Science.gov

Sample records for energy high brightness

  1. High Brightness Beam Applications: Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey A. Krafft

    2005-09-01

    In the first part of the paper some general statements are made regarding applications suitable for utilizing energy recovered linacs (ERLs) by contrasting their potential performance to that of single pass linacs and storage rings. As a result of their potential for extremely good beam quality in combination with high average beam current, ERLs have been used and considered as drivers of both free electron laser and partially coherent photon sources, from THz through X-rays; as a suitable technology for high energy electron cooling; and as a continuous or semi-continuous electron beam source for high energy colliders. At present, beam requirements tend to be highly matched to end use requirements. By reviewing some of the many examples which have either been reduced to practice, or are being explored presently, one can develop an appreciation for the wide range of parameters being considered in ERL applications.

  2. Generating Polarized High-Brightness Muon Beams With High-Energy Gammas

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2009-01-22

    Hadron colliders are impractical at very high energies as effective interaction energy is a fraction of the energies of the beams and luminosity must rise as energy squared. Further, the prevailing gluon-gluon background radiation makes it difficult to sort out events. e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, on other hand, are constrained at TeV energies by beamstrahlung radiation and also by cost as long linacs are required to avoid synchrotron radiation in the rings. A muon collider will have the same advantages in energy reach as an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, but without prohibitive beamstrahlung- and synchrotron- radiation. Generation of the high-brightness polarized muon ({mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}) beams through gamma conversion into pairs in the nuclei field is considered in this paper. The dominant effect in the interaction of the high-energy photons with the solid target will be the production of electron-positron pairs. The low-phase space of the resulting muon beams adequately compensates for the small probability of generating a {mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +} pair.

  3. High brightness electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    High energy physics accelerators and free electron lasers put increased demands on the electron beam sources. This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams using photoinjectors. Recent results from the experimental programs will be given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers will be discussed, and the following topics will be covered. Progress has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency. Cesium telluride has demonstrated significantly longer lifetimes than cesium antimonide at 10{sup {minus}8} torr. However, the laser system is more difficult because cesium telluride requires quadrupled YLF instead of the doubled YLF required for cesium antimonide. The difficulty in using photoinjectors is primarily the drive laser, in particular the amplitude stability. Finally, emittance measurements of photoinjector systems can be complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam. An example of the difficulty in measuring beam emittance is given.

  4. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S; Crane, J; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Jacob, J S; Frigola, P; Lim, J; Rosenzweig, J; Travish, G

    2005-05-19

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10{sup 7} photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 {micro}m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verified the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials.

  5. High Brightness Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Caporaso, G.J.; Boyd, J.K.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-08-07

    The High Brightness Test Stand is a 2 MeV, less than or equal to 10 kA electron accelerator module. This accelerator module, designed as an upgrade prototype for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), combines solid state nonlinear magnetic drives with state-of-the-art induction linac technology. The facility serves a dual role, as it not only provides a test bed for this new technology, but is used to develop high brightness electron optics. We will both further describe the accelerator, as well as present some of the preliminary electron optics measurements.

  6. A high brightness photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, Gregory Peter

    Linear colliders, future electron acceleration schemes, and short pulse, ultrawideband millimeter-wave sources require very bright electron beams. Conventional electron injectors including thermionic cathodes and RF bunchers or DC guns have intrinsic limitations which preclude their usage for many of these applications. RF photoinjectors have shown their ability to produce relativistic electron beams with low emittance and energy spread. However, previously developed RF photoinjectors are also subject to significant limitations. These include extreme sensitivity to timing between the RF in the accelerator structure and the drive laser, low efficiency with respect to the number and charge of the electron bunches produced by the injector, and high cost associated with both the RF drive and laser systems. The presently described system has addressed these issues by combining state-of-the-art capabilities in the laser and RF systems, photocathode materials, and new concepts for synchronization. Phase jitter generated by sources including Klystron modulator voltage fluctuation has been measured in detail, and schemes for alleviating this problem have undergone initial proof-of-principle testing. New concepts for the drive laser system have been tested which will lead to further improvements in performance, simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and compactness. The analytical and experimental work associated with the development of a high brightness, high gradient electron accelerator is presented. The presentation emphasizes the systematic progress toward the original design goals of the project, as well as the state-of-the-art innovations characterizing the system. The linear electron accelerator system is based on a 1 1/2 cell side-wall coupled, π-mode standing wave accelerator structure, driven by a 20 MW SLAC Klystron operating at 8.548 GHz, a Ti:Sapphire laser oscillator, and an 8-pass, chirped pulse Ti:Sapphire laser amplifier. Simulations show an rms transverse

  7. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  8. Kiloamp high-brightness beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brightness preservation of high-current relativistic electron beams under two different types of transport is discussed. Recent progress in improving the brightness of laser-guided beams in the Advanced Test Accelerator is reviewed. A strategy for the preservation of the brightness of space-charge-dominated beams in a solenoidal transport system is presented.

  9. A Bright Source of High-Energy X-rays: Final Report on LDRD Project 04-FS-007

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J D; Felter, T E; Searson, P C; Chen, M

    2005-02-03

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating pure-metal foams via a novel four-step technique based upon ion beam lithography. In this report we discuss why and how such foams are useful as bright, high-photon-energy x-ray sources; the details of the fabrication technique we employed to make such foams; the results obtained; and what we plan to do in the future to improve the technique and turn the foams so fabricated into real laser targets for high-brightness, high-energy back lighting.

  10. Energy transport in plasmas produced by a high brightness krypton fluoride laser focused to a line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hadithi, Y.; Tallents, G. J.; Zhang, J.; Key, M. H.; Norreys, P. A.; Kodama, R.

    1994-05-01

    A high brightness krypton fluoride Raman laser (wavelength 0.268 μm) generating 0.3 TW, 12 ps pulses with 20 μrad beam divergence and a prepulse of less than 10-10 has been focused to produce a 10 μm wide line focus (irradiances ˜0.8-4×1015 W cm-2) on plastic targets with a diagnostic sodium fluoride (NaF) layer buried within the target. Axial and lateral transport of energy has been measured by analysis of x-ray images of the line focus and from x-ray spectra emitted by the layer of NaF with varying overlay thicknesses. It is shown that the ratio of the distance between the critical density surface and the ablation surface to the laser focal width controls lateral transport in a similar manner as for previous spot focus experiments. The measured axial energy transport is compared to medusa [J. P. Christiansen, D. E. T. F. Ashby, and K. V. Roberts, Comput. Phys. Commun. 7, 271 (1974)] one-dimensional hydrodynamic code simulations with an average atom post-processor for predicting spectral line intensities. An energy absorption of ˜10% in the code gives agreement with the experimental axial penetration. Various measured line ratios of hydrogen- and helium-like Na and F are investigated as temperature diagnostics in the NaF layer using the ration [R. W. Lee, B. L. Whitten, and R. E. Strout, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 32, 91 (1984)] code.

  11. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  12. High brightness picosecond electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Merano, M.; Collin, S.; Renucci, P.; Gatri, M.; Sonderegger, S.; Crottini, A.; Ganiere, J.D.; Deveaud, B.

    2005-08-15

    We have developed a high brightness picosecond electron gun. We have used it to replace the thermionic electron gun of a commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to perform time-resolved cathodoluminescence experiments. Picosecond electron pulses are produced, at a repetition rate of 80.7 MHz, by femtosecond mode-locked laser pulses focused on a metal photocathode. This system has a normalized axial brightness of 93 A/cm{sup 2} sr kV, allowing for a spatial resolution of 50 nm in the secondary electron imaging mode of the SEM. The temporal width of the electron pulse is 12 ps.

  13. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, <0.08 numerical aperture (NA) output fiber at a single center wavelength was demonstrated. Our TeraBlade industrial platform achieves world-record brightness levels for direct diode lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  14. High-brightness electron injectors: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The last decade has seen increased emphasis on the development of high-brightness electron beams because of rigorous requirements of the new generation of colliders and the advent of free-electron lasers. This talk describes the approaches now being explored for attaining intense, bright electron beams. The methods for producing bright electron beams include photocathode-based, short-pulse injectors; dc electrostatic accelerator sources; long-pulse beams, which are then compressed in time using subharmonic bunching; combining first and third harmonics in an accelerator to attain the equivalent of high-gradient dc fields; and LaB/sub 6/ rf guns. For several of the approaches, the temporal length of the electron pulse is decreased after acceleration to relativistic energies by impressing an energy spread on the electron bunch and using a nonisochronous beam-transport system to increase the peak current. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Generating High-Brightness Light Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.; Cuneno, M.E.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Filuk, A.B.; Hanson, D.L.; Johnson, D.J.; Mehlohorn, T.A.; Menge, P.R.; Olson, C.L.; Pointon, T.D. Slutz, S.A.; Vesey, R.A.; Welch, D.R.; Wenger, D.F.

    1998-10-22

    Light ion beams may be the best option for an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) driver from the standpoint of ei%ciency, standoff, rep-rate operation and cost. This approach uses high-energy-density pulsed power to efficiently accelerate ions in one or two stages at fields of 0.5 to 1.0 GV/m to produce a medium energy (30 MeV), high-current (1 MA) beam of light ions, such as lithium. Ion beams provide the ability for medium distance transport (4 m) of the ions to the target, and standofl of the driver from high- yield implosions. Rep-rate operation of' high current ion sources has ako been demonstrated for industrial applications and couId be applied to IFE. Although (hese factors make light ions the best Iong-teml pulsed- power approach to IFE, light-ion research is being suspended this year in favor of a Z-pinch-driven approach which has the best opport lnity to most-rapidly achieve the U.S. Department of Energy sponsor's goal of high-yield fusion. This paper will summarize the status and most recent results of the light-ion beam program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and document the prospects of light ions for future IFE driver development.

  16. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  17. Photoluminescence, energy transfer and tunable color of Ce(3+), Tb(3+) and Eu(2+) activated oxynitride phosphors with high brightness.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei; Huo, Jiansheng; Feng, Yang; Zhao, Shuang; You, Hongpeng

    2016-06-21

    New tuneable light-emitting Ca3Al8Si4O17N4:Ce(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(2+) oxynitride phosphors with high brightness have been prepared. When doped with trivalent cerium or divalent europium they present blue luminescence under UV excitation. The energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) and Ce(3+) to Eu(2+) ions is deduced from the spectral overlap between Ce(3+) emission and Tb(3+)/Eu(2+) excitation spectra. The energy-transfer efficiencies and corresponding mechanisms are discussed in detail, and the mechanisms of energy transfer from the Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) and Ce(3+) to Eu(2+) ions are demonstrated to be a dipole-quadrupole and dipole-dipole mechanism, respectively, by the Inokuti-Hirayama model. The International Commission on Illumination value of color tuneable emission as well as luminescence quantum yield (23.8-80.6%) can be tuned by controlling the content of Ce(3+), Tb(3+) and Eu(2+). All results suggest that they are suitable for UV light-emitting diode excitation. PMID:27226201

  18. Highly bright multicolour emission through energy migration in core/shell nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Zhang, Nannan; Leng, Zhihua; Liang, Yimai; Li, Ruiqing; Zou, Lianchun; Gan, Shucai

    2015-04-14

    This paper describes a simple and environmentally-friendly approach that allowed for the facile synthesis of a gadolinium-based core/shell/shell nanotube structure with a set of lanthanide ions incorporated into separated layers. In addition, by the rational design of a core/shell structure we systematically investigated the luminescence properties of different lanthanide ions in NaGdF4 host, and efficient down-conversion emission can be realized through gadolinium sublattice-mediated energy migration. The Gd(3+) ions play an intermediate role in this process. By changing the doped lanthanide ions, we generated multicolour emissions from the luminescent Ln(3+) centers via energy transfer of Ce(3+)→Gd(3+)→Ln(3+) and Ce(3+)→Ln(3+) (Ln = Eu, Tb, Dy and Sm) in separated layers. Due to the strong absorption of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation by Ce(3+) ions, the luminescence efficiency could be enhanced after doping Ce(3+) ions in the shell. In NaGdF4:5% Eu(3+)@NaGdF4@NaGdF4:5% Ce(3+) core/shell/shell nanotubes, with increasing the NaGdF4 interlayer thickness, a gradual decrease in emission intensity was observed for the Eu(3+) activator.

  19. High brightness beams and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams. Thermionic systems are briefly covered. Recent and past results from the photoinjector programs are given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers using photoinjectors is discussed. The progress that has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency, is covered. Finally, a discussion of emittance measurements of photoinjector systems and how the measurement is complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam is presented.

  20. Impulsive and long duration high-energy gamma-ray emission from the very bright 2012 March 7 solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu; and others

    2014-07-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected gamma-rays up to 4 GeV from two bright X-class solar flares on 2012 March 7, showing both an impulsive and temporally extended emission phases. The gamma-rays appear to originate from the same active region as the X-rays associated with these flares. The >100 MeV gamma-ray flux decreases monotonically during the first hour (impulsive phase) followed by a slower decrease for the next 20 hr. A power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff can adequately describe the photon spectrum. Assuming that the gamma rays result from the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with a power-law spectrum, we find that the index of that spectrum is ∼3, with minor variations during the impulsive phase. During the extended phase the photon spectrum softens monotonically, requiring the proton index varying from ∼4 to >5. The >30 MeV proton flux observed by the GOES satellites also shows a flux decrease and spectral softening, but with a harder spectrum (index ∼2-3). Based on these observations, we explore the relative merits of prompt or continuous acceleration scenarios, hadronic or leptonic emission processes, and acceleration at the solar corona or by the fast coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the most likely scenario is continuous acceleration of protons in the solar corona that penetrate the lower solar atmosphere and produce pions that decay into gamma rays. However, acceleration in the downstream of the shock cannot be definitely ruled out.

  1. Bright Idea: Solar Energy Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City.

    This booklet is intended to address questions most frequently asked about solar energy. It provides basic information and a starting point for prospective solar energy users. Information includes discussion of solar space heating, solar water heating, and solar greenhouses. (Author/RE)

  2. Bright, Light and Energy Efficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1981

    1981-01-01

    The new Sharon Elementary School in Newburgh (Indiana) has a three-fuel plan that will allow selection of the most economical energy source for each heating season with an energy-efficient lighting system that includes skylights. (Author/MLF)

  3. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  4. The Los Alamos high-brightness photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of years Los Alamos National Laboratory has been developing photocathode RF guns for high-brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). Previously thermionic high-voltage guns have been the source of choice for the electron accelerators used to drive FELs. The performance of such FELs is severely limited by the emittance growth produced by the subharmonic bunching process and also by the low peak current of the source. In a photoinjector, a laser driven photocathode is placed directly in a high-gradient RF accelerating cavity. A photocathode allows unsurpassed control over the current, and the spatial and temporal profile of the beam. In addition the electrodeless emission'' avoids many of the difficulties associated with multi-electrode guns, i.e. the electrons are accelerated very rapidly to relativistic energies, and there are no electrodes to distort the accelerating fields. For the past two years we have been integrating a photocathode into our existing FEL facility by replacing our thermionic gun and subharmonic bunchers with a high-gradient 1.3 GHz photoinjector. The photoinjector, which is approximately 0.6 m in length, produces 6 MeV, 300 A, 15 ps linac, and accelerated to a final energy of 40 MeV. We have recently begun lasing at wavelengths near 3 {mu}m. 16 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Bass, Gary K.; Copsey, Jesse F.; Garber, Jr., William E.; Kwong, Vincent H.; Levin, Izrail; MacLennan, Donald A.; Roy, Robert J.; Steiner, Paul E.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  6. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  7. High brightness LED in confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Ali; Xiong, Daxi; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    We have introduced a novel illumination system for line scanning confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy is a popular imaging tool in many applications specifically in medical imaging. Line scanning confocal microscopes have been proven to provide images with resolution comparable to point scanning microscopes. In the point scanning microscopes, the light is focused onto a diffraction limited spot. A pinhole is placed conjugate to the diffraction limited spot, in front of the detector to reject the light coming from out-of-focus planes. Therefore, confocal microscopy can provide optical sectioning. The size of the pinhole determines the amount of light that reaches the detector. A large pinhole results in a blurry image since more of the out-of-focus light contribute to the image. On the other hand, a smaller pinhole rejects more of the light, leading to a lower signal-to-noise ratio. Ideally it is desired to deliver a larger amount of optical power to the diffraction limited spot to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and have a smaller pinhole to reject more of the out-of-focus light. This is the property of the illumination system. In order to get a good signal-to noise ratio in the image, the light source has to provide sufficient radiance. We have introduced a new illumination system utilizing a high brightness LED in the line scanning confocal microscope. High brightness LEDs provide more optical power compared to ordinary LEDs from a smaller area; they have higher radiance. Preliminary results from our line scanning confocal microscope show that the high brightness LED is able to provide enough radiance to obtain an image with resolution comparable with the same microscope utilizing the laser diode. However, in high frame-rate application higher radiance or lower-noise detection system is required.

  8. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Manikandan, N.; Aravinthan, K.

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  9. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  10. A high brightness field emission display

    SciTech Connect

    Palevsky, A.

    1996-12-31

    The military requirement for avionics display performance requires that displays be legible with 10,000 foot-candles (fc) bright light shining into the pilot`s eyes, or 10,000 fc shining directly on the display. The contrast ratio under these conditions must be at least 4.66:1. In addition, instant-on operation is sought for temperatures as low as {minus}54 C. Currently these specifications can barely be met by monochrome CRTs whose use is counter-indicated by other factors. No color display can achieve optimum performance in the areas mentioned, nor do any current contenders, primarily AMLCD`s, have any prospects of achieving full compliance. The FED being developed by Raytheon shows strong promise of being able to achieve the brightness and contrast ratios desired. The FED is also inherently able to provide instant-on functionality at any terrestrial temperature and does not require any heating at low temperatures. The technical objective of the Raytheon development program is to develop a high performance, full color, FED Panel that meets the performance and environmental operating condition requirements specified for military and other high performance display applications.

  11. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  12. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm-2 sr-1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  13. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  14. High-brightness high-duty cycle electron injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannibale, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    High brightness electron sources have been one of the driving forces behind the spectacular results achieved in the last decade by accelerator-based applications. Indeed, X-Ray FELs, with their 10-fold orders of magnitude increase in peak brightness, probably represent the best example of it. New ambitious proposals for X-ray FELs and ERLs, as well as inverse Compton sources for X- or gamma-ray production, are now requiring operation at MHz-GHz repetition rates. In response to that, a number of groups around the world have been actively working in developing high-brightness high-duty cycle electron injectors capable of driving such machines. The high repetition rate requirement cannot be met by the existing low-repetition rate high-brightness injector schemes, and new technologies are under investigation. This paper includes a description of the requirements for such injectors, an overview of the pursued technologies and schemes, a description of the main beam dynamics issues associated with the different choices, and a number of examples of the results obtained so far by the groups active in the field.

  15. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of High-Brightness Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-11-30

    Theoretical and computational investigations of adiabatic thermal beams have been carried out in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research and for various applications such as light sources. Most accelerator applications require high-brightness beams. This is true for high-energy accelerators such as linear colliders. It is also true for energy recovery linacs (ERLs) and free electron lasers (FELs) such as x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from February 1, 2013 to November 30, 2013 were: a) Completion of a preliminary theoretical and computational study of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow (Mok, 2013); and b) Presentation of an invited paper entitled ?Adiabatic Thermal Beams in a Periodic Focusing Field? at Space Charge 2013 Workshop, CERN, April 16-19, 2013 (Chen, 2013). In this report, an introductory background for the research project is provided. Basic theory of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow is reviewed. Results of simulation studies of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flows are discussed.

  16. Record high-average current from a high-brightness photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Bruce; Barley, John; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Dobbins, John; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Johnson, Brent; Kaplan, Roger; Karkare, Siddharth; Kostroun, Vaclav; Li Yulin; Liepe, Matthias; Liu Xianghong; Loehl, Florian; Maxson, Jared; Quigley, Peter; Reilly, John; Rice, David; Sabol, Daniel; and others

    2013-01-21

    High-power, high-brightness electron beams are of interest for many applications, especially as drivers for free electron lasers and energy recovery linac light sources. For these particular applications, photoemission injectors are used in most cases, and the initial beam brightness from the injector sets a limit on the quality of the light generated at the end of the accelerator. At Cornell University, we have built such a high-power injector using a DC photoemission gun followed by a superconducting accelerating module. Recent results will be presented demonstrating record setting performance up to 65 mA average current with beam energies of 4-5 MeV.

  17. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  18. Study of beam dynamics for an intense, high-brightness H - beam to design an efficient low-energy beam transport using ESQ lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, S. K.; Allen, C. K.; Reiser, M.

    1994-02-01

    With an aim of transporting an initially diverging high-perveance (generalized beam perveance {2I b}/{I 0β 3γ 3} = 0.003 ), high-brightness (normalized brightness ˜10 11 A/(m rad) 2) H - beam and finally focusing it without any significant emittance dilution, a detailed simulation scheme has been set up incorporating the various nonlinear forces due to the beam and the external focusing elements, e.g., due to space charges, geometrical and chromatic aberrations. The analysis is done following a particular hierarchy to identify the mechanism of emittance growth; this procedure is used to optimize the lens parameters. A combination of six electrostatic quadrupole lenses is configured to deliver a satisfactory solution. The estimated emittance growth is a factor of about 1.6, and this is mainly due to chromatic aberrations. A relatively small group of particles is found to be responsible for the emittance growth. The analysis highlights a number of important issues, e.g., sensitivity to the beam distribution, beam current, lens misalignments, etc. An ESQ LEBT system with some novel features in terms of compactness and mechanical rigidity is developed, and its essential characteristics are described.

  19. ROLE OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTERS IN HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-09-20

    In this paper we explore the possibility of using diamond secondary emitter in a high average current electron injector to amplify the current from the photocathode and to isolate the cathode and the injector from each other to increase the life time of the cathode and preserve the performance of the injector. Secondary electron yield of 225 and current density of 0.8 a/cm{sup 2} have been measured in the transmission mode from type 2 a natural diamond. Although the diamond will be heated during normal operation in the injector, calculations indicate that by cryogenically cooling the diamond, the temperature gradient along the diamond can be maintained within the acceptable range. The electron energy and temporal distributions are expected to be narrow from this device resulting in high brightness beams. Plans are underway to measure the SEY in emission mode, fabricate photocathode-diamond capsule and test diamond and capsule in superconducting RF injector.

  20. High-brightness injectors for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The counterrotating beams in collider rings consist of trains of beam bunches with N{sub B} particles per bunch, spaced a distance S{sub B} apart. When the bunches collide, the interaction rate is determined by the luminosity, which is defined as the interaction rate per unit cross section. For head-on collisions between cylindrical Gaussian beams moving at speed {beta}c, the luminosity is given by L = N{sub B}{sup 2}{beta}c/4{pi}{sigma}{sup 2}S{sub B}, where {sigma} is the rms beam size projected onto a transverse plane (the two transverse planes are assumed identical) at the interaction point. This beam size depends on the rms emittance of the beam and the focusing strength, which is a measure of the 2-D phase-space area in each transverse plane, and is defined in terms of the second moments of the beam distribution. Our convention is to use the rms normalized emittance, without factors of 4 or 6 that are sometimes used. The quantity {tilde {beta}} is the Courant-Synder betatron amplitude function at the interaction point, a characteristic of the focusing lattice and {gamma} is the relativistic Lorentz factor. Achieving high luminosity at a given energy, and at practical values of {tilde {beta}} and S{sub B}, requires a large value for the ratio N{sub B}{sup 2}/{var epsilon}{sub n}, which implies high intensity and small emittance. Thus, specification of the luminosity sets the requirements for beam intensity and emittance, and establishes the requirements on the performance of the injector to the collider ring. In general, for fixed N{sub B}, the luminosity can be increased if {var epsilon}{sub n} can be reduced. The minimum emittance of the collider is limited by the performance of the injector; consequently the design of the injector is of great importance for the ultimate performance of the collider.

  1. Development of a High-Brightness and High-Current Electron Gun for High-Flux γ-Ray Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimori, N.; Nagai, R.; Matsuba, S.; Hajima, R.; Yamamoto, M.; Honda, Y.; Miyajima, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuriki, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-flux mono-energetic γ-ray beam can be generated via Compton scattering of high-power laser by high-brightness electron beam. We have developed a high-brightness and high-current electron gun for generation of the high-flux γ-ray beam. Recently we demonstrated 500 keV electron beam generation, which meets the high-brightness requirement, from our DC photocathode gun at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The gun was transported to High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and connected to the following accelerator system. The gun operational status at KEK and our plan to develop a multialkali photocathode with a long lifetime are presented.

  2. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  3. High-brightness ion and electron rf linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    In the past, development work to increase the energy and intensity of particle accelerators tended to be pursued in separate directions, but now almost all modern applications have to achieve an intensity as high as possible at the desired energy, along with a very good beam quality in terms of the beam confinement, aiming, or focusing. The figure of merit used is the beam brightness, defined as the beam power (or current when the energy is fixed) divided by the phase space appropriate to the problem at hand. Phase space for the beam as a whole is six-dimensional, describing the physical size of the beam and change in size with time or distance; the area projected on one plane is called emittance. Achieving high intensity and good quality simultaneously is difficult, primarily because of nonlinear space- charge and focusing forces at nonrelativistic velocities and because of beam-breakup effects for relativistic beams. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding the physics of these effects; some aspects are reviewed here and related to their impact on practical design aspects. 7 refs.

  4. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is <2.5 eV [2]. Using a simple Einzel lens with magnification of about 0.1, a focused current density of about 40 mAcm-2 is obtained. It is estimated that an additional magnification of about 0.1 can yield a focused current density of > 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  5. High-brightness displays in integrated weapon sight systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Tim; Hogan, Tim

    2014-06-01

    In the past several years Kopin has demonstrated the ability to provide ultra-high brightness, low power display solutions in VGA, SVGA, SXGA and 2k x 2k display formats. This paper will review various approaches for integrating high brightness overlay displays with existing direct view rifle sights and augmenting their precision aiming and targeting capability. Examples of overlay display systems solutions will be presented and discussed. This paper will review significant capability enhancements that are possible when augmenting the real-world as seen through a rifle sight with other soldier system equipment including laser range finders, ballistic computers and sensor systems.

  6. The Very Bright and Nearby GRB130427A: the Extra Hard Spectral Component and Implications for Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The extended high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) emission occurring after the prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually characterized by a single power-law spectrum, which has been explained as the afterglow synchrotron radiation. We report on the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the >100 MeV emission from the very bright and nearby GRB 130427A, up to 100 GeV. By performing time-resolved spectral fits of GRB 130427A, we found a strong evidence of an extra hard spectral component above a few GeV that exists in the extended high-energy emission of this GRB. This extra spectral component may represent the first clear evidence of the long sought-after afterglow inverse Compton emission. Prospects for observations at the very high-energy gamma-rays, i.e., above 100 GeV, are described.

  7. High-brightness 800nm fiber-coupled laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Yuri; Levy, Moshe; Rappaport, Noam; Tessler, Renana; Peleg, Ophir; Shamay, Moshe; Yanson, Dan; Klumel, Genadi; Dahan, Nir; Baskin, Ilya; Shkedi, Lior

    2014-03-01

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. Single emitters offer reliable multi-watt output power from a 100 m lateral emission aperture. By their combination and fiber coupling, pump powers up to 100 W can be achieved from a low-NA fiber pigtail. Whilst in the 9xx nm spectral range the single emitter technology is very mature with <10W output per chip, at 800nm the reliable output power from a single emitter is limited to 4 W - 5 W. Consequently, commercially available fiber coupled modules only deliver 5W - 15W at around 800nm, almost an order of magnitude down from the 9xx range pumps. To bridge this gap, we report our advancement in the brightness and reliability of 800nm single emitters. By optimizing the wafer structure, laser cavity and facet passivation process we have demonstrated QCW device operation up to 19W limited by catastrophic optical damage to the 100 μm aperture. In CW operation, the devices reach 14 W output followed by a reversible thermal rollover and a complete device shutdown at high currents, with the performance fully rebounded after cooling. We also report the beam properties of our 800nm single emitters and provide a comparative analysis with the 9xx nm single emitter family. Pump modules integrating several of these emitters with a 105 μm / 0.15 NA delivery fiber reach 35W in CW at 808 nm. We discuss the key opto-mechanical parameters that will enable further brightness scaling of multi-emitter pump modules.

  8. The BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog. 1; High Time Resolution Spectroscopy of Bright Bursts Using High Energy Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first in a series of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy catalogs from the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Abstract: Observatory, each covering a different aspect of burst phenomenology. In this paper, we present time-sequences of spectral fit parameters for 156 bursts selected either for their high peak flux or fluence.

  9. Femtosecond, High-Brightness Electron Beam Generation and Advanced Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Brown, W J; Tremaine, A M; Kuba, J; Hartemann, F V; Fittinghoff, D N

    2005-02-02

    This document serves as the final report for LDRD project number 04-LW-031, in which we created subpicosecond length, kilo-amp peak current electron beams with the 100 MeV electron/positron linac, using a novel technique designed to produce ultra-short bunch lengths while maintaining the high brightness produced by the S-band photoinjector. In addition, a diagnostic to measure the temporal distribution of the beam was investigated, as conventional pulse length measurement techniques do not apply to extremely short pulses. The creation and diagnosis of beams with both femtosecond length and high transverse brightness is of major concern to next generation acceleration and radiation production experiments. This work leveraged the previous investment in the PLEIADES facility and it's ability to produce high brightness electron beams. In addition, the ultra-short electron pulses generated by this work have been used in conjunction with the PLEIADES X-ray source to produce sub-picosecond, high-brightness X-ray pulses.

  10. VELOCITY BUNCHING OF HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Musumeci, P; Rosenzweig, J B; Brown, W J; England, R J; Ferrario, M; Jacob, J S; Thompson, M C; Travish, G; Tremaine, A M; Yoder, R

    2004-10-15

    Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS) experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly in ICS experiments

  11. Advanced Diagnostics for Developing High-Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.-J.; Yakimenko, V.

    1998-11-24

    The production of high-brightness particle beams calls for the development of advanced beam diagnostics. High brightness beams, meaning beams with a high density in phase space, are important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and advanced accelerator systems. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a high charge. This diagnostic system has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One component of the system is the measurement of a slice emittance which provides a measurement of transverse beam properties (such as emittance) as a function of the longitudinal position. Changing the laser pulse profile of a photocathode RF gun has been suggested as one way to achieve non-linear emittance compensation and improve the brightness and that can be diagnosed by the slice emittance system. The other element of the diagnostic is the tomographic reconstruction of the transverse phase. In our work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This high precision phase space tomography together with the ability to modify the radial charge distribution of the electron beam presents an opportunity to improve the emittance and apply non-linear radial emittance corrections. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics leads to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections. This should lead to great improvements in the beam brightness.

  12. ADVANCED DIAGNOSTICS FOR DEVELOPING HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    1998-11-24

    The production of high-brightness particle beams calls for the development of advanced beam diagnostics. High brightness beams, meaning beams with a high density in phase space, are important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and advanced accelerator systems. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a high charge. This diagnostic system has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One component of the system is the measurement of a slice emittance which provides a measurement of transverse beam properties (such as emittance) as a function of the longitudinal position. Changing the laser pulse profile of a photocathode RF gun has been suggested as one way to achieve non-linear emittance compensation and improve the brightness and that can be diagnosed by the slice emittance system. The other element of the diagnostic is the tomographic reconstruction of the transverse phase. In our work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This high precision phase space tomography together with the ability to modify the radial charge distribution of the electron beam presents an opportunity to improve the emittance and apply non-linear radial emittance corrections. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics leads to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections. This should lead to great improvements in the beam brightness.

  13. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  14. Beam shaping design for compact and high-brightness fiber-coupled laser-diode system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-06-20

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. A compact and high-brightness fiber-coupled system has been designed based on a significant beam shaping method. The laser-diode stack consists of eight mini-bars and is effectively coupled into a standard 100 μm core diameter and NA=0.22 fiber. The simulative result indicates that the module will have an output power over 440 W. Using this technique, compactness and high-brightness production of a fiber-coupled laser-diode module is possible.

  15. Global brightness temperature spectra at high wavenumbers utilizing satellite microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford, J. L.

    1980-05-01

    Satellite microwave brightness temperature (radiance) measurements represent weighted mean temperatures in a certain atmospheric layer. The high density of measurements along a polar-orbiting satellite track allows estimates of the brightness temperature variance spectrum at high meridional wavenumbers. Global data from the Nimbus 6 SCAMS microwave instrument sensitive to the 100-300 mb layer have been analyzed for 30 days in August 1975. The results reveal that the brightness temperature variance spectrum can be fit to the form k to the m power over the range k = 22 to 59 (horizontal wavelengths 1800 to 700 km). Using 95% confidence intervals, the fit yields m = minus 3.1 plus or minus 0.3. These results appear to have significance for estimates of energy cascade between different motion scales in the very high wavenumber regime.

  16. Autostereoscopic display with high brightness and power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenlaub, Jesse B.

    1994-04-01

    Dimension Technologies Inc. has experimentally demonstrated an optical system that produces autostereoscopic images and also allows very high brightness and power efficiency to be achieved using off the shelf color LCDs. This capability is important in applications such as cockpit displays or mobile, portable, or laptop systems where brightness must be maximized but power conserved as much as possible. The effects are achieved through the creation of light line illumination, by means of which autostereoscopic images are produced, and by simultaneously concentrating the light emitted by the display toward the area the viewer's head is. By turning different illumination sources on and off, it is possible to aim both the concentration area and the 3D viewing area at the observer's head as the observer moves. A variation on the system allows two or more persons to be tracked independently. Cross talk (ghosting) can be reduced to the point that imperceptibility can be achieved.

  17. High Brightness and high polarization electron source using transmission photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Jin Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Mano, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Yasuhide; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Okumi, Shoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Konomi, Taro; Ohshima, Takashi; Saka, Takashi; Kato, Toshihiro; Horinaka, Hiromichi; Yasue, Tsuneo; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2009-08-04

    A transmission photocathode was fabricated based on GaAs-GaAsP strained superlattice layers on a GaP substrate and a 20 kV-gun was built to generate the polarized electron beams with the diameter of a few micro-meter. As the results, the reduced brightness of 1.3x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}/sr and the polarization of 90% were achieved.

  18. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G.; Lindle, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  19. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  20. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C. . Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  1. High-intensity and high-brightness source of moderated positrons using a brilliant γ beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Schreckenbach, K.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, large efforts are conducted toward the development of highly brilliant γ beams via Compton back scattering of photons from a high-brilliance electron beam, either on the basis of a normal-conducting electron linac or a (super-conducting) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Particularly, ERLs provide an extremely brilliant electron beam, thus enabling the generation of highest-quality γ beams. A 2.5 MeV γ beam with an envisaged intensity of 1015 photons s-1, as ultimately envisaged for an ERL-based γ-beam facility, narrow band width (10-3), and extremely low emittance (10-4 mm2 mrad2) offers the possibility to produce a high-intensity bright polarized positron beam. Pair production in a face-on irradiated W converter foil (200 μm thick, 10 mm long) would lead to the emission of 2×1013 (fast) positrons per second, which is four orders of magnitude higher compared to strong radioactive 22Na sources conventionally used in the laboratory. Using a stack of converter foils and subsequent positron moderation, a high-intensity low-energy beam of moderated positrons can be produced. Two different source setups are presented: a high-brightness positron beam with a diameter as low as 0.2 mm, and a high-intensity beam of 3×1011 moderated positrons per second. Hence, profiting from an improved moderation efficiency, the envisaged positron intensity would exceed that of present high-intensity positron sources by a factor of 100.

  2. PLEIADES: High Peak Brightness, Subpicosecond Thomson Hard-X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuba, J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Harteman, F V; Le Sage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-12-15

    The Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) facility, is a unique, novel, tunable (10-200 keV), ultrafast (ps-fs), hard x-ray source that greatly extends the parameter range reached by existing 3rd generation sources, both in terms of x-ray energy range, pulse duration, and peak brightness at high energies. First light was observed at 70 keV early in 2003, and the experimental data agrees with 3D codes developed at LLNL. The x-rays are generated by the interaction of a 50 fs Fourier-transform-limited laser pulse produced by the TW-class FALCON CPA laser and a highly focused, relativistic (20-100 MeV), high brightness (1 nC, 0.3-5 ps, 5 mm.mrad, 0.2% energy spread) photo-electron bunch. The resulting x-ray brightness is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} ph/mm{sup 2}/s/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW. The beam is well-collimated (10 mrad divergence over the full spectrum, 1 mrad for a single color), and the source is a unique tool for time-resolved dynamic measurements in matter, including high-Z materials.

  3. High-brightness heavy-ion injector experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westenskow, G. A.; Kwan, J. W.; Grote, D. P.; Bieniosek, F.

    2007-07-01

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion, we have performed experiments to study a proposed merging beamlet approach for the injector. We used an RF plasma source to produce the initial beamlets. An array of converging beamlets was used to produce a beam with the envelope radius, convergence, and ellipticity matched to an electrostatic quadrupole channel. Experimental results were in good quantitative agreement with simulation and have demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. The size of a driver-scale injector system using this approach will be several times smaller than one designed using traditional single large-aperture beams. The success of this experiment has possible significant economical and technical impacts on the architecture of HIF drivers.

  4. High Brightness Plasmon-Enhanced Nanostructured Gold Photoemitters

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Kong, Lingmei; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-30

    Plasmonic nanohole arrays are fabricated in gold thin films by focused ion beam (FIB) lithography. Subsequent heat treatment creates sub 100 nm nanometric structures including tips, rods and flakes, all localized in the nanohole array region. The combined nanohole array and nanostructured surface comprise an efficient photoemitter. High brightness photoemission is observed from this construct using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), following 780 nm femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation. By comparing our observables to results of finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations, we demonstrate that photoemission from the sub-100 nm structures is enhanced in the region of propagating surface plasmons launched from the nanohole arrays. Additionally, by tuning hole diameter and separation in the nanohole array, the photoemission intensity of nanostructured photoemitters can be controlled. We observe a photoemission enhancement of over 108, relative to photoemission from the flat region of the gold substrate at laser intensities well below the ablation threshold.

  5. Emittance Characteristics of High-Brightness H- Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Thomason, J.; Sherman, J.; Alessi, J.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of emittance characteristics from high-brightness, H- ion sources has been undertaken. Representative examples of each important type of H- source for accelerator application are investigated: A magnetron surface plasma source (BNL) a multi-cusp-surface-conversion source (LANL) a Penning source (RAL-ISIS) and a multi-cusp-volume source (LBNL). Presently, comparisons between published emittance values from different ion sources are difficult largely because of different definitions used in reported emittances and the use of different data reduction techniques in analyzing data. Although seldom discussed in the literature, rms-emittance values often depend strongly on the method employed to separate real beam from background. In this work, the problem of data reduction along with software developed for emittance analysis is discussed. Raw emittance data, obtained from the above laboratories, is analyzed using a single technique and normalized rms and 90% area-emittance values are determined along with characteristic emittance versus beam fraction curves.

  6. Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1997-11-01

    The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

  7. State-Of High Brightness RF Photo-Injector Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Massimo; Clendenin, Jym; Palmer, Dennis; Rosenzweig, James; Serafini, Luca

    2000-04-01

    The art of designing optimized high brightness electron RF Photo-Injectors has moved in the last decade from a cut and try procedure, guided by experimental experience and time consuming particle tracking simulations, up to a fast parameter space scanning, guided by recent analytical results and a fast running semi-analytical code, so to reach the optimum operating point which corresponds to maximum beam brightness. Scaling laws and the theory of invariant envelope provide to the designers excellent tools for a first parameters choice and the code HOMDYN, based on a multi-slice envelope description of the beam dynamics, is tailored to describe the space charge dominated dynamics of laminar beams in presence of time dependent space charge forces, giving rise to a very fast modeling capability for photo-injectors design. We report in this talk the results of a recent beam dynamics study, motivated by the need to redesign the LCLS photoinjector. During this work a new effective working point for a split RF photoinjector has been discovered by means of the previous mentioned approach. By a proper choice of rf gun and solenoid parameters, the emittance evolution shows a double minimum behavior in the drifting region. If the booster is located where the relative emittance maximum and the envelope waist occur, the second emittance minimum can be shifted at the booster exit and frozen at a very low level (0.3 mm-mrad for a 1 nC flat top bunch), to the extent that the invariant envelope matching conditions are satisfied.

  8. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  9. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  10. Niobium resonator development for high-brightness ion beam acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    Two niobium resonant cavities for high-brightness ion beam acceleration have been constructed and tested. The first was based on a coaxial quarter-wave geometry and was optimized for phase velocity {beta}{sub o} = 0.15. This cavity, which resonates at 400 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average (wall-to-wall) accelerating gradient of 12.9 MV/m under continuous-wave (cw) fields. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured. The second was based on a coaxial half-wave geometry and was optimized for {beta}{sub o} = 0.12. This cavity, which resonates at 355 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average accelerating gradient of 18.0 MV/m under cw fields. This is the highest average accelerating gradient achieved to date in low-velocity structures designed for cw operation. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured.

  11. A Compact High-Brightness Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Halaxa, E; Kwan, J W; Bieniosek, F

    2005-05-11

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerators, we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. In an 80-kV 20-microsecond experiment, the RF plasma source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet. An extraction current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} was achieved, and the thermal temperature of the ions was below 1 eV. We have tested at full voltage gradient the first 4 gaps of an injector design. Einzel lens were used to focus the beamlets while reducing the beamlet to beamlet space charge interaction. We were able to reach greater than 100 kV/cm in the first four gaps. We also performed experiments on a converging 119 multi-beamlet source. Although the source has the same optics as a full 1.6 MV injector system, these test were carried out at 400 kV due to the test stand HV limit. We have measured the beam's emittance after the beamlets are merged and passed through an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ). Our goal is to confirm the emittance growth and to demonstrate the technical feasibility of building a driver-scale HIF injector.

  12. Optimization of epitaxial layer design for high brightness tapered lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijero, J. M. G.; Rodriguez, D.; Borruel, L.; Sujecki, S.; Larkins, E. C.; Esquivias, I.

    2005-04-01

    A comparative simulation study of the optical output characteristics of tapered lasers with different epitaxial structure was performed. The simulation model self-consistently solves the steady state electrical and optical equations for the flared unstable resonator and was previously backed by experiments on one of the simulated structures. Three different epitaxial designs emitting at 975 nm were analyzed: a standard single quantum well symmetrically located in the confinement region (s-SQW), a double quantum well also symmetrically located (s-DQW) and an asymmetrically located double quantum well (a-DQW). The symmetric structures have different confinement factor but a similar ratio between the active layer thickness and the confinement factor, dQW/Γ, while the a-DQW has similar confinement factor than the s-SQW, but double dQW/Γ. A better performance is predicted for the a-DQW design, reaching considerably higher output power with good beam quality. The results are interpreted in terms of a lower density of power in the QW in the case of the a-DQW design, thus delaying to higher output power the onset of the non-linear effects that degrade the beam quality. The role of dQW/Γ as a figure of merit for high brightness tapered lasers is emphasized.

  13. Conductively cooled high-power high-brightness bars and fiber-coupled arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hailong; Mondry, Mark; Fouksman, Michael; Weiss, Eli; Anikitchev, Serguei; Kennedy, Keith; Li, Jun; Zucker, Erik; Rudy, Paul; Kongas, Jukka; Haapamaa, Jouko; Lehkonen, Sami

    2005-03-01

    Solid-state-laser and fiber laser pumping, reprographics, medical and materials processing applications require high power, high-brightness bars and fiber-coupled arrays. Conductively cooled laser diode bars allow customers to simplify system design and reduce operational size, weight, and costs. We present results on next generation high brightness, high reliability bars and fiber-coupled arrays at 790-830 nm, 940 nm and 980 nm wavelengths. By using novel epitaxial structures, we have demonstrated highly reliable 808 nm, 30% fill-factor conductively cooled bars operating at 60W CW mode, corresponding to a linear power density (LPD) of 20 mW/&mum. At 25°C, the bars have shown greater than 50% wall-plug-efficiency (WPE) when operating at 60W. Our novel approach has also reduced the fast-axis divergence FWHM from 31° to less than 24°. These bars have a 50% brightness improvement compared to our standard products with this geometry. At 980nm, we have demonstrated greater than 100W CW from 20% fill-factor conductively cooled bars, corresponding to a LPD of 50 mW/μm. At 25°C, the WPE for 976nm bars consistently peaks above 65% and remains greater than 60% at 100W. We coupled the beam output from those high-brightness bars into fiber-array-packages ("FAPs"), and we also achieved high-brightness and high-efficiency FAPs. We demonstrated 60W from a 600μm core-diameter fiber-bundle with a high WPE of 55%, and a low numerical aperture of 0.115. The brightness of such FAPs is four times higher than our standard high-power 40W FAP products at Coherent. Ongoing life test data suggests an extrapolated lifetime greater than 10,000 hours at 80W CW operating-condition based on 30%FF conductively cooled bar geometry.

