Power Lines, Inc., Yampa Valley Electric Association, Inc., Intermountain Rural Electric Association, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. v. Public... CFR 385.206 and 385.212 (2011), Grand Valley Rural Power Lines, Inc., Yampa Valley...

  8. 77 FR 7574 - Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit... Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority (GCPHA) filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of... Project, to be located on the P.E. 46A Wasteway, which is part of the Federal Columbia Basin Project,...

  9. 76 FR 76156 - Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit... Coulee Project Hydropower Authority (Grand Coulee Authority) filed an application for a preliminary... the PEC 1973 Drop Hydroelectric Project (PEC 1973 Project or project) to be located on the...

  10. 77 FR 7574 - Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit... Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority (GCPHA) filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of... Project, to be located on the P.E. 16.4 Wasteway, which is part of the Federal Columbia Basin Project,...

  11. 77 FR 7143 - Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit... Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority (GCPHA) filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of... Project, to be located on the P.E. 46A Wasteway, which is part of the Federal Columbia Basin Project,...

  12. City of Grand Rapids Building Solar Roof Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    DeClercq, Mark; Martinez, Imelda

    2012-08-31

    Grand Rapids, Michigan is striving to reduce it environmental footprint. The municipal government organization has established environmental sustainability policies with the goal of securing 100% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020. This report describes the process by which the City of Grand Rapids evaluated, selected and installed solar panels on the Water/Environmental Services Building. The solar panels are the first to be placed on a municipal building. Its new power monitoring system provides output data to assess energy efficiency and utilization. It is expected to generate enough clean solar energy to power 25 percent of the building. The benefit to the public includes the economic savings from reduced operational costs for the building; an improved environmentally sustainable area in which to live and work; and increased knowledge about the use of solar energy. It will serve as a model for future energy saving applications.

  13. The periodicity of Grand Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The sunspot number is the most used index to quantify the solar activity. Nevertheless, the sunspot is a syn- thetic index and not a physical index. Therefore, we should be careful to use the sunspot number to quantify the low (high) solar activity. One of the major problems of using sunspot to quantify solar activity is that its minimum value is zero. This zero value hinders the reconstruction of the solar cycle during the Maunder minimum. All solar indexes can be used as analog signals, which can be easily converted into digital signals. In con- trast, the conversion of a digital signal into an analog signal is not in general a simple task. The sunspot number during the Maunder minimum can be studied as a digital signal of the solar activity In 1894, Maunder published a discovery that has maintained the Solar Physics in an impasse. In his fa- mous work on "A Prolonged Sunspot Minimum" Maunder wrote: "The sequence of maximum and minimum has, in fact, been unfailing during the present century [..] and yet there [..], the ordinary solar cycle was once interrupted, and one long period of almost unbroken quiescence prevailed". The search of new historical Grand solar minima has been one of the most important questions in Solar Physics. However, the possibility of estimating a new Grand solar minimum is even more valuable. Since solar activity is the result of electromagnetic processes; we propose to employ the power to quantify solar activity: this is a fundamental physics concept in electrodynamics. Total Solar Irradiance is the primary energy source of the Earth's climate system and therefore its variations can contribute to natural climate change. In this work, we propose to consider the fluctuations in the power of the Total Solar Irradiance as a physical measure of the energy released by the solar dynamo, which contributes to understanding the nature of "profound solar magnetic field in calm". Using a new reconstruction of the Total Solar Irradiance we found the

  14. Thomas Moran: "The Grand Canyon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan for introducing students in grades four through six to Thomas Moran's painting, "The Grand Canyon." The goal of the lesson is to illustrate the importance of the American West as a subject for artists in the nineteenth century. (JDH)

  15. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-07

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices.

  16. Electronic and optical spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiner, Michael J.

    Electronic transport through molecules has been intensively studied in recent years, due to scientific interest in fundamental questions about charge transport and the technological promise of nanoscale circuitry. A wide range of range of experimental platforms have been developed to electronically probe both single molecules and molecular monolayers. However, it remains challenging to fabricate reliable electronic contacts to molecules, and the vast majority of molecular electronic architectures are not amenable to standard characterization techniques, such as optical spectroscopy. Thus the field of molecular electronics has been hampered with problems of reproducibility, and many fundamental questions about electronic transport remain unanswered. This thesis describes four significant contributions towards the fabrication and characterization of molecular electronic devices: (1) The development of a new method for creating robust, large area junctions where the electronic transport is through a single monolayer of molecules. This method utilizes atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow an ultrathin oxide layer on top of a molecular monolayer, which protects the molecules against subsequent processing. (2) A new method for rapid imaging and analysis of single defects in molecular monolayers. This method also electrically passivates defects as it labels them. (3) Hot carrier spectroscopy of molecular junctions. Using optically excited hot carriers, we demonstrate the ability to probe the energy level lineup inside buried molecular junctions. (4) Efficient coupling of optical fields to metal-insulator-metal (MIM) surface plasmon modes. We show both theoretical and experimental work illustrating the ability to create very intense optical fields inside MIM systems. The intense fields generated in this manner have natural extensions to a variety of applications, such as photon assisted tunneling in molecular junctions, optical modulators, and ultrafast optoelectronic

  17. Entropy Flow Through Near-Critical Quantum Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedan, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    This is the continuation of Friedan (J Stat Phys, 2017. doi: 10.1007/s10955-017-1752-8). Elementary formulas are derived for the flow of entropy through a circuit junction in a near-critical quantum circuit close to equilibrium, based on the structure of the energy-momentum tensor at the junction. The entropic admittance of a near-critical junction in a bulk-critical circuit is expressed in terms of commutators of the chiral entropy currents. The entropic admittance at low frequency, divided by the frequency, gives the change of the junction entropy with temperature—the entropic "capacitance". As an example, and as a check on the formalism, the entropic admittance is calculated explicitly for junctions in bulk-critical quantum Ising circuits (free fermions, massless in the bulk), in terms of the reflection matrix of the junction. The half-bit of information capacity per end of critical Ising wire is re-derived by integrating the entropic "capacitance" with respect to temperature, from T=0 to T=∞.

  18. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  19. Control of Junction Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, T.-C.; Bingham, C.; Kellier, L.

    2001-11-01

    Control for horseshoe vortices resulting from boundary layer separation in front of a structure has long been sought without satisfactory results. Tests were carried out in a water channel with the objective of seeking such a control. The water channel has a test section of .6m wide, .4m deep and 8m long, with an adjustable mean flow speed of up to .5m/s. Flow visualization technique was used to elucidate the flow process. To control the horseshoe vortex a long airfoil of 1cm chord was placed horizontally near the ground upstream of a 10cm thin square plate. It was found that the original horseshoe vortex moved toward and circulated around the airfoil. The junction flow immediately upstream of the obstacle was noticeably steady and free of disturbance. The process was insensitive to the streamwise location of the airfoil, horseshoe's vortical structure, stream speed and acceleration, upstream vortical influx, and magnitude/sign of airfoil's angle of attack. Experimental results with obliquely mounted square cylinder were similar, which demonstrated that controls were effective for all angles of attack.

  20. Rio Grande Wetbacks: Mexican Migrant Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norquest, Carrol

    Farmers in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas saw a rise of wetback labor in the 1930s and 40s. The wetback laborers were Mexicans who had crossed the Rio Grande and were in the United States illegally to work. Carrol Norquest, a farmer in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, employed wetbacks regularly. In this book, Mr. Norquest writes about the…

  1. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  2. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  3. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  4. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  5. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  6. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  7. Shot noise generated by graphene p-n junctions in the quantum Hall effect regime.

    PubMed

    Kumada, N; Parmentier, F D; Hibino, H; Glattli, D C; Roulleau, P

    2015-09-04

    Graphene offers a unique system to investigate transport of Dirac Fermions at p-n junctions. In a magnetic field, combination of quantum Hall physics and the characteristic transport across p-n junctions leads to a fractionally quantized conductance associated with the mixing of electron-like and hole-like modes and their subsequent partitioning. The mixing and partitioning suggest that a p-n junction could be used as an electronic beam splitter. Here we report the shot noise study of the mode-mixing process and demonstrate the crucial role of the p-n junction length. For short p-n junctions, the amplitude of the noise is consistent with an electronic beam-splitter behaviour, whereas, for longer p-n junctions, it is reduced by the energy relaxation. Remarkably, the relaxation length is much larger than typical size of mesoscopic devices, encouraging using graphene for electron quantum optics and quantum information processing.

  8. Shot noise generated by graphene p-n junctions in the quantum Hall effect regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, N.; Parmentier, F. D.; Hibino, H.; Glattli, D. C.; Roulleau, P.

    2015-09-01

    Graphene offers a unique system to investigate transport of Dirac Fermions at p-n junctions. In a magnetic field, combination of quantum Hall physics and the characteristic transport across p-n junctions leads to a fractionally quantized conductance associated with the mixing of electron-like and hole-like modes and their subsequent partitioning. The mixing and partitioning suggest that a p-n junction could be used as an electronic beam splitter. Here we report the shot noise study of the mode-mixing process and demonstrate the crucial role of the p-n junction length. For short p-n junctions, the amplitude of the noise is consistent with an electronic beam-splitter behaviour, whereas, for longer p-n junctions, it is reduced by the energy relaxation. Remarkably, the relaxation length is much larger than typical size of mesoscopic devices, encouraging using graphene for electron quantum optics and quantum information processing.

  9. Studies of silicon p-n junction solar cells. [open circuit photovoltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    Single crystal silicon p-n junction solar cells made with low resistivity substrates show poorer solar energy conversion efficiency than traditional theory predicts. The physical mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy are identified and characterized. The open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of about 0.1 ohm/cm substrate resistivity is investigated under AMO (one sun) conditions.

  10. GRAND DITCH VIEW, FROM FARVIEW CURVE OVERLOOK, VIEWING WEST. DITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRAND DITCH VIEW, FROM FARVIEW CURVE OVERLOOK, VIEWING WEST. DITCH IS INDICATED BY HORIZONTAL LINE NEAR TOP OF CLOUD COVERED PEAKS - Grand Ditch, Baker Creek to LaPoudre Pass Creek, Grand Lake, Grand County, CO

  11. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a cloudless sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  12. Oxygen adsorption at noble metal/TiO2 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Babaei, F.; Alaei-Sheini, Navid; Lajvardi, Mehdi M.

    2016-03-01

    Electric conduction in titanium dioxide is known to be oxygen sensitive and the conductivity of a TiO2 ceramic body is determined mainly by the concentration of its naturally occurring oxygen vacancy. Recently, fabrications and electronic features of a number of noble metal/TiO2-based electronic devices, such as solar cells, UV detectors, gas sensors and memristive devices have been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the effect of oxygen adsorption at the noble metal/TiO2 junction in such devices, and show the potentials of these junctions in chemical sensor fabrication. The polycrystalline, poly-phase TiO2 layers are grown by the selective and controlled oxidation of titanium thin films vacuum deposited on silica substrates. Noble metal thin films are deposited on the oxide layers by physical vapor deposition. Current-voltage (I-V) diagrams of the fabricated devices are studied for Ag/, Au/, and Pt/TiO2 samples. The raw samples show no junction energy barrier. After a thermal annealing in air at 250° C, I-V diagrams change drastically. The annealed samples demonstrate highly non-linear I-V indicating the formation of high Schottky energy barriers at the noble metal/TiO2 junctions. The phenomenon is described based on the effect of the oxygen atoms adsorbed at the junction.

  13. Gauge-Higgs EW and grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosotani, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Four-dimensional Higgs field is identified with the extra-dimensional component of gauge potentials in the gauge-Higgs unification scenario. SO(5) × U(1) gauge-Higgs EW unification in the Randall-Sundrum warped space is successful at low energies. The Higgs field appears as an Aharonov-Bohm phase 𝜃H in the fifth dimension. Its mass is generated at the quantum level and is finite. The model yields almost the same phenomenology as the standard model for 𝜃H < 0.1, and predicts Z‧ bosons around 6-10 TeV with very broad widths. The scenario is generalized to SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unification. Fermions are introduced in the spinor and vector representations of SO(11). Proton decay is naturally forbidden.

  14. Gauge-Higgs EW and Grand Unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosotani, Yutaka

    Four-dimensional Higgs field is identified with the extra-dimensional component of gauge potentials in the gauge-Higgs unifiation scenario. SO(5) × U(1) gauge-Higgs EW unification in the Randall-Sundrum warped space is successful at low energies. The Higgs field appears as an Aharonov-Bohm phase θH in the fifth dimension. Its mass is generated at the quantum level and is finite. The model yields almost the same phenomenology as the standard model for θH < 0.1, and predicts Z' bosons around 6-10 TeV with very broad widths. The scenario is generalized to SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unification. Fermions are introduced in the spinor and vector representations of SO(11). Proton decay is naturally forbidden.

  15. Quantitative bond energetics in atomic-scale junctions.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Nielsen, Aileen; Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-07-22

    A direct measurement of the potential energy surface that characterizes individual chemical bonds in complex materials has fundamental significance for many disciplines. Here, we demonstrate that the energy profile for metallic single-atom contacts and single-molecule junctions can be mapped by fitting ambient atomic force microscope measurements carried out in the near-equilibrium regime to a physical, but simple, functional form. We extract bond energies for junctions formed through metallic bonds as well as metal-molecule link bonds from atomic force microscope data and find that our results are in excellent quantitative agreement with density functional theory based calculations for exemplary junction structures. Furthermore, measurements from a large number of junctions can be collapsed to a single, universal force-extension curve, thus revealing a surprising degree of similarity in the overall shape of the potential surface that governs these chemical bonds. Compared to previous studies under ambient conditions where analysis was confined to trends in rupture force, our approach significantly expands the quantitative information extracted from these measurements, particularly allowing analysis of the trends in bond energy directly.

  16. Spatial inhomogeneous barrier heights at graphene/semiconductor Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomer, Dushyant

    Graphene, a semimetal with linear energy dispersion, forms Schottky junction when interfaced with a semiconductor. This dissertation presents temperature dependent current-voltage and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) measurements performed on graphene Schottky junctions formed with both three and two dimensional semiconductors. To fabricate Schottky junctions, we transfer chemical vapor deposited monolayer graphene onto Si- and C-face SiC, Si, GaAs and MoS2 semiconducting substrates using polymer assisted chemical method. We observe three main type of intrinsic spatial inhomogeneities, graphene ripples, ridges and semiconductor steps in STM imaging that can exist at graphene/semiconductor junctions. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements reveal fluctuations in graphene Dirac point position, which is directly related to the Schottky barrier height. We find a direct correlation of Dirac point variation with the topographic undulations of graphene ripples at the graphene/SiC junction. However, no such correlation is established at graphene/Si and Graphene/GaAs junctions and Dirac point variations are attributed to surface states and trapped charges at the interface. In addition to graphene ripples and ridges, we also observe atomic scale moire patterns at graphene/MoS2 junction due to van der Waals interaction at the interface. Periodic topographic modulations due to moire pattern do not lead to local variation in graphene Dirac point, indicating that moire pattern does not contribute to fluctuations in electronic properties of the heterojunction. We perform temperature dependent current-voltage measurements to investigate the impact of topographic inhomogeneities on electrical properties of the Schottky junctions. We observe temperature dependence in junction parameters, such as Schottky barrier height and ideality factor, for all types of Schottky junctions in forward bias measurements. Standard thermionic emission theory which assumes a perfect

  17. Connection between solar activity cycles and grand minima generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchio, A.; Lepreti, F.; Laurenza, M.; Alberti, T.; Carbone, V.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: The revised dataset of sunspot and group numbers (released by WDC-SILSO) and the sunspot number reconstruction based on dendrochronologically dated radiocarbon concentrations have been analyzed to provide a deeper characterization of the solar activity main periodicities and to investigate the role of the Gleissberg and Suess cycles in the grand minima occurrence. Methods: Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) has been used to isolate the time behavior of the different solar activity periodicities. A general consistency among the results from all the analyzed datasets verifies the reliability of the EMD approach. Results: The analysis on the revised sunspot data indicates that the highest energy content is associated with the Schwabe cycle. In correspondence with the grand minima (Maunder and Dalton), the frequency of this cycle changes to longer timescales of 14 yr. The Gleissberg and Suess cycles, with timescales of 60-120 yr and 200-300 yr, respectively, represent the most energetic contribution to sunspot number reconstruction records and are both found to be characterized by multiple scales of oscillation. The grand minima generation and the origin of the two expected distinct types of grand minima, Maunder and longer Spörer-like, are naturally explained through the EMD approach. We found that the grand minima sequence is produced by the coupling between Gleissberg and Suess cycles, the latter being responsible for the most intense and longest Spörer-like minima (with typical duration longer than 80 yr). Finally, we identified a non-solar component, characterized by a very long scale oscillation of 7000 yr, and the Hallstatt cycle ( 2000 yr), likely due to the solar activity. Conclusions: These results provide new observational constraints on the properties of the solar cycle periodicities, the grand minima generation, and thus the long-term behavior of the solar dynamo.

  18. Edge currents in frustrated Josephson junction ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. M.; Santos, F. D. R.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present a numerical study of quasi-1D frustrated Josephson junction ladders with diagonal couplings and open boundary conditions, in the large capacitance limit. We derive a correspondence between the energy of this Josephson junction ladder and the expectation value of the Hamiltonian of an analogous tight-binding model, and show how the overall superconducting state of the chain is equivalent to the minimum energy state of the tight-binding model in the subspace of one-particle states with uniform density. To satisfy the constraint of uniform density, the superconducting state of the ladder is written as a linear combination of the allowed k-states of the tight-binding model with open boundaries. Above a critical value of the parameter t (ratio between the intra-rung and inter-rung Josephson couplings) the ladder spontaneously develops currents at the edges, which spread to the bulk as t is increased until complete coverage is reached. Above a certain value of t, which varies with ladder size (t = 1 for an infinite-sized ladder), the edge currents are destroyed. The value t = 1 corresponds, in the tight-binding model, to the opening of a gap between two bands. We argue that the disappearance of the edge currents with this gap opening is not coincidental, and that this points to a topological origin for these edge current states.

  19. Thermoelectrics in an array of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Müller, K-H

    2008-07-28

    The room temperature thermoelectric properties of a three-dimensional array of molecular junctions are calculated. The array is composed of n-doped silicon nanoparticles where the surfaces are partially covered with polar molecules and the nanoparticles are bridged by trans-polyacetylene molecules. The role of the polar molecules is to reduce the band bending in the n-doped silicon nanoparticles and to shift the electronic resonances of the bridging molecules to the nanoparticle conduction band edges where the molecular resonances act as electron energy filters. The transmission coefficients of the bridging molecules that appear in the formulas for the Seebeck coefficient, the electrical conductance, and the electronic thermal conductance, are calculated using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. A simple tight-binding Hamiltonian is used to describe the bridging molecules, and the self-energy term is calculated using the parabolic conduction band approximation. The dependencies of the thermoelectric properties of the molecular junctions on the silicon doping concentration and on the molecule-nanoparticle coupling are discussed. The maximal achievable thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of the array is estimated as a function of the phononic thermal conductance of the bridging molecules and the doping of the nanoparticles. The power factor of the array is also calculated. For sufficiently small phononic thermal conductances of the bridging molecules, very high ZT values are predicted.

  20. Model for large arrays of Josephson junctions with unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khveshchenko, D. V.; Crooks, R.

    2011-10-01

    We study large arrays of mesoscopic junctions made out of gapless unconventional superconductors where the tunneling processes of both particle-hole and Cooper pairs give rise to a strongly retarded effective action which, contrary to the standard case, cannot be readily characterized in terms of a local Josephson energy. This action can be relevant, for example, to grain boundary and c-axis junctions in layered high-Tc superconductors. By using a particular functional representation, we describe emergent collective phenomena in this system, ascertain its phase diagram, and compute electrical conductivity.

  1. Free electron gas primary thermometer: The bipolar junction transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Mimila-Arroyo, J.

    2013-11-04

    The temperature of a bipolar transistor is extracted probing its carrier energy distribution through its collector current, obtained under appropriate polarization conditions, following a rigorous mathematical method. The obtained temperature is independent of the transistor physical properties as current gain, structure (Homo-junction or hetero-junction), and geometrical parameters, resulting to be a primary thermometer. This proposition has been tested using off the shelf silicon transistors at thermal equilibrium with water at its triple point, the transistor temperature values obtained involve an uncertainty of a few milli-Kelvin. This proposition has been successfully tested in the temperature range of 77–450 K.

  2. A gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipperian, T. E.; Dawson, L. R.; Chaffin, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high temperature (350 C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for geothermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p(+)n(-)pp(+) structure was formed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The initial design suffers from a series resistance problem which limits the transistor's usefulness at high temperatures.

  3. Magnetic tunnel junctions utilizing diamond-like carbon tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieu, F. J.; Chen, Li; Li, Biao

    2002-05-01

    We have devised a method whereby thin particulate-free diamond-like carbon films can be made with good adhesion onto even room-temperature substrates. The method employs a filtered ionized carbon beam created by the vacuum impact of a high-energy, approximately 1 J per pulse, 248 nm excimer laser onto a carbon target. The resultant deposition beam can be steered and deflected by magnetic and electric fields to paint a specific substrate area. An important aspect of this deposition method is that the resultant films are particulate free and formed only as the result of atomic species impact. The vast majority of magnetic tunnel junctions utilizing thin metallic magnetic films have employed a thin oxidized layer of aluminum to form the tunnel barrier. This has presented reproducibility problems because the indicated optimal barrier thickness is only approximately 13 Å thick. Magnetic tunnel junctions utilizing Co and permalloy films made by evaporation and sputtering have been fabricated with an intervening diamond-like carbon tunnel barrier. The diamond-like carbon thickness profile has been tapered so that seven junctions with different barrier thickness can be formed at once. Magnetoresistive (MR) measurements made between successive permalloy strip ends include contributions from two junctions and from the permalloy and Co strips that act as current leads to the junctions. Magnetic tunnel junctions with thicker carbon barriers exhibit MR effects that are dominated by that of the permalloy strips. Since these tunnel barriers are formed without the need for oxygen, complete tunnel junctions can be formed with all high-vacuum processing.

