Science.gov

Sample records for energy management solutions

  1. Wireless Sensor Network for Advanced Energy Management Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Theisen; Bin Lu, Charles J. Luebke

    2009-09-23

    Eaton has developed an advanced energy management solution that has been deployed to several Industries of the Future (IoF) sites. This demonstrated energy savings and reduced unscheduled downtime through an improved means for performing predictive diagnostics and energy efficiency estimation. Eaton has developed a suite of online, continuous, and inferential algorithms that utilize motor current signature analysis (MCSA) and motor power signature analysis (MPSA) techniques to detect and predict the health condition and energy usage condition of motors and their connect loads. Eaton has also developed a hardware and software platform that provided a means to develop and test these advanced algorithms in the field. Results from lab validation and field trials have demonstrated that the developed advanced algorithms are able to detect motor and load inefficiency and performance degradation. Eaton investigated the performance of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) within various industrial facilities to understand concerns about topology and environmental conditions that have precluded broad adoption by the industry to date. A Wireless Link Assessment System (WLAS), was used to validate wireless performance under a variety of conditions. Results demonstrated that wireless networks can provide adequate performance in most facilities when properly specified and deployed. Customers from various IoF expressed interest in applying wireless more broadly for selected applications, but continue to prefer utilizing existing, wired field bus networks for most sensor based applications that will tie into their existing Computerized Motor Maintenance Systems (CMMS). As a result, wireless technology was de-emphasized within the project, and a greater focus placed on energy efficiency/predictive diagnostics. Commercially available wireless networks were only utilized in field test sites to facilitate collection of motor wellness information, and no wireless sensor network products were

  2. Energy Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobieski, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Education facilities managers are faced with a daunting set of challenges: They must find new ways to reduce energy consumption and carry out greener energy policies. HVAC typically accounts for more than 30% of a building's electricity costs, so there is a clear incentive to eliminate unnecessary heating and cooling of unoccupied rooms. With more…

  3. Energy Management Needs; A Project to Develop Solutions for Higher Education's Energy Problems in the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldren, Sharon L.; Mitchell, Cecilia

    Current patterns of energy management within higher education institutions and energy-related information and services that are needed by senior administrators and others to develop and improve energy management and planning on campus were studied. The findings and recommendations will be used to help develop a new research and action program for…

  4. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Caliò, Renato; Rongala, Udaya Bhaskar; Camboni, Domenico; Milazzo, Mario; Stefanini, Cesare; de Petris, Gianluca; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions. PMID:24618725

  5. Smart energy management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Aniruddha; Singh, Jugdutt

    2010-04-01

    Peak and average energy usage in domestic and industrial environments is growing rapidly and absence of detailed energy consumption metrics is making systematic reduction of energy usage very difficult. Smart energy management system aims at providing a cost-effective solution for managing soaring energy consumption and its impact on green house gas emissions and climate change. The solution is based on seamless integration of existing wired and wireless communication technologies combined with smart context-aware software which offers a complete solution for automation of energy measurement and device control. The persuasive software presents users with easy-to-assimilate visual cues identifying problem areas and time periods and encourages a behavioural change to conserve energy. The system allows analysis of real-time/statistical consumption data with the ability to drill down into detailed analysis of power consumption, CO2 emissions and cost. The system generates intelligent projections and suggests potential methods (e.g. reducing standby, tuning heating/cooling temperature, etc.) of reducing energy consumption. The user interface is accessible using web enabled devices such as PDAs, PCs, etc. or using SMS, email, and instant messaging. Successful real-world trial of the system has demonstrated the potential to save 20 to 30% energy consumption on an average. Low cost of deployment and the ability to easily manage consumption from various web enabled devices offers gives this system a high penetration and impact capability offering a sustainable solution to act on climate change today.

  6. Software-Defined Solutions for Managing Energy Use in Small to Medium Sized Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Peffer, Therese; Blumstein, Carl; Culler, David; Modera, Mark; Meier, Alan

    2015-09-10

    The Project uses state-of-the-art computer science to extend the benefits of Building Automation Systems (BAS) typically found in large buildings (>100,000 square foot) to medium-sized commercial buildings (<50,000 sq ft). The BAS developed in this project, termed OpenBAS, uses an open-source and open software architecture platform, user interface, and plug-and-play control devices to facilitate adoption of energy efficiency strategies in the commercial building sector throughout the United States. At the heart of this “turn key” BAS is the platform with three types of controllers—thermostat, lighting controller, and general controller—that are easily “discovered” by the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. The user interface showcases the platform and provides the control system set-up, system status display and means of automatically mapping the control points in the system.

  7. Energy management

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, J.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Purchasing System Review (CPSR) Program, which oversees the extensive subcontracting activities of the Department's management and operating (M and O) contractors. This review is part of a special GAO audit effort to help ensure that areas vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement are identified and that adequate corrective actions are taken. This effort focuses on 16 areas, one of which is DOE contractor oversight. This report describes the subcontracting deficiencies occurring at DOE, identifies shortcomings in DOE's CPSR Program, and discusses the corrective actions that DOE has committed to take in its CPSR Program in response to these findings.

  8. Energy management

    SciTech Connect

    Dingell, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    In January 1990 GAO began implementing a special audit effort to help ensure that areas vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement are identified and that appropriate corrective actions are taken. This effort focuses on 16 areas, one of which is the Department of Energy's (DOE) contracting practices. As part of this effort, the authors determined if contract audits for monitoring and overseeing DOE's contracting process were being performed and that we identify the impact or potential impact to the government when contract audits were not performed. Specifically, this paper discusses audit coverage of DOE's management and operating (M and O) contractors and DOE contracts, the problems that may occur when contract audit activity is not performed, and factors that have impeded contract audit coverage.

  9. Clean Energy Solutions Center (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Reategui, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Clean Energy Ministerial launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries, led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners. Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries: 1. Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs; 2. Offer expert policy assistance to all countries; 3. Expand peer to peer learning, training, and deployment and policy data for developing countries.

  10. Solar Energy - Solution or Pipedream?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk, Joyce

    This series of lessons and class activities is designed for presentation in a sequence of nine class days. The collection is intended to provide the student in advanced science classes with awareness of the possibilities and limitations of solar energy as a potential solution to the energy crisis. Included are discussion of the following: (1)…

  11. Manage Energy with Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Computerized energy management at Drew University (New Jersey) is accomplished by direct digital control in which microprocessor controllers control, monitor, and carry out energy management functions at the equipment level. (Author/MLF)

  12. Does gasification and biochar amendment provide a viable solution to balance greenhouse gas emissions, energy requirements and orchard residue management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Engil; Suddick, Emma; Six, Johan

    2015-04-01

    By converting biomass residue to biochar, we can generate power cleanly and sequester carbon resulting in overall greenhouse gas (GHG) savings when compared to typical fossil fuel burning and waste disposal. This on-farm research study provides a long-term and high frequency assessment of GHG emissions from biochar amended-soils in an organic walnut orchard in the Central Valley of California, USA. We also estimated the GHG offsets from the conversion of walnut residue into energy through gasification at the on-site walnut processing plant. Soil fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were monitored over 29 months in a 3.6 ha walnut orchard following management and precipitation events. We compared four treatments: control, biochar, compost, and biochar combined with compost. Events involving resource inputs such as fertilization or cover crop mowing induced the largest N2O peaks with average 0.13 kg N2O-N ha-1 day-1, while precipitation events produced the highest CO2 fluxes in average 0.124 Mg CO2-C ha-1 day-1. Biochar alone decreased N2O fluxes in two out of 23 measured events, however, not with enough significant magnitude to modify annual or seasonal totals. This indicates that biochar-induced decreases in N2O fluxes may occasionally occur without significant changes in total emissions. Additionally, biochar alone or in combination with compost did not alter annual or seasonal cumulative CO2 emissions. For this particular study, the conversion of orchard waste into energy and C sequestration through biochar amendment offset 100.3 Mg CO2-Ceq year-1. Thus, given that biochar did not alter cumulative GHG emissions from soils, we conclude that, in the scenario of this study, the use of biochar as a strategy to decrease farm-level GHG emissions is obtained through the gasification of orchard residue into energy and through biochar C sequestration, and not as a tool to decrease soil CO2 and N2O emissions.

  13. Finding urban waste management solutions and policies: Waste-to-energy development and livelihood support system in Payatas, Metro Manila, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Serrona, Kevin Roy; Yu, Jeong-Soo

    2009-01-01

    One of the potential solutions in social and environmental sustainability in municipal solid waste management (MSW) in Metro Manila is to combine community-based recycling and sound landfill management strategies. The marriage of the two puts importance on recycling as a source of livelihood while proper landfill management aims to improve the aesthetic and environmental quality of disposal facilities in urban areas. To do this, a social mapping of wastepickers, junkshops and local recycling practices needs to be undertaken and at the same time assess strategies of the national and local governments vis-à-vis existing laws on municipal solid waste. The case of Payatas controlled disposal facility was taken as a pilot study because it represents the general condition of disposal sites in Metro Manila and the social landscape that it currently has. In addition, a waste-to-energy (WTE) project has been established in Payatas to produce electricity from methane gas. Preliminary interviews with wastepickers show that development interventions in disposal sites such as WTE pose no opposition from host communities for as long as alternative livelihood opportunities are provided. Regulating the flow of wastepickers into the landfill has advantages like improved income and security. Felt needs were also articulated like provision of financial support or capital for junkshop operation and skills training. Overall, a smooth relationship between the local government and community associations pays well in a transitioning landfill management scheme such as Payatas. PMID:25084429

  14. Finding urban waste management solutions and policies: Waste-to-energy development and livelihood support system in Payatas, Metro Manila, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Serrona, Kevin Roy; Yu, Jeong-Soo

    2009-01-01

    One of the potential solutions in social and environmental sustainability in municipal solid waste management (MSW) in Metro Manila is to combine community-based recycling and sound landfill management strategies. The marriage of the two puts importance on recycling as a source of livelihood while proper landfill management aims to improve the aesthetic and environmental quality of disposal facilities in urban areas. To do this, a social mapping of wastepickers, junkshops and local recycling practices needs to be undertaken and at the same time assess strategies of the national and local governments vis-à-vis existing laws on municipal solid waste. The case of Payatas controlled disposal facility was taken as a pilot study because it represents the general condition of disposal sites in Metro Manila and the social landscape that it currently has. In addition, a waste-to-energy (WTE) project has been established in Payatas to produce electricity from methane gas. Preliminary interviews with wastepickers show that development interventions in disposal sites such as WTE pose no opposition from host communities for as long as alternative livelihood opportunities are provided. Regulating the flow of wastepickers into the landfill has advantages like improved income and security. Felt needs were also articulated like provision of financial support or capital for junkshop operation and skills training. Overall, a smooth relationship between the local government and community associations pays well in a transitioning landfill management scheme such as Payatas.

  15. Managing neurocysticercosis: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Fogang, Yannick Fogoum; Savadogo, Abdoul Aziz; Camara, Massaman; Toffa, Dènahin Hinnoutondji; Basse, Anna; Sow, Adjaratou Djeynabou; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a major cause of neurological morbidity in the world. Variability in the neuropathology and clinical presentation of NCC often make it difficult to diagnose and manage. Diagnosis of NCC can be challenging especially in endemic and resource-limited countries where laboratory and imaging techniques are often lacking. NCC management can also be challenging as current treatment options are limited and involve symptomatic agents, antiparasitic agents, or surgery. Although antiparasitic treatment probably reduces the number of active lesions and long-term seizure frequency, its efficacy is limited and strategies to improve treatment regimens are warranted. Treatment decisions should be individualized in relation to the type of NCC. Initial measures should focus on symptomatic management, with antiparasitic therapy only to be considered later on, when appropriate. Symptomatic treatment remains the cornerstone in NCC management which should not only focuses on epilepsy, but also on other manifestations that cause considerable burden (recurrent headaches, cognitive decline). Accurate patients' categorization, better antiparasitic regimens, and definition of new clinical outcomes for trials on NCC could improve management quality and prognosis of NCC. Prevention strategies targeting tapeworm carriers and infected pigs are yielding good results in local models. If local elimination of transmission is confirmed and replicated, this will open the door to cysticercosis eradication efforts worldwide. PMID:26527895

  16. Managing neurocysticercosis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Fogang, Yannick Fogoum; Savadogo, Abdoul Aziz; Camara, Massaman; Toffa, Dènahin Hinnoutondji; Basse, Anna; Sow, Adjaratou Djeynabou; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a major cause of neurological morbidity in the world. Variability in the neuropathology and clinical presentation of NCC often make it difficult to diagnose and manage. Diagnosis of NCC can be challenging especially in endemic and resource-limited countries where laboratory and imaging techniques are often lacking. NCC management can also be challenging as current treatment options are limited and involve symptomatic agents, antiparasitic agents, or surgery. Although antiparasitic treatment probably reduces the number of active lesions and long-term seizure frequency, its efficacy is limited and strategies to improve treatment regimens are warranted. Treatment decisions should be individualized in relation to the type of NCC. Initial measures should focus on symptomatic management, with antiparasitic therapy only to be considered later on, when appropriate. Symptomatic treatment remains the cornerstone in NCC management which should not only focuses on epilepsy, but also on other manifestations that cause considerable burden (recurrent headaches, cognitive decline). Accurate patients’ categorization, better antiparasitic regimens, and definition of new clinical outcomes for trials on NCC could improve management quality and prognosis of NCC. Prevention strategies targeting tapeworm carriers and infected pigs are yielding good results in local models. If local elimination of transmission is confirmed and replicated, this will open the door to cysticercosis eradication efforts worldwide. PMID:26527895

  17. Energy Management Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasmania Dept. of Education, Hobart (Australia). Facilities Services Section.

    This report presents an overview of the energy management plan for Tasmanian schools designed to minimize the costs of all forms of energy usage within these facilities. The policy and objectives of the plan are provided along with details of the plan itself and its current status. Appendices contain an extract from Asset Management Plan for Real…

  18. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  19. Energy and Water Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valek, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Energy efficiency isn't just a good idea; it's a necessity, both for cost reasons and to meet federal regulatory requirements. First, rising energy unit costs continue to erode NASA's mission budget. NASA spent roughly $156M on facility energy in FY 2007. Although that represents less than one per cent of NASA's overall annual budget, the upward trend in energy costs concerns the agency. While NASA reduced consumption 13%, energy unit costs have risen 63%. Energy cost increases counteract the effects of energy conservation, which results in NASA buying less yet spending more. The second factor is federal energy legislation. The National Energy Conservation Policy Act, as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Executive Order (EO) 13423 (January, 2007), and the Energy Independence and Security Act (December, 2007), mandates energy/water conservation goals for all federal agencies, including NASA. There are also reporting requirements associated with this legislation. The Energy/Water Management Task was created to support NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division (HO EMD) in meeting these requirements. With assistance from TEERM, HQ EMD compiled and submitted the NASA Annual Report to the Department of Energy FY 2007. The report contains information on how NASA is meeting federally mandated energy and water management goals. TEERM monitored input for timeliness, errors, and conformity to the new energy/water reporting guidelines and helped compile the information into the final report. TEERM also assists NASA Energy/Water Management with proposal and award calls, updates to the energy/water management database, and facilitating communication within the energy/water management community. TEERM is also supporting NASA and the Interagency Working Group (IWG) on Hydrogen and Fuel Cells. Established shortly after the President announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in 2003, this IWG serves as the mechanism for collaboration among the Federal agencies

  20. Campus Energy Management Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welzenbach, Lanora, Ed.

    This publication is a compilation of data concerning energy conservation measures at more than 60 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. The data are presented for the information of all who are interested in the variety of ways in which institutions of higher education are managing energy. Project descriptions are divided into…

  1. Coupled Fluid Energy Solute Transport

    1992-02-13

    CFEST is a Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport code for the study of a multilayered, nonisothermal ground-water system. It can model discontinuous as well as continuous layers, time-dependent and constant source/sinks, and transient as well as steady-state flow. The finite element method is used for analyzing isothermal and nonisothermal events in a confined aquifer system. Only single-phase Darcian flow is considered. In the Cartesian coordinate system, flow in a horizontal plane, in a verticalmore » plane, or in a fully three-dimensional region can be simulated. An option also exists for the axisymmetric analysis of a vertical cross section. The code employs bilinear quadrilateral elements in all two dimensional analyses and trilinear quadrilateral solid elements in three dimensional simulations. The CFEST finite element formulation can approximate discontinuities, major breaks in slope or thickness, and fault zones in individual hydrogeologic units. The code accounts for heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and porosity and accommodates anisotropy (collinear with the Cartesian coordinates). The variation in the hydraulic properties is described on a layer-by-layer basis for the different hydrogeologic units. Initial conditions can be prescribed hydraulic head or pressure, temperature, or concentration. CFEST can be used to support site, repository, and waste package subsystem assessments. Some specific applications are regional hydrologic characterization; simulation of coupled transport of fluid, heat, and salinity in the repository region; consequence assessment due to natural disruption or human intrusion scenarios in the repository region; flow paths and travel-time estimates for transport of radionuclides; and interpretation of well and tracer tests.« less

  2. Blazing the energy trail: The Municipal Energy Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force pioneers energy and environmental solutions for US cities and counties. When local officials participate in the task force, they open the door to many resources for their communities. The US is entering a period of renewed interest in energy management. Improvements in municipal energy management allow communities to free up energy operating funds to meet other needs. These improvements can even keep energy dollars in the community through the purchase of services and products used to save energy. With this idea in mind, the US Department of Energy Municipal Energy Management Program has funded more than 250 projects that demonstrate innovative energy technologies and management tools in cities and counties through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF). UCETF helps the US Department of Energy foster municipal energy management through networks with cities and urbanized counties and through links with three national associations of local governments. UCETF provides funding for projects that demonstrate innovative and realistic technologies, strategies, and methods that help urban America become more energy efficient and environmentally responsible. The task force provides technical support to local jurisdictions selected for projects. UCETF also shares information about successful energy management projects with cities and counties throughout the country via technical reports and project papers. The descriptions included here capsulize a sample of UCETF`s demonstration projects around the country.

  3. Homemaker energy management. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.J.

    1983-06-01

    A film Homemaker Energy Management is described and production costs are listed. Techniques for energy conservation are shown, not only in daily home management, but also in decoration, interior design, and purchasing (appliances, clothing, etc.). (MHR)

  4. Electrofuels: Versatile Transportation Energy Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: ARPA-E’s Electrofuels Project is using microorganisms to create liquid transportation fuels in a new and different way that could be up to 10 times more energy efficient than current biofuel production methods. ARPA-E is the only U.S. government agency currently funding research on Electrofuels.