  14. High brightness, high current injector design for the ATF upgrade at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-04-01

    Brookhaven National Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is in the process of moving to a new place and upgrading its major capabilities: The electron beam energy and CO2 laser power. Specifically, the maximum electron beam energy will be first projected to 100-150 MeV and then upgraded to 500 MeV while at the same time the laser power will increase 100 fold, thus making the new ATF a powerful tool in advanced accelerator concept research. The bright electron bunch produced by the new state-of-the-art photocathode rf gun will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. The injector is a key element of this accelerator upgrade. It must deliver a high average current beam with very small transverse and longitudinal emittances, at a sufficiently high energy that space charge effects are under control. We review here the detailed injector design and present first results from beam dynamics simulations. We give emphasis in the production of compressed flat beams which have important applications in novel light-source concepts and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. We present a theoretical model and with the aid of simulation examine the influence of space charge, bunch compression and suggest a operating regime with minimal phase space dilutions.

  15. A significant hardening and rising shape detected in the MeV/GeV νFν spectrum from the recently discovered very-high-energy blazar S4 0954+65 during the bright optical flare in 2015 February

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; Itoh, Ryosuke; Finke, Justin D.; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ojha, Roopesh; Carpenter, Bryce; Lindfors, Elina; Krauß, Felicia; Desiante, Rachele; Shiki, Kensei; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie E.; Buson, Sara; Nilsson, Kari; Fallah Ramazani, Vandad; Reinthal, Riho; Takalo, Leo; Pursimo, Tapio; Boschin, Walter

    2016-08-01

    We report on Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and multi-wavelength results on the recently discovered very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) blazar S4 0954+65 (z = 0.368) during an exceptionally bright optical flare in 2015 February. During the time period (2015 February 13/14, or MJD 57067) when the MAGIC telescope detected VHE γ-ray emission from the source, the Fermi-LAT data indicated a significant spectral hardening at GeV energies, with a power-law photon index of 1.8 ± 0.1-compared with the 3FGL (The Fermi LAT 4-Year Point Source Catalog) value (averaged over four years of observation) of 2.34 ± 0.04. In contrast, Swift X-Ray Telescope data showed a softening of the X-ray spectrum, with a photon index of 1.72 ± 0.08 (compared with 1.38 ± 0.03 averaged during the flare from MJD 57066 to 57077), possibly indicating a modest contribution of synchrotron photons by the highest-energy electrons superposed on the inverse Compton component. Fitting of the quasi-simultaneous (<1 d) broad-band spectrum with a one-zone synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model revealed that GeV/TeV emission could be produced by inverse-Compton scattering of external photons from the dust torus. We emphasize that a flaring blazar showing high flux of ≳1.0 × 10-6 photons cm-2 s-1 (E > 100 MeV) and a hard spectral index of ΓGeV < 2.0 detected by Fermi-LAT on daily timescales is a promising target for TeV follow-up by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes to discover high-redshift blazars, investigate their temporal variability and spectral features in the VHE band, and also constrain the intensity of the extragalactic background light.

  16. Evolution of laser-produced Sn extreme ultraviolet source diameter for high-brightness source

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in; Arai, Goki; Hara, Hiroyuki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Ohashi, Hayato; Sunahara, Atsushi; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Miura, Taisuke; Mocek, Tomas; Endo, Akira

    2014-08-18

    We have investigated the effect of irradiation of solid Sn targets with laser pulses of sub-ns duration and sub-mJ energy on the diameter of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emitting region and source conversion efficiency. It was found that an in-band EUV source diameter as low as 18 μm was produced due to the short scale length of a plasma produced by a sub-ns laser. Most of the EUV emission occurs in a narrow region with a plasma density close to the critical density value. Such EUV sources are suitable for high brightness and high repetition rate metrology applications.

  17. Measured Properties of the DUVFEL High Brightness, Ultrashort Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, Paul J

    2002-08-20

    The DUVFEL electron linac is designed to produce sub-picosecond, high brightness electron bunches to drive an ultraviolet FEL. The accelerator consists of a 1.6 cell S-band photoinjector, variable pulse length Ti:Sapp laser, 4 SLAC-type S-band accelerating sections, and 4-dipole chicane bunch compressor. In preparation for FEL operation, the compressed electron beam has been fully characterized. Measurement of the beam parameters and simulation of the beam are presented. The properties of the laser and photoinjector are summarized in Table 1. In typical running, 10 mJ of IR light is produced by the Spectraphyics Tsunami Ti:Sapphire oscillator and TSA50 amplifier, which is frequency tripled to produce 450 uJ of UV light. After spatial filtering and aperturing of the gaussian mode to produce a nearly uniform laser spot, about 200-300 uJ is delivered to the cathode. This produces 300 pC of charge at the accelerating phase of 30 degrees. The RF cavity is a Gun IV [1] with copper cathode that has been modified for better performance [2]. In principle, the laser pulse length may be adjusted from 100 fs to 10 ps, however there are practical limitations on the range of adjustment due to dispersion characteristics and efficiency of the BBO crystals. The thickness of the harmonic crystals is optimized for pulse lengths from 1-5 ps. Within this range of pulse lengths there is evidence [3] of variations in the time profile of the UV light that are sensitive to the phase-matching angle of the crystal.

  18. Process for producing high quality, high molecular weight microcrystalline wax derived from undewaxed bright stock

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.J.

    1986-08-26

    A process is described for preparing high molecular weight microcrystalline wax from a hydrocracked, undewaxed bright stock, comprising: (a) contacting the bright stock with hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst having hydrodenitrification activity under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen content of the stock to produce a substantially nitrogen-free product; (b) contacting the substantially nitrogen-free product with hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst having hydrogenation activity under mild conditions to produce a wax-containing oil; and (c) solvent dewaxing the wax-containing oil to produce high molecular weight microcrystalline wax.

  19. High Precision Photometry of Bright Transiting Exoplanet Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Eastman, Jason; Johnson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the past two decades, the successful search for exoplanets and the characterization of their physical properties have shown the immense progress that has been made towards finding planets with characteristics similar to Earth. For most exoplanets with a radius about the size of Earth, evaluating their physical properties, such as the mass, radius and equilibrium temperature, cannot be determined with satisfactory precision. The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) was recently built to obtain spectroscopic and photometric measurements to find, confirm, and characterize Earth-like exoplanets. MINERVA's spectroscopic survey targets the brightest, nearby stars which are well-suited to the array's capabilities, while its primary photometric goal is to search for transits around these bright targets. Typically, it is difficult to find satisfactory comparison stars within a telescope's field of view when the primary target is very bright. This issue is resolved by using one of MINERVA's telescopes to observe the primary bright star while the other telescopes observe a distinct field of view that contains satisfactory bright comparison stars. We describe the code used to identify nearby comparison stars, schedule the four telescopes, produce differential photometry from multiple telescopes, and show the first results from this effort.This work has been funded by the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program, the ERAU Honors Program, the ERAU Undergraduate Research Spark Fund, and the Banneker Institute at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

  20. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  1. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform.

  2. Brightness-enhanced high-efficiency single emitters for fiber laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Shamay, Moshe; Cohen, Shalom; Berk, Yuri; Klumel, Genadi; Don, Yaroslav; Peleg, Ophir; Levy, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Reliable single emitters delivering <10W in the 9xx nm spectral range, are common energy sources for fiber laser pumps. The brightness (radiance) of a single emitter, which connotes the angular concentration of the emitted energy, is just as important a parameter as the output power alone for fiber coupling applications. We report on the development of high-brightness single emitters that demonstrate <12W output with 60% wall-plug efficiency and a lateral emission angle that is compatible with coupling into 0.15 NA delivery fiber. Using a purpose developed active laser model, simulation of far-field patterns in the lateral (slow) axis can be performed for different epitaxial wafer structures. By optimizing both the wafer and chip designs, we have both increased the device efficiency and improved the slow-axis divergence in high-current operation. Device reliability data are presented. The next-generation emitters will be integrated in SCD's NEON fiber pump modules to upgrade the pump output towards higher ex-fiber powers with high efficiency.

  3. Low-NA fiber laser pumps powered by high-brightness single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levy, Moshe; Peleg, Ophir; Rappaport, Noam; Shamay, Moshe; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Berk, Yuri; Baskin, Ilya

    2015-03-01

    Fiber laser manufacturers demand high-brightness laser diode pumps delivering optical pump energy in both a compact fiber core and narrow angular content. A pump delivery fiber of a 105 μm core and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) is typically used, where the fiber NA is under-filled to ease the launch of laser diode emission into the fiber and make the fiber tolerant to bending. At SCD, we have developed high-brightness NEON multi-emitter fiber-coupled pump modules that deliver 50 W output from a 105 μm, 0.15 NA fiber enabling low-NA power delivery to a customer's fiber laser network. Brightness-enhanced single emitters are engineered with ultra-low divergence for compatibility with the low-NA delivery fiber, with the latest emitters delivering 14 W with 95% of the slow-axis energy contained within an NA of 0.09. The reduced slow-axis divergence is achieved with an optimized epitaxial design, where the peak optical intensity is reduced to both lessen filamentation within the laser cavity and reduce the power density on the output facet thus increasing the emitter reliability. The low mode filling of the fiber allows it to be coiled with diameters down to 70 mm at full operating power despite the small NA and further eliminates the need for mode-stripping at fiber combiners and splices downstream from our pump modules. 50W fiber pump products at 915, 950 and 975 nm wavelengths are presented, including a wavelengthstabilized version at 976 nm.

  4. Advances in high power and high brightness laser bars with enhanced reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haiyan; Jiang, Ching-Long (John); Xiong, Yihan; Inyang, Aloysius; Zhang, Qiang; Lewin, Alexander; Strohmaier, Stephan; Treusch, Georg

    2013-02-01

    The advances in laser-diode technology have enabled high efficiency direct diode base modules to emerge as a building block for industrial high power laser systems. Consequently, these systems have been implemented with advance robust, higher-brightness and reliable laser sources for material processing application. Here at the company, we use low-fill factor bars to build fiber-coupled and passively cooled modules, which form the foundation for "TruDiode," the series of TRUMPF direct diode laser systems that can perform in the multi-kilowatt arena with high beam quality. However, higher reliable output power, additional efficiency and greater slow axis beam quality of the high power laser bars are necessary to further increase the brightness and reduce the cost of the systems. In order to improve the slow axis beam quality, we have optimized the bar epitaxial structures as well as the lateral design. The detailed near field and far field studies of the slow axis for each individual emitters on the bar provide us with information about the dependency of beam quality as a function of the drive current. Based on these study results for direct diode application, we have optimized the high brightness bar designs at 900-1070nm wavelengths. In addition, high power and high efficiency laser bars with high fill factors have been used to build the pump sources for thin disc laser systems at TRUMPF Photonics. For better system performances with lower costs, we have further optimized bar designs for this application. In this paper, we will give an overview of our recent advances in high power and brightness laser bars with enhanced reliability. We will exhibit beam quality study, polarization and reliability test results of our laser bars in the 900-1070nm wavelengths region for coarse wavelength multiplexing. Finally, we will also present the performance and reliability results of the 200W bar, which will be used for our next generation thin disk laser pump source.

  5. Design of a high-power, high-brightness Nd:YAG solar laser.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dawei; Almeida, Joana; Garcia, Dário

    2014-03-20

    A simple high-power, high-brightness Nd:YAG solar laser pumping approach is presented in this paper. The incoming solar radiation is both collected and concentrated by four Fresnel lenses and redirected toward a Nd:YAG laser head by four plane-folding mirrors. A fused-silica secondary concentrator is used to compress the highly concentrated solar radiation to a laser rod. Optimum pumping conditions and laser resonator parameters are found through ZEMAX and LASCAD numerical analysis. Solar laser power of 96 W is numerically calculated, corresponding to the collection efficiency of 24  W/m². A record-high solar laser beam brightness figure of merit of 9.6 W is numerically achieved.

  6. Compact stacking of diode lasers for pulsed light sources of high brightness.

    PubMed

    Alahautala, Taito; Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf

    2004-07-20

    A compact stacking architecture for high-power diode-laser arrays is proposed and compared with traditional stacks. The objective of compact stacking is to achieve high brightness values without the use of microlenses. The calculated brightness for a compact stack is over 300 W mm(-2) sr(-1), which is approximately 40 times higher than that of a traditional stack made of similar laser emitters. Even higher brightness values of over 600 W mm(-2) sr(-1) were reached in practice. A laser head was manufactured in which the light from several compact laser stacks could be fiber coupled or the light could be transformed to a highly uniform beam.

  7. High-efficiency XeCl discharge laser with high-brightness SrTiO3 corona preionizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugii, Masakatsu; Hara, Hiroshi

    1989-07-01

    An XeCl discharge laser with a high-brightness corona preionizer using a segmented columnar SrTiO3 dielectric is discussed. A high overall efficiency of 2.35 percent with a laser output energy of 350 mJ was obtained using a SrTiO3 doorknob capacitor cut by a diamond cutter as the dielectric. These characteristics are almost the same value as that obtained with an UV-spark-preionized XeCl laser using the same laser tube.

  8. Efficient Pumping Schemes for High Average Brightness Collisional X-ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Smith, R F; Patel, P K; Price, D F

    2003-10-07

    Advances in transient collisional x-ray lasers have been demonstrated over the last 5 years as a technique for achieving tabletop soft x-ray lasers using 2-10 J of laser pump energy. The high peak brightness of these sources operating in the high output saturation regime, in the range of 10{sup 24}-10{sup 25} ph. mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} s-1 (0.1% BW){sup -1}, is ideal for many applications requiring high photon fluence in a single short burst. However, the pump energy required for these x-ray lasers is still relatively high and limits the x-ray laser repetition rate to 1 shot every few minutes. Higher repetition rate collisional schemes have been reported and show some promise for high output in the future. We report a novel technique for enhancing the coupling efficiency of the laser pump into the gain medium that could lead to enhanced x-ray inversion with a factor of ten reduction in the drive energy. This has been applied to the collisional excitation scheme for Ni-like Mo at 18.9 nm and x-ray laser output has been demonstrated. Preliminary results show lasing on a single shot of the optical laser operating at 10 Hz and with 70 mJ in the short pulse. Such a proposed source would have higher average brightness, {approx}10{sup 14} ph. mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} s{sup -1} (0.1% BW){sup -1}, than present bending magnet 3rd generation synchrotron sources operating at the same spectral range.

  9. Multilayer-Based Optics for High-Brightness X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Chapman, H. N.; Aquila, A.; Krzywinski, J.; Nelson, A. J.

    2011-09-09

    High-brightness x-ray sources, such as next-generation synchrotrons and free-electron lasers (FELs), pose unique challenges for the development of x-ray optics. The peak intensities of FEL pulses can be high enough to convert any material placed in a focused beam into plasma. X-ray optics, which are used close to the focal spot, are likely to be partially or completely damaged in a single shot. Such optics would need to be replenished after each shot. Optics that are used in the unfocused or indirect beam may survive much longer, perhaps indefinitely, if care is used to limit the energy absorbed in the optics. Here we present different types of multilayer-based optics, which were used successfully in FEL experiments for reflecting, focusing, and filtering high-intensity, pulsed x-rays in a variety of novel science applications.

  10. Influence of longitudinally tapered collimators on a high brightness electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Froehlich, L.; Karantzoulis, E.

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the design and operation of a longitudinally tapered collimator in a single-pass S-band linac driving a high brightness electron beam. Measurements were done for the transverse emittance growth induced by the collimator wakefield as a function of the lateral displacement of the beam inside the collimator and the energy acceptance provided by an identical collimator installed in a dispersive region. The measurements demonstrate that: (i) the proposed design allows very precise and reproducible motion down to the micron level of the compact, four-hole collimator; (ii) the collimator does not degrade the beam emittance in the presence of standard trajectory control; (iii) the measured kick factor and energy acceptance are in agreement with the theoretical expectations. These measurements were made using 500 pC, 2.4 ps long bunches at the FERMI@Elettra free electron laser facility.

  11. Bright High Average Power Table-top Soft X-Ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, Jorge; Reagan, Brendon; Wernsing, Keith; Luther, Brad; Curtis, Alden; Nichols,, Anthony; Wang, Yong; Alessi, David; Martz, Dale; Yin, Liang; Wang, Shoujun; Berrill, Mark A; Furch, Federico; Woolston, Mark; Patel, Dinesh; Marconi, Mario; Menoni, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by ultrafast solid state lasers. These lasers have numerous applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  12. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-02

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  13. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  14. High-power high-brightness solar laser approach for renewable Mg recovery from MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Joana; Liang, Dawei

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen and heat energy from the reaction of magnesium with water can be used for engines and fuel cells. However, at least 4000 K is necessary for magnesium oxide reduction. Ultra high brightness solar-pumped lasers become essential to make this renewable process technology efficient and economically competitive. 2.3 mg/kJ solar laser - induced magnesium production efficiency has been achieved by T. Yabe et al., in 2012, by focusing a 53 W solar laser beam on a mixture of MgO with Si as reducing agent. This result is however far from the 12.1 mg/kJ attained with 2 kW/mm2 CO2 laser beam. To improve substantially the solar laser - induced Mg production efficiency, a simple high-power, high brightness Nd:YAG solar laser pumping approach is proposed. The solar radiation is both collected and concentrated by four Fresnel lenses, and redirected towards a Nd:YAG laser head by four plane folding mirrors. A fused-silica secondary concentrator is used to compress the highly concentrated solar radiation to a laser rod. Optimum pumping conditions and laser resonator parameters are found through ZEMAXand LASCADnumerical analysis. High-record solar laser beam brightness figure of merit - defined as the ratio between laser power and the product of Mx 2 and My 2 - of 10.5 W is numerically achieved, being 5.5 times higher than the previous record and about 1600 times more than that of the most powerful Nd:YAG solar laser. 8340 W/mm2 is numerically achieved at its focal region, which can quadruple the magnesium production efficiency with clean energy.

  15. Numerical simulations of novel high-power high-brightness diode laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucke, Konstantin; Rogg, Joseph; Kelemen, Marc T.; Poprawe, Reinhart; Weimann, Guenter

    2001-07-01

    One of the key topics in today's semiconductor laser development activities is to increase the brightness of high-power diode lasers. Although structures showing an increased brightness have been developed specific draw-backs of these structures lead to a still strong demand for investigation of alternative concepts. Especially for the investigation of basically novel structures easy-to-use and fast simulation tools are essential to avoid unnecessary, cost and time consuming experiments. A diode laser simulation tool based on finite difference representations of the Helmholtz equation in 'wide-angle' approximation and the carrier diffusion equation has been developed. An optimized numerical algorithm leads to short execution times of a few seconds per resonator round-trip on a standard PC. After each round-trip characteristics like optical output power, beam profile and beam parameters are calculated. A graphical user interface allows online monitoring of the simulation results. The simulation tool is used to investigate a novel high-power, high-brightness diode laser structure, the so-called 'Z-Structure'. In this structure an increased brightness is achieved by reducing the divergency angle of the beam by angular filtering: The round trip path of the beam is two times folded using internal total reflection at surfaces defined by a small index step in the semiconductor material, forming a stretched 'Z'. The sharp decrease of the reflectivity for angles of incidence above the angle of total reflection leads to a narrowing of the angular spectrum of the beam. The simulations of the 'Z-Structure' indicate an increase of the beam quality by a factor of five to ten compared to standard broad-area lasers.

  16. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D.; Posilović, K.; Pohl, J.; Weyers, M.

    2014-10-20

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  17. Employment from Solar Energy: A Bright but Partly Cloudy Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeltzer, K. K.; Santini, D. J.

    A comparison of quantitative and qualitative employment effects of solar and conventional systems can prove the increased employment postulated as one of the significant secondary benefits of a shift from conventional to solar energy use. Current quantitative employment estimates show solar technology-induced employment to be generally greater…

  18. Current development and patents on high-brightness white LED for illumination.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wen-Yuan; Lo, Ikai; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Chou, Ming-Chi; Shih, Cheng-Hung

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the current development and patents for the application of high-brightness and high-efficiency white light-emitting diode (LED). The high-efficiency GaN nanostructures, such as disk, pyramid, and rod were grown on LiAlO(2) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy, and a model was developed to demonstrate the growth of the GaN nanostructures. Based on the results, the GaN disk p-n junction was designed for the application of high brightness and high efficiency white LED.

  19. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1987-12-01

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1 to 5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, has been consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approximately 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser type cathodes.

  20. Design of high-brightness TEM00-mode solar-pumped laser for renewable material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, D.; Almeida, J.

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sunlight into laser light by direct solar pumping is of ever-increasing importance because broadband, temporally constant, sunlight is converted into laser light, which can be a source of narrowband, collimated, rapidly pulsed, radiation with the possibility of obtaining extremely high brightness and intensity. Nonlinear processes, such as harmonic generation, might be used to obtain broad wavelength coverage, including the ultraviolet wavelengths, where the solar flux is very weak. The direct excitation of large lasers by sunlight offers the prospect of a drastic reduction in the cost of coherent optical radiation for high average power materials processing. This renewable laser has a large potential for many applications such as high-temperature materials processing, renewable magnesium-hydrogen energy cycle and so on. We propose here a scalable TEM00 mode solar laser pumping scheme, which is composed of four firststage 1.13 m diameter Fresnel lenses with its respective folding mirrors mounted on a two-axis automatic solar tracker. Concentrated solar power at the four focal spots of these Fresnel lenses are focused individually along a common 3.5 mm diameter, 70 mm length Nd:YAG rod via four pairs of second-stage fused-silica spherical lenses and third-stage 2D-CPCs (Compound Parabolic Concentrator), sitting just above the laser rod which is also double-pass pumped by four V-shaped pumping cavities. Distilled water cools both the rod and the concentrators. 15.4 W TEM00 solar laser power is numerically calculated, corresponding to 6.7 times enhancement in laser beam brightness.

  1. High brightness symmetric emittance rf photoinjector preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Ostiguy, J.F.; Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    A preliminary design for a high bunch charge (8 nC), low emittance (< 20 mm-mr) radiofrequency electron photoinjector matched to the requirements of the Tesla Test Facility is presented. A 1.5 cell iris coupled {pi}mode structure with high average accelerating gradient is chosen for its high shunt impedance, simplicity, and ability to accommodate an externally mounted solenoid for simultaneous beam divergence control and emittance compensation. Beam optics are optimized for an overall injector consisting of the electron gun followed by one linac capture section, a dipole chicane for magnetic bunch compression to achieve a bunch length corresponding to {sigma}{sub z} = 1 mm. Electrical and beam dynamical aspects of the photoinjector design are presented. A description of the proposed experimental program is included.

  2. Experimental characterization of high-brightness electron photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Babzien, M.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pogorelsky, R.M.I.; Qui, X.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1995-10-09

    Operational experience of the emittance compensated photoinjector at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is presented in this paper. The photoinjector has demonstrated the stability and reliability required for UV and X-ray FEL applications. The RF gun has been routinely running at more than 100 MV/m peak acceleration field; the laser system of the photoinjector has achieved 2% peak to peak energy stability, 0.5% point stability and better than 2 ps timing jitter. The highest measured quantum efficiency of the Cu cathode is 0.05%. The electron beam bunch length was measured to be 10 ps using a linac RF phase scan. The normalized rms emittance for a 0.5 nC charge was measured, to be from 1 to 2 mm-mrad, which agrees with PARMELA simulations.

  3. Brightness enhancement in a high-peak-power cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar; Heebner, John E; Messerly, Michael J; Dawson, Jay W; Beach, Raymond J; Barty, C P J

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate a cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifier (CPRFA) whose brightness-enhancement factor depends on the cladding-to-core diameter ratio. The pump and the signal are coupled independently into different input arms of a pump-signal combiner, and the output is spliced to the Raman amplifier fiber. The CPRFA generates 20 microJ, 7 ns pulses at 1100 nm at a 2.2 kHz repetition rate with 300 microJ (25.1 kW peak power) of input pump energy. The amplified signal's peak power is 2.77 kW, and the brightness-enhancement factor is 192--the highest peak power and brightness enhancement achieved in a CPRFA at any wavelength, to our knowledge.

  4. Brightness enhancement in a high-peak-power cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar; Heebner, John E; Messerly, Michael J; Dawson, Jay W; Beach, Raymond J; Barty, C P J

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate a cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifier (CPRFA) whose brightness-enhancement factor depends on the cladding-to-core diameter ratio. The pump and the signal are coupled independently into different input arms of a pump-signal combiner, and the output is spliced to the Raman amplifier fiber. The CPRFA generates 20 microJ, 7 ns pulses at 1100 nm at a 2.2 kHz repetition rate with 300 microJ (25.1 kW peak power) of input pump energy. The amplified signal's peak power is 2.77 kW, and the brightness-enhancement factor is 192--the highest peak power and brightness enhancement achieved in a CPRFA at any wavelength, to our knowledge. PMID:19823559

  5. High-brightness fiber-coupled diode laser module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsch, Friedhelm; Hennig, Petra; Nickel, Michael

    1998-05-01

    Based on a pair of step-mirrors for beam rearranging we coupled the emission of three high-power diode laser arrays into an optical fiber of 800 micrometer diameter. We compressed the fast axis collimated beams of three diode lasers in respect to their fast axes by means of a step prism and symmetrized the beam parameter product by reordering the radiation which is focused into a fiber then. By simple optimization a coupling efficiency of 70% can be obtained.

  6. Current State of the Art in High Brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craford, George

    2007-03-01

    LED's have been commercially available since the 1960's. For many years they were used primarily for indicator applications. The remarkable increase in materials technology and efficiency that has been achieved since the early 1990's for AlInGaP red and amber LEDs, and InGaN green and blue LEDs, has enabled the penetration of markets such as outdoor display, signaling, and automotive brake light and turn signal applications. White LEDs, which are either blue LEDs combined with a phosphor, or a combination of red, green, and blue LEDs, are being used in emerging applications such as cell phone flash, television backlights, projection, and automotive headlights. In addition, to efficiency improvements these applications have required the development of higher power packages and, in some of these applications which are etendue limited, higher luminance devices. High power devices are commercially available which are capable of 140 lumens output and have an efficacy of around 70 lm/W for white emission. New package and chip technologies have been demonstrated which have a luminance of 38 mega nits (Mcd/m^2), approximately 50% more luminance than that of an automotive headlamp halogen bulb (˜25 mega nits). The recent progress in materials technology, packaging, and chip technology makes it clear that LED's will become important for general illumination applications. The rate of LED penetration of this market will depend upon continued increases in performance and lower costs as well as better control of the white spectral emission. Efficiency, current density, and costs are closely linked because the cost in dollars/lumen is inversely proportional to how many lumens can be realized from each unit of device area for a given device type. Performance as high as 138 lm/W, and over 40% wall plug efficiency, has been reported for low power research devices and over 90 lm/W for high power research devices. It is clear that high power commercial products with performance in

  7. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blomberg, Ben; Mihalcea, Daniel; Panuganti, Harsha; Piot, Philippe; Brau, Charles; Choi, Bo; Gabella, William; Ivanov, Borislav; Mendenhall, Marcus; Lynn, Christopher; Sen, Tanaji; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  8. A 3D Parallel Beam Dynamics Code for Modeling High Brightness Beams in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Lidia, S.; Ryne, R.D.; Limborg, C.; /SLAC

    2006-02-13

    In this paper we report on IMPACT-T, a 3D beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and rf linacs. IMPACT-T is one of the few codes used in the photoinjector community that has a parallel implementation, making it very useful for high statistics simulations of beam halos and beam diagnostics. It has a comprehensive set of beamline elements, and furthermore allows arbitrary overlap of their fields. It is unique in its use of space-charge solvers based on an integrated Green function to efficiently and accurately treat beams with large aspect ratio, and a shifted Green function to efficiently treat image charge effects of a cathode. It is also unique in its inclusion of energy binning in the space-charge calculation to model beams with large energy spread. Together, all these features make IMPACT-T a powerful and versatile tool for modeling beams in photoinjectors and other systems. In this paper we describe the code features and present results of IMPACT-T simulations of the LCLS photoinjectors. We also include a comparison of IMPACT-T and PARMELA results.

  9. A 3d Parallel Beam Dynamics Code for Modeling High BrightnessBeams in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Lidia, S.; Ryne, R.; Limborg, C.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper we report on IMPACT-T, a 3D beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and rf linacs. IMPACT-T is one of the few codes used in the photoinjector community that has a parallel implementation, making it very useful for high statistics simulations of beam halos and beam diagnostics. It has a comprehensive set of beamline elements, and furthermore allows arbitrary overlap of their fields. It is unique in its use of space-charge solvers based on an integrated Green function to efficiently and accurately treat beams with large aspect ratio, and a shifted Green function to efficiently treat image charge effects of a cathode. It is also unique in its inclusion of energy binning in the space-charge calculation to model beams with large energy spread. Together, all these features make IMPACT-T a powerful and versatile tool for modeling beams in photoinjectors and other systems. In this paper we describe the code features and present results of IMPACT-T simulations of the LCLS photoinjectors. We also include a comparison of IMPACT-T and PARMELA results.

  10. High-brightness diode lasers with very narrow vertical divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbert, Götz; Bugge, Frank; Eppich, Bernd; Fricke, Joerg; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Paschke, Katrin; Pietrzak, Agnieszka; Wenzel, Hans; Tränkle, Günther

    2008-02-01

    A narrow vertical divergence of about 30° including 95% of power is highly desired in many applications. Principal designs for narrow divergence diode lasers like simple broad waveguide and more sophisticated resonant waveguide structures are discussed. Devices with narrow divergence could be realized in the wavelength range 800nm to 1060nm using very broad waveguide structures. More than 1W in fundamental mode and about 5W nearly diffraction limited output could be achieved from ridge waveguide laser and from diode lasers with tapered resonator structure, respectively.

  11. High-brightness source based on luminescent concentration.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Dick K G; Bruls, Dominique; Jagt, Henri

    2016-07-11

    The concept of a high-luminance light source based on luminescent conversion of LED light and optical concentration in a transparent phosphor is explained. Experiments on a realized light source show that a luminous flux of 8500 lm and a luminance of 500 cd/mm2 can be attained using 56 pump LEDs at 330 W electrical input power. The measurement results are compared to optical simulations, showing that the experimental optical efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The present status enables applications like mid-segment digital projection using LED technology, whereas the concept is scalable to higher fluxes. PMID:27410894

  12. High-brightness source based on luminescent concentration.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Dick K G; Bruls, Dominique; Jagt, Henri

    2016-07-11

    The concept of a high-luminance light source based on luminescent conversion of LED light and optical concentration in a transparent phosphor is explained. Experiments on a realized light source show that a luminous flux of 8500 lm and a luminance of 500 cd/mm2 can be attained using 56 pump LEDs at 330 W electrical input power. The measurement results are compared to optical simulations, showing that the experimental optical efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The present status enables applications like mid-segment digital projection using LED technology, whereas the concept is scalable to higher fluxes.

  13. The winds of high luminosity late-type bright stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Carpenter, K. G.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of the Fe II line asymmetries were studied to determine the radial dependence of the wind velocity for each star. The dependence of the Fe II profiles on spectral type and luminosity class and thus the variation of the velocity fields with stellar type was also investigated. This allows the generality of the results reported for alpha Ori by Carpenter (1984b) to be judged. In addition, new atomic data was used along with observations of the C II (UV 0.01) multiplet to estimate N(sub e) in the stellar winds. Measures of relative Fe II fluxes can be used in a probability-of-escape model to determine the opacity and hydrogen column density versus height in the chromosphere of each star. Finally, analysis of the fluorescent Fe II lines (pumped by Ly alpha) near 2507 A will yield estimates of the intrinsic stellar Ly alpha flux that cannot be measured directly because of interstellar and circumstellar absorption. One important goal of the effort was to acquire high resolution spectra of the whole 2300 to 3200 A region of 13 luminous K and M stars as a data base that will be enormously valuable in planning observations with the Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph. It is also proposed to follow up the recent discovery of significant variations in the Fe II chromospheric emission line profiles from the M-giant Gamma Cru for the purpose of determining the underlying cause of the variations.

  14. 100W high-brightness multi-emitter laser pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duesterberg, Richard; Xu, Lei; Skidmore, Jay A.; Guo, James; Cheng, Jane; Du, Jihua; Johnson, Brad; Vecht, David L.; Guerin, Nicolas; Huang, Benlih; Yin, Dongliang; Cheng, Peter; Raju, Reddy; Lee, Kong Weng; Cai, Jason; Rossin, Victor; Zucker, Erik P.

    2011-03-01

    We report results of a spatially-multiplexed broad area laser diode platform designed for efficient pumping of fiber lasers or direct-diode systems. Optical output power in excess of 100W from a 105μm core, 0.15NA fiber is demonstrated with high coupling efficiency. The compact form factor and low thermal resistance enable tight packing densities needed for kW-class fiber laser systems. Broad area laser diodes have been optimized to reduce near- and far-field performance and prevent blooming without sacrificing other electro-optic parameters. With proper lens optimization this produces ~5% increase in coupling / wall plug efficiency for our design. In addition to performance characteristics, an update on long term reliability testing of 9XX nm broad area laser diode is provided that continues to show no wear out under high acceleration. Under nominal operating conditions of 12W ex-facet power at 25C, the diode mean time to failure (MTTF) is forecast to be ~ 480 kh.

  15. Intra-fiber mode combining schemes, demonstrating high power brightness preservation and coherent-coupling brightness enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Yariv; Zuitlin, Roey; Glick, Yaakov; Aviel, Matitya; Shafir, Noam; Feldman, Revital; Dahan, Asaf; Urbach, Benayahu; Levy, Daniel; Shekel, Eyal; Sintov, Yoav

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate intra-fiber couplers performance that is close to complete brightness preservation up to 3kW. Furthermore, when mutually coherent sources were used, the same couplers were able to achieve brightness enhancement with almost no beam quality (BQ) deterioration. The couplers are based on an adiabatic, all-fiber, mode coupling device preserving the lowest spatial mode orders. Brightness levels that approach the theoretical limits were achieved by compressing the participating modes into a tight cross section. Incoherent combination is shown for 2×1, 3×1 and 7×1 combined elements. Additionally, we present a solution for preserving the beam propagation factor of the coupler by using a specialty engineered core delivery fiber. The fabricated components are fully fiber- integrated, hence, without free-space limitations. An overall transmission of <90% was obtained, while the coupler-delivery connection is responsible for less than 0.5% loss. Consequently, relatively low temperatures were observed in the combiner package. Alternatively, utilizing two mutually coherent sources, a quadratic brightness factor improvement was demonstrated. The scheme does not require polarization preserving fibers, and achieved rugged 'in-phase' mode-locking. This allows for a significantly simplified scheme, compared to common coherent combining methods. Prospect on future trends relating to nonlinearities and thermal load management are discussed.

  16. Toward high brightness, multi-kilowatt solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Manes, K.R.

    1990-11-01

    High average power (HAP) solid state laser output with improved beam quality has introduced new capabilities in materials processing. At the 500 W level and with a beam quality of a few'' times the diffraction limit, the General Electric NY slab is able to drill 5 cm of stainless steel in a few seconds. We expect that 2--3 kW of near infrared laser output in a low order spatial mode would enable metal working now unknown to industry. The HAP output of slab lasers is limited by the size of the available laser crystals and the pump power. Core free, six cm diameter NY boules have been grown on an experimental basis. High optical quality NG can be obtained up to 10 cm in diameter. We present the results of our modeling based on these crystals pumped by advanced arc-lamps or laser diode arrays. We project HAP laser outputs of 1.6 kW from an existing Vortek pumped NG oscillator and about 2 kW from diode pumped NY device. Several kW of laser output can be expected from two such slabs in a MOPA configuration before optical damage limits are reached. The three dimensional stress-optic code which we used to optimize our designs, was normalized to available experimental data obtained with the above NG slab at the 500 W level and a 40 W diode pumped NY test bed. Our calculations indicate the essential parameters for attainment of high beam quality. Cooling uniformity across the pumped faces of the slab is critical and the location of the transition between pumped and un-pumped regions towards the slab tips is very important. A flat pumping profile was found to be desirable and predicted one wave of distortion which should be correctable over about 75% of the aperture however, an even better wavefront was predicted over 90% of the aperture when the regions near the edges of the slab were slightly over-pumped relative to the central regions and the regions near to the ends were tapered to compensate for transition effects.

  17. The AAVSO High Energy Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron

    2004-06-01

    The AAVSO is expanding its International Gamma-Ray Burst Network to incorporate other high energy objects such as blazars and magnetic cataclysmic variables (polars). The new AAVSO High Energy Network will be collaborating with the Global Telescope Network (GTN) to observe bright blazars in support of the upcoming GLAST mission. We also will be observing polars in support of the XMM mission. This new network will involve both visual and CCD obsrvers and is expected to last for many years.

  18. High-Precision Measurements of the Brightness Variation of Nereid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Yoichi

    2013-04-01

    Nereid, the outer satellite of Neptune, has a highly eccentric prograde orbit with a semimajor axis of larger than 200 in units of Neptune's radius, and is classified as an irregular satellite. Although the capture origin of irregular satellites has been widely accepted, several previous studies suggest that Nereid was formed in the circumplanetary disk of Neptune and ejected outward to the present location by Triton. A series of our photometric observations confirm that Nereid's rotation period, 11.5 hr, is stable and nonchaotic, as indicated by Grav, Holman, and Kavelaars (2003, ApJ, 591, L71). The optical colors of Nereid are indistinguishable from those of trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs, especially from these objects with neutral colors. We also found the consistency of Nereid's rotation period based on the size-rotation distribution of small outer bodies. It is likely that Nereid originated as an immigrant body captured from the heliocentric orbit that was 4-5 AU away from Neptune's orbit.

  19. Spatial light modulators for high-brightness projection displays.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, K; Fujii, T; Kikuchi, H; Fujikake, H; Kawakita, M; Hirano, Y; Sato, F

    1999-09-10

    We fabricated polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal light valves (PDLCLV's) consisting of a 30-microm-thick hydrogenated amorphous-silicon film and a 10-microm-thick polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC) film composed of nematic liquid-crystal (LC) microdroplets surrounded by polymer. The device can modulate high-power reading light, because the PDLC becomes transparent or opalescent independent of the polarization state of the reading light when either sufficient or no writing light is incident on the PDLCLV. This device has a limiting resolution of 50 lp/mm (lp indicates line pairs), a reading light efficiency of 60%, a ratio of intensity of light incident on the PDLC layer to intensity of light radiated from the layer, and an extinction ratio of 130:1. The optically addressed video projection system with three PDLCLV's, LC panels of 1048 x 480 pixels as input image sources, a 1-kW Xe lamp, and a schlieren optical system projected television (TV) pictures of 600 and 450 TV lines in the horizontal and the vertical directions on a screen with a diagonal length of 100 in. The total output flux of this system was 1500 lm. PMID:18324076

  20. Designing and optimizing highly efficient grating for high-brightness laser based on spectral beam combining

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying-Ying E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Wang, Li-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xue-Chun E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn

    2015-03-14

    A highly efficient nano-periodical grating is theoretically investigated for spectral beam combining (SBC) and is experimentally implemented for attaining high-brightness laser from a diode laser array. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis with the S matrix method is employed to optimize the parameters of the grating. According the optimized parameters, the grating is fabricated and plays a key role in SBC cavity. The diffraction efficiency of this grating is optimized to 95% for the output laser which is emitted from the diode laser array. The beam parameter product of 3.8 mm mrad of the diode laser array after SBC is achieved at the output power of 46.3 W. The optical-to-optical efficiency of SBC cavity is measured to be 93.5% at the maximum operating current in the experiment.

  1. High brightness sub-nanosecond Q-switched laser using volume Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian M.; Hale, Evan; Venus, George; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Glebov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    The design of Q-switched lasers capable of producing pulse widths of 100's of picoseconds necessitates the cavity length be shorter than a few centimeters. Increasing the amount of energy extracted per pulse requires increasing the mode area of the resonator that for the same cavity length causes exciting higher order transverse modes and decreasing the brightness of the output radiation. To suppress the higher order modes of these multimode resonators while maintaining the compact cavity requires the use of intra-cavity angular filters. A novel Q-switched laser design is presented using transmitting Bragg gratings (TBGs) as angular filters to suppress the higher order transverse modes. The laser consists of a 5 mm thick slab of Nd:YAG, a 3 mm thick slab of Cr:YAG with a 20% transmission, one TBG aligned to suppress the higher order modes along the x-axis, and a 40% output coupler. The gratings are recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass, which has a high damage threshold that can withstand both the high peak powers and high average powers present within the resonator. Using a 4.1 mrad TBG in a 10.8 mm long resonator with an 800μm x 400 μm pump beam, a nearly diffraction limited beam quality of M2 = 1.3 is obtained in a 0.76 mJ pulse with a pulse width of 614 ps.

  2. High-brightness water-window electron-impact liquid-jet microfocus source

    SciTech Connect

    Skoglund, P.; Lundstroem, U.; Vogt, U.; Hertz, H. M.

    2010-02-22

    We demonstrate stable high-brightness operation of an electron-impact water-jet-anode soft x-ray source. A 30 kV, 7.8 W electron beam is focused onto a 20 mum diameter jet resulting in water-window oxygen line emission at 525 eV/2.36 nm with a brightness of 3.0x10{sup 9} ph/(sxmum{sup 2}xsrxline). Monte Carlo-based modeling shows good quantitative agreement with the experiments. The source has potential to increase the x-ray power and brightness by another 1-2 orders of magnitude and fluid-dynamical jet instabilities is determined to be the most important limiting factor. The source properties make it an attractive alternative for table-top x-ray microscopy.

  3. Untangling the contributions of image charge and laser profile for optimal photoemission of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Makino, K.; Ruan, C. Y.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2014-11-07

    Using our model for the simulation of photoemission of high brightness electron beams, we investigate the virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge), laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform, and elliptical), and aspect ratios (pancake- and cigar-like) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length, and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for ultrafast electron microscope systems that take into account constraints on the number of generated electrons and on the required time resolution.

  4. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1988-04-01

    Large diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1-5-microsec electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, approximately 300,000 A/sq cm sq rad has been consistently measured. To obtain this high-current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between about 1600 and 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure 10 to the -6th to -10 to the -5th Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  5. High Brightness Electron Guns for Next-Generation Light Sources and Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    H. Bluem; M.D. Cole; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; I. Ben-Zvi; T. Srinivasan-Rao; P. Colestock; D.C. Nguyen; R.L. Wood; L. Young; D. Janssen; J. Lewellen; G. Neil; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2004-07-01

    Advanced Energy Systems continues to develop advanced electron gun and injector concepts. Several of these projects have been previously described, but the progress and status of each will be updated. The project closest to completion is an all superconducting RF (SRF) gun, being developed in collaboration with the Brookhaven National Laboratory, that uses the niobium of the cavity wall itself as the photocathode material. This gun has been fabricated and will shortly be tested with beam. The cavity string for a closely-coupled DC gun and SRF cavity injector that is expected to provide beam quality sufficient for proposed ERL light sources and FELs will be assembled at the Jefferson Laboratory later this year. We are also collaboration with Los Alamos on a prototype CW normal-conducting RF gun with similar performance, that will undergo thermal testing in late 2004. Another CW SRF gun project that uses a high quantum efficiency photocathode, similar to the FZ-Rossendorf approach, has just begun. Finally, we will present the RF design and cold test results for a fully axisymmetric, ultra-high-brightness x-band RF gun.

  6. A High Brightness, X-Band Photoinjector for the Production of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, Gregory Peter

    1997-11-01

    Linear colliders, future electron acceleration schemes, and short pulse, ultrawideband millimeter-wave sources require very bright electron beams. RF photoinjectors have shown their ability to produce relativistic electron beams with low emittance and energy spread. Previously developed RF photoinjectors are subject to significant limitations. These include extreme sensitivity to timing between the RF in the accelerator structure and the drive laser, low efficiency with respect to the number and charge of the electron bunches produced by the injector, and high cost associated with both the RF drive system and the laser system. The presently described system has addressed these issues by combining state-of-the-art capabilities in the laser and RF systems, photocathode materials, and new concepts for synchronization. Phase jitter has been measured in detail, and schemes for alleviating this problem have undergone initial proof-of-principle testing. An RF signal sampled from within the high power RF cavity has been used to directly modelock a solid-state diode laser oscillator. Characterization of the electron beam produced by the system is presented. The linear electron accelerator system is based on a 1 1/2 cell side-wall coupled standing wave accelerator structure, driven by a 20 MW SLAC Klystron operating at 8.548 GHz, a Multiple Quantum Well Al:GaAs solid state laser oscillator, and an 8-pass chirped pulse Ti:Sapphire laser amplifier.