  4. Charge Transport Processes in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher Eugene

    Molecular electronics (ME) has evolved into a rich area of exploration that combines the fields of chemistry, materials, electronic engineering and computational modeling to explore the physics behind electronic conduction at the molecular level. Through studying charge transport properties of single molecules and nanoscale molecular materials the field has gained the potential to bring about new avenues for the miniaturization of electrical components where quantum phenomena are utilized to achieve solid state molecular device functionality. Molecular junctions are platforms that enable these studies and consist of a single molecule or a small group of molecules directly connected to electrodes. The work presented in this thesis has built upon the current understanding of the mechanisms of charge transport in ordered junctions using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecular thin films. Donor and acceptor compounds were synthesized and incorporated into SAMs grown on metal substrates then the transport properties were measured with conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). In addition to experimentally measured current-voltage (I-V) curves, the transport properties were addressed computationally and modeled theoretically. The key objectives of this project were to 1) investigate the impact of molecular structure on hole and electron charge transport, 2) understand the nature of the charge carriers and their structure-transport properties through long (<4 nm) conjugated molecular wires, and 3) quantitatively extract interfacial properties characteristic to macroscopic junctions, such as energy level alignment and molecule-contact electronic coupling from experimental I-V curves. Here, we lay ground work for creating a more complete picture of charge transport in macroscopically ordered molecular junctions of controlled architecture, length and charge carrier. The polaronic nature of hopping transport has been predicted in long, conjugated molecular wires

  5. Electron Transport through Porphyrin Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi

    The goal of this work is to study the properties that would affect the electron transport through a porphyrin molecular junction. This work contributes to the field of electron transport in molecular junctions in the following 3 aspects. First of all, by carrying out experiments comparing the conductance of the iron (III) porphyrin (protected) and the free base porphyrin (protected), it is confirmed that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting plays an important role in the electron transport through molecular junctions. Secondly, by carrying out an in-situ deprotection of the acetyl-protected free base porphyrin molecules, it is found out that the presence of acetyl groups reduces the conductance. Thirdly, by incorporating the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrum and the in-situ deprotection prior to formation of molecular junctions, it allows a more precise understanding of the molecules involved in the formation of molecular junctions, and therefore allows an accurate analysis of the conductance histogram. The molecules are prepared by self-assembly and the junctions are formed using a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) molecular break junction technique. The porphyrin molecules are characterized by MALDI in solution before self-assembly to a gold/mica substrate. The self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of porphyrins on gold are characterized by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) reflection spectroscopy to confirm that the molecules are attached to the substrate. The SAMs are then characterized by Angle-Resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) to determine the thickness and the average molecular orientation of the molecular layer. The electron transport is measured by conductance-displacement (G-S) experiments under a given bias (-0.4V). The conductance value of a single molecule is identified by a statistical analysis

  6. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  7. Velocity modulation of electron transport through a ferromagnetic silicene junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huai-Hua, Shao; Dan, Guo; Ben-Liang, Zhou; Guang-Hui, Zhou

    2016-03-01

    We address velocity-modulation control of electron wave propagation in a normal/ferromagnetic/normal silicene junction with local variation of Fermi velocity, where the properties of charge, valley, and spin transport through the junction are investigated. By matching the wavefunctions at the normal-ferromagnetic interfaces, it is demonstrated that the variation of Fermi velocity in a small range can largely enhance the total conductance while keeping the current nearly fully valley- and spin-polarized. Further, the variation of Fermi velocity in ferromagnetic silicene has significant influence on the valley and spin polarization, especially in the low-energy regime. It may drastically reduce the high polarizations, which can be realized by adjusting the local application of a gate voltage and exchange field on the junction. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274108).

  8. Electrodeposited CuInSe2 Thin Film Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R. P.; Mantovani, J. G.; Bailey, S. G.; Hepp, A. F.; Gordon, E. M.; Haraway, R.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated thin films and junctions based on copper indium diselenide (CIS) which have been grown by electrochemical deposition. CIS is a leading candidate for use in polycrystalline thin film photovoltaic solar cells. Electrodeposition is a cost-effective method for producing thin-film CIS. We have produced both p and n type CIS thin films from the same aqueous solution by simply varying the deposition potential. A CIS pn junction was deposited using a step-function potential. Stoichiometry of the single layer films was determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. Carrier densities of these films increased with deviation from stoichiometry, as determined by the capacitance versus voltage dependence of Schottky contacts. Optical bandgaps for the single layer films as determined by transmission spectroscopy were also found to increase with deviation from stoichiometry. Rectifying current versus voltage characteristics were demonstrated for the Schottky barriers and for the pn junction.

  9. Symmetry analysis of transport properties in helical superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qiang; Zhang, Yinhan; Zhang, Kunhua; Jin, Biao; Zhang, Changlian

    2017-03-01

    We study the discrete symmetries satisfied by helical p-wave superconductors with the d-vectors {{k}x}\\hat{x}+/- {{k}y}\\hat{y} or {{k}y}\\hat{x}+/- {{k}x}\\hat{y} and the transformations brought by symmetry operations to ferromagnet and spin-singlet superconductors, which show intimate associations with the transport properties in heterojunctions, including helical superconductors. In particular, the partial symmetries of the Hamiltonian under spin-rotation and gauge-rotation operations are responsible for the novel invariances of the conductance in tunnel junctions and the new selection rules for the lowest current and peculiar phase diagrams in Josephson junctions, which were reported recently. The symmetries of constructed free energies for Josephson junctions are also analyzed, and are consistent with the results from the Hamiltonian.

  10. Interface states in carbon nanotube junctions: Rolling up graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, H.; Ayuela, A.; Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, L.

    2009-07-01

    We study the origin of interface states in carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions between achiral tubes. By applying the Born-von Karman boundary condition to an interface between armchair- and zigzag-terminated graphene layers, we are able to explain their number and energies. We show that these interface states, costumarily attributed to the presence of topological defects, are actually related to zigzag-edge states, as those of graphene zigzag nanoribbons. Spatial localization of interface states is seen to vary greatly and may extend appreciably into either side of the junction. Our results give an alternative explanation to the unusual decay length measured for interface states of semiconductor nanotube junctions and could be further tested by local probe spectroscopies.

  11. Symmetry analysis of transport properties in helical superconductor junctions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiang; Zhang, Yinhan; Zhang, Kunhua; Jin, Biao; Zhang, Changlian

    2017-03-01

    We study the discrete symmetries satisfied by helical p-wave superconductors with the d-vectors [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] and the transformations brought by symmetry operations to ferromagnet and spin-singlet superconductors, which show intimate associations with the transport properties in heterojunctions, including helical superconductors. In particular, the partial symmetries of the Hamiltonian under spin-rotation and gauge-rotation operations are responsible for the novel invariances of the conductance in tunnel junctions and the new selection rules for the lowest current and peculiar phase diagrams in Josephson junctions, which were reported recently. The symmetries of constructed free energies for Josephson junctions are also analyzed, and are consistent with the results from the Hamiltonian.

  12. Grand Challenges of Enterprise Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, W.D; Neal, R.E.; Marks, D.

    2001-04-01

    Enterprise Integration connects and combines people, processes, systems, and technologies to ensure that the right people and the right processes have the right information and the right resources at the right time. A consensus roadmap for Technologies for Enterprise Integration was created as part of an industry/government/academia partnership in the Integrated Manufacturing Technology Initiative (IMTI). Two of the grand challenges identified by the roadmapping effort will be addressed here--Customer Responsive Enterprises and Totally Connected Enterprises. Each of these challenges is briefly discussed as to the current state of industry and the future vision as developed in the roadmap.

  13. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT. PMID:27221947

  14. Measure Guideline: Optimizing the Configuration of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Burdick, A.

    2014-03-01

    This measure guideline offers additional recommendations to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers for optimizing flexible duct, constant-volume HVAC systems using junction boxes within Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual D guidance (Rutkowski, H. Manual D -- Residential Duct Systems, 3rd edition, Version 1.00. Arlington, VA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America, 2009.). IBACOS used computational fluid dynamics software to explore and develop guidance to better control the airflow effects of factors that may impact pressure losses within junction boxes among various design configurations (Beach, R., Prahl, D., and Lange, R. CFD Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, submitted for publication 2013). These recommendations can help to ensure that a system aligns more closely with the design and the occupants' comfort expectations. Specifically, the recommendations described herein show how to configure a rectangular box with four outlets, a triangular box with three outlets, metal wyes with two outlets, and multiple configurations for more than four outlets. Designers of HVAC systems, contractors who are fabricating junction boxes on site, and anyone using the ACCA Manual D process for sizing duct runs will find this measure guideline invaluable for more accurately minimizing pressure losses when using junction boxes with flexible ducts.

  15. Enhanced Thermoelectric Performance of Hybrid Nanoparticle-Single-Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerah-Harush, Elinor; Dubi, Yonatan

    2015-06-01

    It was recently suggested that molecular junctions would be excellent elements for efficient and high-power thermoelectric energy-conversion devices. However, experimental measurements of thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions indicate rather poor efficiency, raising the question of whether it is indeed possible to design a setup for molecular junctions that will exhibit enhanced thermoelectric performance. Here we suggest that hybrid single-molecule-nanoparticle junctions can serve as efficient thermoelectric converters. The introduction of a semiconducting nanoparticle introduces new tuning capabilities, which are absent in conventional metal-molecule-metal junctions. Using a generic model for the molecule and nanoparticle with realistic parameters, we demonstrate that the thermopower can be of the order of hundreds of microvolts per degree kelvin and that the thermoelectric figure of merit can reach values close to 1, an improvement of 4 orders of magnitude over existing measurements. This favorable performance persists over a wide range of experimentally relevant parameters and is robust against disorder (in the form of surface-attached molecules) and against electron decoherence at the nanoparticle-molecule interface.

  16. Minimal realistic SU(5) Grand Unified Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assad, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Despite making predictions in unprecedented agreement with experiment, such as the magnetic dipole moment of the electron to one part in a billion, the experimental confirmation of neutrino flavor oscillations, and thus of massive neutrinos, implies that the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics is incomplete. An extension of the SM, which retains its low energy predictions while accounting for massive neutrinos, is achieved through the introduction of the dimension 5 Weinberg operator and its associated energy scale above the electroweak (102 GeV), but below the Planck scale (1019 GeV). The Beyond Standard Model (BSM) class of Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) implicates such a scale (1016 GeV) in the unification of the three SM gauge couplings, thus making the origin of neutrino mass a theoretically appealing probe into particle behavior at energies currently inaccessible experimentally. Here, we compare the 24F and 15H extensions of the Georgi-Glashow SU(5) GUT to accommodate massive neutrinos and to unify SM gauge couplings while minimizing the theory's additional field content. Using the Monte Carlo event generator MadGraph, each extension is found to produce distinct signatures at the run II of the LHC.

  17. dc properties of series-parallel arrays of Josephson junctions in an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, S.J. )

    1991-04-01

    A detailed dc theory of superconducting multijunction interferometers has previously been developed by several authors for the case of parallel junction arrays. The theory is now extended to cover the case of a loop containing several junctions connected in series. The problem is closely associated with high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors and their clusters of intrinsic Josephson junctions. These materials exhibit spontaneous interferometric effects, and there is no reason to assume that the intrinsic junctions form only parallel arrays. A simple formalism of phase states is developed in order to express the superconducting phase differences across the junctions forming a series array as functions of the phase difference across the weakest junction of the system, and to relate the differences in critical currents of the junctions to gaps in the allowed ranges of their phase functions. This formalism is used to investigate the energy states of the array, which in the case of different junctions are split and separated by energy barriers of height depending on the phase gaps. Modifications of the washboard model of a single junction are shown. Next a superconducting inductive loop containing a series array of two junctions is considered, and this model is used to demonstrate the transitions between phase states and the associated instabilities. Finally, the critical current of a parallel connection of two series arrays is analyzed and shown to be a multivalued function of the externally applied magnetic flux. The instabilities caused by the presence of intrinsic serial junctions in granular high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} materials are pointed out as a potential source of additional noise.

  18. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  19. Effect of Electron-Phonon Scattering on Shot Noise in Nanoscale Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chang; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the effect of electron-phonon inelastic scattering on shot noise in nanoscale junctions in the regime of quasiballistic transport. We predict that when the local thermal energy of the junction is larger than its lowest vibrational mode energy eVc, the inelastic contribution to shot noise (conductance) increases (decreases) with bias as V (V). The corresponding Fano factor thus increases as V. We also show that the inelastic contribution to the Fano factor saturates with increasing thermal current exchanged between the junction and the bulk electrodes to a value which, for V≫Vc, is independent of bias. These predictions can be readily tested experimentally.

  20. The Yolla Bolly junction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, M.C.; Jayko, A.S. ); Jones, D.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Engebretson, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    West of Red Bluff, California, rocks of the northern Coast Ranges, Klamath-Sierra Nevada, and Great Valley provinces come together at what has been called the Yolla Bolly junction. Mapping of the Red Bluff and Willows 1:100,000 quadrangles has greatly clarified the enigmatic features of this complex area. Terranes of the Klamath Mountains and their Cretaceous sedimentary cover have been thrust northwestward over the Elder Creek terrane and Franciscan rocks, north of the left-lateral Cold Fork fault zone. The Condrey Mountain window (Franciscan Pickett Peak terrane) provides a measure of the magnitude of this thrusting (ca 90 km). South of the Cold Fork fault zone, the Franciscan and Elder Creek terranes were driven southeastward as tectonic wedges onto Sierran-Klamath basement. Timing of this scissor-tectonics is not constrained near the junction, but further north in southwest Oregon, Lower Eocene strata were deformed by overthrusting of the Klamath block whereas Upper Eocene strata overlap the thrust, indicating that thrusting occurred between about 52 and 60 Ma. Plate reconstructions for this time interval indicate the close proximity of the Kula-Farallon-North America triple junction and that old (ca 100 m.y.) Farallon lithosphere was being subducted north of the junction whereas to the south, very young (ca 10 m.y.) Kula plate was presumably obducted onto North America.

  1. 76 FR 18547 - Grand River Dam Authority, Salina Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority, Salina Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Proposed... Inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places Rule 2010 of the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  2. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  3. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  4. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

  5. 76 FR 40903 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License...: Grand River Dam Authority. e. Name of Project: Salina Pumped Storage Project. f. Location: The project... River Dam Authority, P.O. Box 409, Vinita, OK 73401-0409. Tel: (918) 256-5545. i. FERC Contact:...

  6. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm/sup 2/ and a thickness of 100 ..mu..m. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150/sup 0/K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs.

  7. Length dependence of conductance and thermopower of hybrid alkyl-thiophene single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotiuga, Michele; Chang, William B.; Mai, Cheng-Kang; Pauly, Fabian; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Segalman, Rachel A.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2014-03-01

    Single-molecule junctions are novel, controllable testbeds for understanding mixed electronic and thermal transport at interfaces. Here, we study a set of newly-synthesized molecules containing alkyl and thiophene units of increasing length in order to control junction level alignment and electronic coupling with a combination of theory and experiment. Using a first-principles scattering-state approach, based on self-energy corrected density functional theory, we calculate the conductance and thermopower of thiol-terminated alkyl-thiophene-Au junctions, elucidating the relationship between length and thermopower. We compare our work to statistical measurements with a scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction technique, and discuss the impact of junction geometry on our results. Work supported by ONR/AFOSR BAA 10-026 and computational resources provided by NERSC.

  8. Photoelectric polarization-sensitive broadband photoresponse from interface junction states in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Jing, Lei; Suarez Morell, Eric; Dyer, Gregory C.; Wickey, Lee; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Grine, Albert D.; Wanke, Michael C.; Shaner, Eric A.; Lau, Chun Ning; Foa Torres, Luis E. F.; Fistul, Mikhail V.; Efetov, Konstantin B.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has established itself as a promising optoelectronic material. Many details of the photoresponse (PR) mechanisms in graphene in the THz-to-visible range have been revealed, however, new intricacies continue to emerge. Interface junctions, formed at the boundaries between parts of graphene with different number of layers or different stacking orders, and making connection between electrical contacts, provide another peculiar setup to establish PR. Here, we experimentally demonstrate an enhanced polarization sensitive photoelectric PR in graphene sheets containing interface junctions as compared to homogenous graphene sheets in the visible, infrared, and THz spectral regions. Our numerical simulations show that highly localized electronic states are created at the interface junctions, and these states exhibit a unique energy spectrum and enhanced probabilities for optical transitions. The interaction of electrons from interface junction states with electromagnetic fields generates a polarization-sensitive PR that is maximal for the polarization direction perpendicular to the junction interface.

  9. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. Construction of the forebay dam, which replaced the eastern end of the original Grand Coulee Dam, was completed in 1974. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  10. Grand challenges for biological engineering.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Riley, Mark R

    2009-09-22

    Biological engineering will play a significant role in solving many of the world's problems in medicine, agriculture, and the environment. Recently the U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE) released a document "Grand Challenges in Engineering," covering broad realms of human concern from sustainability, health, vulnerability and the joy of living. Biological engineers, having tools and techniques at the interface between living and non-living entities, will play a prominent role in forging a better future. The 2010 Institute of Biological Engineering (IBE) conference in Cambridge, MA, USA will address, in part, the roles of biological engineering in solving the challenges presented by the NAE. This letter presents a brief outline of how biological engineers are working to solve these large scale and integrated problems of our society.

  11. Grand unification of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Kaspi, Victoria M

    2010-04-20

    The last decade has shown us that the observational properties of neutron stars are remarkably diverse. From magnetars to rotating radio transients, from radio pulsars to isolated neutron stars, from central compact objects to millisecond pulsars, observational manifestations of neutron stars are surprisingly varied, with most properties totally unpredicted. The challenge is to establish an overarching physical theory of neutron stars and their birth properties that can explain this great diversity. Here I survey the disparate neutron stars classes, describe their properties, and highlight results made possible by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, in celebration of its 10th anniversary. Finally, I describe the current status of efforts at physical "grand unification" of this wealth of observational phenomena, and comment on possibilities for Chandra's next decade in this field.

  12. Grand unification of neutron stars

    PubMed Central

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has shown us that the observational properties of neutron stars are remarkably diverse. From magnetars to rotating radio transients, from radio pulsars to isolated neutron stars, from central compact objects to millisecond pulsars, observational manifestations of neutron stars are surprisingly varied, with most properties totally unpredicted. The challenge is to establish an overarching physical theory of neutron stars and their birth properties that can explain this great diversity. Here I survey the disparate neutron stars classes, describe their properties, and highlight results made possible by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, in celebration of its 10th anniversary. Finally, I describe the current status of efforts at physical “grand unification” of this wealth of observational phenomena, and comment on possibilities for Chandra’s next decade in this field. PMID:20404205

  13. Tight junction proteins: from barrier to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Runkle, E Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-08-28

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis.

  14. Tight Junction Proteins: From Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, E. Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-01-01

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis. PMID:23743355

  15. 75 FR 6094 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Grand Junction, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ...; telephone (425) 203-4537. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On October 29, 2009, the FAA published in the... areas extending upward from 700 feet or more above the surface of the earth. * * * * * ANM CO E5...

  16. Google Earth Grand Tour Themes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bentley, C.; Dordevic, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    As part of an NSF TUES Type 3 project entitled "Google Earth for Onsite and Distance Education (GEODE)," we are assembling a "Grand Tour" of locations on Earth and other terrestrial bodies that every geoscience student should know about and visit at least in virtual reality. Based on feedback from colleagues at previous meetings, we have identified nine Grand Tour themes: "Plates and Plumes," "Rocks and Regions," "Geology Through Time," "The Mapping Challenge*," "U.S. National Parks*," "The Magical Mystery Tour*," "Resources and Hazards," "Planets and Moons," and "Top of the Pops." Themes marked with an asterisk are most developed at this stage and will be demonstrated in real time. The Mapping Challenge invites students to trace geological contacts, measure bedding strike and dip and the plunge, trend, and facing of a fold. There is an advanced tool for modeling periclinal folds. The challenge is presented in a game-like format with an emphasis on puzzle-solving that will appeal to students regardless of gender. For the tour of U.S. national parks, we divided the most geologically important parks into four groups—Western Pacific, West Coast, Rockies, and East Coast. We are combining our own team's GigaPan imagery with imagery already available on the Internet. There is a great deal of imagery just waiting to be annotated for geological education purposes. The Magical Mystery Tour takes students to Google Streetview locations selected by instructors. Students are presented with questions or tasks and are given automatic feedback. Other themes are under development. Within each theme, we are crowd-sourcing contributions from colleagues and inviting colleagues to vote for or against proposed locations and student interactions. The GEODE team includes the authors and: Heather Almquist, Stephen Burgin, Cinzia Cervato, Gene Cooper, Paul Karabinos, Terry Pavlis, Jen Piatek, Bill Richards, Jeff Ryan, Ron Schott, Kristen St. John, and Barb Tewksbury.

  17. Hyacinths Choke the Rio Grande

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, demonstrate the potential of satellite-based remote sensors to monitor infestations of non-native plant species. These images show the vigorous growth of water hyacinths along a stretch of the Rio Grande River in Texas. The infestation had grown so dense in some places it was impeding the flow of water and rendered the river impassible for boats. The hyacinth is an aquatic weed native to South America. The plant is exotic looking and, when it blooms, the hyacinth produces a pretty purple flower, which is why it was introduced into North America. However, it has the capacity to grow and spread at astonishing rates so that in the wild it can completely clog the flow of rivers and waterways in a matter of days or weeks. The top image was acquired on March 30, 2002, and the bottom image on May 9, 2002. In the near-infrared region of the spectrum, photosynthetically-active vegetation is highly reflective. Consequently, vegetation appears bright to the near-infrared sensors aboard ASTER; and water, which absorbs near-infrared radiation, appears dark. In these false-color images produced from the sensor data, healthy vegetation is shown as bright red while water is blue or black. Notice a water hyacinth infestation is already apparent on March 30 near the center of the image. By May 9, the hyacinth population has exploded to cover more than half the river in the scene. Satellite-based remote sensors can enable scientists to monitor large areas of infestation like this one rather quickly and efficiently, which is particularly useful for regions that are difficult to reach from on the ground. (For more details, click to read Showdown in the Rio Grande.) Images courtesy Terrametrics; Data provided by the ASTER Science Team

  18. Comparison of the radiological dose from the Cerro Grande fire to a natural wildfire.

    PubMed

    Volkerding, John M

    2004-01-01

    Since the Cerro Grande fire burned portions of a Department of Energy facility where nuclear weapons research occurs, it is important to determine if the fire posed greater risk to the public than a natural fire. All wildfires release radioactive as well as other toxic pollutants into the atmosphere. Thus, it is important to determine if the radioactive air emissions from the Cerro Grande fire were statistically different than those from a natural wildfire, specifically the Viveash fire.

  19. What Should Be America’s Next Post 9-11 Grand Strategy?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-26

    THE PROPOSED GRAND STRATEGIES? Strategy and strategic thinking are not passwords for success. Poor strategy like medicine will kill. If policy makers...Peloponnesian War, (New York: Prometheus Book, 1998). 81 Stein, 100. 88 82 Figure 11. Grand Strategy Effectiveness. Based on ideas and information...obsolete. See Robert Zubrin, (Energy Victory: Winning the War on Terror, New York: Prometheus Books), 2007. See Paul Roberts, The End of Oil: On the Edge

  20. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  1. 33 CFR 117.285 - Grand Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grand Canal. 117.285 Section 117.285 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.285 Grand Canal. (a) The draw of the Lansing Island bridge, mile 0.7, shall open on...