  5. Black Plane Solutions and Localized Gravitational Energy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the issue of gravitational energy localization for static plane-symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in 3+1 dimensions with asymptotic anti-de Sitter behavior. We apply three different energy-momentum complexes, the Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz, and Møller prescriptions, to the metric representing this category of solutions and determine the energy distribution for each. We find that the three prescriptions offer identical energy distributions, suggesting their utility for this type of model. PMID:27347499

  6. Phosphorescence and Energy Transfer in Rigid Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, E.; Cabello, A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates the general aspects of intermolecular energy transfer between triplet states in rigid solutions of organic compounds solved in an ethanol-ether mixture. Measurements of quenching and energy transfer processes are made using the chemicals of benzophenone and naphthalene. (CS)

  7. Energy Management Guide for Building Management. Electricity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consolidated Edison Co., Brooklyn, NY.

    This guide is intended for use by commercial building management and operating staffs to encourage energy conservation. The measures suggested are meant to allow building operation at optimum efficiency while minimizing energy waste. Though mainly applicable to multistory buildings, the suggested energy conservation measures are also adaptable to…

  8. Sustainable-energy managment practices in an energy economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darkwa, K.

    2001-10-01

    The economic survival of any nation depends upon its ability to produce and manage sufficient supplies of low-cost safe energy. The world's consumption of fossil fuel resources currently increasing at 3% per annum is found to be unsustainable. Projections of this trend show that mankind will exhaust all known reserves in the second half of the coming century. Governments, industrialists, commercial organizations, public sector departments and the general public have now become aware of the urgent requirements for the efficient management of resources and energy-consuming activities. Most organizations in the materials, manufacturing and retail sectors and in the service industries have also created energy management departments, or have employed consultants, to monitor energy consumption and to reduce wastage. Conversely, any sustained attempt to reduce rates of energy consumption even by as little as 0.1% per annum ensures relatively an eternal future supply as well as reduction on environmental and ecological effect. Thus, there is no long- term solution to energy flow problem other than systematic and effective energy management and the continuous application of the techniques of energy management. Essential energy management strategies in support of a sustainable energy- economy are discussed.

  9. Energy Management in Municipal Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Community Affairs, Boston. Energy Conservation Project.

    This manual is written for the manager or supervisor responsible for instituting an energy management program for municipal buildings. An introduction discusses the management issues facing municipal government in dealing with the need to reduce energy consumption. The guide reviews methods for central coordination of activity to ensure that…

  10. Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1987-02-01

    The Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit was designed to help engineering educators develop and teach energy management courses. Montana State University and Oklahoma State University courses are embodied in the model curriculum given. The curricula offered at many other universities throughout the United States are also presented. The kit was designed specifically to train engineering students to be good energy managers. Courses at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level are presented.

  11. Energy management circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Corless, R. W.

    1985-10-15

    An energy management circuit for use in a telephone or other device which includes an electronic memory is disclosed. The invention provides a capacitive keep alive power supply to maintain said memory in an active condition during extended periods when the device is disconnected from a line power source, as in a telephone on-hook condition. A large capacitor charge is maintained within a predetermined voltage range during such disconnect conditions by a resistively coupled trickle charge power source. A comparator is operated to monitor capacitor charge and to produce a control signal when the voltage at the capacitor falls below a selected memory keep alive level. The control signal operates a switch to bypass the trickle charge circuit. The switch couples line power directly to the capacitor to charge the capacitor to a voltage sufficient to maintain memory contents intact. A switch inhibit circuit is provided to prevent trickle charge bypass during an inadequate or excessive line voltage condition. A sleep timer circuit is also provided to conserve energy required to operate the present invention by allowing the invention to operate periodically and only for short intervals.

  12. ISO 50001 Energy Management Standard

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-12

    This powerful standard from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) provides an internationally recognized framework for organizations to voluntarily implement an energy management system.

  13. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Arabic Translation) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-06-01

    This is the Arabic translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Services fact sheet. The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  14. Implementing Proactive Network Management Solutions in the Residence Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, Param

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses how to implement networking solutions in residence halls at Arcadia University in Philadelphia. Sections of the paper include: (1) About Arcadia University; (2) Residence Halls Network; (3) How Campus Manager Helped Arcadia University; (4) What Is Campus Manager; (5) How Campus Manager Works; (6) Campus Manager Remediation…

  15. Charged Vaidya solution satisfies weak energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Soumyabrata; Ganguli, Suman; Virmani, Amitabh

    2016-07-01

    The external matter stress-tensor supporting charged Vaidya solution appears to violate weak energy condition in certain region of the spacetime. Motivated by this, a new interpretation of charged Vaidya solution was proposed by Ori (Class Quant Grav 8:1559, 1991) in which the energy condition continues to be satisfied. In this construction, one glues an outgoing Vaidya solution to the original ingoing Vaidya solution provided the surface where the external stress-tensor vanishes is spacelike. We revisit this study and extend it to higher-dimensions, to AdS settings, and to higher-derivative f( R) theories. In asymptotically flat space context, we explore in detail the case when the mass function m( v) is proportional to the charge function q( v). When the proportionality constant ν = q(v)/m(v) lies in between zero and one, we show that the surface where the external stress-tensor vanishes is spacelike and lies in between the inner and outer apparent horizons.

  16. Sustainable solutions for solid waste management in Southeast Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Ngoc, Uyen Nguyen; Schnitzer, Hans

    2009-06-01

    Human activities generate waste and the amounts tend to increase as the demand for quality of life increases. Today's rate in the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEANs) is alarming, posing a challenge to governments regarding environmental pollution in the recent years. The expectation is that eventually waste treatment and waste prevention approaches will develop towards sustainable waste management solutions. This expectation is for instance reflected in the term 'zero emission systems'. The concept of zero emissions can be applied successfully with today's technical possibilities in the agro-based processing industry. First, the state-of-the-art of waste management in Southeast Asian countries will be outlined in this paper, followed by waste generation rates, sources, and composition, as well as future trends of waste. Further on, solutions for solid waste management will be reviewed in the discussions of sustainable waste management. The paper emphasizes the concept of waste prevention through utilization of all wastes as process inputs, leading to the possibility of creating an ecosystem in a loop of materials. Also, a case study, focusing on the citrus processing industry, is displayed to illustrate the application of the aggregated material input-output model in a widespread processing industry in ASEAN. The model can be shown as a closed cluster, which permits an identification of opportunities for reducing environmental impacts at the process level in the food processing industry. Throughout the discussion in this paper, the utilization of renewable energy and economic aspects are considered to adapt to environmental and economic issues and the aim of eco-efficiency. Additionally, the opportunities and constraints of waste management will be discussed. PMID:19285384

  17. Sustainable solutions for solid waste management in Southeast Asian countries

    SciTech Connect

    Uyen Nguyen Ngoc Schnitzer, Hans

    2009-06-15

    Human activities generate waste and the amounts tend to increase as the demand for quality of life increases. Today's rate in the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEANs) is alarming, posing a challenge to governments regarding environmental pollution in the recent years. The expectation is that eventually waste treatment and waste prevention approaches will develop towards sustainable waste management solutions. This expectation is for instance reflected in the term 'zero emission systems'. The concept of zero emissions can be applied successfully with today's technical possibilities in the agro-based processing industry. First, the state-of-the-art of waste management in Southeast Asian countries will be outlined in this paper, followed by waste generation rates, sources, and composition, as well as future trends of waste. Further on, solutions for solid waste management will be reviewed in the discussions of sustainable waste management. The paper emphasizes the concept of waste prevention through utilization of all wastes as process inputs, leading to the possibility of creating an ecosystem in a loop of materials. Also, a case study, focusing on the citrus processing industry, is displayed to illustrate the application of the aggregated material input-output model in a widespread processing industry in ASEAN. The model can be shown as a closed cluster, which permits an identification of opportunities for reducing environmental impacts at the process level in the food processing industry. Throughout the discussion in this paper, the utilization of renewable energy and economic aspects are considered to adapt to environmental and economic issues and the aim of eco-efficiency. Additionally, the opportunities and constraints of waste management will be discussed.

  18. Sustainable solutions for solid waste management in Southeast Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Ngoc, Uyen Nguyen; Schnitzer, Hans

    2009-06-01

    Human activities generate waste and the amounts tend to increase as the demand for quality of life increases. Today's rate in the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEANs) is alarming, posing a challenge to governments regarding environmental pollution in the recent years. The expectation is that eventually waste treatment and waste prevention approaches will develop towards sustainable waste management solutions. This expectation is for instance reflected in the term 'zero emission systems'. The concept of zero emissions can be applied successfully with today's technical possibilities in the agro-based processing industry. First, the state-of-the-art of waste management in Southeast Asian countries will be outlined in this paper, followed by waste generation rates, sources, and composition, as well as future trends of waste. Further on, solutions for solid waste management will be reviewed in the discussions of sustainable waste management. The paper emphasizes the concept of waste prevention through utilization of all wastes as process inputs, leading to the possibility of creating an ecosystem in a loop of materials. Also, a case study, focusing on the citrus processing industry, is displayed to illustrate the application of the aggregated material input-output model in a widespread processing industry in ASEAN. The model can be shown as a closed cluster, which permits an identification of opportunities for reducing environmental impacts at the process level in the food processing industry. Throughout the discussion in this paper, the utilization of renewable energy and economic aspects are considered to adapt to environmental and economic issues and the aim of eco-efficiency. Additionally, the opportunities and constraints of waste management will be discussed.

  19. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs. PMID:27601927

  20. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs. PMID:27601927

  1. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs.

  2. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Chinese Translation) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    This is the Chinese language translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) fact sheet. The Solutions Center helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  3. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Vietnamese Translation) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This is the Vietnamese language translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) fact sheet. The Solutions Center helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  4. Affordable Energy-Efficient New Housing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subrato; Widder, Sarah H.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Beal, David; Sutherland, Karen; Abbott, , K.; Fonorow, Ken; Eklund, Ken; Lubliner, Michael; Salzberg, Emily; Peeks, B.; Hewes, T.; Kosar, D.

    2012-05-31

    Since 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America has sponsored research at PNNL to investigate cost-effective, energy-saving home-building technologies and to demonstrate how high-performance homes can deliver lower utility bills, increased comfort, and improved indoor air quality, while maintaining accessibility for low-income homeowners. PNNL and its contractors have been investigating 1) cost-effective whole-house solutions for Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) and specific HFH affiliates in hot-humid and marine climates; 2) cost-effective energy-efficiency improvements for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in new, stick-built and manufactured homes; and 3) energy-efficient domestic hot-water systems.

  5. Energy Management in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian School Trustees Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet provides the basic information for starting an energy conservation program. Guidelines for involving all school personnel and promoting energy conservation throughout the entire Canadian education system are provided. Outlined in the booklet are methods for climate proofing the building envelope and making the system air tight,…

  6. Finite Energy One-Half Monopole Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Rosy; Ng, Ban-Loong; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2012-12-01

    We present finite energy SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs particles of one-half topological charge. The magnetic fields of these solutions at spatial infinity correspond to the magnetic field of a positive one-half magnetic monopole at the origin and a semi-infinite Dirac string on one-half of the z-axis carrying a magnetic flux of (2π )/(g) going into the origin. Hence the net magnetic charge is zero. The gauge potentials are singular along one-half of the z-axis, elsewhere they are regular.

  7. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy: Challenges and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Milligan, M.; Lew, D.

    2013-09-01

    In the U.S., a number of utilities are adopting higher penetrations of renewables, driven in part by state policies. While power systems have been designed to handle the variable nature of loads, the additional supply-side variability and uncertainty can pose new challenges for utilities and system operators. However, a variety of operational and technical solutions exist to help integrate higher penetrations of wind and solar generation. This paper explores renewable energy integration challenges and mitigation strategies that have been implemented in the U.S. and internationally, including forecasting, demand response, flexible generation, larger balancing areas or balancing area cooperation, and operational practices such as fast scheduling and dispatch.

  8. Energy signature analysis: Radar for energy managers

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, L.

    1998-07-01

    Energy Signature Analysis (ESA) acts as a noise filter, to enhance usefulness of energy data. It provides vital feedback on operating and maintenance (O{ampersand}M) consistency and strategies, trends, and on conservation changes to facilities and equipment. Energy and temperatures characterize building performance, Energy use drivers fall in one of two groups: (1) weather and inside temperature, or (2) building characteristics, occupancy, and O and M practices. ESA weather-normalizes with delta T, and uses optimal smoothing to minimize weather, occupancy, and thermostat-driven scatter in energy use. The remaining variability arises from causes of great interest--changes in building characteristics, occupancy patterns, and O and M practices. Energy use rate is plotted versus coincident delta T, for sequenced typical weeks. When nothing but weather changes, consistently managed buildings show low scatter; r{sup 2} for regular occupancy is often 0.96 or better. Efficiency requires consistency; energy use should only change with weather and thermostat settings. Inconsistent management or equipment faults cause scatter, outliers, or an uptrend to alert management. Improved consistence reduces scatter. Worthwhile retrofits, HVAC tuning, and improved management strategies lower the curve. Important changes show merit in a week. High scatter cripples purely statistical uses of building energy data. For ESA, outliers are chances to find inconsistency and behaviors to avoid (high outliers) or foster (low outliers). Area-normalized ESA permits comparing facilities with different size or weather. Model output for new buildings, recast in ESA format, can help track building commissioning or give modelers feedback. Example ESAs use hourly total energy, outside and sampled inside temperatures. Problems found are investigated using hourly HVAC and baseload data. Baseload and HVAC loadshapes show peak-shaving, shut-down and tuning opportunities. New weekly data points show results

  9. Energy Management Controls. Course Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen County Vocational-Technical High School, Hackensack, NJ.

    This course is one of four in a solar systems and energy management program developed by the Bergen County Vocational-Technical Schools to help tradespeople (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; mechanics; plumbers; and electricians) to develop an awareness of alternate energy sources and to gain skills in the areas of solar installations…

  10. A marketing solution: managed care woes?

    PubMed

    MacStravic, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Two interrelated problems are included among the causes of managed care woes: the dramatic increase in unhealthy lifestyles together with the results these have had on health services utilization and expenditures; and the dramatic increase in consumer demand for "lifestyle" or quality of life (QoL) enhancing products and services. Together these are helping to drive managed care toward a crisis, in both commercial and government-sponsored insurance survival prospects. Aside from the frequently mentioned problem of our aging population and the shifting balance between the number of healthy young workers paying in, vs. unhealthy or older workers spending out, these problems greatly exacerbate the double-digit inflation that has become a recurring characteristic of health insurance premiums, and threaten the very existence of managed care.

  11. Data management for the internet of things: design primitives and solution.

    PubMed

    Abu-Elkheir, Mervat; Hayajneh, Mohammad; Ali, Najah Abu

    2013-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a networking paradigm where interconnected, smart objects continuously generate data and transmit it over the Internet. Much of the IoT initiatives are geared towards manufacturing low-cost and energy-efficient hardware for these objects, as well as the communication technologies that provide objects interconnectivity. However, the solutions to manage and utilize the massive volume of data produced by these objects are yet to mature. Traditional database management solutions fall short in satisfying the sophisticated application needs of an IoT network that has a truly global-scale. Current solutions for IoT data management address partial aspects of the IoT environment with special focus on sensor networks. In this paper, we survey the data management solutions that are proposed for IoT or subsystems of the IoT. We highlight the distinctive design primitives that we believe should be addressed in an IoT data management solution, and discuss how they are approached by the proposed solutions. We finally propose a data management framework for IoT that takes into consideration the discussed design elements and acts as a seed to a comprehensive IoT data management solution. The framework we propose adapts a federated, data- and sources-centric approach to link the diverse Things with their abundance of data to the potential applications and services that are envisioned for IoT. PMID:24240599

  12. Data management for the internet of things: design primitives and solution.

    PubMed

    Abu-Elkheir, Mervat; Hayajneh, Mohammad; Ali, Najah Abu

    2013-11-14

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a networking paradigm where interconnected, smart objects continuously generate data and transmit it over the Internet. Much of the IoT initiatives are geared towards manufacturing low-cost and energy-efficient hardware for these objects, as well as the communication technologies that provide objects interconnectivity. However, the solutions to manage and utilize the massive volume of data produced by these objects are yet to mature. Traditional database management solutions fall short in satisfying the sophisticated application needs of an IoT network that has a truly global-scale. Current solutions for IoT data management address partial aspects of the IoT environment with special focus on sensor networks. In this paper, we survey the data management solutions that are proposed for IoT or subsystems of the IoT. We highlight the distinctive design primitives that we believe should be addressed in an IoT data management solution, and discuss how they are approached by the proposed solutions. We finally propose a data management framework for IoT that takes into consideration the discussed design elements and acts as a seed to a comprehensive IoT data management solution. The framework we propose adapts a federated, data- and sources-centric approach to link the diverse Things with their abundance of data to the potential applications and services that are envisioned for IoT.