  7. Nanoluciferase signal brightness using furimazine substrates opens bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to widefield microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiho; Grailhe, Regis

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, BRET) techniques are powerful tools for studying protein-protein interactions in cellular assays. In contrast to fluorescent proteins, chemiluminescent proteins do not require excitation light, known to trigger autofluorescence, phototoxicity, and photobleaching. Regrettably, low signal intensity of luciferase systems restricts their usage as they require specialized microscopes equipped with ultra low-light imaging cameras. In this study, we report that bioluminescence quantification in living cells using a standard widefield automated microscope dedicated to screening and high content analysis is possible with the newer luciferase systems, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With such equipment, we showed that robust intramolecular BRET can be measured using a combination of Nluc and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Using the human Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1) dimer model, we next validated that intermolecular BRET could be quantified at a single cell level. The enhanced signal brightness of Nluc enabling BRET imaging to widefield microscopy shows strong potential to open up single cell protein-protein interactions studies to a wider audience. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. Reduced-mode (REM) diodes enable high brightness fiber-coupled modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanskar, M.; Bao, L.; Chen, Z.; Dawson, D.; DeVito, M.; Dong, W.; Grimshaw, M.; Guan, X.; Hemenway, M.; Kennedy, K.; Martinsen, R.; Urbanek, W.; Zhang, S.

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for high-power, high-brightness diode lasers from 8xx nm to 9xx nm for applications such as fiber laser pumping, materials processing, solid-state laser pumping, and consumer electronics manufacturing. The kilowatt CW fiber laser pumping (915 nm - 976 nm), in particular, requires the diode lasers to have both high power and high brightness in order to achieve high-performance and reduced manufacturing costs. This paper presents continued progress in the development of high brightness fiber-coupled product platform, elementTM. Further brightness improvement and power-scaling have been enabled by both the rise in chip brightness as well as the increase in number of chips used to couple into a given numerical aperture. We have developed a new generation of high power broad area laser known as reduced-mode diode (REM-diode) which suppresses many of the higher order modes in the slow axis and reduces divergence up to two times at the same operating conditions. To date, we have achieved slow-axis brightness as high as 4.3 W/mm-mrad for devices with thermal resistance of ~2.5 C/W. As a result, we have achieved >75 watts from a 1×6 elementTMin the 9xx nm spectral range; and 177 watts of peak power from a 2×6 elementTM. We have also improved our optics for fiber-coupling which accommodates 7 emitters per polarization in the same numerical aperture. Using this configuration, we project 200 watts of peak power from a 2×7 elementTM with a reliable product at 176 W of power from 105 μm and 0.15 NA fiber. REM-diodes can also be wavelength stabilized using VBGs. The reliability of REM-diodes are equal or better than broad area lasers (BALs). We present current status on ongoing reliability assessment of chip-on-submount.

  9. Improvement of the temporal and spatial contrast of high-brightness laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmári, S.; Dajka, R.; Barna, A.; Gilicze, B.; Földes, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    A novel method is suggested for temporal and spatial cleaning of high-brightness laser pulses, which seems more energy-scalable than that based on crossed polarizers and offers better contrast improvement compared to the plasma mirror technique. The suggested arrangement utilizes nonlinear modulation of the beam in the Fourier-plane leading both to directional and to temporal modulation. By the use of a ‘conjugate’ aperture arrangement before and after the nonlinear spatial selector, intensity dependent transmission is obtained; simultaneous temporal and spatial filtering can be realized both for amplitude and phase modulation. In the case of phase modulation introduced by plasma generation in noble gases the experimental observations are in good agreement with the theory; demonstrating  >103 improvement in the temporal contrast, ~40% throughput, associated with effective spatial filtering. Due to the broad spectral and power durability of the optical arrangement used here, the method is widely applicable for energetic beams even of UV wavelengths, where most of the former techniques have limited throughput.

  10. A high brightness, X-band photoinjector for the production of coherent synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, G. P.; Bennett, C. V.; White, W. E.; Landahl, E. C.; Laurent, L. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Hartemann, F. V.; Ho, C. H.; Lau, W. K.; Yang, T. T.

    1998-05-01

    Linear colliders, future electron acceleration concepts, and short pulse, ultrawideband millimeter-wave sources all require bright electron beams. Photoinjectors have demonstrated the ability to produce relativistic electron beams with low emittance and energy spread. The system described herein combines state-of-the-art capabilities in the laser and rf systems, advanced photocathode materials, and new concepts for synchronization. Phase jitter has been measured in detail, and schemes for alleviating this problem have undergone initial proof-of-principle testing. Direct mode locking of a multiple quantum well Al:GaAs solid-state laser oscillator by an rf signal sampled from within a high-power rf accelerator cavity was demonstrated for the first time. Characterization of the electron beam produced by the system is presented. The linear electron accelerator system is comprised of a 1.5 cell side-wall coupled standing wave accelerator structure, driven by a 20 MW Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Klystron operating at 8.548 GHz, a Ti:sapphire laser oscillator, and a chirped pulse Ti:sapphire laser amplifier.

  11. High Precision Bright-Star Astrometry with the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secrest, Nathan; Dudik, Rachel; Berghea, Ciprian T.; Hennessy, Greg; Dorland, Bryan

    2015-05-01

    While GAIA will provide excellent positional measurements of hundreds of millions of stars between 5 < mag < 20, an ongoing challenge in the field of high-precision differential astrometry is the positional accuracy of very bright stars (mag < 5), due to the enormous dynamic range between bright stars of interest, such as those in the Hipparcos catalog, and their background field stars, which are especially important for differential astrometry. Over the past few years, we have been testing the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System (UAHC), which utilizes an H4RG-10 detector in windowing mode, as a possible solution to the NOFS USNO Bright Star Astrometric Database (UBAD). In this work, we discuss the results of an astrometric analysis of single-epoch Hipparcos data taken with the UAHC from the 1.55m Kaj Strand Astrometric Reflector at NOFS from June 27-30, 2014. We discuss the calibration of this data, as well as an astrometric analysis pipeline we developed that will enable multi-epoch differential and absolute astrometry with the UAHC. We find that while the overall differential astrometric stability of data taken with the UAHC is good (5-10 mas single-measurement precision) and comparable to other ground-based astrometric camera systems, bright stars in the detector window suffer from several systematic effects, such as insufficient window geometry and centroiding failures due to read-out artifacts - both of which can be significantly improved with modifications to the electronics, read-out speed and microcode.

  12. Double Bright Band Observations with High-Resolution Vertically Pointing Radar, Lidar, and Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber E.; Demoz, Belay; Vermeesch, Kevin; Hicks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    On 11 May 2010, an elevated temperature inversion associated with an approaching warm front produced two melting layers simultaneously, which resulted in two distinct bright bands as viewed from the ER-2 Doppler radar system, a vertically pointing, coherent X band radar located in Greenbelt, MD. Due to the high temporal resolution of this radar system, an increase in altitude of the melting layer of approximately 1.2 km in the time span of 4 min was captured. The double bright band feature remained evident for approximately 17 min, until the lower atmosphere warmed enough to dissipate the lower melting layer. This case shows the relatively rapid evolution of freezing levels in response to an advancing warm front over a 2 h time period and the descent of an elevated warm air mass with time. Although observations of double bright bands are somewhat rare, the ability to identify this phenomenon is important for rainfall estimation from spaceborne sensors because algorithms employing the restriction of a radar bright band to a constant height, especially when sampling across frontal systems, will limit the ability to accurately estimate rainfall.

  13. A novel high-brightness broadband light-source technology from the VUV to the IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Stephen; Smith, Don; Besen, Matthew; Partlow, Matthew; Stolyarov, Daniil; Zhu, Huiling; Holber, William

    2010-04-01

    A novel technology has been developed which enables high-brightness, broadband light output from the VUV to the IR spectral regions. A focused laser is used to sustain a high-pressure xenon discharge inside a bulb, creating a smaller, hotter discharge than can be obtained by using an electrically-driven discharge. This allows for continuous output down to 120 nm wavelength and into the infrared. Application areas include hyperspectral imaging, standoff detection, surveillance, bioanalytical instrumentation, microscopy, and materials studies. Laser-driven optical discharges were first investigated over 30 years ago, providing the initial technical understanding of such discharges. However it took the convergence of two separate elements - the availability of low-cost, high-efficiency CW diode lasers; and a market need for high-brightness, broadband light source - to provide the impetus for further development in this area. Using near-IR CW diode lasers at power levels from 15 W to over 2000 W, we have generated high-pressure xenon discharges having temperatures as high as 10,000 C. The optical brightness of these discharges can be over an order of magnitude higher than those obtainable from the brightest xenon arc lamps, and can be several orders of magnitude brighter than deuterium lamps. Results from modeling of these discharges as well as experimental measurements will be presented.

  14. High brightness phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes on transparent and flexible cellulose films.

    PubMed

    Purandare, Sumit; Gomez, Eliot F; Steckl, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) were fabricated on flexible and transparent reconstituted cellulose obtained from wood pulp. Cellulose is naturally available, abundant, and biodegradable and offers a unique substrate alternative for the fabrication of flexible OLEDs. Transparent cellulose material was formed by dissolution of cellulose in an organic solvent (dimethyl acetamide) at elevated temperature (165 °C) in the presence of a salt (LiCl). The optical transmission of 40-μm thick transparent cellulose sheet averaged 85% over the visible spectrum. High brightness and high efficiency thin film OLEDs were fabricated on transparent cellulose films using phosphorescent Ir(ppy)3 as the emitter material. The OLEDs achieved current and luminous emission efficiencies as high as 47 cd A(-1) and 20 lm W(-1), respectively, and a maximum brightness of 10,000 cd m(-2).

  15. High brightness phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes on transparent and flexible cellulose films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purandare, Sumit; Gomez, Eliot F.; Steckl, Andrew J.

    2014-03-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) were fabricated on flexible and transparent reconstituted cellulose obtained from wood pulp. Cellulose is naturally available, abundant, and biodegradable and offers a unique substrate alternative for the fabrication of flexible OLEDs. Transparent cellulose material was formed by dissolution of cellulose in an organic solvent (dimethyl acetamide) at elevated temperature (165 °C) in the presence of a salt (LiCl). The optical transmission of 40-μm thick transparent cellulose sheet averaged 85% over the visible spectrum. High brightness and high efficiency thin film OLEDs were fabricated on transparent cellulose films using phosphorescent Ir(ppy)3 as the emitter material. The OLEDs achieved current and luminous emission efficiencies as high as 47 cd A-1 and 20 lm W-1, respectively, and a maximum brightness of 10 000 cd m-2.

  16. Universal envelope equation and emittance evolution of high-brightness beam in linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-X.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-01-01

    We report a universal beam envelope equation that governs the transverse linear dynamics of high-intensity and high-brightness relativistic beams under constant acceleration in axisymmetric linear accelerators. This dimensionless and almost parameter-free nonlinear equation is useful for understanding scaling properties and for investigating nonlinear behaviors that are beyond analytical analysis. Particularly, we explore emittance compensation in high-brightness beams evolving from the space-charge regime to the thermal-emittance regime, a transition that commonly occurs during acceleration but is not well studied. A new formula is given for correctly computing the rms bunch emittance from slice envelopes, which is different from the commonly used quadratic sum of the thermal emittance and the rms emittance in the envelope phase space.

  17. Analysis of a high brightness photo electron beam with self field and wake field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    High brightness sources are the basic ingredients in the new accelerator developments such as Free-Electron Laser experiments. The effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, e.g. R.F., Space charge and Wake fields can be detrimental to the beam and the experiments. We present and discuss the formulation used, some simulation and results for the Brookhaven National Laboratory high brightness beam that illustrates effects of the accelerating field, space charge forces (e.g. due to self field of the bunch), and the wake field (e.g. arising from the interaction of the cavity surface and the self field of the bunch).

  18. Analysis of a high brightness photo electron beam with self field and wake field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    High brightness sources are the basic ingredients in the new accelerator developments such as Free-Electron Laser experiments. The effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, e.g. R.F., Space charge and Wake fields can be detrimental to the beam and the experiments. We present and discuss the formulation used, some simulation and results for the Brookhaven National Laboratory high brightness beam that illustrates effects of the accelerating field, space charge forces (e.g. due to self field of the bunch), and the wake field (e.g. arising from the interaction of the cavity surface and the self field of the bunch).

  19. Bright, highly water-soluble triazacyclononane europium complexes to detect ligand binding with time-resolved FRET microscopy.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Sadovnikova, Victoria; Bourrier, Emmanuel; Mathis, Gérard; Lamarque, Laurent; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Parker, David

    2014-09-26

    Luminescent europium complexes are used in a broad range of applications as a result of their particular emissive properties. The synthesis and application of bright, highly water-soluble, and negatively charged sulfonic- or carboxylic acid derivatives of para-substituted aryl-alkynyl triazacyclononane complexes are described. Introduction of the charged solubilizing moieties suppresses cellular uptake or adsorption to living cells making them applicable for labeling and performing assays on membrane receptors. These europium complexes are applied to monitor fluorescent ligand binding on cell-surface proteins with time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays in plate-based format and using TR-FRET microscopy.

  20. Production of high brightness H- beam by charge exchange of hydrogen atom beam in sodium jet

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V.; Zelenski, A.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

    2010-11-16

    Production of H{sup -} beam for accelerators applications by charge exchange of high brightness hydrogen neutral beam in a sodium jet cell is experimentally studied in joint BNL-BINP experiment. In the experiment, a hydrogen-neutral beam with 3-6 keV energy, equivalent current up to 5 A and 200 microsecond pulse duration is used. The atomic beam is produced by charge exchange of a proton beam in a pulsed hydrogen target. Formation of the proton beam is performed in an ion source by four-electrode multiaperture ion-optical system. To achieve small beam emittance, the apertures in the ion-optical system have small enough size, and the extraction of ions is carried out from the surface of plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of {approx}0.2 eV formed as a result of plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. Developed for the BNL optically pumped polarized ion source, the sodium jet target with recirculation and aperture diameter of 2 cm is used in the experiment. At the first stage of the experiment H{sup -} beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}0.15 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained. To increase H{sup -} beam current ballistically focused hydrogen neutral beam will be applied. The effects of H{sup -} beam space-charge and sodium-jet stability will be studied to determine the basic limitations of this approach.

  1. High-brightness electron beams for ultrafast electron microdiffraction and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tianyin; Zhou, Faran; Chang, Kiseok; Tao, Zhensheng; Williams, Joe; Ruan, Chong-Yu; MSU UEM Collaboration

    Currently the ultrafast electron diffraction has achieved sub-picosecond temporal resolution and atomic resolution. However, direct ultrafast imaging of a nanometer scale specimen through coherent single-particle diffraction has not been achieved largely due to insufficient intensity when tuned to a coherence length that matches the size of the specimen under the projected phase space density. Utilizing a recently implemented high-brightness electron source with flexible optical design, we test the performance of ultrafast electron microdiffraction and coherence imaging. We demonstrate the feasibilities of single-shot microdiffraction on a single micrometer-sized domain in Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) and coherent diffractive imaging of 10 nm scale charge-ordered domain structures in single-crystal complex materials, as validated by the measured brightness at the sample plane. These initial results show that source-limited performance even from a sub-relativistic electron beamline can drastically improve the current performance of ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  2. High brightness field emission from printed carbon nanotubes in an S-band microwave gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qilong; Li, Xiangkun; Di, Yusong; Yu, Cairu; Zhang, Xiaobing; Li, Ming; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were applied as cold cathode and placed into an S-band microwave gun operating at 2856 MHz with the pulse duration of 2.8 μs. High brightness field emission was demonstrated and the current density achieves the value more than 4.2 A/cm2. The emittance of field emission beam is calculated to be nearly 21 μm based on the beam profile of emission electrons monitored via yttrium aluminum garnet screen. The infrared image of printed CNTs confirms that the emitters in the center contributed more electrons and the heat generated during the large current density field emission. The results in the paper imply that randomly distributed printed CNTs have the potential to be applied as the high brightness electron sources for free electron lasers.

  3. Bright high-order harmonic generation with controllable polarization from a relativistic plasma mirror.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources with a controllable polarization state are powerful tools for investigating the structural and electronic as well as the magnetic properties of materials. However, such light sources are still limited to only a few free-electron laser facilities and, very recently, to high-order harmonic generation from noble gases. Here we propose and numerically demonstrate a laser-plasma scheme to generate bright XUV pulses with fully controlled polarization. In this scheme, an elliptically polarized laser pulse is obliquely incident on a plasma surface, and the reflected radiation contains pulse trains and isolated circularly or highly elliptically polarized attosecond XUV pulses. The harmonic polarization state is fully controlled by the laser-plasma parameters. The mechanism can be explained within the relativistically oscillating mirror model. This scheme opens a practical and promising route to generate bright attosecond XUV pulses with desirable ellipticities in a straightforward and efficient way for a number of applications. PMID:27531047

  4. Bright high-order harmonic generation with controllable polarization from a relativistic plasma mirror

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources with a controllable polarization state are powerful tools for investigating the structural and electronic as well as the magnetic properties of materials. However, such light sources are still limited to only a few free-electron laser facilities and, very recently, to high-order harmonic generation from noble gases. Here we propose and numerically demonstrate a laser–plasma scheme to generate bright XUV pulses with fully controlled polarization. In this scheme, an elliptically polarized laser pulse is obliquely incident on a plasma surface, and the reflected radiation contains pulse trains and isolated circularly or highly elliptically polarized attosecond XUV pulses. The harmonic polarization state is fully controlled by the laser–plasma parameters. The mechanism can be explained within the relativistically oscillating mirror model. This scheme opens a practical and promising route to generate bright attosecond XUV pulses with desirable ellipticities in a straightforward and efficient way for a number of applications. PMID:27531047

  5. Numerical evaluation of a 13.5-nm high-brightness microplasma extreme ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Hiroyuki Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Jiang, Weihua; Miura, Taisuke; Endo, Akira; Ejima, Takeo; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2015-11-21

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission and its spatial distribution as well as plasma parameters in a microplasma high-brightness light source are characterized by the use of a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The expected EUV source size, which is determined by the expansion of the microplasma due to hydrodynamic motion, was evaluated to be 16 μm (full width) and was almost reproduced by the experimental result which showed an emission source diameter of 18–20 μm at a laser pulse duration of 150 ps [full width at half-maximum]. The numerical simulation suggests that high brightness EUV sources should be produced by use of a dot target based microplasma with a source diameter of about 20 μm.

  6. High-brightness low-power consumption microLED arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonar, James R.; Valentine, Gareth J.; Gong, Zheng; Small, James; Gorton, Steve

    2016-03-01

    microLED arrays are a route to providing emissive displays with high brightness and low power consumption performance. In this talk we will discuss results pertaining to sub 10 μm LED pixels, the challenges posed and performance achieved in forming microLED arrays. In particular, pixel pitch, backplane capabilities and colourisation. The applications which can benefit from this approach will also be discussed.

  7. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  8. REX, a 5-MV pulsed-power source for driving high-brightness electron beam diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.L.; Kauppila, T.J.; Ridlon, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Relativistic Electron-beam Experiment, or REX accelerator, is a pulsed-power source capable of driving a 100-ohm load at 5 MV, 50 kA, 45 ns (FWHM) with less than a 10-ns rise and 15-ns fall time. This paper describes the pulsed-power modifications, modelling, and extensive measurements on REX to allow it to drive high impedance (100s of ohms) diode loads with a shaped voltage pulse. A major component of REX is the 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick Lucite insulator with embedded grading rings that separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. A radially tailored, liquid-based resistor provides a stiff voltage source that is insensitive to small variations of the diode current and, in addition, optimizes the electric field stress across the vacuum side of the insulator. The high-current operation of REX employs both multichannel peaking and point-plane diverter switches. This mode reduces the prepulse to less than 2 kV and the postpulse to less than 5% of the energy delivered to the load. Pulse shaping for the present diode load is done through two L-C transmission line filters and a tapered, glycol-based line adjacent to the water PFL and output switch. This has allowed REX to drive a diode producing a 4-MV, 4.5-kA, 55-ns flat-top electron beam with a normalized Lapostolle emittance of 0.96 mm-rad corresponding to a beam brightness in excess of 4.4 {times} 10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2} {minus}rad{sup 2}. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Optimization of high-order harmonic brightness in the space and time domains

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Kim, I. Jong; Lee, Dong Gun; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lee, Yong Soo; Nam, Chang Hee; Tosa, Valer

    2004-03-01

    Brightness of high-order harmonics is optimized in the space domain by profile flattening and self-guiding of intense femtosecond laser pulse and in the time domain by controlling the laser chirp. The profile flattening and self-guiding of the laser pulse propagating through a long gas jet effectively increased the phase-matched harmonic generation volume, thereby obtaining strong harmonics with low beam divergence, and the laser chirp control allowed the generation of spectrally sharp harmonics. At optimized conditions, the 61st harmonic, obtained at 134 A from Ne, had a brightness of about 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}/srad with a beam divergence of 0.5 mrad and a spectral bandwidth of 0.7 A.

  10. An Increasing Stellar Baryon Fraction in Bright Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Papovich, Casey; Milosavljević, Miloš; Dekel, Avishai; Narayanan, Desika; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Cooray, Asantha; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salmon, Brett; Willner, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately {M}{UV}*˜ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 173 bright, MUV < -21 galaxies at z = 4-7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that {M}{UV}* galaxies at z = 4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/M⊙) = 9.6-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z = 4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z = 2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation for a fixed dust-attenuation curve. Matching the abundances of these bright z = 4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi ΛCDM simulation implies that the typical halo masses in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies decrease from log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.9 at z = 4 to log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.4 at z = 7. Thus, although we are studying galaxies at a similar stellar mass across multiple redshifts, these galaxies live in lower mass halos at higher redshift. The stellar baryon fraction in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies in units of the cosmic mean Ωb/Ωm rises from 5.1% at z = 4 to 11.7% at z = 7; this evolution is significant at the ˜3σ level. This rise does not agree with simple expectations of how galaxies grow, and implies that some effect, perhaps a diminishing efficiency of feedback, is allowing a higher fraction of available baryons to be converted into stars at high redshifts.

  11. Highly modular high-brightness diode laser system design for a wide application range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, Haro; Kruschke, Bastian; Koch, Ralf; Ferrario, Fabio; Kern, Holger; Pahl, Ullrich; Ehm, Einar; Pflueger, Silke; Grohe, Andreas; Gries, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    For an economic production it is important to serve as many applications as possible while keeping the product variations minimal. We present our modular laser design, which is based on single emitters and various combining technics. In a first step we accept a reduction of the very high brightness of the single emitters by vertical stacking. Those emitters can be wavelength stabilized by an external resonator, providing the very same feedback to each of those laser diodes which leads to an output power of about 100W with BPP of <3.5 mm*mrad (FA) and <5 mm*mrad (SA). Further power scaling is accomplished by polarization and wavelength multiplexing yielding high optical efficiencies of more than 80% and results in about 500 W launched into a 100 μm fiber with 0.15 NA. Subsequently those building blocks can be stacked also by the very same dense spectral combing technique up to multi kW Systems without further reduction of the BPP. These "500W building blocks" are consequently designed in a way that without any system change new wavelengths can be implemented by only exchanging parts but without change of the production process. This design principal offers the option to adapt the wavelength of those blocks to any applications, from UV, visible into the far IR. From laser pumping and scientific applications to materials processing such as cutting and welding of copper aluminum or steel and also medical application. Operating at wavelengths between 900 nm and 1100 nm, these systems are mainly used in cutting and welding, but the technology can also be adapted to other wavelength ranges, such as 793 nm and 1530 nm. Around 1.5 μm the diodes are already successfully used for resonant pumping of Erbium lasers.[1] Furthermore, the fully integrated electronic concept allows addressing further applications, as it is capable of very short μs pulses up to cw mode operation by simple software commands.

  12. High-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules in fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Marty; Urbanek, Wolfram; Hoener, Kylan; Kennedy, Keith W.; Bao, Ling; Dawson, David; Cragerud, Emily S.; Balsley, David; Burkholder, Gary; Reynolds, Mitch; Price, Kirk; Haden, Jim; Kanskar, Manoj; Kliner, Dahv A.

    2014-03-01

    High-power, high-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules enable high-performance industrial fiber lasers with simple system architectures, multi-kW output powers, excellent beam quality, unsurpassed reliability, and low initial and operating costs. We report commercially available (element™), single-emitter-based, 9xx nm pump sources with powers up to 130 W in a 105 μm fiber and 250 W in a 200 μm fiber. This combination of high power and high brightness translates into improved fiber laser performance, e.g., simultaneously achieving high nonlinear thresholds and excellent beam quality at kW power levels. Wavelength-stabilized, 976 nm versions of these pumps are available for applications requiring minimization of the gain-fiber length (e.g., generation of high-peak-power pulses). Recent prototypes have achieved output powers up to 300 W in a 200 μm fiber. Extensive environmental and life testing at both the chip and module level under accelerated and real-world operating conditions have demonstrated extremely high reliability, with innovative designs having eliminated package-induced-failure mechanisms. Finally, we report integrated Pump Modules that provide < 1.6 kW of fiber-coupled power conveniently formatted for fiber-laser pumping or direct-diode applications; these 19" rack-mountable, 2U units combine the outputs of up to 14 elements™ using fused-fiber combiners, and they include high-efficiency diode drivers and safety sensors.

  13. High-Brightness Picosecond Proton Beam Source Based on BNL TW CO2 Laser: Proof-of-Principle Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Pavlishin, I. V.; Yakimenko, V.; Shkolnikov, P. L.; Pukhov, A.

    2006-11-27

    We initiate study of a high-brightness multi-MeV ion and proton beam source driven by a picosecond CO2 laser. High-energy, collimated particle beams will originate from the rear surface of laser-irradiated foils by a process called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA). The expected advantage of using a CO2 gas laser for this application rather than the ultra-fast solid state lasers is the 100-fold increase of the electron ponderomotive potential for the same laser intensity due to a 10 times longer CO2 laser wavelength. This promises to provide substantial enhancement in energy efficiency and particle yield, and will facilitate the advancement of the TNSA technique towards practical applications.

  14. High Precision Bright-Star Astrometry with the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secrest, Nathan; Dudik, Rachel; Berghea, Ciprian; Hennessy, Greg; Dorland, Bryan

    2015-08-01

    While GAIA will provide excellent positional measurements of hundreds of millions of stars between 5 < mag < 20, an ongoing challenge in the field of high-precision differential astrometry is the positional accuracy of very bright stars (mag < 5), due to the enormous dynamic range between bright stars of interest, such as those in the Hipparcos catalog, and their background field stars, which are especially important for differential astrometry. Over the past few years, we have been testing the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System (UAHC), which utilizes an H4RG-10 detector in windowing mode, as a possible solution to the NOFS USNO Bright Star Astrometric Database (UBAD). In this work, we discuss the results of an astrometric analysis of single-epoch Hipparcos data taken with the UAHC from the 1.55m Kaj Strand Astrometric Reflector at NOFS from June 27-30, 2014. We discuss the calibration of this data, as well as an astrometric analysis pipeline we developed that will enable multi-epoch differential and absolute astrometry with the UAHC. We find that while the overall differential astrometric stability of data taken with the UAHC is good (5-10 mas single-measurement precision) and comparable to other ground-based astrometric camera systems, bright stars in the detector window suffer from several systematic effects, such as insufficient window geometry and centroiding failures due to read-out artifacts—both of which can be significantly improved with modifications to the electronics, read-out speed and microcode.

  15. Single-crystal phosphors for high-brightness white LEDs/LDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víllora, Encarnación G.; Arjoca, Stelian; Inomata, Daisuke; Shimamura, Kiyoshi

    2016-03-01

    White light-emitting diodes (wLEDs) are the new environmental friendly sources for general lighting purposes. For applications requiring a high-brightness, current wLEDs present overheating problems, which drastically decrease their emission efficiency, color quality and lifetime. This work gives an overview of the recent investigations on single-crystal phosphors (SCPs), which are proposed as novel alternative to conventional ceramic powder phosphors (CPPs). This totally new approach takes advantage of the superior properties of single-crystals in comparison with ceramic materials. SCPs exhibit an outstanding conversion efficiency and thermal stability up to 300°C. Furthermore, compared with encapsulated CPPs, SCPs possess a superior thermal conductivity, so that generated heat can be released efficiently. The conjunction of all these characteristics results in a low temperature rise of SCPs even under high blue irradiances, where conventional CPPs are overheated or even burned. Therefore, SCPs represent the ideal, long-demanded all-inorganic phosphors for high-brightness white light sources, especially those involving the use of high-density laser-diode beams.

  16. Working group II report: Production and dynamics of high brightness beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarizes the main discussions of the Working Group on the Production and Dynamics of High Brightness Beams. The following topics are covered in this paper. Proposed new electron sources and needed research on existing sources is covered. The discussions on issues relating to the description of phase space on non-thermalized electron beam distributions and the theoretical modeling on non-thermalized electron beam distributions is presented. Finally, the present status of the theoretical modeling of beam transport in bends is given.

  17. High brightness beam shaping and fiber coupling of laser-diode bars.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-04-10

    The strong beam quality mismatch in the fast and slow axes of laser-diode bars requires a significant beam shaping method to reach the parameters needed for fiber coupling. An effective solution to this problem is proposed that is based on a right-angle prism array and a distributed cylinder-lens stack. Coupling 12 mini-bars into a standard 100 μm core diameter and 0.15 numerical aperture fiber is achieved, and the output power can reach 400 W. Using this technique, production of compact and high brightness fiber-coupled laser-diode modules is possible.

  18. Computational and experimental characterization of high-brightness beams for femtosecond electron imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Tao, Z.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.; Ruan, C.-Y.

    2013-12-16

    Using a multilevel fast multipole method, coupled with the shadow imaging of femtosecond photoelectron pulses for validation, we quantitatively elucidate the photocathode, space charge, and virtual cathode physics, which fundamentally limit the spatiotemporal and spectroscopic resolution and throughput of ultrafast electron microscope (UEM) systems. We present a simple microscopic description to capture the nonlinear beam dynamics based on a two-fluid picture and elucidate an unexpected dominant role of image potential pinning in accelerating the emittance growth process. These calculations set theoretical limits on the performance of UEM systems and provide useful guides for photocathode design for high-brightness electron beam systems.

  19. Growth of highly bright-white silica nanowires as diffusive reflection coating in LED lighting.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shuang; Shi, Tielin; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Dan; Lai, Wuxing; Tang, Zirong

    2011-12-19

    Large quantities of silica nanowires were synthesized through thermal treatment of silicon wafer in the atmosphere of N(2)/H(2)(5%) under 1200 °C with Cu as catalyst. These nanowires grew to form a natural bright-white mat, which showed highly diffusive reflectivity over the UV-visible range, with more than 60% at the whole range and up to 88% at 350 nm. The utilization of silica nanowires in diffusive coating on the reflector cup of LED is demonstrated, which shows greatly improved light distribution comparing with the specular reflector cup. It is expected that these nanowires can be promising coating material for optoelectronic applications.

  20. Application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness ion-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of cw linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams. The key issues associated with this endeavor have been delineated in an earlier paper. Considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically to resolve a number of these issues. In this paper we summarize this progress. We also identify current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will confront the remaining issues and/or provide added capability to the technology. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  1. High-brightness, high-current density cathode for induction linac FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Chen, Y.-J.; Nexsen, W.E.; Green, M.C.; Miram, G.; Nordquist, A.V.

    1988-09-28

    We have recently initiated an investigation to determine the intrinsic operating limits of an osmium coated dispenser cathode for use in free-electron lasers (FELs) driven by an induction linear accelerator. The experimental apparatus consists of a 5.1-cm-diam osmium coated dispenser cathode driven by a 250-kV, 10-..cap omega.., 35-ns Blumlein pulse line. The pepper pot technique is used to measure intrinsic cathode brightness and uniformity. Recent measurements have yielded brightness values exceeding 1 /times/ 10/sup 10/ A/m/sup 2/rad/sup 2/ for current densities up to 140 A/cm/sup 2/. We have also obtained quantitative data on cathode poisoning caused by a number of chemical agents of interest in the induction linac environment. 7 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A novel and high brightness AlN:Mn2+ red phosphor for field emission displays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Xie, Rong-Jun; Dierre, Benjamin; Takeda, Takashi; Suehiro, Takayuki; Hirosaki, Naoto; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Li, Huili; Sun, Zhuo

    2014-04-28

    Mn(2+) doped-AlN red phosphors were prepared by the solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction, SEM-EDS, photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence were utilized to characterize the prepared phosphor. Under UV light or electron beam excitation, the AlN:Mn(2+) phosphors exhibit a strong red emission centered at 600 nm, which is ascribed to the characteristic (4)T1((4)G)-(6)A1((6)S) transition of Mn(2+). Energy level diagrams were constructed to discuss the photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence processes of the AlN:1% Mn(2+) phosphor. The oxygen-related defects in AlN have great influence on the photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of the AlN:1% Mn(2+) phosphor. The dependence of brightness on accelerating voltage or electric current, the decay behavior of CL intensity under the electron bombardment, and the stability of CIE chromaticity coordinates were investigated in detail. The results indicate that the AlN:Mn(2+) phosphor exhibits a higher brightness, higher color purity, and lower saturation compared to the red Y2O3:Eu(3+) phosphor, which gives the AlN:Mn(2+) phosphor great potential as a red phosphor for full color FEDs. PMID:24526132

  3. High brightness neutral hydrogen in M31: A new probe of interstellar pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert; Walterbos, Rene

    1990-01-01

    An observational parameter of our own Galaxy, the peak brightness temperature of neutral hydrogen in emission, was determined almost twenty years ago (Burton 1970). This quantity, although possessing a degree of local variations, has a remarkably consistent peak value of 125 K towards spiral arm segments with a few isolated peaks extending to 135 K, once sufficient spatial and velocity resolution are used (less than or equal to 70 pc, less than or equal to 5 km/s) to resolve the emission peaks. The higher spatial and velocity resolution of more recent surveys has not led to the detection of higher brightnesses. For many years this remarkable observational result has received little attention, primarily because similar data for other galaxies, which would allow a meaningful comparison and analysis, did not exist. Recently this situation has changed. A Westerbork survey of M33 (Deul and Van der Hulst 1987, and private comm.) with 40 pc x 8 km/s resolution has revealed consistent peak values of only 95 plus or minus 5 K (although there is still some question of whether the velocity resolution was sufficient in this case), while a Very Large Array (VLA) survey of M31 (Braun 1989a) with 35 pc x 5 km/s resolution has shown consistent peak values but at a temperature of 155 to 165 K. It has become clear that although peak HI brightness seems to be a well-defined quantity within individual galaxies (with a degree of local variation) there are very significant differences in this quantity amongst different galaxies. Researchers embarked on an observational program directed at a sample of 11 nearby galaxies: NGC 55, 247, 7793, 3031, 2366, 2403, 4236, 4826, 4736, 4244, and 5457. They hope to determine the gas properties and phases as a function of both galaxy type and position within the galaxies utilizing high resolution HI observations and optical narrow band imagery and spectroscopy which are now underway.

  4. Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

    2006-08-17

    This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as “on the fly” adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include • AC Power Factor Correction; • High power efficiency; • Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular “white” light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

  5. Method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam

    DOEpatents

    Hannon, Fay

    2016-08-02

    A method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam. The method includes 1) determining the bunch charge and the initial kinetic energy of the highly space-charge dominated input beam; 2) applying the bunch charge and initial kinetic energy properties of the highly space-charge dominated input beam to determine the number of accelerator cavities required to accelerate the bunches to relativistic speed; 3) providing the required number of accelerator cavities; and 4) setting the gradient of the radio frequency (RF) cavities; and 5) operating the phase of the accelerator cavities between -90 and zero degrees of the sinusoid of phase to simultaneously accelerate and bunch the charged particles to maximize brightness, and until the beam is relativistic and emittance-dominated.

  6. High brightness potassium ion gun for the HIF neutralized transport experiment (NTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high intensity beam to a small spot requires a high brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable size provides the capability to vary the beam perveance and to significantly reduce the beam emittance. We shall report on the gun characterization including current density profile, phase space distributions and the control of electrons generated by the beam scraping at the aperture. Comparison with particle simulations using the EGUN code will be presented.

  7. High brightness direct diode laser with kW output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, Haro; Kruschke, Bastian; Koch, Ralf; Ferrario, Fabio; Kern, Holger; Pahl, Ulrich; Pflueger, Silke; Gries, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    High power, high brightness diode lasers are beginning to challenge solid state lasers, i.e. disk and fiber lasers. The core technologies for brightness scaling of diode lasers are optical stacking and dense spectral combining (DSC), as well as improvements of the diode material. Diode lasers will have the lowest cost of ownership, highest efficiency and most compact design among all lasers. In our modular product design tens of single emitters are combined in a compact package and launched into a 200 μm fiber with 0.08 NA. Dense spectral combining enables power scaling from 80 W to kilowatts. Volume Bragg Gratings and dichroic filters yield high optical efficiencies of more than 80% at low cost. Each module emits up to 500 W with a beam quality of 5.5 mm*mrad and less than 20 nm linewidth. High speed switching power supplies are integrated into the module and rise times as short as 6 μs have been demonstrated. Fast control algorithms based on FPGA and embedded microcontroller ensure high wall plug efficiency with a unique control loop time of only 30 μs. Individual modules are spectrally combined to result in direct diode laser systems with kilowatts of output power at identical beam quality. For low loss fiber coupling a 200 μm fiber is used and the NA is limited to 0.08 corresponding to a beam quality of 7.5 mm*mrad. The controller architecture is fully scalable without sacrificing loop time. We leverage automated manufacturing for cost effective, high yield production. A precision robotic system handles and aligns the individual fast axis lenses and tracks all quality relevant data. Similar technologies are also deployed for dense spectral combining aligning the VBG and dichroic filters. Operating at wavelengths between 900 nm and 1100 nm, these systems are mainly used in cutting and welding, but the technology can also be adapted to other wavelength ranges, such as 793 nm and 1530 nm. Around 1.5 μm the diodes are already successfully used for resonant

  8. Properties and Frequency Conversion of High-Brightness Diode-Laser Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Beier, Bernard; Wallenstein, Richard

    An overview of recent developments in the field of high-power, high-brightness diode-lasers, and the optically nonlinear conversion of their output into other wavelength ranges, is given. We describe the generation of continuous-wave (CW) laser beams at power levels of several hundreds of milliwatts to several watts with near-perfect spatial and spectral properties using Master-Oscillator Power-Amplifier (MOPA) systems. With single- or double-stage systems, using amplifiers of tapered or rectangular geometry, up to 2.85 W high-brightness radiation is generated at wavelengths around 810nm with AlGaAs diodes. Even higher powers, up to 5.2W of single-frequency and high spatial quality beams at 925nm, are obtained with InGaAs diodes. We describe the basic properties of the oscillators and amplifiers used. A strict proof-of-quality for the diode radiation is provided by direct and efficient nonlinear optical conversion of the diode MOPA output into other wavelength ranges. We review recent experiments with the highest power levels obtained so far by direct frequency doubling of diode radiation. In these experiments, 100mW single-frequency ultraviolet light at 403nm was generated, as well as 1W of single-frequency blue radiation at 465nm. Nonlinear conversion of diode radiation into widely tunable infrared radiation has recently yielded record values. We review the efficient generation of widely tunable single-frequency radiation in the infrared with diode-pumped Optical Parametric Oscillators (OPOs). With this system, single-frequency output radiation with powers of more than 0.5W was generated, widely tunable around wavelengths of 2.1,m and 1.65,m and with excellent spectral and spatial quality. These developments are clear indicators of recent advances in the field of high-brightness diode-MOPA systems, and may emphasize their future central importance for applications within a vast range of optical

  9. High resolution deep imaging of a bright radio quiet QSO at z ~ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; He, Wei; Yamada, Toru; Tanaka, Ichi; Iye, Masanori; Ji, Tuo

    2015-05-01

    We have obtained deep J and Ks-band images centered on a bright radio quiet QSO UM 402 (zem = 2.856) using the IRCS camera and adaptive optics systems that are part of the Subaru Telescope, as well as retrieved WFC3/F140W archive images of this object. A faint galaxy (mk = 23.32±0.05 in the Vega magnitude system) that lies ~ 2.4″ north of the QSO sightline has been clearly resolved in all three deep high resolution datasets, and appears as an irregular galaxy with two close components in the Ks-band images (separation ~ 0.3″). Given the small impact parameter (b = 19.6 kpc, at zlls = 2.531), as well as the red color of (J - Ks)Vega ~ 1.6, it might be a candidate galaxy giving rise to the Lyman Limit system absorption at zabs = 2.531 seen in the QSO spectrum. After carefully subtracting the point spread function from the QSO images, the host galaxy of this bright radio quiet QSO at z ~ 3 was marginally revealed. We placed a lower limit on the host component of mk ~ 23.3 according to our analyses. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  10. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. High-power high-brightness semiconductor tapered diode lasers for the red and near infrared spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumpf, B.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.

    2010-02-01

    The most promising concept to achieve high-output power together with a good beam quality is the tapered laser consisting of a straight ridge waveguide (RW) section and a tapered gain-region. The RW section should support only the fundamental guided mode and should suppress higher order modes. The taper angle has to be selected with respect to the lateral divergence of the beam propagating from the RW to the tapered section. High brightness tapered devices in the wavelength range between 635 nm and 1085 nm will be presented. For red emitting tapered lasers around 650 nm, the output power is limited to about 1 W due to the properties of the laser material. At this output power a beam propagation ratio M2 of 1.3 and a brightness of 100 MW•cm-2•sr-1 will be shown. Devices made from laser structures with low vertical divergence down to 25° (95% power included) without a significant deterioration of device parameters will be presented for the longer wavelength range near 1 μm. For tapered lasers manufactured from these structures, nearly diffraction limited output powers larger than 10 W and a brightness of 1 GW•cm-2•sr-1 were measured.

  12. High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Barletta, William A.; Jiang, Ximan; Ji, Lili

    2009-10-27

    Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

  13. PREFACE: Workshop on Sources of Polarized Leptons and High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, Wolfgang; Aulenbacher, Kurt

    2011-04-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the International Workshop on Sources of Polarized Leptons and High Brightness Electron Beams (PESP2010). The workshop was hosted by the University of Bonn from 21-24 September 2010. PESP2010 has been conducted as satellite workshop preceding the International SPIN Physics Symposium (SPIN2010). In view of the expanding and challenging field of the production of high brightness lepton beams, the selection of workshop topics was extended to cover the demands of modern accelerator developments and applications. As novel light sources such as FELs and ERLs place new requirements on the properties of unpolarized beams in terms of brightness and intensity, the generation of DC and pulsed beams was included as a major topic in the scientific program. In keeping with tradition, polarized beams formed another key topic. The discussion was however extended to the generation of polarized positron beams, as e.g. required for future linear colliders. Besides the presentation of recent developments in these fields and status reports from laboratories worldwide, additional emphasis was put on the applications of polarized electron beams. PESP2010 was attended by 61 registered participants from all over the world. The scientific program comprised 30 talks in plenary sessions and 7 posters. An overview of the scientific results presented at PESP2010 was given in a summary talk at the SPIN2010 symposium. In total 24 contributions to the proceedings were submitted and reviewed by members of the scientific advisory committee before publication in this volume. Many people contributed to the success of the workshop. Among them are members of the Local Organizing Committee as well as the scientific and technical staff of the Physics Institute and the in-house accelerator facility ELSA, who patiently and efficiently took care of the numerous organizational aspects related to the event. The environment they created was highly conducive to a

  14. Quantitative in situ determination of hydration of bright high-sulfate Martian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Gellert, R.; Lee, M.; Mallett, C. L.; Maxwell, J. A.; O'Meara, J. M.