  2. FOI and Fire at the MGM Grand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, William N.; Marie, Janice

    The fire at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada, brought to light a lack of compliance with the freedom of information philosophy and its supporting statutes. Freedom of information means circulation of important information. However, at the Grand Hotel, the hotel staff had not been properly trained in disaster procedures, the escape…

  3. Quantum Phase Transition in Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, K.; Girvin, S. M.

    1997-03-01

    One-dimensional Josephson junction arrays of SQUIDS exhibit a novel superconductor-insulator phase transition. The critical regime can be accessed by tuning the effective Josephson coupling energy using a weak magnetic field applied to the SQUIDS. The role of instantons induced by quantum fluctuations will be discussed. One novel feature of these systems which can be explained in terms of quantum phase slips is that in some regimes, the array resistance decreases with increasing length of the array. We calculate the finite temperature crossover function for the array resistance and compare our theoretical results with the recent experiments by D. Haviland and P. Delsing at Chalmers. This work is supported by DOE grant #DE-FG02-90ER45427 and by NSF DMR-9502555.

  4. Studies of silicon pn junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications of the basic Shockley equations that result from the random and nonrandom spatial variations of the chemical composition of a semiconductor were developed. These modifications underlie the existence of the extensive emitter recombination current that limits the voltage over the open circuit of solar cells. The measurement of parameters, series resistance and the base diffusion length is discussed. Two methods are presented for establishing the energy bandgap narrowing in the heavily-doped emitter region. Corrections that can be important in the application of one of these methods to small test cells are examined. Oxide-charge-induced high-low-junction emitter (OCI-HLE) test cells which exhibit considerably higher voltage over the open circuit than was previously seen in n-on-p solar cells are described.

  5. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  6. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  7. Thermocouple, multiple junction reference oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved oven for maintaining the junctions of a plurality of reference thermocouples at a common and constant temperature is described. The oven is characterized by a cylindrical body defining a heat sink with axially extended-cylindrical cavity a singularized heating element which comprises a unitary cylindrical heating element consisting of a resistance heating coil wound about the surface of metallic spool with an axial bore defined and seated in the cavity. Other features of the oven include an annular array of radially extended bores defined in the cylindrical body and a plurality of reference thermocouple junctions seated in the bores in uniformly spaced relation with the heating element, and a temperature sensing device seated in the axial bore for detecting temperature changes as they occur in the spool and circuit to apply a voltage across the coil in response to detected drops in temperatures of the spool.

  8. KASCADE-Grande Review, Recent Results, Future Endeavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoo, S.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Beck, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    A detailed knowledge of the energy spectrum and composition of cosmic rays (CRs) is the most important source of information for solving the riddle of the origin of CRs. The KASCADE experiment and its extension KASCADE-Grande have contributed much to the current knowledge about both the spectrum and composition in the energy range from around 1 PeV to 1 EeV. One of the most important results of the KASCADE experiment is the connection of the knee at a few PeV to a decrease in the flux of light primaries. Later, KASCADE-Grande found a knee-like structure also in the spectrum of heavy elements at around 90 PeV and an ankle-like feature in the spectrum of light elements just above 100 PeV. In this contribution a short review of the experiment will be followed by an overview on the current results on spectrum and composition of CRs and a summary of the further activities within the KASCADE-Grande collaboration related to both, data analysis and data publication.

  9. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  10. 17. Photocopy of photograph (original contact print in Grand Rapids ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (original contact print in Grand Rapids Michigan City Library, Michigan Room) circa 1908, photographer unknown. VIEW NORTH - NORTHEAST, SOUTHSIDE, GENERAL VIEW. - Bridge Street Bridge, Spanning Grand River, Michigan & Bridge Streets, Grand Rapids, MI

  11. Light threshold effects in supersymmetric grand unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, A.E.; Grinstein, B.

    1993-08-01

    Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories have a rich spectrum of particles barely heavier than the intermediate vector bosons. As their non-supersymmetric counterparts, they lead to many relations among low energy observables. But the precise form of the predictions is modified by the extended spectrum. If the masses of these new particles are comparable to M{sub Z}, the standard computation of their effect becomes inaccurate. The authors, present a detailed discussion of the correct procedure, and carry out the relevant computations to one loop order. Attention is paid to the special treatment that the top and Higgs particles must receive. The size of the effect is explored for a range of parameters in the minimal supersymmetric SU(5) grand-unified theory with radiative breaking. It is found that the naive (leading-log) computation can be fairly inaccurate.

  12. Shallow junction formation by polyatomic cluster ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Daisuke; Shimada, Norihiro; Matsuo, Jiro; Yamada, Isao

    1996-12-31

    Recent integrated circuits require shallow junctions which are less than 0.1 {mu}m depth. This creates a strong demand for low energy ion beam techniques. Equivalent low-energy and high-current ion beams can be realized quite easily with clusters, because the kinetic energy of the cluster is shared between the constituent atoms. Additionally, cluster-ion beams avoid damage due to excessive charge. We have used polyatomic clusters, decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}), as a kind of B cluster, in order to form a very shallow p{sup +} junction. A B SIMS profile of B{sub 10}H{sub 14} implanted into Si (100) at 20keV was quite similar to that of B implanted at 2keV. These SIMS measurements revealed that the cluster ion beam can realize equivalent low-energy implantation quite easily. The implantation efficiency achieved was about 90%. The damage induced by B{sub 10}H{sub 14} implantation was completely removed by a 600{degrees}C furnace anneal for 30 min, and implanted B atoms were electrically activated. After rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 900{degrees}C of a sample prepared with a close of 5{times}10{sup 13} ion/cm{sup 2}, the sheet resistance decreased to about 600W/sq. and the activation efficiency was about 50%. These results show that a polyatomic cluster ion beam is useful for shallow junction formation.

  13. Nonmechanical Conductance Switching in a Molecular Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Baratz, Adva; Baer, Roi

    2012-02-16

    We present a molecular junction composed of a donor (polyacetylene strands) and an acceptor (malononitrile) connected together via a benzene ring and coupled weakly to source and drain electrodes on each side, for which a gate electrode induces intramolecular charge transfer, switching reversibly the character of conductance. Using a new brand of density functional theory, for which orbital energies are similar to the quasiparticle energies, we show that the junction displays a single, gate-tunable differential conductance channel in a wide energy range. The gate field must align parallel to the displacement vector between donors and acceptor to affect their potential difference; for strong enough fields, spontaneous intramolecular electron transfer occurs. This event radically affects conductance, reversing the charge of carriers, enabling a spin-polarized current channel. We discuss the physical principles controlling the operation of the junction and find interplay of quantum interference, charging, Coulomb blockade, and electron-hole binding energy effects. We expect that this switching behavior is a generic property for similar donor-acceptor systems of sufficient stability.

  14. Quantum Dynamics of a d-wave Josephson Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Thilo

    2007-03-01

    Thilo Bauch ^1, Floriana Lombardi ^1, Tobias Lindstr"om ^2, Francesco Tafuri ^3, Giacomo Rotoli ^4, Per Delsing ^1, Tord Claeson ^1 1 Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 G"oteborg, Sweden. 2 National Physical Laboratory, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW, UK. 3 Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia-Dipartimento Ingegneria dell'Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, Aversa (CE), Italy. 4 Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Energetica e Gestionale, Universita of L'Aquila, Localita Monteluco, L'Aquila, Italy. We present direct observation of macroscopic quantum properties in an all high critical temperature superconductor d-wave Josephson junction. Although dissipation caused by low energy excitations is expected to strongly suppress quantum effects we demonstrate macroscopic quantum tunneling [1] and energy level quantization [2] in our d-wave Josephson junction. The results clearly indicate that the role of dissipation mechanisms in high temperature superconductors has to be revised, and may also have consequences for a new class of solid state ``quiet'' quantum bit with superior coherence time. We show that the dynamics of the YBCO grain boundary Josephson junctions fabricated on a STO substrate are strongly affected by their environment. As a first approximation we model the environment by the stray capacitance and stray inductance of the junction electrodes. The total system consisting of the junction and stray elements has two degrees of freedom resulting in two characteristic resonance frequencies. Both frequencies have to be considered to describe the quantum mechanical behavior of the Josephson circuit. [1] T. Bauch et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 087003 (2005). [2] T. Bauch et al, Science 311, 57 (2006).

  15. Performance Analysis of Ultra-Thin Silicon Based Tunnel Junctions for Tandem Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, H.; Rostami, A.; Dolatyari, M.; Rostami, G.

    Nowadays silicon solar cells have an efficiency of up to 20 % and in order to increase the efficiency of them, fabrication of multi-junction thin film solar cells with different band gaps is one of the most promising approaches. The silicon based tandem solar cells are third generation new style solar cells with ultra-high efficiency. The sub-cells in a tandem solar cell have different energy band gaps. In order to match the currents between sub-cells, tunnel junctions are used to connect the sub-cells. This work will concentrate on simulating the tunnel junction for application as part of multi-junction solar cell. In this way dopant concentration is changed and the tunnel junction current-voltage characteristics and their Energy band diagram in different dopant levels under equilibrium condition for moderate and usual doping have been calculated. An n++-Si/p++-Si tunnel junction is selected to simulate the overall characteristics of cell by numerical finite element method. We have simulated a symmetric silicon tunnel junction with thickness of 25 nm for n-type and 25 nm for p-type silicon by changing doping value from 1 × 10e20 cm-3 to 2 × 10e20 cm-3. The simulation results show that the doping concentration of 2 × 10e20 cm-3 is suitable for both sides.

  16. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and…

  17. Theoretical study of trends in conductance for molecular junctions formed with armchair carbon nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiing-Rei; Zhang, Lei; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2007-09-01

    The transmission through prototype aromatic molecule junctions formed between armchair (metallic) carbon nanotube electrodes is studied using a tight-binding model with a Green’s function embedding approach. Analytical and numerical results for transmission near the Fermi energy are obtained for junctions of single molecules with a one-point contact to each electrode, pairs of such molecules in the junction, and double stranded molecules with a two-point contact to each electrode. While an ideal single stranded molecule (ideal polyene) with odd number of atoms gives unit transmission at the Fermi energy, two such strands in the junction demonstrate significant interference effects, with net transmission varying from near zero to near 2 depending on the specific contact sites at the electrodes. Ideal polyenes with even number of atoms give nonresonant single-molecule transmission at the Fermi energy and less pronounced interference effects from their double-molecule junctions. The bonded, two stranded junction (polyacene) also gives nonresonant transmission at the Fermi energy. Allowing for the more realistic bond alternation observed in aromatic molecules results in nonresonant transmission with exponential length dependence.

  18. Proton radiation damage in vertical junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. H.; Statler, R. L.

    A comparative experimental study of proton radiation damage in silicon vertical junction (VJ) and silicon planar solar cells was performed at three energies, 1-MeV, 2-MeV, and 3.5-MeV, for a normal incidence monoenergetic proton beam. Proton fluence levels up to 3 x 10 to the 12th protons/sq cm were achieved, with solar cell I-V characterization measurements performed at incremental fluences, using a recently calibrated Spectrolab X-25L Solar Simulator. The VJ cells were made from 0.4 ohm-cm silicon, while the planar cells were made from 10 ohm-cm silicon and had a back surface reflector. The VJ cells proved to be more radiation resistant than the baseline planar cells, and the damage data from various proton energies indicate that the vertical junction concept does work effectively for maintaining high collection efficiency despite heavy radiation exposure.

  19. Electric breakdown in ultrathin MgO tunnel barrier junctions for spin-transfer torque switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfers, M.; Drewello, V.; Reiss, G.; Thomas, A.; Thiel, K.; Eilers, G.; Münzenberg, M.; Schuhmann, H.; Seibt, M.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions for spin-transfer torque (STT) switching are prepared to investigate the dielectric breakdown. Intact and broken tunnel junctions are characterized by transport measurements prior to transmission electron microscopy analysis. The comparison to our previous model for thicker MgO tunnel barriers reveals a different breakdown mechanism arising from the high current densities in a STT device: instead of local pinhole formation at a constant rate, massive electromigration and heating leads to displacement of the junction material and voids are appearing. This is determined by element resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and three dimensional tomographic reconstruction.

  20. An efficient triple-junction polymer solar cell having a power conversion efficiency exceeding 11%.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yoshimura, Ken; Ohya, Kenichiro; You, Jingbi; Gao, Jing; Hong, Zirou; Yang, Yang

    2014-08-27

    Tandem solar cells have the potential to improve photon conversion efficiencies (PCEs) beyond the limits of single-junction devices. In this study, a triple-junction tandem design is demonstrated by employing three distinct organic donor materials having bandgap energies ranging from 1.4 to 1.9 eV. Through optical modeling, balanced photon absorption rates are achieved and, thereby, the photo-currents are matched among the three subcells. Accordingly, an efficient triple-junction tandem organic solar cell can exhibit a record-high PCE of 11.5%.

  1. Electromagnetic environment and Peltier effect in normal-metal/insulator/superconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardas, Athanassios

    1997-07-01

    The influence of external environment on the heat transport through a tunnel junction connecting a normal-metal and a superconductor is analyzed theoretically. It is demonstrated that at finite temperatures finite impedance of the junction electrodes, limits the maximum amount of heat that can be extracted from the normal-metal via the electric current and thus reduces the efficiency of the thermoelectric electron refrigeration. This behaviour is more pronounced for charging energies Ec of the junction, larger than the superconducting gap Δ and persists for a wide range of values of the impedance.

  2. Thermal conductance of the junction between single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2014-11-01

    The thermal conductances of the carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions that would be found in a CNT aerogel are predicted using molecular dynamics simulations. At a temperature of 300 K, the thermal conductance of a perpendicular junction converges to 40 pW/K as the CNT lengths approach 100 nm. The key geometric parameter affecting the thermal conductance is the angle formed by the two CNTs. At pressures above 1 bar, the presence of a surrounding gas leads to an effective increase in the junction thermal conductance by providing a parallel path for energy flow.

  3. Conductance spectroscopy of nontopological-topological superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, F.; Cole, William S.; Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the zero-temperature differential conductance d I /d V of a voltage-biased one-dimensional junction between a nontopological and a topological superconductor for arbitrary junction transparency using the scattering matrix formalism. We consider two representative models for the topological superconductors: (i) spinful p -wave and (ii) s -wave with spin-orbit coupling and spin splitting. We verify that in the tunneling limit (small junction transparencies) where only single Andreev reflections contribute to the current, the conductance for voltages below the nontopological superconductor gap Δs is zero and there are two symmetric conductance peaks appearing at e V =±Δs with the quantized value (4 -π ) 2 e2/h due to resonant Andreev reflection from the Majorana zero mode. However, when the junction transparency is not small, there is a finite conductance for e |V |< Δs arising from multiple Andreev reflections. The conductance at e V =±Δs in this case is no longer quantized. In general, the conductance is particle-hole asymmetric except for sufficiently small transparencies. We further show that, for certain values of parameters, the tunneling conductance from a zero-energy conventional Andreev bound state can be made to mimic the conductance from a true Majorana mode.

  4. Tuning RNA Flexibility with Helix Length and Junction Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Julie L.; Pollack, Lois

    2015-01-01

    The increasing awareness of RNA’s central role in biology calls for a new understanding of how RNAs, like proteins, recognize biological partners. Because RNA is inherently flexible, it assumes a variety of conformations. This conformational flexibility can be a critical aspect of how RNA attracts and binds molecular partners. Structurally, RNA consists of rigid basepaired duplexes, separated by flexible non-basepaired regions. Here, using an RNA system consisting of two short helices, connected by a single-stranded (non-basepaired) junction, we explore the role of helix length and junction sequence in determining the range of conformations available to a model RNA. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer reports on the RNA conformation as a function of either mono- or divalent ion concentration. Electrostatic repulsion between helices dominates at low salt concentration, whereas junction sequence effects determine the conformations at high salt concentration. Near physiological salt concentrations, RNA conformation is sensitive to both helix length and junction sequence, suggesting a means for sensitively tuning RNA conformations. PMID:26682821

  5. Measurement of Quantum Phase-Slips in Josephson Junction Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, Wiebke

    2011-03-01

    Quantum phase-slip dynamics in Josephson junction chains could provide the basis for the realization of a new type of topologically protected qubit or for the implementation of a new current standard. I will present measurements of the effect of quantum phase-slips on the ground state of a Josephson junction chain. We can tune in situ the strength of the phase-slips. These phase-slips are the result of fluctuations induced by the finite charging energy of each junction in the chain. Our measurements demonstrate that a Josephson junction chain under phase bias constraint behaves in a collective way. I will also show evidence of coherent phase-slip interference, the so called Aharonov-Casher effect. This phenomenon is the dual of the well known Aharonov-Bohm interference. In collaboration with I.M. Pop, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble, France; I. Protopopov, L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kosygin str. 2, Moscow 119334, Russia and Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany; and F. Lecocq, Z. Peng, B. Pannetier, O. Buisson, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier. European STREP MIDAS, ANR QUANTJO.

  6. Tunneling transport in d-wave superconductor-silicene junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajati, Y.; Vosoughi nia, S.; Rashedi, G.

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically study the tunneling conductance of a normal/d-wave superconductor silicene junction using Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) formalism. We discuss in detail how the conductances spectra are affected by inducing d-wave superconducting pairing symmetry in the buckled silicene. It is obtained that the amplitude of the spin/valley-dependent Andreev reflection and subgap conductance of the junction can be strongly modulated by the orientation angle of superconductive gap (β) and perpendicular electric field (EZ), suggesting that one may experimentally tune the transport properties of the junction through changing β and EZ. We demonstrate that the subgap conductance exhibits an oscillatory behavior as a function of the orientation angle of superconductive gap (β) with a period of π / 2 and by increasing the insulating gap of silicene, the charge conductance oscillations suppress. Remarkably, due to the buckled structure of silicene at the maximum orientation angle of the d-wave superconducting β = π / 4 , we found a very distinct behavior from the graphene-based NS junction where the charge conductance is insensitive to the bias energy. In addition, the Andreev reflection and subgap conductance can be switched on and off by applying electric field.

  7. Metal-ceramic junctions - Mechanical and physicochemical interactive joining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascar, Guy

    Reactive brazing and thermocompression are discussed in terms of their use as joining techniques for metal-ceramic structures. Theoretical consideration is given to brazing under vacuum conditions to examine the relationships between contact surface and volume, interfacial energy, surface energy, and adhesion energy. Brazing is shown to permit metal-ceramic junctions without metallization of the ceramic substrate, although several reactions and metallic materials can affect joint strength. Thermocompression is distinguished from brazing and shown to limit the alteration of the ceramic material. The protection of the mechanical properties of the ceramic and metal components of the materials is a critical aspect of industrial applications of brazing and thermocompression.

  8. Last workshop on grand unification

    SciTech Connect

    Frampton, P.H. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-01-01

    The presentations at the workshop alternated between experiment and theory in the traditional manner. Let me introduce first all the experimental topics. For the proton decay experiments, their present status was provided by Ayres, Ernwein, Gajewski and Totsuka for the Soudan, Frejus, IMB and Kamioka groups respectively. Massive neutrinos were reviewed by Robertson, solar neutrinos by Bahcall, and double beta decay by Avignone. Monopole searches were covered by Barish. Other experimental talks concerned both astrophysics and the Standard Model. In astrophysics, Perlmutter presented the possible discovery of a sub- millisecond pulsar in supernova 1987A and Sadoulet outlined a program to search for dark matter. Within the Standard Model, Matthews reported the recent discovery of Z{sup 0} particle decays at SLC and Dehmelt described his high-accuracy measurement of (g-2){sub c}. The theoretical talks were on GUTs, extensions of the Standard Model, general relativity and strings, and theoretical astrophysics and cosmology. Langacker talked on grand unification, proton decay and neutrino masses.

  9. Grand unification through gravitational effects

    SciTech Connect

    Calmet, Xavier; Hsu, Stephen D. H.; Reeb, David

    2010-02-01

    We systematically study the unification of gauge couplings in the presence of (one or more) effective dimension-5 operators cHG{sub {mu}{nu}G}{sup {mu}{nu}/}4M{sub pl}, induced into the grand unified theory by gravitational interactions at the Planck scale. These operators alter the usual condition for gauge-coupling unification, which can, depending on the Higgs content H and vacuum expectation value, result in unification at scales M{sub X} significantly different than naively expected. We find nonsupersymmetric models of SU(5) and SO(10) unification, with natural Wilson coefficients c, that easily satisfy the constraints from proton decay. Furthermore, gauge-coupling unification at scales as high as the Planck scale seems feasible, possibly hinting at simultaneous unification of gauge and gravitational interactions. In the Appendix we work out the group theoretical aspects of this scenario for SU(5) and SO(10) unified groups in detail; this material is also relevant in the analysis of nonuniversal gaugino masses obtained from supergravity.

  10. Supersymmetry and supergravity: Phenomenology and grand unification

    SciTech Connect

    Arnowitt, R. |; Nath, P.

    1993-12-31

    A survey is given of supersymmetry and supergravity and their phenomenology. Some of the topics discussed are the basic ideas of global supersymmetry, the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and its phenomenology, the basic ideas of local supersymmetry (supergravity), grand unification, supersymmetry breaking in supergravity grand unified models, radiative breaking of SU(2) {times} U(1), proton decay, cosmological constraints, and predictions of supergravity grand unified models. While the number of detailed derivations are necessarily limited, a sufficient number of results are given so that a reader can get a working knowledge of this field.

  11. 77 FR 23242 - Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Grand Coulee Project Hydroelectric Authority; Notice of Preliminary Permit... consist of the following new facilities: (1) An upper reservoir inlet/outlet structure equipped with...

  12. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Bizard, Anna H.; Hickson, Ian D.

    2014-01-01

    Double Holliday junctions (dHJS) are important intermediates of homologous recombination. The separate junctions can each be cleaved by DNA structure-selective endonucleases known as Holliday junction resolvases. Alternatively, double Holliday junctions can be processed by a reaction known as “double Holliday junction dissolution.” This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called “dissolvasome” comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold containing accessory factor (Rmi1). This review details our current knowledge of the dissolution process and the players involved in catalyzing this mechanistically complex means of completing homologous recombination reactions. PMID:24984776

  13. In vitro formation of gap junction vesicles.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A

    1976-02-01

    A method is described that uses trypsin digestion combined with collagenase-hyaluronidase which produces a population of gap junction vesicles. The hexagonal lattice of subunits ("connexons") comprising the gapjunctions appears unaltered by various structural criteria and by buoyant density measurements. The gap junction vesciles are closed by either a single or a double profile of nonjunctional "membrane," which presents a smooth, particle-free fracture face. Horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c studies have revealed that about 20% of the gap junction vesicles are impermeable to proteins 12,000 daltons or larger. The increased purity of the trypsinized junction preparation suggests that one of the disulfide reduction products of the gap-junction principal protein may be a nonjunctional contaminating peptide. The gap junction appears to be composed of a single 18,000-dalton protein, connexin, which may be reduced to a single 9,000-dalton peak. The number of peptides in this reduced peak are still unknown.

  14. Experiments on non-equilibrium superconductor-normal metal-superconductor Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosser, Michael S.