  13. Data Management for the Internet of Things: Design Primitives and Solution

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Elkheir, Mervat; Hayajneh, Mohammad; Ali, Najah Abu

    2013-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a networking paradigm where interconnected, smart objects continuously generate data and transmit it over the Internet. Much of the IoT initiatives are geared towards manufacturing low-cost and energy-efficient hardware for these objects, as well as the communication technologies that provide objects interconnectivity. However, the solutions to manage and utilize the massive volume of data produced by these objects are yet to mature. Traditional database management solutions fall short in satisfying the sophisticated application needs of an IoT network that has a truly global-scale. Current solutions for IoT data management address partial aspects of the IoT environment with special focus on sensor networks. In this paper, we survey the data management solutions that are proposed for IoT or subsystems of the IoT. We highlight the distinctive design primitives that we believe should be addressed in an IoT data management solution, and discuss how they are approached by the proposed solutions. We finally propose a data management framework for IoT that takes into consideration the discussed design elements and acts as a seed to a comprehensive IoT data management solution. The framework we propose adapts a federated, data- and sources-centric approach to link the diverse Things with their abundance of data to the potential applications and services that are envisioned for IoT. PMID:24240599

  14. Invited review: piglet mortality: management solutions.

    PubMed

    Kirkden, R D; Broom, D M; Andersen, I L

    2013-07-01

    Preweaning mortality varies greatly among herds and this is partly attributed to differences in farrowing house management. In this review, we describe the various management strategies than can be adopted to decrease mortality and critically examine the evidence that exists to support their use. First, we consider which management procedures are effective against specific causes of death: intrapartum stillbirth, hypothermia, starvation, disease, crushing, and savaging. The most effective techniques include intervention to assist dystocic sows, measures to prevent and treat sow hypogalactia, good farrowing house hygiene, providing newborn piglets with a warm microenvironment, early fostering of supernumerary piglets, methods that assist small and weak piglets to breathe and obtain colostrum, and intervention to prevent deaths from crushing and savaging. The provision of nest-building material and modifications to the pen to assist the sow when lying down may also be beneficial, but the evidence is less clear. Because most deaths occur around the time of farrowing and during the first few days of life, the periparturient period is a particularly important time for management interventions intended to reduce piglet mortality. A number of procedures require a stockperson to be present during and immediately after farrowing. Second, we consider the benefits of farrowing supervision for preweaning mortality in general, focusing particularly on methods for the treatment of dystocia and programs of piglet care that combine multiple procedures. Third, we discuss the need for good stockmanship if farrowing supervision is to be effective. Stockmanship refers not only to technical skills but also to the manner in which sows are handled because this influences their fearfulness of humans. We conclude that piglet survival can be improved by a range of management procedures, many of which occur in the perinatal period and require the supervision of farrowing by trained staff

  15. Management of exfoliative glaucoma: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Holló, Gábor; Katsanos, Andreas; Konstas, Anastasios GP

    2015-01-01

    Exfoliative glaucoma is the most common type of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide. It is characterized by high intraocular pressure (IOP) and worse 24-hour IOP characteristics. In order to minimize progression, treatment of exfoliative glaucoma has to provide a low long-term mean IOP and good 24-hour IOP control. To achieve these goals, fixed-dose combination eye drops, argon and selective laser trabeculoplasty, and various forms of surgery (trabeculectomy, deep sclerectomy, viscocanalostomy, ab interno trabeculotomy, trabecular aspiration, and cataract surgery) all need to be considered during the long-term management of the disease. Since exfoliative glaucoma is a disease of the elderly, and is frequently associated with systemic vascular disease, interdisciplinary consultations are of great clinical importance. These management aspects and the current medical, laser, and surgical results are covered in this review, with a special focus on the needs of the general ophthalmologist. PMID:26045655

  16. Management of exfoliative glaucoma: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Holló, Gábor; Katsanos, Andreas; Konstas, Anastasios Gp

    2015-01-01

    Exfoliative glaucoma is the most common type of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide. It is characterized by high intraocular pressure (IOP) and worse 24-hour IOP characteristics. In order to minimize progression, treatment of exfoliative glaucoma has to provide a low long-term mean IOP and good 24-hour IOP control. To achieve these goals, fixed-dose combination eye drops, argon and selective laser trabeculoplasty, and various forms of surgery (trabeculectomy, deep sclerectomy, viscocanalostomy, ab interno trabeculotomy, trabecular aspiration, and cataract surgery) all need to be considered during the long-term management of the disease. Since exfoliative glaucoma is a disease of the elderly, and is frequently associated with systemic vascular disease, interdisciplinary consultations are of great clinical importance. These management aspects and the current medical, laser, and surgical results are covered in this review, with a special focus on the needs of the general ophthalmologist.

  17. Management of orbital fractures: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Jennings R; Pemberton, John D; Bonilla-Velez, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Many specialists encounter and treat orbital fractures. The management of these fractures is often challenging due to the impact that they can have on vision. Acute treatment involves a thorough clinical examination and management of concomitant ocular injuries. The clinical and radiographic findings for each individual patient must then be analyzed for the need for surgical intervention. Deformity and vision impairment can occur from these injuries, and while surgery is intended to prevent these problems, it can also create them. Therefore, surgical approach and implant selection should be carefully considered. Accurate anatomic reconstruction requires complete assessment of fracture margins and proper implant contouring and positioning. The implementation of new technologies for implant shaping and intraoperative assessment of reconstruction will hopefully lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:26604678

  18. Corporate solutions to caseload management -- an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Robert; Gow, Ann; McDowell, Joan

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of a change in health visiting service delivery from GP caseload management to corporate caseload working, in one inner city health centre located in a deprived area of Glasgow. The aim of the study was to identify if moving to corporate caseload working provides the reported benefits cited in the limited literature available. A purposive sample consisting of ten health visitors, one GP, one manager and three clients volunteered to participate in this mixed methods evaluation study. Data were collected by means of a stress questionnaire, public health nursing diary, focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Findings show that immediate improvements were seen in team working, staff communication, sharing practice, enhanced clinical reflection and standards of documentation. However, corporate caseload working did not appear to reduce staff stress levels, increase public health nursing activity or improve quality of client service. Further research conducted over a longer time period with a full staffing complement is needed to validate these findings.

  19. Formal Validation of Fault Management Design Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Corrina; Karban, Robert; Andolfato, Luigi; Day, John

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper describes an approach used to develop SysML modeling patterns to express the behavior of fault protection, test the model's logic by performing fault injection simulations, and verify the fault protection system's logical design via model checking. A representative example, using a subset of the fault protection design for the Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) system, was modeled with SysML State Machines and JavaScript as Action Language. The SysML model captures interactions between relevant system components and system behavior abstractions (mode managers, error monitors, fault protection engine, and devices/switches). Development of a method to implement verifiable and lightweight executable fault protection models enables future missions to have access to larger fault test domains and verifiable design patterns. A tool-chain to transform the SysML model to jpf-Statechart compliant Java code and then verify the generated code via model checking was established. Conclusions and lessons learned from this work are also described, as well as potential avenues for further research and development.

  20. Energy planning and management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

  1. Ophthalmic regional blocks: management, challenges, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Palte, Howard D

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade ophthalmic anesthesia has witnessed a major transformation. The sun has set on the landscape of ophthalmic procedures performed under general anesthesia at in-hospital settings. In its place a new dawn has ushered in the panorama of eye surgeries conducted under regional and topical anesthesia at specialty eye care centers. The impact of the burgeoning geriatric population is that an increasing number of elderly patients will present for eye surgery. In order to accommodate increased patient volumes and simultaneously satisfy administrative initiatives directed at economic frugality, administrators will seek assistance from anesthesia providers in adopting measures that enhance operating room efficiency. The performance of eye blocks in a holding suite meets many of these objectives. Unfortunately, most practicing anesthesiologists resist performing ophthalmic regional blocks because they lack formal training. In future, anesthesiologists will need to block eyes and manage common medical conditions because economic pressures will eliminate routine preoperative testing. This review addresses a variety of topical issues in ophthalmic anesthesia with special emphasis on cannula and needle-based blocks and the new-generation antithrombotic agents. In a constantly evolving arena, the sub-Tenon’s block has gained popularity while the deep angulated intraconal (retrobulbar) block has been largely superseded by the shallower extraconal (peribulbar) approach. Improvements in surgical technique have also impacted anesthetic practice. For example, phacoemulsification techniques facilitate the conduct of cataract surgery under topical anesthesia, and suture-free vitrectomy ports may cause venous air embolism during air/fluid exchange. Hyaluronidase is a useful adjuvant because it promotes local anesthetic diffusion and hastens block onset time but it is allergenic. Ultrasound-guided eye blocks afford real-time visualization of needle position and local

  2. Ophthalmic regional blocks: management, challenges, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Palte, Howard D

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade ophthalmic anesthesia has witnessed a major transformation. The sun has set on the landscape of ophthalmic procedures performed under general anesthesia at in-hospital settings. In its place a new dawn has ushered in the panorama of eye surgeries conducted under regional and topical anesthesia at specialty eye care centers. The impact of the burgeoning geriatric population is that an increasing number of elderly patients will present for eye surgery. In order to accommodate increased patient volumes and simultaneously satisfy administrative initiatives directed at economic frugality, administrators will seek assistance from anesthesia providers in adopting measures that enhance operating room efficiency. The performance of eye blocks in a holding suite meets many of these objectives. Unfortunately, most practicing anesthesiologists resist performing ophthalmic regional blocks because they lack formal training. In future, anesthesiologists will need to block eyes and manage common medical conditions because economic pressures will eliminate routine preoperative testing. This review addresses a variety of topical issues in ophthalmic anesthesia with special emphasis on cannula and needle-based blocks and the new-generation antithrombotic agents. In a constantly evolving arena, the sub-Tenon's block has gained popularity while the deep angulated intraconal (retrobulbar) block has been largely superseded by the shallower extraconal (peribulbar) approach. Improvements in surgical technique have also impacted anesthetic practice. For example, phacoemulsification techniques facilitate the conduct of cataract surgery under topical anesthesia, and suture-free vitrectomy ports may cause venous air embolism during air/fluid exchange. Hyaluronidase is a useful adjuvant because it promotes local anesthetic diffusion and hastens block onset time but it is allergenic. Ultrasound-guided eye blocks afford real-time visualization of needle position and local

  3. Facility Energy Management via a Commercial Web Service

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; O'Neill, Patrick

    2005-08-09

    The World Wide Web (the Web) is rapidly transforming many business practices. The purpose of this chapter is to show readers how facility management tools provided by application service providers (ASPs) via the Web may represent a simple, cost-effective solution to their facility and energy management problems. Accessing tools simply by using a web browser and an Internet connection, all participants in the management of a facility can get convenient access to the information and tools to get their needs met more effectively. Further, energy tools that are integrated into these facility management software environments become readily accessible and can be linked to other tools for managing work orders for getting energy-wasting problems fixed. The chapter also describes how the Federal Energy Management Program is working to make such energy tools readily available.

  4. Solutions in radiology services management: a literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Aline Garcia; Vergara, Lizandra Garcia Lupi; Merino, Eugenio Andrés Díaz; Wagner, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at reviewing the literature to identify solutions for problems observed in radiology services. Materials and Methods Basic, qualitative, exploratory literature review at Scopus and SciELO databases, utilizing the Mendeley and Illustrator CC Adobe softwares. Results In the databases, 565 papers – 120 out of them, pdf free – were identified. Problems observed in the radiology sector are related to procedures scheduling, humanization, lack of training, poor knowledge and use of management techniques, and interaction with users. The design management provides the services with interesting solutions such as Benchmarking, CRM, Lean Approach, ServiceBlueprinting, continued education, among others. Conclusion Literature review is an important tool to identify problems and respective solutions. However, considering the small number of studies approaching management of radiology services, this is a great field of research for the development of deeper studies. PMID:26543281

  5. Linac Energy Management for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chungming; Iverson, Richard; Krejcik, Patrick; Rogind, Deborah; White, Greg; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    Linac Energy Management (LEM) is a control system program that scales magnet field set-point settings following a change in beam energy. LEM is necessary because changes in the number, phase, and amplitude of the active klystrons change the beam's rigidity, and therefore, to maintain constant optics, one has to change focusing gradients and bend fields accordingly. This paper describes the basic process, the control system application programs we developed for LEM, and some of the implementation lessons learned at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  6. Drowning in PC Management: Could a Linux Solution Save Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Short on funding and IT staff, a Western Canada library struggled to provide adequate public computing resources. Staff turned to a Linux-based solution that supports up to 10 users from a single computer, and blends Web browsing and productivity applications with session management, Internet filtering, and user authentication. In this article,…

  7. Energy management: a reemerging concern for the department manager.

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    2001-09-01

    The cost of energy in the average health care institution, at one time rarely more than I percent of the total budget, has amounted to 3 percent to 5 percent or more of the budget since the mid-1970s. As society gradually adjusted to these higher energy costs, the urgency for energy conservation faded, and true energy management, briefly a high priority, fell by the wayside. It is now evident that higher energy costs are here to stay, and energy supplies are becoming more limited, in some areas alarmingly so, at the same time other financial concerns are making themselves felt. Therefore, energy management is resurfacing as an active management concern. Much of energy management at the department level is a matter of awareness and attitude, and an energy-conscious manager can influence the staff toward energy consciousness. PMID:11556556

  8. Energy manager design for microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01

    On-site energy production, known as distributed energy resources (DER), offers consumers many benefits, such as bill savings and predictability, improved system efficiency, improved reliability, control over power quality, and in many cases, greener electricity. Additionally, DER systems can benefit electric utilities by reducing congestion on the grid, reducing the need for new generation and transmission capacity, and offering ancillary services such as voltage support and emergency demand response. Local aggregations of distributed energy resources (DER) that may include active control of on-site end-use energy devices can be called microgrids. Microgrids require control to ensure safe operation and to make dispatch decisions that achieve system objectives such as cost minimization, reliability, efficiency and emissions requirements, while abiding by system constraints and regulatory rules. This control is performed by an energy manager (EM). Preferably, an EM will achieve operation reasonably close to the attainable optimum, it will do this by means robust to deviations from expected conditions, and it will not itself incur insupportable capital or operation and maintenance costs. Also, microgrids can include supervision over end-uses, such as curtailing or rescheduling certain loads. By viewing a unified microgrid as a system of supply and demand, rather than simply a system of on-site generation devices, the benefits of integrated supply and demand control can be exploited, such as economic savings and improved system energy efficiency.

  9. Dynamic management of integrated residential energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratori, Matteo

    This study combines principles of energy systems engineering and statistics to develop integrated models of residential energy use in the United States, to include residential recharging of electric vehicles. These models can be used by government, policymakers, and the utility industry to provide answers and guidance regarding the future of the U.S. energy system. Currently, electric power generation must match the total demand at each instant, following seasonal patterns and instantaneous fluctuations. Thus, one of the biggest drivers of costs and capacity requirement is the electricity demand that occurs during peak periods. These peak periods require utility companies to maintain operational capacity that often is underutilized, outdated, expensive, and inefficient. In light of this, flattening the demand curve has long been recognized as an effective way of cutting the cost of producing electricity and increasing overall efficiency. The problem is exacerbated by expected widespread adoption of non-dispatchable renewable power generation. The intermittent nature of renewable resources and their non-dispatchability substantially limit the ability of electric power generation of adapting to the fluctuating demand. Smart grid technologies and demand response programs are proposed as a technical solution to make the electric power demand more flexible and able to adapt to power generation. Residential demand response programs offer different incentives and benefits to consumers in response to their flexibility in the timing of their electricity consumption. Understanding interactions between new and existing energy technologies, and policy impacts therein, is key to driving sustainable energy use and economic growth. Comprehensive and accurate models of the next-generation power system allow for understanding the effects of new energy technologies on the power system infrastructure, and can be used to guide policy, technology, and economic decisions. This

  10. School Solutions. Special Report: IAQ and Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birr, Dave

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how energy service companies (ESCO) can help schools upgrade their indoor air quality and make them environmentally sound. How ESCO's help in arranging funding for indoor environmental improvements through energy performance contracts is discussed. Tips on energy-efficiency measures for improving indoor environmental quality are…

  11. Systemic solutions for multi-benefit water and environmental management.

    PubMed

    Everard, Mark; McInnes, Robert

    2013-09-01

    The environmental and financial costs of inputs to, and unintended consequences arising from narrow consideration of outputs from, water and environmental management technologies highlight the need for low-input solutions that optimise outcomes across multiple ecosystem services. Case studies examining the inputs and outputs associated with several ecosystem-based water and environmental management technologies reveal a range from those that differ little from conventional electro-mechanical engineering techniques through methods, such as integrated constructed wetlands (ICWs), designed explicitly as low-input systems optimising ecosystem service outcomes. All techniques present opportunities for further optimisation of outputs, and hence for greater cumulative public value. We define 'systemic solutions' as "…low-input technologies using natural processes to optimise benefits across the spectrum of ecosystem services and their beneficiaries". They contribute to sustainable development by averting unintended negative impacts and optimising benefits to all ecosystem service beneficiaries, increasing net economic value. Legacy legislation addressing issues in a fragmented way, associated 'ring-fenced' budgets and established management assumptions represent obstacles to implementing 'systemic solutions'. However, flexible implementation of legacy regulations recognising their primary purpose, rather than slavish adherence to detailed sub-clauses, may achieve greater overall public benefit through optimisation of outcomes across ecosystem services. Systemic solutions are not a panacea if applied merely as 'downstream' fixes, but are part of, and a means to accelerate, broader culture change towards more sustainable practice. This necessarily entails connecting a wider network of interests in the formulation and design of mutually-beneficial systemic solutions, including for example spatial planners, engineers, regulators, managers, farming and other businesses, and

  12. Research on Factors Influencing Individual's Behavior of Energy Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yanfeng

    With the rapid rise of distributed generation, Internet of Things, and mobile Internet, both U.S. and European smart home manufacturers have developed energy management solutions for individual usage. These applications help people manage their energy consumption more efficiently. Domestic manufacturers have also launched similar products. This paper focuses on the factors influencing Energy Management Behaviour (EMB) at the individual level. By reviewing academic literature, conducting surveys in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, the author builds an integrated behavioural energy management model of the Chinese energy consumers. This paper takes the vague term of EMB and redefines it as a function of two separate behavioural concepts: Energy Management Intention (EMI), and the traditional Energy Saving Intention (ESI). Secondly, the author conducts statistical analyses on these two behavioural concepts. EMI is the main driver behind an individual's EMB. EMI is affected by Behavioural Attitudes, Subjective Norms, and Perceived Behavioural Control (PBC). Among these three key factors, PBC exerts the strongest influence. This implies that the promotion of the energy management concept is mainly driven by good application user experience (UX). The traditional ESI also demonstrates positive influence on EMB, but its impact is weaker than the impacts arising under EMI's three factors. In other words, the government and manufacturers may not be able to change an individual's energy management behaviour if they rely solely on their traditional promotion strategies. In addition, the study finds that the government may achieve better promotional results by launching subsidies to the manufacturers of these kinds of applications and smart appliances.

  13. 75 FR 76962 - Application To Export Electric Energy; MAG Energy Solutions, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Application To Export Electric Energy; MAG Energy Solutions, Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Application. SUMMARY: MAG Energy Solutions, Inc. (MAG...

  14. Integrated computational and conceptual solutions for complex environmental information management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rückemann, Claus-Peter

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the recent results of the integration of computational and conceptual solutions for the complex case of environmental information management. The solution for the major goal of creating and developing long-term multi-disciplinary knowledge resources and conceptual and computational support was achieved by implementing and integrating key components. The key components are long-term knowledge resources providing required structures for universal knowledge creation, documentation, and preservation, universal multi-disciplinary and multi-lingual conceptual knowledge and classification, especially, references to Universal Decimal Classification (UDC), sustainable workflows for environmental information management, and computational support for dynamical use, processing, and advanced scientific computing with Integrated Information and Computing System (IICS) components and High End Computing (HEC) resources.