    2008-04-01

    The total water content of soils and rocks encountered by the Spirit rover has been determined by a new analysis method applied to the existing data from the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). This approach employs Monte Carlo simulation of the intensities of the photon scatter peaks in the APXS spectra, together with extraction of these intensities from the spectra. For any individual sample, the water detection limits (~6 wt %) and error bars are high due to low counting statistics in the spectra, but combining the data from a well-defined group of similar samples improves the error bars and lowers the limit. Thus typical basaltic surface soils are found to be essentially dry (<1 wt % water) and basaltic rocks are very close to dry (<3.5 wt % water). For four bright subsurface soils in Gusev Crater the water content lies in the range 6-18 wt % these soils contain sulfur at unusually high levels (>12 wt %, 30 wt % SO3) relative to the soils common at other landing sites. Mass balance mixing calculations of available cations infer the presence of Fe-, Mg-, and Ca-sulfates in these bright soils. Together with constraints from mineralogy, our results imply that highly hydrated ferric sulfates are the most important carrier of the bound water found in these four spots. In conjunction with the complementary available chemical and mineralogical information they reveal additional information about present bound water reservoirs on Mars, their mineralogy and their spatial and lateral distribution along the Spirit rover's traverse.

  15. Bright high z SnIa: A challenge for {lambda}CDM

    SciTech Connect

    Perivolaropoulos, L.; Shafieloo, A.

    2009-06-15

    It has recently been pointed out by Kowalski et. al.[Astrophys. J. 686, 749 (2008).] that there is 'an unexpected brightness of the SnIa data at z>1'. We quantify this statement by constructing a new statistic which is applicable directly on the type Ia supernova (SnIa) distance moduli. This statistic is designed to pick up systematic brightness trends of SnIa data points with respect to a best fit cosmological model at high redshifts. It is based on binning the normalized differences between the SnIa distance moduli and the corresponding best fit values in the context of a specific cosmological model (e.g. {lambda}CDM). These differences are normalized by the standard errors of the observed distance moduli. We then focus on the highest redshift bin and extend its size toward lower redshifts until the binned normalized difference (BND) changes sign (crosses 0) at a redshift z{sub c} (bin size N{sub c}). The bin size N{sub c} of this crossing (the statistical variable) is then compared with the corresponding crossing bin size N{sub mc} for Monte Carlo data realizations based on the best fit model. We find that the crossing bin size N{sub c} obtained from the Union08 and Gold06 data with respect to the best fit {lambda}CDM model is anomalously large compared to N{sub mc} of the corresponding Monte Carlo data sets obtained from the best fit {lambda}CDM in each case. In particular, only 2.2% of the Monte Carlo {lambda}CDM data sets are consistent with the Gold06 value of N{sub c} while the corresponding probability for the Union08 value of N{sub c} is 5.3%. Thus, according to this statistic, the probability that the high redshift brightness bias of the Union08 and Gold06 data sets is realized in the context of a (w{sub 0},w{sub 1})=(-1,0) model ({lambda}CDM cosmology) is less than 6%. The corresponding realization probability in the context of a (w{sub 0},w{sub 1})=(-1.4,2) model is more than 30% for both the Union08 and the Gold06 data sets indicating a much better

  16. Design, conditioning, and performance of a high voltage, high brightness dc photoelectron gun with variable gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxson, Jared; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Dobbins, John; Liu, Xianghong; Smolenski, Karl

    2014-09-01

    A new high voltage photoemission gun has been constructed at Cornell University which features a segmented insulator and a movable anode, allowing the cathode-anode gap to be adjusted. In this work, we describe the gun's overall mechanical and high voltage design, the surface preparation of components, as well as the clean construction methods. We present high voltage conditioning data using a 50 mm cathode-anode gap, in which the conditioning voltage exceeds 500 kV, as well as at smaller gaps. Finally, we present simulated emittance results obtained from a genetic optimization scheme using voltage values based on the conditioning data. These results indicate that for charges up to 100 pC, a 30 mm gap at 400 kV has equal or smaller 100% emittance than a 50 mm gap at 450 kV, and also a smaller core emittance, when placed as the source for the Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector with bunch length constrained to be <3 ps rms. For 100 pC up to 0.5 nC charges, the 50 mm gap has larger core emittance than the 30 mm gap, but conversely smaller 100% emittance.

  17. Design, conditioning, and performance of a high voltage, high brightness dc photoelectron gun with variable gap

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, Jared; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Dobbins, John; Liu, Xianghong; Smolenski, Karl

    2014-09-15

    A new high voltage photoemission gun has been constructed at Cornell University which features a segmented insulator and a movable anode, allowing the cathode-anode gap to be adjusted. In this work, we describe the gun's overall mechanical and high voltage design, the surface preparation of components, as well as the clean construction methods. We present high voltage conditioning data using a 50 mm cathode-anode gap, in which the conditioning voltage exceeds 500 kV, as well as at smaller gaps. Finally, we present simulated emittance results obtained from a genetic optimization scheme using voltage values based on the conditioning data. These results indicate that for charges up to 100 pC, a 30 mm gap at 400 kV has equal or smaller 100% emittance than a 50 mm gap at 450 kV, and also a smaller core emittance, when placed as the source for the Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector with bunch length constrained to be <3 ps rms. For 100 pC up to 0.5 nC charges, the 50 mm gap has larger core emittance than the 30 mm gap, but conversely smaller 100% emittance.

  18. Research on the high-brightness traffic variable message sign based on laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Li-li; Huang, Hai-tao; Ruan, Chi

    2015-10-01

    Researches indicate that foggy weather is one of the most critical factors that restrict human's traffic activities and cause traffic accidents. It will reduce the visibility of traffic message board, which could cause the insecurity of transportation. Commonly, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were used as light source for variable message sign, which could not be seen clearly in the foggy low visibility condition. A high-brightness light source which could be used for variable information board was firstly put forward in this paper. And a new type of variable message sign used in low visibility condition was also introduced. Besides, the attenuation characteristics of laser diode (LD) and light-emitting diode (LED) were analyzed respectively. Calculation and simulation show that the attenuation of red light source is fastest, and the yellow LED light has the better transmittance property. In the experiment, LDs were used to make variable message board for verifying image definition. A 16*16 array structure composed of LDs was designed and could display Chinese characters. By comparing the display effect of LDs and LEDs driven with same power, they were placed in fog chamber of the visibility less than 5 meters. And experiment results show that the penetrability of red LD light is better than that of red LED. So traffic variable message sign based on LDs could improve the image definition and the information could be seen more clearly in the foggy weather. In addition to the high-brightness, good coherence, good direction, experimental results show that traffic variable message board based on LD has better visual effect in low visibility condition.

  19. High brightness cathode experiments on the experimental test accelerator (ETA). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, L.; Proulx, G.

    1984-01-01

    The experiments performed on the ETA during the months of September through October of 1984 were intended to accomplish two objectives; to discover or develop a source capable of producing an electron beam whose brightness is substantially higher than that of previous sources, and to determine, if possible, the mechanisms which limit the source brightness so that further enhancements might be obtained. The results of the experiments met these objectives to a limited degree. A cathode material (velvet) and a diode geometry were identified which resulted in more than a factor of two improvements in brightness over that obtained with previous flashboard cathodes. Experiments were performed which have yielded information about mechanisms which may limit beam brightness, and have suggested approaches for further work to improve brightness. However, the desired brightness of 10/sup 5/ A/(cm/sup 2/-rad/sup 2/) was not achieved in these experiments. This report contains a discussion of the cathodes used, the diode geometries employed, the diagnostics, the typical characteristics of a single beam experiment, and the characteristics of the collimator used to measure the brightness. The entire ensemble of brightness data is presented and broken down into classes of experiments. In addition, the results of an EBQ calculation of one diode geometry are discussed, and differences between the results of similar experiments on ETA and ATA are noted. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  20. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium–tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  1. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium-tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  2. Tunable high-power high-brightness vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li

    The extraction of high power with high beam quality from semiconductor lasers has long been a goal of semiconductor laser research. Optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) have already shown the potential for their high power high brightness operation. In addition, the macroscopic nature of the external cavity in these lasers makes intracavity nonlinear frequency conversion quite convenient. High-power high-brightness VECSELs with wavelength flexibility enlarge their applications. The drawbacks of the VECSELs are their poor spectral characteristics, thermal-induced wavelength shift and a few-nm-wide linewidth. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate tunable high-power high-brightness VECSELs with spectral and polarization control. The low gain and microcavity resonance of the VECSEL are the major challenges for developing tunable high-power VECSELs with large tunability. To overcome these challenges, the V-shaped cavity, where the anti-reflection coated VECSEL chip serves as a folding mirror, and an extremely low-loss (at tuned wavelength) intracavity birefringent filter at Brewster's angle are employed to achieved the high gain, low-loss wavelength selectivity and the elimination of microcavity. This cavity results in multi-watt TEM00 VECSELs with a wavelength tuning range of 20˜30 nm about 975 nm. Also the longitudinal mode discrimination introduced by birefringent filter makes the linewidth narrow down to 0.5 nm. After the tunable linearly polarized fundamental beam is achieved, the tunable blue-green VECSELs are demonstrated by using type I intracavity second-harmonic generation. The spectral control of VECSELs makes it possible to apply them as an efficient pump source for Er/Yb codoped single-mode fiber laser and to realize the spectral beam combining for multi-wavelength high-brightness power scaling. In this dissertation, theory, design, fabrication and characterization are presented. Rigorous microscopic

  3. The effect of surface brightness dimming in the selection of high-z galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Calvi, V.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradley, L.; Pizzella, A.; Kim, S.

    2014-12-01

    Cosmological surface brightness (SB) dimming of the form (1 + z){sup –4} affects all sources. The strong dependence of SB dimming on redshift z suggests the presence of a selection bias when searching for high-z galaxies, i.e., we tend to detect only those galaxies with a high SB. However, unresolved knots of emission are not affected by SB dimming, thus providing a way to test the clumpiness of high-z galaxies. Our strategy relies on the comparison of the total flux detected for the same source in surveys characterized by different depth. For all galaxies, deeper images permit the better investigation of low-SB features. Cosmological SB dimming makes these low-SB features hard to detect when going to higher and higher redshifts. We used the GOODS and HUDF Hubble Space Telescope legacy data sets to study the effect of SB dimming on low-SB features of high-z galaxies and compare it to the prediction for smooth sources. We selected a sample of Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 4 (i.e., B {sub 435}-band dropouts) detected in all of the data sets and found no significant trend when comparing the total magnitudes measured from images with different depth. Through Monte Carlo simulations we derived the expected trend for galaxies with different SB profiles. The comparison to the data hints at a compact distribution for most of the rest-frame ultraviolet light emitted from high-z galaxies.

  4. High-brightness power delivery for fiber laser pumping: simulation and measurement of low-NA fiber guiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levy, Moshe; Peleg, Ophir; Rappaport, Noam; Shamay, Moshe; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Berk, Yuri; Baskin, Ilya

    2015-02-01

    Fiber laser manufacturers demand high-brightness laser diode pumps delivering optical pump energy in both a compact fiber core and narrow angular content. A pump delivery fiber of a 105 μm core and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) is typically used, where the fiber NA is under-filled to ease the launch of laser diode emission into the fiber and make the fiber tolerant to bending. At SCD, we have developed multi-emitter fiber-coupled pump modules that deliver 50 W output from a 105 μm, 0.15 NA fiber at 915, 950 and 976 nm wavelengths enabling low-NA power delivery to a customer's fiber laser network. In this work, we address the challenges of coupling and propagating high optical powers from laser diode sources in weakly guiding step-index multimode fibers. We present simulations of light propagation inside the low-NA multimode fiber for different launch conditions and fiber bend diameters using a ray-racing tool and demonstrate how these affect the injection of light into cladding-bounded modes. The mode filling at launch and source NA directly limit the bend radius at which the fiber can be coiled. Experimentally, we measure the fiber bend loss using our 50 W fiber-coupled module and establish a critical bend diameter in agreement with our simulation results. We also employ thermal imaging to investigate fiber heating caused by macro-bends and angled cleaving. The low mode filling of the 0.15 NA fiber by our brightness-enhanced laser diodes allows it to be coiled with diameters down to 70 mm at full operating power despite the low NA and further eliminates the need for mode-stripping at fiber combiners and splices downstream from our pump modules.

  5. Development of high-brightness ultrafast electron microscope for studying nanoscale dynamics associated with strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng

    Strongly correlated-electron materials are a class of materials that exhibit numerous intriguing emergent phenomena, including metal-to-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, etc. These phenomena are beyond the reach of the conventional solid state physics, which is based on the band theory. Instead, strong electron-electron correlations are found to play important roles, which leads to complicated interplay between different degrees of freedoms (charge, lattice, spins...). In this thesis, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is used to investigate the photo-induced ultrafast structural dynamics of strongly correlated materials, among which VO2 is taken as an exemplar system, one that reveals the fundamental physics behind photo-induced phase transitions, electron-electron correlation on nanometer scales, and the electron-phonon coupling in this exotic class of materials. The phenomena presented here are expected to have more general significance as they may reflect the physics to which other strongly correlated materials also conform. In polycrystalline VO2 thin films, the structural changes resulting from photoexcitation with femtosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths are observed to lead to non-thermal phase transitions, which require less energy compared to the phase transitions induced by thermal excitation. The details of the structural change are extracted from the UED results revealing stepwise atomic movements after photoexcitation, which suggests the phase transition starts with a dilation of the correlated d electrons. On the other hand, the structural phase transition is found to be decoupled from the metal-to-insulator transition when the sample dimension is reduced to the sub-micrometer scale, which is attributed to the interface charge doping effects from different substrates. A new phase (M3, monoclinic metallic phase) is distinguished, which has not been discussed by the existing theoretical

  6. High brightness MEMS mirror based head-up display (HUD) modules with wireless data streaming capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanovic, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Hachtel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    A high brightness Head-Up Display (HUD) module was demonstrated with a fast, dual-axis MEMS mirror that displays vector images and text, utilizing its ~8kHz bandwidth on both axes. Two methodologies were evaluated: in one, the mirror steers a laser at wide angles of <48° on transparent multi-color fluorescent emissive film and displays content directly on the windshield, and in the other the mirror displays content on reflective multi-color emissive phosphor plates reflected off the windshield to create a virtual image for the driver. The display module is compact, consisting of a single laser diode, off-the-shelf lenses and a MEMS mirror in combination with a MEMS controller to enable precise movement of the mirror's X- and Y-axis. The MEMS controller offers both USB and wireless streaming capability and we utilize a library of functions on a host computer for creating content and controlling the mirror. Integration with smart phone applications is demonstrated, utilizing the mobile device both for content generation based on various messages or data, and for content streaming to the MEMS controller via Bluetooth interface. The display unit is highly resistant to vibrations and shock, and requires only ~1.5W to operate, even with content readable in sunlit outdoor conditions. The low power requirement is in part due to a vector graphics approach, allowing the efficient use of laser power, and also due to the use of a single, relatively high efficiency laser and simple optics.

  7. Rear-side resonator architecture for the passive coherent combining of high-brightness laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, G; Doyen-Moldovan, I; Janicot, S; Hanna, M; Decker, J; Crump, P; Blume, G; Erbert, G; Georges, P; Lucas-Leclin, G

    2016-03-01

    We describe a new coherent beam combining architecture based on passive phase locking of emitters in an extended cavity on the rear facet and their coherent combination on the front facet. This rear-side technique provides strong optical feedback for phase locking while maintaining a high electrical-to-optical efficiency. Two high-brightness high-power tapered laser diodes are coherently combined using a Michelson-based cavity. The combining efficiency is above 82% and results in an output power of 6.7 W in a nearly diffraction-limited beam with an M(4σ)(2)≤1.2. A semi-active automatic adjustment of the current enhances the long-term stability of the combination, while the short-term stability is passively ensured by the extended cavity. This new laser configuration exhibits the simplicity of passive self-organizing architectures while providing a power conversion efficiency of 27% that is comparable to master oscillator power amplifier architectures. PMID:26974088

  8. The complex evolutionary paths of local infrared bright galaxies: a high angular resolution mid-infrared view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Poulton, R.; Roche, P. F.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Aretxaga, I.; Martínez-Paredes, M.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Colina, L.; Esquej, P.; González-Martín, O.; Ichikawa, K.; Imanishi, M.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Telesco, C.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the evolutionary connection between local IR-bright galaxies (log LIR ≥ 11.4 L⊙) and quasars. We use high angular resolution (˜ 0.3-0.4 arcsec˜ few hundred parsecs) 8 - 13 μm ground-based spectroscopy to disentangle the AGN mid-IR properties from those of star formation. The comparison between the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH feature emission and that measured with Spitzer/IRS indicates that the star formation is extended over a few kpc in the IR-bright galaxies. The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity of IR-bright galaxies is lower than in quasars. Although the dust distribution is predicted to change as IR-bright galaxies evolve to IR-bright quasars and then to optical quasars, we show that the AGN mid-IR emission of all the quasars in our sample is not significantly different. In contrast, the nuclear emission of IR-bright galaxies with low AGN contributions appears more heavily embedded in dust although there is no clear trend with the interaction stage or projected nuclear separation. This suggests that the changes in the distribution of the nuclear obscuring material may be taking place rapidly and at different interaction stages washing out the evidence of an evolutionary path. When compared to normal AGN, the nuclear star formation activity of quasars appears to be dimming whereas it is enhanced in some IR-bright nuclei, suggesting that the latter are in an earlier star-formation dominated phase.

  9. Active Detection and Imaging of Nuclear Materials with High-Brightness Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G G; Betts, S M; Berry, R D; Fisher, S E; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P

    2009-02-26

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and {gamma}-ray results are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photo-electron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  10. Experience with a high-brightness storage ring: the NSLS 750 MeV vuv ring

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J.

    1984-01-01

    The NSLS vuv ring is the first implementation of the proposals of R. Chasman and G.K. Green for a synchrotron radiation source with enhanced brightness: its lattice is a series of achromatic bends with two zero-gradient dipoles each, giving small damped emittance; and these bends are connected by straight sections with zero dispersion to accommodate wigglers and undulators without degrading the radiation damping properties of the ring. The virtues of the Chasman-Green lattice, its small betatron and synchrotron emittances, may be understood with some generality; e.g. the electron ..gamma..m/sub 0/c/sup 2/ energy and the number of achromatic bends M sets a lower limit on the betatron emittance of e/sub x/ > 7.7 x 10/sup -13/ ..gamma../sup 2//M meter-radians. There is strong interest in extrapolation of this type of lattice to 6 GeV and to 32 achromatic bends. The subject of this report is the progress toward achieving performance in the vuv ring limited by the radiation damping parameters optimized in its design. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Longitudinal Profile Diagnostic Scheme with Subfemtosecond Resolution for High-Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Andonian, G.; Hemsing, E.; Xiang, D.; Musumeci, P.; Murokh, A.; Tochitsky, S.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; /UCLA

    2012-05-03

    High-resolution measurement of the longitudinal profile of a relativistic electron beam is of utmost importance for linac based free-electron lasers and other advanced accelerator facilities that employ ultrashort bunches. In this paper, we investigate a novel scheme to measure ultrashort bunches (subpicosecond) with exceptional temporal resolution (hundreds of attoseconds) and dynamic range. The scheme employs two orthogonally oriented deflecting sections. The first imparts a short-wavelength (fast temporal resolution) horizontal angular modulation on the beam, while the second imparts a long-wavelength (slow) angular kick in the vertical dimension. Both modulations are observable on a standard downstream screen in the form of a streaked sinusoidal beam structure. We demonstrate, using scaled variables in a quasi-1D approximation, an expression for the temporal resolution of the scheme and apply it to a proof-of-concept experiment at the UCLA Neptune high-brightness injector facility. The scheme is also investigated for application at the SLAC NLCTA facility, where we show that the subfemtosecond resolution is sufficient to resolve the temporal structure of the beam used in the echo-enabled free-electron laser. We employ beam simulations to verify the effect for typical Neptune and NLCTA parameter sets and demonstrate the feasibility of the concept.

  12. Probing the physics of bright supernovae with high-cadence photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste; Boumis, Panos

    2016-06-01

    We propose high-cadence photometry as a tool to probe the physics of both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova explosions. We demonstrate the idea by conducting high-cadence monitoring of theoptical light curve of the nearby, Type Ia SN 2014J in M82. B and V-band photometry on days 15‑18 after tmax(B) was obtained with a cadence of 2 min per band, using the 2.3 m Aristarchos telescope, at Helmos Observatory, Greece. The data reveal evidence for rapid variability at the 0.02‑0.05 mag level on timescales of 15‑60 min on all four nights. The rapid variability could be due to one or a combination of the following scenarios: the clumpiness of the ejecta, their interaction with circumstellar material, the asymmetry of the explosion, or the mechanism causing the secondary maximum in the near-infrared lightcurve. We present our plans to use the new Prime Focus Instrument with its fast-frame sCMOS cameras on the Kryoneri 1.2 m telescope in Greece, constructed as part of ESA's lunar monitoring project NELIOTA, to systematically monitor bright supernovae for rapid variability.

  13. High-efficient and brightness white organic light-emitting diodes operated at low bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Yu, Junsheng; Yuan, Kai; Jian, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) used for display application and lighting need to possess high efficiency, high brightness, and low driving voltage. In this work, white OLEDs consisted of ambipolar 9,10-bis 2-naphthyl anthracene (ADN) as a host of blue light-emitting layer (EML) doped with tetrabutyleperlene (TBPe) and a thin codoped layer consisted of N, N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPB) as a host of yellow light-emitting layer doped with 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidin-4-yl-vinyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) were investigated. With appropriate tuning in the film thickness, position, and dopant concentration of the co-doped layer, a white OLED with a luminance yield of 10.02 cd/A with the CIE coordinates of (0.29, 0.33) has been achieved at a bias voltage of 9 V and a luminance level of over 10,000 cd/m2. By introducing the PIN structure with both HIL and bis(10- hydroxybenzo-quinolinato)-beryllium (BeBq2) ETL, the power efficiency of white OLED was improved.

  14. High-brightness blue organic light emitting diodes with different types of guest-host systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jing-shuang; Peng, Cui-yun; Guo, Kun-ping; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate high-brightness blue organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) using two types of guest-host systems. A series of blue OLEDs were fabricated using three organic emitters of dibenz anthracene (perylene), di(4-fluorophenyl) amino-di (styryl) biphenyl (DSB) and 4,4'-bis[2-(9-ethyl-3-carbazolyl)vinyl]biphenyl (BCzVBi) doped into two hosting materials of 4,4'-bis(9-carbazolyl) biphenyl (CBP) and 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5(4-tert-butyl-phenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) as blue emitting layers, respectively. We achieve three kinds of devices with colors of deep-blue, pure-blue and sky-blue with the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.16, 0.10), (0.15, 0.15) and (0.17, 0.24), respectively, by employing PBD as host material. In addition, we present a microcavity device using the PBD guest-host system and achieve high-purity blue devices with narrowed spectrum.

  15. High-efficiency high-brightness diode lasers at 1470 nm/1550 nm for medical and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallup, Kendra; Ungar, Jeff; Vaissie, Laurent; Lammert, Rob; Hu, Wentao

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers in the 1400 nm to 1600 nm regime are used in a variety of applications including pumping Er:YAG lasers, range finding, materials processing, aesthetic medical treatments and surgery. In addition to the compact size, efficiency, and low cost advantages of traditional diode lasers, high power semiconductor lasers in the eye-safe regime are becoming widely used in an effort to minimize the unintended impact of potentially hazardous scattered optical radiation from the laser source, the optical delivery system, or the target itself. In this article we describe the performance of high efficiency high brightness InP laser bars at 1470nm and 1550nm developed at QPC Lasers for applications ranging from surgery to rangefinding.

  16. Transverse emittance-preserving arc compressor for high-brightness electron beam-based light sources and colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-03-01

    Bunch length magnetic compression is used in high-brightness linacs driving free-electron lasers (FELs) and particle colliders to increase the peak current of the injected beam. To date, it is performed in dedicated insertions made of few degrees bending magnets and the compression factor is limited by the degradation of the beam transverse emittance owing to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). We reformulate the known concept of CSR-driven optics balance for the general case of varying bunch length and demonstrate, through analytical and numerical results, that a 500 pC charge beam can be time-compressed in a periodic 180 deg arc at 2.4 GeV beam energy and lower, by a factor of up to 45, reaching peak currents of up to 2 kA and with a normalized emittance growth at the 0.1 μ \\text{m} rad level. The proposed solution offers new schemes of beam longitudinal gymnastics; an application to an energy recovery linac driving FEL is discussed.

  17. The NIR to UV Spectral Energy Distributions of Gamma-Ray Bright Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmrose, Michael P.; Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2015-01-01

    In the small fraction of quasars classified as blazars, relatively unprocessed radiation from the accretion disk, known as the big blue bump (BBB) in the spectral energy distribution (SED), mixes with synchrotron radiation from the jet at optical-UV wavelengths. Decoupling of the contribution to the SED from these two components can be accomplished through the use of spectropolarimetric observations. The spectral index, αs, of the synchrotron emission is revealed from observations at Steward Observatory of the polarized flux spectrum at λ= 4000-7000 Å in the observer's frame. The BBB emission is then obtained by fitting a two-component model of the form Fν = A ναs+ B ναBBB to the full spectrum and fixing αBBB, the spectral index of the BBB, to 1/3. Another prominent emission feature of AGN is from an IR-emitting dusty molecular torus located ~1-10 pc from the central engine. The spectral signature of the dusty torus is also intertwined with synchrotron emission. Using near-IR (NIR) and optical observations with a time baseline of several years, we separate the NIR and optical SED of a number of gamma-ray bright blazars into a rapidly variable and a relatively constant component. Subtracting the former component, from synchrotron radiation, allows the hidden dust component to be revealed. We can also attempt to use the dataset to determine the variability (if any) of the the BBB and dust emission. If successful, this would allow us to determine the radiation environment encountered by electrons in the jet, important for inverse Compton models designed to explain gamma-ray production in blazars. This research has been supported in part by NASA Fermi Guest Investigator grants NNX11AQ03G and NNX11AO40G.

  18. Production of quasi ellipsoidal laser pulses for next generation high brightness photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rublack, T.; Good, J.; Khojoyan, M.; Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Hartl, I.; Schreiber, S.; Andrianov, A.; Gacheva, E.; Khazanov, E.; Mironov, S.; Potemkin, A.; Zelenogorskii, V. V.; Syresin, E.

    2016-09-01

    The use of high brightness electron beams in Free Electron Laser (FEL) applications is of increasing importance. One of the most promising methods to generate such beams is the usage of shaped photocathode laser pulses. It has already demonstrated that temporal and transverse flat-top laser pulses can produce very low emittance beams [1]. Nevertheless, based on beam simulations further improvements can be achieved using quasi-ellipsoidal laser pulses, e.g. 30% reduction in transverse projected emittance at 1 nC bunch charge. In a collaboration between DESY, the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science (IAP RAS) in Nizhny Novgorod and the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna such a laser system capable of producing trains of laser pulses with a quasi-ellipsoidal distribution, has been developed. The prototype of the system was installed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY in Zeuthen (PITZ) and is currently in the commissioning phase. In the following, the laser system will be introduced, the procedure of pulse shaping will be described and the last experimental results will be shown.

  19. Performance of an electron gun for a high-brightness X-ray generator

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, Takashi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    A prototype thermionic electron gun for a high-brightness X-ray generator has been developed. Its extraction voltage and design current are 60 kV and 100 mA (DC), respectively. The X-ray generator aims towards a maximum brilliance of 60 kW mm−2. The beam sizes at the rotating anticathode must therefore be within 1.0 mm × 0.1 mm and a small beam emittance is required. The fabricated electron gun optimizes an aperture grid and a Whenelt electrode. The performance of the prototype electron gun measured using pulsed-beam tests is as follows: maximum beam current, 85.7 mA; beam focus size at the rotating anticathode, 0.79 mm × 0.13 mm. In DC beam tests, FWHM beam sizes were measured to be 0.65 mm × 0.08 mm at the rotating anticathode with a beam current of 45 mA. The beam current recently reached ∼60 mA with some thermal problems. PMID:18421153

  20. Determining contrast sensitivity functions for monochromatic light emitted by high-brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Vasudha; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Raghavan, Ramesh; Boyce, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is becoming the choice for many lighting applications that require monochromatic light. However, one potential problem with LED-based lighting systems is uneven luminance patterns. Having a uniform luminance distribution is more important in some applications. One example where LEDs are becoming a viable alternative and luminance uniformity is an important criterion is backlighted monochromatic signage. The question is how much uniformity is required for these applications. Presently, there is no accepted metric that quantifies luminance uniformity. A recent publication proposed a method based on digital image analysis to quantify beam quality of reflectorized halogen lamps. To be able to employ such a technique to analyze colored beams generated by LED systems, it is necessary to have contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) for monochromatic light produced by LEDs. Several factors including the luminance, visual field size, and spectral power distribution of the light affect the CSFs. Although CSFs exist for a variety of light sources at visual fields ranging from 2 degrees to 20 degrees, CSFs do not exist for red, green, and blue light produced by high-brightness LEDs at 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields and at luminances typical for backlighted signage. Therefore, the goal of the study was to develop a family of CSFs for 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields illuminated by narrow-band LEDs at typical luminances seen in backlighted signs. The details of the experiment and the results are presented in this manuscript.

  1. Dark current studies on a normal-conducting high-brightness very-high-frequency electron gun operating in continuous wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C. F.; Qian, H.; Sannibale, F.; Zolotorev, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements and analysis of a field-emitted electron current in the very-high-frequency (VHF) gun, a room temperature rf gun operating at high field and continuous wave (CW) mode at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The VHF gun is the core of the Advanced Photo-injector Experiment (APEX) at LBNL, geared toward the development of an injector for driving the next generation of high average power x-ray free electron lasers. High accelerating fields at the cathode are necessary for the high-brightness performance of an electron gun. When coupled with CW operation, such fields can generate a significant amount of field-emitted electrons that can be transported downstream the accelerator forming the so-called "dark current." Elevated levels of a dark current can cause radiation damage, increase the heat load in the downstream cryogenic systems, and ultimately limit the overall performance and reliability of the facility. We performed systematic measurements that allowed us to characterize the field emission from the VHF gun, determine the location of the main emitters, and define an effective strategy to reduce and control the level of dark current at APEX. Furthermore, the energy spectra of isolated sources have been measured. A simple model for energy data analysis was developed that allows one to extract information on the emitter from a single energy distribution measurement.

  2. Energy Migration Engineering of Bright Rare-Earth Upconversion Nanoparticles for Excitation by Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yeteng; Rostami, Iman; Wang, Zihua; Dai, Hongjie; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2015-11-01

    A novel Nd(3+) -sensitized upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP) that can be excited by near-infrared 740 nm light-emitting diode (LED) lamps with bright upconversion luminescence is designed. Yb(3+) ion distribution is engineered to increase the energy migration efficiency. The benefit of the novel LED-excited UCNPs is demonstrated by imaging of breast cancer cells and enabling an economic handheld semiquantitative visual measurement device. PMID:26393770

  3. Bright attosecond soft X-ray pulse trains by transient phase-matching in two-color high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Bernd; Weber, Paul; Kovács, Katalin; Balogh, Emeric; Major, Balázs; Tosa, Valer; Han, Songhee; Vrakking, Marc J J; Varjú, Katalin; Rouzée, Arnaud

    2015-12-28

    We study two-color high-order harmonic generation in Neon with 790 nm and 1300 nm driving laser fields and observe an extreme-ultraviolet continuum that extends to photon energies of 160 eV. Using a 6-mm-long, high pressure gas cell, we optimize the HHG yield at high photon energies and investigate the effect of ionization and propagation under phase-matching conditions that allow us to control the temporal structure of the XUV emission. Numerical simulations that include the 3D propagation of the two-color laser pulse show that a bright isolated attosecond pulse with exceptionally high photon energies can be generated in our experimental conditions due to an efficient hybrid optical and phase-matching gating mechanism. PMID:26832053

  4. High-brightness laser diode module over 300W with 100μm/Na 0.22 fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yohei; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Takahashi, Yukihiko; Katagiri, Ken; Yamagata, Yuji; Sakamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Daiichiro

    2016-03-01

    High-brightness laser diode module over 300 W with 100 μm core/NA 0.22 fiber has been developed by integrating the several tens of optimally designed single emitter laser diodes in a newly designed package. We employed the Asymmetric Decoupled Confinement Heterostructure (ADCH) and the wide strip width to increase the durability for the catastrophic optical damage. High fiber-coupling efficiency was obtained with the uniquely designed micro-optical system. In addition, low thermal resistance made it possible to operate higher power. As a result, 300 W power was achieved without thermal rollover at 15.5 A with significantly high reliability. The high-brightness modules have a great advantage for high power fiber lasers such as 10 kW and beyond.

  5. High brightness, quantum-defect-limited conversion efficiency in cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifiers and oscillators.

    PubMed

    Heebner, John E; Sridharan, Arun K; Dawson, Jay W; Messerly, Michael J; Pax, Paul H; Shverdin, Miro Y; Beach, Raymond J; Barty, Chris P J

    2010-07-01

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation of cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplification in an unexplored parameter space of high conversion efficiency (> 60%) and high brightness enhancement (> 1000). Fibers with large clad-to-core diameter ratios can provide a promising means for Raman-based brightness enhancement of diode pump sources. Unfortunately, the diameter ratio cannot be extended indefinitely since the intensity generated in the core can greatly exceed that in the cladding long before the pump is fully depleted. If left uncontrolled, this leads to the generation of parasitic second-order Stokes wavelengths in the core, limiting the conversion efficiency and as we will show, clamping the achievable brightness enhancement. Using a coupled-wave formalism, we present the upper limit on brightness enhancement as a function of diameter ratio for conventionally guided fibers. We further present strategies for overcoming this limit based upon depressed well core designs. We consider two configurations: 1) pulsed cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifier (CPRFA) and 2) cw cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser (CPRFL).

  6. High brightness, quantum-defect-limited conversion efficiency in cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifiers and oscillators.

    PubMed

    Heebner, John E; Sridharan, Arun K; Dawson, Jay W; Messerly, Michael J; Pax, Paul H; Shverdin, Miro Y; Beach, Raymond J; Barty, Chris P J

    2010-07-01

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation of cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplification in an unexplored parameter space of high conversion efficiency (> 60%) and high brightness enhancement (> 1000). Fibers with large clad-to-core diameter ratios can provide a promising means for Raman-based brightness enhancement of diode pump sources. Unfortunately, the diameter ratio cannot be extended indefinitely since the intensity generated in the core can greatly exceed that in the cladding long before the pump is fully depleted. If left uncontrolled, this leads to the generation of parasitic second-order Stokes wavelengths in the core, limiting the conversion efficiency and as we will show, clamping the achievable brightness enhancement. Using a coupled-wave formalism, we present the upper limit on brightness enhancement as a function of diameter ratio for conventionally guided fibers. We further present strategies for overcoming this limit based upon depressed well core designs. We consider two configurations: 1) pulsed cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifier (CPRFA) and 2) cw cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser (CPRFL). PMID:20639956

  7. Cesium telluride cathodes for the next generation of high-average current high-brightness photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Filippetto, D. Qian, H.; Sannibale, F.

    2015-07-27

    We report on the performances of a Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode under extreme conditions of high peak time-dependent accelerating fields, continuous wave operations, and MHz pulse extraction with up to 0.3 mA average current. The measurements, performed in a normal conducting cavity, show extended lifetime and robustness, elucidate the main mechanisms for cathode degradation, and set the required system vacuum performance for compatibility with the operations of a high average power X-ray free electron laser user facility, opening the doors to the next generation of MHz-scale ultrafast scientific instruments.

  8. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C.A.

    1987-12-13

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) cathodes operated at 10 kV produced 1-5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq. cm. Normalized beam brightness was consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB/sub 6/ cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approx 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron-bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less-demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  9. The Interplay of the NIR to UV Spectral Energy Distributions of Gamma-Ray Bright Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmrose, Michael P.; Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2014-06-01

    The small fraction of AGN in which a relativistic jet is aligned with the observer’s lineof sight are classified as blazars. Radiation from the accretion disk and perhaps the jetis absorbed and reprocessed through various structures inside the AGN, and subsequentlyre-emitted across a broad range of frequencies. In some blazars, relatively unprocessedradiation from the accretion disk is visible in the optical-UV portion of the spectrum. Inspectral energy distributions (SEDs) this produces the so-called Big Blue Bump (BBB).Measuring the strength of the BBB emission is complicated by the fact that the synchrotronemission from the relativistic jet is also prominent in the same portion of the SED.We separate the unpolarized BBB emission of a sample of blazars from the polarized synchrotron emission present in the optical-UV emission through the use spectropolarimetric observations spanning λ= 4000-7000 Å in the observer’s frame. With the assumption that the BBB emission is unpolarized, the spectral index of the synchrotron emission, αs, is determined from the polarized flux spectrum. The strength of the BBB then follows by fitting a two component model of the form Fν = A ν-αs + B ν-αBBB , where αBBB is the spectral index of the BBB and is set to 5/3. We combine these observations with a time series of photometric observations spanning the NIR (J, H, and Ks ) and the optical (u‧ , g‧ , r‧ , i‧ , and z‧ ) spectrum. This yields a time baseline ofseveral years for a sample of gamma-ray bright blazars to determine the variability of the BBB and to trace its impact on both the NIR emission from the torus, as well as any effect on gamma-ray production. Any such variability indicates that the structure of the accretion disc evolves appreciably on time scales of few years. Coupling of BBB emission with dust emission will help determine the size scale of the inner-most radius of the torus. This is needed to determine the radiation environment of the torus

  10. Recent developments in the application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1991-12-31

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high- brightness ion beams. Since the last workshop, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm{sup 2}) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam impingement and cumulative beam breakup have also yielded encouraging results. Consequently, a section of superconducting resonators and focusing elements has been designed for tests with high-current deuteron beams. In addition, considerable data pertaining to the rf properties of high-{Tc} superconductors has been collected at rf-field amplitudes and frequencies of interest in connection with accelerator operation. This paper summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will build upon it.

  11. Recent developments in the application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1991-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high- brightness ion beams. Since the last workshop, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm{sup 2}) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam impingement and cumulative beam breakup have also yielded encouraging results. Consequently, a section of superconducting resonators and focusing elements has been designed for tests with high-current deuteron beams. In addition, considerable data pertaining to the rf properties of high-{Tc} superconductors has been collected at rf-field amplitudes and frequencies of interest in connection with accelerator operation. This paper summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will build upon it.

  12. Novel high refractive index, thermally conductive additives for high brightness white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Richard Stephen

    In prior works the inclusion of nanoparticle fillers has typically been shown to increase the thermal conductivity or refractive index of polymer nanocomposites separately. High refractive index zirconia nanoparticles have already proved their merit in increasing the optical efficiency of encapsulated light emitting diodes. However, the thermal properties of zirconia-silicone nanocomposites have yet to be investigated. While phosphor-converted light emitting diodes are at the forefront of solid-state lighting technologies for producing white light, they are plagued by efficiency losses due to excessive heating at the semiconductor die and in and around the phosphor particles, as well as photon scattering losses in the phosphor layer. It would then be of great interest if the high refractive index nanoparticles were found to both be capable of increasing the refractive index, thus reducing the optical scattering, and also the thermal conductivity, channeling more heat away from the LED die and phosphors, mitigating efficiency losses from heat. Thermal conductance measurements on unfilled and nanoparticle loaded silicone samples were conducted to quantify the effect of the zirconia nanoparticle loading on silicone nanocomposite thermal conductivity. An increase in thermal conductivity from 0.27 W/mK to 0.49 W/mK from base silicone to silicone with 33.5 wt% zirconia nanoparticles was observed. This trend closely mirrored a basic rule of mixtures prediction, implying a further enhancement in thermal conductivity could be achieved at higher nanoparticle loadings. The optical properties of transparency and light extraction efficiency of these composites were also investigated. While overall the zirconia nanocomposite showed good transparency, there was a slight decrease at the shorter wavelengths with increasing zirconia content. For longer wavelength LEDs, such as green or red, this might not matter, but phosphor-converted white LEDs use a blue LED as the photon source

  13. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux of high brightness undulators by gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z. )

    1995-02-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  14. High brightness laser-diode device emitting 500 W from a 200 μm/NA0.22 fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junhong, Yu; Linhui, Guo; Hualing, Wu; Zhao, Wang; Hao, Tan; Songxin, Gao; Deyong, Wu; Kai, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A practical method of achieving high brightness and high power fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and ZEMAX software simulation, which is obtained by technologies of precision beam collimation, free space beam combining and polarization beam combining based on mini-bar diode laser chip. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output power from the multimode fiber with 200 μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) could reach 528 W, equalizing brightness is 11.0 MW/(cm2 sr) and electro-optical efficiency (defined as fiber output power divided by voltage and current of the module) is 43.0%. By this method, much wider applications of fiber-coupled laser-diode are anticipated.

  15. Note: Development of a volume-limited dot target for a high brightness extreme ultraviolet microplasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Thanh Hung Suzuki, Yuhei; Hara, Hiroyuki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryoichi; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2014-11-15

    We report on production of volume-limited dot targets based on electron beam lithographic and sputtering technologies for use in efficient high brightness extreme ultraviolet microplasma sources. We successfully produced cylindrical tin (Sn) targets with diameters of 10, 15, and 20 μm and a height of 150 nm. The calculated spectrum around 13.5 nm was in good agreement with that obtained experimentally.

  16. Lightweight high-brightness helmet-mounted head-up display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Mathieu; North, Thibault; Bourquin, Stéphane; Kilcher, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    We present a compact binocular head-up display for integration in a motorcycle helmet. A 2D MEMS-mirror reflecting laser beams enables the formation of a bright image superimposed on the user vision by means of retinal scanning. A 3d-printed prototype including the required optical components is presented and characterized. It fits the morphology of most users thanks to several degrees of freedom accessible to the user for fine-tuning.

  17. Detection of a high brightness temperature radio core in the active-galactic-nucleus-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Wrobel, J. M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, Susana; Bureau, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present new high spatial resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) H I absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active-galactic-nucleus-(AGN-)driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation (SF) in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate of 13 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in NGC 1266 reported by Alatalo et al. exceeds SF rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution H I absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P {sub rad} = 1.48 × 10{sup 20} W Hz{sup –1}, and a brightness temperature T {sub b} > 1.5 × 10{sup 7} K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  18. Detection of a High Brightness Temperature Radio Core in the Active-galactic-nucleus-driven Molecular Outflow Candidate NGC 1266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, Kristina; Alatalo, Katherine; Wrobel, J. M.; Young, Lisa M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, Susana; Bureau, Martin

    2013-12-01

    We present new high spatial resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) H I absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active-galactic-nucleus-(AGN-)driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation (SF) in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate of 13 M ⊙ yr-1 in NGC 1266 reported by Alatalo et al. exceeds SF rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution H I absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P rad = 1.48 × 1020 W Hz-1, and a brightness temperature T b > 1.5 × 107 K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  19. High spatial resolution observations of Orion bright bar: CS (J = 1-0) and H51. cap alpha. emission

    SciTech Connect

    Omodaka, T.; Hayashi, M.; Hasegawa, T.

    1984-07-15

    High-resolution strip maps of CS (J = 1-0) and H51..cap alpha.. line emission across the Orion bright bar are presented. The intensity of CS emission is weaker in the H II region with a rapid increase at the optical bar, while the H51 ..cap alpha.. line was detected only on the side of the H II region. The variation of the CS intensity can be reproduced by a beam-convolved step function with the position of the step coincident with the ionization front. The molecular cloud associated with the bright bar is redshifted relative to the ambient molecular cloud by about 2 km s/sup -1/. This may suggest the dynamical interactions between the molecular cloud and the H II region excited by the Trapezium stars.

  20. Energy recovery linacs in high-energy and nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; Ya. Derbenev; V. Litvinenko; L. Merminga

    2005-03-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. We describe some of the potential applications which are under development by our laboratories in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The applications that we discuss are electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for some of these applications are high currents of polarized electrons, high-charge and high-current electron beams and the associated issues of High-Order Modes. The advantages of ERLs for these applications are numerous and will be outlined in the text. It is worth noting that some of these advantages are the high-brightness of the ERL beams and their relative immunity to beam-beam disturbances.

  1. Diagnostics of high-brightness short-pulse lasers and the plasmas they generate

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Cobble, J.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.

    1994-02-01

    The properties of a laser influence the interaction of the intense laser light with materials. The authors will describe some of the diagnostics that they have implemented at the Los Alamos Bright Source to correlate the changes in the x-ray spectrum and temporal history of a laser generated silicon plasmas with the changes of the incident XeCl laser light. One property is of special interest, the existence of a short prepulse. They find that the prepulse enhances the generation of the x-rays from a later pulse.