    By controlling the distribution function within the normal metal of a superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction, one can reverse the supercurrent-phase relation in the normal wire, creating a pi-junction. This manipulation is done by injecting normal quasiparticle current into the wire, via one or more leads attached at the middle of the junction. Two experiments evolve from this concept. First, in a sample of four reservoirs, two normal and two superconducting, all connected by a wire cross of normal metal, one may inject current either antisymmetrically (AS) or symmetrically (S). In the AS case, current is injected into one normal lead and extracted from the other, creating normal current flow that does not interact with the supercurrent except at the junction. In the S case, current is injected into both normal leads and extracted from the superconductors. Theory predicts that, in the absence of electron energy relaxation in the normal part of the junction, these two situations should result in identical behavior of the Josephson junction. However, due to Joule heating, the S case shows a slightly larger maximum pi-current than the AS case. The second experiment considers a more subtle effect resulting from normal current being injected symmetrically into a SNS Josephson junction. One side of the SNS junction has both normal current and supercurrent flowing in the same direction while the other side has opposing current flows. This situation creates an effective energy gradient across the SNS junction that can appear in the distribution function of the normal wire. Using superconductor/insulator/normal metal tunnelling spectroscopy, it is possible to extract these changes to the distribution function.

  15. Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque (New Mexico)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque (New Mexico) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  16. William Shatner and the Grand Entrance

    NASA Video Gallery

    As NASA prepares for Curiosity rover landing on Mars, William Shatner shares this thrilling story of NASA's hardest planetary science mission to date. The video titled, "Grand Entrance," guides vie...

  17. Wintertime meteorology of the Grand Canyon region

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The Grand Canyon region of the American Southwest is an interesting region meteorologically, but because of its isolated location, the lack of major population centers in the region, and the high cost of meteorological field experiments, it has historically received little observational attention. In recent years, however, attention has been directed to episodes of visibility degradation in many of the US National parks, and two recent field studies focused on this visibility problem have greatly increased the meteorological data available for the Grand Canyon region. The most recent and comprehensive of these studies is the Navajo Generating Station Winter Visibility Study of 1989--90. This study investigated the sources of visibility degradation in Grand Canyon National Park and the meteorological mechanisms leading to low visibility episodes. In this paper we present analyses of this rich data set to gain a better understanding of the key wintertime meteorological features of the Grand Canyon region.

  18. Wil Wheaton and the Grand Entrance

    NASA Video Gallery

    As NASA prepares for Curiosity rover landing on Mars, Wil Wheaton shares this thrilling story of NASA's hardest planetary science mission to date. The video titled, "Grand Entrance," guides viewers...

  19. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies.

  20. Magnetic tunnel junction pattern technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eugene; Schwarz, Benjamin; Choi, Chang Ju; Kula, Witold; Wolfman, Jerome; Ounadjela, Kamel; Geha, Sam

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) pattern technique that involves transforming the magnetic layer above the tunnel barrier in unwanted areas into an insulator, thus providing insulation between different MTJ devices without suffering common tunnel barrier shorting problems. With this technique, 90%-100% yielding MTJ devices have been observed. MTJ results using this process are superior to an etching based process. Switching distribution of patterned magnetic bits is also narrower using this novel technique. Process control and the ability to stop on the tunnel barrier have been demonstrated.

  1. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  2. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  3. American Grand Strategy: The End of Primacy?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-13

    experts, this forum resulted in multiple strategic though pieces outlining a way ahead for American grand strategy. However, the lack of Presidential ...AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY THE END OF PRIMACY? by Carey J. Jones, USAF, Lt Col A Research Report Submitted...valid OMB control number 1. REPORT DATE 13 FEB 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE American

  4. AdS and ds Entropy from String Junctions or the Function of Junction Conjunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Eva

    Flux compactifications of string theory exhibiting the possibility of discretely tuning the cosmological constant to small values have been constructed. The highly tuned vacua in this discretuum have curvature radii which scale as large powers of the flux quantum numbers, exponential in the number of cycles in the compactiflcation. By the arguments of Susskind/Witten (in the AdS case) and Gibbons/Hawking (in the dS case), we expect correspondingly large entropies associated with these vacua. If they are to provide a dual description of these vacua on their Coulomb branch, branes traded for the flux need to account for this entropy at the appropriate energy scale. In this note, we argue that simple string junctions and webs ending on the branes can account for this large entropy, obtaining a rough estimate for junction entropy that agrees with the existing rough estimates for the spacing of the discretuum. In particular, the brane entropy can account for the (A)dS entropy far away from string scale correspondence limits.

  5. Electrodeposited, Transverse Nanowire Electroluminescent Junctions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaopeng; Xu, Qiang; Dutta, Rajen K; Le Thai, Mya; Li, Xiaowei; Penner, Reginald M

    2016-09-27

    The preparation by electrodeposition of transverse nanowire electroluminescent junctions (tn-ELJs) is described, and the electroluminescence (EL) properties of these devices are characterized. The lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition process is first used to prepare long (millimeters), linear, nanocrystalline CdSe nanowires on glass. The thickness of these nanowires along the emission axis is 60 nm, and the width, wCdSe, along the electrical axis is adjustable from 100 to 450 nm. Ten pairs of nickel-gold electrical contacts are then positioned along the axis of this nanowire using lithographically directed electrodeposition. The resulting linear array of nickel-CdSe-gold junctions produces EL with an external quantum efficiency, EQE, and threshold voltage, Vth, that depend sensitively on wCdSe. EQE increases with increasing electric field and also with increasing wCdSe, and Vth also increases with wCdSe and, therefore, the electrical resistance of the tn-ELJs. Vth down to 1.8(±0.2) V (for wCdSe ≈ 100 nm) and EQE of 5.5(±0.5) × 10(-5) (for wCdSe ≈ 450 nm) are obtained. tn-ELJs produce a broad EL emission envelope, spanning the wavelength range from 600 to 960 nm.

  6. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a partially cloudy sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  7. Stretching of BDT-gold molecular junctions: thiol or thiolate termination?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Amaury De Melo; Rungger, Ivan; Pontes, Renato Borges; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; da Silva, Antônio José Roque; Schwingenschlöegl, Udo; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    It is often assumed that the hydrogen atoms in the thiol groups of a benzene-1,4-dithiol dissociate when Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions are formed. We demonstrate, by stability and transport property calculations, that this assumption cannot be made. We show that the dissociative adsorption of methanethiol and benzene-1,4-dithiol molecules on a flat Au(111) surface is energetically unfavorable and that the activation barrier for this reaction is as high as 1 eV. For the molecule in the junction, our results show, for all electrode geometries studied, that the thiol junctions are energetically more stable than their thiolate counterparts. Due to the fact that density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) underestimates the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital by several electron-volts, and that it does not capture the renormalization of the energy levels due to the image charge effect, the conductance of the Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions is overestimated. After taking into account corrections due to image charge effects by means of constrained-DFT calculations and electrostatic classical models, we apply a scissor operator to correct the DFT energy level positions, and calculate the transport properties of the thiol and thiolate molecular junctions as a function of the electrode separation. For the thiol junctions, we show that the conductance decreases as the electrode separation increases, whereas the opposite trend is found for the thiolate junctions. Both behaviors have been observed in experiments, therefore pointing to the possible coexistence of both thiol and thiolate junctions. Moreover, the corrected conductance values, for both thiol and thiolate, are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those calculated with DFT-LDA. This brings the theoretical results in quantitatively good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Restoring The Azimuthal Symmetry Of Charged Particle Lateral Density In The Range Of KASCADE-Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Sima, O.; Rebel, H.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.

    2010-11-24

    KASCADE-Grande, an extension of the former KASCADE experiment, is a multi-component Extensive Air Shower (EAS) experiment located in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Campus North), Germany. An important observable for analyzing the EAS is the lateral density of charged particles in the intrinsic shower plane. This observable is deduced from the basic information provided by the Grande scintillators - the energy deposit - first in the observation plane, by using a Lateral Energy Correction Function (LECF), then in the intrinsic shower plane, by applying an adequate mapping procedure. In both steps azimuthal.

  9. Band-Engineered Local Cooling in Nanoscale Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Bailey C.; Chen, Yu-Chang

    2017-02-01

    The stability and performance of nanoscale junctions are closely related to the local effective temperature. The local effective temperature is mainly caused by the competition between heating and cooling processes in inelastic electron-phonon scat- tering. Local cooling occurs when the rate of energy in cooling exceeds that in heating. Previous research has been done using either specific potential configuration or an adatom to achieve local cooling. We propose an engineer-able local-cooling mechanism in asymmetric two-terminal tunneling junctions, in which one electrode is made of metal, whereas the other is made of a selectable bad-metal, such as heavily-doped polysilicon. The width of energy window of the selectable material, defined as the width covering all possible energy states counting from the conduction band minimum, can be engineered through doping. Interestingly, we have shown that substantial local cooling can be achieved at room temperature when the width of energy window of the low-density electrode is comparable to the energy of the phonon. The unusual local cooling is caused by the narrowed width of energy window, which obstructs the inelastic scattering for heating.

  10. Band-Engineered Local Cooling in Nanoscale Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Bailey C.; Chen, Yu-Chang

    2017-01-01

    The stability and performance of nanoscale junctions are closely related to the local effective temperature. The local effective temperature is mainly caused by the competition between heating and cooling processes in inelastic electron-phonon scat- tering. Local cooling occurs when the rate of energy in cooling exceeds that in heating. Previous research has been done using either specific potential configuration or an adatom to achieve local cooling. We propose an engineer-able local-cooling mechanism in asymmetric two-terminal tunneling junctions, in which one electrode is made of metal, whereas the other is made of a selectable bad-metal, such as heavily-doped polysilicon. The width of energy window of the selectable material, defined as the width covering all possible energy states counting from the conduction band minimum, can be engineered through doping. Interestingly, we have shown that substantial local cooling can be achieved at room temperature when the width of energy window of the low-density electrode is comparable to the energy of the phonon. The unusual local cooling is caused by the narrowed width of energy window, which obstructs the inelastic scattering for heating. PMID:28198445

  11. Full range of proximity effect probed with superconductor/graphene/superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Guéron, S.; Chepelianskii, A.; Bouchiat, H.

    2016-09-01

    The high tunability of the density of states of graphene makes it an ideal probe of quantum transport in different regimes. In particular, the supercurrent that can flow through a nonsuperconducting (N) material connected to two superconducting (S) electrodes, crucially depends on the length of the N relative to the superconducting coherence length. Using graphene as the N material we have investigated the full range of the superconducting proximity effect, from short to long diffusive junctions. By combining several S/graphene/S samples with different contacts and lengths, and measuring their gate-dependent critical currents (Ic) and normal state resistance RN, we compare the product e RNIc to the relevant energies, the Thouless energy in long junctions and the superconducting gap of the contacts in short junctions, over three orders of magnitude of Thouless energy. The experimental variations strikingly follow a universal law, close to the predictions of the proximity effect both in the long and short junction regime, as well as in the crossover region, thereby revealing the interplay of the different energy scales. Differences in the numerical coefficients reveal the crucial role played by the interfacial barrier between graphene and the superconducting electrodes, which reduces the supercurrent in both short and long junctions. Surprisingly, the reduction of supercurrent is independent of the gate voltage and of the nature of the electrodes. A reduced induced gap and Thouless energy are extracted, revealing the role played by the dwell time in the barrier in the short junction, and an effective increased diffusion time in the long junction. We compare our results to the theoretical predictions of Usadel equations and numerical simulations, which better reproduce experiments with imperfect NS interfaces.

  12. Coherently driven, ultrafast electron-phonon dynamics in transport junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, Joshua E.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-07-28

    Although the vast majority of studies of transport via molecular-scale heterojunctions have been conducted in the (static) energy domain, experiments are currently beginning to apply time domain approaches to the nanoscale transport problem, combining spatial with temporal resolution. It is thus an opportune time for theory to develop models to explore both new phenomena in, and new potential applications of, time-domain, coherently driven molecular electronics. In this work, we study the interaction of a molecular phonon with an electronic wavepacket transmitted via a conductance junction within a time-domain model that treats the electron and phonon on equal footing and spans the weak to strong electron-phonon coupling strengths. We explore interference between two coherent energy pathways in the electronic subspace, thus complementing previous studies of coherent phenomena in conduction junctions, where the stationary framework was used to study interference between spatial pathways. Our model provides new insights into phase decoherence and population relaxation within the electronic subspace, which have been conventionally treated by density matrix approaches that often rely on phenomenological parameters. Although the specific case of a transport junction is explored, our results are general, applying also to other instances of coupled electron-phonon systems.

  13. Internal photoemission in molecular junctions: parameters for interfacial barrier determinations.

    PubMed

    Fereiro, Jerry A; Kondratenko, Mykola; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard L

    2015-01-28

    The photocurrent spectra for large-area molecular junctions are reported, where partially transparent copper top contacts permit illumination by UV-vis light. The effect of variation of the molecular structure and thickness are discussed. Internal photoemission (IPE), a process involving optical excitation of hot carriers in the contacts followed by transport across internal system barriers, is dominant when the molecular component does not absorb light. The IPE spectrum contains information regarding energy level alignment within a complete, working molecular junction, with the photocurrent sign indicating transport through either the occupied or unoccupied molecular orbitals. At photon energies where the molecular layer absorbs, a secondary phenomenon is operative in addition to IPE. In order to distinguish IPE from this secondary mechanism, we show the effect of the source intensity as well as the thickness of the molecular layer on the observed photocurrent. Our results clearly show that the IPE mechanism can be differentiated from the secondary mechanism by the effects of variation of experimental parameters. We conclude that IPE can provide valuable information regarding interfacial energetics in intact, working molecular junctions, including clear discrimination of charge transport mediated by electrons through unoccupied system orbitals from that mediated by hole transport through occupied system orbitals.

  14. Quantum phase-slip junction under microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, A.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Rastelli, G.

    2015-05-01

    We consider the dynamics of a quantum phase-slip junction (QPSJ), a dual Josephson junction, connected to a microwave source with frequency ωmw. With respect to an ordinary Josephson junction, a QPSJ can sustain dual Shapiro steps, consisting of well-defined current plateaus at multiple integers of e ωmw/π in the current-voltage (I -V ) characteristic. The experimental observation of these plateaus has been elusive up to now. We argue that thermal as well as quantum fluctuations can smear the I -V characteristic considerably. In order to understand these effects, we study a current-biased QPSJ under microwave irradiation and connected to an inductive and resistive environment. We find that the effect of the fluctuations is governed by the resistance of the environment and by the ratio of the phase-slip energy and the inductive energy. Our results are of interest for experiments aiming at the observation of dual Shapiro steps in QPSJ devices for the definition of a new quantum current standard.

  15. Frame junction vibration transmission with a modified frame deformation model.

    PubMed

    Moore, J A

    1990-12-01

    A previous paper dealt with vibration transmission through junctions of connected frame members where the allowed frame deformations included bending, torsion, and longitudinal motions [J.A. Moore, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 2766-2776 (1990)]. In helicopter and aircraft structures the skin panels can constitute a high impedance connection along the length of the frames that effectively prohibits in-plane motion at the elevation of the skin panels. This has the effect of coupling in-plane bending and torsional motions within the frame. This paper discusses the transmission behavior through frame junctions that accounts for the in-plane constraint in idealized form by assuming that the attached skin panels completely prohibit inplane motion in the frames. Also, transverse shear deformation is accounted for in describing the relatively deep web frame constructions common in aircraft structures. Longitudinal motion in the frames is not included in the model. Transmission coefficient predictions again show the importance of out-of-plane bending deformation to the transmission of vibratory energy in an aircraft structure. Comparisons are shown with measured vibration transmission data along the framing in the overhead of a helicopter airframe, with good agreement. The frame junction description has been implemented within a general purpose statistical energy analysis (SEA) computer code in modeling the entire airframe structure including skin panels.

  16. Slit Diaphragms Contain Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Bornheimer, Scott; Kudlicka, Krystyna; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2009-01-01

    Slit diaphragms are essential components of the glomerular filtration apparatus, as changes in these junctions are the hallmark of proteinuric diseases. Slit diaphragms, considered specialized adherens junctions, contain both unique membrane proteins (e.g., nephrin, podocin, and Neph1) and typical adherens junction proteins (e.g., P-cadherin, FAT, and catenins). Whether slit diaphragms also contain tight junction proteins is unknown. Here, immunofluorescence, immunogold labeling, and cell fractionation demonstrated that rat slit diaphragms contain the tight junction proteins JAM-A (junctional adhesion molecule A), occludin, and cingulin. We found these proteins in the same protein complexes as nephrin, podocin, CD2AP, ZO-1, and Neph1 by cosedimentation, coimmunoprecipitation, and pull-down assays. PAN nephrosis increased the protein levels of JAM-A, occludin, cingulin, and ZO-1 several-fold in glomeruli and loosened their attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. These data extend current information about the molecular composition of slit diaphragms by demonstrating the presence of tight junction proteins, although slit diaphragms lack the characteristic morphologic features of tight junctions. The contribution of these proteins to the assembly of slit diaphragms and potential signaling cascades requires further investigation. PMID:19478094

  17. Analysis of Tight Junction Formation and Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Foster, Carmen M; Retterer, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study segmentation of tight junctions and analyze the formation and integrity of tight junctions in large-scale confocal image stacks, a challenging biological problem because of the low spatial resolution images and the presence of breaks in tight junction structure. We present an automated, three-step processing approach for tight junction analysis. In our approach, we first localize each individual nucleus in the image by using thresholding, morphological filters and active contours. By using each nucleus position as a seed point, we automatically segment the cell body based on the active contour. We then use an intensity-based skeletonization algorithm to generate the boundary regions for each cell, and features are extracted from tight junctions associated with each cell to assess tight junction continuity. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically segment tight junctions and compute relevant features that provide a quantitative measure of tight junction formation to which the permeability of the cell monolayer can ultimately be correlated.

  18. Different Views of the Grand Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elders, Wilfred A.

    Each year the spectacular scenery of the Grand Canyon of Arizona awes its more than 4,000,000 visitors. Just as its enormous scale dwarfs our human sense of space, its geology also dwarfs our human sense of time. Perhaps here, more than anywhere else on the planet, we can experience a sense of ``Deep Time.'' The colorful rocks exposed in the vertical walls of the canyon display a span of 1.8 billion years of Earth's history [Beus and Morales, 2003]. But wait! There is a different view! According to Vail [2003], this time span is only 6,000 years and the Grand Canyon and its rocks are a record of the Biblical 6 days of creation and Noah's flood. During a visit to Grand Canyon, in August 2003, I learned that Vail's book, Grand Canyon: A Different View, is being sold within the National Park. The author and compiler of Grand Canyon: A Different View is a Colorado River guide who is well acquainted with the Grand Canyon at river level. He has produced a book with an attractive layout and beautiful photographs. The book is remarkable because it has 23 co-authors, all male, who comprise a veritable ``Who's Who'' in creationism. For example, Henry Morris and John Whitcomb, the authors of the seminal young Earth creationist text, The Genesis Flood [Whitcomb and Morris, 1961], each contribute a brief introduction. Each chapter of Grand Canyon: A Different View begins with an overview by Vail, followed by brief comments by several contributors that ``have been peer reviewed to ensure a consistent and Biblical perspective.'' This perspective is strict Biblical literalism.

  19. Electric-field-assisted switching in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Gang; Li, Mingen; Hageman, Stephen; Chien, C L

    2011-11-13

    The advent of spin transfer torque effect accommodates site-specific switching of magnetic nanostructures by current alone without magnetic field. However, the critical current density required for usual spin torque switching remains stubbornly high around 10(6)-10(7) A cm(-2). It would be fundamentally transformative if an electric field through a voltage could assist or accomplish the switching of ferromagnets. Here we report electric-field-assisted reversible switching in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where the coercivity, the magnetic configuration and the tunnelling magnetoresistance can be manipulated by voltage pulses associated with much smaller current densities. These results represent a crucial step towards ultralow energy switching in magnetic tunnel junctions, and open a new avenue for exploring other voltage-controlled spintronic devices.

  20. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions with harmonic and anharmonic modes.

    PubMed

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Jiang, Jian-Hua; Segal, Dvira

    2015-01-01

    We study charge and energy transfer in two-site molecular electronic junctions in which electron transport is assisted by a vibrational mode. To understand the role of mode harmonicity/anharmonicity in transport behavior, we consider two limiting situations: (i) the mode is assumed harmonic, (ii) we truncate the mode spectrum to include only two levels, to represent an anharmonic mode. Based on the cumulant generating functions of the models, we analyze the linear-response and nonlinear performance of these junctions and demonstrate that while the electrical and thermal conductances are sensitive to whether the mode is harmonic/anharmonic, the Seebeck coefficient, the thermoelectric figure-of-merit, and the thermoelectric efficiency beyond linear response, conceal this information.

  1. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions with harmonic and anharmonic modes

    PubMed Central

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Summary We study charge and energy transfer in two-site molecular electronic junctions in which electron transport is assisted by a vibrational mode. To understand the role of mode harmonicity/anharmonicity in transport behavior, we consider two limiting situations: (i) the mode is assumed harmonic, (ii) we truncate the mode spectrum to include only two levels, to represent an anharmonic mode. Based on the cumulant generating functions of the models, we analyze the linear-response and nonlinear performance of these junctions and demonstrate that while the electrical and thermal conductances are sensitive to whether the mode is harmonic/anharmonic, the Seebeck coefficient, the thermoelectric figure-of-merit, and the thermoelectric efficiency beyond linear response, conceal this information. PMID:26665085

  2. Thermomechanical models of the Rio Grande rift

    SciTech Connect

    Bridwell, R.J.; Anderson, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Fully two-dimensional, coupled thermochemical solutions of a continental rift and platform are used to model the crust and mantle structure of a hot, buoyant mantle diapir beneath the Rio Grande rift. The thermomechanical model includes both linear and nonlinear laws of the Weertman type relating shear stress and creep strain rate, viscosity which depends on temperature and pressure, and activation energy, temperature-dependent thermal conductivity, temperature-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, the Boussinesq approximation for thermal bouyancy, material convection using a stress rate that is invariant to rigid rotations, an elastically deformable crust, and a free surface. The model determines the free surface velocities, solid state flow field in the mantle, and viscosity structure of lithosphere and asthenosphere. Regional topography and crustal heat flow are simulated. A suite of symmetric models, assumes continental geotherms on the right and the successively increasing rift geotherms on the left. These models predict an asthenospheric flow field which transfers cold material laterally toward the rift at > 300 km, hot, buoyant material approx. 200 km wide which ascends vertically at rates of 1 km/my between 175 to 325 km, and spreads laterally away from the rift at the base of the lithosphere. Crustal spreading rates are similar to uplift rates. The lithosphere acts as stiff, elastic cap, damping upward motion through decreased velocities of 1 km/10 my and spreading uplift laterally. A parameter study varying material coefficients for the Weertman flow law suggests asthenospheric viscosities of approx. 10/sup 22/ to 10/sup 23/ poise. Similar studies predict crustal viscosities of approx. 10/sup 25/ poise. The buoyant process of mantle flow narrows and concentrates heat transport beneath the rift, increases upward velocity, and broadly arches the lithosphere. 10 figures, 1 table.