  15. Financing renewable energy: Obstacles and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.H.

    1994-06-01

    The majority of renewable energy technology projects now being developed use long term project financing to raise capital. The financial community scrutinizes renewables more closely than some conventionally fueled electric generation facilities because it perceives renewables as risky and expensive. Renewables pay for this perceived risk through higher interest charges and other more restrictive loan covenants. Risks that are not eliminated in the power sales agreement or through some other means generally result in higher project costs during financing. In part, this situation is a product of the private placement market and project finance process in which renewable energy facilities must function. The project finance process attracts banks and institutional lenders as well as equity investors (often pension funds) who do not want to place their capital at great risk. Energy project finance exists on the basis of a secure revenue stream and a thorough understanding of electric generation technology. Renewables, like all energy projects, operating in uncertain regulatory environments are often difficult to finance. In the uncertain regulatory environment in which renewables now operate, investors and lenders are nervous about challenges to existing contracts between independent power producers and utilities. Challenges to existing contracts could foretell challenges to contracts in the future. Investors and lenders now look to state regulatory environments as an indicator of project risk. Renewable energy technology evolves quickly. Yet, often the information about technological evolution is not available to those who invest in the energy projects. Or, those who have invested in new renewable energy technology in the past have lost money and are nervous about doing so in the future - even though technology may have improved. Inadequate or unfavorable information is a barrier to the development of renewables.

  16. Lighting Energy Management for Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Lighting Bureau, Washington, DC.

    Colleges and universities probably rely on more types of lighting than do other facilities. This booklet is intended to help administrators achieve the goal of lighting energy management--gaining maximum benefit from illumination systems while minimizing energy waste. The development of a lighting energy management plan requires knowledge of the…

  17. Managing Energy in Your Educational Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This booklet explains how to develop and implement a plan to manage energy in educational facilities. It can be used to identify energy savings opportunities and implement a plan to reduce energy costs. It discusses the following steps for creating an effective energy-use plan: (1) get started and organize for success; (2) look at energy use and…

  18. Energy Management. A Guide for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Association of School Boards, Winneconne.

    A successful energy management program in a single school or a school district requires an energy audit or survey. The audit identifies how much energy is being consumed, as well as where it is going. Furthermore, it shows opportunities for energy conservation. The walk-through energy conservation survey is the method that has the best prospect…

  19. Energy Decisions: Is Solar Power the Solution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Vincent W.

    2011-01-01

    People around the world are concerned about affordable energy. It is needed to power the global economy. Petroleum-based transportation and coal-fired power plants are economic prime movers fueling the global economy, but coal and gasoline are also the leading sources of air pollution. Both of these sources produce greenhouse gases and toxins.…

  20. Modeling the Energy of Stringy Black Hole Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radinschi, Irina; Ciobanu, Brindusa

    2008-05-01

    The localization of energy has attracted attention as one of the most intricate issues and is the subject of many studies since the outset of general relativity. In this paper we compute the energy distribution of a dual dilatonic solution in low-energy string theory using the Landau-Lifshitz, Weinberg and Mo/ller prescriptions. We also point out the connections between the expressions for energy computed in these prescriptions, study some particular cases, and model the energetic properties of this solution using the Maple and Mathematica programs.

  1. Modeling the energy of stringy black hole solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Radinschi, Irina; Ciobanu, Brindusa

    2008-05-29

    The localization of energy has attracted attention as one of the most intricate issues and is the subject of many studies since the outset of general relativity. In this paper we compute the energy distribution of a dual dilatonic solution in low-energy string theory using the Landau-Lifshitz, Weinberg and Moeller prescriptions. We also point out the connections between the expressions for energy computed in these prescriptions, study some particular cases, and model the energetic properties of this solution using the Maple and Mathematica programs.

  2. Energy management and vehicle synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czysz, P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1995-01-01

    The major drivers in the development of launch vehicles for the twenty-first century are reduction in cost of vehicles and operations, continuous reusability, mission abort capability with vehicle recovery, and readiness. One approach to the design of such vehicles is to emphasize energy management and propulsion as being the principal means of improvements given the available industrial capability and the required freedom in selecting configuration concept geometries. A methodology has been developed for the rational synthesis of vehicles based on the setting up and utilization of available data and projections, and a reference vehicle. The application of the methodology is illustrated for a single stage to orbit (SSTO) with various limits for the use of airbreathing propulsion.

  3. Energy management and vehicle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czysz, P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    The major drivers in the development of launch vehicles for the twenty-first century are reduction in cost of vehicles and operations, continuous reusability, mission abort capability with vehicle recovery, and readiness. One approach to the design of such vehicles is to emphasize energy management and propulsion as being the principal means of improvements given the available industrial capability and the required freedom in selecting configuration concept geometries. A methodology has been developed for the rational synthesis of vehicles based on the setting up and utilization of available data and projections, and a reference vehicle. The application of the methodology is illustrated for a single stage to orbit (SSTO) with various limits for the use of airbreathing propulsion.

  4. About the Federal Energy Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Kidd

    2009-04-23

    Richard Kidd, Program Manager for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), presents a discussion on FEMP direction and its future role, federal funding trends, future financing trends, and Earth Day observations.

  5. Energy management subsystem. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wightman, C.W.

    1997-03-01

    In todays environment-conscious world, increasing levels of automotive emissions have been recognized as a major source of pollutants and greenhouse gases. Despite increasingly stringent tailpipe emission standards, the increased use of the automobile has more than offset the lowered per-vehicle emissions. Consequently, there is a great deal of interest in so-called zero-emission vehicles, such as electric and hybrid-electric automobiles. Although very attractive in terms of emissions, these vehicle present some design challenges which are not generally part of conventional automotive design. One such challenge is the development of an effective energy management strategy for the vehicle. While a conventional automobile has an engine whose power output far exceeds the average vehicle needs, hybrid electric vehicles generally have very limited energy reserves and efficiency in the use of these reserves is paramount if acceptable overall performance is to be achieved. Man aspects of the vehicle design (such as aerodynamics, powertrain design, gross weight, etc.) strongly influence the overall vehicle efficiency. However, the actual performance achieved by any given driver is strongly dependent on his or her driving skills. One way to reduce the effect of differences in driving skills is to provide for automatic accelerator control, permitting the vehicle to be driven in an efficient manner without necessitating extensive driver training. This report describes an accelerator/brake control systems developed for use on the Zia Roadrunner New Mexico Tech`s entry in the 1993 Sunrayce for solar-electric hybrid vehicles.

  6. Energy Management for Colleges & Universities. Energy Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This publication is an administrative guide or manual for energy conservation at higher education facilities. Text and diagrams describe a broad range of energy conservation equipment and management options. Chapter titles, which indicate contents, are: (1) Energy Overview; (2) Energy: Its Conversion, Use, and Waste; (3) Energy Data Base; (4)…

  7. Providing Solutions To Energy and Environmental Problems

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Jointly Sponsored Research Program emphasizes technology commercialization and continues to be highly successful and supported strongly and enthusiastically by WRI's industrial clientele. All of the available Department of Energy (USDOE) funding for each of the first seven years has been committed to projects. All available FY 97 funding was obligated in June 1997. The demand for funds continues to outstrip available monies and an additional $3 million per year in USDOE funding could easily be accommodated. As summarized in Table 1, since the program's inception in 1990, $19,140,754 in USDOE funds have been obligated and committed against an industrial match of $25,446,281.

  8. Energy Management Manual for dairy processors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Small Manufacturer and Food Processing Energy Management Program was an information development project focused on energy management for dairy processors. The goal was to improve the quality and relevance of energy conservation practices as they relate to production of dairy products in a manufacturing and processing plant. The information development involved two thrusts carried out concurrently: (1) Development and publication of an energy management manual to increase understanding of plant management, operation, and process personnel concerning energy conservation and management in dairy processing, and (2) Development of a series of computer programs to aid in the analysis of present plant performance and project alternate production processes and plant operation schemes. Use of the programs results in process schematics, an energy balance and a basis for cost estimates.

  9. Management of chronic pain in osteoporosis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Paolucci, Teresa; Saraceni, Vincenzo Maria; Piccinini, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a pathological condition that manifests clinically as pain, fractures, and physical disability, resulting in the loss of independence and the need for long-term care. Chronic pain is a multidimensional experience with sensory, affective, and cognitive aspects. Age can affect each of these dimensions and the pain that is experienced. In OP, chronic pain appears to have sensory characteristics and properties of nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Its evaluation and treatment thus require a holistic approach that focuses on the specific characteristics of this population. Pain management must therefore include pharmacological approaches, physiotherapy interventions, educational measures, and, in rare cases, surgical treatment. Most rehabilitative treatments in the management of patients with OP do not evaluate pain or physical function, and there is no consensus on the effects of rehabilitation therapy on back pain or quality of life in women with OP. Pharmacological treatment of pain in patients with OP is usually insufficient. The management of chronic pain in patients with OP is complicated with regard to its diagnosis, the search for reversible secondary causes, the efficacy and duration of oral bisphosphonates, and the function of calcium and vitamin D. The aim of this review is to discuss the most appropriate solutions in the management of chronic pain in OP. PMID:27099529

  10. Saving Energy. Managing School Facilities, Guide 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England). Architects and Building Branch.

    This guide offers information on how schools can implement an energy saving action plan to reduce their energy costs. Various low-cost energy-saving measures are recommended covering heating levels and heating systems, electricity demand reduction and lighting, ventilation, hot water usage, and swimming pool energy management. Additional…

  11. FEMP (Federal Energy Management Program) Update, Spring 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The FEMP Update, published quarterly by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), provides information that will assist federal managers in their energy management responsibilities. The Update is distributed primarily to federal facility and energy management personnel.

  12. 75 FR 45111 - Electric Quarterly Reports; Strategic Energy Management Corp.; Solaro Energy Marketing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ...] Electric Quarterly Reports; Strategic Energy Management Corp.; Solaro Energy Marketing Corporation; Notice... Order, the Commission directed Strategic Energy Management Corp. and Solaro Energy Marketing Corporation... Energy Management Corp. and Solaro Energy Marketing Corporation) have failed to file their...

  13. Future World Energy Constraints and the Direction for Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lightfoot, H.D.

    2004-09-12

    This paper was originally written in response to the concern that rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere caused by burning of fossil fuels will ultimately contribute to global warming. Now we are beginning to see evidence of coming problems in the supply of fuels for transportation. This paper describes the benefits of adequate energy supply and the problems of future energy supply. Partial solutions are suggested for immediate application as well as longer term solutions to address both of these concerns. To evaluate the situation and solutions we must understand: (1) how much primary energy is currently used world-wide and might be needed in 2100, (2) how important energy is to the welfare of people, (3) the forms of energy sources and end uses and (4) where new sources may come from. The major portion of world primary energy demand is provided by fossil fuels. This portion dropped from 93% in 1970 to 85% in 1995, mainly because of the increased use of nuclear energy. How ever, since the mid-1990s fossil fuels have maintained their 85% share of world energy supply. The importance of the relationship between per capita energy consumption and per capita income for the world is discussed. The limits of conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energies are examined. The contribution of renewable energies is compared to 41 different views of world energy demand in 2100. Without new technology for large scale storage of intermittent electricity from wind and solar the contribution of renewable energies is not likely to grow significantly beyond the current level of 7-8%. The paper offers conclusions and partial solutions that we can work on immediately. Examination of the forms of energy supplied by the sun, which is powered by nuclear fusion, and the way in which nuclear fission currently supplies energy to the world sets the research framework for longer term solutions. This framework points towards two possible longer term complementary res earch projects which

  14. Decision exploration lab: a visual analytics solution for decision management.

    PubMed

    Broeksema, Bertjan; Baudel, Thomas; Telea, Arthur G; Crisafulli, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    We present a visual analytics solution designed to address prevalent issues in the area of Operational Decision Management (ODM). In ODM, which has its roots in Artificial Intelligence (Expert Systems) and Management Science, it is increasingly important to align business decisions with business goals. In our work, we consider decision models (executable models of the business domain) as ontologies that describe the business domain, and production rules that describe the business logic of decisions to be made over this ontology. Executing a decision model produces an accumulation of decisions made over time for individual cases. We are interested, first, to get insight in the decision logic and the accumulated facts by themselves. Secondly and more importantly, we want to see how the accumulated facts reveal potential divergences between the reality as captured by the decision model, and the reality as captured by the executed decisions. We illustrate the motivation, added value for visual analytics, and our proposed solution and tooling through a business case from the car insurance industry.

  15. Thermal energy management process experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal energy management processes experiment (TEMP) will demonstrate that through the use of two-phase flow technology, thermal systems can be significantly enhanced by increasing heat transport capabilities at reduced power consumption while operating within narrow temperature limits. It has been noted that such phenomena as excess fluid puddling, priming, stratification, and surface tension effects all tend to mask the performance of two-phase flow systems in a 1-g field. The flight experiment approach would be to attack the experiment to an appropriate mounting surface with a 15 to 20 meter effective length and provide a heat input and output station in the form of heaters and a radiator. Using environmental data, the size, location, and orientation of the experiment can be optimized. The approach would be to provide a self-contained panel and mount it to the STEP through a frame. A small electronics package would be developed to interface with the STEP avionics for command and data handling. During the flight, heaters on the evaporator will be exercised to determine performance. Flight data will be evaluated against the ground tests to determine any anomalous behavior.

  16. Energy Management Technician Curriculum Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarvis, Robert E.

    This document is the result of an effort to develop a comprehensive curriculum to train community college students as energy management technicians. The main body of the document contains the energy management technician training curriculum and course content for the proposed courses in the two-year sequence; a report of how the curriculum was…

  17. Michigan School District Buys Energy Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technological Horizons in Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    With the aid of a federal grant for energy conservation, the Warren Consolidated School System (Michigan) will purchase a Margaux 6400 Building Management system to manage energy usage in 35 district buildings. Reasons for selecting the system and system capabilities are briefly discussed. (Author/JN)

  18. 3 CFR - Federal Leadership on Energy Management

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Federal Leadership on Energy Management Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of December 5, 2013 Federal Leadership on Energy Management Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies In order to create a clean...

  19. Continuing Developments in PV Risk Management: Strategies, Solutions, and Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.; Speer, B.; Hill, R.

    2013-02-01

    As the PV industry matures, successful risk management practices will become more imperative to ensure investor confidence, control costs, and facilitate further growth. This report discusses several key aspects of risk management during the commercial- and utility-scale project life cycle, from identification of risks, to the process of mitigating and allocating those risks among project parties, to transferring those risks through insurance. The report also explores novel techniques in PV risk management, options to offload risks onto the capital markets, and innovative insurance policies (namely warranty policies) that address risks unique to the PV sector. One of the major justifications for robust risk management in the PV industry is the cost-reduction opportunities it affords. If the PV industry can demonstrate the capability to successfully manage its risks, thereby inspiring confidence in financiers, it may be able to obtain a lower cost of capital in future transactions. A lower cost of capital translates to a lower cost of energy, which will in turn enhance PV?s competitiveness at a time when it will have to rely less on subsidies to support its market penetration.

  20. Electric load management and energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kheir, N. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electric load management and energy conservation relate heavily to the major problems facing power industry at present. The three basic modes of energy conservation are identified as demand reduction, increased efficiency and substitution for scarce fuels. Direct and indirect load management objectives are to reduce peak loads and have future growth in electricity requirements in such a manner to cause more of it to fall off the system's peak. In this paper, an overview of proposed and implemented load management options is presented. Research opportunities exist for the evaluation of socio-economic impacts of energy conservation and load management schemes specially on the electric power industry itself.

  1. A generic solution for unwanted traffic control through trust management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zheng; Kantola, Raimo; Shen, Yue

    2014-01-01

    The Internet has dramatically changed our daily life. But it is also bogged down by unwanted traffic, which is malicious, harmful or unexpected for its receivers. In order to control the unwanted traffic over the Internet, especially the mobile Internet, in this paper, we propose a generic unwanted traffic control (UTC) solution through trust management. It can control unwanted traffic from its source to destinations in a personalized manner according to trust evaluation at a Global Trust Operator, traffic and behavior analysis at hosts and traffic observation in the Internet. Thus, it can conduct UTC by integrating distributed and centralized functions and supporting both defensive and offensive approaches. Simulation based evaluation shows that the solution is effective with regard to accuracy and efficiency for botnet intrusion and DDoS intrusion via reflectors. It is also robust against a number of malicious system attacks, such as hide evidence attack, bad mouthing attack, on-off attack, malicious attack by an Internet Service Provider and combinations of the above, playing in conjunction with traffic intrusions. Meanwhile, the solution can provide a personalized UTC based on unwanted traffic detection behaviors.

  2. Energy Management for Automatic Monitoring Stations in Arctic Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Demian

    Automatic weather monitoring stations deployed in arctic regions are usually installed in hard to reach locations. Most of the time they run unsupervised and they face severe environmental conditions: very low temperatures, ice riming, etc. It is usual practice to use a local energy source to power the equipment. There are three main ways to achieve this: (1) a generator whose fuel has to be transported to the location at regular intervals (2) a battery and (3) an energy harvesting generator that exploits a local energy source. Hybrid systems are very common. Polar nights and long winters are typical of arctic regions. Solar radiation reaching the ground during this season is very low or non-existent, depending on the geographical location. Therefore, solar power generation is not very effective. One straightforward, but expensive and inefficient solution is the use of a large bank of batteries that is recharged during sunny months and discharged during the winter. The main purpose of the monitoring stations is to collect meteorological data at regular intervals; interruptions due to a lack of electrical energy can be prevented with the use of an energy management subsystem. Keeping a balance between incoming and outgoing energy flows, while assuring the continuous operation of the station, is the delicate task of energy management strategies. This doctoral thesis explores alternate power generation solutions and intelligent energy management techniques for equipment deployed in the arctic. For instance, harvesting energy from the wind to complement solar generation is studied. Nevertheless, harvested energy is a scarce resource and needs to be used efficiently. Genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic, and common sense are used to efficiently manage energy flows within a simulated arctic weather station.

  3. The energy of the analytic lump solution in SFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Giaccari, S.; Tolla, D. D.

    2011-08-01

    In a previous paper a method was proposed to find exact analytic solutions of open string field theory describing lower dimensional lumps, by incorporating in string field theory an exact renormalization group flow generated by a relevant operator in a worldsheet CFT. In this paper we compute the energy of one such solution, which is expected to represent a D24 brane. We show, both numerically and analytically, that its value corresponds to the theoretically expected one.