  2. Detection of a high brightness temperature radio core in the AGN-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, K.; Alatalo, K.; Wrobel, J. M.; Young, L. M.; Morganti, R.; Davis, T. A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, S.; Bureau, M.

    2014-05-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) Hi absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN)-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate reported in Alatalo et al. (2011) in NGC 1266 of 13 M⊙ year-1 exceeds star formation rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution Hi absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P rad = 1.48 × 1020 W Hz-1, and a brightness temperature T b > 1.5 × 107 K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs, with supermassive black hole masses similar to Sgr A*, may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  3. Extremely High Brightness from Polymer-Encapsulated Quantum Dots for Two-photon Cellular and Deep-tissue Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanyan; Liu, Helin; Han, Rongcheng; Huang, Lu; Shi, Hao; Sha, Yinlin; Jiang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Materials possessing high two photon absorption (TPA) are highly desirable for a range of fields, such as three-dimensional data storage, TP microscopy (TPM) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Specifically, for TPM, high TP excitation (TPE) brightness (σ × ϕ, where σ is TPA cross-sections and ϕ is fluorescence quantum yield), excellent photostability and minimal cytotoxicity are highly desirable. However, when TPA materials are transferred to aqueous media through molecule engineering or nanoparticle formulation, they usually suffer from the severely decrease of quantum yield (QY). Here, we report a convenient and efficient method for preparing polymer-encapsulated quantum dots (P-QD). Interestingly, the QY was considerably enhanced from original 0.33 (QDs in THF) to 0.84 (P-QD in water). This dramatic enhancement in QY is mainly from the efficiently blocking nonradiative decay pathway from the surface trap states, according to the fluorescence decay lifetimes analysis. The P-QD exhibits extremely high brightness (σ × ϕ up to 6.2 × 106 GM), high photostability, excellent colloidal stability and minimal cytotoxicity. High quality cellular TP imaging with high signal-to-background ratio (> 100) and tissue imaging with a penetration depth of 2200 μm have been achieved with P-QD as probe. PMID:25909393

  4. Much Ado about Microbunching: Coherent Bunching in High Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    The push to provide ever brighter coherent radiation sources has led to the creation of correspondingly bright electron beams. With billions of electrons packed into normalized emittances (phase space) below one micron, collective effects may dominate both the preservation and use of such ultra-bright beams. An important class of collective effects is due to density modulations within the bunch, or microbunching. Microbunching may be deleterious, as in the case of the Microbunching Instability (MBI), or it may drive radiation sources of unprecedented intensity, as in the case of Free Electron Lasers (FELs). In this work we begin by describing models of microbunching due to inherent beam shot noise, which sparks both the MBI as well as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first hard X-ray laser. We first use this model to propose a mechanism for reducing the inherent beam shot noise as well as for predicting MBI effects. We then describe experimental measurements of the resulting microbunching at LCLS, including optical radiation from the MBI, as well as the first gain length and harmonic measurements from a hard X-ray FEL. In the final chapters, we describe schemes that use external laser modulations to microbunch light sources of the future. In these sections we describe coherent light source schemes for both both linacs and storage rings.

  5. The impact of the semiconductor emitting diode brightness distribution on the energy sensitivity of the opto-electronic system with the optical equisignal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrylov, Ivan S.; Timofeev, Alexander N.; Kleshchenok, Maksim A.

    2016-04-01

    The research of the influence of the LED radiation brightness distribution on the energy sensitivity of optical-electronic systems with optical equal zone is provided. Mathematical modeling of the radiation field on a matrix receiver, considering lens spherical aberration, is provided. The possibility of forming a uniform illumination on the photo-detector matrix, changing the shape of the distribution of the brightness of the LED at a predetermined invariable spherical aberration of the lens is provided.

  6. The impact of the semiconductor emitting diode brightness distribution on the energy sensitivity of the opto-electronic system with the optical equisignal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrylov, Ivan S.; Timofeev, Alexander N.; Kleshchenok, Maksim A.

    2016-04-01

    The research of the influence of the LED radiation brightness distribution on the energy sensitivity of optical-electronic systems with optical equal zone is provided. Mathematical modeling of the radiation field on a matrix receiver, considering lens spherical aberration, is provided. The possibility of forming a uniform illumination on the photo-detector matrix, changing the shape of the distribution of the brightness of the LED at a predetermined invariable spherical aberration of the lens is provided.

  7. EUV light source with high brightness at 13.5 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, V M; Prokof'ev, A V; Khristoforov, O B; Koshelev, K N; Khadzhiyskiy, F Yu

    2014-11-30

    The results of the studies on the development of a highbrightness radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range are presented. The source is intended for using in projection EUV lithography, EUV mask inspection, for the EUV metrology, etc. Novel approaches to creating a light source on the basis of Z-pinch in xenon allowed the maximal brightness [130 W(mm{sup 2} sr){sup -1}] to be achieved in the vicinity of plasma for this type of radiation sources within the 2% spectral band centred at the wavelength of 13.5 nm that corresponds to the maximal reflection of multilayer Mo/Si mirrors. In this spectral band the radiation power achieves 190 W in the solid angle of 2π at a pulse repetition rate of 1.9 kHz and an electric power of 20 kW, injected into the discharge. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. The influence of snow depth and surface air temperature on satellite-derived microwave brightness temperature. [central Russian steppes, and high plains of Montana, North Dakota, and Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.; Allison, L. J.; Diesen, B. C., III

    1980-01-01

    Areas of the steppes of central Russia, the high plains of Montana and North Dakota, and the high plains of Canada were studied in an effort to determine the relationship between passive microwave satellite brightness temperature, surface air temperature, and snow depth. Significant regression relationships were developed in each of these homogeneous areas. Results show that sq R values obtained for air temperature versus snow depth and the ratio of microwave brightness temperature and air temperature versus snow depth were not as the sq R values obtained by simply plotting microwave brightness temperature versus snow depth. Multiple regression analysis provided only marginal improvement over the results obtained by using simple linear regression.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics of High-Brightness Electron Beams and Beam-Plasma Interactions: Theories, Simulations, and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Bohn , P. Piot and B. Erdelyi

    2008-05-31

    According to its original Statement of Work (SOW), the overarching objective of this project is: 'To enhance substantially the understanding of the fundamental dynamics of nonequilibrium high-brightness beams with space charge.' Our work and results over the past three and half years have been both intense and fruitful. Inasmuch as this project is inextricably linked to a larger, growing research program - that of the Beam Physics and Astrophysics Group (BPAG) - the progress that it has made possible cannot easily be separated from the global picture. Thus, this summary report includes major sections on 'global' developments and on those that can be regarded as specific to this project.

  10. High-power, high-brightness pseudospark-produced electron beam driven by improved pulse line accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Junbino Zhu; Mingchang Wang; Zhijiang Wang

    1995-12-31

    A high power (200KV), intense current density, low emittance (71mmmrad), high brightness (8x10{sup 10}A/m rad) electron beam was generated in the 10cm long, high-voltage-resistive multi-gap hollow cathode pseudospark chamber filled with 15pa nitrogen and driven by an improved pulse line accelerator. The beam was ejected with the 1mm diameter, the 2.2KA beam current, and the 400ns pulse length, and could propagated 20cm in the drift tube. At a distance of 5cm from the anode it penetrated consecutively an acid-sensitive discoloring film and a 0.05mm-thick copper foil both stuck closely, left 0.6mm and 0.3mm holes on them, respectively. That 10 shots on an acid-sensitive film produced a hole of 1.6mm at 7cm downstream of anode showed its good repeatability. After 60 shots the pseudospark discharge chamber was disassembled and observed that almost no destructive damage traces left on the surfaces of its various electrodes and insulators. But on almost all the surfaces of changeable central hole parts installed on intermediate electrodes there are traces of electron emission from the sides facing the anode and of bombardment on the sides facing the cathode, in contrast with which on the front- and back-surfaces of hollow cathode no visible traces of electron emission from then was observed. In addition, there were different tints, strip-like regions on the side of anode facing the cathode. Another interesting phenomenon was that there were a set of concentric circular or elliptical ring pattern on the acid-sensitive discoloring film got at 5cm from the anode and observed tinder a metallograph. It seems that the pseudospark electron beam is Laminar beam i.e, being possessed of a multi-layer structure, at least in the case of multi-gap pseudospark discharge chamber. It was found experimentally that the quality of pseudospark electron beam is much better than that of the cold-cathode electron beam.

  11. High-brightness 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot tapered laser with high temperature stability.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yulian; Ji, Haiming; Xu, Pengfei; Gu, Yongxian; Ma, Wenquan; Yang, Tao

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate high-brightness 1.3 μm tapered lasers with high temperature stability by using p-doped InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) as the active region. It is found that the beam quality factor M(2) for the devices is almost unchanged as the light power and temperature increase. The almost constant M(2) results from the p-doped QD active region.

  12. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    DOE PAGES

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-05-15

    Here we present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm2). Lastly, this allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use asmore » transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer.« less

  13. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    SciTech Connect

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-05-15

    Here we present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm2). Lastly, this allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use as transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer.

  14. Development of a high-brightness electron beam system towards femtosecond microdiffraction and imaging and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kiseok

    To make a `molecular movie', an `ultrafast camera' with simultaneously very high spatial and temporal resolution to match the atomic dynamics is required. The ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) technique based on femtosecond laser technology can provide a basic framework for realizing such an `ultrafast camera' although this technology has not achieved its full utility as a universal imaging and spectroscopy tool, due to limitations in generation and preservation of a high-brightness electron beam in the ultrafast regime. With moderate electron pulse intensity (103-10 4 electrons per pulse), UED experiments have been successfully applied to investigate photo-induced non-thermal melting processes, structural phase transitions, and transient surface charge dynamics. Based on the previous development of ultrafast electron diffractive voltammetry (UEDV), we extend the UEDV with an aim to identify the different constituents of the measured transient surface voltage (TSV) and discuss their respective roles in Coulomb refraction. From applying this methodology on Si/SiO2 interface and surfaces decorated with nano-structures, we are able to elucidate localized charge injection, dielectric relaxation, carrier diffusion, and enhancements on such processes through surface plasmon resonances, with direct resolution in the charge state and possibly correlated structural dynamics at these interfaces. These new results highlight the high sensitivity of the interfacial charge transfer to the nanoscale modification, environment, and surface plasmonics enhancement and demonstrate the diffraction-based ultrafast surface voltage probe as a unique method to resolve the nanometer scale charge carrier dynamics. The future applications of the UED and UEDV techniques lie in the direct visualization and site-selected studies such as nano-structured interfaces, a single nanoparticle or domain, which can be enabled by the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron beam system for

  15. Rainbow brightness.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, S D

    1982-08-15

    A theory for the brightness of rainbows is presented. The light reaching the observer consists of a beam of singly scattered sunlight, originating from the directly illuminated portion of a rainswath, which, in turn, has suffered depletion by scattering or absorption in its path through the atmosphere. The model incorporates the relevant features of cloud geometry and solar position in relation to the observer appropriate to rainbows. The model helps explain why the bottom (or near-horizon portion) of the rainbow tends to be both brighter and redder than the top (or horizontal portion furthest above the ground) when the sun is near the horizon. The greater brightness of the bottom of the bow derives principally from the greater length of the directly illuminated part of the rainswath near the horizon, while the increased redness of the bow's bottom is due to the severe depletion of the short-wavelength contribution to the rainbow beam in its passage through the atmosphere. PMID:20396168

  16. Diode-pumped high-efficiency high-brightness Q-switched ND:YAG slab laser.

    PubMed

    Armandillo, E; Norrie, C; Cosentino, A; Laporta, P; Wazen, P; Maine, P

    1997-08-01

    A high-efficiency diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG oscillator designed for future spaceborne applications has been demonstrated and characterized. The laser is based on a side-pumped slab geometry and uses an unstable resonator with a radially variable-reflectivity output coupler. The laser provides an output pulse energy of 100 mJ at a 100-Hz repetition rate, with a near-diffraction-limited beam and an overall electrical optical efficiency exceeding 6%. PMID:18185784

  17. 1.2-kW single-mode fiber laser based on 100-W high-brightness pump diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbo; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Liao, Kai-Hsiu; Segall, Jeff; Muendel, Martin H.; Morehead, James J.; Shen, Jane; Kutsuris, Matt; Luu, Johnny; Franke, Justin; Nguyen, Kelvin; Woods, Dave; Vance, Fred; Vecht, David; Meng, David; Duesterberg, Richard; Xu, Lei; Skidmore, Jay; Peters, Matthew; Guerin, Nicolas; Guo, James; Cheng, Jane; Du, Jihua; Johnson, Brad; Yin, Dongliang; Hsieh, Allen; Cheng, Peter; Demir, Abdullah; Cai, Jason; Gurram, Rupa; Lee, Kong-Weng; Raju, Reddy; Zou, Daniel; Srinivasan, Raman; Saini, Mandeep; Zavala, Laura; Rossin, Victor; Zucker, Erik P.; Ishiguro, Hiroaki; Sako, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    We have demonstrated a monolithic (fully fused), 1.2-kW, Yb-doped fiber laser with near-single-mode beam quality. This laser employs a new generation of high-brightness, fiber-coupled pump sources based on spatially multiplexed single emitters, with each pump providing 100 W at 915 nm within 0.15 NA from a standard 105/125 μm fiber. The fiber laser is end pumped through the high-reflector FBG using a 19:1 fused-fiber pump combiner, eliminating the need for pump/signal combiners. The output wavelength is 1080 nm, with a linewidth of < 0.5 nm FWHM. A peak power of 1.5 kW was reached in modulated operation (1-ms pulse duration) with M2 < 1.2.

  18. Highly reliable and bright GaN vertical LED on metal alloy substrate using corrugated pyramid shaped surface technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jiunn-Yi; Chu, Chen-Fu; Cheng, Chao-Chen; Liu, Wen-Huan; Cheng, Hao-Chun; Fan, Feng-Hsu; Yen, Jui-Kang; Tran, Chuong Anh; Doan, Trung

    2008-02-01

    GaN vertical LED on metal alloy substrate (VLEDMS) is a desirable technology suitable for solid state lighting application from the viewpoint of reliability and lighting efficacy performance. A new top surface engineering technique for efficient light extraction is employed to VLEDMS to improve power conversion efficiency further. Corrugated pyramid shaped (CPS) surfaces are developed and formed on VLEDMS. By using such structure, VLEDMS exhibit a great enhancement of around 20% in light output power, and a high efficiency of over 100 lumens per watt can also be achieved by white LEDs. In the life test, the light output power of VLEDMS chips drop only by less than 10% within 3,000 hours, and the chips can also endure over 1000 cycles of thermal shocks without significant variations in electro-optical performance. Therefore, the highly reliable and bright VLEDMS using CPS surface engineering technique is very suitable for the solid-state lighting application.

  19. High brightness imaging system using vertical cavity surface-emitting laser micro-arrays- results and proposed enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentzer, Mark A.; Ghosh, Chuni L.

    2011-05-01

    Laser illumination systems for high brightness imaging through the self-luminosity of explosive events, at Aberdeen Proving Ground and elsewhere, required complex pulse timing, extensive cooling, large-scale laser systems (frequencydoubled flash-pumped Nd:YAG, Cu-vapor, Q-switched ruby), making them difficult to implement for range test illumination in high speed videography. A Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) array was designed and implemented with spectral filtering to effectively remove self-luminosity and the fireball from the image, providing excellent background discrimination in a variety of range test scenarios. Further improvements to the system are proposed for applications such as imaging through murky water or dust clouds with optimal penetration of obscurants.

  20. How Bright Is the Sun?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  1. High energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  2. Stability and debris in high-brightness liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Otendal, M.; Tuohimaa, T.; Hertz, H. M.

    2007-01-15

    We investigate the x-ray spot stability and the debris emission in liquid-metal-jet anode electron-impact x-ray sources operating in the 10-100 W microfocus regime. The x-ray spot size is 15-23 {mu}m in diameter and the electron-beam power density is up to {approx}210 kW/mm{sup 2}, an order of magnitude higher than for conventional microfocus sources. In the power range of the investigation the source is stable in terms of spot size and position. The debris emission rate increases exponentially with the applied electron-beam power but may be reduced by combining larger and faster target jets with smaller e-beam foci and by mitigation schemes. It is concluded that the investigated factors will not limit the performance and function of liquid-metal-jet-anode electron-impact microfocus sources when operating in this high-brightness regime.

  3. Effect of chip and bonding defects on the junction temperatures of high-brightness light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton E., Jr.

    2005-11-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a strong candidate for the next-generation general illumination applications. LEDs are making great strides in brightness performance and reliability; however, the barrier to widespread use in general illumination still remains the cost (dollars per lumen). LED packaging designers are pushing the LED performance to its limits. This is resulting in increased drive currents and thus the need for lower-thermal-resistance packaging. The efficiency and reliability of solid-state lighting devices strongly depends on successful thermal management, because the junction temperature of the chip is the prime driver for effective operation. As the power density continues to increase, the integrity of the package electrical and thermal interconnects becomes extremely important. Experimental results with high-brightness LED packages show that chip attachment defects can cause significant thermal gradients across the LED chips, leading to premature failures. Perfect chip and interconnect structures for highly conductive substrates showed only a 2 K temperature variation over a chip area of approximately 1 mm2, while defective chips experienced greater than 40 K temperature variations over an identical area. A further numerical study was also carried out with parametric finite-element models to understand the temperature profile variation of the chip active layer due to the bump defects. Finite-element models were utilized to evaluate the effects of hot spots in the chip active layer. The importance of zero defects in one of the more popular interconnect schemes--the epi-down soldered flip-chip configuration--is investigated and demonstrated.

  4. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  5. A Bright Shining Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurowitz, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Sometimes students come up with crazy ideas. When this author first started teaching at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia five years ago, she had a sophomore share such an idea with her. He wanted to put solar panels on the school's roof as a way to reduce the school's carbon footprint and set a bright clean…

  6. New Class of Bright and Highly Stable Chiral Cyclen Europium Complexes for Circularly Polarized Luminescence Applications.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lixiong; Lo, Wai-Sum; Coates, Ian D; Pal, Robert; Law, Ga-Lai

    2016-09-01

    High glum values of +0.30 (ΔJ = 1, 591 nm, in DMSO) and -0.23 (ΔJ = 1, 589 nm, in H2O) were recorded in our series of newly designed macrocyclic europium(III) complexes. A sterically locking approach involving a bidentate chromophore is adopted to control the formation of one stereoisomer, giving rise to extreme rigidity, high stability, and high emission intensity. The combination of a chiral substituent on a macrocyclic chelate for lanthanide ions opens up new perspectives for the further development of circulary polarized luminescent chiral tags in optical and bioapplications. PMID:27537354

  7. Development of a High-Brightness VHF Electron Source at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.; Sannibale, Fernando; Staples, John W.; Virostek, Steve P.; Wells, Russell P.

    2007-07-10

    Currently proposed ERL and high average power FEL projects require electron beam sources that can generate {approx}1nC bunch charges at high repetition rates. Many proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose a novel solution that greatly diminishes high voltage breakdown issues while also decreasing peak RF power requirements in a warm copper device, and that has the benefit of mapping the rf oscillation period much more closely to the required beam repetition rate. We present the initial RF and mechanical design for a 750kV electron source and beam injection system utilizing a gun resonant in the VHF band. Beam dynamics simulations demonstrate excellent beam quality preservation and transport.

  8. Dynamics of laser-produced Sn microplasma for a high-brightness extreme ultraviolet light source

    SciTech Connect

    Yuspeh, S.; Tao, Y.; Burdt, R. A.; Tillack, M. S.; Ueno, Y.; Najmabadi, F.

    2011-05-16

    The effect of laser focal spot diameters of 26 and 150 {mu}m on 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is investigated. Simulations show that the smaller spot size has a shorter electron plasma density scale length and deeper and denser laser energy deposition region. This results in additional time required for plasma expansion and radiation transport to efficiently emit EUV light. This is experimentally observed as an increase in the delay between the EUV emission and the laser pulse. The shorter scale length plasma reabsorbs less EUV light, resulting in a higher conversion efficiency, smaller and slightly brighter light source.

  9. Six-dimensional measurements of trains of high brightness electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G. P.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Innocenti, L.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2015-08-01

    Trains of ultrashort electron pulses with THz repetition rate, so-called comblike beams, are assuming an ever growing interest in plasma-based acceleration. In particle-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), a train of driver bunches with separation of the order of plasma wavelength, i.e., 300 μ m , resonantly excites a plasma wake, which accelerates a trailing witness bunch, injected at the accelerating phase. Comblike beams have great potentialities in different fields of applications. In particular, radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers and THz radiation, take advantage from the possibility to tailor electron beams modulated both in time and energy, to customize emission bandwidth and temporal properties. In these scenarios, the manipulation of longitudinal phase space to investigate different bunch configurations, in terms of energy and time separation, is founded on the knowledge of the 6D phase space of each bunch in the train. In this paper we present the methods developed at the SPARC_LAB test facility in order to fulfill the requirements. Starting from conventional diagnostics, therefore applying well-known tools using more than one diagnostic at the same time, we have completely characterized not only the full 6D phase space of a comblike electron beam with THz repetition rate, but also each single bunch within the train. To our knowledge, this is the first time such a measurement has been performed. Experimental results for multibunch trains in different configurations, suitable for PWFA applications, will be shown and discussed.

  10. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  11. High gain-production efficiency and large brightness X-UV laser at Palaiseau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeglé, P.; Carillon, A.; Dhez, P.; Goedtkindt, P.; Jamelot, G.; Klisnick, A.; Rus, B.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Jacquemot, S.; Mazataud, D.; Mens, A.; Chauvineau, J. P.

    1995-05-01

    A large gain has been measured for the J=0-1 line of neonlike Zn at λ=21.2 nm. The time evolutions and the localization of emission zones of the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines are compared. It is shown that a train of very small prepulses before the main pulse has an important role in the J=0=1 emission. A half-cavity has been successfully used to attain a nearly saturated intensity with a 2 cm long plasma. The X-UV pulse energy is of 400 μJ, the laser power of 5 MW. The driving laser is the 0.4 KJ, 600 ps laser of LULI.

  12. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Robinson, Joseph S.; Ranitovic, Predrag; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2015-06-11

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. In this article, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s-1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10-5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Finally, spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications.

  13. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Robinson, Joseph S.; Ranitovic, Predrag; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. Here, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s−1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10−5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications. PMID:26067922

  14. The evolutionary status of the bright high-latitude supergiant HD 190390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyniers, M.; Cuypers, J.

    2005-03-01

    Despite its mean apparent magnitude of mV = 6.39, the evolutionary status of HD 190390 (HR 7671), a luminous F-type supergiant at high galactic latitude, is still not very clear, but in most papers a post-AGB classification is assumed. New observational material has been obtained with four different instruments and is presented here. An extensive abundance analysis based on high resolution, high signal-to-noise NTT+EMMI spectra confirms the metal deficiency of this object ([Fe/H] = -1.6), together with a high lithium content (log ɛ(Li) = 1.9). A variability analysis based on Geneva photometry over seven years reveals beating with a period of ~3000 days. It is, however, not clear whether this beating is caused by a stable triplet, or it is the consequence of small changes in the main frequency. More recent data obtained with the HIPPARCOS satellite and the Mercator telescope not only confirm the main period, but also support the presence of a second periodicity of 11 days, which was also found in the Geneva photometry. A conclusive evolutionary status of this object is not given, but alternative to the UU Her (i.e. post-AGB) status, a W Vir classification is discussed. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (programme 61.E-0426), and at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain.

  15. RNA mango aptamer-fluorophore: a bright, high-affinity complex for RNA labeling and tracking.

    PubMed

    Dolgosheina, Elena V; Jeng, Sunny C Y; Panchapakesan, Shanker Shyam S; Cojocaru, Razvan; Chen, Patrick S K; Wilson, Peter D; Hawkins, Nancy; Wiggins, Paul A; Unrau, Peter J

    2014-10-17

    Because RNA lacks strong intrinsic fluorescence, it has proven challenging to track RNA molecules in real time. To address this problem and to allow the purification of fluorescently tagged RNA complexes, we have selected a high affinity RNA aptamer called RNA Mango. This aptamer binds a series of thiazole orange (fluorophore) derivatives with nanomolar affinity, while increasing fluorophore fluorescence by up to 1,100-fold. Visualization of RNA Mango by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, together with injection and imaging of RNA Mango/fluorophore complex in C. elegans gonads demonstrates the potential for live-cell RNA imaging with this system. By inserting RNA Mango into a stem loop of the bacterial 6S RNA and biotinylating the fluorophore, we demonstrate that the aptamer can be used to simultaneously fluorescently label and purify biologically important RNAs. The high affinity and fluorescent properties of RNA Mango are therefore expected to simplify the study of RNA complexes. PMID:25101481

  16. Highly surface functionalized carbon nano-onions for bright light bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasconi, Marco; Maffeis, Viviana; Bartelmess, Juergen; Echegoyen, Luis; Giordani, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials functionalized with fluorescent and water-soluble groups have emerged as platforms for biological imaging because of their low toxicity and ability to be internalized by cells. The development of imaging probes based on carbon nanomaterials for biomedical studies requires the understanding of their biological response as well as the efficient and safety exposition of the nanomaterial to the cell compartment where it is designed to operate. Here, we present a fluorescent probe based on surface functionalized carbon nano-onions (CNOs) for biological imaging. The modification of CNOs by chemical oxidation of the defects on the outer shell of these carbon nanoparticles results in an extensive surface functionalization with carboxyl groups. We have obtained fluorescently labelled CNOs by a reaction involving the amide bond formation between fluoresceinamine and the carboxylic acids groups on the surface of the CNOs. The functionalized CNOs display high emission properties and dispersability in water due to the presence of high surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups that translate in an efficient fluorescent probe for in vitro imaging of HeLa cells, without significant cytotoxicity. The resulting nanomaterial represents a promising platform for biological imaging applications due to the high dispersability in water, its efficient internalization by cancer cells and localization in specific cell compartments.

  17. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  18. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  19. Critical issues for high-brightness heavy-ion beams- prioritized

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R; Davidson, R; Faltens, A; Friedman, A; Grisham, L; Grote, D P; Haber, I; Kaganovich, I; Covo, M K; Kwan, J W; Lee, E; Logan, B G; Lund, S M; Qin, H; Seidl, P A; Sharp, W M; Vay, J L; Yu, S S

    2007-02-28

    This study group was initiated to consider whether there were any ''show-stopper'' issues with accelerators for heavy-ion warm-dense matter (WDM) and heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF), and to prioritize them. Showstopper issues would appear as limits to beam current; that is, the beam would be well-behaved below the current limit, and significantly degraded in current or emittance if the current limit were exceeded at some region of an accelerator. We identified 14 issues: 1-6 could be addressed in the near term, 7-10 are potentially attractive solutions to performance and cost issues but are not yet fully characterized, 11-12 involve multibeam effects that cannot be more than partially studied in near-term facilities, and 13-14 involve new issues that are present in some novel driver concepts. Comparing the issues with the new experimental, simulation, and theoretical tools that we have developed, it is apparent that our new capabilities provide an opportunity to re-examine and significantly increase our understanding of the number one issue--halo growth and mitigation.

  20. Bright x-ray sources from laser irradiation of foams with high concentration of Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, F. Patterson, J. R.; May, M.; Colvin, J. D.; Biener, M. M.; Wittstock, A.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Satcher, J. H.; Gammon, S. A.; Poco, J. F.; Fournier, K. B.; Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Ishihara, K.; Tanaka, N.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nishimura, H.

    2014-02-15

    Low-density foams irradiated by a 20 kJ laser at the Omega laser facility (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY, USA) are shown to convert more than 5% of the laser energy into 4.6 to 6.0 keV x rays. This record efficiency with foam targets is due to novel fabrication techniques based on atomic-layer-deposition of Ti atoms on an aerogel scaffold. A Ti concentration of 33 at. % was obtained in a foam with a total density of 5 mg/cm{sup 3}. The dynamics of the ionization front through these foams were investigated at the 1 kJ laser of the Gekko XII facility (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan). Hydrodynamic simulations can reproduce the average electron temperature but fail to predict accurately the heat front velocity in the foam. This discrepancy is shown to be unrelated to the possible water adsorbed in the foam but could be attributed to effects of the foam micro-structure.

  1. Quantum dot-encoded mesoporous beads with high brightness and uniformity: rapid readout using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaohu; Nie, Shuming

    2004-04-15

    A new generation of optically encoded beads has been prepared by using mesoporous polystyrene beads and surfactant-coated semiconductor quantum dots. In comparison with nonporous beads of similar sizes and chemical compositions, the encoded porous beads are approximately 1000 times brighter and 5 times more uniform in fluorescence intensities. Using both absolute intensity and ratiometric fluorescence coding, we show that the beads can be identified with a standard flow cytometer at 1000 beads/s. This result indicates that the multiple excited-state lifetimes and relaxation pathways of quantum dots do not limit their applications in high-speed optical detection and imaging.

  2. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  3. Bright upconversion luminescence and increased Tc in CaBi2Ta2O9:Er high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dengfeng; Wang, Xusheng; Xu, Chaonan; Yao, Xi; Lin, Jian; Sun, Tiantuo

    2012-05-01

    Er3+ doped CaBi2Ta2O9 (CBT) bismuth layered-structure high temperature piezoelectric ceramics were synthesized by the traditional solid state method. The upconversion (UC) emission properties of Er3+ doped CBT ceramics were investigated as a function of Er3+ concentration and incident pump power. A bright green upconverted emission was obtained under excitation 980 nm at room temperature. The observed strong green and weak red emission bands corresponded to the transitions from 4S3/2 and 4F9/2 to 4I15/2, respectively. The dependence of UC emission intensity on pumping power indicated that a three-photon process was involved in UC emissions. Studies of dielectric with temperature have also been carried out. Introduction of Er increased the Curie temperature of CBT, thus, making this ceramic suitable for sensor applications at higher temperatures. Because of its strong up-converted emission and increased Tc, the multifunctional high temperature piezoelectric ceramic may be useful in high temperature sensor, fluorescence thermometry, and optical-electro integration applications.

  4. Development of Deep Penetration Welding Technology with High Brightness Laser under Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Seiji; Yohei, Abe; Mizutani, Masami; Kawahito, Yousuke

    The authors have developed a new chamber for laser welding under the low vacuum conditions achieved by using rotary pumps. High-power disk laser bead-on-plate welding was performed on Type 304 stainless steel or A5052 aluminium alloy plate at the powers of 10, 16 and 26 kW at various welding speeds under low vacuum. The sound welds of more than 50 and 70 mm in penetration depth could be produced in Type 304 at the pressure of 0.1 kPa, the speed of 0.3 m/min and the power of 16 kW and 26 kW, respectively. Similar penetration was achieved in A 5052 aluminum alloy. Welding phenomena under low vacuum were also understood by observing the behavior of a keyhole inlet, a molten pool, melt flows and a plume ejected from a keyhole through high speed video cameras. Low interaction between a laser beam and a plume under low vacuum was confirmed by using probe laser beam method.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: High frequency peakers. I. The bright sample (Dallacasa+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallacasa, D.; Stanghellini, C.; Centonza, M.; Fanti, R.

    2001-05-01

    Here we present a sample of sources with convex radio spectra peaking at frequencies above a few GHz. We call these radio sources High Frequency Peakers (HFPs). This sample extends to higher turnover frequencies than the samples of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) and GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources. HFPs are rare due to the strong bias against them caused by their turnover occurring at frequencies about one order of magnitude higher than in CSS-GPS samples. he sample has been selected by a comparison between the Green Bank survey (87GB) at 4.9 GHz and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) at 1.4 GHz. Then the candidates have been observed with the VLA at 1.365, 1.665, 4.535, 4.985, 8.085, 8.485, 14.96 and 22.46 GHz in order to derive a simultaneous radio spectrum, and remove variable sources from the sample. The final list of genuine HFP sources consists of 55 objects with flux density exceeding 300 mJy at 4.9 GHz at the time of the 87GB observation. Optical identifications are available for 29 of them; 24 are high redshift quasars, 3 are galaxies (one of them has indeed broad lines in the optical spectrum) and 2 are BL Lac objects. The remaining sources are mostly empty fields (17) on the digitised POSS or have uncertain classification (9). (1 data file).

  6. Combined Radiometer-Radar Microphysical Profile Estimations with Emphasis on High Frequency Brightness Temperature Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Wang, James R.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Hood, Robbie; Manning, Will; Meneghini, Robert; Weinman, James A.; Hildebrand, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Information about the vertical microphysical cloud structure is useful in many modeling and predictive practices. Radiometers and radars are used to observe hydrometeor properties. This paper describes an iterative retrieval algorithm that combines the use of airborne active and wideband (10 to 340 GHz) passive observations to estimate the vertical content and particle size distributions of liquid and frozen hydrometeors. The physically-based retrieval algorithm relies on the high frequencies (greater than 89 GHz) to provide details on the frozen hydrometeors. Neglecting the high frequencies yielded acceptable estimates of the liquid profiles, but the ice profiles were poorly retrieved. Airborne radar and radiometer observations from the third Convection and Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX-3) were used in the retrieval algorithm as constraints. Nadir profiles were estimated for a minute each of flight time (approximately 12.5 km along track) from an anvil, convection, and quasi- stratiform rain. The complex structure of the frozen hydrometeors required the most iterations for convergence for the anvil cloud type. The wideband observations were found to more than double the estimated frozen hydrometeor content as compared to retrievals using only 90-GHz and below. The convective and quasi-stratiform quickly reached convergence (minimized difference between observations and calculations using the estimated profiles). A qualitative validation using coincident in situ CAMEX-3 observations shows that the retrieved particle size distributions are well corroborated with independent measurements.

  7. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  8. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  9. High-brightness long 940-nm diode lasers with double-waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrescu-Prahova, Iulian B.; Moritz, Thomas; Riordan, John

    2003-07-01

    Two double-waveguide 940 nm asymmetric structures with 8 nm InxGa1-xAs quantum well (x = 0.13) are presented. They consist of an active region waveguide that includes a QW and an optical trap waveguide on the n side of the active region. The second structure has a supplementary optical wall in the p - clad that further pushes the optical field from the active region and reduces the confinement factor. The nominal lengths were chosen as 2.8 mm and 4 mm and the design values for the d/gamma ratio were 0.8 μm and 1.14 μm, respectively. Devices were fabricated with 100 μm apertures and yielded threshold current densities of 0.2 kA/cm2 and 0.17 kA/cm2 with corresponding slope efficiencies of 0.76 W/A and 0.85 W/A. At high current levels devices presented a power saturation behavior. The highest power values were 9.7 W (rollover) and 11.5 W (CMOD), respectively.

  10. The emittances and brightnesses of high-intensity negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; McConnell, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The emittances of high-intensity ion beams extracted from cesium sputter negative ion sources equipped with cylindrical and ellipsoidal solid tungsten and spiral-wound tantalum (General Ionex Corporation, Model 860), and cesium surface ionizers have been measured for several ion species, including /sup 12/C/sup -/, /sup 28/Si/sup -/, /sup 58/Ni/sup -/, and /sup 197/Au/sup -/. While certain sets of data from the ellipsoidal and cylindrical geometry ionizer sources suggest a moderate growth in emittance with increasing negative ion beam intensity I over the range of intensities investigated (5 less than or equal to 1 less than or equal to 60 ..mu..A) of perhaps 20%, not all data exhibit this dependence, especially those from the Model 860 source. As well, no evidence of an emittance dependence on ion mass of a monotonic nature was found. The emittances of ion beams at the 80% intensity level from the Model 860 source are found to be higher on the average by factors of 1.8 and 1.7, respectively, than those from sources equipped with ellipsoidal and cylindrical geometry cesium surface ionizers.

  11. The evolutionary status of high and extremely low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Studying dwarf galaxies can shed light on the original building blocks of galaxy formation. Most large galaxies are thought to be built up over billions of years through the collisions and mergers of smaller galaxies. The dwarf galaxies we see today are the evolved remnants of those building blocks, and by understanding their nature and evolution, we can study the raw ingredients of galaxy formation. Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Almost Dark galaxies are at opposite extremes of today's population of dwarf galaxies. BCDs are exceptionally compact and host very intense starbursts, while Almost Dark galaxies are much more diffuse and have weak stellar populations. This work studies the evolutionary context of BCDs by using deep, high-resolution images to study the detailed structure of their components, and by fitting our multi-wavelength observations with models to describe the properties of their stars, gas, and dust. BCDs appear to have exceptionally compact old stellar populations and unusually large star formation rates, when compared to typical dwarf galaxies. By contrast, the optically faint, gas-dominated Almost Dark galaxies have extremely low star formation rates and weak stellar populations. In particular, one of the Almost Darks studied in this work has very unusual properties and is in disagreement with widely-studied scaling relations for large samples of galaxies. It appears to have too little stellar mass, a distribution of HI that is too extended to be supported by its modest rotation, and the highest well-measured gas mass-to-light ratio ever observed. These two extreme classes may represent evolutionary stages that all galaxies pass through, and appear to be extreme ends of the broad continuum of dwarf galaxy properties. In order to use today's dwarf galaxies as windows into the building blocks of early galaxy formation, these unusual states and evolutionary pathways must be understood.

  12. The evolutionary status of high and extremely low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven

    2015-07-01

    Studying dwarf galaxies can shed light on the original building blocks of galaxy formation. Most large galaxies are thought to be built up over billions of years through the collisions and mergers of smaller galaxies. The dwarf galaxies we see today are the evolved remnants of those building blocks, and by understanding their nature and evolution, we can study the raw ingredients of galaxy formation. Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Almost Dark galaxies are at opposite extremes of today's population of dwarf galaxies. BCDs are exceptionally compact and host very intense starbursts, while Almost Dark galaxies are much more diffuse and have weak stellar populations. This work studies the evolutionary context of BCDs by using deep, high-resolution images to study the detailed structure of their components, and by fitting our multi-wavelength observations with models to describe the properties of their stars, gas, and dust. BCDs appear to have exceptionally compact old stellar populations and unusually large star formation rates, when compared to typical dwarf galaxies. By contrast, the optically faint, gas-dominated Almost Dark galaxies have extremely low star formation rates and weak stellar populations. In particular, one of the Almost Darks studied in this work has very unusual properties and is in disagreement with widely-studied scaling relations for large samples of galaxies. It appears to have too little stellar mass, a distribution of HI that is too extended to be supported by its modest rotation, and the highest well-measured gas mass-to-light ratio ever observed. These two extreme classes may represent evolutionary stages that all galaxies pass through, and appear to be extreme ends of the broad continuum of dwarf galaxy properties. In order to use today's dwarf galaxies as windows into the building blocks of early galaxy formation, these unusual states and evolutionary pathways must be understood.

  13. Liquid crystal displays with high brightness of visualization versus active displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olifierczuk, Marek; Zieliński, Jerzy

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays Liquid Crystal Displays (LCD) takes the very important place among different visualization devices. It's are used in many standard applications such as computer or video screens. In May 2006, 100" LCD TV monitor had been shown by LG. But beside of this main direction of display development, very interesting - because of insignificant electro-magnetic disturbances - is the possibility of it's applications in motorization and aviation. An example of it can be a glass cockpit of U2 , Boeing 777 or many different car dashboards. On this field beside LCD we have now many another display technologies, but interesting for us are 3 of them: FEDs (Field Emission Displays), OLEDs (Organic Light Emitting Diode), PLEDs (Polymer Light Emitting Diode). The leading position of LCD is a result of LCD unique advantages of flat form, weight, power consumption, and reliability, higher (than CRT) luminance, luminance uniformity, sunlight readability, wide dimming range, fault tolerance and a large active display area with a small border. The basis of starting our investigation was the comparison of passive LCD and the other technology, which can be theoretically used on motorization and aviation field. The following parameters are compared: contrast ratio, luminance level, temperature stability, life-time, operating temperature range, color performance, and depth, viewing cone, technology maturity, availability and cost. In our work an analysis of Liquid Crystal Displays used in specific applications is done. The possibilities of the applications such a display under high lighting level are presented. The presented results of this analysis are obtained from computer program worked by authors, which makes it possible to calculate the optical parameters of transmissive and reflective LCD working in quasi-real conditions. The base assumption of this program are shown. This program calculate the transmission and reflection coefficient of a display taking into account the

  14. High Resolution Monthly Oceanic Rainfall Based on Microwave Brightness Temperature Histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D.; Chiu, L. S.

    2005-12-01

    A statistical emission-based passive microwave retrieval algorithm has been developed by Wilheit, Chang and Chiu (1991) to estimate space/time oceanic rainfall. The algorithm has been applied to Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data taken on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites to provide monthly oceanic rainfall over 2.5ox2.5o and 5ox5o latitude-longitude boxes by the Global Precipitation Climatology Project-Polar Satellite Precipitation Data Center (GPCP-PSPDC, URL: http://gpcp-pspdc.gmu.edu/) as part of NASA's contribution to the GPCP. The algorithm has been modified and applied to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) data to produce a TRMM Level 3 standard product (3A11) over 5ox5o latitude/longitude boxes. In this study, the algorithm code is modified to retrieve rain rates at 2.5ox2.5o and 1ox1o resolutions for TMI. Two months of TMI data have been tested and the results compared with the monthly mean rain rates derived from TRMM Level 2 TMI rain profile algorithm (2A12) and the original 5ox5o data from 3A11. The rainfall pattern is very similar to the monthly average of 2A12, although the intensity is slightly higher. Details in the rain pattern, such as rain shadow due to island blocking, which were not discernible from the low resolution products, are now easily discernible. The spatial average of the higher resolution rain rates are in general slightly higher than lower resolution rain rates, although a Student-t test shows no significant difference. This high resolution product will be useful for the calibration of IR rain estimates for the production of the GPCP merge rain product.