  3. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  4. Modeling single molecule junction mechanics as a probe of interface bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2017-03-01

    Using the atomic force microscope based break junction approach, applicable to metal point contacts and single molecule junctions, measurements can be repeated thousands of times resulting in rich data sets characterizing the properties of an ensemble of nanoscale junction structures. This paper focuses on the relationship between the measured force extension characteristics including bond rupture and the properties of the interface bonds in the junction. A set of exemplary model junction structures has been analyzed using density functional theory based calculations to simulate the adiabatic potential surface that governs the junction elongation. The junction structures include representative molecules that bond to the electrodes through amine, methylsulfide, and pyridine links. The force extension characteristics are shown to be most effectively analyzed in a scaled form with maximum sustainable force and the distance between the force zero and force maximum as scale factors. Widely used, two parameter models for chemical bond potential energy versus bond length are found to be nearly identical in scaled form. Furthermore, they fit well to the present calculations of N-Au and S-Au donor-acceptor bonds, provided no other degrees of freedom are allowed to relax. Examination of the reduced problem of a single interface, but including relaxation of atoms proximal to the interface bond, shows that a single-bond potential form renormalized by an effective harmonic potential in series fits well to the calculated results. This allows relatively accurate extraction of the interface bond energy. Analysis of full junction models shows cooperative effects that go beyond the mechanical series inclusion of the second bond in the junction, the spectator bond that does not rupture. Calculations for a series of diaminoalkanes as a function of molecule length indicate that the most important cooperative effect is due to the interactions between the dipoles induced by the donor

  5. Modeling single molecule junction mechanics as a probe of interface bonding

    DOE PAGES

    Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2017-03-07

    Using the atomic force microscope based break junction approach, applicable to metal point contacts and single molecule junctions, measurements can be repeated thousands of times resulting in rich data sets characterizing the properties of an ensemble of nanoscale junction structures. This paper focuses on the relationship between the measured force extension characteristics including bond rupture and the properties of the interface bonds in the junction. We analyzed a set of exemplary model junction structures using density functional theory based calculations to simulate the adiabatic potential surface that governs the junction elongation. The junction structures include representative molecules that bond tomore » the electrodes through amine, methylsulfide, and pyridine links. The force extension characteristics are shown to be most effectively analyzed in a scaled form with maximum sustainable force and the distance between the force zero and force maximum as scale factors. Widely used, two parameter models for chemical bond potential energy versus bond length are found to be nearly identical in scaled form. Furthermore, they fit well to the present calculations of N–Au and S–Au donor-acceptor bonds, provided no other degrees of freedom are allowed to relax. Examination of the reduced problem of a single interface, but including relaxation of atoms proximal to the interface bond, shows that a single-bond potential form renormalized by an effective harmonic potential in series fits well to the calculated results. This, then, allows relatively accurate extraction of the interface bond energy. Analysis of full junction models shows cooperative effects that go beyond the mechanical series inclusion of the second bond in the junction, the spectator bond that does not rupture. Calculations for a series of diaminoalkanes as a function of molecule length indicate that the most important cooperative effect is due to the interactions between the dipoles induced by

  6. Single molecule dynamics at a mechanically controllable break junction in solution at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Tatsuya; Kiguchi, Manabu; Takase, Mai; Nagasawa, Fumika; Nabika, Hideki; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi; Uosaki, Kohei; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki; Murakoshi, Kei

    2013-01-23

    The in situ observation of geometrical and electronic structural dynamics of a single molecule junction is critically important in order to further progress in molecular electronics. Observations of single molecular junctions are difficult, however, because of sensitivity limits. Here, we report surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a single 4,4'-bipyridine molecule under conditions of in situ current flow in a nanogap, by using nano-fabricated, mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) electrodes. When adsorbed at room temperature on metal nanoelectrodes in solution to form a single molecule junction, statistical analysis showed that nontotally symmetric b(1) and b(2) modes of 4,4'-bipyridine were strongly enhanced relative to observations of the same modes in solid or aqueous solutions. Significant changes in SERS intensity, energy (wavenumber), and selectivity of Raman vibrational bands that are coincident with current fluctuations provide information on distinct states of electronic and geometrical structure of the single molecule junction, even under large thermal fluctuations occurring at room temperature. We observed the dynamics of 4,4'-bipyridine motion between vertical and tilting configurations in the Au nanogap via b(1) and b(2) mode switching. A slight increase in the tilting angle of the molecule was also observed by noting the increase in the energies of Raman modes and the decrease in conductance of the molecular junction.

  7. Simulation of interface states effect on the scanning capacitance microscopy measurement of p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Kong, F. C. J.

    2002-12-01

    A two-dimensional numerical simulation model of interface states in scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) measurements of p-n junctions is presented. In the model, amphoteric interface states with two transition energies in the Si band gap are represented as fixed charges to account for their behavior in SCM measurements. The interface states are shown to cause a stretch-out and a parallel shift of the capacitance-voltage characteristics in the depletion and neutral regions of p-n junctions, respectively. This explains the discrepancy between the SCM measurement and simulation near p-n junctions, and thus modeling interface states is crucial for SCM dopant profiling of p-n junctions.

  8. Extended Majorana zero modes in a topological superconducting-normal T-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spånslätt, Christian; Ardonne, Eddy

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the sub gap properties of a three terminal Josephson T-junction composed of topologically superconducting wires connected by a normal metal region. This system naturally hosts zero energy Andreev bound states which are of self-conjugate Majorana nature and we show that they are, in contrast to ordinary Majorana zero modes, spatially extended in the normal metal region. If the T-junction respects time-reversal symmetry, we show that a zero mode is distributed only in two out of three arms in the junction and tuning the superconducting phases allows for transfer of the mode between the junction arms. We further provide tunneling conductance calculations showing that these features can be detected in experiments. Our findings suggest an experimental platform for studying the nature of spatially extended Majorana zero modes.

  9. SEM observation of p-n junction in semiconductors using fountain secondary electron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Takashi; Kimura, Takashi; Iwai, Hideo

    2016-11-01

    When we observe a p-n junction in a certain semiconductors using scanning electron microscope, it is known that the p-type region is brighter than n-type region in secondary electron (SE) image. To clarify this origin, the p-n junctions in 4H-SiC was observed using fountain secondary electron detector (FSED). The original FSED image shows brighter p-region than n-region, which is similar to the SE image taken by Everhart-Thonley detector, mainly due to the background component of SE signal. By subtracting the background, the line profiles of FSED signal across p-n junction have been recorded according to the SE energies. These profiles may include the detailed information of p-n junction.

  10. Critical Current Scaling in Long Diffusive Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Chung Ting; Borzenets, Ivan V.; Draelos, Anne W.; Amet, Francois; Bomze, Yuriy; Jones, Gareth; Craciun, Monica; Russo, Saverio; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    2016-08-01

    We present transport measurements on long diffusive graphene-based Josephson junctions. Several junctions are made on a single-domain crystal of CVD graphene and feature the same contact width of ~9$\\mu$m but vary in length from 400 to 1000 nm. As the carrier density is tuned with the gate voltage, the critical current in the these junctions spans a range from a few nA up to more than $5\\mu$A, while the Thouless energy, ETh, covers almost two orders of magnitude. Over much of this range, the product of the critical current and the normal resistance IcRn is found to scale linearly with ETh, as expected from theory. However, the ratio IcRn /ETh is found to be 0.1-0.2: much smaller than the predicted ~10 for long diffusive SNS junctions.

  11. Charge and spin current oscillations in a tunnel junction induced by magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartora, C. A.; Nobrega, K. Z.; Cabrera, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    Usually, charge and spin transport properties in tunnel junctions are studied in the DC bias regime and/or in the adiabatic regime of time-varying magnetic fields. In this letter, the temporal dynamics of charge and spin currents in a tunnel junction induced by pulsed magnetic fields is considered. At low bias voltages, energy and momentum of the conduction electrons are nearly conserved in the tunneling process, leading to the description of the junction as a spin-1/2 fermionic system coupled to time-varying magnetic fields. Under the influence of pulsed magnetic fields, charge and spin current can flow across the tunnel junction, displaying oscillatory behavior, even in the absence of DC bias voltage. A type of spin capacitance function, in close analogy to electric capacitance, is predicted.

  12. High-performance DC SQUIDs with submicrometer niobium Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    de Waal, V.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.; van den Hamer, P.

    1983-11-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of low-noise, all-niobium, thin-film planar dc SQUIDs with submicrometer Josephson junctions. The junctions are evaporated obliquely through a metal shadow evaporation mask, which is made using optical lithography with 0.5 ..mu..m tolerance. The Josephson junction barrier is formed by evaporating a thin silicon film and with a subsequent oxidation in a glow discharge. The junction parameters can be reproduced within a factor of two. Typical critical currents of the SQUIDs are about 3 ..mu..A and the resistances are about 100 ..cap omega... With SQUIDs having an inductance of 1 nH the voltage modulation is a least 60 ..mu..V. An intrinsic energy resolution of 4 x 10/sup -32/ J/Hz has been reached. The SQUIDs are coupled to wire-wound input coils or with thin-film input coils. The thin-film input coil consists of a niobium spiral of 20 turns on a separate substrate. In both cases the coil is glued onto a 2-nH SQUID with a coupling efficiency of at least 0.5. Referred to the thin-film input coil, the best coupled energy resolution achieved is 1.2 x 10/sup -30/ J/Hz measured in a flux-locked loop at frequencies above 10 Hz. As far as we know, this is the best figure achieved with an all-refractory-metal thin-film SQUID. The fabrication technique used is suited for making circuits with SQUID and pickup coil on the same substrate. We describe a compact, planar, first-order gradiometer integrated with a SQUID on a single substrate. The gradient noise of this device is 3 x 10/sup -12/ Tm/sup -1/. The gradiometer has a size of 12 mm x 17 mm, is simple to fabricate, an is suitable for biomedical applications.

  13. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  14. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    measurements in juncture flows around the nose of a wing-body junction. Measured values of mean-velocity and/or turbulence kinetic energy was used to predict the magnitude of the shear stress vector. Algebraic stress models performed the best followed by Cebeci-Smith eddy viscosity model. The flow is reported to be dominated by a pressure field produced by the wing and the velocity field generated by the horseshoe vortex that is wrapped around the junction between the wing and wall. Kubendran et al. conclude from an experimental study that the shape of leading edge of the wing as characterized by its slenderness ratio is a major factor in determining the flow fields in the juncture region. The more thinner the leading edge of the juncture, the weaker the horseshoe vortex is. Also, with a slender leading edge, the secondary flow in the juncture would be due mainly to the cross-stream gradients of Reynolds stresses rather than due to a lateral skewing of the shear layer.

  15. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  16. 2010 Panel on the biomaterials grand challenges.

    PubMed

    Reichert, William Monty; Ratner, Buddy D; Anderson, James; Coury, Art; Hoffman, Allan S; Laurencin, Cato T; Tirrell, David

    2011-02-01

    In 2009, the National Academy for Engineering issued the Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century comprised of 14 technical challenges that must be addressed to build a healthy, profitable, sustainable, and secure global community (http://www.engineeringchallenges.org). Although crucial, none of the NEA Grand Challenges adequately addressed the challenges that face the biomaterials community. In response to the NAE Grand Challenges, Monty Reichert of Duke University organized a panel entitled Grand Challenges in Biomaterials at the at the 2010 Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Seattle. Six members of the National Academies-Buddy Ratner, James Anderson, Allan Hoffman, Art Coury, Cato Laurencin, and David Tirrell-were asked to propose a grand challenge to the audience that, if met, would significantly impact the future of biomaterials and medical devices. Successfully meeting these challenges will speed the 60-plus year transition from commodity, off-the-shelf biomaterials to bioengineered chemistries, and biomaterial devices that will significantly advance our ability to address patient needs and also to create new market opportunities.

  17. 2010 Panel on the Biomaterials Grand Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, William “Monty”; Ratner, Buddy D.; Anderson, James; Coury, Art; Hoffman, Allan S.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Tirrell, David

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the National Academy for Engineering issued the Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century comprised of 14 technical challenges that must be addressed to build a healthy, profitable, sustainable, and secure global community (http://www.engineeringchallenges.org). Although crucial, none of the NEA Grand Challenges adequately addressed the challenges that face the biomaterials community. In response to the NAE Grand Challenges, Monty Reichert of Duke University organized a panel entitled Grand Challenges in Biomaterials at the at the 2010 Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Seattle. Six members of the National Academies—Buddy Ratner, James Anderson, Allan Hoffman, Art Coury, Cato Laurencin, and David Tirrell—were asked to propose a grand challenge to the audience that, if met, would significantly impact the future of biomaterials and medical devices. Successfully meeting these challenges will speed the 60-plus year transition from commodity, off-the-shelf biomaterials to bioengineered chemistries, and biomaterial devices that will significantly advance our ability to address patient needs and also to create new market opportunities. PMID:21171147

  18. Lifeomics leads the age of grand discoveries.

    PubMed

    He, Fuchu

    2013-03-01

    When our knowledge of a field accumulates to a certain level, we are bound to see the rise of one or more great scientists. They will make a series of grand discoveries/breakthroughs and push the discipline into an 'age of grand discoveries'. Mathematics, geography, physics and chemistry have all experienced their ages of grand discoveries; and in life sciences, the age of grand discoveries has appeared countless times since the 16th century. Thanks to the ever-changing development of molecular biology over the past 50 years, contemporary life science is once again approaching its breaking point and the trigger for this is most likely to be 'lifeomics'. At the end of the 20th century, genomics wrote out the 'script of life'; proteomics decoded the script; and RNAomics, glycomics and metabolomics came into bloom. These 'omics', with their unique epistemology and methodology, quickly became the thrust of life sciences, pushing the discipline to new high. Lifeomics, which encompasses all omics, has taken shape and is now signalling the dawn of a new era, the age of grand discoveries.

  19. Superconducting Tunnel Junctions for High-Precision EUV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, F.; Carpenter, M. H.; Cantor, R.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-08-01

    We have characterized the photon response of superconducting tunnel junctions in the extreme ultraviolet energy range below 100 eV with a pulsed 355 nm laser. The detectors are operated at rates up to 5000 counts/s, are very linear in energy and have an energy resolution between 0.9 and 2 eV. We observe multiple peaks that correspond to an integer number of photons with a Poissonian probability distribution and that can be used for high-accuracy energy calibration. The uncertainty of the centroid depends on the detector resolution and the counting statistics and can be as low as 1 meV for well-separated peaks with >10^5 counts. We discuss the precision of the peak centroid as a function of detector resolution and total number of counts and the accuracy of the energy calibration.

  20. Overview from bluff east of facility. Note buildings #35 (left). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview from bluff east of facility. Note buildings #35 (left). #33 (center), and #31 A (right) VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  1. Radon/radon daughter environmental chamber located in the northwest end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Radon/radon daughter environmental chamber located in the northwest end of building. VIEW LOOKING WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, Building No. 32, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  2. 5. Oblique view of center and south sections of building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Oblique view of center and south sections of building. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF CENTER SECTION. - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, Building No. 3022, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  3. Charge transport and rectification in molecular junctions formed with carbon-based electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taekyeong; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Lee, Chulho; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-07-29

    Molecular junctions formed using the scanning-tunneling-microscope-based break-junction technique (STM-BJ) have provided unique insight into charge transport at the nanoscale. In most prior work, the same metal, typically Au, Pt, or Ag, is used for both tip and substrate. For such noble metal electrodes, the density of electronic states is approximately constant within a narrow energy window relevant to charge transport. Here, we form molecular junctions using the STM-BJ technique, with an Au metal tip and a microfabricated graphite substrate, and measure the conductance of a series of graphite/amine-terminated oligophenyl/Au molecular junctions. The remarkable mechanical strength of graphite and the single-crystal properties of our substrates allow measurements over few thousand junctions without any change in the surface properties. We show that conductance decays exponentially with molecular backbone length with a decay constant that is essentially the same as that for measurements with two Au electrodes. More importantly, despite the inherent symmetry of the oligophenylamines, we observe rectification in these junctions. State-of-art ab initio conductance calculations are in good agreement with experiment, and explain the rectification. We show that the highly energy-dependent graphite density of states contributes variations in transmission that, when coupled with an asymmetric voltage drop across the junction, leads to the observed rectification. Together, our measurements and calculations show how functionality may emerge from hybrid molecular-scale devices purposefully designed with different electrodes beyond the so-called "wide band limit," opening up the possibility of assembling molecular junctions with dissimilar electrodes using layered 2D materials.

  4. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S-Au-S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au-Au-Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au-Au-Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  5. Dilemmas of Brazilian Grand Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army War...NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S ) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER( S ) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved... energy . Brazilian officials argue that IBSA carries ex- tra legitimacy because its members are all developing, multicultural democracies, and

  6. Research Furthers Conservation of Grand Canyon Sandbars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melis, Theodore S.; Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Wright, Scott A.

    2007-01-01

    Grand Canyon National Park lies approximately 25 km (15 mi) down-river from Glen Canyon Dam, which was built on the Colorado River just south of the Arizona-Utah border in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Before the dam began to regulate the Colorado River in 1963, the river carried such large quantities of red sediment, for which the Southwest is famous, that the Spanish named the river the Rio Colorado, or 'red river'. Today, the Colorado River usually runs clear below Glen Canyon Dam because the dam nearly eliminates the main-channel sand supply. The daily and seasonal flows of the river were also altered by the dam. These changes have disrupted the sedimentary processes that create and maintain Grand Canyon sandbars. Throughout Grand Canyon, sandbars create habitat for native plants and animals, supply camping beaches for river runners and hikers, and provide sediment needed to protect archaeological resources from weathering and erosion. Maintenance of sandbars in the Colorado River ecosystem, the river corridor that stretches from the dam to the western boundary of Grand Canyon National Park, is a goal of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program. The program is a federally authorized initiative to ensure that the mandates of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 are met through advances in information and resource management. The U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center has responsibility for scientific monitoring and research efforts for the program. Extensive research and monitoring during the past decade have resulted in the identification of possible alternatives for operating Glen Canyon Dam that hold new potential for the conservation of sand resources.

  7. Microtubules regulate disassembly of epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; McCall, Ingrid C; Babbin, Brian; Samarin, Stanislav N; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background Epithelial tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) form the apical junctional complex (AJC) which regulates cell-cell adhesion, paracellular permeability and cell polarity. The AJC is anchored on cytoskeletal structures including actin microfilaments and microtubules. Such cytoskeletal interactions are thought to be important for the assembly and remodeling of apical junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of microtubules in disassembly of the AJC in intestinal epithelial cells using a model of extracellular calcium depletion. Results Calcium depletion resulted in disruption and internalization of epithelial TJs and AJs along with reorganization of perijunctional F-actin into contractile rings. Microtubules reorganized into dense plaques positioned inside such F-actin rings. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole prevented junctional disassembly and F-actin ring formation. Stabilization of microtubules with either docetaxel or pacitaxel blocked contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated internalization of junctional proteins into a subapical cytosolic compartment. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of microtubule motors, kinesins, prevented contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated disassembly of apical junctions. Kinesin-1 was enriched at the AJC in cultured epithelial cells and it also accumulated at epithelial cell-cell contacts in normal human colonic mucosa. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated association of kinesin-1 with the E-cadherin-catenin complex. Conclusion Our data suggest that microtubules play a role in disassembly of the AJC during calcium depletion by regulating formation of contractile F-actin rings and internalization of AJ/TJ proteins. PMID:16509970

  8. Molecular mechanism of double Holliday junction dissolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Processing of homologous recombination intermediates is tightly coordinated to ensure that chromosomal integrity is maintained and tumorigenesis avoided. Decatenation of double Holliday junctions, for example, is catalysed by two enzymes that work in tight coordination and belong to the same ‘dissolvasome’ complex. Within the dissolvasome, the RecQ-like BLM helicase provides the translocase function for Holliday junction migration, while the topoisomerase III alpha-RMI1 subcomplex works as a proficient DNA decatenase, together resulting in double-Holliday-junction unlinking. Here, we review the available architectural and biochemical knowledge on the dissolvasome machinery, with a focus on the structural interplay between its components. PMID:25061510

  9. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  10. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  11. Fixed Junction Photovoltaic Devices Based On Polymerizable Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limanek, Austin; Leger, Janelle, , Dr.

    Recently, polymer-based photovoltaic devices (PPVs) have received significant attention as a possible affordable, large area and flexible solar energy technology. In particular, research on chemically fixed p-i-n junctions in polymer photovoltaic devices has shown promising results. These devices are composed of ionic monomers in a polymer matrix sandwiched between two electrodes. When a potential is applied, the ionic monomers migrate towards their corresponding electrodes, enabling electrochemical doping of the polymer. This leads to the formation of bonds between the polymer and ionic monomers, resulting in the formation of a chemically fixed p-i-n junction. However, early devices suffered from long charging times and low overall response. This has been attributed to the low phase compatibility between the ionic monomers and the polymer. It has been shown for light-emitting electrochemical cells, replacing the ionic monomers with polymerizable ionic liquids (PILs) mitigates these challenges. We will present the use of PILs as the dopant in fixed junction PPV devices. Preliminary devices demonstrate significantly improved performance, decreased charging times, and high open circuit voltages. This research supported by the National Science Foundation DMR-1057209.

  12. Chiral interface states in graphene p -n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohnitz, Laura; De Martino, Alessandro; Häusler, Wolfgang; Egger, Reinhold

    2016-10-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of unidirectional interface states which form near p -n junctions in a graphene monolayer subject to a homogeneous magnetic field. The semiclassical limit of these states corresponds to trajectories propagating along the p -n interface by a combined skipping-snaking motion. Studying the two-dimensional Dirac equation with a magnetic field and an electrostatic potential step, we provide and discuss the exact and essentially analytical solution of the quantum-mechanical eigenproblem for both a straight and a circularly shaped junction. The spectrum consists of localized Landau-like and unidirectional snaking-skipping interface states, where we always find at least one chiral interface state. For a straight junction and at energies near the Dirac point, when increasing the potential step height, the group velocity of this state interpolates in an oscillatory manner between the classical drift velocity in a crossed electromagnetic field and the semiclassical value expected for a purely snaking motion. Away from the Dirac point, chiral interface states instead resemble the conventional skipping (edge-type) motion found also in the corresponding Schrödinger case. We also investigate the circular geometry, where chiral interface states are predicted to induce sizable equilibrium ring currents.

  13. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are

  14. Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...procurement or storage of standard, common use fuels. NATURAL GAS Natural gas, abundant globally and domestically, offers energy versatility among

  15. Superparamagnetism in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions with a thin pinned ferromagnetic electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, J. F.; Chen, J. Y.; Venkatesan, M.; Feng, G.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2010-05-01

    MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions have been fabricated with a thin Co40Fe40B20 (CoFeB) layer in the pinned synthetic antiferromagnetic CoFe/Ru/CoFeB stack. An inverted tunneling magnetoresistance is observed due to the unbalanced synthetic antiferromagnet. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles form when the CoFeB layer is thinner than 1.5 nm, and an abnormal temperature dependence of the junction resistance is associated with superparamagnetism when the thermal fluctuation energy exceeds the magnetic anisotropy energy. This explanation accounts for the temperature dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance effect.