  4. Dynamic management of integrated residential energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratori, Matteo

    This study combines principles of energy systems engineering and statistics to develop integrated models of residential energy use in the United States, to include residential recharging of electric vehicles. These models can be used by government, policymakers, and the utility industry to provide answers and guidance regarding the future of the U.S. energy system. Currently, electric power generation must match the total demand at each instant, following seasonal patterns and instantaneous fluctuations. Thus, one of the biggest drivers of costs and capacity requirement is the electricity demand that occurs during peak periods. These peak periods require utility companies to maintain operational capacity that often is underutilized, outdated, expensive, and inefficient. In light of this, flattening the demand curve has long been recognized as an effective way of cutting the cost of producing electricity and increasing overall efficiency. The problem is exacerbated by expected widespread adoption of non-dispatchable renewable power generation. The intermittent nature of renewable resources and their non-dispatchability substantially limit the ability of electric power generation of adapting to the fluctuating demand. Smart grid technologies and demand response programs are proposed as a technical solution to make the electric power demand more flexible and able to adapt to power generation. Residential demand response programs offer different incentives and benefits to consumers in response to their flexibility in the timing of their electricity consumption. Understanding interactions between new and existing energy technologies, and policy impacts therein, is key to driving sustainable energy use and economic growth. Comprehensive and accurate models of the next-generation power system allow for understanding the effects of new energy technologies on the power system infrastructure, and can be used to guide policy, technology, and economic decisions. This

  5. Principles of light energy management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, N.

    1994-01-01

    Six methods used to minimize excess energy effects associated with lighting systems for plant growth chambers are reviewed in this report. The energy associated with wall transmission and chamber operating equipment and the experimental requirements, such as fresh air and internal equipment, are not considered here. Only the energy associated with providing and removing the energy for lighting is considered.

  6. Savings impact of a corporate energy manager

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, B.D.; O'Donnell, B.A.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the cost savings impact of employing an energy manager with a 16,000-employee corporation. The corporation, Canada's second largest airline, is currently operating nearly 3,000,000 ft{sup 2} of mixed-use facilities spread across the country, with an annual energy budget for ground facilities of over Cdn $4,000,000. This paper outlines the methodology used by the energy manager to deploy an energy management program over a two-year period between April 1995 and May 1997. The paper examines the successes and the lessons learned during the period and summarizes the costs and benefits of the program. The energy manager position was responsible for developing an energy history database with more than 100 active accounts and for monitoring and verifying energy savings. The energy manager implemented many relatively low-cost energy conservation measures, as well as some capital projects, during the first two years of the program. In total, these measures provided energy cost savings of $210,000 per year, or 5% of the total budget. In each case, technologies installed as part of the energy retrofit projects provided not only cost savings but also better control, reduced maintenance, and improved working conditions for employees.

  7. On finite energy monopole solutions in Weinberg-Salam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, D. G.; Zhang, P. M.; Zou, L. P.

    2015-09-01

    We study the problem of existence of finite energy monopole solutions in the Weinberg-Salam model starting with the most general ansatz for static axially-symmetric electroweak magnetic fields. The ansatz includes an explicit construction of field configurations with various topologies described by the monopole and Hopf charges. We introduce a unique SU(2) gauge invariant definition for the electromagnetic field. It has been proved that the magnetic charge of any finite energy monopole solution must be screened at far distance. This implies nonexistence of finite energy monopole solutions with a nonzero total magnetic charge. In the case of a special axially-symmetric Dashen-Hasslacher-Neveu ansatz, we revise the structure of the sphaleron solution and show that sphaleron represents a nontrivial system of monopole and antimonopole with their centers located in one point. This is different from the known interpretation of the sphaleron as a monopole-antimonopole pair like Nambu’s “dumb-bell.” In general, the axially-symmetric magnetic field may admit a helical structure. We conjecture that such a solution exists and estimate an upper bound for its energy, Ebound = 4.65TeV.

  8. SHARING AND DEPLOYING INNOVATIVE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS TO MANAGE WASTE ACROSS THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Crolley, R.; Thompson, M.

    2011-01-31

    There has been a need for a faster and cheaper deployment model for information technology (IT) solutions to address waste management needs at US Department of Energy (DOE) complex sites for years. Budget constraints, challenges in deploying new technologies, frequent travel, and increased job demands for existing employees have prevented IT organizations from staying abreast of new technologies or deploying them quickly. Despite such challenges, IT organizations have added significant value to waste management handling through better worker safety, tracking, characterization, and disposition at DOE complex sites. Systems developed for site-specific missions have broad applicability to waste management challenges and in many cases have been expanded to meet other waste missions. Radio frequency identification (RFID) and global positioning satellite (GPS)-enabled solutions have reduced the risk of radiation exposure and safety risks. New web-based and mobile applications have enabled precision characterization and control of nuclear materials. These solutions have also improved operational efficiencies and shortened schedules, reduced cost, and improved regulatory compliance. Collaboration between US Department of Energy (DOE) complex sites is improving time to delivery and cost efficiencies for waste management missions with new information technologies (IT) such as wireless computing, global positioning satellite (GPS), and radio frequency identification (RFID). Integrated solutions developed at separate DOE complex sites by new technology Centers of Excellence (CoE) have increased material control and accountability, worker safety, and environmental sustainability. CoEs offer other DOE sister sites significant cost and time savings by leveraging their technology expertise in project scoping, implementation, and ongoing operations.

  9. Energy efficient Buildings, A Neglected Solution to the Energy Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Leon

    2007-04-01

    Many institutions, such as policymakers in Washington, have concentrated on the energy problem from the supply side. It makes more sense to have a balanced approach that also emphasizes means to limit consumption by improving the efficiency of energy use. Residential and commercial buildings constitute the largest energy consumption sector of the U.S. Buildings use almost 40 percent of our total energy, and are larger than the transportation sector by far. Buildings also consume two-thirds of our total electricity. The issue of efficient buildings is particularly acute in the developing world where there is a massive construction effort underway. Proper actions in the urban and regional environment here and abroad can yield substantial immediate as well as long term results. Major advances in energy efficiency in the built environment require a broad approach to building research and development. No one ``silver bullet'' will make a major impact by itself. Rather, substantial improvements in energy efficiency require the development of advanced technologies and an integrated approach to planning, design, optimization, and operation.

  10. Energy Management Strategies for Home Economics Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver.

    This energy activity guide, developed and field tested in Colorado, presents teaching units and strategies to aid home economics teachers to teach energy management. The guide is divided into six subject areas: introduction (background information on energy use and conservation); foods and nutrition; clothing and textiles; housing and home…

  11. Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

  12. Community Energy Management Programs for Commercial Building Owners and Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Walter S.

    1987-01-01

    A voluntary program in Ontario encourages the private sector to reduce its energy consumption in commercial buildings by experimenting with innovative building operation techniques. Charts and tables illustrate the outstanding results achieved by program participants. Yearly energy management forums are convened in Toronto and Ottawa. (MLF)

  13. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Anand K; Khandker, Nabil; Kurczewski, Lisa; Brophy, Gretchen M

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical–psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and “pseudoseizure” patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who deals with the acute management of seizures may encounter. The document also highlights the numerous avenues for new research that would help practitioners optimize epilepsy management. PMID:26966367

  14. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Anand K; Khandker, Nabil; Kurczewski, Lisa; Brophy, Gretchen M

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical-psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and "pseudoseizure" patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who deals with the acute management of seizures may encounter. The document also highlights the numerous avenues for new research that would help practitioners optimize epilepsy management.

  15. Total facility energy management at Mercy Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    In large facilities, successful energy management cannot be measured by a few projects, no matter how significant the energy savings. Large facilities today are comprised of extensive energy consuming systems. For every energy project developed, two more projects remain to be discovered. The successful energy manager is one who has completed ten projects, or twenty, or thirty, and is still finding more projects to do. Nothing is assumed to be as efficient as possible, and no part of any system is ignored. The successful energy manager is willing to take risks, not of being fired, but to use imagination, study engineering theory, exercise common sense, develop concept designs, calculate savings, sell projects to management, control designers, study equipment performance, pre-select contractors, manage the contractor efforts, solve inherent problems along the way, and then optimize the project after acceptance when the designers and contractors all walk off. Once the successful energy manager establishes his credibility, his problem becomes finding enough time to get the projects rolling as he dreams them up. He sees what others do not. As they say in the North, only the lead dog sees new scenery.

  16. On-Line for Energy Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, J. Howard; Moffett, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    A number of school systems are saving money with computerized energy management systems. Administrators of Elizabethton Public Schools, Tennessee, also changed the school calendar with an extended winter break that substantially reduced electrical peaks. (MLF)

  17. 1995 Department of Energy Records Management Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Records Management Group (RMG) provides a forum for DOE and its contractor personnel to review and discuss subjects, issues, and concerns of common interest. This forum will include the exchange of information, and interpretation of requirements, and a dialog to aid in cost-effective management of the DOE Records Management program. Issues addressed by the RMG may result in recommendations for DOE-wide initiatives. Proposed DOE-wide initiatives shall be, provided in writing by the RMG Steering Committee to the DOE Records Management Committee and to DOE`s Office of ERM Policy, Records, and Reports Management for appropriate action. The membership of the RMG is composed of personnel engaged in Records Management from DOE Headquarters, Field sites, contractors, and other organizations, as appropriate. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Services du Centre de Solutions Pour Les Energies Propres (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This is the French translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center services fact sheet. The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  19. 1994 Department of Energy Records Management Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Records Management Group (RMG) provides a forum for DOE and its contractor personnel to review and discuss subjects, issues, and concerns of common interest. This forum will include the exchange of information, and interpretation of requirements, and a dialog to aid in cost-effective management of the DOE Records Management program. This report contains the contributions from this forum.

  20. CRC Clinical Trials Management System (CTMS): An Integrated Information Management Solution for Collaborative Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R.O.; Greaves, Andrew W.; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Research Consortium (CRC) consists of 9 geographically distributed sites conducting a program of research including both basic science and clinical components. To enable the CRC’s clinical research efforts, a system providing for real-time collaboration was required. CTMS provides such functionality, and demonstrates that the use of novel data modeling, web-application platforms, and management strategies provides for the deployment of an extensible, cost effective solution in such an environment. PMID:14728471

  1. Renewable energy technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: potentials, barriers and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable energy penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great potential for renewable energies from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of Energy initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable energy to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable energy resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable energy use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable energy policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable energy development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable energy technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable energy technology sector in Kazakhstan.

  2. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 3: State of Practiceof Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2004-02-01

    In this report, the third in a series, we provide an evaluation of several products that exemplify the current state of practice of Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems (EMCIS). The available features for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard to emerging trends in EMCIS and potential benefits to the federal sector. The first report [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems. The second report [2] serves as a basic reference for building control system (BCS) networking fundamentals and includes an assessment of current approaches to open communications. Part 4 of this series will discuss applications software from a user's perspective. It is important for energy managers in the Federal sector to have a high level of knowledge and understanding of these complex energy management systems. This series of reports provides energy practitioners with some basic informational and educational tools to help make decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings potential.

  3. 78 FR 75209 - Federal Leadership on Energy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... utilities and energy providers for the purposes of business management and energy usage management. (f... Documents#0;#0; ] Memorandum of December 5, 2013 Federal Leadership on Energy Management Memorandum for the.... Today I am establishing new goals for renewable energy as well as new energy-management...

  4. Guide to Energy Management in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This guide has been prepared to assist Oklahoma school officials in developing an energy management plan. It consists of a compilation of materials drawn from a number of local, state, and federal resources. A model organizational structure is shown that could be adapted by each district in organizing an energy plan. The necessity of an energy…

  5. Energy Management and the Infrastructure System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a state-of-the-art energy management program at Wake Forest University (North Carolina) designed to include all on-campus property, and explores the various aspects of cost/benefit analysis in its development. A campus profile, electrical and thermal energy analyses, and a summary table of utility budget data are included. (GR)

  6. Lead By Example with Smart Energy Management (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    Brochure outlining the mission and activities of the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program, which facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship.

  7. Protection of the myocardium with high-energy solutions.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, S; Feinberg, H

    1975-07-01

    An approach to intraoperative protection of the myocardium is described that attempts to increase glucose utilization by infusion of high-energy solutions during aortic cross-clamping. Infusion of hypertonic glucose or glucose plus insulin prior to aortic cross-clamping has enhanced contractility and increased high-energy phosphate moieties in animals with induced ischemia. Recent pilot experiments in our laboratory suggest that infusions of creatine may result in increased production of creatine phosphate, which in turn induces phosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate to adenosine triphosphate, possibly enhancing myocardial contractility. The intraoperative clinical benefits of these infusions remain to be proved, however.

  8. Deep Energy Retrofit Guidance for the Building America Solutions Center

    SciTech Connect

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. DOE Building America program has established a research agenda targeting market-relevant strategies to achieve 40% reductions in existing home energy use by 2030. Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs) are part of the strategy to meet and exceed this goal. DERs are projects that create new, valuable assets from existing residences, by bringing homes into alignment with the expectations of the 21st century. Ideally, high energy using, dated homes that are failing to provide adequate modern services to their owners and occupants (e.g., comfortable temperatures, acceptable humidity, clean, healthy), are transformed through comprehensive upgrades to the building envelope, services and miscellaneous loads into next generation high performance homes. These guidance documents provide information to aid in the broader market adoption of DERs. They are intended for inclusion in the online resource the Building America Solutions Center (BASC). This document is an assemblage of multiple entries in the BASC, each of which addresses a specific aspect of Deep Energy Retrofit best practices for projects targeting at least 50% energy reductions. The contents are based upon a review of actual DERs in the U.S., as well as a mixture of engineering judgment, published guidance from DOE research in technologies and DERs, simulations of cost-optimal DERs, Energy Star and Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) product criteria, and energy codes.

  9. Utilising integrated urban water management to assess the viability of decentralised water solutions.

    PubMed

    Burn, Stewart; Maheepala, Shiroma; Sharma, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Cities worldwide are challenged by a number of urban water issues associated with climate change, population growth and the associated water scarcity, wastewater flows and stormwater run-off. To address these problems decentralised solutions are increasingly being considered by water authorities, and integrated urban water management (IUWM) has emerged as a potential solution to most of these urban water challenges, and as the key to providing solutions incorporating decentralised concepts at a city wide scale. To incorporate decentralised options, there is a need to understand their performance and their impact on a city's total water cycle under alternative water and land management options. This includes changes to flow, nutrient and sediment regimes, energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and the impacts on rivers, aquifers and estuaries. Application of the IUWM approach to large cities demands revisiting the fundamental role of water system design in sustainable city development. This paper uses the extended urban metabolism model (EUMM) to expand a logical definition for the aims of IUWM, and discusses the role of decentralised systems in IUWM and how IUWM principles can be incorporated into urban water planning.

  10. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  11. Interfacial Free Energy of Cu-Co Solid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevnenko, S. N.

    2013-06-01

    The surface energies of Cu-Co solid solutions in hydrogen atmosphere were measured. The measurements were performed on pure copper and copper alloys containing 0.45, 0.7, 1.4, 2.25, 2.50, and 2.8 at. pct Co and 4.1 at. pct Co for the temperature range 1245 K to 1349 K (972 °C to 1076 °C). The experiments were conducted using the zero creep method for 18 mcm foils. The modified method allowed " in situ" determining of the surface energy. It was shown that the surface energy increases as the concentration increases up to 1.4 at. pct Co and then decreases. Such extreme behavior was obtained by the direct method for the first time in a solid metallic system.

  12. Computer-based electric energy cost management

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.C.; Gallant, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Control over electrical energy operating costs and their associated administrative overheads can be greatly improved by using a computer to manage electric service contracts. The electrical power supervision system (EPSS) is particularly effective for oil and gas producers whose electric loads are both diversified and distributed over several geographic areas. The system allows for centralized control under a trained specialist who ensures that for each production facility the contract terms and electrical costs are optimized. In addition, this approach to electric energy management effectively reduces corporate overheads by automating invoice payment procedures and enhancing lines of communication with the electric utilities.

  13. Energy Smart Management of Scientific Data

    SciTech Connect

    Otoo, Ekow; Rotem, Dron; Tsao, Shih-Chiang

    2009-04-12

    Scientific data centers comprised of high-powered computing equipment and large capacity disk storage systems consume considerable amount of energy. Dynamic power management techniques (DPM) are commonly used for saving energy in disk systems. These involve powering down disks that exhibit long idle periods and placing them in standby mode. A file request from a disk in standby mode will incur both energy and performance penalties as it takes energy (and time) to spin up the disk before it can serve a file. For this reason, DPM has to make decisions as to when to transition the disk into standby mode such that the energy saved is greater than the energy needed to spin it up again and the performance penalty is tolerable. The length of the idle period until the DPM decides to power down a disk is called idlenessthreshold. In this paper, we study both analytically and experimentally dynamic power management techniques that save energy subject to performance constraints on file access costs. Based on observed workloads of scientific applications and disk characteristics, we provide a methodology for determining file assignment to disks and computing idleness thresholds that result in significant improvements to the energy saved by existing DPMsolutions while meeting response time constraints. We validate our methods with simulations that use traces taken from scientific applications.

  14. Managing the urban water-energy nexus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escriva-Bou, Alvar; Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel; Lund, Jay R.

    2016-04-01

    Water use directly causes a significant amount of energy use in cities. In this paper we assess energy and greenhouse emissions related with each part of the urban water cycle and the consequences of several changes in residential water use for customers, water and energy utilities, and the environment. First, we develop an hourly model of urban water uses by customer category including water-related energy consumption. Next, using real data from East Bay Municipal Utility District in California, we calibrate a model of the energy used in water supply, treatment, pumping and wastewater treatment by the utility. Then, using data from the California Independent System Operator, we obtain hourly costs of energy for the energy utility. Finally, and using emission factors reported by the energy utilities we estimate greenhouse gas emissions for the entire urban water cycle. Results of the business-as-usual scenario show that water end uses account for almost 95% of all water-related energy use, but the 5% managed by the utility is still worth over 12 million annually. Several simulations analyze the potential benefits for water demand management actions showing that moving some water end-uses from peak to off-peak hours such as outdoor use, dishwasher or clothes washer use have large benefits for water and energy utilities, especially for locations with a high proportion of electric water heaters. Other interesting result is that under the current energy rate structures with low or no fixed charges, energy utilities burden most of the cost of the conservation actions.