  15. Crossing the Lyman valley: how many UV-bright high redshift quasars are there?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Alain; Jakobsen, Peter

    1993-09-01

    We present predictions for the appearance of the high redshift quasar population at far-UV (λ <~ 1500A) wavelengths, with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of carrying out the HeII λ304A equivalent of the Gunn-Peterson test with HST and FUSE. We assume that the shape of the intrinsic extreme-UV spectra of luminous quasars can be described by a simple power law, and combine the quasar evolution models of Schmidt & Green (1983) and Boyle et al. (1988) with the intervening Lyman continuum absorption model of Moller & Jakobsen (1990) in order to calculate the distribution of quasars in apparent far- UV flux and redshift. We present curves giving the predicted total number of observable quasars on the sky as a function of limiting far-UV sensitivity at received HeII λ304A for the redshift range z > 3 accessible with HST and the range 2 < z <3 accessible with FUSE. The steepness of the quasar luminosity function is enhanced by the effects of intervening Lyman continuum absorption, and leads to the number of observable quasars being strongly dependent on the limiting sensitivity and assumed quasar spectrum. Nonetheless, our analysis suggests that a limiting far-UV spectroscopic sensitivity of Flambda_ ~ 1 x 10^16^ ergs s^-1^ cm^2^ A^-1^ is required in order to be able to observe HeII λ304A absorption in the ~10^2^ brightest quasars at redshifts z > 3. This sensitivity cannot currently be reached with the aberrated HST observatory but may be achievable in the future with the COSTAR and STIS instruments. In the lower redshift range 2 < Z < 3, where redshifted HeII λ304A line is accessible with FUSE, the corresponding sensitivity required to reach the ~10^2^ brightest quasars is Flambda_ ~ 1 x 10^-15^ ergs s^-1^ cm^-2^ A^-1^. This sensitivity is below that expected for the prime spectrographic mode of FUSE, but could be achieved in a low resolution mode

  16. Adamantane-based wide-bandgap host material: blue electrophosphorescence with high efficiency and very high brightness.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu; Zhu, Liping; Li, Yifan; Yu, Ling; Wu, Kailong; Chen, Tianheng; Huang, Manli; Wang, Feng; Gong, Shaolong; Ma, Dongge; Qin, Jingui; Yang, Chuluo

    2015-05-26

    An adamantane-based host material, namely, 4-{3-[4-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]adamantan-1-yl}benzonitrile (CzCN-Ad), was prepared by linking an electron-donating carbazole unit and an electron-accepting benzonitrile moiety through an adamantane bridge. In this approach, two functional groups were attached to tetrahedral points of adamantane to construct an "sp(3)" topological configuration. This design strategy endows the host material with a high triplet energy of 3.03 eV due to the disruption of intramolecular charge transfer. Although CzCN-Ad has a low molecular weight, the rigid nonconjugated adamantane bridge results in a glass transition temperature of 89 °C. These features make CzCN-Ad suitable for fabricating blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). The devices based on sky-blue phosphor bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridinato-N,C(2')](picolinato)iridium(III) (FIrpic) achieved a high maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 24.1%, which is among the best results for blue PhOLEDs ever reported. Furthermore, blue PhOLEDs with bis(2,4-difluorophenylpyridinato)-tetrakis(1-pyrazolyl)borate iridium(III) (FIr6) as dopant exhibited a maximum EQE of 14.2% and a maximum luminance of 34 262 cd m(-2). To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest luminance ever reported for FIr6-based PhOLEDs. PMID:25900890

  17. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  18. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  19. Differential responses to high- and low-dose ultraviolet-B stress in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shinya; Kojo, Kei H.; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Endo, Masaki; Toki, Seiichi; Isoda, Hiroko; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation leads to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, growth inhibition, and cell death. To evaluate the UV-B stress–induced changes in plant cells, we developed a model system based on tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells. Both low-dose UV-B (low UV-B: 740 J m−2) and high-dose UV-B (high UV-B: 2960 J m−2) inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death; these effects were more pronounced at high UV-B. Flow cytometry showed cell cycle arrest within 1 day after UV-B irradiation; neither low- nor high-UV-B–irradiated cells entered mitosis within 12 h. Cell cycle progression was gradually restored in low-UV-B–irradiated cells but not in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. UV-A irradiation, which activates cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, reduced inhibition of cell proliferation by low but not high UV-B and suppressed high-UV-B–induced cell death. UV-B induced CPD formation in a dose-dependent manner. The amounts of CPDs decreased gradually within 3 days in low-UV-B–irradiated cells, but remained elevated after 3 days in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. Low UV-B slightly increased the number of DNA single-strand breaks detected by the comet assay at 1 day after irradiation, and then decreased at 2 and 3 days after irradiation. High UV-B increased DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay 1 and 3 days after irradiation. Caffeine, an inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) checkpoint kinases, reduced the rate of cell death in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. Our data suggest that low-UV-B–induced CPDs and/or DNA strand-breaks inhibit DNA replication and proliferation of BY-2 cells, whereas larger contents of high-UV-B–induced CPDs and/or DNA strand-breaks lead to cell death. PMID:25954287

  20. High-Energy Charged Particles in the Innermost Jovian Magnetosphere

    PubMed

    Fischer; Pehlke; Wibberenz; Lanzerotti; Mihalov

    1996-05-10

    The energetic particles investigation carried by the Galileo probe measured the energy and angular distributions of the high-energy particles from near the orbit of Io to probe entry into the jovian atmosphere. Jupiter's inner radiation region had extremely large fluxes of energetic electrons and protons; intensities peaked at approximately2.2RJ (where RJ is the radius of Jupiter). Absorption of the measured particles was found near the outer edge of the bright dust ring. The instrument measured intense fluxes of high-energy helium ions (approximately62 megaelectron volts per nucleon) that peaked at approximately1.5RJ inside the bright dust ring. The abundances of all particle species decreased sharply at approximately1.35RJ; this decrease defines the innermost edge of the equatorial jovian radiation.

  1. Bright Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how to upgrade lighting technology in schools to reduce energy consumption and cut operating costs. Explores fixture efficiency using ballast and lamp upgrades and compact fluorescent lights. Other ideas include changing exit signs to ones that use less wattage, improving luminary efficiency through use of reflectors and shielding…

  2. High energy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Canizares, Claude; Catura, Richard C.; Clark, George W.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Friedman, Herbert; Giacconi, Riccardo; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Helfand, David J.; Holt, Stephen S.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) important scientific problems for high energy astrophysics (stellar activity, the interstellar medium in galaxies, supernovae and endpoints of stellar evolution, nucleosynthesis, relativistic plasmas and matter under extreme conditions, nature of gamma-bursts, identification of black holes, active nuclei, accretion physics, large-scale structures, intracluster medium, nature of dark matter, and the X- and gamma-ray background); (2) the existing experimental programs (Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), U.S. participation in foreign missions, and attached Shuttle and Space Station Freedom payloads); (3) major missions for the 1990's; (4) a new program of moderate missions; (5) new opportunities for small missions; (6) technology development issues; and (7) policy issues.

  3. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey data. I. Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since z ~ 1.2

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; R. Perfecto; Song, J.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; et al

    2016-01-14

    Here, using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift.

  4. Evolution and constrains in the star formation histories of IR-bright star forming galaxies at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklias, Panos; Schaerer, Daniel; Elbaz, David

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and constraining the early cosmic star formation history of the Universe is a key question of galaxy evolution. A large fraction of star formation is dust obscured, so it is crucial to have access to the IR emission of galaxies to properly study them.Utilizing the multi-wavelength photometry from GOODS-Herschel, we perform SED fitting with different variable star formation histories (SFHs), which we constrain thanks to the observed IR luminosities, on a large sample of individually IR-detected sources from z~1 to 4. We explore how (and to which extent) constraining dust attenuation thanks to the IR luminosities allows to reduce the scatter (expected when using variable SFHs, in contrast to IR+UV standard calibrations) in physical properties and relations such as mass-SFR and the so-called star-forming Main Sequence (MS).Although limited at the high-z end, our analysis shows a change of trends in SFHs between low and high z, that follows the established cosmic SFR density, with galaxies found to prefer rising SFRs at z~3-4, and declining SFRs at z≤1. We show that a fraction of galaxies (~20%), mainly at z≤2, can have lower SFRs than IR-inferred, but still being compatible with the observations, indicative of being post-starbursts/undergoing quenching while bright in the IR, in agreement with theoretical work. The IR-constrained stellar population models we obtain also indicate that the two main modes of star formation - MS and starburst - evolve differently with time, with the former being mostly slow evolving and lying on the MS for long lasting periods, and the latter being very recent, rapidly increasing bursts (or on the decline, when belonging to the aforementioned "quenched" category). Finally, we illustrate how spectroscopic observation of nebular emission lines further enables as to constrain effectively the SFHs of galaxies.

  5. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source.

    PubMed

    Wells, R P; Ghiorso, W; Staples, J; Huang, T M; Sannibale, F; Kramasz, T D

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  6. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  7. High-energy transients.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K

    2013-06-13

    We present an overview of high-energy transients in astrophysics, highlighting important advances over the past 50 years. We begin with early discoveries of γ-ray transients, and then delve into physical details associated with a variety of phenomena. We discuss some of the unexpected transients found by Fermi and Swift, many of which are not easily classifiable or in some way challenge conventional wisdom. These objects are important insofar as they underscore the necessity of future, more detailed studies. PMID:23630376

  8. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  9. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, Jay W.; Allen, Graham S.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Barty, Chrisopher B. J.

    2015-10-27

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  10. Prospects at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-11-01

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs.

  11. An X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Record High Spectral Purity and Average Brightness (Progress and Prospects for X-ray Free Electron Lasers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang-Je

    2009-06-24

    With the success of the LCLS at SLAC, synchrotron radiation community is entering the era of x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) with an enormous jump in brightness and coherence over that possible with third-generation x-ray sources. The LCLS is a single-pass, high-gain device producing quasi-coherent x-rays known as self-amplified spontaneous emission. Hard x-ray FELs are also feasible in an oscillator (XFELO) configuration, in which an x-ray pulse is trapped a low-loss optical cavity consisting of diamond crystals, permitting build-up in the intensity and coherence over several hundred passes. An XFELO produces ultrahigh spectral purity and brightness-average brightness several orders of magnitude higher than, and peak brightness comparable to, self-amplified spontaneous emission devices; opening up new scientific opportunities as well as drastically improving and complementing experimental techniques developed at third-generation x-ray facilities. We discuss unique R&D issues in accelerator and x-ray optics and encouraging progress to date.

  12. Simultaneous fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field imaging with aberration correction over a wide field-of-view with Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to acquire both fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field images with correction for the spatially varying aberrations over a microscope's wide field-of-view (FOV). First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, FPM algorithm is able to leverage on the redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images to estimate the microscope aberrations, which usually deteriorate in regions further away from the FOV's center. Second, the procedure acquires a raw wide-FOV fluorescence image within the same setup. Lack of moving parts allows us to use the FPM-estimated aberration map to computationally correct for the aberrations in the fluorescence image through deconvolution. Overlaying the aberration-corrected fluorescence image on top of the high-resolution bright-field image can be done with accurate spatial correspondence. This can provide means to identifying fluorescent regions of interest within the context of the sample's bright-field information. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of ~18.

  13. Bright Ideas for Educators: Creative Projects by Recipients of FirstEnergy's Mathematics, Science and Technology Education Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Delores

    This document presents some of the projects that were highly rated and recommended for funding by the FirstEnergy Educational Advisory Council. A panel of educators and school administrators evaluated and endorsed the educational resources made available to schools and community groups. Project titles; teacher, school, and contact information; the…

  14. Building block diode laser concept for high brightness laser output in the kW range and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Fabio; Fritsche, Haro; Grohe, Andreas; Hagen, Thomas; Kern, Holger; Koch, Ralf; Kruschke, Bastian; Reich, Axel; Sanftleben, Dennis; Steger, Ronny; Wallendorf, Till; Gries, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The modular concept of DirectPhotonics laser systems is a big advantage regarding its manufacturability, serviceability as well as reproducibility. By sticking to identical base components an economic production allows to serve as many applications as possible while keeping the product variations minimal. The modular laser design is based on single emitters and various combining technics. In a first step we accept a reduction of the very high brightness of the single emitters by vertical stacking several diodes in fast axis. This can be theoretically done until the combined fast axis beam quality is on a comparable level as the individual diodes slow axis beam quality without loosing overall beam performance after fiber coupling. Those stacked individual emitters can be wavelength stabilized by an external resonator, providing the very same feedback to each of those laser diodes which leads to an output power of about 100 W with BPP of <3.5 mm*mrad (FA) and <5 mm*mrad (SA). In the next steps, further power scaling is accomplished by polarization and wavelength multiplexing yielding high optical efficiencies of more than 80% and resulting in a building block module with about 500 W launched into a 100 μm fiber with 0.15 NA. Higher power levels can be achieved by stacking those building blocks using the very same dense spectral combing technique up to multi kW Systems without further reduction of the BPP. The 500 W building blocks are consequently designed in a way that they feature a high flexibility with regard to their emitting wavelength bandwidth. Therefore, new wavelengths can be implemented by only exchanging parts and without any additional change of the production process. This design principal theoretically offers the option to adapt the wavelength of those blocks to any applications, from UV, visible into the far IR as long as there are any diodes commercially available. This opens numerous additional applications like laser pumping, scientific

  15. Bright field illumination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Edward D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A Bright Field Illumination system for inspecting a range of characteristically different kinds of defects, depressions, and ridges in a selected material surface. The system has an illumination source placed near a first focus of an elliptical reflector. In addition, a camera facing the inspected area is placed near the illumination source and the first focus. The second focus of the elliptical reflector is located at a distance approximately twice the elliptical reflector's distance above the inspected surface. The elliptical reflector directs the light from the source onto the inspected surface. Due to the shape of the elliptical reflector, light that is specularly reflected from the inspected surface is directed into the camera is which located at the position of the reflected second focus of the ellipse. This system creates a brightly lighted background field against which damage sites appear as high contrast dark objects which can be easily detected by a person or an automated inspection system. In addition, the Bright Field Illumination system and method can be used in combination with a vision inspection system providing for multiplexed illumination and data handling of multiple kinds of surface characteristics including abrupt and gradual surface variations and differences between measured characteristics of different kinds and prior instruments.

  16. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  17. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  18. Production of a high brightness H{sup -} beam by charge exchange of a hydrogen atom beam in a sodium jet

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2011-09-26

    Production of H{sup -} beams for applications in accelerators via charge exchange of a high brightness hydrogen neutral beam in a sodium jet cell is experimentally studied in a joint experiment by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physcis (BINP). In the experiment, a hydrogen atomic beam with an energy 3-6 keV, an equivalent current up to 5 A and a pulse duration 200 microseconds is used. Initial results demonstrate that an H{sup -} beam with a current 36 mA, an energy 5 keV and {approx}0.15 cm{center_dot}mrad normalized emittance was obtained. The recirculating sodium jet target with an entrance aperture 2 cm, which was developed for the BNL optically pumped polarized ion source, is used in the experiment. To increase the H{sup -} beam current, geometric focusing of the hydrogen neutral beam will be used in the future experiments. In addition, the effects of H{sup -} beam space-charge and sodium-jet stability will be studied to determine the basic limitations of this approach. The atomic beam is produced by charge exchange of a proton beam in a pulsed hydrogen target. The proton beam is formed by an ion source with a four-electrode multiaperture ion-optical system with small-size apertures. The plasma emission surface is formed by the plasma expansion from an arc plasma generator. The transverse ion temperature at the emission surface is 0.2 eV.

  19. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C D

    2015-07-24

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications. PMID:26252685

  20. Multi-kW high-brightness fiber coupled diode laser based on two dimensional stacked tailored diode bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Andreas; Unger, Andreas; Köhler, Bernd; Küster, Matthias; Dürsch, Sascha; Kissel, Heiko; Irwin, David A.; Bodem, Christian; Plappert, Nora; Kersten, Maik; Biesenbach, Jens

    2016-03-01

    The demand for high brightness fiber coupled diode laser devices in the multi kW power region is mainly driven by industrial applications for materials processing, like brazing, cladding and metal welding, which require a beam quality better than 30 mm x mrad and power levels above 3kW. Reliability, modularity, and cost effectiveness are key factors for success in the market. We have developed a scalable and modular diode laser architecture that fulfills these requirements through use of a simple beam shaping concept based on two dimensional stacking of tailored diode bars mounted on specially designed, tap water cooled heat sinks. The base element of the concept is a tailored diode laser bar with an epitaxial and lateral structure designed such that the desired beam quality in slow-axis direction can be realized without using sophisticated beam shaping optics. The optical design concept is based on fast-axis collimator (FAC) and slow-axis collimator (SAC) lenses followed by only one additional focusing optic for efficient coupling into a 400 μm fiber with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.12. To fulfill the requirements of scalability and modularity, four tailored bars are populated on a reduced size, tap water cooled heat sink. The diodes on these building blocks are collimated simply via FAC and SAC. The building blocks can be stacked vertically resulting in a two-dimensional diode stack, which enables a compact design of the laser source with minimum beam path length. For a single wavelength, up to eight of these building blocks, implying a total of 32 tailored bars, can be stacked into a submodule, polarization multiplexed, and coupled into a 400 μm, 0.12NA fiber. Scalability into the multi kW region is realized by wavelength combining of replaceable submodules in the spectral range from 900 - 1100 nm. We present results of a laser source based on this architecture with an output power of more than 4 kW and a beam quality of 25 mm x mrad.

  1. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  2. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  3. Application of a transverse phase-space measurement technique for high-brightness, H{sup {minus}} beams to the GTA H{sup {minus}} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Garcia, R.C.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sander, O.R.; Sandoval, D.P.; Shinas, M.A.; Smith, M.; Yuan, V.W.; Connolly, R.C.

    1995-05-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) had the objective Of Producing a high-brightness, high-current H-beam. The major components were a 35 keV injector, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), an intertank matching section (IMS), and a drift tube linac (DTL), consisting of 10 modules. A technique for measuring the transverse phase-space of high-power density beams has been developed and tested. This diagnostic has been applied to the GTA H-beam. Experimental results are compared to the slit and collector technique for transverse phase-space measurements and to simulations.

  4. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  5. Development of a high-brightness and low-divergence lithium neutral beam for a Zeeman polarimetry on JT-60U.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Atshushi; Kamiya, Kensaku; Iguchi, Harukazu; Fujita, Takaaki; Kakiuchi, Hideto; Kamada, Yutaka

    2008-09-01

    A high-brightness and low-divergence neutral beam is obtained for a Zeeman polarimetry of edge plasmas on JT-60U. The electron density and the pitch angle of the magnetic field line, thus the plasma current density distribution, can be measured by the Zeeman polarimetry using the lithium beam. A thermionic ion source heated by an electron beam is developed in order to obtain the ion beam current extraction over 10 mA. The beam optics is designed after detailed numerical simulation taking the space charge effects into account because a low-divergence angle of the neutral lithium beam leads to a narrow spectrum of the beam emission. It is also necessary to keep the beam radius small for good spatial resolution due to a long beam line of 6.5 m. The newly developed ion gun is operated on a test stand which simulates the diagnostic arrangement on JT-60U. The ion beam current of 10 mA at a beam energy of 10 keV is successfully extracted from the ion source operated at the temperature over 1300 degrees C and focused by Einzel lens. The full width at half maximum radius of the ion beam at the neutralizer is about 9 mm. A sodium vapor neutralizer neutralizes the collimated ion beam fully at the temperature of 300 degrees C. The neutral beam profiles are measured at two locations of the beam line at Z=2.3 m (beam monitor position) and Z=6.5 m (plasma region). The half-width at half maximum radius of the neutral beam of 26 mm and the equivalent beam current of 3 mA with the beam divergence angle of 0.2 deg which is the half-angle divergence are obtained. Those parameters satisfy the requirements of the Zeeman polarimetry. Furthermore, a long pulse extraction with a current of 10 mA and duration of 50 s is attained.

  6. High Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.

    INTRODUCTION PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS GENERAL REQUIRED LUMINOSITY FOR LEPTON COLLIDERS THE EFFECTIVE PHYSICS ENERGIES OF HADRON COLLIDERS HADRON-HADRON MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST CIRCULAR e^{+}e^- MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST e^{+}e^- LINEAR COLLIDERS LUMINOSITY CONVENTIONAL RF SUPERCONDUCTING RF AT HIGHER ENERGIES γ - γ COLLIDERS μ ^{+} μ^- COLLIDERS ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES DESIGN STUDIES STATUS AND REQUIRED R AND D COMPARISION OF MACHINES CONCLUSIONS DISCUSSION

  7. PERFORMANCE LIMITATIONS IN HIGH-ENERGY ION COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-05-16

    High-energy ion colliders (hadron colliders operating with ions other than protons) are premier research tools for nuclear physics. The collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operations considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species, including asymmetric collisions. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams limits are set by space charge, charge exchange, and intrabeam scattering effects. The latter leads to luminosity lifetimes of only a few hours for intense heavy ions beams. Currently, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the only operating high-energy ion collider. Later this decade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN, will also run with heavy ions.

  8. High rising energy savings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    In an effort to demonstrate that cost effective energy innovation is found in the synergistic combination of many basic proven architectural, mechanical and electrical elements, a team of consultants, architects and engineers joined together on a project: Galleria One in Atlanta, Georgia. They started with an efficient envelope and excellent individual floor VAV air conditioning systems. They reduced and eliminated heat gains. A Value and Energy Engineering checklist was created and is presented in this paper. There was no additional annual operation and maintenance cost incurred by the energy conserving features of the project with the exception of an emergency generator, which runs approximately 100 hours each summer and thus requires some additional maintenance.

  9. Highly bright yellow-green-emitting CuInS₂ colloidal quantum dots with core/shell/shell architecture for white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyun; Hong, Ara; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Yang, Heesun; Lee, Kwangyeol; Jang, Ho Seong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we report bright yellow-green-emitting CuInS2 (CIS)-based quantum dots (QDs) and two-band white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using them. To achieve high quantum efficiency (QE) of yellow-green-emitting CIS QDs, core/shell/shell strategy was introduced to high quality CIS cores (QE = 31.7%) synthesized by using metal-oleate precursors and 1-dodecanethiol. The CIS/ZnS/ZnS QDs showed a high QE of 80.0% and a peak wavelength of 559 nm under the excitation of 450 nm, which is well matched with dominant wavelength of blue LEDs. The formation of core/shell/shell structure was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy analyses. Intense and broad yellow-green emission band of the CIS/ZnS/ZnS is beneficial for bright two-band white light. When the CIS/ZnS/ZnS was coated on the blue LEDs, the fabricated white LED showed bright natural white light (luminous efficacy (η(L)) = 80.3 lm·W(-1), color rendering index (R(a)) = 73, correlated color temperature (T(c)) = 6140 K). The QD-white LED package showed a high light conversion efficiency of 72.6%. In addition, the CIS/ZnS/ZnS-converted white LED showed relatively stable white light against the variation of forward bias currents of 20-150 mA [color coordinates (x, y) = (0.3320-0.3207, 0.2997-0.2867), R(a) = 70-72, T(c) = 5497-6375 K]. PMID:25757746

  10. The Swift gamma-ray burst redshift distribution: selection biases and optical brightness evolution at high z?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coward, D. M.; Howell, E. J.; Branchesi, M.; Stratta, G.; Guetta, D.; Gendre, B.; Macpherson, D.

    2013-07-01

    We employ realistic constraints on astrophysical and instrumental selection effects to model the gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshift distribution using Swift triggered redshift samples acquired from optical afterglows and The Optically Unbiased GRB Host survey. Models for the Malmquist bias, redshift desert, and the fraction of afterglows missing because of host galaxy dust extinction are used to show how the `true' GRB redshift distribution is distorted to its presently observed biased distribution. We also investigate another selection effect arising from a correlation between Eiso and Lopt. The analysis, which accounts for the missing fraction of redshifts in the two data subsets, shows that a combination of selection effects (both instrumental and astrophysical) can describe the observed GRB redshift distribution. Furthermore, the observed distribution is compatible with a GRB rate evolution that tracks the global star formation rate, although the rate at high z cannot be constrained with confidence. Taking optical selection effects into account, it may not be necessary to invoke high-energy GRB luminosity evolution with redshift to explain the observed GRB rate at high z.

  11. Measurement of brightness temperature of two-dimensional electron gas in channel of a high electron mobility transistor at ultralow dissipation power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, A. M.; Shulga, V. M.; Turutanov, O. G.; Shnyrkov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    A technically simple and physically clear method is suggested for direct measurement of the brightness temperature of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the channel of a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). The usage of the method was demonstrated with the pseudomorphic HEMT as a specimen. The optimal HEMT dc regime, from the point of view of the "back action" problem, was found to belong to the unsaturated area of the static characteristics possibly corresponding to the ballistic electron transport mode. The proposed method is believed to be a convenient tool to explore the ballistic transport, electron diffusion, 2DEG properties and other electrophysical processes in heterostructures.

  12. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  13. High energy transmission annular beam X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Dicken, Anthony; Shevchuk, Alex; Rogers, Keith; Godber, Simon; Evans, Paul

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate material phase retrieval by linearly translating extended polycrystalline samples along the symmetry axis of an annular beam of high-energy X-rays. A series of pseudo-monochromatic diffraction images are recorded from the dark region encompassed by the beam. We measure Bragg maxima from different annular gauge volumes in the form of bright spots in the X-ray diffraction intensity. We present the experiment data from three materials with different crystallographic structural properties i.e. near ideal, large grain size and preferred orientation. This technique shows great promise for analytical inspection tasks requiring highly penetrating radiation such as security screening, medicine and non-destructive testing.

  14. BrightFocus Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program Macular Degeneration Research Program National Glaucoma Research Program Molecular Neurodegeneration ... Foundation BrightFocus Foundation 22512 Gateway Center Drive Clarksburg, MD ...

  15. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 z > 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ˜ ‑22 mag or z AB ˜ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  16. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ˜ -22 mag or z AB ˜ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  17. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    PubMed

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light.

  18. Bright Beginnings. WWC Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Bright Beginnings is an early childhood curriculum, based in part on High/Scope[R] and Creative Curriculum[R], with an additional emphasis on literacy skills. The curriculum consists of nine thematic units designed to enhance children's cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development, and each unit includes concept maps, literacy lessons,…

  19. Brightness of Moonlight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garstang, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of the brightness of moonlight by comparison with lamp-light from a low wattage light bulb is an elementary project in astronomy which illustrates scientific principles for the freshman level. Two methods used for the comparison (shadow brightness method and grease spot method) are explained, with suggestions and expected answers. (DH)

  20. Spectroscopic investigation of the vapor plume during laser processing of AISI 52100 steel using a high brightness diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, David Mark

    2001-12-01

    microstructure in the heat affected zone consisted of a mix of spheroidal chromium carbides within a ferrite matrix. This work represents the first comprehensive characterization of atomic species within a plasma created during processing of a ferrous alloy using a high brightness, diode-pumped Nd:YAG slab laser.

  1. Bright is the New Black - Multi-Year Performance of Generic High-Albedo Roofs in an Urban Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, S. R.; Imhoff, M.; Rosenzweig, C.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Pasqualini, A.; Kong, A. Y. Y.; Grillo, D.; Freed, A.; Hillel, D.; Hartung, E.

    2012-01-01

    High-albedo white and cool roofing membranes are recognized as a fundamental strategy that dense urban areas can deploy on a large scale, at low cost, to mitigate the urban heat island effect. We are monitoring three generic white membranes within New York City that represent a cross-section of the dominant white membrane options for U.S. flat roofs: (1) an ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber membrane; (2) a thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) membrane and; (3) an asphaltic multi-ply built-up membrane coated with white elastomeric acrylic paint. The paint product is being used by New York City s government for the first major urban albedo enhancement program in its history. We report on the temperature and related albedo performance of these three membranes at three different sites over a multi-year period. The results indicate that the professionally installed white membranes are maintaining their temperature control effectively and are meeting the Energy Star Cool Roofing performance standards requiring a three-year aged albedo above 0.50. The EPDM membrane however shows evidence of low emissivity. The painted asphaltic surface shows high emissivity but lost about half of its initial albedo within two years after installation. Given that the acrylic approach is an important "do-it-yourself," low-cost, retrofit technique, and, as such, offers the most rapid technique for increasing urban albedo, further product performance research is recommended to identify conditions that optimize its long-term albedo control. Even so, its current multi-year performance still represents a significant albedo enhancement for urban heat island mitigation.

  2. High-brightness table-top hard X-ray source driven by sub-100-femtosecond mid-infrared pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaupt, Jannick; Juvé, Vincent; Holtz, Marcel; Ku, Shinan; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas; Ališauskas, Skirmantas; Pugžlys, Audrius; Baltuška, Andrius

    2014-12-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in the condensed phase represents a key topic of current physics, chemistry and materials science. Femtosecond hard X-ray pulses are important structure probes that have been applied in time-resolved X-ray absorption and diffraction. Optical pump/X-ray probe schemes with compact laser-driven table-top sources have allowed for tiny changes of diffracted intensity to be measured with X-ray photon statistics, which has set the ultimate sensitivity limit. To address the strong quest for a higher X-ray flux, here we present the first hard X-ray plasma source driven by intense mid-infrared sub-100-fs pulses at 3.9 μm. The comparably long optical period allows for accelerating electrons from the Cu target to very high kinetic energies and for generating a characteristic Kα flux of 109 photons per pulse, 25 times more than with our 800 nm driver. Theoretical simulations account for the experimental results in a wide range of driving fields and predict a further enhancement of X-ray flux.

  3. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  4. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  5. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of a Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON): a high brightness detection platform based on a dye-doped silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shibsekhar; Dixit, Chandra K; Woolley, Robert; O'Kennedy, Richard; McDonagh, Colette

    2012-05-29

    A highly bright and photostable, fluorescent nanohybrid particle is presented which consists of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) embedded in dye-doped silica in a core-shell configuration. The dye used is the near-infrared emitting 4,5-benzo-5'-(iodoacetaminomethyl)-1',3,3,3',3'-pentamethyl-1-(4-sulfobutyl) indodicarbo cyanine. The nanohybrid architecture comprises a GNP core which is separated from a layer of dye molecules by a 15 nm buffer layer and has an outer protective, undoped silica shell. Using this architecture, a brightness factor of 550 has been achieved compared to the free dye. This hybrid system, referred to as Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON) in this paper, is the first nanohybrid construct to our knowledge which demonstrates such tunable fluorescence property. NEON has enhanced photostability compared to the free dye and compared to a control particle without GNPs. Furthermore, the NEON particle, when used as a fluorescent label in a model bioassay, shows improved performance over assays using a conventional single dye molecule label.

  7. Self-consistent simulation of radiation and space-charge in high-brightness relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, David R.

    2007-12-01

    The ability to preserve the quality of relativistic electron beams through transport bend elements such as a bunch compressor chicane is increasingly difficult as the current increases because of effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and space-charge. Theoretical CSR models and simulations, in their current state, often make unrealistic assumptions about the beam dynamics and/or structures. Therefore, we have developed a model and simulation that contains as many of these elements as possible for the purpose of making high-fidelity end-to-end simulations. Specifically, we are able to model, in a completely self-consistent, three-dimensional manner, the sustained interaction of radiation and space-charge from a relativistic electron beam in a toroidal waveguide with rectangular cross-section. We have accomplished this by combining a time-domain field solver that integrates a paraxial wave equation valid in a waveguide when the dimensions are small compared to the bending radius with a particle-in-cell dynamics code. The result is shown to agree with theory under a set of constraints, namely thin rigid beams, showing the stimulation resonant modes and including comparisons for waveguides approximating vacuum, and parallel plate shielding. Using a rigid beam, we also develop a scaling for the effect of beam width, comparing both our simulation and numerical integration of the retarded potentials. We further demonstrate the simulation calculates the correct longitudinal space-charge forces to produce the appropriate potential depression for a converging beam in a straight waveguide with constant dimensions. We then run fully three-dimensional, self-consistent end-to-end simulations of two types of bunch compressor designs, illustrating some of the basic scaling properties and perform a detailed analysis of the output phase-space distribution. Lastly, we show the unique ability of our simulation to model the evolution of charge/energy perturbations on a

  8. Field emission display device structure based on double-gate driving principle for achieving high brightness using a variety of field emission nanoemitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Dai, Y. Y.; Luo, J.; Li, Z. L.; Deng, S. Z.; She, J. C.; Xu, N. S.

    2007-06-01

    In order to apply various cold cathode nanoemitters in a field emission display (FED) and to achieve high brightness, a FED device structure with double gates and corresponding driving method have been proposed. Individual pixel addressing can be achieved by applying proper sequence of positive or negative voltage to the lower gate and upper gate, respectively. The feasibility of the device has been demonstrated by using carbon nanotube and tungsten oxide nanowire cold emitters. Display of moving images has been demonstrated and high luminance up to 2500cd/m2 was obtained. The reported device structure is versatile for nanoemitters regardless of substrate or preparation temperature. The results are of significance to the development of FED using nanoemitters.

  9. A line identification study of the IUE SWP high dispersion spectrum of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 of Messier 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Cacciari, C.; Leckrone, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    A line identification study was performed of the coaddition of three SWP high dispersion IUE exposures of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 of Messier 13. One of these images took two IUE shifts. The previous study by de Boer and Savage (1983) was extended and stellar lines of C I, C II, C III, C IV, N I, N III, O I, O III, O IV,Al III, Si II, Si III, Si IV, P III, S II, and S III and interstellar lines of C I, C II, C IV, N I, N III, N IV, N V, O I, Al II, Al III, Si II, Si IV, S II, and Fe II were found. These lines are the strongest expected lines in a hot Population II star. Apparent intensity minima corresponding to interstellar features are noted, especially those matching a high velocity cloud found by de Boer and Savage.

  10. Frontiers for discovery in high energy density physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    2005-07-01

    Recent advances in extending the energy, power, and brightness of lasers, particle beams, and Z-pinch generators make it possible to create matter with extremely high energy density in the laboratory. The collective interaction of this matter, often in the plasma state, with itself, intense particle beams, and radiation fields, is a rapidly growing field of research called high energy density physics. It is a field characterized by extreme states of matter, previously unattainable in laboratory experiments, and not unlike the conditions occurring in many astrophysical systems. It is also a field rich in opportunities for scientific discovery and compelling applications, propelled by advances in high-performance computing and advanced instrumentation and measuring techniques. This plenary presentation will summarize the results of two recent national studies of high energy density physics commissioned by the National Academies -- National Research Council, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy's Interagency Working Group on the Physics of the Universe. It will also provide an overview of the exciting research opportunities of high intellectual value in this highly interdisciplinary field, with examples ranging from fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion, to the creation of quark-gluon plasmas characteristic of the very early Universe using heavy ion accelerators. For purposes of this presentation, the working definition of high energy density refers to energy densities exceeding 100 kilojoules per cubic centimeter, or equivalently, pressures exceeding one megabar. For reference, the bulk moduli of solid materials under standard conditions are about 100 kilojoules per cubic centimeter.

  11. Contrast adaptation to luminance and brightness modulations.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takehiro; Nakayama, Kazuki; Kawashima, Yuki; Yamauchi, Yasuki

    2016-03-01

    Perceptual brightness and color contrast decrease after seeing a light temporally modulating along a certain direction in a color space, a phenomenon known as contrast adaptation. We investigated whether contrast adaptation along the luminance direction arises from modulation of luminance signals or apparent brightness signals. The stimulus consisted of two circles on a gray background presented on a CRT monitor. In the adaptation phase, the luminance and chromaticity of one circle were temporally modulated, while the other circle was kept at a constant luminance and color metameric with an equal-energy white. We employed two types of temporal modulations, namely, in luminance and brightness. Chromaticity was sinusoidally modulated along the L-M axis, leading to dissociation between luminance and brightness (the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch effect). In addition, luminance modulation was minimized in the brightness modulation, while brightness modulation was minimized in the luminance modulation. In the test phase, an asymmetric matching method was used to measure the magnitude of contrast adaptation for both modulations. Our results showed that, although contrast adaptation along the luminance direction occurred for both modulations, contrast adaptation for luminance modulation was significantly stronger than that for the brightness modulation regardless of the temporal frequency of the adaptation modulation. These results suggest that luminance modulation is more influential in contrast adaptation than brightness modulation.

  12. High brightness extreme ultraviolet (at 13.5 nm) emission from time-of-flight controlled discharges with coaxial fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Yokoyama, Takuma; Zhidkov, Alexei; Sato, Hiroto; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Hotta, Eiki

    2008-09-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission from discharge produced plasma with the coaxial injection of fuel vapor (tin and lithium) produced by laser ablation is experimentally studied. Multiple plasma pinches preceding a strong and long recombination radiation of EUV are observed in the first half cycle of a sinusoidal discharge current. Due to the time-of-flight control type of the discharge, the shape of pinch radiation pulses is almost identical. With the coaxial injection of time-of-flight controlled discharges, the highest brightness of EUV emission (maximum extracted energy of 244.3 mJ/2π sr per pulse with the emitter size of ˜1×0.3 mm2 in full width at half maximum) is provided with efficiency exceeding 2% of deposited energy into the plasma (or 1% of dissipated energy in the discharge) due to a much better matching with the optimal plasma parameters in the recombination regime and a decrease in the off-duty factor. Stability of emitting plasma of the repetitive pinches is essentially improved with use of a second laser pulse.

  13. Star Light, Star Bright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iadevaia, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a technique for obtaining a rough measure of the brightness among different stars. Materials needed include a standard 35-mm camera, a plastic ruler, and a photo enlarger. Although a telescope can be used, it is not essential. (JN)

  14. High-brightness semipolar (2021¯) blue InGaN/GaN superluminescent diodes for droop-free solid-state lighting and visible-light communications.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Leonard, John T; Pourhashemi, Arash; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P; Speck, James S; Alyamani, Ahmed Y; El-Desouki, Munir M; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-06-01

    A high-brightness, droop-free, and speckle-free InGaN/GaN quantum well blue superluminescent diode (SLD) was demonstrated on a semipolar (2021¯) GaN substrate. The 447-nm emitting SLD has a broad spectral linewidth of 6.3 nm at an optical power of 123 mW. A peak optical power of 256 mW was achieved at 700 mA CW injection current. By combining YAG:Ce phosphor, SLD-generated white light shows a color-rendering index (CRI) of 68.9 and a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4340 K. The measured frequency response of the SLD revealed a -3  dB bandwidth of 560 MHz, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the device for both solid-state lighting (SSL) and visible-light communication (VLC) applications.

  15. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kolmogorov, A. Stupishin, N.; Atoian, G.; Ritter, J.; Zelenski, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2014-02-15

    The RHIC polarized H{sup −} ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H{sub 2} gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce “geometrical” beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  16. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade.

    PubMed

    Kolmogorov, A; Atoian, G; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Ritter, J; Stupishin, N; Zelenski, A

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H(-) ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  17. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmogorov, A.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ritter, J.; Stupishin, N.; Zelenski, A.

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H- ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ˜0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  18. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  19. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Gleckman, Philip L.; O'Gallagher, Joseph J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  20. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  1. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; Barthelmy, Scott; Palmer, David; Mitchell, John; Esposito, Joseph; Sreekumar, P.; Hua, Xin-Min; Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Chan, Kai-Wing; Soong, Yang; Barrett, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  2. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Holdridge, David V.; Norris, J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  3. Relative brightness of the O{sup +}({sup 2} D-{sup 2} P) doublets in low-energy aurorae

    SciTech Connect

    Whiter, D. K.; Lanchester, B. S.; Gustavsson, B.; Jallo, N. I. B.; Jokiaho, O.; Dahlgren, H.; Ivchenko, N.

    2014-12-10

    The ratio of the emission line doublets from O{sup +} at 732.0 nm (I {sub 732}) and 733.0 nm (I {sub 733}) has been measured in auroral conditions of low-energy electron precipitation from Svalbard (78.°20 north, 15.°83 east). Accurate determination of R = I {sub 732}/I {sub 733} provides a powerful method for separating the density of the O{sup +} {sup 2} P{sub 1} {sub /2,3} {sub /2}{sup o} levels in modeling of the emissions from the doublets. A total of 383 spectra were included from the winter of 2003-2004. The value obtained is R = I {sub 732}/I {sub 733} = 1.38 ± 0.02, which is higher than theoretical values for thermal equilibrium in fully ionized plasma, but is lower than reported measurements by other authors in similar auroral conditions. The continuity equations for the densities of the two levels are solved for different conditions, in order to estimate the possible variations of R. The results suggest that the production of ions in the two levels from O ({sup 3} P {sub 1}) and O ({sup 3} P {sub 2}) does not follow the statistical weights, unlike astrophysical calculations for plasmas in nebulae. The physics of auroral impact ionization may account for this difference, and therefore for the raised value of R. In addition, the auroral solution of the densities of the ions, and thus of the value of R, is sensitive to the temperature of the neutral atmosphere. Although the present work is a statistical study, it shows that it is necessary to determine whether there are significant variations in the ratio resulting from non-equilibrium conditions, from auroral energy deposition, large electric fields, and changes in temperature and composition.

  4. Cavity Light-Emitting Diode for Durable, High-Brightness and High-Efficiency Lighting Applications: First Budget Period Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yijian Shi

    2009-09-30

    A COLED device consists of a top electrode (anode) and a bottom electrode (cathode) separated by a thin dielectric layer. In this metal/dielectric stack, numerous small wells, or cavities, are etched through the top electrode and the dielectric layer. These cavities are subsequently filled with LEP molecules. When a voltage is applied between the top and bottom electrodes, holes (from the top electrode) and electrons (from the bottom electrode) are injected into the polymer. Light emission is generated upon recombination of holes and electrons within the polymer along the perimeters of cavities. Figure 1 compares the structures of the COLED and the traditional OLED. The existing COLED fabrication process flow is illustrated in Figure 2. A COLED can potentially be 5 times more efficient and can operate at as much as 100 times higher current density with much longer lifetime than an OLED. To fully realize these potential advantages, the COLED technology must overcome the following technical barriers, which were the technical focused points for Years 1 and 2 (Phase I) of this project: (1) Construct optimum thickness dielectric layer: In the traditional OLED structure, the optimal thickness of the LEP film is approximately 80-100 nm. In a COLED device, the effective LEP thickness roughly equals the thickness of the dielectric layer. Therefore, the optimal dielectric thickness for a COLED should also be roughly equal to 80-100 nm. Generally speaking, it is technically challenging to produce a defect-free dielectric layer at this thickness with high uniformity, especially over a large area. (2) Develop low-work-function cathode: A desired cathode should have a low work function that matches the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of the LEP molecules. This is usually achieved by using a low-work-function metal such as calcium, barium, lithium, or magnesium as the cathode. However, these metals are very vulnerable to oxygen and water. Since the cathode of the

  5. High-energy neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Michele Rhea

    2001-12-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for the radiation protection quantity effective dose were calculated for neutrons, photons and protons with energies up to 2 GeV using the MCNPX code. The calculations were performed using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory versions of the MIRD-V male and female anthropomorphic phantoms modified to include the skin and esophagus. The latest high-energy neutron evaluated cross-section libraries and the recommendations given in ICRP Publication 60 and ICRP Publication 74 were utilized to perform the calculations. Sets of fluence-to- effective dose conversion coefficients are given for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral, right-lateral and rotational irradiation geometries. This is the first set of dose conversion coefficients over this energy range calculated for the L-LAT irradiation geometry. A unique set of high-energy neutron depth-dose benchmark experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center/Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE/WNR) complex. The experiments consisted of filtered neutron beams with energies up to 800 MeV impinging on a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 tissue-equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose was measured in the phantom at various depths with tissue-equivalent ion chambers. The phantom and the experimental set-up were modeled using MCNPX. Comparisons of the experimental and computational depth- dose distributions indicate that the absorbed dose calculated by MCNPX is within 13% for neutrons with energies up to 750 MeV. This experiment will serve as a benchmark experiment for the testing of high-energy radiation transport codes for the international radiation protection community.

  6. High energy density electrochemical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, J. J.; Williams, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Primary cell has an anode of lithium, a cathode containing dihaloisocyanuric acid, and a nonaqueous electrolyte comprised of a solution of lithium perchlorate in methyl formate. It produces an energy density of 213 watt hrs/lb and can achieve a high current density.

  7. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  8. High Energy Astronomy Observatory program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtalik, F. S.

    1979-01-01

    The series of three orbiting high energy astronomy observatories that comprise the HEAO program are described. Several unique designs as well as the attitude control and determination system, used for observatory scan rotation of the first and third missions and for precision pointing on the second mission, are analyzed. Attention is given to observatory requirements, design characteristics, and the RGA performance summary.

  9. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOEpatents

    Zolotorev, Max

    2010-07-13

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  10. Options for integrated beam experiments for inertial fusion energy and high-energy density physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, M. A.; Celata, C. M.; Lee, E. P.; Logan, B. G.; Waldron, W. L.; Yu, S. S.; Barnard, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL), a collaboration among LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, is presently focused on separate smaller-scale scientific experiments addressing key issues of future Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and High-Energy-Density-Physics (HEDP) drivers: the injection, transport, and focusing of intense heavy ion beams at currents from 25 to 600 mA. As a next major step in the HIF-VNL program, we aim for a fully integrated beam physics experiment, which allows integrated source-to-target physics research with a high-current heavy ion beam of IFE-relevant brightness with the goal of optimizing target focusing. This paper describes two rather different options for such an integrated experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) and the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Both proposals put emphasis on the unique capability for integrated injection, acceleration, compression, and focusing of a high-current, space-charge-dominated heavy ion beam.

  11. Bright Central Galaxies (BCGs) in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data: Stellar Mass Growth in X-Ray Selected Clusters and Groups Since z=1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Miller, Christopher; McKay, Timothy; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We study the stellar mass of bright central galaxies and its evolution with time. We use a new sample of 106 0 < z < 1 . 3 clusters that have been selected in the X-ray and confirmed with redshift follow-up from Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This new sample allows us to probe BCG evolution over a wide range of halo mass and redshift using a single data set. We derive constraints on the BCG stellar to halo mass relation as a function of cluster mass/redshift and investigate the stellar mass growth of BCGs to z = 1.2. At z < 0 . 9 , we find that the semi-analytical modeling reproduces the observed growth of BCGs. However, at z > 0 . 9 , we confirm previous findings that the observed BCGs appear to be overly-massive (luminous) when compared to the models. The growth rate for BCGs in a M200 =10 13 . 8 solar mass cluster at z=1.0 is observed to be slower than that predicted by hierarchical growth and semi-analytic modeling.