  16. Light-splitting photovoltaic system utilizing two dual-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Kanglin; Yang, Hui; Lu, Shulong; Dong, Jianrong; Zhou, Taofei; Wang, Rongxin; Jiang, Desheng

    2010-12-15

    There are many difficulties limiting the further development of monolithic multi-junction solar cells, such as the growth of lattice-mismatched material and the current matching constraint. As an alternative approach, the light-splitting photovoltaic system is investigated intensively in different aspects, including the energy loss mechanism and the choice of energy bandgaps of solar cells. Based on the investigation, a two-dual junction system has been implemented employing lattice-matched GaInP/GaAs and InGaAsP/InGaAs cells grown epitaxially on GaAs and InP substrates, respectively. (author)

  17. Direct optical determination of interfacial transport barriers in molecular tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Fereiro, Jerry A; McCreery, Richard L; Bergren, Adam Johan

    2013-07-03

    Molecular electronics seeks to build circuitry using organic components with at least one dimension in the nanoscale domain. Progress in the field has been inhibited by the difficulty in determining the energy levels of molecules after being perturbed by interactions with the conducting contacts. We measured the photocurrent spectra for large-area aliphatic and aromatic molecular tunnel junctions with partially transparent copper top contacts. Where no molecular absorption takes place, the photocurrent is dominated by internal photoemission, which exhibits energy thresholds corresponding to interfacial transport barriers, enabling their direct measurement in a functioning junction.

  18. Defect motion and lattice pinning barriers in Josephson-junction ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.; Lim, Jong Soo; Fortin, J.-Y.; Choi, J.; Choi, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    We study the motion of domain wall defects in a fully frustrated Josephson-junction ladder system, driven by small applied currents. For small system sizes, the energy barrier E{sub B} to the defect motion is computed analytically via symmetry and topological considerations. More generally, we perform numerical simulations directly on the equations of motion, based on the resistively-shunted junction model, to study the dynamics of defects, varying the system size. Coherent motion of domain walls is observed for large system sizes. In the thermodynamical limit, we find E{sub B}=0.1827 in units of the Josephson coupling energy.

  19. Midwest appropriate technology small grants program. Grand Traverse community alcohol project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Findings are presented resulting from the joint energy project in Grand Traverse, Michigan. The production of butanol and acetone from corn by various clostridium strains has been evaluated. Plant design and flow plans are completed. The project has since been cancelled due to lack of funds. (DMC)

  20. Grand Challenges and Chemical Engineering Curriculum--Developments at TU Dortmund University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kockmann, Norbert; Lutze, Philip; Gorak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Chemical processing industry is progressively focusing their research activities and product placements in the areas of Grand Challenges (or Global Megatrends) such as mobility, energy, communication, or health care and food. Innovation in all these fields requires solving high complex problems, rapid product development as well as dealing with…

  1. Thermochemical analysis of magnesium diboride thin film synthesis and its application to Josephson junction fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon

    MgB2 is an unusual binary metallic superconductor in that it has a transition temperature of almost twice that of other metallic compounds and possesses two superconductor gaps. It has proven to be difficult to fabricate in thin film form, predominantly as a result of the high volatility of Mg. In this thesis, critical factors involved in MgB2 thin film growth and the synthesis of multilayer MgB2 Josephson junctions have been studied. The thermochemistry of MgB2 thin film growth has been investigated. The low Mg sticking coefficient at temperatures over 300°C prevents high temperature synthesis with traditional vacuum growth methods. However, as a result of the large kinetic barrier to MgB2 decomposition, metastable growth and subsequent thermal processing is possible. The Mg sticking coefficient is found to be strongly dependent upon B flux. High Mg and B fluxes make it possible to extend the processing window to elevated temperatures by enhancing the Mg sticking coefficient. A transition temperature of 37˜38K was achieved using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). For the fabrication of Josephson junctions, various barrier layers including native oxide, boron, AIN, and thermal oxide were explored. Cross-bridge junction structures were fabricated using shadow masks. Repeatable tunneling characteristics were observed from metal/native oxide/MgB2 junctions. MgB 2 energy gaps and density of states, as well as the barrier's height and thickness, have been inferred from tunneling conductance measurements. MgB2/native oxide or boron/MgB2 junctions with 1mm 2 areas were fabricated and also exhibited tunneling characteristics. The junctions produced with the cross geometry process have a Josephson coupling energy that is too small compared to the thermal energy to exhibit supercurrent as a result of the junction's large size and high resistance. To overcome this limitation, planar type junctions were prepared using conventional microfabrication techniques. MgB2,/AlN/MgB2 and

  2. 27 CFR 9.137 - Grand Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Colorado River and intersects with U.S. Highways 6 and 24, adjacent to and immediately west of the Orchard... Gunnison River to its junction with the Colorado River in section 22, T. 1 S., R. 1 W.; (10) Thence continuing in a northwesterly direction along the Colorado River to the bridge where County Road 340...

  3. 27 CFR 9.137 - Grand Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Colorado River and intersects with U.S. Highways 6 and 24, adjacent to and immediately west of the Orchard... Gunnison River to its junction with the Colorado River in section 22, T. 1 S., R. 1 W.; (10) Thence continuing in a northwesterly direction along the Colorado River to the bridge where County Road 340...

  4. 27 CFR 9.137 - Grand Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Colorado River and intersects with U.S. Highways 6 and 24, adjacent to and immediately west of the Orchard... Gunnison River to its junction with the Colorado River in section 22, T. 1 S., R. 1 W.; (10) Thence continuing in a northwesterly direction along the Colorado River to the bridge where County Road 340...

  5. 27 CFR 9.137 - Grand Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Colorado River and intersects with U.S. Highways 6 and 24, adjacent to and immediately west of the Orchard... Gunnison River to its junction with the Colorado River in section 22, T. 1 S., R. 1 W.; (10) Thence continuing in a northwesterly direction along the Colorado River to the bridge where County Road 340...

  6. 27 CFR 9.137 - Grand Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Colorado River and intersects with U.S. Highways 6 and 24, adjacent to and immediately west of the Orchard... Gunnison River to its junction with the Colorado River in section 22, T. 1 S., R. 1 W.; (10) Thence continuing in a northwesterly direction along the Colorado River to the bridge where County Road 340...

  7. Probing the rupture of a Ag atomic junction in a Ag-Au mixed electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We probed that the atomic junction in Ag part ruptures during stretching of atomic sized contacts of Ag-Au mixed electrodes, resulting in Ag-Ag electrodes through a scanning tunneling microscope breaking junction (STM-BJ) technique. We observed that the conductance and tunneling decay constant for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions are essentially the same for the Ag-Au mixed and the Ag-Ag electrodes. We also found the molecular plateau length and the evolution patterns with the Ag-Au mixed electrodes are similar to those with Ag-Ag electrodes rather than the Au-Au electrodes in the molecular junction elongation. This result is attributed to the smaller binding energy of Ag atoms compared to that of Au atoms, so the Ag junction part is more easily broken than that of Au part in stretching of Ag-Au mixed electrodes. Furthermore, we successfully observed that the rupture force of the atomic junction for the Ag-Au mixed electrodes was identical to that for the Ag-Ag electrodes and smaller than that for the Au-Au electrodes. This study may advance the understanding of the electrical and the mechanical properties in molecular devices with Ag and Au electrodes in future.

  8. Process For Direct Integration Of A Thin-Film Silicon P-N Junction Diode With A Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2005-08-23

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  9. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  10. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2004-12-07

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  11. A Grand Unified Theory of Interdisciplinarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lennard J.

    2007-01-01

    Aside from the appeal to administrators as a tool to reduce costs by combining less robust departments with heftier relations, interdisciplinarity is a powerful idea because it implies that different branches of knowledge can benefit from talking to one another: a grand, unified theory of knowledge in which each discipline contributes building…

  12. Toxic Waste in Grand Banks. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchka, Peter

    "Toxic Waste in Grand Banks" is an assessment task in which students from a high school economics class investigate the issues of economic prosperity, environmental concerns, government intervention in the market economy, and responsible civic participation in solving community problems. Students will demonstrate an ability--both individually and…

  13. Rio Grande rift: problems and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Baldridge, W.S.; Olsen, K.H.; Callender, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Topics and ideas addressed include: (1) the regional extent of the Rio Grande rift; (2) the structure of the crust and upper mantle; (3) whether the evidence for an axile dike in the lower crust is compelling; (4) the nature of faulting and extension in the crust; and (5) the structural and magmatic development of the rift. 88 references, 5 figures.

  14. Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamill, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, one of the world's most spectacular gorges, is a premier U.S. National Park and a World Heritage Site. The canyon supports a diverse array of distinctive plants and animals and contains cultural resources significant to the region's Native Americans. About 15 miles upstream of Grand Canyon National Park sits Glen Canyon Dam, completed in 1963, which created Lake Powell. The dam provides hydroelectric power for 200 wholesale customers in six western States, but it has also altered the Colorado River's flow, temperature, and sediment-carrying capacity. Over time this has resulted in beach erosion, invasion and expansion of nonnative species, and losses of native fish. Public concern about the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations prompted the passage of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992, which directs the Secretary of the Interior to operate the dam 'to protect, mitigate adverse impacts to, and improve values for which Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area were established...' This legislation also required the creation of a long-term monitoring and research program to provide information that could inform decisions related to dam operations and protection of downstream resources.

  15. The Grand Strategy of the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    emerging American political consciousness .6 Since the Revolutionary era, most American conflicts have been articulated and justified with some reference...The Grand Strategy of the United States ways. The result was a rise in international organized crime, quantum increases in international and domestic

  16. Grand Canyon Humpback Chub Population Improving

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Matthew E.

    2007-01-01

    The humpback chub (Gila cypha) is a long-lived, freshwater fish found only in the Colorado River Basin. Physical adaptations-large adult body size, large predorsal hump, and small eyes-appear to have helped humpback chub evolve in the historically turbulent Colorado River. A variety of factors, including habitat alterations and the introduction of nonnative fishes, likely prompted the decline of native Colorado River fishes. Declining numbers propelled the humpback chub onto the Federal list of endangered species in 1967, and the species is today protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Only six populations of humpback chub are currently known to exist, five in the Colorado River Basin above Lees Ferry, Ariz., and one in Grand Canyon, Ariz. The U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center oversees monitoring and research activities for the Grand Canyon population under the auspices of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP). Analysis of data collected through 2006 suggests that the number of adult (age 4+ years) humpback chub in Grand Canyon increased to approximately 6,000 fish in 2006, following an approximate 40-50 percent decline between 1989 and 2001. Increasing numbers of adult fish appear to be the result of steadily increasing numbers of juvenile fish reaching adulthood beginning in the mid- to late-1990s and continuing through at least 2002.

  17. Comprehensive District Reform: Philadelphia's Grand Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Useem, Elizabeth; Balfanz, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This report describes "Philadelphia's Grand Experiment" in comprehensive school district reform, from its conception through its initial months of implementation. In 2001, as part of the remedy for low student performance, the governor ordered the state to take over governance of the Philadelphia School District, with a substantial…

  18. Search for a Realistic Orbifold Grand Unification

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoshiharu

    2008-05-13

    We review the prototype model of a grand unified theory on the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} and discuss topics related to the choice of boundary conditions; the dynamical rearrangement of gauge symmetry and the equivalence classes of BCs. We explore a family unification scenario by orbifolding.

  19. Map Your Way to the Grand Canyon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Holly

    2005-01-01

    In the introductory assignment, each randomly assigned group spends about 10 to 15 minutes at each station. The author incorporates as much sensory stimulation in the activity as possible. At the first station, students view a PowerPoint show from a geology class the author participated in at the Grand Canyon. At station two, students look at a…

  20. The Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speece, Susan

    1991-01-01

    An assessment of the water quality of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon was made, using the following parameters: dissolved oxygen, water temperature, hydrogen ion concentration, total dissolved solids, turbidity, and ammonium/nitrogen levels. These parameters were used to provide some clue as to the "wellness" and stability of the…

  1. Monopoles of SU(15) grand unification

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, P.B.

    1991-03-01

    In a recently analyzed grand unified model based on the gauge group SU(15), monopoles are automatically consistent with the cosmological mass density bound. The Parker bound of monopole flux puts some constaints on the model which can be easily satisfied.

  2. Grand Unification with and without Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Melfo, Alejandra

    2007-06-19

    Grand Unified Theories based on the group SO(10) generically provide interesting and testable relations between the charged fermions and neutrino sector masses and mixings. In the light of the recent neutrino data, we reexamine these relations both in supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models, and give a brief review of their present status.

  3. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  4. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  5. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  6. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  7. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  8. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  9. Enhancement at the junction of silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gu, Geun Hoi; Suh, Jung Sang

    2008-08-19

    The enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) at the junction of linearly joined silver nanorods (31 nm in diameter) deposited in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide templates was studied systematically by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The single and joined silver nanorod arrays showed a similar extinction spectrum when their length was the same. Maximum enhancement was observed from the junction system of two nanorods of the same size with a total length of 62 nm. This length also corresponded to the optimum length of single nanorods for SERS by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The enhancement at the junction was approximately 40 times higher than that of the 31 nm single nanorod, while it was 4 times higher than that of the 62 nm single nanorod. The enhancement factor at the junction after oxide removal was approximately 3.9 x 10 (9).

  10. UTE MRI of the Osteochondral Junction

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Reni; Chen, Karen; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    The osteochondral junction is composed of numerous tissue components and serves important functions relating to structural stability and proper nutrition in joints such as the knee and spine. Conventional MR techniques have been inadequate at imaging the tissues of the osteochondral junction primarily because of the intrinsically short T2 nature of these tissues, rendering them “invisible” with the standard acquisitions. Ultrashort time to echo (UTE) MR techniques acquire sufficient MR signal of osteochondral tissues, thereby allowing direct evaluation. This article reviews the anatomy of the osteochondral junction of the knee and the spine, technical aspects of UTE MRI, and the application of UTE MRI for evaluation of the osteochondral junction. PMID:25061547

  11. Helical junctions as determinants for RNA folding: origin of tertiary structure stability of the hairpin ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Klostermeier, D; Millar, D P

    2000-10-24

    Helical junctions are ubiquitous structural elements that govern the folding and tertiary structure of RNAs. The tobacco ringspot virus hairpin ribozyme consists of two helix-loop-helix elements that lie on adjacent arms of a four-way junction. In the active form of the hairpin ribozyme, the loops are in proximity. The nature of the helical junction determines the stability of the hairpin ribozyme tertiary structure [Walter, N. G., Burke, J. M., and Millar, D. P. (1999) Nat. Struct. Biol. 6, 544-549] and thus its catalytic activity. We used two-, three-, and four-way junction hairpin ribozymes as model systems to investigate the thermodynamic basis for the different tertiary structure stabilities. The equilibrium between docked and extended conformers was analyzed as a function of temperature using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (trFRET). As the secondary and tertiary structure transitions overlap, information from UV melting curves and trFRET had to be combined to gain insight into the thermodynamics of both structural transitions. It turned out that the higher tertiary structure stability observed in the context of a four-way junction is the result of a lower entropic cost for the docking process. In the two- and three-way junction ribozymes, a high entropic cost counteracts the favorable enthalpic term, rendering the docked conformer only marginally stable. Thus, two- and three-way junction tertiary structures are more sensitive toward regulation by ligands, whereas four-way junctions provide a stable scaffold. Altogether, RNA folding and stability appear to be governed by principles similar to those for the folding of proteins.

  12. Full canonical information from grand-potential density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2014-12-05

    We present a general and formally exact method to obtain the canonical one-body density distribution and the canonical free energy from direct decomposition of classical density functional results in the grand ensemble. We test the method for confined one-dimensional hard-core particles for which the exact grand potential density functional is explicitly known. The results agree to within high accuracy with those from exact methods and our Monte Carlo many-body simulations. The method is relevant for treating finite systems and for dynamical density functional theory.

  13. Union County - La Grande, Oregon geothermal district heating: feasibility assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, H. II; Giddings, M.; Hanson, P.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents an assessment of geothermal district heating in the City of La Grande, Oregon. Eight study area districts were analyzed to determine their economic feasibility. Results from the analyses conclude that certain districts within the City of La Grande are economically feasible if certain assumptions are correct. Development of geothermal district heating for these areas would provide direct energy and dollar savings to the building owners and would also provide direct and indirect benefits to low and moderate income households within the City.

  14. Gamma Ray and Neutrino Detector Facility (GRANDE). Progress report for Task C

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, H.W.; Yodh, G.B.

    1991-08-01

    GRANDE is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. The authors proposed that the detector be constructed in phases, beginning with an active detector area of 31,000 m{sup 2} (GRANDE-I) and expanding to a final size of 100,000--150,000 m{sup 2}. Some of the characteristics of GRANDE-I are shown. GRANDE utilizes the proven technology of water Cerenkov detectors. A feasibility study has shown that the powerful background discrimination inherent in the directional property of the Cerenkov light and in the large size of the detector, will allow successful surface operation with an acceptably small trigger rate. The engineering analysis showed that the facility can be built over the reasonably short time span of 4 years using well-known construction technologies. Combining the neutrino detector and the extensive air shower array in a single facility greatly enhances the physics potential of GRANDE. It also achieves a considerable saving in cost and time since a sizable fraction of such costs, for either experiment, is in the site preparation. Additionally, the neutrino detector benefits from the efficient cosmic-ray anticoincidence afforded by the gamma detector. A site has been selected (a water-filled quarry near Little Rock, Arkansas) and an engineering firm has completed the preliminary design of the detector structure. They also have designed the water purification system, and have preliminary designs for the data harvesting electronics and other systems. During this past year the authors learned that the proposal to construct GRANDE-I was not approved by DOE. The construction of such a detector was considered premature by the reviewers and one major technical concern still dominated the reviews. In order to answer the technical concerns while waiting for the results from the current generation of gamma-ray detectors, they propose to construct and operate a small prototype

  15. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 2, Site specific---California through Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provide site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes for the following sites: eight California facilities which are Energy Technology engineering Center, General Atomics, General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, and Sandia national Laboratories; Grand Junction Project Office; Rocky Flats Plant; Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory-Windsor Site; Pinellas Plant; Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard; Argonne National Laboratory-West; and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

  16. Anaesthesia management in craniovertebral junctional anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Craniovertebral Junctional (CVJ) anomalies are developmental disorders that affect the skeleton and enclosed neuraxis at the junction of cranium and cervical spine. The high prevalence of airway obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease in combination with cardiovascular manifestations poses a high anaesthetic risk to these patients. This article provides a discussion of management of anaesthesia in patients with craniovertebral anomalies, the evaluation of risk factors in these patients and their management, including emergency airway issues. PMID:27891026

  17. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  18. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  19. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  20. Creationism in the Grand Canyon, Texas Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    2004-01-01

    AGU President Bob Dickinson, together with presidents of six other scientific societies, have written to Joseph Alston, Superintendent of Grand Canyon National Park, pointing out that a creationist book, The Grand Canyon: A Different View, is being sold in bookstores within the borders of the park as a scientific explanation about Grand Canyon geologic history. President Dickinson's 16 December letter urges that Alston clearly separate The Grand Canyon: A Different View from books and materials that discuss the legitimate scientific understanding of the origin of the Grand Canyon. The letter warns the Park Service against giving the impression that it approves of the anti-science movement known as young-Earth creationism, or that it endorses the advancement of religious tenets disguised as science. The text of the letter is on AGU's Web site http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/policy/sci_pol.html. Also, this fall, AGU sent an alert to Texas members about efforts by intelligent design creationists aimed at weakening the teaching of biological evolution in textbooks used in Texas schools. The alert pointed scientists to a letter, drafted by AGU, together with the American Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Astronomical Society, that urged the Texas State Board of Education to adopt textbooks that presented only accepted, peer-reviewed science and pedagogical expertise. Over 550 scientists in Texas added their names to the letter (http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/policy/texas_textbooks.pdf ), sent to the Board of Education on 1 November prior to their vote to adopt a slate of new science textbooks. The Board voted 11-5 in favor of keeping the textbooks free of changes advocated by groups supporting intelligent design creationism.

  1. Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE`s obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991.

  2. Development of an Integrated Performance Evaluation Program (IPEP) for the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, W.E.; Ka; Lindahl, P.C.; Bottrell, D.; Newberry, R.; Klusek, C.; Morton, S.; Karp, K.

    1993-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with DOE`s Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), and Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO), is working with the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop the Integrated Performance Evaluation Program (IPEP). The purpose of IPEP is to integrate performance evaluation (PE) information from existing PE programs with expanded quality assurance (QA) activities to develop information about the quality of radiological, mixed waste, and hazardous environmental sample analyses provided by all laboratories supporting DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) programs. The IPEP plans to utilize existing PE programs when available and appropriate for use by DOE-EM; new PE programs will be developed only when no existing program meets DOE`s needs.

  3. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  4. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise.

  5. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  6. Graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Trainer, Daniel J.; Chen, Ke

    2016-10-01

    We report a development of graphene tunnel junctions made by chemical vapor deposition grown graphene and sputtered aluminum insulating by an in-situ grown aluminum oxide. The thin oxide layer formed in between the metal layer and the two-dimensional material is a crucial part of a tunnel junction. We characterized surface morphology of oxide layers and studied tunneling spectra of lead and silver tunnel junctions to estimate the quality of the aluminum oxide. The Brinkman-Rowell-Dynes model was applied to fit the conductance-voltage plots to calculate the thickness of oxide layers. Junctions with graphene both on bottom and on top were fabricated and their tunneling properties were characterized after exposure to air for weeks to test time stability. Furthermore, the resistances of graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide formed naturally and in an oxygen atmosphere were studied. Our results demonstrate that in-situ aluminum oxide is an effective barrier for graphene tunnel junctions. The methods of barrier formation enable the realization of more tunnel devices and circuits based on graphene.