  15. Integrated energy management study. Energy efficient transport program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Integrated Energy Management (IEM) Study investigated the practicality and feasibility of a closed-loop energy management system for transport aircraft. The study involved: (1) instrumentation and collection of in-flight data for a United Airlines 727-200 flying 80 revenue flights throughout the United Airlines network,(2) analysis of the in-flight data to select representative city pairs and establish operational procedures employed in flying a reference flight profile, (3) simulation of the reference profile in a fast-time model to verify the model and establish performance values against which to measure IEM benefits, (4) development of IEM algorithms, and (5) assessment of the IEM concept.

  16. Energy Management Checklist for the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Glenda

    This booklet contains a checklist of equipment and activities for the individual's use in home energy management. The categories covered include: (1) insulation; (2) windows; (3) temperature control; (4) lighting; (5) heating water; (6) laundry; (7) cleaning and maintenance; (8) cooking; (9) refrigeration; (10) dishwashing; (11) recreation; and…

  17. US Department of Energy, Annual report on energy management

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    A report on DOE's In-house Energy Management Program for reducing energy consumption and increasing energy efficiency in all of its facilities and operations is presented. Programs in energy conservation surveys and studies, retrofit projects, fuel conversion projects, operation and maintenance improvements, driver training, and employee awareness have enabled the department to reduce its energy consumption in FY 1979 by 12.7% in BTU per gross sq. ft. as compared to 1973. Total cost of energy conservation projects in 1979 was $11.455 million. Cost avoidance as a result of implementing these programs is expected to be $3.75 million annually. To date, DOE has invested $51.4 million in retrofit projects.

  18. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  19. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  20. Solid-solution nanocrystallite formation by high-energy milling.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hanjung; Jung, Suna; Cho, Sung-Wook; Kil, Dae-Sup; Roh, Ki-Min; Lim, Jae-Won

    2013-09-01

    Solid-solution nanocrystalline powders were prepared by the high-energy milling of Ti alloys with graphite. The B1 structure (NaCl-like structure) phases, (Ti, Cr)C and (Ti, Al)C, were formed during the milling process of Ti-Cr + graphite and Ti-Al + graphite, and the synthetic procedures were investigated in terms of the phase evolution from XRD data. The (Ti, Al)C phase was obtained after milling for 20 hr at BPR = 40:1 (under a more severe condition), while the (Ti, Cr)C phase formed after milling for 20 hr at BPR = 20:1 (a relatively soft condition). The difference in the tendency to create a solid solution with Ti in the B1 structure caused a difference in the synthetic behavior of (Ti, Al)C and (Ti, Cr)C. In other words, (Ti, Cr)C is formed earlier than (Ti, Al)C during milling because the atomic size of Cr (0.166 nm) is similar to that of Ti (0.176 nm), which leads to the straightforward formation of the solid-solution (Ti, Cr)C as compared to when (Ti, Al)C is used. As a result, the crystallite size of the (Ti, Al)C phase (2-3 nm) synthesized at a later stage becomes smaller than that of the (Ti, Cr)C phase (5 10 nm) formed at an earlier stage during milling.

  1. Local measures of intermolecular free energies in solution.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ching-Ling; Martini, Silvia; Bryant, Robert G

    2004-11-24

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation rate changes induced by freely diffusing oxygen in aqueous and mixed solvents are reported for representative amino acids and glucose. The local oxygen concentration at each spectrally resolved proton was deduced from the paramagnetic contribution to the relaxation rate. The measured relaxation increment is compared to that of the force-free diffusion relaxation model, and the differences are related to a free energy for the oxygen association with different portions of the solute molecules. The free energy differences are small, on the order of -800 to -2000 J/mol, but are uniformly negative for all proton positions measured on the amino acids in water and reflect the energetic benefit of weak association of hydrophobic cosolutes. For glucose, CH proton positions report negative free energies for oxygen association, the magnitude of which depends on the solvent; however, the hydroxyl positions report positive free energy differences relative to the force-free diffusion model, which is consistent with partial occupancy in the OH region by a solvent hydrogen bond. PMID:15548022

  2. Arsenic: a roadblock to potential animal waste management solutions.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Keeve E; Graham, Jay P; Price, Lance B; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2005-09-01

    The localization and intensification of the poultry industry over the past 50 years have incidentally created a largely ignored environmental management crisis. As a result of these changes in poultry production, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) produce far more waste than can be managed by land disposal within the regions where it is produced. As a result, alternative waste management practices are currently being implemented, including incineration and pelletization of waste. However, organic arsenicals used in poultry feed are converted to inorganic arsenicals in poultry waste, limiting the feasibility of waste management alternatives. The presence of inorganic arsenic in incinerator ash and pelletized waste sold as fertilizer creates opportunities for population exposures that did not previously exist. The removal of arsenic from animal feed is a critical step toward safe poultry waste management. PMID:16140615

  3. 75 FR 62852 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Chevron Energy Solutions Lucerne Valley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Chevron Energy Solutions Lucerne Valley Solar Project, California and the Approved Plan Amendment to the California Desert...)/Approved Plan Amendment (PA) to the California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan for the Chevron...

  4. Energy management analysis of lunar oxygen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazzolari, R.; Wong-Swanson, B. G.

    1990-01-01

    Energy load models in the process of hydrogen reduction of ilmenite for lunar oxygen production are being developed. The load models will be used as a first step to ultimately determine the optimal energy system needed to supply the power requirements for the process. The goal is to determine the energy requirements in the process of hydrogen reduction of ilmenite to produce oxygen. The general approach is shown, and the objectives are to determine the energy loads of the processes in the system. Subsequent energy management studies will be made to minimize the system losses (irreversibilities) and to design optimal energy system power requirements. A number of processes are being proposed as possible candidates for lunar application and some detailed experimental efforts are being conducted within this project at the University of Arizona. Priorities are directed toward developing the energy models for each of the proposed processes being considered. The immediate goals are to identify the variables that would impact energy requirements and energy sources of supply.

  5. Papapetrou Energy-Momentum Complex for a Stringy Black Hole Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Radinschi, I.; Ciobanu, B.

    2007-09-10

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the energy distribution of a stringy black hole solution with the Papapetrou energy-momentum complex. The space-time under consideration describes the dual solution known as the magnetic black hole solution. The energy distribution depends on the mass M and charge Q of the magnetic black hole.

  6. 49 CFR 238.403 - Crash energy management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crash energy management. 238.403 Section 238.403... Equipment § 238.403 Crash energy management. (a) Each power car and trailer car shall be designed with a crash energy management system to dissipate kinetic energy during a collision. The crash...

  7. 49 CFR 238.403 - Crash energy management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crash energy management. 238.403 Section 238.403... Equipment § 238.403 Crash energy management. (a) Each power car and trailer car shall be designed with a crash energy management system to dissipate kinetic energy during a collision. The crash...

  8. 49 CFR 238.403 - Crash energy management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crash energy management. 238.403 Section 238.403... Equipment § 238.403 Crash energy management. (a) Each power car and trailer car shall be designed with a crash energy management system to dissipate kinetic energy during a collision. The crash...

  9. 49 CFR 238.403 - Crash energy management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crash energy management. 238.403 Section 238.403... Equipment § 238.403 Crash energy management. (a) Each power car and trailer car shall be designed with a crash energy management system to dissipate kinetic energy during a collision. The crash...

  10. 49 CFR 238.403 - Crash energy management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crash energy management. 238.403 Section 238.403... Equipment § 238.403 Crash energy management. (a) Each power car and trailer car shall be designed with a crash energy management system to dissipate kinetic energy during a collision. The crash...

  11. Power management circuit for resonant energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirku, Tomas; Steinbauer, Miloslav; Kluge, Martin

    2009-05-01

    This paper deals with the design of the power management circuit for the vibration generator developed in the frame of the European WISE project and its testing in the connection with the generator and the dynamic load simulating the real load. This generator is used as an autonomous energy source for wireless sensor applications. It can be used for example in the aeronautic, automotive and many other applications. The generator output power analysis was based on the vibration spectrum measured on the helicopter engine, provided by the consortium EADS, EUROCOPTER, DASSAULT AVIATION - 6.RP -WIreless SEnsing (WISE) project. This spectrum shows very unstable vibration levels. It was done the statistical analysis of these vibration levels and it was shown that there is a need of the power management circuit, which can provide a stable output voltage for the supplied circuit and if there is a need it can store an immediately unusable generated energy. The generator can't be used as the only energy source for the sensor circuit, because there are not any vibrations when for example a motor is stopped. In these periods and in the time of low vibration levels the circuit must be supplied from battery. The power management circuit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. It has two power inputs - the battery and the generator. It can switch between them at certain defined generator output levels by the threshold detector. Also when there is too much of the generated power, it can store the extra energy in the storage for the later usage. The storage device is the advanced capacitor. The advanced capacitor is a device containing three capacitors. These capacitors are connected (and charged) sequentially so the increasing capacity is provided. The developed power management was tested in the connection with the real vibration generator raised by stable vibration levels and the dynamic load simulating the real sensor in the main operation stages - sampling and data

  12. Simulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P. G.; Torcellini, P. A.; Crawley, D.

    2008-01-01

    An energy management system (EMS) is a dedicated computer that can be programmed to control all of a building's energy-related systems, including heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water, interior lighting, exterior lighting, on-site power generation, and mechanized systems for shading devices, window actuators, and double facade elements. Recently a new module for simulating an EMS was added to the EnergyPlus whole-building energy simulation program. An essential part of the EMS module is the EnergyPlus Runtime Language (ERL), which is a simple programming language that is used to specify the EMS control algorithms. The new EMS controls and the flexibility of ERL allow EnergyPlus to simulate many novel control strategies that are not possible with the previous generation of building energy simulation programs. This paper surveys the standard controls in EnergyPlus, presents the new EMS features, describes the implementation of the module, and explores some of the possible applications for the new EMS capabilities in EnergyPlus.

  13. Vehicle to grid: electric vehicles as an energy storage solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Rodney; Waite, Nicholas; Wells, Nicole; Kiamilev, Fouad E.; Kempton, Willett M.

    2013-05-01

    With increased focus on intermittent renewable energy sources such as wind turbines and photovoltaics, there comes a rising need for large-scale energy storage. The vehicle to grid (V2G) project seeks to meet this need using electric vehicles, whose high power capacity and existing power electronics make them a promising energy storage solution. This paper will describe a charging system designed by the V2G team that facilitates selective charging and backfeeding by electric vehicles. The system consists of a custom circuit board attached to an embedded linux computer that is installed both in the EVSE (electric vehicle supply equipment) and in the power electronics unit of the vehicle. The boards establish an in-band communication link between the EVSE and the vehicle, giving the vehicle internet connectivity and the ability to make intelligent decisions about when to charge and discharge. This is done while maintaining compliance with existing charging protocols (SAEJ1772, IEC62196) and compatibility with standard "nonintelligent" cars and chargers. Through this system, the vehicles in a test fleet have been able to successfully serve as portable temporary grid storage, which has implications for regulating the electrical grid, providing emergency power, or supplying power to forward military bases.

  14. Space shuttle entry terminal area energy management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A historical account of the development for Shuttle's Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) is presented. A derivation and explanation of logic and equations are provided as a supplement to the well documented guidance computation requirements contained within the official Functional Subsystem Software Requirements (FSSR) published by Rockwell for NASA. The FSSR contains the full set of equations and logic, whereas this document addresses just certain areas for amplification.

  15. Energy efficiency through integrated environmental management.

    PubMed

    Benromdhane, Souad Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Integrated environmental management became an economic necessity after industrial development proved to be unsustainable without consideration of environmental direct and indirect impacts. Energy dependency and air pollution along with climate change grew into major challenges facing developed and developing countries alike. Thus, a new global market structure emerged and changed the way we do trade. The search intensified for alternatives to petroleum. However, scientists, policy makers, and environmental activists agreed to focus on strategic conservation and optimization of energy use. Environmental concerns will remain partially unaddressed with the current pace of consumption because greenhouse gas emissions will continue to rise with economic growth. This paper discusses energy efficiency, steady integration of alternative sources, and increased use of best available technologies. Energy criteria developed for environmental labeling certification are presented. Our intention is to encourage manufacturers and service providers to supply consumers with less polluting and energy-consuming goods and services, inform consumers of the environmental and energy impacts, and thereby instill sustainable and responsible consumption. As several programs were initiated in developed countries, environmental labeling requirements created barriers to many exports manufactured in developing countries, affecting current world trade and putting more pressure on countries to meet those requirements. Defining an institutional and legal framework of environmental labeling is a key challenge in implementing such programs for critical economic sectors like tourism, textiles, and food production where energy needs are the most important aspect to control. A case study of Tunisia and its experience with eco-labeling is presented.

  16. Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing maximizing thermal efficiency and optimizing energy management through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems.

  17. Conical intersections of free energy surfaces in solution: Effect of electron correlation on a protonated Schiff base in methanol solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Toshifumi; Nakano, Katsuhiro; Kato, Shigeki

    2010-08-14

    The minimum energy conical intersection (MECI) optimization method with taking account of the dynamic electron correlation effect [T. Mori and S. Kato, Chem. Phys. Lett. 476, 97 (2009)] is extended to locate the MECI of nonequilibrium free energy surfaces in solution. A multistate electronic perturbation theory is introduced into the nonequilibrium free energy formula, which is defined as a function of solute and solvation coordinates. The analytical free energy gradient and interstate coupling vectors are derived, and are applied to locate MECIs in solution. The present method is applied to study the cis-trans photoisomerization reaction of a protonated Schiff base molecule (PSB3) in methanol (MeOH) solution. It is found that the effect of dynamic electron correlation largely lowers the energy of S{sub 1} state. We also show that the solvation effect strongly stabilizes the MECI obtained by twisting the terminal C=N bond to become accessible in MeOH solution, whereas the conical intersection is found to be unstable in gas phase. The present study indicates that both electron correlation and solvation effects are important in the photoisomerization reaction of PSB3. The effect of counterion is also examined, and seems to be rather small in solution. The structures of free energy surfaces around MECIs are also discussed.

  18. Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, Anna; Hampson, Anne; Hedman, Bruce; Garland, Patti; Bautista, Paul

    2008-12-01

    This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future—as an: environmental solution, significantly reducing CO2 emissions through greater energy efficiency; competitive business solution, increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; local energy solution, deployable throughout the United States; and infrastructure modernization solution, relieving grid congestion and improving energy security.

  19. Manage your energy, not your time.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tony

    2007-10-01

    As the demands of the workplace keep rising, many people respond by putting in ever longer hours, which inevitably leads to burnout that costs both the organization and the employee. Meanwhile, people take for granted what fuels their capacity to work--their energy. Increasing that capacity is the best way to get more done faster and better. Time is a finite resource, but energy is different. It has four wellsprings--the body, emotions, mind, and spirit--and in each, it can be systematically expanded and renewed. In this article, Schwartz, founder of the Energy Project, describes how to establish rituals that will build energy in the four key dimensions. For instance, harnessing the body's ultradian rhythms by taking intermittent breaks restores physical energy. Rejecting the role of a victim and instead viewing events through three hopeful lenses defuses energy-draining negative emotions. Avoiding the constant distractions that technology has introduced increases mental energy. And participating in activities that give you a sense of meaning and purpose boosts the energy of the spirit. The new workday rituals succeed only if leaders support their adoption, but when that happens, the results can be powerful. A group of Wachovia Bank employees who went through an energy management program outperformed a control group on important financial metrics like loans generated, and they reported substantially improved customer relationships, productivity, and personal satisfaction. These findings corroborated anecdotal evidence gathered about the effectiveness of this approach at other companies, including Ernst & Young, Sony, and Deutsche Bank. When organizations invest in all dimensions of their employees' lives, individuals respond by bringing all their energy wholeheartedly to work -and both companies and their people grow in value.

  20. Manage your energy, not your time.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tony

    2007-10-01

    As the demands of the workplace keep rising, many people respond by putting in ever longer hours, which inevitably leads to burnout that costs both the organization and the employee. Meanwhile, people take for granted what fuels their capacity to work--their energy. Increasing that capacity is the best way to get more done faster and better. Time is a finite resource, but energy is different. It has four wellsprings--the body, emotions, mind, and spirit--and in each, it can be systematically expanded and renewed. In this article, Schwartz, founder of the Energy Project, describes how to establish rituals that will build energy in the four key dimensions. For instance, harnessing the body's ultradian rhythms by taking intermittent breaks restores physical energy. Rejecting the role of a victim and instead viewing events through three hopeful lenses defuses energy-draining negative emotions. Avoiding the constant distractions that technology has introduced increases mental energy. And participating in activities that give you a sense of meaning and purpose boosts the energy of the spirit. The new workday rituals succeed only if leaders support their adoption, but when that happens, the results can be powerful. A group of Wachovia Bank employees who went through an energy management program outperformed a control group on important financial metrics like loans generated, and they reported substantially improved customer relationships, productivity, and personal satisfaction. These findings corroborated anecdotal evidence gathered about the effectiveness of this approach at other companies, including Ernst & Young, Sony, and Deutsche Bank. When organizations invest in all dimensions of their employees' lives, individuals respond by bringing all their energy wholeheartedly to work -and both companies and their people grow in value. PMID:17972496

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Moisture Management of High-Walls

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    Moisture management of high-R walls is important to ensure optimal performance. This case study, developed by Building America team Building Science Corporation, focuses on how eight high-R walls handle the three main sources of moisture—construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leaks.

  2. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Halilovic, Jenana; Christensen, Cinda L; Nguyen, Hien H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues. PMID:24971015

  3. Managing dyslipidemia in HIV/AIDS patients: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Nazik Elmalaika OS; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a chronic disease associated with dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. In addition, the administration of combination antiretroviral therapy is associated with an increase in the incidence of metabolic risk factors (insulin resistance, lipoatrophy, dyslipidemia, and abnormalities of fat distribution in HIV patients). HIV dyslipidemia is a common problem, and associated with an increase in incidence of cardiovascular disease. Further challenges in the management of HIV dyslipidemia are the presence of diabetes and metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hypothyroidism, chronic kidney disease, the risk of diabetes associated with statin administration, age and ethnicity, and early menopause in females. Dyslipidemia in patients with HIV is different from the normal population, due to the fact that HIV increases insulin resistance and HIV treatment not only may induce dyslipidemia but also may interact with lipid-lowering medication. The use of all statins (apart from simvastatin and lovastatin) is safe and effective in HIV dyslipidemia, and the addition of ezetimibe, fenofibrate, fish oil, and niacin can be used in statin-unresponsive HIV dyslipidemia. The management of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risks associated with HIV is complex, and a certain number of patients may require management in specialist clinics run by specialist physicians in lipid disorders. Future research is needed to address best strategies in the management of hyperlipidemia with HIV infection. PMID:25565897

  4. Classroom Management: Seating Solutions [and] Hooray for Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novelli, Joan; Edgar, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Two articles present suggestions for enhancing classroom management in creative ways. The first article describes how to use flexible seating arrangements to encourage cooperation, friendship, and community. The second article discusses how to encourage and work with classroom volunteers from the community. (SM)

  5. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, R E

    1980-01-01

    The Office of the Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Environmental Technology has established the OTEC Program Management Office to be responsible for the ANL-assigned tasks of the OTEC Program under DOE's Chicago Operations and Regional Office (DOE/CORO). The ANL OTEC Program Management Plan is essentially a management-by-objective plan. The principal objective of the program is to provide lead technical support to CORO in its capacity as manager of the DOE power-system program. The Argonne OTEC Program is divided into three components: the first deals with development of heat exchangers and other components of OTEC power systems, the second with development of biofouling counter-measures and corrosion-resistant materials for these components in seawater service, and the third with environmental and climatic impacts of OTEC power-system operation. The essential points of the Management Plan are summarized, and the OTEC Program is described. The organization of the OTEC Program at ANL is described including the functions, responsibilities, and authorities of the organizational groupings. The system and policies necessary for the support and control functions within the organization are discussed. These functions cross organizational lines, in that they are common to all of the organization groups. Also included are requirements for internal and external reports.