  12. Galaxies in X-Ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data. I. Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies since z~1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; Wilcox, H.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Jeltema, T.; Hollowood, D.; Bacon, D.; Capozzi, D.; Collins, C.; Das, R.; Gerdes, D.; Hennig, C.; Hilton, M.; Hoyle, B.; Kay, S.; Liddle, A.; Mann, R. G.; Mehrtens, N.; Nichol, R. C.; Papovich, C.; Sahlén, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stott, J.; Viana, P. T.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Castander, F. J.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Cunha, C. E.; Eifler, T. F.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, Paul; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; da Costa, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, {m}*\\propto {≤ft(\\frac{{M}200}{1.5× {10}14{M}⊙ }\\right)}0.24+/- 0.08{(1+z)}-0.19+/- 0.34, and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M200,z = 1013.8 M⊙ at z = 1.0: m*,BCG appears to have grown by 0.13 ± 0.11 dex, in tension at the ˜2.5σ significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  13. High brightness GaN vertical light emitting diodes on metal alloyed substrate for general lighting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Chuong Anh; Chu, Chen-Fu; Cheng, Chao-Chen; Liu, Wen-Huan; Chu, Jiunn-Yi; Cheng, Hao-Chun; Fan, Feng-Hsu; Yen, Jui-Kang; Doan, Trung

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of the GaN-based vertical light emitting diodes on metal alloyed substrate (VLEDMS) were investigated. The VLEDMS exhibits very good current-voltage behaviour with low serial dynamic resistance of 0.7 Ω and low operated voltage of 3.2 V at 350 mA. High current operation up to 3 A in continuous mode was demonstrated without any performance deterioration. The high thermal conductivity of metal alloyed substrate exhibits excellent heat dissipation capability. Chip scaling without efficiency loss shows a unique property of VLEDMS. A light output efficiency of 70 lumens/W or better was achieved in single chip or multiple chips package. Coupled with good reliability and mass production ability, VLEDMS is very suitable for general lighting application.

  14. Evolution of bulgeless low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xu; Hammer, Francois; Yang, Yanbin; Liang, Yanchun

    2015-08-01

    We study the environment, the morphology and stellar population of bulgeless low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample. The differences of environments between LSB and high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies are not obvious, suggesting they may locate in similar environments. The stellar populations of LSB galaxies in low density region are similar with those of LSB galaxies in high density region. Irregular LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than the regular LSB galaxies.

  15. Bright patches on Ariel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Distinct bright patches are visible on Ariel, the brightest of Uranus' five largest satellites. Voyager 2 obtained this image Jan. 22, 1986, from a distance of 2.52 million kilometers (1.56 million miles). The clear-filter image, obtained with the narrow-angle camera, shows a resolution of 47 km (29 miles). Ariel is about 1,300 km (800 mi) in diameter. This image shows several distinct bright areas that reflect nearly 45 percent of the incident sunlight; on average, the satellite displays a reflectivity of about 25-30 percent. The bright areas are probably fresh water ice, perhaps excavated by impacts. The south pole of Ariel is slightly off center of the disk in this view. Voyager 2 will obtain its best views of the satellite on Jan. 24, at a closest-approach distance of 127,000 km (79,000 mi). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  16. BRIGHT lights, BIG city: high redshift radio galaxies, giant Ly-a halos, and proto-clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, Willem J.; Reuland, Michiel A.; de Vries, Willem H.; Stanford, Adam; Dey, Arjun; Kurk, Jaron; Venemans, Bram; Roettgering, Huub J. A.; Miley, George; De Breuck, Carlos; Dopita, Mike; Sutherland, Ralph; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan

    2003-02-01

    High redshift radio galaxies are great cosmological tools for pinpointing the most massive objects in the early Universe: massive forming galaxies, active super-massive black holes and proto-clusters. We report on deep narrow-band imaging and spectroscopic observations of several z > 2 radio galaxy fields to investigate the nature of giant Ly-α nebulae centered on the galaxies and to search for over-dense regions around them. We discuss the possible implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters.

  17. Bright upconversion luminescence and increased Tc in CaBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}:Er high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Dengfeng; Wang Xusheng; Yao Xi; Xu Chaonan; Lin Jian; Sun Tiantuo

    2012-05-15

    Er{sup 3+} doped CaBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (CBT) bismuth layered-structure high temperature piezoelectric ceramics were synthesized by the traditional solid state method. The upconversion (UC) emission properties of Er{sup 3+} doped CBT ceramics were investigated as a function of Er{sup 3+} concentration and incident pump power. A bright green upconverted emission was obtained under excitation 980 nm at room temperature. The observed strong green and weak red emission bands corresponded to the transitions from {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} to {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, respectively. The dependence of UC emission intensity on pumping power indicated that a three-photon process was involved in UC emissions. Studies of dielectric with temperature have also been carried out. Introduction of Er increased the Curie temperature of CBT, thus, making this ceramic suitable for sensor applications at higher temperatures. Because of its strong up-converted emission and increased Tc, the multifunctional high temperature piezoelectric ceramic may be useful in high temperature sensor, fluorescence thermometry, and optical-electro integration applications.

  18. WIDGET: Ultra Bright Optical Transients Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Y.; Lin, H.-M.; Tashiro, M.; Widget Team

    2010-12-01

    The WIDeField telescope for Gamma-ray burst Early Timing (WIDGET) is used for a fully automated, ultra-wide-field survey aimed at detecting the prompt optical emission associated with Gamma-ray Bursts (GRB). WIDGET surveys the HETE-2 and Swift/BAT pointing directions covering a total field of view of 62x62 degree every 10 seconds using an unfiltered system. This monitoring survey allows exploration of the optical emission before the gamma-ray trigger. At the same time, WIDGET is the quite unique instrument to explore ultra-bright optical transients with high time resolution. Combination with the MAXI survey, WIDGET has higher potential to make simultaneous discoveries of optical counterparts for high energy transients. We developed the serendipitous transient finding pipeline. We report the preliminary results.

  19. Atmospheric CO2 remote sensing system based on high brightness semiconductor lasers and single photon counting detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Serrano, Antonio; Vilera, Maria Fernanda; Esquivias, Ignacio; Faugeron, Mickael; Krakowski, Michel; van Dijk, Frédéric; Kochem, Gerd; Traub, Martin; Adamiec, Pawel; Barbero, Juan; Ai, Xiao; Rarity, John G.; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Ehret, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    We propose an integrated path differential absorption lidar system based on all-semiconductor laser sources and single photon counting detection for column-averaged measurements of atmospheric CO2. The Random Modulated Continuous Wave (RM-CW) approach has been selected as the best suited to semiconductor lasers. In a RM-CW lidar, a pseudo random sequence is sent to the atmosphere and the received signal reflected from the target is correlated with the original sequence in order to retrieve the path length. The transmitter design is based on two monolithic Master Oscillator Power Amplifiers (MOPAs), providing the on-line and off-line wavelengths close to the selected absorption line around 1.57 µm. Each MOPA consists of a frequency stabilized distributed feedback master oscillator, a bent modulator section, and a tapered amplifier. This design allows the emitters to deliver high power and high quality laser beams with good spectral properties. An output power above 400 mW with a SMSR higher than 45 dB and modulation capability have been demonstrated. On the side of the receiver, our theoretical and experimental results indicate that the major noise contribution comes from the ambient light and detector noise. For this reason narrow band optical filters are required in the envisioned space-borne applications. In this contribution, we present the latest progresses regarding the design, modeling and characterization of the transmitter, the receiver, the frequency stabilization unit and the complete system.

  20. Bright and dark sides of impulsivity: performance of women with high and low trait impulsivity on neuropsychological tasks.

    PubMed

    Perales, Jose C; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Moya, Maribel; Lozano, Oscar; Perez-Garcia, Miguel

    2009-11-01

    We administered a multidimensional measure of trait impulsivity (the UPPS-P impulsivity scale; Cyders et al., 2007) to a nonclinical sample of 155 individuals and selected 32 participants at the two ends of the trait impulsivity continuum: high (HI, n = 15) and low (LI, n = 17) impulsive women. We further tested these extreme groups on neuropsychological measures of motor impulsivity (go/no-go, d2), delay discounting (Now or Later Questionnaire), reflection impulsivity (Matching Familiar Figures Test), self-regulation (Revised-Strategy Application Test), and decision making (Iowa Gambling Task). High-trait-impulsivity women were found to commit more commission errors in the initial stage of the go/no-go task but also to make fewer omission errors in the d2 test than did low-trait-impulsivity women. Both effects can be accounted for by a lower response criterion in impulsive women. On the other hand, measures of delay discounting, reflection impulsivity, self-regulation, and decision making did not yield significant differences between the two groups. This pattern of results supports the idea that trait impulsivity in healthy women is linked to neurocognitive mechanisms involved in response monitoring and inhibition, but not to mechanisms involved in self-regulation or decision making. These findings temper the assumption that impulsivity is the core cause of dysfunctional risky and/or impulsive behavior in psychopathological or neuropsychological profiles. PMID:19358009

  1. Research and development of an electron beam focusing system for a high-brightness X-ray generator.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Noriyoshi; Sugimura, Takashi; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator, where an electron beam of up to 60 keV irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped Cu anticathode, has achieved a beam brilliance of 130 kW mm(-2) (at 2.3 kW). A higher-flux electron beam is expected from simulation by optimizing the geometry of a combined-function-type magnet instead of the fringing field of the bending magnet. In order to minimize the size of the X-ray source the electron beam has been focused over a short distance by a new combined-function bending magnet, whose geometrical shape was determined by simulation using the Opera-3D, General Particle Tracer and CST-STUDIO codes. The result of the simulation clearly shows that the role of combined functions in both the bending and the steering magnets is important for focusing the beam to a small size. FWHM sizes of the beam are predicted by simulation to be 0.45 mm (horizontal) and 0.05 mm (vertical) for a 120 keV/75 mA beam, of which the effective brilliance is about 500 kW mm(-2) on the supposition of a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. High-power tests have begun using a high-voltage 120 kV/75 mA power supply for the X-ray generator instead of 60 kV/100 mA. The beam focus size on the target will be verified in the experiments. PMID:21169692

  2. Research and development of an electron beam focusing system for a high-brightness X-ray generator

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Noriyoshi; Sugimura, Takashi; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator, where an electron beam of up to 60 keV irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped Cu anticathode, has achieved a beam brilliance of 130 kW mm−2 (at 2.3 kW). A higher-flux electron beam is expected from simulation by optimizing the geometry of a combined-function-type magnet instead of the fringing field of the bending magnet. In order to minimize the size of the X-ray source the electron beam has been focused over a short distance by a new combined-function bending magnet, whose geometrical shape was determined by simulation using the Opera-3D, General Particle Tracer and CST-STUDIO codes. The result of the simulation clearly shows that the role of combined functions in both the bending and the steering magnets is important for focusing the beam to a small size. FWHM sizes of the beam are predicted by simulation to be 0.45 mm (horizontal) and 0.05 mm (vertical) for a 120 keV/75 mA beam, of which the effective brilliance is about 500 kW mm−2 on the supposition of a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. High-power tests have begun using a high-voltage 120 kV/75 mA power supply for the X-ray generator instead of 60 kV/100 mA. The beam focus size on the target will be verified in the experiments. PMID:21169692

  3. Evidence for Temporally-Extended, High-Energy Emission from Gamma Ray Burst 990104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, D. N.; Bertsch, D. L.; Ritz, S.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV - GeV) has been observed in several gamma ray bursts and temporally-extended emission from lower-energy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. Observations of extended, high-energy emission are, however, scarce. Here we present evidence for a gamma ray burst emission that is both high-energy and extended, coincident with lower energy emissions. For the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104, we show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) trigger and initial burst emission. Between the initial output and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a period of approx. 100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma ray bursts.

  4. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  5. Cosmology for high energy physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1987-11-01

    The standard big bang model of cosmology is presented. Although not perfect, its many successes make it a good starting point for most discussions of cosmology. Places are indicated where well understood laboratory physics is incorporated into the big bang, leading to successful predictions. Much less established aspects of high energy physics and some of the new ideas they have introduced into the field of cosmology are discussed, such as string theory, inflation and monopoles. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  6. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  7. High energy electron positron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Soding, P.

    1987-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA in a year from now, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics will come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of a few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way more useful to any high energy physicist in particular to newcomers in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions. It includes the most relevant data, parametrizations, theoretical background, and a chapter on detectors. Contents: Foreword; Detectors for High Energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ Physics; Lepton Pair Production and Electroweak Parameters; Hadron Production, Strong and Electroweak Properties; tau Physics; Recent Results on the Charm Sector; Bottom Physics; Lifetime Measurements of tau, Charmed and Beauty Hadrons; UPSILON Spectroscopy; Hadronic Decays of the UPSILON; Quark and Gluon Fragmentation in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ Continuum; Jet Production and QCD; Two Photon Physics; Search for New Particles.

  8. Brightness predictions for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Daniel W. E.; Marsden, Brian G.; Morris, Charles S.

    2001-02-01

    Daniel W E Green, Brian G Marsden and Charles S Morris write with the aim of illuminating the issue of cometary light curves and brightness predictions, following the publication in this journal last October of the letter by John McFarland (2000).

  9. Bright Fireball Over Georgia

    NASA Video Gallery

    A camera in Cartersville, Ga., captured this view of a bright fireball over Georgia on the night of Mar. 7, 2012, at approx. 10:19:11 EST. The meteor was first recorded at an altitude of 51.5 miles...

  10. On the acceleration of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Fraschetti, Federico

    2008-12-13

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) hit the Earth's atmosphere with energies exceeding 10(18)eV. This is the same energy as carried by a tennis ball moving at 100 km h-1, but concentrated on a subatomic particle. UHECRs are so rare (the flux of particles with E>10(20)eV is 0.5 km -2 per century) that only a few such particles have been detected over the past 50 years. Recently, the HiRes and Auger experiments have reported the discovery of a high-energy cut-off in the UHECR spectrum, and Auger has found an apparent clustering of the highest energy events towards nearby active galactic nuclei. Consensus is building that the highest energy particles are accelerated within the radio-bright lobes of these objects, but it remains unclear how this actually happens, and whether the cut-off is due to propagation effects or reflects an intrinsically physical limitation of the acceleration process. The low event statistics presently allows for many different plausible models; nevertheless observations are beginning to impose strong constraints on them. These observations have also motivated suggestions that new physics may be implicated. We present a review of the key theoretical and observational issues related to the processes of propagation and acceleration of UHECRs and proposed solutions.

  11. Bright Streak on Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These two images of Jupiter's small, irregularly shaped moon Amalthea, obtained by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft in August 1999(left) and November 1999 (right), form a 'stereo pair' that helps scientists determine this moon's shape and the topography of its surface features. Features as small as 3.8 kilometers (2.4 miles) across can be resolved in these images, making them among the highest-resolution images ever taken of Amalthea.

    The large impact crater visible in both images, near the right-hand edge of Amalthea's disk, is about 40 kilometers (about 29 miles) across; two ridges, tall enough to cast shadows, extend from the top of the crater in a V-shape reminiscent of a 'rabbit ears' television antenna. To the left of these ridges, in the top center portion of Amalthea's disk, is a second large impact crater similar in size to the first crater. To the left of this second crater is a linear 'streak' of relatively bright material about 50 kilometers (31 miles) long. In previous spacecraft images of Amalthea taken from other viewing directions, this bright feature was thought to be a small, round, bright 'spot' and was given the name Ida. These new images reveal for the first time that Ida is actually a long, linear 'streak.' This bright streak may represent material ejected during the formation of the adjacent impact crater, or it may just mark the crest of a local ridge. Other patches of relatively bright material can be seen elsewhere on Amalthea's disk, although none of these other bright spots has Ida's linear shape.

    In both images, sunlight is coming from the left and north is approximately up. Note that the north pole of Amalthea is missing in the right-hand image (it was cut off by the edge of the camera frame). The bright streak, Ida, is on the side of the moon that faces permanently away from Jupiter, and the crater near the right-hand edge of the disk is in the center of Amalthea's leading side (the side of the moon that 'leads

  12. Through BAL Quasars Brightly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartas, George

    2003-01-01

    We report on an observation of the broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1115+080 performed with the XMM-Newton observatory. Spectral analysis reveals the second case of a relativistic X-ray-absorbing outflow in a BAL quasar. The first case was revealed in a recent observation of APM 08279+5255 with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. As in the case of APM 08279+5255, the observed flux of PG 1115+080 is greatly magnified by gravitational lensing. The relatively high redshift (z=1.72) of the quasar places the redshifted energies of resonant absorption features in a sensitive portion of the XMM- Newton spectral response. The spectrum indicates the presence of complex low-energy absorption in the 0.2-0.6 keV observed energy band and high-energy absorption in the 2-5 keV observed energy band. The high-energy absorption is best modeled by two Gaussian absorption lines with rest-frame energies of 7.4 and 9.5 keV. Assuming that these two lines axe produced by resonant absorption due to Fe XXV, we infer that the X-ray absorbers are outflowing with velocities of approx. 0.10c and approx. 0.34c respectively. We have detected significant variability of the energies and widths of the X-ray BALs in PG 1115+080 and APM 08279+5255 over timescales of 19 and 1.8 weeks (proper time), respectively. The BAL variability observed from APM 08279+5255 supports our earlier conclusion that these absorbers are most likely launched at relatively small radii of less than 10(exp 16)(Mbh/M8)(sup 1/2) cm. A comparison of the ionization properties and column densities of the low-energy and high-energy absorbers indicates that these absorbers are likely distinct; however, higher spectral resolution is needed to confirm this result. Finally, we comment on prospects for constraining the kinematic and ionization properties of these X-ray BALs with the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum transfected with ultra bright NanoLuc luciferase offers high sensitivity detection for the screening of growth and cellular trafficking inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Mauro F; Nie, Catherine Q; Elsworth, Brendan; Charnaud, Sarah C; Sanders, Paul R; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery is a key part of malaria control and eradication strategies, and could benefit from sensitive and affordable assays to quantify parasite growth and to help identify the targets of potential anti-malarial compounds. Bioluminescence, achieved through expression of exogenous luciferases, is a powerful tool that has been applied in studies of several aspects of parasite biology and high throughput growth assays. We have expressed the new reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase in Plasmodium falciparum and showed it is at least 100 times brighter than the commonly used firefly luciferase. Nluc brightness was explored as a means to achieve a growth assay with higher sensitivity and lower cost. In addition we attempted to develop other screening assays that may help interrogate libraries of inhibitory compounds for their mechanism of action. To this end parasites were engineered to express Nluc in the cytoplasm, the parasitophorous vacuole that surrounds the intraerythrocytic parasite or exported to the red blood cell cytosol. As proof-of-concept, these parasites were used to develop functional screening assays for quantifying the effects of Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of protein secretion, and Furosemide, an inhibitor of new permeation pathways used by parasites to acquire plasma nutrients. PMID:25392998

  14. Pion exchange at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    The state of Regge pion exchange calculations for high-energy reactions is reviewed. Experimental evidence is summarized to show that (i) the pion trajectory has a slope similar to that of other trajectories; (ii) the pion exchange contribution can dominate contributions of higher trajectories up to quite a large energy; (iii) many two-body cross sections with large pion contributions can be fit only by models which allow for kinematical conspiracy at t=0. The theory of kinematic conspiracy is reviewed for two-body amplitudes, and calculations of the conspiring pion--Pomeron cut discussed. The author then summarizes recent work on pion exchange in Reggeized Deck models for multiparticle final states, with emphasis on the predictions of various models (with and without resonances) for phases of the partial wave amplitudes.

  15. A tuneable ultra-compact high-power, ultra-short pulsed, bright gamma-ray source based on bremsstrahlung radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Vieux, G.; Issac, R. C.; Brunetti, E.; Ersfeld, B.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M. P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Shea, V. O.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Bendoyro, R. A.; Dias, J. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Ibbotson, T. P. A.; and others

    2012-03-15

    The laser driven plasma wakefield accelerator is a very compact source of high energy electrons. When the quasi-monoenergetic beam from these accelerators passes through dense material, high energy bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a collimated beam with high flux. We show how a source based on this emission process can produce more than 10{sup 9} photons per pulse with a mean energy of 10 MeV. We present experimental results that show the feasibility of this method of producing high energy photons and compare the experimental results with GEANT4 Montecarlo simulations, which also give the scaling required to evaluate its suitability as method to produce radioisotopes via photo-nuclear reactions or for imaging applications.

  16. Duke University high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  17. High Energy Laser Diagnostic Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, James R.; Goddard, Douglas N.; Thomas, David; Lewis, Jay

    2010-10-08

    Recent advancements in high energy laser (HEL) sources have outpaced diagnostic tools capable of accurately quantifying system performance. Diagnostic tools are needed that allow system developers to measure the parameters that define HEL effectiveness. The two critical parameters for quantifying HEL effectiveness are the irradiance on target and resultant rise in target temperature. Off-board sensing has its limitations, including unpredictable changes in the reflectivity of the target, smoke and outgassing, and atmospheric distortion. On-board sensors overcome the limitations of off-board techniques but must survive high irradiance levels and extreme temperatures.We have developed sensors for on-target diagnostics of high energy laser beams and for the measurement of the thermal response of the target. The conformal sensors consist of an array of quantum dot photodetectors and resistive temperature detectors. The sensor arrays are lithographically fabricated on flexible substrates and can be attached to a variety of laser targets. We have developed a nanoparticle adhesive process that provides good thermal contact with the target and that ensures the sensor remains attached to the target for as long as the target survives. We have calibrated the temperature and irradiance sensors and demonstrated them in a HEL environment.

  18. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  19. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  20. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  1. High-Energy-Density Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenes, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Capacitors capable of storing energy at high densities are being developed for use in pulse-power circuits in such diverse systems as defibrillators, particle- beam accelerators, microwave sources, and weapons. Like typical previously developed energy-storage capacitors, these capacitors are made from pairs of metal/solid-dielectric laminated sheets that are wound and pressed into compact shapes to fit into cans, which are then filled with dielectric fluids. Indeed, these capacitors can be fabricated largely by conventional fabrication techniques. The main features that distinguish these capacitors from previously developed ones are improvements in (1) the selection of laminate materials, (2) the fabrication of the laminated sheets from these materials, and (3) the selection of dielectric fluids. In simplest terms, a high-performance laminated sheet of the type used in these capacitors is made by casting a dielectric polymer onto a sheet of aluminized kraft paper. The dielectric polymer is a siloxane polymer that has been modified with polar pendant groups to increase its permittivity and dielectric strength. Potentially, this polymer is capable of withstanding an energy density of 7.5 J/cm3, which is four times that of the previous state-of-the-art-capacitor dielectric film material. However, the full potential of this polymer cannot be realized at present because (1) at thicknesses needed for optimum performance (.8.0 m), the mechanical strength of a film of this polymer is insufficient for incorporation into a wound capacitor and (2) at greater thickness, the achievable energy density decreases because of a logarithmic decrease in dielectric strength with increasing thickness. The aluminized kraft paper provides the mechanical strength needed for processing of the laminate and fabrication of the capacitor, and the aluminum film serves as an electrode layer. Because part of the thickness of the dielectric is not occupied by the modified siloxane polymer, the

  2. THE HIGH-VELOCITY SYSTEM: INFALL OF A GIANT LOW-SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS GALAXY TOWARD THE CENTER OF THE PERSEUS CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Alice P.-Y.; Lim, Jeremy; Chan, Jeffrey C.-C.; Ohyama, Youichi; Broadhurst, T.

    2015-12-01

    The high-velocity system (HVS) lies just north-west of the center and is moving at a speed of 3000 km s{sup −1} toward NGC 1275, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Perseus cluster. We report imaging spectroscopy of the HVS in Hα and [N ii] that resolves both the nature of this galaxy and its physical relationship with NGC 1275. The HVS exhibits a distorted disk having a projected rotational velocity that rises steadily to ∼200 km s{sup −1} at a radius of ∼12 kpc, the same maximal extent detectable in neutral gas and dust. We discover highly blueshifted emission at relative velocities of up to ∼800 km s{sup −1} distributed throughout and confined almost entirely within the projected area of the disk, tracing gas stripped by ram pressure. The distribution of the stripped gas implies that the HVS is moving essentially along our sightline closely toward the center of NGC 1275. We show that the speed of the HVS is consistent with it having fallen from rest at the virial radius of the Perseus cluster and reached ∼100 kpc from the cluster center. Despite having an overall metallicity (inferred from [N ii]/Hα) significantly lower than that of star-forming disk galaxies, the HVS exhibits a current star formation rate of ∼3.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} and numerous young star clusters projected against giant H ii regions. The evidence assembled implicates a progenitor giant low-surface-brightness galaxy that, because of galaxy harassment and/or the cluster tidal field, has developed two prominent spiral arms along which star formation is strongly elevated.

  3. Retrieval of Maps of PM2.5 Aerosol in the Problematic California Valleys: Bright, Speckled Reflectances, Thin AOT, but High Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley suffers from severe episodes of respirable aerosol (PM2.5) in wintertime. We provide maps of aerosol episodes using daily snapshots of PM2.5 and its changing features despite numerous difficulties inherent to sampling the region, with special focus on the DISCOVER-AQ period, Jan-Feb 2013, which had many supporting measurements. Both high pollution and retrieval difficulties tend to occur in many Mediterranean agricultural regions. One difficulty is the relatively bright surfaces with considerable exposed soil. NASA's MAIAC and MODIS Deep Blue retrieval techniques are shown to have considerable skill even at low aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, as evaluated by concurrent AERONET sunphotometer measurements. More significantly, these AOT values can correspond to high daytime PM2.5 since aerosol mixed layer depth is thin and variable, 200m - 600 m. The thin layers derive from typical subsidence of dry air between more stormy periods. This situation provides an advantage: water vapor column is also almost completely limited to a similar mixed layer depth, and can thus serve as a measure of aerosol dilution. The ratio of AOT to column-water-vapor from MODIS products provides two advantages: (1) it can provide a measure related to particle density, via a mixed-layer proxy, and (2) it can ratio out some errors that crop up in the retrieval of very low AOT, e.g. bidirectional reflectance and other angular dependences. These effects are combined, so we disentangle them using AERONET data. Data from the NASA Langley HSRL-2 lidar and in-situ measurements from DISCOVER-AQ are also helpful. At the time of abstract submission, sporadic errors in the column water estimates provide the greatest limitation. Looking to the near future, we suggest why the use of geostationary TEMPO data will allow multiple sampling opportunities per day, supplementary or alternative information for AOT, aerosol absorption, and even column water.

  4. Efficient, high-brightness wavelength-beam-combined commercial off-the-shelf diode stacks achieved by use of a wavelength-chirped volume Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Chann, B; Goyal, A K; Fan, T Y; Sanchez-Rubio, A; Volodin, B L; Ban, V S

    2006-05-01

    We report a method of scaling the spatial brightness from commercial off-the-shelf diode laser stacks through wavelength beam combining, by use of a linearly wavelength-chirped volume Bragg grating (VBG). Using a three-bar commercial stack of broad-area lasers and a VBG, we demonstrate 89.5 W cw of beam-combined output with a beam-combining efficiency of 75%. The output beam has a propagation factor M2 approximately 26 on the slow axis and M2 approximately 21 on the fast axis. This corresponds to a brightness of approximately 20 MW/cm2 sr. To our knowledge, this is the highest brightness broad-area diode laser system. We achieve 81% coupling efficiency into a 100 microm, 0.22 N.A. fiber.

  5. Creating Extreme Material Properties with High-Energy Laser Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerhofer, David

    2005-07-01

    Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Rd, Rochester, NY 14623 High-energy laser systems create extreme states of matter by coupling their energy into a target via ablation of the outer layers. In planar experiments on the OMEGA laser system, single-shock pressures can exceed 10 Mbar. In spherical geometry, the compressed target pressures can be significantly higher than 1 Gbar. These pressures will be increased by one or two orders of magnitude on the 1.8-MJUV National Ignition Facility, under construction at LLNL. The inherent flexibility of multibeam laser systems allows many techniques to be applied to studying the properties of materials under extreme conditions. Recent experiments have used Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure to observe shock-induced phase transformations in Fe on the ns time scale. Techniques are being used and/or developed to measure the equation of state of compressed materials, including solids, foams, and liquid D2, both on and off the Hugoniot. The coupling of high-energy petawatt (HEPW) lasers to high-energy laser systems will greatly extend the accessible range of material conditions. HEPW lasers produce extremely intense beams of electrons and protons that can be coupled with high-energy compression to access a large region of temperature and density space, for example, by heating a compressed target. These beams, along with the extremely bright x-ray emission, provide new diagnostic opportunities. This presentation will highlight some of the recent advances and future opportunities in creating and measuring extreme materials properties. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the NY State Energy Research and Development Authority. The support of DOE does not constitute an endorsement by DOE of the views expressed in this article.

  6. Relative ordering between bright and dark excitons in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihang; Nakamura, Daisuke; Liu, Huaping; Kataura, Hiromichi; Takeyama, Shojiro

    2014-11-11

    The ordering and relative energy splitting between bright and dark excitons are critical to the optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), as they eventually determine the radiative and non-radiative recombination processes of generated carriers. In this work, we report systematic high-field magneto-optical study on the relative ordering between bright and dark excitons in SWNTs. We identified the relative energy position of the dark exciton unambiguously by brightening it in ultra-high magnetic field. The bright-dark excitonic ordering was found to depend not only on the tube structure, but also on the type of transitions. For the 1(st) sub-band transition, the bright exciton appears to be higher in energy than its dark counterpart for any chiral species and is robust against environmental effect. While for the 2(nd) sub-band, their relative ordering was found to be chirality-sensitive: the bright exciton can be either higher or lower than the dark one, depending on the specific nanotube structures. These findings provide new clues for engineering the optical and electronic properties of SWNTs.

  7. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 1993 September 15-20 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on September 20. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0 sec .30) and an average value of 250 km (0 sec .35). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0 sec .17) and the largest is 600 km (O sec .69). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this

  8. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 15-20 Sept. 1993 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on 20 Sept. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured FWHM distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0.30 sec) and an average value of 250 km (0.35 sec). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0.17 sec) and the largest is 600 km (O.69 sec). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this area fraction measurement in the context of

  9. High temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    The theory and current status of materials research for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion are reviewed. Semiconductors are shown to be the preferred class of materials for this application. Optimization of the figure of merit of both broadband and narrow-band semiconductors is discussed as a function of temperature. Phonon scattering mechanisms are discussed, and basic material guidelines are given for reduction of thermal conductivity. Two general classes of materials show promise for high temperature figure of merit (Z) values, namely the rare earth chalcogenides and the boron-rich borides. The electronic transport properties of the rare earth chalcogenides are explicable on the basis of degenerate or partially degenerate n-type semiconductors. Boron and boron-rich borides exhibit p-type hopping conductivity, with detailed explanations proposed for the transport differing from compound to compound. Some discussion is presented on the reasons for the low thermal conductivities in these materials. Also, ZTs greater than one appear to have been realized at high temperature in many of these compounds.

  10. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  11. High energy beam lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Hartley, J.; Cowan, T.E.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a positron lifetime defect analysis capability based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational with a 60 mCi {sup 22}Na source providing a current of 7 10{sup 5} positrons per second. Lifetime data are derived from a thin plastic transmission detector providing an implantation time and a BaF{sub 2} detector to determine the annihilation time. Positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick sample specimens at counting rates in excess of 2000 per second. The instrument is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for in situ measurements.

  12. High energy femtosecond pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassonde, Philippe; Mironov, Sergey; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Payeur, Stéphane; Khazanov, Efim; Sergeev, Alexander; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mourou, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    An original method for retrieving the Kerr nonlinear index was proposed and implemented for TF12 heavy flint glass. Then, a defocusing lens made of this highly nonlinear glass was used to generate an almost constant spectral broadening across a Gaussian beam profile. The lens was designed with spherical curvatures chosen in order to match the laser beam profile, such that the product of the thickness with intensity is constant. This solid-state optics in combination with chirped mirrors was used to decrease the pulse duration at the output of a terawatt-class femtosecond laser. We demonstrated compression of a 33 fs pulse to 16 fs with 170 mJ energy.

  13. Low Energy Building for High Energy People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The Huston Huffman Center at the University of Oklahoma's Norman campus has a jogging track as well as facilities for exercise and court games that are fully accessible to the handicapped. The building is set eight feet in the ground both to reduce its bulk and to conserve energy. (Author/MLF)

  14. Laser acceleration of low emittance, high energy ions and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julien; Audebert, Patrick; Borghesi, Marco; Pépin, Henri; Willi, Oswald

    2009-03-01

    Laser-accelerated ion sources have exceptional properties, i.e. high brightness and high spectral cut-off (56 MeV at present), high directionality and laminarity (at least 100-fold better than conventional accelerators beams), short burst duration (ps). Thanks to these properties, these sources open new opportunities for applications. Among these, we have already explored their use for proton radiography of fields in plasmas and for warm dense matter generation. These sources could also stimulate development of compact ion accelerators or be used for medical applications. To extend the range of applications, ion energy and conversion efficiency must however be increased. Two strategies for doing so using present-day lasers have been successfully explored in LULI experiments. In view of applications, it is also essential to control (i.e. collimate and energy select) these beams. For this purpose, we have developed an ultra-fast laser-triggered micro-lens providing tuneable control of the beam divergence as well as energy selection. To cite this article: J. Fuchs et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  15. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these

  16. Low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  17. Bright gamma-ray flares of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1222+216 observed at the highest energies with Fermi-LAT and VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errando, Manel

    2014-08-01

    Flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are the most powerful sources continuously detected at gamma-ray energies, with luminosities exceeding 1048 erg s-1. The high-energy emission of quasars peaks in the MeV-GeV band, and only a few episodic detections have been reported at very high energies (VHE, E>100 GeV). We will present the first results from an observing campaign on the FSRQ 3C 279 in April 2014 during the brightest gamma-ray outburst ever recorded for this object, with flux exceeding the historic 1991 flare seen by EGRET. Observations include simultaneous coverage with the Fermi-LAT satellite and the VERITAS ground-based array spanning four decades in energy from 100 MeV to 1 TeV with unprecedented sensitivity. We will also report on the detection of persistent VHE emission from the quasar PKS 1222+216 over a week-long period in March 2014. These observations present strong challenges to current models of energy dissipation in relativistic jets. The implications of the absence/presence of VHE emission in connection with flaring activity in the MeV-GeV regime will be discussed, especially concerning the role of ambient photon fields in the radiation mechanisms, and the size and location of the gamma-ray emission region.

  18. Compact, high energy gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stapleton, Robert E.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1976-08-03

    An electrically pumped gas laser amplifier unit having a disc-like configuration in which light propagation is radially outward from the axis rather than along the axis. The input optical energy is distributed over a much smaller area than the output optical energy, i.e., the amplified beam, while still preserving the simplicity of parallel electrodes for pumping the laser medium. The system may thus be driven by a comparatively low optical energy input, while at the same time, owing to the large output area, large energies may be extracted while maintaining the energy per unit area below the threshold of gas breakdown.

  19. Review of high-energy plasma wakefield experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Patric; Hogan, Mark J.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments have made considerable progress in the past decade by using high-energy particle beams to drive large amplitude waves or wakes in a plasma. Electron beam driven experiments have measured the integrated and dynamic aspects of plasma focusing, the bright flux of high-energy betatron radiation photons, particle beam refraction at the plasma/neutral gas interface, and the structure and amplitude of the accelerating wakefield. Gradients spanning kT/m to MT/m for focusing and 100 MeV/m to 50 GeV/m for acceleration have been excited in plasmas with densities of 10 14 to 10 cm, respectively. The large accelerating gradient led to the energy doubling of 42 GeV electrons in only 85 cm of plasma. Positron beam driven experiments have evidenced the comparatively more complex dynamic and integrated plasma focusing, the subsequent halo formation and emittance growth in the positron beam and demonstrated accelerating gradients of nearly 100 MeV/m. This article summarizes this experimental progress, illustrates the key enabling technologies that made the work possible, concludes with a brief discussion of proposed future directions, and suggests that the PWFA could one day revolutionize e/e linear colliders. To cite this article: P. Muggli, M.J. Hogan, C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  20. Analysis of Bright Harvest Remote Analysis for Residential Solar Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Nangle, John; Simon, Joseph

    2015-06-17

    Bright Harvest provides remote shading analysis and design products for residential PV system installers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the NREL Commercialization Assistance Program, completed comparative assessments between on-site measurements and remotely calculated values to validate the accuracy of Bright Harvest’s remote shading and power generation.

  1. Brightness enhanced DNA FIT-probes for wash-free RNA imaging in tissue.

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Felix; Gaspar, Imre; Ephrussi, Anne; Seitz, Oliver

    2013-12-18

    Fluorogenic oligonucleotides enable RNA imaging in cells and tissues. A high responsiveness of fluorescence is required when unbound probes cannot be washed away. Furthermore, emission should be bright in order to enable detection against autofluorescent background. The development of fluorescence-quenched hybridization probes has led to remarkable improvement of fluorescence responsiveness. Yet, comparably little attention has been paid to the brightness of smart probes. We describe hybridization probes that combine responsiveness with a high brightness of the measured signal. The method relies upon quencher-free DNA forced intercalation (FIT)-probes, in which two (or more) intercalator dyes of the thiazole orange (TO) family serve as nucleobase surrogates. Initial experiments on multi-TO-labeled probes led to improvements of responsiveness, but self-quenching limited their brightness. To enhance both brightness and responsiveness the highly responsive TO nucleoside was combined with the highly emissive oxazolopyridine analogue JO. Single-stranded TO/JO FIT-probes are dark. In the probe-target duplex, quenching caused by torsional twisting and dye-dye contact is prevented. The TO nucleoside appears to serve as a light collector that increases the extinction coefficient and transfers excitation energy to the JO emitter. This leads to very bright JO emission upon hybridization (F/F0 = 23, brightness = 43 mL mol(-1) cm(-1) at λex = 516 nm). TO/JO FIT-probes allowed the direct fluorescence microscopic imaging of oskar mRNA within a complex tissue. Of note, RNA imaging was feasible under wide-field excitation conditions. The described protocol enables rapid RNA imaging in tissue without the need for cutting-edge equipment, time-consuming washing, or signal amplification.

  2. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  3. High brightness diode pumped Er:YAG laser system at 2.94 µm with nearly 1kW peak power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Manuel; Heinrich, Arne; Hagen, Clemens; Unterrainer, Karl

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated a monolithic high-power diode-pumped Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm with average output power of up to 50W and pulse energy beyond 300mJ in 400 μs pulses. The high peak power of nearly 1kW is delivered in a high quality beam (M2 < 15), maintained over a large cooling water temperature range of 18-25 °C. The improved resonator configuration allows for stable operation from 0-10% duty-cycle in contrast to prior developments showing saturation. As a first application, fiber-coupling into a 230 μm, 0.2NA GeO2-fiber with standard optics has been shown, reaching 30W average power and 200mJ pulse energy out of the fiber, only limited by the fiber..

  4. Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Tilted Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Ye; Haferman, Jeffrey L.; Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft and ground-based radar data from the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled-Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) show that convective systems are not always vertical. Instead, many are tilted from vertical. Satellite passive microwave radiometers observe the atmosphere at a viewing angle. For example, the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) on the TRMM satellite have an incident angle of about 50deg. Thus, the brightness temperature measured from one direction of tilt may be different than that viewed from the opposite direction due to the different optical depth. This paper presents the investigation of passive microwave brightness temperatures of tilted convective systems. To account for the effect of tilt, a 3-D backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been applied to a simple tilted cloud model and a dynamically evolving cloud model to derive the brightness temperature. The radiative transfer results indicate that brightness temperature varies when the viewing angle changes because of the different optical depth. The tilt increases the displacements between high 19 GHz brightness temperature (Tb(sub 19)) due to liquid emission from lower level of cloud and the low 85 GHz brightness temperature (Tb(sub 85)) due to ice scattering from upper level of cloud. As the resolution degrades, the difference of brightness temperature due to the change of viewing angle decreases dramatically. The dislocation between Tb(sub 19) and Tb(sub 85), however, remains prominent.

  5. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  6. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  7. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  8. Identification and quantification of metallo-chlorophyll complexes in bright green table olives by high-performance liquid chromatrography-mass spectrometry quadrupole/time-of-flight.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Ruiz, Ramón; Riedl, Ken M; Schwartz, Steven J

    2011-10-26

    Five different samples of table olives, two regular Spanish table olives and three "bright green table olives", have been analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS to determine their pigment profile. Typical pigment profiles of almost all table olives show primarily chlorophyll derivatives lacking metals (e.g., pheophytin a/b and 15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6)). Bright green table olives have a unique profile including metallo-chlorophyll complexes (Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6) with 26-48% and Cu-pheophytin a with 3-18%) as their major pigments. New tentative structures have been identified by MS such as 15(2)-Me-phytol-rhodin g(7), 15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6), 15(2)-Me-phytol-isochlorin e(4), Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-rhodin g(7), Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6), and Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-isochlorin e(4), and new MS/MS fragmentation patterns are reported for Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-rhodin g(7), Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6), Cu-pheophytin b, Cu-pheophytin a, Cu-pyropheophytin b, and Cu-pyropheophytin a. The presence of metallo-chlorophyll derivatives is responsible for the intense color of bright green table olives, but these metallo-chlorophyll complexes may be regarded as a "green staining" defect that is unacceptable to consumers. PMID:21905735

  9. Identification and Quantification of Metallo–Chlorophyll Complexes in Bright Green Table Olives by High-Performance Liquid Chromatrography–Mass Spectrometry Quadrupole/Time-of-Flight

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio-Ruiz, Ramón; Riedl, Ken M.; Schwartz, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Five different samples of table olives, two regular Spanish table olives and three “bright green table olives”, have been analyzed by HPLC–MS/MS to determine their pigment profile. Typical pigment profiles of almost all table olives show primarily chlorophyll derivatives lacking metals (e.g., pheophytin a/b and 152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6). Bright green table olives have a unique profile including metallo–chlorophyll complexes (Cu-152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6 with 26–48% and Cu-pheophytin a with 3–18%) as their major pigments. New tentative structures have been identified by MS such as 152-Me-phytol-rhodin g7, 152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6, 152-Me-phytol-isochlorin e4, Cu-152-Me-phytol-rhodin g7, Cu-152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6, and Cu-152-Me-phytol-isochlorin e4, and new MS/MS fragmentation patterns are reported for Cu-152-Me-phytol-rhodin g7, Cu-152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6, Cu-pheophytin b, Cu-pheophytin a, Cu-pyropheophytin b, and Cu-pyropheophytin a. The presence of metallo–chlorophyll derivatives is responsible for the intense color of bright green table olives, but these metallo–chlorophyll complexes may be regarded as a “green staining” defect that is unacceptable to consumers. PMID:21905735

  10. Neutralizer options for high energy H/sup -/ beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.

    1986-10-01

    A neutralizer converts a negative ion beam into a neutral beam, but it also increases the beamline cost, weight and size while reducing its output power, efficiency and possibly the reliability of the entire system. In addition it scatters the newly formed neutrals, altering the beam current density distribution, causing the beam divergence to get larger and the brightness to go down. In the following, the role of neutralizers for hydrogen ion beams is reviewed, and the problems encountered over a range of beam energies are discussed. Consideration is given to enhancing the goals of the neutral beam application, be they the highest neutral fraction, optimum overall efficiency or maximum beam brightness, etc.

  11. High energy gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Michael Richard

    This thesis presents a design study into gamma ray collimation techniques for use in high energy radiation imaging devices for the nuclear industry. Such technology is required to provide information on the nature and location of isotopes within nuclear facilities that have reached the end of their useful life. The work has concentrated on the use of two different techniques, namely mechanical collimation using the Anger camera and electronic collimation using a Compton camera. The work has used computational models to evaluate the performance of such systems and thereby suggest optimal design parameters for use in prototype devices. Ray tracing models have been constructed to simulate both parallel hole and tapered bore diverging collimators. Investigations have been carried out to measure the effects on the spatial resolution of changing various design parameters of the collimators. The effects of varying the hole size, septal thickness and collimator length over a range of source to collimator distances likely to be encountered in an industrial scenario have been examined. Some new insight into the nature of the point spread function of mechanical collimators has been gained and the limitations of the conventional analytical approach to collimator evaluation have been highlighted. Modifications to the standard equations used in collimator design have subsequently been suggested. An analytical description of tapered bore collimators has been derived. Monte Carlo models have been developed to model a single scatter Compton camera. Germanium, silicon and sodium iodide have been investigated as candidates for the scattering detector in such a device. A model of a complete ring array Compton camera system has been used to evaluate performance. The data from the Monte Carlo model has been reconstructed to form images. The quality of the images generated have then been compared with images obtained from parallel hole and focusing mechanical collimators.

  12. Richard Bright in Hungary: a reevaluation.

    PubMed

    Nagy, J; Sonkodi, S

    1997-01-01

    Richard Bright, the highly respected physician and nephrologist at Guy's Hospital, had a strong liking for travel. In 1815 he traveled in Hungary and made very important observations about the country. His 762-page book, entitled Travels from Vienna through Lower Hungary has detailed, sometimes appreciative, sometimes very critical remarks and comments on Hungarian history, art, archeology, religion, the situation of nationalities, education, social conditions, law, farming, and mining. The Hungarians cherished the memory of Bright's travel in their country as reflected in several papers and on two commemorative tablets recognizing him as a true and sincere friend of Hungary.