  7. 43. and Design, Grand Canyon National Park, dated August 23, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. and Design, Grand Canyon National Park, dated August 23, 1934, and September 17, 1934 (original located at Federal Records Center, Denver, Colorado, #113/3084-set of 2) SEWAGE PLANT ADDITION. - Water Reclamation Plant, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  8. 26. VIEW OF THE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE CROSSING GRAND CANAL AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW OF THE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE CROSSING GRAND CANAL AT 30TH STREET IN PHOENIX, LOOKING WEST, Photographer: Mark Durben, April 1989 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 21. VIEW OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING OLD ALIGNMENT, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING OLD ALIGNMENT, LOOKING WEST LOCATION UNKNOWN. THE WIDE DRY BED OF THE SALT RIVER SPANS THE BACKGROUND. Photographer: Mark Durben, April 1989 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 32. VIEW OF TERMINUS OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING TURNOUT GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF TERMINUS OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING TURNOUT GATES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. WASTE WATER IS TURNED INTO THE BED OF NEW RIVER. Photographer: Mark Durben, April 1989 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 31. VIEW SHOWING DEMOSSING ALONG GRAND CANAL. THE DRAGLINE SCOOPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW SHOWING DEMOSSING ALONG GRAND CANAL. THE DRAGLINE SCOOPS UP AQUATIC WEEDS AND DEPOSITS THEM IN A DUMP TRUCK. Photographer: Mark Durben, April 1989 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Social and Environmental Inventory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Utilities 107-108 FIGUR~ES Figure Number Title Pag 14 Projected Population - Region 67 1 5 Projected Population - Grand Forks County 68 Study Area 16...Projected Population - Polk County Study Area 68 17 Planning Regions 105 TABLES Tale Number Title Pg 21 Historic Sites in the Grand Forks Area 61I 22...of Indians, traders and settlers; and those related to the populations which currently reside in the area. The information on archeology and history

  13. Photocurrent generation efficiency of a carbon nanotube pn junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulley, Daniel; Aspitarte, Lee; Minot, Ethan

    Carrier multiplication effects can enhance the quantum efficiency of photovoltaic devices. For example, quantum dot solar cells have demonstrated photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies greater than 100% when photon energies exceed twice the band gap. Carbon nanotube photodiodes exhibit carrier multiplication effects (Gabor et al., Science 2009), but the quantum efficiency of such photodiodes has not previously been characterized. We have reproduced the carrier multiplication phenomena in individual CNT pn junctions and investigated the conditions under which it occurs. We will present early results quantifying the internal quantum efficiency of the process.

  14. Ion implantation of solar cell junctions without mass analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D.; Tonn, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a summary of an investigation to determine the feasibility of producing solar cells by means of ion implantation without the use of mass analysis. Ion implants were performed using molecular and atomic phosphorus produced by the vaporization of solid red phosphorus and ionized in an electron bombardment source. Solar cell junctions were ion implanted by mass analysis of individual molecular species and by direct unanalyzed implants from the ion source. The implant dose ranged from 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 16th atoms/sq cm and the energy per implanted atom ranged from 5 KeV to 40 KeV in this study.

  15. Variational calculation of barriers for metal-vacuum-metal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, E.; Orosz, L.

    1990-11-01

    A (quasi-self-consistent) variational calculation of (static) barriers for metal-vacuum-metal (MVM) junctions is presented. A simple family of trial functions for the electron density at metal surfaces (in jellium model) as proposed by Schmickler and Henderson is applied for minimizing the energy functional incorporating the image potential proposed by Serena, Soler and Garcia. Tunnel barriers for a tungsten-vacuum-gold arrangement are calculated on the basis of this model. The results of the presented model calculation are compared to those of Binnig et al. The present variational method is more simple than correct self-consistent models, nevertheless reasonable results are obtained in this way.

  16. Anisotropic magnetotransport in Dirac-Weyl magnetic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ominato, Yuya; Kobayashi, Koji; Nomura, Kentaro

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically study the anisotropic magnetotransport in Dirac-Weyl magnetic junctions where a doped ferromagnetic Weyl semimetal is sandwiched between doped Dirac semimetals. We calculate the conductance using the Landauer formula and find that the system exhibits extraordinarily large anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The AMR depends on the ratio of the Fermi energy to the strength of the exchange interaction. The origin of the AMR is the shift of the Fermi surface in the Weyl semimetal, and the mechanism is completely different from the conventional AMR originating from the spin dependent scattering and the spin-orbit interaction.

  17. Drift-diffusion theory of symmetrical double-junction diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Pierre E.; Henisch, Heinz K.

    1982-11-01

    Using numerical methods, we have calculated the current-voltage characteristics, energy contours and carrier distributions of a symmetrical double junction diode ( n+nn+ and n+pn+). It is found that the I-V characteristics at low currents and voltages depend greatly on the doping concentration of the base region; at hihg currents, they do not. In that regime, the characteristics bunch together, and can be approximated with remarkable fidelity by the Mott-Gurney law for space-charge controlled conduction in solids. Characteristics are presented for different impurity densities and base widths.

  18. Electromagnetic Environment and Peltier effect in Normal-metal/Insulator/Superconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardas, Athanassios

    1997-03-01

    The influence of external environment on the transport of heat/energy through a tunnel junction connecting a normal-metal and a superconductor is theoretically analyzed. It is demonstrated that the presence of electromagnetic modes, at finite temperatures, limits the maximum amount of heat that can be extracted from the normal-metal via the electric current and thus reduces the efficiency of the thermoelectric electron refrigeration. Coulomb charging effects diminish the cooling power of the junction. This behaviour is more pronounced for charging energies Ec larger than the superconducting gap Δ and persists for a wide range of values of the external Ohmic impendance. Consequences of inelastic tunneling on the differential conductance of the NIS junction are also considered.

  19. Addressing the Grand Challenge of atmospheric carbon dioxide: geologic sequestration vs. biological recycling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    On February 15, 2008, the National Academy of Engineering unveiled their list of 14 Grand Challenges for Engineering. Building off of tremendous advancements in the past century, these challenges were selected for their role in assuring a sustainable existence for the rapidly increasing global community. It is no accident that the first five Challenges on the list involve the development of sustainable energy sources and management of environmental resources. While the focus of this review is to address the single Grand Challenge of "develop carbon sequestration methods", is will soon be clear that several other Challenges are intrinsically tied to it through the principles of sustainability. How does the realm of biological engineering play a role in addressing these Grand Challenges? PMID:22047501

  20. Grand unification in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2003-07-01

    We have recently proposed an alternative picture for the physics at the scale of gauge coupling unification, where the unified symmetry is realized in higher dimensions but is broken locally by a symmetry breaking defect. Gauge coupling unification, the quantum numbers of quarks and leptons and the longevity of the proton arise as phenomena of the symmetrical bulk, while the lightness of the Higgs doublets and the masses of the light quarks and leptons probe the symmetry breaking defect. Moreover, the framework is extremely predictive if the effective higher dimensional theory is valid over a large energy interval up to the scale of strong coupling. Precise agreement with experiments is obtained in the simplest theory— SU(5) in five dimensions with two Higgs multiplets propagating in the bulk. The weak mixing angle is predicted to be sin 2θw=0.2313±0.0004, which fits the data with extraordinary accuracy. The compactification scale and the strong coupling scale are determined to be M c≃5×10 14 GeV and M s≃1×10 17 GeV, respectively. Proton decay with a lifetime of order 10 34 years is expected with a variety of final states such as e+π0, and several aspects of flavor, including large neutrino mixing angles, are understood by the geometrical locations of the matter fields. When combined with a particular supersymmetry breaking mechanism, the theory predicts large lepton flavor violating μ→ e and τ→ μ transitions, with all superpartner masses determined by only two free parameters. The predicted value of the bottom quark mass from Yukawa unification agrees well with the data. This paper is mainly a review of the work presented in hep-ph/0103125, hep-ph/0111068, and hep-ph/0205067 [1-3].

  1. On the calculation of the absolute grand potential of confined smectic-A phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Baus, Marc; Ryckaert, Jean-Paul

    2015-09-01

    We determine the absolute grand potential Λ along a confined smectic-A branch of a calamitic liquid crystal system enclosed in a slit pore of transverse area A and width L, using the rod-rod Gay-Berne potential and a rod-wall potential favouring perpendicular orientation at the walls. For a confined phase with an integer number of smectic layers sandwiched between the opposite walls, we obtain the excess properties (excess grand potential Λexc, solvation force fs and adsorption Γ) with respect to the bulk phase at the same μ (chemical potential) and T (temperature) state point. While usual thermodynamic integration methods are used along the confined smectic branch to estimate the grand potential difference as μ is varied at fixed L, T, the absolute grand potential at one reference state point is obtained via the evaluation of the absolute Helmholtz free energy in the (N, L, A, T) canonical ensemble. It proceeds via a sequence of free energy difference estimations involving successively the cost of localising rods on layers and the switching on of a one-dimensional harmonic field to keep layers integrity coupled to the elimination of inter-layers and wall interactions. The absolute free energy of the resulting set of fully independent layers of interacting rods is finally estimated via the existing procedures. This work opens the way to the computer simulation study of phase transitions implying confined layered phases.

  2. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction from the left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, J.; el-Atassi, R.; Rosenheck, S.; Calkins, H.; Langberg, J.; Morady, F. )

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique for catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction using radiofrequency energy delivered in the left ventricle. Catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction using a catheter positioned across the tricuspid annulus was unsuccessful in eight patients with a mean {plus minus} SD age of 51 {plus minus} 19 years who had AV nodal reentry tachycardia (three patients), orthodromic tachycardia using a concealed midseptal accessory pathway, atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter (two patients), or atrial fibrillation. Before attempts at catheter ablation of the AV junction, each patient had been refractory to pharmacological therapy, and four had failed attempts at either catheter modification of the AV node using radiofrequency energy or surgical and catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. Conventional right-sided catheter ablation of the AV junction using radiofrequency energy in six patients and both radiofrequency energy and direct current shocks in two patients was ineffective. The mean amplitude of the His bundle potential recorded at the tricuspid annulus at the sites of unsuccessful AV junction ablation was 0.1 {plus minus} 0.08 mV, with a maximum His amplitude of 0.03-0.28 mV. A 7F deflectable-tip quadripolar electrode catheter with a 4-mm distal electrode was positioned against the upper left ventricular septum using a retrograde aortic approach from the femoral artery. Third-degree AV block was induced in each of the eight patients with 20-36 W applied for 15-30 seconds. The His bundle potential at the sites of successful AV junction ablation ranged from 0.06 to 0.99 mV, with a mean of 0.27 {plus minus} 0.32 mV. There was no rise in the creatine kinase-MB fraction and no complications occurred. An intrinsic escape rhythm of 30-60 beats/min was present in seven of the eight patients.

  3. 27 CFR 9.129 - Arroyo Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arroyo Grande Valley. 9... Arroyo Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arroyo Grande Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of Arroyo...

  4. 27 CFR 9.129 - Arroyo Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arroyo Grande Valley. 9... Arroyo Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arroyo Grande Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of Arroyo...

  5. 27 CFR 9.129 - Arroyo Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arroyo Grande Valley. 9... Arroyo Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arroyo Grande Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of Arroyo...

  6. 27 CFR 9.129 - Arroyo Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arroyo Grande Valley. 9... Arroyo Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arroyo Grande Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of Arroyo...

  7. 27 CFR 9.129 - Arroyo Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arroyo Grande Valley. 9... Arroyo Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arroyo Grande Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of Arroyo...

  8. Radiocarbon dates from the Casa Grande. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This report suggests a very early Civano construction date for Casa Grande, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Arizona on the basis of C14 dates from fragments of two primary roof beams. The radiocarbon dates presented are seen as a positive contribution to an understanding of the history of Casa Grande.

  9. 16. Photocopy of photograph (original contact print in Grand Rapids, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (original contact print in Grand Rapids, Michigan City Library, Michigan Room) 1904, photographer unknown. VIEW NORTHEAST, SOUTHSIDE, BRIDGE UNDER CONSTRUCTION. Note old railroad tressel bridge. - Bridge Street Bridge, Spanning Grand River, Michigan & Bridge Streets, Grand Rapids, MI

  10. 76 FR 43597 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lower Grand River, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lower Grand River, LA AGENCY: Coast... operation of the LA 77 bridge across the ] Lower Grand River, mile 47.0 (Alternate Route) at Grosse Tete..., telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The LA 77 bridge across the Lower Grand River, mile...

  11. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support.

  12. Fostering Scientific Literacy: Establishing Social Relevance via the Grand Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyford, M. E.; Myers, J. D.; Buss, A.

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies and polls suggest the general public’s understanding of science and scientific literacy remain woefully inadequate despite repeated calls for improvement over the last 150 years. This inability to improve scientific literacy significantly is a complex problem likely driven by a number of factors. However, we argue that past calls and efforts for improving scientific literacy have failed to: 1) articulate a truly meaningful justification for society to foster a scientifically literate public; 2) provide a rationale that motivates individuals of diverse backgrounds to become scientifically literate; 3) consider the impact of personal perspective, e.g. values, beliefs, attitudes, etc., on learning; and 4) offer a relevant and manageable framework in which to define scientific literacy. For instance, past calls for improving scientific literacy, e.g. the U.S. is behind the Soviets in the space race, U.S students rank below country X in math and science, etc., have lacked justification, personal motivation and a comprehensive framework for defining scientific literacy. In these cases, the primary justification for improving science education and scientific literacy was to regain international dominance in the space race or to advance global standing according to test results. These types of calls also articulate short-term goals that are rendered moot once they have been achieved. At the same time, teaching practices have commonly failed to consider the perspectives students bring to the classroom. Many STEM faculty do not address issues of personal perspective through ignorance or the desire to avoid controversial subjects, e g. evolution, climate change. We propose that the ‘grand challenges’ (e.g., energy, climate change, antibacterial resistance, water, etc.) humankind currently faces provides a compelling framework for developing courses and curricula well-suited for improving scientific literacy. A grand challenge paradigm offers four

  13. Microwave response and photon emission of a voltage baised Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebari, Salha; Grimm, Alexander; Hazra, Dibyendu; Hofheinz, Max

    The readout of superconducting qubits requires amplifiers combining noise close to the quantum limit, high gain, large bandwidth, and sufficient dynamic range. Josephson parametric amplifiers using Josephson junctions in the 0-voltage state, driven by a large microwave signals, begin to perform sufficiently well in all 4 of these aspects to be of practical use, but remain difficult to optimize and use. Recent experiments with superconducting circuits consisting of a DC voltage-biased Josephson junction in series with a resonator, showed that a tunneling Cooper pair can emit one or several photons with a total energy of 2e times the applied voltage. We present microwave reflection measurements on this device indicating that amplification is possible with a simple DC voltage-biased Josephson junction. We compare these measurements with the noise power emitted by the junction and show that, for low Josephson energy, transmission and noise emission can be explained within the framework of P(E) theory of inelastic Cooper pair tunneling. Combined with a theoretical model, our results indicate that voltage-biased Josephson junctions might be useful for amplification near the quantum limit, offering simpler design and a different trade-off between gain, bandwidth and dynamic range.

  14. Down to 2 nm Ultra Shallow Junctions : Fabrication by IBS Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation Prototype PULSION registered

    SciTech Connect

    Torregrosa, Frank; Etienne, Hasnaa; Mathieu, Gilles; Roux, Laurent

    2006-11-13

    Classical beam line implantation is limited in low energies and cannot achieve P+/N junctions requirements for <45nm node. Compared to conventional beam line ion implantation, limited to a minimum of about 200 eV, the efficiency of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is no more to prove for the realization of Ultra Shallow Junctions (USJ) in semiconductor applications: this technique allows to get ultimate shallow profiles (as implanted) thanks to no lower limitation of energy and offers high dose rate. In the field of the European consortium NANOCMOS, Ultra Shallow Junctions implanted on a semi-industrial PIII prototype (PULSION registered ) designed by the French company IBS, have been studied. Ultra shallow junctions implanted with BF3 at acceleration voltages down to 20V were realized. Contamination level, homogeneity and depth profile are studied. The SIMS profiles obtained show the capability to make ultra shallow profiles (as implanted) down to 2nm.

  15. Multi-junction-solar-cell designs and characterizations based on detailed-balance principle and luminescence yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hidefumi; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Kim, Changsu; Chen, Shaoqiang; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-03-01

    We developed a straightforward method based on detailed balance relations to analyze individual subcells in multi-junction solar cells via measuring absolute electroluminescence quantum yields. This method was applied to characterization of a InGaP/GaAs/Ge 3-junction solar cell for satellite use. In addition to subcell I-V characteristics and internal luminescence yields, we derived balance sheets of energy and carriers, which revealed respective subcell contributions of radiative and nonradiative recombination losses, junction loss, and luminescence coupling. These results provide important diagnosis and feedback to fabrications. We calculated conversion-efficiency limit and optimized bandgap energy in 2-, 3-, and 4-junction tandem solar cells, including finite values of sub-cell internal luminescence quantum yields to account for realistic material qualities in sub-cells. With reference to the measured internal luminescence quantum yields, the theoretical results provide realistic targets of efficiency limits and improved design principles of practical tandem solar cells.

  16. Quantum Phase Slips in Topological Josephson Junction Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Mota, Rosa; Vishveshwara, Smitha; Pereg-Barnea, Tami

    We study quantum phase slip processes (QPS) in a ring of N topological superconducting islands joined by Josephson junctions and threaded by magnetic flux. In this array, neighboring islands interact through the usual charge 2e Josephson tunneling and the Majorana assisted charge e tunneling. When the charging energy associated with the island's capacitance is zero, the energy vs. flux relation of the system is characterized by parabolas centered around even or odd multiples of the superconducting flux quantum, depending on the parity of the system. For small but non-zero charging energy, quantum fluctuations can lead to tunneling between these classical states. In this work, we calculate the amplitude of these tunneling processes, commonly known as quantum phase slips. We also add gate voltages to our system and study how the amplitude of QPS in these topological Josephson array is modified by Aharanov-Casher interference effects.

  17. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas; fish communities at selected sites, 1993-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Fish communities at 10 sites in the Rio Grande Basin were sampled during low-flow periods between 1993 and 1995 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The ecology of fish communities is one of several lines of evidence used to characterize water-quality conditions. This report describes the fish communities at selected sites in the Rio Grande Basin and relates the structure of these fish communities to the physical and chemical characteristics of the streams. Twenty-nine species of fish representing 10 families were identified in 25 samples collected during this study. Species richness ranged from 1 to 13. Cluster analysis of the 25 samples collected during this study delineated four groups of sites that were based on the similarity of the fish communities. The first two groups were individual sites with low species richness. The third group contained the most samples, and the fourth group consisted of samples from the Rio Grande at Isleta, New Mexico, and the Rio Grande at El Paso, Texas. The shift in community structure of samples from group 3 to group 4 reflects changes from predominantly coldwater fishes to warmwater fishes. Four metrics of biotic integrity (percentages of introduced individuals, omnivores, tolerant individuals, and anomalies) were used in this study to provide a broad overview of the community structure. The relative percentages of introduced species at the Rio Grande near Del Norte, Colorado; Saguache Creek near Saguache, Colorado; Rio Grande below Taos Junction Bridge, near Taos, New Mexico; and Rio Grande at Isleta are indicative of biological stress on the communities at these sites. The dominance of omnivores in samples from the Rio Grande below Taos Junction Bridge, near Taos; Rio Chama near Chamita, New Mexico; Rio Grande at Isleta; and Rio Grande at El Paso is an indication of environmental stress at these sites. In 1995, tolerant species accounted for the entire fish community at the Rio

  18. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  19. Elongated nanostructures for radial junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yinghuan; Di Vece, Marcel; Rath, Jatindra K.; van Dijk, Lourens; Schropp, Ruud E. I.

    2013-10-01

    In solar cell technology, the current trend is to thin down the active absorber layer. The main advantage of a thinner absorber is primarily the reduced consumption of material and energy during production. For thin film silicon (Si) technology, thinning down the absorber layer is of particular interest since both the device throughput of vacuum deposition systems and the stability of the devices are significantly enhanced. These features lead to lower cost per installed watt peak for solar cells, provided that the (stabilized) efficiency is the same as for thicker devices. However, merely thinning down inevitably leads to a reduced light absorption. Therefore, advanced light trapping schemes are crucial to increase the light path length. The use of elongated nanostructures is a promising method for advanced light trapping. The enhanced optical performance originates from orthogonalization of the light's travel path with respect to the direction of carrier collection due to the radial junction, an improved anti-reflection effect thanks to the three-dimensional geometric configuration and the multiple scattering between individual nanostructures. These advantages potentially allow for high efficiency at a significantly reduced quantity and even at a reduced material quality, of the semiconductor material. In this article, several types of elongated nanostructures with the high potential to improve the device performance are reviewed. First, we briefly introduce the conventional solar cells with emphasis on thin film technology, following the most commonly used fabrication techniques for creating nanostructures with a high aspect ratio. Subsequently, several representative applications of elongated nanostructures, such as Si nanowires in realistic photovoltaic (PV) devices, are reviewed. Finally, the scientific challenges and an outlook for nanostructured PV devices are presented.

  20. Elongated nanostructures for radial junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yinghuan; Vece, Marcel Di; Rath, Jatindra K; Dijk, Lourens van; Schropp, Ruud E I

    2013-10-01

    In solar cell technology, the current trend is to thin down the active absorber layer. The main advantage of a thinner absorber is primarily the reduced consumption of material and energy during production. For thin film silicon (Si) technology, thinning down the absorber layer is of particular interest since both the device throughput of vacuum deposition systems and the stability of the devices are significantly enhanced. These features lead to lower cost per installed watt peak for solar cells, provided that the (stabilized) efficiency is the same as for thicker devices. However, merely thinning down inevitably leads to a reduced light absorption. Therefore, advanced light trapping schemes are crucial to increase the light path length. The use of elongated nanostructures is a promising method for advanced light trapping. The enhanced optical performance originates from orthogonalization of the light's travel path with respect to the direction of carrier collection due to the radial junction, an improved anti-reflection effect thanks to the three-dimensional geometric configuration and the multiple scattering between individual nanostructures. These advantages potentially allow for high efficiency at a significantly reduced quantity and even at a reduced material quality, of the semiconductor material. In this article, several types of elongated nanostructures with the high potential to improve the device performance are reviewed. First, we briefly introduce the conventional solar cells with emphasis on thin film technology, following the most commonly used fabrication techniques for creating nanostructures with a high aspect ratio. Subsequently, several representative applications of elongated nanostructures, such as Si nanowires in realistic photovoltaic (PV) devices, are reviewed. Finally, the scientific challenges and an outlook for nanostructured PV devices are presented.

  1. 78 FR 11680 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ..., the former name of the Grand Rapids Public Museum). The object is a stone human effigy vessel that was... lot of unassociated funerary objects was bequeathed to the Grand Rapids Public Museum by Dr. Ruth Herrick. The lot of unassociated funerary objects is identified in the Grand Rapids Public...

  2. Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Jesse; & Tidwell, Vincent

    2010-08-05

    URGSIM estimates the location of surface water and groundwater resources in the upper Rio Grande Basin between the Colorado-New Mexico state line, and Caballo Reservoir from 1975 - 2045. It is a mass balance hydrology model of the Upper Rio Grande surface water, groundwater, and water demand systems which runs at a monthly timestep from 1975-1999 in calibration mode, 2000 – 2004 in validation mode, and 2005 – 2045 in scenario analysis mode.

  3. 77 FR 59395 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Revised Restricted Service List for a Programmatic Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 188 (Thursday, September 27, 2012)] [Notices] [Pages 59395-59396] [FR Doc No: 2012-23804] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2524-018--Oklahoma Salina Pumped Storage Project] Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of...