  6. E-Learning Barriers and Solutions to Knowledge Management and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oye, Nathaniel David; Salleh, Mazleena

    2013-01-01

    This paper present a systematic overview of barriers and solutions of e-learning in knowledge management (KM) and knowledge transfer (KT) with more focus on organizations. The paper also discusses KT in organizational settings and KT in the field of e-learning. Here, an e-learning initiative shows adaptive solutions to overcome knowledge transfer…

  7. Security issues at the Department of Energy and records management

    SciTech Connect

    NUSBAUM,ANNA W.

    2000-03-13

    In order to discuss the connection between security issues within the Department of Energy and records management, the author covers a bit of security history and talks about what she calls ``the Amazing Project''. Initiated in late May 1999, it was to be a tri-laboratory (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of Livermore, California, Los Alamos National Laboratory of Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California) project. The team that formed was tasked to develop the best set of security solutions that still enabled weapon mission work to get done and the security solutions were to be the same set for everyone. The amazing project was called ''The Integrated Security Management Project'', or ''ISecM' for short. She'll describe why she thinks this project was so amazing and what it accomplished. There's a bit of sad news about the project, but then she'll move onto discuss what was learned at Sandia as a result of the project and what they're currently doing in records management.

  8. Spatial structures in microtubular solutions requiring a sustained energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabony, J.; Job, D.

    1990-08-01

    MICROTUBULES are believed to be the principal organizers of the cell interior1. Cells respond to a variety of stimuli by modifying the spatial distribution of the microtubules. These effects are central to cell division and morphogenesis2, and embryo development3. During embryo development, macroscopic patterns are frequently observed3. Here we report that microtubular solutions spontaneously form alternating white and dark stripes about 1 mm wide and 1 cm long. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements show that in each segment the microtubules are aligned obliquely to the direction of the stripe, and that the white and dark stripes differ in having mutually orthogonal orientations. The formation of these structures requires an initial reservoir of organic phosphate. Phosphorus NMR measurements show that the process is accompanied by the energy-liberating conversion of organic to inorganic phosphate. These observations, together with similarities to the dissipative spatial structure formed by the Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction4-6, provide strong evidence that the observed structures are energy-dissipative in nature. Dissipative structures are thought to be critical to the appearence of complex living organisms7,8. Our results strongly suggest that microtubules are capable of forming such structures. Microtubular dissipative structures may occur during mitosis and embryo morphogenesis.

  9. Bioenergy in Energy Transformation and Climate Management

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Steven K.; Kriegler, Elmar; Bibas, Ruben; Calvin, Katherine V.; Popp, Alexander; van Vuuren, Detlef; Weyant, John

    2014-04-01

    Unlike fossil fuels, biomass is a renewable resource that can sequester carbon during growth, be converted to energy, and then re-grown. Biomass is also a flexible fuel that can service many end-uses. This paper explores the importance of bioenergy to potential future energy transformation and climate change management. Using a model comparison of fifteen models, we characterize and analyze future dependence on, and the value of, bioenergy in achieving potential long-run climate objectives—reducing radiative forcing to 3.7 and 2.8 W/m2 in 2100 (approximately 550 and 450 ppm carbon dioxide equivalent atmospheric concentrations). Model scenarios project, by 2050, bioenergy growth of 2 to 10% per annum reaching 5 to 35 percent of global primary energy, and by 2100, bioenergy becoming 15 to 50 percent of global primary energy. Non-OECD regions are projected to be the dominant suppliers of biomass, as well as consumers, with up to 35 percent of regional electricity from biopower by 2050, and up to 70 percent of regional liquid fuels from biofuels by 2050. Bioenergy is found to be valuable to many models with significant implications for mitigation costs and world consumption. The availability of bioenergy, in particular biomass with carbon dioxide capture and storage (BECCS), notably affects the cost-effective global emissions trajectory for climate management by accommodating prolonged near-term use of fossil fuels. We also find that models cost-effectively trade-off land carbon and nitrous oxide emissions for the long-run climate change management benefits of bioenergy. Overall, further evaluation of the viability of global large-scale bioenergy is merited.

  10. Urban energy management: a course on the administration of public energy programs. An instructor's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelbaum, Dr., Len; Olsen, Dr., Marvin; Hyman, Dr., Barry; Sheridan, Mimi; Dahlberg, Judy; O'Brien, Jeremy

    1980-12-01

    The course provides local government administrators, staff, and students with the background knowledge to deal with a broad range of energy management concerns and is not to train technical energy conservation specialists. Section II contains the Instructor's Guide and Section III provides the Student Outlines and Handouts on the following subjects: The Energy Problem; National Energy Politics and Programs; State and Local Energy Programs; Techniques of Energy Planning; Techniques of Energy Conservation; Techniques of Renewable Energy Production; Strategies for Voluntary Energy Management; Strategies for Finan. Energy Management; and Strategies for Mandatory Energy Management. (MCW)

  11. Municipal waste management and energy recovery in an Italian region.

    PubMed

    Cucchiella, Federica; D'Adamo, Idiano; Gastaldi, Massimo

    2012-12-01

    Diverting waste from landfill is one of the basic priorities on improving the use of resources and reducing the environmental impacts of waste management. In order to achieve this goal it is necessary to limit the amount of materials sent to final disposal and promote energy recovery. In Italy the use of recycling is registering a growing trend but the recourse to landfill is still too high with respect to European Commission targets. The aim of the paper was to analyse the financial and economic benefits that energy recovery could produce by diverting waste from landfills in an Italian region, as landfilling cannot be a solution in the long term because of its finite capacity and for various other ecological reasons. A sensitivity analysis on the critical variables of this plan and a risk analysis are also provided.

  12. Bio-energy Recovery Systems for brewery wastewater management

    SciTech Connect

    Beers, A.R.

    1995-11-01

    Anheuser-Busch has installed anaerobic wastewater pretreatment systems or {open_quotes}Bio-Energy Recovery Systems{close_quotes} (BERS) at six breweries in the U.S. The primary purpose of BERS is the removal of soluble organic matter (grain liquor, waste beer, cleaning solutions) from wastewater in order to reduce the impact on downstream treatment works, either privately or publicly held. A byproduct of the anaerobic process is biogas (75% methane) which is used in the plants` boilers to create steam. A history of Anheuser-Busch`s wastewater management philosophy is discussed including the adoption and refinement of various treatment methods. A case study is presented, demonstrating by way of an energy balance the savings realized by BERS installation. Finally, the environmental benefits of these projects are displayed in a life cycle analysis.

  13. New directions in cardiac arrhythmia management: present challenges and future solutions.

    PubMed

    Nattel, Stanley; Andrade, Jason; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Lena; Dyrda, Katia; Mondesert, Blandine; Khairy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a major contributor to population morbidity and mortality. Enormous advances in arrhythmia management have occurred over the 60 years since the founding of the Montreal Heart Institute, but important challenges remain. The purpose of this article is to identify the areas of cardiac arrhythmia therapy that need improvement and to discuss the evolving approaches that promise solutions. Challenges in diagnosis, detection, and risk-stratification include difficulties in separating benign from high-risk syncope and pinpointing the underlying causes, the detection of silent atrial fibrillation in patients at risk of stroke, and inadequate identification of sudden-death risk. Implantable devices are limited by the need for battery and device replacements, device complications like infection and dysfunction, and lead complications like fracture, infection, or displacement. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy, although widely used, is plagued by a very limited range of available agents, supply issues, insufficient efficacy, and significant adverse effect risk. Health economic concerns include the high cost of new technologies, challenges in establishing cost effectiveness, and restrictive practices of government or third-party payers. Major improvements in arrhythmia management can be expected from new discoveries and technological developments in genetics, innovative diagnostic tools for arrhythmia monitoring, imaging and analysis, new approaches to antiarrhythmic drug development, biological therapies, and continuing improvement in implantable device technology like further miniaturization, leadless technology, and use of novel energy sources. As exciting as the developments in arrhythmia management have been in the past, we can look forward to exponential improvement in our ability to manage arrhythmia patients in the near future.

  14. Optimal energy management in grain drying.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, S

    1986-01-01

    Grain drying is very specific to the geographic location, kind of drying system, and the type of grain. Under a given set of conditions, the optimal system can be selected based on careful evaluation. However, a good choice of drying systems, procedures, and management practices can be made from the information already available. The review of several grain-drying procedures has provided some insight in making a quick evaluation of the process and arriving at the most suitable system for a particular application. Despite extensive research efforts, the present knowledge of grain drying is yet insufficient to optimally design each drying process with respect to capacity, quality, and energy requirement. There is a need for incorporating grain and air parameters more accurately. It is also important to develop comprehensive drying simulation models to encompass agronomic practices, such as planting and harvesting. Recent efforts indicate a strong influence of planting and harvesting strategies on optimal drying and storage system selection. Results of the varietal trials at Ohio State University indicate that it is now possible to select midseason varieties, which dry down rapidly, without sacrificing yield. Also, low moisture at harvest is important to the energy management process because it affects total drying time and energy required. It is also important from a quality standpoint because kernel damage increases rapidly at harvesting moisture levels above 25%. The trend in grain-dryer design has shifted from focusing on drying capacity and operation reliability to energy consumption. The development in design of energy efficient continuous-flow dryers has been significant. Multistage concurrentflow dryers are excellent examples. Various aspects of dryer staging for efficient operation and control are yet to be determined. Recirculation of the exhaust air is a proven method of improving energy efficiency. Likewise, in batch-in-bin systems, stirring and

  15. Optimal energy management in grain drying.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, S

    1986-01-01

    Grain drying is very specific to the geographic location, kind of drying system, and the type of grain. Under a given set of conditions, the optimal system can be selected based on careful evaluation. However, a good choice of drying systems, procedures, and management practices can be made from the information already available. The review of several grain-drying procedures has provided some insight in making a quick evaluation of the process and arriving at the most suitable system for a particular application. Despite extensive research efforts, the present knowledge of grain drying is yet insufficient to optimally design each drying process with respect to capacity, quality, and energy requirement. There is a need for incorporating grain and air parameters more accurately. It is also important to develop comprehensive drying simulation models to encompass agronomic practices, such as planting and harvesting. Recent efforts indicate a strong influence of planting and harvesting strategies on optimal drying and storage system selection. Results of the varietal trials at Ohio State University indicate that it is now possible to select midseason varieties, which dry down rapidly, without sacrificing yield. Also, low moisture at harvest is important to the energy management process because it affects total drying time and energy required. It is also important from a quality standpoint because kernel damage increases rapidly at harvesting moisture levels above 25%. The trend in grain-dryer design has shifted from focusing on drying capacity and operation reliability to energy consumption. The development in design of energy efficient continuous-flow dryers has been significant. Multistage concurrentflow dryers are excellent examples. Various aspects of dryer staging for efficient operation and control are yet to be determined. Recirculation of the exhaust air is a proven method of improving energy efficiency. Likewise, in batch-in-bin systems, stirring and

  16. Automated lettuce nutrient solution management using an array of ion-selective electrodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated sensing and control of macronutrients in hydroponic solutions would allow more efficient management of nutrients for crop growth in closed systems. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a computer-controlled nutrient management system with an array of ion-selective electro...

  17. The Need for a Strategic Foundation for Digital Learning and Knowledge Management Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asgarkhani, Mehdi

    2004-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the importance of a strategic foundation when digital learning or knowledge management (KM) solutions are planned and developed. It looks at some key issues of e-Learning and knowledge management (KM) through discussing the various stages (technologies) and potential benefits of e-Learning; the state of the e-Learning…

  18. Provenance In Sensor Data Management: A Cohesive, Independent Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, Zachary P; Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-01-01

    In today's information-driven workplaces, data is constantly undergoing transformations and being moved around. The typical business-as-usual approach is to use email attachments, shared network locations, databases, and now, the cloud. More often than not, there are multiple versions of the data sitting in different locations and users of this data are confounded by the lack of metadata describing its provenance, or in other words, its lineage. Our project is aimed to solve this issue in the context of sensor data. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Building Technologies Research and Integration Center has reconfigurable commercial buildings deployed on the Flexible Research Platforms (FRPs). These FRPs are instrumented with a large number of sensors which measure a number of variables such as HVAC efficiency, relative humidity, and temperature gradients across doors, windows, and walls. Sub-minute resolution data from hundreds of channels is acquired. This sensor data, traditionally, was saved to a shared network location which was accessible to a number of scientists for performing complicated simulation and analysis tasks. The sensor data also participates in elaborate quality assurance exercises as a result of inherent faults. Sometimes, faults are induced to observe building behavior. It became apparent that proper scientific controls required not just managing the data acquisition and delivery, but to also manage the metadata associated with temporal subsets of the sensor data. We built a system named ProvDMS, or Provenance Data Management System for the FRPs, which would both allow researchers to retrieve data of interest as well as trace data lineage. This provides researchers a one-stop shop for comprehensive views of various data transformation allowing researchers to effectively trace their data to its source so that experiments, and derivations of experiments, may be reused and reproduced without much overhead of the repeatability of experiments that

  19. Operational management of offshore energy assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolios, A. J.; Martinez Luengo, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy assets and especially those deployed offshore are subject to a variety of harsh operational and environmental conditions which lead to deterioration of their performance and structural capacity over time. The aim of reduction of CAPEX in new installations shifts focus to operational management to monitor and assess performance of critical assets ensuring their fitness for service throughout their service life and also to provide appropriate and effective information towards requalification or other end of life scenarios, optimizing the OPEX. Over the last decades, the offshore oil & gas industry has developed and applied various approaches in operational management of assets through Structural Health and Condition Monitoring (SHM/CM) systems which can be, at a certain level, transferable to offshore renewable installations. This paper aims to highlight the key differences between offshore oil & gas and renewable energy assets from a structural integrity and reliability perspective, provide a comprehensive overview of different approaches that are available and applicable, and distinguish the benefits of such systems in the efficient operation of offshore energy assets.

  20. EnergySolution's Clive Disposal Facility Operational Research Model - 13475

    SciTech Connect

    Nissley, Paul; Berry, Joanne

    2013-07-01

    EnergySolutions owns and operates a licensed, commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in Clive, Utah. The Clive site receives low-level radioactive waste from various locations within the United States via bulk truck, containerised truck, enclosed truck, bulk rail-cars, rail boxcars, and rail inter-modals. Waste packages are unloaded, characterized, processed, and disposed of at the Clive site. Examples of low-level radioactive waste arriving at Clive include, but are not limited to, contaminated soil/debris, spent nuclear power plant components, and medical waste. Generators of low-level radioactive waste typically include nuclear power plants, hospitals, national laboratories, and various United States government operated waste sites. Over the past few years, poor economic conditions have significantly reduced the number of shipments to Clive. With less revenue coming in from processing shipments, Clive needed to keep its expenses down if it was going to maintain past levels of profitability. The Operational Research group of EnergySolutions were asked to develop a simulation model to help identify any improvement opportunities that would increase overall operating efficiency and reduce costs at the Clive Facility. The Clive operations research model simulates the receipt, movement, and processing requirements of shipments arriving at the facility. The model includes shipment schedules, processing times of various waste types, labor requirements, shift schedules, and site equipment availability. The Clive operations research model has been developed using the WITNESS{sup TM} process simulation software, which is developed by the Lanner Group. The major goals of this project were to: - identify processing bottlenecks that could reduce the turnaround time from shipment arrival to disposal; - evaluate the use (or idle time) of labor and equipment; - project future operational requirements under different forecasted scenarios. By identifying

  1. Optimal management of night eating syndrome: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Kucukgoncu, Suat; Midura, Margaretta; Tek, Cenk

    2015-01-01

    Night Eating Syndrome (NES) is a unique disorder characterized by a delayed pattern of food intake in which recurrent episodes of nocturnal eating and/or excessive food consumption occur after the evening meal. NES is a clinically important disorder due to its relationship to obesity, its association with other psychiatric disorders, and problems concerning sleep. However, NES often goes unrecognized by both health professionals and patients. The lack of knowledge regarding NES in clinical settings may lead to inadequate diagnoses and inappropriate treatment approaches. Therefore, the proper diagnosis of NES is the most important issue when identifying NES and providing treatment for this disorder. Clinical assessment tools such as the Night Eating Questionnaire may help health professionals working with populations vulnerable to NES. Although NES treatment studies are still in their infancy, antidepressant treatments and psychological therapies can be used for optimal management of patients with NES. Other treatment options such as melatonergic medications, light therapy, and the anticonvulsant topiramate also hold promise as future treatment options. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of NES, including its diagnosis, comorbidities, and treatment approaches. Possible challenges addressing patients with NES and management options are also discussed.