  13. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  14. High Energy Continuum of High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion with the RXTE team at GSFC showed that a sufficiently accurate background subtraction procedure had now, been derived for sources at the flux level of PKS 2126-158. However this solution does not apply to observations carried out before April 1997, including our observation. The prospect of an improved solution becoming available soon is slim. As a result the RXTE team agreed to re-observe PKS2126-158. The new observation was carried out in April 1999. Quasi-simultaneous optical observations were obtained, as Service observing., at the 4-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope, and ftp-ed from the AAT on 22April. The RXTE data was processed in late June, arriving at SAO in early July. Coincidentally, our collaborative Beppo-SAX observation of PKS2126-158 was made later in 1999, and a GTO Chandra observation (with which we are involved) was made on November 16. Since this gives us a unique monitoring data for a high redshift quasar over a broad pass-band we are now combining all three observations into a single comprehensive study Final publication of the RXTE data will thus take place under another grant.

  15. High resolution energy-angle correlation measurement of hard x rays from laser-Thomson backscattering.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, A; Irman, A; Bussmann, M; Couperus, J P; Cowan, T E; Debus, A D; Kuntzsch, M; Ledingham, K W D; Lehnert, U; Sauerbrey, R; Schlenvoigt, H P; Seipt, D; Stöhlker, Th; Thorn, D B; Trotsenko, S; Wagner, A; Schramm, U

    2013-09-13

    Thomson backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright x-ray pulses but also for the investigation of the complex particle dynamics at the interaction point. For this purpose a complete spectral characterization of a Thomson source powered by a compact linear electron accelerator is performed with unprecedented angular and energy resolution. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to 3D simulations enables, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard x-ray source PHOENIX (photon electron collider for narrow bandwidth intense x rays) and potential gamma-ray sources.

  16. Exploring the blazar zone in high-energy flares of FSRQs

    SciTech Connect

    Pacciani, L.; Donnarumma, I.; Tavecchio, F.; Stamerra, A.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Uemura, M.

    2014-07-20

    The gamma-ray emission offers a powerful diagnostic tool to probe jets and their surroundings in flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). In particular, sources emitting at high energies (>10 GeV) give us the strongest constraints. This motivates us to start a systematic study of flares with bright emission above 10 GeV, examining archival data of the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray telescope. At the same time, we began to trigger Target of Opportunity observations to the Swift observatory at the occurrence of high-energy flares, obtaining a wide coverage of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for several FSRQs during flares. Among others, we investigate the SED of a peculiar flare of 3C 454.3, showing a remarkably hard gamma-ray spectrum, quite different from the brightest flares of this source, and a bright flare of CTA 102. We modeled the SED in the framework of the one-zone leptonic model, using also archival optical spectroscopic data to derive the luminosity of the broad lines and thus estimate the disk luminosity, from which the structural parameters of the FSRQ nucleus can be inferred. The model allowed us to evaluate the magnetic field intensity in the blazar zone and to locate the emitting region of gamma-rays in the particular case in which gamma-ray spectra show neither absorption from the broad-line region (BLR) nor the Klein-Nishina curvature expected in leptonic models assuming the BLR as the source of seed photons for the External Compton scenario. For FSRQs bright above 10 GeV, we were able to identify short periods lasting less than one day characterized by a high rate of high-energy gamma-rays and hard gamma-ray spectra. We discussed the observed spectra and variability timescales in terms of injection and cooling of energetic particles, arguing that these flares could be triggered by magnetic reconnection events or turbulence in the flow.

  17. Simultaneous brightness contrast of foraging Papilio butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Takahashi, Yuki; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the sense of brightness in the foraging Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. We presented two red discs of different intensity on a grey background to butterflies, and trained them to select one of the discs. They were successfully trained to select either a high intensity or a low intensity disc. The trained butterflies were tested on their ability to perceive brightness in two different protocols: (i) two orange discs of different intensity presented on the same intensity grey background and (ii) two orange discs of the same intensity separately presented on a grey background that was either higher or lower in intensity than the training background. The butterflies trained to high intensity red selected the orange disc of high intensity in protocol 1, and the disc on the background of low intensity grey in protocol 2. We obtained similar results in another set of experiments with purple discs instead of orange discs. The choices of the butterflies trained to low intensity red were opposite to those just described. Taken together, we conclude that Papilio has the ability to learn brightness and darkness of targets independent of colour, and that they have the so-called simultaneous brightness contrast. PMID:22179808

  18. A brightness exceeding simulated Langmuir limit

    SciTech Connect

    Nakasuji, Mamoru

    2013-08-15

    When an excitation of the first lens determines a beam is parallel beam, a brightness that is 100 times higher than Langmuir limit is measured experimentally, where Langmuir limits are estimated using a simulated axial cathode current density which is simulated based on a measured emission current. The measured brightness is comparable to Langmuir limit, when the lens excitation is such that an image position is slightly shorter than a lens position. Previously measured values of brightness for cathode apical radii of curvature 20, 60, 120, 240, and 480 μm were 8.7, 5.3, 3.3, 2.4, and 3.9 times higher than their corresponding Langmuir limits, respectively, in this experiment, the lens excitation was such that the lens and the image positions were 180 mm and 400 mm, respectively. From these measured brightness for three different lens excitation conditions, it is concluded that the brightness depends on the first lens excitation. For the electron gun operated in a space charge limited condition, some of the electrons emitted from the cathode are returned to the cathode without having crossed a virtual cathode. Therefore, method that assumes a Langmuir limit defining method using a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities may need to be revised. For the condition in which the values of the exceeding the Langmuir limit are measured, the simulated trajectories of electrons that are emitted from the cathode do not cross the optical axis at the crossover, thus the law of sines may not be valid for high brightness electron beam systems.

  19. High-energy thermal synchrotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, J. N.; Epstein, R. I.; Petrosian, V.

    1985-09-01

    The authors compute thermal synchrotron spectra for which the photon energy is comparable to the mean electron thermal energy. In this regime it is necessary to include the restriction that a photon receives no more energy than the kinetic energy of the radiating electron. The derived spectra fall off more rapidly at high energies than was previously estimated. It is found that the thermal synchrotron mechanism can still provide satisfactory fits to the very hard γ-ray burst spectra for sufficiently high temperatures and low magnetic fields. As example, data for the γ-ray burst of 1982 January 25 are discussed.

  20. Very High Energy Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts with the Whipple/VERITAS Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Badran, H.M.; Blaylock, G.; Bond, I.H.; Boyle, P.J.; Bradbury, S.M.; Buckley, J.H.; Byrum, K.; Carter-Lewis, D.A.; Celik, O.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Daniel, M.K.; Calle Perez, I. de la; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, D.J.; Fegan, S.J.; Finley, J.P.; Fortson, L.F.

    2005-02-21

    Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) observations at Very High Energies (VHE, E > 100 GeV) can impose tight constraints on some GRB emission models. Many GRB after-glow models predict a VHE component similar to that seen in blazars and supernova remnants, in which the GRB spectral energy distribution has a double-peaked shape extending into the VHE regime. Consistent with this afterglow scenario, EGRET detected delayed high energy emission from all five bright BATSE GRBs that occurred within its field of view. GRB observations have had high priority in the observing program at the Whipple 10m Telescope and will continue to be high priority targets when the next generation observatory VERITAS comes online. Upper limits on the VHE emission from ten GRBs observed with the Whipple Telescope are reported here.

  1. Bright fission: singlet fission into a pair of emitting states.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David

    2015-06-01

    This paper reintroduces and explores the generation of two bright states from a single photon via a singlet fission mechanism in organic materials. This particular photophysical process is labeled here as bright fission (BF). The central part of the study is devoted to set the theoretical foundations of BF by discussing possible electronic mechanisms, the role of different excited states with various physical nature, the presence of competing deactivation channels, and the possible requirements for the BF viability. In a second part, some of the properties related to BF are computationally explored in anthracene. The analysis of computed high-lying excited states identifies several optical transitions as good candidates to trigger BF in anthracene. The approximation of excitonic couplings of these high energy levels to other electronic states within the same energy range suggests possible paths to populate electronic configurations potentially able to split in two independent spin singlets, i.e. singlet-singlet states. The study also explores the electronic structure of the energetically lowest singlet-singlet states in anthracene dimers and discusses the presence of charge transfer configurations and their relation to the singlet-singlet manifold. The computational results suggest fast relaxation to the lowest singlet-singlet state, from which the excitonic fission may occur. All in all, the present work aims at motivating to pursue further efforts in the study of the BF process in organic materials.

  2. High energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  3. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  4. High energy gamma ray balloon instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Baker, R. G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Chesney, J. R.; Derdeyn, S. M.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hunter, S. D.; Jacques, J. S.; Laubenthal, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    The High Energy Gamma Ray Balloon Instrument was built in part to verify certain subsystems' performance for the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument, the high energy telescope to be carried on the Gamma Ray Observatory. This paper describes the instrument, the performance of some subsystems, and some relevant results.

  5. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  6. Brightness enhancement of plasma ion source by utilizing anode spot for nano applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Park, Man-Jin; Moon, Dae Won; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y S

    2012-02-01

    Anode spots are known as additional discharges on positively biased electrode immersed in plasmas. The anode spot plasma ion source (ASPIS) has been investigated as a high brightness ion source for nano applications such as focused ion beam (FIB) and nano medium energy ion scattering (nano-MEIS). The generation of anode spot is found to enhance brightness of ion beam since the anode spot increases plasma density near the extraction aperture. Brightness of the ASPIS has been estimated from measurement of emittance for total ion beam extracted through sub-mm aperture. The ASPIS is installed to the FIB system. Currents and diameters of the focused beams with∕without anode spot are measured and compared. As the anode spot is turned on, the enhancement of beam current is observed at fixed diameter of the focused ion beam. Consequently, the brightness of the focused ion beam is enhanced as well. For argon ion beam, the maximum normalized brightness of 12,300 A∕m(2) SrV is acquired. The ASPIS is applied to nano-MEIS as well. The ASPIS is found to increase the beam current density and the power efficiency of the ion source for nano-MEIS. From the present study, it is shown that the ASPIS can enhance the performance of devices for nano applications.

  7. Brightness enhancement of plasma ion source by utilizing anode spot for nano applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Park, Man-Jin; Moon, Dae Won

    2012-02-15

    Anode spots are known as additional discharges on positively biased electrode immersed in plasmas. The anode spot plasma ion source (ASPIS) has been investigated as a high brightness ion source for nano applications such as focused ion beam (FIB) and nano medium energy ion scattering (nano-MEIS). The generation of anode spot is found to enhance brightness of ion beam since the anode spot increases plasma density near the extraction aperture. Brightness of the ASPIS has been estimated from measurement of emittance for total ion beam extracted through sub-mm aperture. The ASPIS is installed to the FIB system. Currents and diameters of the focused beams with/without anode spot are measured and compared. As the anode spot is turned on, the enhancement of beam current is observed at fixed diameter of the focused ion beam. Consequently, the brightness of the focused ion beam is enhanced as well. For argon ion beam, the maximum normalized brightness of 12 300 A/m{sup 2} SrV is acquired. The ASPIS is applied to nano-MEIS as well. The ASPIS is found to increase the beam current density and the power efficiency of the ion source for nano-MEIS. From the present study, it is shown that the ASPIS can enhance the performance of devices for nano applications.

  8. β-Ga2O3 and single-crystal phosphors for high-brightness white LEDs and LDs, and β-Ga2O3 potential for next generation of power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víllora, Encarnación G.; Arjoca, Stelian; Shimamura, Kiyoshi; Inomata, Daisuke; Aoki, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    β-Ga2O3 is the most transparent conductive oxide, well known since several decades for its large bandgap of 4.8 eV. Its potential as semiconductor material, however, is just emerging in recent years. Present work shows the development of βGa2O3 for semiconductor applications and its current state-of-the-art. The discussion is focused on three different aspects: (1) Advantageous growth from melt of large-size β-Ga2O3single-crystals. High-crystalline quality and carrier control make possible the production of conductive and semi-insulating wafers. (2) β-Ga2O3as substrate for homoepitaxy as well as for heteroepitaxial deposition of GaN-based devices. High-brightness blue-LEDs with vertical current injection are demonstrated. (3) Potential of β-Ga2O3for high-power devices with higher breakdown voltage than GaN and SiC counterparts. The first Schottky barrier diode is shown, as well as first transistors (MESFET and MOSFET) are indicated. Single-crystal phosphors are introduced as novel alternative to currently used powder phosphors. In connection with high-brightness white light-sources, based on LEDs or LDs plus phosphor converters, single-crystal phosphors possess advantageous features. These avoid the use of resins and exhibit a very high internal quantum efficiency, which remains stable with the temperature increase.

  9. Studies of hot B subdwarfs. Part 2: Energy distributions of three bright sdB/sdOB stars in the 950-5500 angstrom range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesemael, F.; Holberg, J. B.; Veilleux, S.; Lamontagne, R.; Fontaine, G.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the subdwarf B or OB stars HD 205805, UV 1758+36 and Feige 66 are presented. All three objects display the H I Layman series in absorption. These observations are combined with low dispersion IUE spectrophotometry and with Stroemgren photometry to construct virtually complete energy distributions, which extend over the range 950-5500 angstroms. Effective temperatures based on model atmosphere calculations for high gravity, hydrogen rich stars are determined. Our analyses yield T Sub e 28,200 + or - 1300 K for HD 205805, T sub e 31, 800 + or - 1100 K for UV 1758+36, and T sub e 35,700 + or - 1500 K for Feige 66. The importance of far ultraviolet observations below L sub alpha in reducing the uncertainties associated with the interstellar extinction and the degradation of the IUE sensitivity is emphasized.

  10. A Survey of Luminous High-redshift Quasars with SDSS and WISE. II. the Bright End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ≈ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Yi, Weimin; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Green, Richard; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Shu; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-09-01

    This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ˜ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ˜ 5. Combining our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ˜ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range of 4.7 ≤ z < 5.4 and -29 < M 1450 ≤ -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/V a method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as α = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope β = -3.58 ± 0.24 and a fainter break magnitude {M}1450* = -26.98 ± 0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a luminosity evolution and density evolution model. Using the best-fit QLF, the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background at z ˜ 5 is found to be 18%-45% with a clumping factor C of 2-5. Our sample suggests an evolution of radio loud fraction with optical luminosity but no obvious evolution with redshift.

  11. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  12. High energy physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    The hadron collider group is studying proton-antiproton interactions at the world`s highest collision energy 2 TeV. Data-taking with the D0 detector is in progress at Fermilab and the authors have begun the search for the top quark. S. Wimpenny is coordinating the effort to detect t{bar t} decaying to two leptons, the most readily identifiable channel. At UC Riverside design and testing for a silicon tracker for the D0 upgrade is in progress; a parallel development for the SDC detector at SSC is also underway. The major group effort of the lepton group has been devoted to the OPAL experiment at LEP. They will continue to focus on data-taking to improve the quality and quantity of their data sample. A large number of papers have been published based on approximately 500,000 events taken so far. The authors will concentrate on physics analysis which provides stringent tests of the Standard Model. The authors are continuing participation in the RD5 experiment at the SPS to study muon triggering and tracking. The results of this experiment will provide critical input for the design of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment being proposed for the LHC. The theory group has been working on problems concerning the possible vilation of e-{mu}-{tau} universality, effective Lagrangians, neutrino physics, as well as quark and lepton mass matrices.

  13. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  14. Computing in high-energy physics

    DOE PAGES

    Mount, Richard P.

    2016-05-31

    I present a very personalized journey through more than three decades of computing for experimental high-energy physics, pointing out the enduring lessons that I learned. This is followed by a vision of how the computing environment will evolve in the coming ten years and the technical challenges that this will bring. I then address the scale and cost of high-energy physics software and examine the many current and future challenges, particularly those of management, funding and software-lifecycle management. Lastly, I describe recent developments aimed at improving the overall coherence of high-energy physics software.

  15. High Energy Electron Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) balloon-borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons. The instrument was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN H2 bean-dine in September of 1999. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well.

  16. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  17. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  18. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  19. CERN and the high energy frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsesmelis, Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the particle physics programme at CERN at the high-energy frontier. Starting from the key open questions in particle physics and the large-scale science facilities existing at CERN, concentrating on the Large Hadron Collider(LHC), this paper goes on to present future possibilities for global projects in high energy physics. The paper presents options for future colliders, all being within the framework of the recently updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, and all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. The paper concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward for high-energy physics research.

  20. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2016-07-12

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal’s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  1. High-energy, high-power, long-life battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abens, S. G.

    1969-01-01

    High-energy-density primary battery achieves energy densities of up to 130 watt hrs./lb. The electrochemical couple consists of a lithium anode, a copper-fluoride cathode, and uses methyl formate/lithium hexafluoroarsenate for the electrolyte. Once achieved, battery life is approximately 30 hours.

  2. Personal audio with a planar bright zone.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Philip; Jackson, Philip J B; Olik, Marek; Pedersen, Jan Abildgaard

    2014-10-01

    Reproduction of multiple sound zones, in which personal audio programs may be consumed without the need for headphones, is an active topic in acoustical signal processing. Many approaches to sound zone reproduction do not consider control of the bright zone phase, which may lead to self-cancellation problems if the loudspeakers surround the zones. Conversely, control of the phase in a least-squares sense comes at a cost of decreased level difference between the zones and frequency range of cancellation. Single-zone approaches have considered plane wave reproduction by focusing the sound energy in to a point in the wavenumber domain. In this article, a planar bright zone is reproduced via planarity control, which constrains the bright zone energy to impinge from a narrow range of angles via projection in to a spatial domain. Simulation results using a circular array surrounding two zones show the method to produce superior contrast to the least-squares approach, and superior planarity to the contrast maximization approach. Practical performance measurements obtained in an acoustically treated room verify the conclusions drawn under free-field conditions. PMID:25324075

  3. The energy spectrum of ultra high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuzayyad, Tareq Ziad

    2000-11-01

    The Energy Spectrum of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays is measured by the first of two High Resolution Fly's Eye detectors in the monocular mode. The data set collected in the period of May 1997 to June 1999 was used for the measurement. A new reconstruction procedure (profile constrained geometry fit) was developed to analyze the data. This procedure gives reasonably good energy resolution, but poor xmax resolution. Resolution and systematics are discussed in the thesis. The spectrum measurement results are consistent with previous measurements in normalization and general shape. The spectrum appears to continue beyond the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min cutoff.

  4. High energy mode locked fiber oscillators for high contrast, high energy petawatt laser seed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; An, J; Kim, D; Barty, C J

    2006-06-15

    In a high-energy petawatt laser beam line the ASE pulse contrast is directly related to the total laser gain. Thus a more energetic input pulse will result in increased pulse contrast at the target. We have developed a mode-locked fiber laser with high quality pulses and energies exceeding 25nJ. We believe this 25nJ result is scalable to higher energies. This oscillator has no intra-cavity dispersion compensation, which yields an extremely simple, and elegant laser configuration. We will discuss the design of this laser, our most recent results and characterization of all the key parameters relevant to it use as a seed laser. Our oscillator is a ring cavity mode-locked fiber laser [1]. These lasers operate in a self-similar pulse propagation regime characterized by a spectrum that is almost square. This mode was found theoretically [2] to occur only in the positive dispersion regime. Further increasing positive dispersion should lead to increasing pulse energy [2]. We established that the positive dispersion required for high-energy operation was approximately that of 2m of fiber. To this end, we constructed a laser cavity similar to [1], but with no gratings and only 2m of fiber, which we cladding pumped in order to ensure sufficient pump power was available to achieve mode-locked operation. A schematic of the laser is shown in figure 1 below. This laser produced low noise 25nJ pulses with a broad self similar spectrum (figure 2) and pulses that could be de-chirped to <100fs (figure 3). Pulse contrast is important in peta-watt laser systems. A major contributor to pulse contrast is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which is proportional to the gain in the laser chain. As the oscillator strength is increased, the required gain to reach 1PW pulses is decreased, reducing ASE and improving pulse contrast. We believe these lasers can be scaled in a stable fashion to pulse energies as high as 100nJ and have in fact seen 60nJ briefly in our lab, which is work still

  5. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angellini, L.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the three months of the reporting period. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics.

  6. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  7. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

  8. High Energy Neutrino Flash From Far-UV/X-Ray Flares of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-25

    The recent observations of bright optical and X-ray flares by the Swift satellite suggest these are produced by the late activities of the central engine. We study the neutrino emission from far-UV/X-ray flares under the late internal shock model. Since the efficiency of pion production in the highest energy is higher than that of the prompt bursts, such neutrino flashes from flares can give comparable or larger contributions to a diffuse very high energy neutrino background if the total energy input into flares is comparable to the radiated energy of the prompt bursts. These signals are very important because they have possibility to probe the nature of flares (baryonic or magnetic, the photon field, the magnetic field, and so on).

  9. High Energy Flywheel Containment Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Trase, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel testing facility is being constructed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility is to be used for life cycle testing of various flywheel rotors. The lifecycle testing consists of spinning a rotor from a low rpm (approx. 20,000 ) to a high rpm (approx. 60,000) and then back to the low rpm. This spin cycle will model that which the rotor will see during use. To simulate the lifetime of the rotor, the spin cycle will be performed tens of thousands of times. A typical life cycle spin test is expected to last six months. During this time the rotor will be spun through a cycle every five minutes. The test will run continuously for the six month period barring a flywheel failure. Since it is not reasonable to have the surrounding area evacuated of personnel for the duration of the testing, the flywheel facility has to be designed to withstand a flywheel rotor failure and insure that there is no danger to any personnel in the adjacent buildings or surrounding areas. In order to determine if the facility can safely contain a flywheel rotor failure an analysis of the facility in conjunction with possible flywheel failure modes was performed. This analysis is intended as a worst case evaluation of the burst liner and vacuum tank's ability to contain a failure. The test chamber consists of a cylindrical stainless steel vacuum tank, two outer steel containment rings, and a stainless steel burst liner. The stainless steel used is annealed 302, which has an ultimate strength of 620 MPa (90,000 psi). A diagram of the vacuum tank configuration is shown. The vacuum tank and air turbine will be located below ground in a pit. The tank is secured in the pit with 0.3 m (12 in.) of cement along the base and the remaining portion of the tank is surrounded by gravel up to the access ports. A 590 kg (1300 lb.) bulkhead is placed on top of the pit during operation and the complete facility is housed within a concrete structure which has 7.5 cm (3 in.) thick walls. A cutaway

  10. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  11. Ultra high energy cosmic ray spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cady, R.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, P. R.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Salamon, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays have been observed by means of atmospheric fluorescence with the Fly's Eye since 1981. The differential energy spectrum above 0.1 EeV is well fitted by a power law with slope 2.94 + or - 0.02. Some evidence of flattening of the spectrum is observed or energies greater than 10 EeV, however only one event is observed with energy greater than 50 EeV and a spectral cutoff is indicated above 70 EeV.

  12. A Very Bright Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that young inventors at a Maryland high school are not only learning scientific principles, but also teamwork and the tenets of patent law. Twice a week, 10 members of the Clarksburg High School's Coyote Inventors Club gather in a second-floor computer lab to peck away at building a deceptively simple device: a cable that…

  13. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building lifemore » cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  14. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, Felix

    2011-12-01

    The undisputed galactic origin of cosmic rays at energies below the so-called knee implies an existence of a nonthemal population of galactic objects which effectively accelerate protons and nuclei to TeV-PeV energies. The distinct signatures of these cosmic PeVatrons are high energy neutrinos and γ-rays produced through hadronic interactions. While γ-rays can be produced also by directly accelerated electrons, high energy neutrinos provide the most straightforward and unambiguous information about the nucleonic component of accelerated particles. The planned km3-volume class high energy neutrino detectors are expected to be sensitive enough to provide the first astrophysically meaningful probes of potential VHE neutrino sources. This optimistic prediction is based on the recent discovery of high energy γ-ray sources with hard energy spectra extending to 10 TeV and beyond. Amongst the best-bet candidates are two young shell-type supernova remnants - RXJ 1713.7-4946 and RXJ 0852.0-4622, and perhaps also two prominent plerions - the Crab Nebula and Vela X. Because of strong absorption of TeV γ-rays, one may expect detectable neutrino fluxes also from (somewhat fainter) compact TeV γ-ray emitters like the binary systems LS 5039 and LS I+61 303, and, hopefully, also from hypothetical "hidden" or "orphan" neutrino sources.

  15. High energy density in multisoliton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, Danial; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.

    2015-09-01

    Solitons are very effective in transporting energy over great distances and collisions between them can produce high energy density spots of relevance to phase transformations, energy localization and defect formation among others. It is then important to study how energy density accumulation scales in multisoliton collisions. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximal energy density that can be achieved in collision of N slowly moving kinks and antikinks in the integrable sine-Gordon field, remarkably, is proportional to N2, while the total energy of the system is proportional to N . This maximal energy density can be achieved only if the difference between the number of colliding kinks and antikinks is minimal, i.e., is equal to 0 for even N and 1 for odd N and if the pattern involves an alternating array of kinks and antikinks. Interestingly, for odd (even) N the maximal energy density appears in the form of potential (kinetic) energy, while kinetic (potential) energy is equal to zero. The results of the present study rely on the analysis of the exact multisoliton solutions for N =1 ,2 , and 3 and on the numerical simulation results for N =4 ,5 ,6 , and 7. The effect of weak Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian perturbations on the maximal energy density in multikink collisions is also discussed as well as that of the collision relative phase. Based on these results one can speculate that the soliton collisions in the sine-Gordon field can, in principle, controllably produce very high energy density. This can have important consequences for many physical phenomena described by the Klein-Gordon equations.

  16. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV–visible spectral region (360–610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10–24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  17. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  18. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-19

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  19. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-19

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor. PMID:27383631

  20. A bright neutron source driven by relativistic transparency of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.; Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties and excite nuclear reactions with a large field of applications. It has been stated over the last years, that there is a growing need for intense, pulsed neutron sources, either fast or moderated neutrons for the scientific community. Accelerator based spallation sources provide unprecedented neutron fluxes, but could be complemented by novel sources with higher peak brightness that are more compact. Lasers offer the prospect of generating a very compact neutron source of high peak brightness that could be linked to other facilities more easily. We present experimental results on the first short pulse laser driven neutron source powerful enough for applications in radiography. For the first time an acceleration mechanism (BOA) based on the concept of relativistic transparency has been used to generate neutrons. This mechanism not only provides much higher particle energies, but also accelerated the entire target volume, thereby circumventing the need for complicated target treatment and no longer limited to protons as an intense ion source. As a consequence we have demonstrated a new record in laser-neutron production, not only in numbers, but also in energy and directionality based on an intense deuteron beam. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies in excess of 100 MeV and showed pronounced directionality, which makes then extremely useful for a variety of applications. The results also address a larger community as it paves the way to use short pulse lasers as a neutron source. They can open up neutron research to a broad academic community including material science, biology, medicine and high energy density physics as laser systems become more easily available to universities and therefore can complement large scale facilities like reactors or particle accelerators. We believe that this has the potential to increase the user community for neutron research largely.

  1. High-energy-efficiency optical system for an LED-based headlamp architecture.

    PubMed

    Ge, Aiming; Wang, Wei; Du, Zhengqing; Qiu, Peng; Wang, Junwei; Cai, Jinlin

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a low-beam system for an LED-based headlamp architecture, which is composed of an elliptical reflector, a baffle, and a faceted reflector. Using a single device with high brightness LED of merely 6.00 W, two devices total 12.00 W. With a low beam 55 W traditional halogen light source compared to 78.18% energy savings, the specified illumination requirements for the headlamp low beam can be achieved, according to the ECE regulation "Addendum 111: Regulation No. 112 Revision 2." As we have expected, on the test screen at a distance of 25 m, the simulation results as well as the testing results for the prototype can reach the illuminance distribution requirements, including all specified regions and key points. Moreover, this faceted low beam system enjoys the features of high compactness, high energy efficiency, and feasibility of manufacturing.

  2. Development of High Energy Cathode (PNNL)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries with high energy densities are required to reach DOE’s goal on early commercialization of electrical vehicles, including HEV, PHEV and EV. To increase the energy of cathode, voltage or/and capacity of cathode need to be increased. During FY10, we have investigated cathode materials with high operation voltages, for example LiMnPO4, and renewable organic cathode with high capacities. Environmentally friendly materials and low cost synthesis approaches have been intentionally explored during our efforts.

  3. Brightness Changes in Sun-like Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Stephen M.; Henry, Gregory W.

    1998-01-01

    Does the Sun's energy output vary with time? Are observable climatic changes on the earth caused by changes in the Sun? Can we gain greater insight into this relation-ship by studying other stars with properties similar to the Sun's? In recent years, satellite observations have shown that the solar irradiance varies in phase with the 1 l-year sunspot cycle. The Sun is brighter by about O.l% at the peak of the sunspot cycle when solar magnetic activity is at its maximum. Over longer intervals, changes in the cart h's climate and solar magnetic activity seem to be correlated. We are using automatic photoelectric telescopes to measure brightness changes in a sample of 150 Sun-like stars. Lowell Observatory astronomers have also observed about 30 of these same stars with a manual telescope in a program that began 10 years before ours. Since these two data sets were acquired with different instruments and so have significant systematic differences, we developed software to combine them accurately and, therefore, extend our observational time coverage. We show sample results of brightness variations over 14 years in several Sun-like stars with different ages. Longitudinal studies like these, combined with cross-sectional studies of the larger sample of stars, may eventually allow us to infer with confidence the Sun's long-term brightness history and its impact on the earth's climate.

  4. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: the highest energy frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello Neto, João R. T.

    2016-04-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are the highest energy messengers of the present universe, with energies up to 1020 eV. Studies of astrophysical particles (nuclei, electrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. The primary particles interact in the atmosphere and generate extensive air showers. Analysis of those showers enables one not only to estimate the energy, direction and most probable mass of the primary cosmic particles, but also to obtain information about the properties of their hadronic interactions at an energy more than one order of magnitude above that accessible with the current highest energy human-made accelerator. In this contribution we will review the state-of-the-art in UHECRs detection. We will present the leading experiments Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array and discuss the cosmic ray energy spectrum, searches for directional anisotropy, studies of mass composition, the determination of the number of shower muons (which is sensitive to the shower hadronic interactions) and the proton-air cross section.

  5. The Bright Lights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1976

    1976-01-01

    High intensity discharge lighting sources share the compactness and beam controllability of incandescent sources, but are far more efficient and longer-lived. They share the efficiency and long life of fluorescent sources, but are compact and optically controllable, and are available in higher wattages. (Author/MLF)

  6. Introduction to High-Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan; Bruggen, Marcus

    2003-04-01

    High-energy astrophysics covers cosmic phenomena that occur under the most extreme physical conditions. It explores the most violent events in the Universe: the explosion of stars, matter falling into black holes, and gamma-ray bursts - the most luminous explosions since the Big Bang. Driven by a wealth of new observations, the last decade has seen a large leap forward in our understanding of these phenomena. Exploring modern topics of high-energy astrophysics, such as supernovae, neutron stars, compact binary systems, gamma-ray bursts, and active galactic nuclei, this textbook is ideal for undergraduate students in high-energy astrophysics. It is a self-supporting, timely overview of this exciting field of research. Assuming a familiarity with basic physics, it introduces all other concepts, such as gas dynamics or radiation processes, in an instructive way. An extended appendix gives an overview of some of the most important high-energy astrophysics instruments, and each chapter ends with exercises.• New, up-to-date, introductory textbook providing a broad overview of high-energy phenomena and the many advances in our knowledge gained over the last decade • Written especially for undergraduate teaching use, it introduces the necessary physics and includes many exercises • This book fills a valuable niche at the advanced undergraduate level, providing professors with a new modern introduction to the subject

  7. High-cadence spectroscopy of M dwarfs - I. Analysis of systematic effects in HARPS-N line profile measurements on the bright binary GJ 725A+B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiñas, Z. M.; Amado, P. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Barnes, J.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the sources of instrumental systematic noise is a must to improve the design of future spectrographs. In this study, we alternated observations of the well-suited pair of M-stars GJ 725A+B to delve into the sub-night High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher for the Northern hemisphere (HARPS-N) response. Besides the possible presence of a low-mass planet orbiting GJ 725B, our observations reveal changes in the spectral energy distribution (SED) correlated with measurements of the width of the instrumental line profile and, to a lower degree, with the Doppler measurements. To study the origin of these effects, we searched for correlations among several quantities defined and measured on the spectra and on the acquisition images. We find that the changes in apparent SED are very likely related to flux losses at the fibre input. Further tests indicate that such flux losses do not seriously affect the shape of the instrumental point spread function of HARPS-N, but identify an inefficient fitting of the continuum as the most likely source of the systematic variability observed in the full width at half-maximum. This index, accounting for the HARPS-N cross-correlation profiles width, is often used to decorrelate Doppler time series. We show that the Doppler measurement obtained by a parametric least-squares fitting of the spectrum accounting for continuum variability is insensitive to changes in the slope of the SED, suggesting that forward modelling techniques to measure moments of the line profile are the optimal way to achieve higher accuracy. Remaining residual variability at ˜1 m s-1 suggests that for M-stars Doppler surveys the current noise floor still has an instrumental origin.

  8. Canadian high energy neutron spectrometry system (chenss)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Les

    The Canadian high-energy neutron spectrometry system (CHENSS) has been constructed in order to accurately characterize the fluence and energy distribution of high-energy neutrons encountered on space missions in low-Earth orbit. The CHENSS is a proton-recoil spectrometer based on a cylindrical gelled scintillator, with pulse-shape discrimination properties comparable to those of a liquid scintillator, completely surrounded by thin plastic panels, which can be used to veto coincident events due to charged particles. The CHENSS has been irradiated by monoenergetic neutron reference beams with energies up to 19 MeV at the Physikalisch- TechnischeBundesanstalt and in quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at 100 and 200 MeV at the iThemba Labs facilities. Comparison of the data with fluence determinations performed in parallel to the CHENSS measurements shows good consistency and demonstrates the efficacy of the spectrometer for measurements in space.

  9. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag. The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag-2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed-power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NTF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  10. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag . The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag -2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed- power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NIF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  11. In Situ Mosaic Brightness Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Lorre, Jean J.

    2012-01-01

    In situ missions typically have pointable, mast-mounted cameras, which are capable of taking panoramic mosaics comprised of many individual frames. These frames are mosaicked together. While the mosaic software applies radiometric correction to the images, in many cases brightness/contrast seams still exist between frames. This is largely due to errors in the radiometric correction, and the absence of correction for photometric effects in the mosaic processing chain. The software analyzes the overlaps between adjacent frames in the mosaic and determines correction factors for each image in an attempt to reduce or eliminate these brightness seams.

  12. Scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

  13. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  14. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  15. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kai, K.

    1986-01-01

    A project for space observations of solar flares for the coming solar maximum phase is briefly described. The main objective is to make a comprehensive study of high energy phenomena of flares through simultaneous imagings in both hard and soft X-rays. The project will be performed with collaboration from US scientists. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) WG of ISAS (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences) has extensively discussed future aspects of space observations of high energy phenomena of solar flares based on successful results of the Hinotori mission, and proposed a comprehensive research program for the next solar maximum, called the HESP (SOLAR-A) project. The objective of the HESP project is to make a comprehensive study of both high energy phenomena of flares and quiet structures including pre-flare states, which have been left uncovered by SMM and Hinotori. For such a study simultaneous imagings with better resolutions in space and time in a wide range of energy will be extremely important.

  16. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded descriptions (Ch. V), and a

  17. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  18. High energy particles and quanta in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B. (Editor); Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The various subdisciplines of high-energy astrophysics are surveyed in a series of articles which attempt to give an overall view of the subject as a whole by emphasizing the basic physics common to all fields in which high-energy particles and quanta play a role. Successive chapters cover cosmic ray experimental observations, the abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation, cosmic electrons, solar modulation, solar particles (observation, relationship to the sun acceleration, interplanetary medium), radio astronomy, galactic X-ray sources, the cosmic X-ray background, and gamma ray astronomy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  19. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  20. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  1. Status of High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Marek

    2015-08-01

    With the recent discovery of high-energy neutrinos of extra-terrestrial origin by the IceCube neutrino observatory, neutrino-astronomy is entering a new era. This review will cover currently operating open water/ice neutrino telescopes, the latest evidence for a flux of extra-terrestrial neutrinos and current efforts in the search for steady and transient neutrino point sources. Generalised constraints on potential astrophysical sources are presented, allowing to focus the hunt for the sources of the observed high-energy neutrinos.

  2. Physical Properties of Bright Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittichová, J.; Meech, K. J.

    2002-09-01

    We will show preliminary results from a program of long-term observation of the dust coma activity of bright comets. One and half years of observation of 32 selected comets in B, V, R, I filters are used for the study of the physical properties and the dust activity of their comae at a range of heliocentric distances from 0.99 to 8.61 AU. This enables us to compare the activity of different cometary nuclei at similar solar radiation conditions. As shown in the Table, the selected comets belong to different cometary populations from the point of view of their active age (near parabolic orbits versus short-period orbits, outbursts of brightness, disruption of nuclei) and orbital parameters (the eccentricity from 0.04 to 1.01 AU, the perihelion distance from 0.34 to 8.24 AU). The knowledge of physical properties of cometary nuclei and coma are very important to our understanding of the environment in the outer solar system during the era of formation. The comet dataset of 1128 images will enable us to study thermal evolution of the small dust particles, their dynamical parameters and size distribution as a function of time and grain size at different heliocentric distances. Our future goal is to model the near-nucleus particle region using a Finston-Probstein dust model. Since our observations are still in progress at this time we will present only preliminary results of brightness and color changes for several selected bright comets.

  3. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Denneau, L.; Stalder, B.; Heinze, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-04-01

    Seven bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  4. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-03-01

    Seven bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  5. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Six bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  6. StarBright Learning Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This article features StarBright Learning Exchange, a program that provides a cross-cultural exchange between Australian and South African early childhood educators. The program was originated when its president, Carol Allen, and her colleague, Karen Williams, decided that they could no longer sit by and watch the unfolding social catastrophe that…

  7. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  8. The Large Hadron Collider: Redefining High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Sarah

    2007-06-19

    Particle physicists have a description of the forces of nature known as the Standard Model that has successfully withstood decades of testing at laboratories around the world. Though the Standard Model is powerful, it is not complete. Important details like the masses of particles are not explained well, and realities as fundamental as gravity, dark matter, and dark energy are left out altogether. I will discuss gaps in the model and why there is hope that some puzzles will be solved by probing high energies with the Large Hadron Collider. Beginning next year, this machine will accelerate protons to record energies, hurling them around a 27 kilometer ring before colliding them 40 million times per second. Detectors the size of five-story buildings will record the debris of these collisions. The new energy frontier made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider will allow thousands of physicists to explore nature's fundamental forces and particles from a fantastic vantage point.

  9. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  10. Trends in experimental high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    Data from a scan of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review are used to demonstrate that American high-energy physicists show a pattern of accelerator and instrumentation usage characteristic of that expected from the logistic-substitution model of Marchetti and of Fischer and Pry.

  11. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of the junior high science curriculum. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  12. Energy Conservation Featured in Illinois High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The William Fremd High School in Palatine, Illinois, scheduled to open in 1977, is being built with energy conservation uppermost in mind. In this system, 70 heat pumps will heat and cool 300,000 square feet of educational facilities. (Author/MLF)

  13. High Energy 2-Micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier, high energy Q-switched 2-micron laser system has been recently demonstrated. The laser and amplifiers are all designed in side-pumped rod configuration, pumped by back-cooled conductive packaged GaAlAs diode laser arrays. This 2-micron laser system provides nearly transform limited beam quality.

  14. High energy radiation from neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M.

    1985-04-01

    Topics covered include young rapidly spinning pulsars; static gaps in outer magnetospheres; dynamic gaps in pulsar outer magnetospheres; pulse structure of energetic radiation sustained by outer gap pair production; outer gap radiation, Crab pulsar; outer gap radiation, the Vela pulsar; radioemission; and high energy radiation during the accretion spin-up of older neutron stars. 26 refs., 10 figs. (GHT)

  15. Energy Activities for Junior High Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Energy Agency, St. Paul.

    The document contains seven learning activities for junior high students on the energy situation. Objectives are to help students gain understanding and knowledge about the relationships between humans and their social and physical environments; solve problems and clarify issues; examine personal beliefs and values; and recognize the relationships…

  16. DOE is Funding Young High- Energy Physicists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waff, Craig B.

    1978-01-01

    Reports on some recommendations made by a subpanel on High Energy Physics Manpower for the purpose of employing additional physicists through the transfer of some postdoctoral monies to produce long-term positions, and the creation of a five-year national fellowship program. (GA)

  17. Devloping High Energy Radiography for HED Experiments on NIF and Omega-EP

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B; Tommasini, R; Remington, B; Key, M; Town, R

    2008-02-14

    High energy radiography capabilities are essential for many future DNT/HED experiments on NIF. We have been developing bright, high-energy (15-100 keV), high resolution (< 20 {micro}m), 1-D and 2-D radiography solutions for DNT experiments on NIF. In this LDRD, we have made significant progress utilizing high-energy, high-intensity, short-pulse lasers to generate hard K-{alpha} photons. High energy K-{alpha} sources are created by hot electrons interacting in the target fluor material after irradiation by lasers with intensity I{sub L} > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. High resolution point projection 1-D and 2-D radiography have been achieved using {mu}-foil and {mu}-wire targets attached to low-Z substrate materials. The {mu}-wire size was 10 x 10 x 300 {micro}m on a 300 x 300 x 5 {micro}m CH substrate creating the point source size equivalent to these micro targets. This unique technique will utilize the NIF short pulse laser (ARC) as a backlighter suitable for the full range of DNT science experiments on NIF.

  18. Photometric Properties of Ceres and the Occator Bright Spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Le Corre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Sykes, Mark V.; Nathues, Andreas; Pieters, Carle M.; Ciarniello, Mauro; Turrini, Diego; McFadden, Lucy A.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2015-11-01

    Dawn discovered several extremely bright spots on Ceres, the most prominent of which is located inside the Occator crater that is at least 4-5 times brighter than the average Ceres. Interestingly, these bright spots are located in relatively young craters that are at the longitudes corresponding to the maximum water vapor observed by the Herschel Space Observatory, suggesting possible correlation with water sublimation on Ceres. We used the multi-color imaging data collected by the Dawn Framing Camera to analyze the global photometric properties of Ceres and the bright spots, especially those located inside the Occator crater. Our objectives are to determine the albedo and other light scattering properties of the bright spots on Ceres in the visible wavelengths, in order to characterize their physical properties and find clues about their composition and possible formation mechanisms and the correlation with water sublimation. The overall geometric albedo of Ceres’ global surface is 0.09-0.10, consistent with previous studies. The Hapke roughness parameter is about 20°, close to many other asteroids, rather than 44° as reported earlier. Correspondingly, the phase function of Ceres is less backscattering than previously modeled. In contrast, the geometric albedo of the bright spots inside the Occator crater is 0.4-0.5, and the single scattering albedo is 0.7-0.8, brighter than Vesta’s global albedo but much darker than many icy satellites in the outer solar system. The Hapke roughness of the bright spots is much higher than Ceres average, suggesting relatively loose deposit of materials rather than more coherent or tightly packed materials. The phase function of bright spots material is relatively more forward scattering than average Ceres, possibly correlated to stronger multiple scattering due to high albedo resulting from more transparent materials. The highest resolution images as of late-August 2015 show fine structures within the Occator bright spots. We

  19. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-06-10

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ({sup f}licker{sup )} of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T {sub eff} = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  20. High-energy emission from transients.

    PubMed

    Hinton, J A; Starling, R L C

    2013-06-13

    Cosmic explosions dissipate energy into their surroundings on a very wide range of time scales: producing shock waves and associated particle acceleration. The historical culprits for the acceleration of the bulk of Galactic cosmic rays are supernova remnants: explosions on approximately 10(4) year time scales. Increasingly, however, time-variable emission points to rapid and efficient particle acceleration in a range of different astrophysical systems. Gamma-ray bursts have the shortest time scales, with inferred bulk Lorentz factors of approximately 1000 and photons emitted beyond 100 GeV, but active galaxies, pulsar wind nebulae and colliding stellar winds are all now associated with time-variable emission at approximately teraelectron volt energies. Cosmic photons and neutrinos at these energies offer a powerful probe of the underlying physical mechanisms of cosmic explosions, and a tool for exploring fundamental physics with these systems. Here, we discuss the motivations for high-energy observations of transients, the current experimental situation, and the prospects for the next decade, with particular reference to the major next-generation high-energy observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array. PMID:23630380