  4. SeaWiFS: Grand Banks Brightening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    There is a hole in the cloud cover today over the Grand Banks of Newfoundland through which SeaWiFS was able to catch this view of a very large patch of bright aquamarine water. Either a large storm has passed over the Banks stirring up the bottom sediments, or some large bloom of phytoplankton is under way. Part of the Island of Newfoundland, including the snow-covered Avalon Peninsula, can also be seen in the northwest corner of the image.

  5. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanebrook, J. Richard

    This document describes a course designed to acquaint students with the many societal and technological problems facing the United States and the world due to the increasing demand for energy. The course begins with a writing assignment that involves readings on the environmental philosophy of Native Americans and the Chernobyl catastrophe.…

  6. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  7. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  8. Introduction-Grand Challenges and small steps.

    PubMed

    De Grandis, Giovanni; Efstathiou, Sophia

    2016-04-01

    This collection addresses two different audiences: 1) historians and philosophers of the life sciences reflecting on collaborations across disciplines, especially as regards defining and addressing Grand Challenges; 2) researchers and other stakeholders involved in cross-disciplinary collaborations aimed at tackling Grand Challenges in the life and medical sciences. The essays collected here offer ideas and resources both for the study and for the practice of goal-driven cross-disciplinary research in the life and medical sciences. We organise this introduction in three sections. The first section provides some background and context. The second motivates our take on this topic and then outlines the central ideas of each paper. The third section highlights the specificity and significance of this approach by considering: a) how this collection departs from existing literature on inter- and trans-disciplinarity, b) what is characteristic about this approach, and c) what role this suggests for the history and philosophy of the life sciences in addressing Grand Challenges.

  9. Raptor Use of the Rio Grande Gorge

    SciTech Connect

    Ponton, David A.

    2015-03-20

    The Rio Grande Gorge is a 115 km long river canyon located in Southern Colorado (15 km) and Northern New Mexico (100 km). The majority of the canyon is under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management {BLM), and 77 km of the canyon south of the Colorado/New Mexico border are designated Wild River under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Visits I have made to the Rio Grande Gorge over the past 15 .years disclosed some raptor utilization. As the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area gained publicity, its similarity to the Rio Grande Gorge became obvious, and I was intrigued by the possibility of a high raptor nesting density in the Gorge. A survey in 1979 of 20 km of the northern end of the canyon revealed a moderately high density of red-tailed hawks and prairie falcons. With the encouragement of that partial survey, and a need to assess the impact of river-running on nesting birds of prey, I made a more comprehensive survey in 1980. The results of my surveys, along with those of a 1978 helicopter survey by the BLM, are presented in this report, as well as general characterization of the area, winter use by raptors, and an assessment of factors influencing the raptor population.

  10. YBCO step-edge junctions with high IcRn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Foley, C. P.

    2010-06-01

    Step-edge junctions represent one type of grain boundary Josephson junction employed in high-temperature superconducting junction technology. To date, the majority of results published in the literature focus on [001]-tilt grain boundary junctions (GBJs) produced using bicrystal substrates. We investigate the step morphology and YBCO (yttrium barium copper oxide) film structure of YBCO-based step-edge junctions on MgO [001] substrates which structurally resemble [100]-tilt junctions. High-resolution electron microscopy reveals a clean GBJ interface of width ~ 1 nm and a single junction at the top edge. The dependence of the transport properties on the MgO step-edge and junction morphology is examined at 4.2 K, to enable direct comparison with results for other junction studies such as [001]-tilt and [100]-tilt junctions and building on previously published 77 K data. MgO step-edge junctions show a slower reduction in critical current density with step angle compared with [001]-tilt junctions. For optimized step parameters, transport measurements revealed large critical current and normal resistance (IcRN) products (~3-5 mV), comparable with the best results obtained in other kinds of [100]-tilt GBJs in YBCO at 4.2 K. Junction-based devices such as SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) and THz imagers show excellent performance when MgO-based step-edge junctions are used.

  11. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  12. Dislocation multi-junctions and strain hardening.

    PubMed

    Bulatov, Vasily V; Hsiung, Luke L; Tang, Meijie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; Bartelt, Maria C; Cai, Wei; Florando, Jeff N; Hiratani, Masato; Rhee, Moon; Hommes, Gregg; Pierce, Tim G; de la Rubia, Tomas Diaz

    2006-04-27

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects called dislocations. First proposed theoretically in 1934 (refs 1-3) to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening, a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions that tie the dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed 'multi-junctions'. We first predict the existence of multi-junctions using dislocation dynamics and atomistic simulations and then confirm their existence by transmission electron microscopy experiments in single-crystal molybdenum. In large-scale dislocation dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication, thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in body-centred cubic crystals.

  13. Conductance spectra of asymmetric ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanai, K.

    2017-01-01

    A theory of tunneling spectroscopy of ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions was studied. We applied a delta-functional approximation for the interface scattering properties under a one-dimensional system of a free electron approach. The reflection and transmission probabilities were calculated in the ballistic regime, and the conductance spectra were then calculated using the Landauer formulation. The magnetization directions were set to be either parallel (P) or anti-parallel (AP) alignments, for comparison. We found that the conductance spectra was suppressed when increasing the interfacial scattering at the interfaces. Moreover, the electron could exhibit direct transmission when the thickness was rather thin. Thus, there was no oscillation in this case. However, in the case of a thick layer the conductance spectra oscillated, and this oscillation was most prominent when the middle layer thickness increased. In the case of direct transmission, the conductance spectra of P and AP systems were definitely suppressed with increased exchange energy of the middle ferromagnet. This also refers to an increase in the magnetoresistance of the junction. In the case of oscillatory behavior, the positions of the resonance peaks were changed as the exchange energy was changed.

  14. Exploring the {alpha}p-process with Grand Raiden

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, S.; Berg, G. P. A.; Couder, M.; Goerres, J.; Patel, D.; Sault, K.; Wiescher, M.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Zenihiro, J.; Dozono, M.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.

    2009-01-28

    {sup 22}Mg, {sup 30}S, {sup 34}Ar and {sup 38}Ca have been investigated using (p,t) reactions at RCNP with the intent of identifying energy levels in nuclei that determine the reaction rates along the pathway of the {alpha}p-process. These experiments exploit the high resolution and 0 deg. capabilities of the Grand Raiden spectrometer and the WS beamline, which can deliver a fully dispersion matched beam to target. The level information is vital to understanding the nucleosynthesis occurring during explosive hydrogen burning, which, for example, is thought to occur during type I X-ray bursts. In the case of {sup 22}Mg, new reaction rate calculations have been performed for the {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na reaction. The experimental technique will be discussed, and the experimental results will be presented.

  15. WEB based online event displays for KASCADE-grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieler, H.; Weindl, A.

    2008-07-01

    For three detector components of the KASCADE-Grande experiment, WEB based online event displays have been implemented. They provide, in a fast and simplified way, actual information about energy deposits and arrival times of measured events, and the overall detector status. Besides the aspect of being able to show air shower events to interested people wherever there is an internet access available, these event displays are an easy and highly useful tool for controlling and maintaining tasks from remote places. The event displays are designed as client-server applications, with the server running as independent part of the local data acquisition. Simplified event data are distributed via socket connections directly to the java applets acting as clients. These clients can run in any common browser on any computer anywhere on the planet.

  16. Formulation of Liouville's theorem for grand ensemble molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Site, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Liouville's theorem in a grand ensemble, that is for situations where a system is in equilibrium with a reservoir of energy and particles, is a subject that, to our knowledge, has not been explicitly treated in literature related to molecular simulation. Instead, Liouville's theorem, a central concept for the correct employment of molecular simulation techniques, is implicitly considered only within the framework of systems where the total number of particles is fixed. However, the pressing demand of applied science in treating open systems leads to the question of the existence and possible exact formulation of Liouville's theorem when the number of particles changes during the dynamical evolution of the system. The intention of this paper is to stimulate a debate about this crucial issue for molecular simulation.

  17. Grand canonical electronic density-functional theory: Algorithms and applications to electrochemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, III, William A.; Arias, Tomas A.

    2017-03-16

    First-principles calculations combining density-functional theory and continuum solvation models enable realistic theoretical modeling and design of electrochemical systems. When a reaction proceeds in such systems, the number of electrons in the portion of the system treated quantum mechanically changes continuously, with a balancing charge appearing in the continuum electrolyte. A grand-canonical ensemble of electrons at a chemical potential set by the electrode potential is therefore the ideal description of such systems that directly mimics the experimental condition. We present two distinct algorithms: a self-consistent field method and a direct variational free energy minimization method using auxiliary Hamiltonians (GC-AuxH), to solvemore » the Kohn-Sham equations of electronic density-functional theory directly in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed potential. Both methods substantially improve performance compared to a sequence of conventional fixed-number calculations targeting the desired potential, with the GC-AuxH method additionally exhibiting reliable and smooth exponential convergence of the grand free energy. Lastly, we apply grand-canonical density-functional theory to the under-potential deposition of copper on platinum from chloride-containing electrolytes and show that chloride desorption, not partial copper monolayer formation, is responsible for the second voltammetric peak.« less

  18. Grand canonical electronic density-functional theory: Algorithms and applications to electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A.; Arias, Tomas A.

    2017-03-01

    First-principles calculations combining density-functional theory and continuum solvation models enable realistic theoretical modeling and design of electrochemical systems. When a reaction proceeds in such systems, the number of electrons in the portion of the system treated quantum mechanically changes continuously, with a balancing charge appearing in the continuum electrolyte. A grand-canonical ensemble of electrons at a chemical potential set by the electrode potential is therefore the ideal description of such systems that directly mimics the experimental condition. We present two distinct algorithms: a self-consistent field method and a direct variational free energy minimization method using auxiliary Hamiltonians (GC-AuxH), to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of electronic density-functional theory directly in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed potential. Both methods substantially improve performance compared to a sequence of conventional fixed-number calculations targeting the desired potential, with the GC-AuxH method additionally exhibiting reliable and smooth exponential convergence of the grand free energy. Finally, we apply grand-canonical density-functional theory to the under-potential deposition of copper on platinum from chloride-containing electrolytes and show that chloride desorption, not partial copper monolayer formation, is responsible for the second voltammetric peak.

  19. NREL, CSEM Jointly Set New Efficiency Record with Dual-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Scientists set a new world record for converting non-concentrated sunlight into electricity using a dual-junction III-V/Si solar cell. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) scientists have collaborated to create a novel tandem solar cell that operates at 29.8% conversion efficiency under non-concentrator (1-sun) conditions. In comparison, the 1-sun efficiency of a silicon (Si) single-junction solar cell is probably still a few years away from converging on its practical limit of about 26%.

  20. Steiner minimal trees—the final destinations for lipid nanotube networks with three-way junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, YaJun; Wu, JiYe; Yin, Jie; Fan, QinShan

    2011-04-01

    Through the combination of the minimum energy principle in physics and the Steiner minimal tree (SMT) theory in geometry, this paper proves a universal law for lipid nanotube networks (LNNs): at stable equilibrium state, the network of three-way lipid nanotube junctions is equivalent to a SMT. Besides, an arbitrary (usually non-equilibrium) network of lipid nanotube junctions may fission into a SMT through diffusions and dynamic self-organizations of lipid molecules. Potential applications of the law to the micromanipulations of LNNs are presented.

  1. Monitoring the junction temperature of an IGBT through direct measurement using a fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzo, João P.; Lukasievicz, Tiago; Vogt, Marcio; de Oliveira, Valmir; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.; Cardozo da Silva, Jean Carlos

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes a new technique to monitor the junction temperature of an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) through direct measurement using an optical fiber sensor mounted on the chip structure. Some features of the sensor such as electromagnetic immunity, small size and fast response time allow the identification of temperature changes generated by the energy loss during device operation. In addition to the online monitoring of the junction temperature, results show the thermal characteristics of the IGBT, which can be used to develop an accurate model to simulate the heat generated during the device conduction and switching processes.

  2. Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

    2014-11-25

    Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

  3. Investigation of acceptor states in ZnO by junction DLTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Wenckstern, H.; Pickenhain, R.; Schmidt, H.; Brandt, M.; Biehne, G.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Brauer, G.

    2007-07-01

    We have realized a p-type ZnO surface layer by N + ion implantation of a high quality ZnO wafer and subsequent annealing. The conduction type of this surface layer was revealed by scanning capacitance microscopy. Rectifying current-voltage characteristics for processed devices were coherent with the existence of an internal pn junction. Deep donor- and acceptor-like defects were investigated by junction deep level transient spectroscopy. The donor-like levels correspond to those commonly observed for E1 and E3 defects. The acceptor states resolved have thermal activation energies of about 150 meV and 280 meV, respectively.

  4. Salinity in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley, western Colorado, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, David L.; von Guerard, Paul B.

    1996-01-01

    Salinity, or the dissolved-solids concentration, is the measure of salts such as sodium chloride, calcium bicarbonate, and calcium sulfate that are dissolved in water. About one-half of the salinity in the Colorado River Basin is from natural sources (U.S. Department of the Interior, 1995), such as thermal springs in the Glenwood-Dotsero area, located about 90 miles upstream from Grand Junction (fig. 1). Effects of human activities, such as irrigation, reservoir evaporation, and transbasin diversions, have increased the levels of salinity in the Colorado River. High salinity can affect industrial and municipal water users by causing increased water-treatment costs, increased deterioration of plumbing and appliances, increased soap needs, and undesirable taste of drinking water. High salinity also can cause lower crop yields by reducing water and nutrient uptake by plants and can increase agricultural production costs because of higher leaching and drainage requirements. Agricultural losses might occur when salinity reaches about 700?850 milligrams per liter (U.S Department of the Interior, 1994). Figure 1. Irrigated area in the Grand Valley and locations of sampling sites for the 1994?95 salinity study of the Colorado River. The Colorado River is the major source of irrigation water to the Grand Valley (fig. 1) and also is one source of water for the Clifton Water District, which supplies domestic water to part of the eastern Grand Valley. During spring and early summer in 1994, the Colorado River in the Grand Valley had lower than average streamflow. There was concern by water users about the effect of this low streamflow on salinity in the river. In 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado River Water Conservation District, began a study to evaluate salinity in the Colorado River. This fact sheet describes results of that study. The specific objectives of the fact sheet are to (1) compare salinity in the Colorado River among

  5. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  6. Conductance decay of a surface hydrogen tunneling junction fabricated along a Si(001)- (2×1) -H atomic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hiroyo; Yeo, Yong Kiat; Saeys, Mark; Joachim, Christian

    2010-05-01

    On a Si(001)- (2×1) -H substrate, electrons tunneling through hydrogen atomic junctions fabricated between two surface dangling-bond (DB) wires are theoretically investigated using the elastic-scattering quantum-chemistry method. The surface states introduced in the Si band gap by removing H atoms from a Si(001)- (2×1) -H surface were calculated and also analyzed using a simple tight-binding model. The two-channel surface conductance of a DB wire results from a combination of through-space and through-lattice electronic couplings between DB states. The conductance of the DB wire-H-junction-DB wire structure decreases exponentially with the length of H junction with an inverse decay rate ranging from 0.20 to 0.23Å-1 , depending on the energy. When the DB wire-H-junction-DB wire structure is contacted by Au nanoelectrodes, the transmission resonances corresponding to the DB wire states split, demonstrating a coupling of the DB wires through short surface hydrogen atomic junctions. This splitting decreases with the length of H junction between the DB wires with an inverse decay length ranging from 0.22 to 0.44Å-1 , indicating that such an atomic scale surface tunneling junction is not a very good insulator.

  7. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  8. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B

    2006-10-25

    Triple junctions are often initiation points for insulator flashover in pulsed power devices. The two-dimensional finite-element TriComp [1] modeling software suite was utilized for its electrostatic field modeling package to investigate electric field behavior in the anode and cathode triple junctions of a high voltage vacuum-insulator interface. TriComp enables simple extraction of values from a macroscopic solution for use as boundary conditions in a subset solution. Electric fields computed with this zoom capability correlate with theoretical analysis of the anode and cathode triple junctions within submicron distances for nominal electrode spacing of 1.0 cm. This paper will discuss the iterative zoom process with TriComp finite-element software and the corresponding theoretical verification of the results.

  9. Photocurrent Measurements of Carbon Nanotube PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Nathaniel; Zhong, Zhaohui; Bosnick, Ken; Park, Jiwoong; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Gated p-n junctions in semiconducting nanotubes have recently drawn much attention for their electronic and optoelectronic characteristics [1,2,3]. We investigate the photocurrent response at a nanotube gated p-n junction using a focused laser illumination source. We find that the photocurrent at zero source-drain bias increases linearly with optical power for the component of light along the length of the nanotube. Scanned photocurrent imaging demonstrates that carrier generation occurs primarily between the p- and n- type segments of the device. Measurements in an optical cryostat down to 4K reveal large photoresponse and step-like structure in the reverse bias photocurrent. These results show that nanotube p-n junctions are highly sensitive, nanoscale photodetectors. [1] J.U. Lee et al, App. Phys. Lett. 85, 145 (2004). [2] J.U. Lee, App. Phys. Lett. 87, 073101 (2005). [3] K. Bosnick et al, App. Phys. Lett. 89, 163121 (2006).

  10. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  11. Numerical Investigation of Josephson Junction Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, I.; Dimova, S.; Boyadjiev, T.

    2009-10-29

    Multilayered long Josephson Junction Structures form an interesting physical system where both nonlinearity and interaction between subsystems play an important role. Such systems allow to study physical effects that do not occur in single Josephson junction.The Sakai-Bodin-Pedersen model--a system of perturbed sine-Gordon equations--is used to study the dynamic states of stacks of inductively coupled long Josephson Junctions (LJJs). The corresponding static problem is numerically investigated as well. In order to study the stability of possible static solutions a Sturm-Liouville problem is generated and solved.The transitions from static to dynamic state and the scenario of these transitions are analyzed depending on the model parameters. Different physical characteristics--current-voltage characteristics, individual instant voltages and internal magnetic fields, are calculated and interpreted.

  12. Brownian refrigeration by hybrid tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltonen, J. T.; Helle, M.; Timofeev, A. V.; Solinas, P.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Pekola, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    Voltage fluctuations generated in a hot resistor can cause extraction of heat from a colder normal metal electrode of a hybrid tunnel junction between a normal metal and a superconductor. We extend the analysis presented in Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.210604 98, 210604 (2007) of this heat rectifying system, bearing resemblance to a Maxwell’s demon. Explicit analytic calculations show that the entropy of the total system is always increasing. We then consider a single-electron transistor configuration with two hybrid junctions in series, and show how the cooling is influenced by charging effects. We analyze also the cooling effect from nonequilibrium fluctuations instead of thermal noise, focusing on the shot noise generated in another tunnel junction. We conclude by discussing limitations for an experimental observation of the effect.

  13. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 2, Site specific---California through Idaho. [Waste mixtures of hazardous materials and low-level radioactive wastes or transuranic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provide site-specific information on DOE's mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes for the following sites: eight California facilities which are Energy Technology engineering Center, General Atomics, General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, and Sandia national Laboratories; Grand Junction Project Office; Rocky Flats Plant; Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory-Windsor Site; Pinellas Plant; Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard; Argonne National Laboratory-West; and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

  14. Non-invasive microfluidic gap junction assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sisi; Lee, Luke P

    2010-03-01

    Gap junctions are protein channels between cells that allow direct electrical and metabolic coupling via the exchange of biomolecules and ions. Their expression, though ubiquitous in most mammalian cell types, is especially important for the proper functioning of cardiac and neuronal systems. Many existing methods for studying gap junction communication suffer from either unquantifiable data or difficulty of use. Here, we measure the extent of dye spread and effective diffusivities through gap junction connected cells using a quantitative microfluidic cell biology platform. After loading dye by hydrodynamic focusing of calcein/AM, dye transfer dynamics into neighboring, unexposed cells can be monitored via timelapse fluorescent microscopy. By using a selective microfluidic dye loading over a confluent layer of cells, we found that high expression of gap junctions in C6 cells transmits calcein across the monolayer with an effective diffusivity of 3.4 x 10(-13) m(2)/s, which are highly coupled by Cx43. We also found that the gap junction blocker 18alpha-GA works poorly in the presence of serum even at high concentrations (50 microM); however, it is highly effective down to 2.5 microM in the absence of serum. Furthermore, when the drug is washed out, dye spread resumes rapidly within 1 min for all doses, indicating the drug does not affect transcriptional regulation of connexins in these Cx43+ cells, in contrast to previous studies. This integrated microfluidic platform enables the in situ monitoring of gap junction communication, yielding dynamic information about intercellular molecular transfer and pharmacological inhibition and recovery.

  15. Using Grand Challenges to Teach Science: A Biology-Geology Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyford, M.; Myers, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Three science courses at the University of Wyoming explore the inextricable connections between science and society by centering on grand challenges. Two of these courses are introductory integrated science courses for non-majors while the third is an upper level course for majors and non-majors. Through collaboration, the authors have developed these courses to explore the grand challenges of energy, water and climate. Each course focuses on the fundamental STEM principles required for a citizen to understand each grand challenge. However, the courses also emphasize the non-STEM perspectives (e.g., economics, politics, human well-being, externalities) that underlie each grand challenge and argue that creating equitable, sustainable and just solutions to the grand challenges hinges on an understanding of STEM and non-STEM perspectives. Moreover, the authors also consider the multitude of personal perspectives individuals bring to the classroom (e.g., values, beliefs, empathy misconceptions) that influence any stakeholder's ability to engage in fruitful discussions about grand challenge solutions. Discovering Science (LIFE 1002) focuses on the grand challenges of energy and climate. Students attend three one-hour lectures, one two-hour lab and a one-hour discussion each week. Lectures emphasize the STEM and non-STEM principles underlying each grand challenge. Laboratory activities are designed to be interdisciplinary and engage students in inquiry-driven activities to reinforce concepts from lecture and to model how science is conducted. Labs also expose students to the difficulties often associated with scientific studies, the limits of science, and the inherent uncertainties associated with scientific findings. Discussion sessions provide an opportunity for students to explore the complexity of the grand challenges from STEM and non-STEM perspectives, and expose the multitude of personal perspectives an individual might harbor related to each grand challenge

  16. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  17. Greening of the Grand Canyon -- developing a sustainable design for the Grand Canyon National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.T.

    1995-11-01

    The Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) is faced with increasing visitor demand that is threatening the natural and cultural resources of one of the most popular recreation sites in the United States. The National Park Service (NPS) developed a draft General Management Plan (GMP), which provides management objectives and visions for the entire park, with alternative plans for the park`s developed areas. With the GMP as a starting point, a Grand Canyon Sustainable Design Workshop was conducted to make the Grand Canyon National Park more environmentally and economically sustainable. The workshop, which used the Environmental Design Charrette process, addressed integrated environmental solutions and their implementation in three primary areas: Integrated Information, Visitor Experience, and Resource Efficiency. This paper describes the Environmental Design Charrette process and the efforts of the Resource Efficiency group.

  18. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  19. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  20. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}