  2. Dental management in patients with hypertension: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Southerland, Janet H; Gill, Danielle G; Gangula, Pandu R; Halpern, Leslie R; Cardona, Cesar Y; Mouton, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a chronic illness affecting more than a billion people worldwide. The high prevalence of the disease among the American population is concerning and must be considered when treating dental patients. Its lack of symptoms until more serious problems occur makes the disease deadly. Dental practitioners can often be on the frontlines of prevention of hypertension by evaluating preoperative blood pressure readings, performing risk assessments, and knowing when to consider medical consultation of a hypertensive patient in a dental setting. In addition, routine follow-up appointments and patients seen on an emergent basis, who may otherwise not be seen routinely, allow the oral health provider an opportunity to diagnose and refer for any unknown disease. It is imperative to understand the risk factors that may predispose patients to hypertension and to be able to educate them about their condition. Most importantly, the oral health care provider is in a pivotal position to play an active role in the management of patients presenting with a history of hypertension because many antihypertensive agents interact with pharmacologic agents used in the dental practice. The purpose of this review is to provide strategies for managing and preventing complications when treating the patient with hypertension who presents to the dental office. PMID:27799823

  3. Risk management and lessons learned solutions for satellite product assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrère, Jean-Luc

    2004-08-01

    The historic trend of the space industry towards lower cost programmes and more generally a better economic efficiency raises a difficult question to the quality assurance community: how to achieve the same—or better—mission success rate while drastically reducing the cost of programmes, hence the cost and level of quality assurance activities. EADS Astrium Earth Observation and Science (France) Business Unit have experimented Risk Management and Lessons Learned on their satellite programmes to achieve this goal. Risk analysis and management are deployed from the programme proposal phase through the development and operations phases. Results of the analysis and the corresponding risk mitigation actions are used to tailor the product assurance programme and activities. Lessons learned have been deployed as a systematic process to collect positive and negative experience from past and on-going programmes and feed them into new programmes. Monitoring and justification of their implementation in programmes is done under supervision from the BU quality assurance function. Control of the system is ensured by the company internal review system. Deployment of these methods has shown that the quality assurance function becomes more integrated in the programme team and development process and that its tasks gain focus and efficiency while minimising the risks associated with new space programmes.

  4. Optimal management of night eating syndrome: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kucukgoncu, Suat; Midura, Margaretta; Tek, Cenk

    2015-01-01

    Night Eating Syndrome (NES) is a unique disorder characterized by a delayed pattern of food intake in which recurrent episodes of nocturnal eating and/or excessive food consumption occur after the evening meal. NES is a clinically important disorder due to its relationship to obesity, its association with other psychiatric disorders, and problems concerning sleep. However, NES often goes unrecognized by both health professionals and patients. The lack of knowledge regarding NES in clinical settings may lead to inadequate diagnoses and inappropriate treatment approaches. Therefore, the proper diagnosis of NES is the most important issue when identifying NES and providing treatment for this disorder. Clinical assessment tools such as the Night Eating Questionnaire may help health professionals working with populations vulnerable to NES. Although NES treatment studies are still in their infancy, antidepressant treatments and psychological therapies can be used for optimal management of patients with NES. Other treatment options such as melatonergic medications, light therapy, and the anticonvulsant topiramate also hold promise as future treatment options. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of NES, including its diagnosis, comorbidities, and treatment approaches. Possible challenges addressing patients with NES and management options are also discussed. PMID:25834450

  5. Computer configuration for Ontario Hydro's new Energy Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Barrie, D.; Hill, D.S.; Yuen, A.

    1989-08-01

    In 1985, Ontario Hydro decided to build a new System Control Centre and install a new Energy Management System. This decision was primarily due to obsolescence, space restrictions and other site considerations rather than dissatisfaction with the existing Energy Management System. Indeed, the existing Energy Management System had several features (eg, the suite of custom-developed application programs) which were considered so valuable to the System Operators that they should be retained in the new Energy Management System. Nevertheless, because new hardware was being installed, it provided an opportunity to review the standards of performance demanded of the Energy Management System and technological advances that could be utilized to best effect.

  6. Appendix E - GPRA06 federal energy management program documentation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The mission of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to promote energy security, environmental stewardship and cost reduction through energy efficiency and water conservation, the use of distributed and renewable energy, and sound utility management decisions at Federal sites. [FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request, p. 475

  7. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: REMOVAL OF PHENOL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS USING HIGH ENERGY ELECTRON BEAM IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions with high-energy electrons results in the formation of the aqueous electron, hydrogen radical, H-, and the hydroxyl radical, OH-. These reactive transient species initiate chemical reactions capable of destroying organic compounds in aqueous solut...

  8. Xcel Energy implements an alarm management strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, J.; Abreu, G.

    2007-11-15

    Not so long ago, Xcel Energy's Pawnee Station, a 505 MW coal-fired generating station in Brush, Colorado, USA was commonly generating 300 to 400 alarms per 8-hour shift. The article describes how the alarm system was revised and improved by tackling alarm dead-bands, and rationalising alarms for routine events. Operators are trained to understand the functions of alarm management components, their use and response, and obtain feedback. Today the power station reports about one alarm per hour. 3 photos.

  9. Regulatory and technical trends driving environmental information management solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perrell, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Four environmental policy trends are dramatically changing the way society protects the environment. They are: risk-based and economic-based decision making; devolution of environmental authority; community participation; and corporate environmental accountability. These trends are reflected in recent legislative and regulatory initiatives, including the Comprehensive Emergency Response and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) amendment bills, EPA`s expanded Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) reporting requirements, Regulatory Reform bills, administrative reform programs such as EPA`s Common Sense Initiative, broadened permit trading programs, and facility-wide permits. Environmental regulation is maturing into a new era of environmental management that is decentralized, market-driven, and performance-based. Moreover, these policy trends expand the accountability of responsible parties beyond government enforcement to a broad group of stakeholders.

  10. Managing nut-induced anaphylaxis: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Jeanne M; Järvinen, Kirsi M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of peanut and tree nut allergy in the USA has increased, especially in the pediatric population. Nut allergy remains the leading cause of fatal anaphylactic reactions. Management of anaphylaxis includes not only treatment of symptoms during a reaction, but strict dietary avoidance and education on potential situations, which may place the patient at high risk for accidental exposure. Cross-reactivity between various nuts along with various cross-contamination sources should be discussed with all nut-allergic individuals. Exciting research continues to emerge on other potential treatments for patients allergic to nuts, including allergen immunotherapy. Results of such interventions have been encouraging, though further studies are needed regarding safety and long-term outcomes before these can be applied to clinical practice.

  11. Managing nut-induced anaphylaxis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lomas, Jeanne M; Järvinen, Kirsi M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of peanut and tree nut allergy in the USA has increased, especially in the pediatric population. Nut allergy remains the leading cause of fatal anaphylactic reactions. Management of anaphylaxis includes not only treatment of symptoms during a reaction, but strict dietary avoidance and education on potential situations, which may place the patient at high risk for accidental exposure. Cross-reactivity between various nuts along with various cross-contamination sources should be discussed with all nut-allergic individuals. Exciting research continues to emerge on other potential treatments for patients allergic to nuts, including allergen immunotherapy. Results of such interventions have been encouraging, though further studies are needed regarding safety and long-term outcomes before these can be applied to clinical practice. PMID:26604803

  12. Managing drug-resistant epilepsy: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Dalic, Linda; Cook, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ~20%–30% of people with epilepsy remain refractory to treatment and are said to have drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). This multifaceted condition comprises intractable seizures, neurobiochemical changes, cognitive decline, and psychosocial dysfunction. An ongoing challenge to both researchers and clinicians alike, DRE management is complicated by the heterogeneity among this patient group. The underlying mechanism of DRE is not completely understood. Many hypotheses exist, and relate to both the intrinsic characteristics of the particular epilepsy (associated syndrome/lesion, initial response to AED, and the number and type of seizures prior to diagnosis) and other pharmacological mechanisms of resistance. The four current hypotheses behind pharmacological resistance are the “transporter”, “target”, “network”, and “intrinsic severity” hypotheses, and these are reviewed in this paper. Of equal challenge is managing patients with DRE, and this requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, pharmacists, dietitians, and specialist nurses. Attention to comorbid psychiatric and other diseases is paramount, given the higher prevalence in this cohort and associated poorer health outcomes. Treatment options need to consider the economic burden to the patient and the likelihood of AED compliance and tolerability. Most importantly, higher mortality rates, due to comorbidities, suicide, and sudden death, emphasize the importance of seizure control in reducing this risk. Overall, resective surgery offers the best rates of seizure control. It is not an option for all patients, and there is often a significant delay in referring to epilepsy surgery centers. Optimization of AEDs, identification and treatment of comorbidities, patient education to promote adherence to treatment, and avoidance of triggers should be periodically performed until further

  13. Energy Conservation Manual for School Food Service Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messersmith, Ann M.; Wheeler, George; Rousso, Victoria

    Energy cost management is important in all school food service operations, particularly at times when rising energy costs threaten budgets. This document is designed as a reference manual on energy and provides information about monitoring energy use and developing energy improvement and conservation plans. The manual offers energy conservation…

  14. Energy management in supermarkets: chain's FMS saves energy, cuts spoilage

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, F.

    1985-05-06

    A facility management system (FMS) designed specifically for supermarkets has achieved a 10 to 15% energy savings and reduced food spoilage at the 19-store chain of Angelo's Supermarkets in southeast Massachusetts. Completed installations at six of the stores averaged $30,000, with an estimated payback of under two years. Installations in the remaining stores will be complete within a five-year period. The chain chose Con-Trol's FMS 2000 because the vendor agreed to help develop customized software after difficulties arose with earlier installations of IBM equipment. Savings come primarily from load management and an alarm system that signals personnel of equipment problems. Both computer and personnel monitoring is continuous.

  15. INL Site Executable Plan for Energy and Transportation Fuels Management

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest L. Fossum

    2008-11-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  16. Seismic risk management solution for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Justin; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear power plants should safely operate during normal operations and maintain core-cooling capabilities during off-normal events, including external hazards (such as flooding and earthquakes). Management of external hazards to expectable levels of risk is critical to maintaining nuclear facility and nuclear power plant safety. Seismic risk is determined by convolving the seismic hazard with seismic fragilities (capacity of systems, structures, and components). Seismic isolation (SI) is one protective measure showing promise to minimize seismic risk. Current SI designs (used in commercial industry) reduce horizontal earthquake loads and protect critical infrastructure from the potentially destructive effects of large earthquakes. The benefit of SI application in the nuclear industry is being recognized and SI systems have been proposed in American Society of Civil Engineer Standard 4, ASCE-4, to be released in the winter of 2014, for light water reactors facilities using commercially available technology. The intent of ASCE-4 is to provide criteria for seismic analysis of safety related nuclear structures such that the responses to design basis seismic events, computed in accordance with this standard, will have a small likelihood of being exceeded. The U.S. nuclear industry has not implemented SI to date; a seismic isolation gap analysis meeting was convened on August 19, 2014, to determine progress on implementing SI in the U.S. nuclear industry. The meeting focused on the systems and components that could benefit from SI. As a result, this article highlights the gaps identified at this meeting.

  17. Construction materials as a waste management solution for cellulose sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Modolo, R.; Rodrigues, M.; Coelho, I.

    2011-02-15

    Sustainable waste management system for effluents treatment sludge has been a pressing issue for pulp and paper sector. Recycling is always recommended in terms of environmental sustainability. Following an approach of waste valorisation, this work aims to demonstrate the technical viability of producing fiber-cement roof sheets incorporating cellulose primary sludge generated on paper and pulp mills. From the results obtained with preliminary studies it was possible to verify the possibility of producing fiber-cement sheets by replacing 25% of the conventional used virgin long fiber by primary effluent treatment cellulose sludge. This amount of incorporation was tested on an industrial scale. Environmental parameters related to water and waste, as well as tests for checking the quality of the final product was performed. These control parameters involved total solids in suspension, dissolved salts, chlorides, sulphates, COD, metals content. In the product, parameters like moisture, density and strength were controlled. The results showed that it is possible to replace the virgin long fibers pulp by primary sludge without impacts in final product characteristics and on the environment. This work ensures the elimination of significant waste amounts, which are nowadays sent to landfill, as well as reduces costs associated with the standard raw materials use in the fiber-cement industrial sector.

  18. Privacy Management and Networked PPD Systems - Challenges Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Pharow, Peter; Petersen, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    Modern personal portable health devices (PPDs) become increasingly part of a larger, inhomogeneous information system. Information collected by sensors are stored and processed in global clouds. Services are often free of charge, but at the same time service providers' business model is based on the disclosure of users' intimate health information. Health data processed in PPD networks is not regulated by health care specific legislation. In PPD networks, there is no guarantee that stakeholders share same ethical principles with the user. Often service providers have own security and privacy policies and they rarely offer to the user possibilities to define own, or adapt existing privacy policies. This all raises huge ethical and privacy concerns. In this paper, the authors have analyzed privacy challenges in PPD networks from users' viewpoint using system modeling method and propose the principle "Personal Health Data under Personal Control" must generally be accepted at global level. Among possible implementation of this principle, the authors propose encryption, computer understandable privacy policies, and privacy labels or trust based privacy management methods. The latter can be realized using infrastructural trust calculation and monitoring service. A first step is to require the protection of personal health information and the principle proposed being internationally mandatory. This requires both regulatory and standardization activities, and the availability of open and certified software application which all service providers can implement. One of those applications should be the independent Trust verifier. PMID:25980881

  19. Privacy Management and Networked PPD Systems - Challenges Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Pharow, Peter; Petersen, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    Modern personal portable health devices (PPDs) become increasingly part of a larger, inhomogeneous information system. Information collected by sensors are stored and processed in global clouds. Services are often free of charge, but at the same time service providers' business model is based on the disclosure of users' intimate health information. Health data processed in PPD networks is not regulated by health care specific legislation. In PPD networks, there is no guarantee that stakeholders share same ethical principles with the user. Often service providers have own security and privacy policies and they rarely offer to the user possibilities to define own, or adapt existing privacy policies. This all raises huge ethical and privacy concerns. In this paper, the authors have analyzed privacy challenges in PPD networks from users' viewpoint using system modeling method and propose the principle "Personal Health Data under Personal Control" must generally be accepted at global level. Among possible implementation of this principle, the authors propose encryption, computer understandable privacy policies, and privacy labels or trust based privacy management methods. The latter can be realized using infrastructural trust calculation and monitoring service. A first step is to require the protection of personal health information and the principle proposed being internationally mandatory. This requires both regulatory and standardization activities, and the availability of open and certified software application which all service providers can implement. One of those applications should be the independent Trust verifier.

  20. Seismic risk management solution for nuclear power plants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coleman, Justin; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear power plants should safely operate during normal operations and maintain core-cooling capabilities during off-normal events, including external hazards (such as flooding and earthquakes). Management of external hazards to expectable levels of risk is critical to maintaining nuclear facility and nuclear power plant safety. Seismic risk is determined by convolving the seismic hazard with seismic fragilities (capacity of systems, structures, and components). Seismic isolation (SI) is one protective measure showing promise to minimize seismic risk. Current SI designs (used in commercial industry) reduce horizontal earthquake loads and protect critical infrastructure from the potentially destructive effects of large earthquakes. The benefitmore » of SI application in the nuclear industry is being recognized and SI systems have been proposed in American Society of Civil Engineer Standard 4, ASCE-4, to be released in the winter of 2014, for light water reactors facilities using commercially available technology. The intent of ASCE-4 is to provide criteria for seismic analysis of safety related nuclear structures such that the responses to design basis seismic events, computed in accordance with this standard, will have a small likelihood of being exceeded. The U.S. nuclear industry has not implemented SI to date; a seismic isolation gap analysis meeting was convened on August 19, 2014, to determine progress on implementing SI in the U.S. nuclear industry. The meeting focused on the systems and components that could benefit from SI. As a result, this article highlights the gaps identified at this meeting.« less

  1. Battery Monitoring and Electrical Energy Management. Precondition for future vehicle electric power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Eberhard; Richter, Gerolf

    New vehicle electric systems are promoted by the needs of fuel economy and ecology as well as by new functions for the improvement of safety and comfort, reliability, and the availability of the vehicle. Electrically controlled and powered systems for braking, steering and stabilisation need a reliable supply of electrical energy. The planned generation of electrical energy (only when it is economically beneficial meaningful), an adequate storage, and thrifty energy housekeeping with an intelligent integration of the battery as the storage medium into the overall concept of the vehicle Energy Management, and early detection of possible restrictions of reliability by Battery Monitoring allows for actions by the Energy Management well in advance, while the driver need not be involved at all. To meet today's requirements for Battery Monitoring and Energy Management, solutions have been developed for series vehicles launched in years 2001-2003, operating at the 14 V level.

  2. Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    SciTech Connect

    Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

    2007-01-10

    need business model and an independent energy aggregator-business model. The approach of developing two group models of DER energy participation in the market is unique. The Detroit Edison (DECo, Utility)-led team includes: DTE Energy Technologies (Dtech, DER provider), Electrical Distribution Design (EDD, Virginia Tech company supporting EPRI’s Distribution Engineering Workstation, DEW), Systems Integration Specialists Company (SISCO, economic scheduling and real-time protocol integrator), and OSIsoft (PI software system for managing real-time information). This team is focused on developing the application engineering, including software systems necessary for DER’s integration, control and sale into the market place. Phase II Highlights Installed and tested an ICCP link with SSL (security) between DECo, the utility, and DTE Energy Technologies (DTECH), the aggregator, making DER data available to the utility for both monitoring and control. Installed and tested PI process book with circuit & DER operational models for DECo SOC/ROC operator’s use for monitoring of both utility circuit and customer DER parameters. The PI Process Book models also included DER control for the DECo SOC/ROC operators, which was tested and demonstrated control. The DER Tagging and Operating Procedures were developed, which allowed that control to be done in a safe manner, were modified for required MOC/MISO notification procedures. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) was modified to include temperature normalized load research statistics, using a 30 hour day-ahead weather feed. This allowed day-ahead forecasting of the customer load profile and the entire circuit to determine overload and low voltage problems. This forecast at the point of common coupling was passed to DTech DR SOC for use in their economic dispatch algorithm. Standard Work Instructions were developed for DER notification, sale, and operation into the MISO market. A software mechanism consisting of a suite

  3. Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Federal Government, as the nation's largest energy consumer, has a tremendous opportunity and acknowledged responsibility to lead by example. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) plays a critical role in this effort. FEMP facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of services across a variety of program areas.

  4. Using Open Plan with integrated Xbase applications for effective project management solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Freier, K.D.; Hirschi, E.J.

    1994-04-01

    Open Plan`s open architecture allows the user many advantages that are not available from other project management software. One of these advantages is its ability to interface with various database management systems, thereby allowing the user to develop a project management system tailored to their specific needs. This open architecture offers maximum flexability to the user to personalize reports, screens, data structures, and develop customized management systems. Using Xbase, applications can be developed for every facet of a complete project management system including baseline development, performance measurement, reporting, and analysis. These applications can range from simple routines such as user-defined status worksheets, milestone logs and other reports, to complex cost,and schedule control systems. The combined power of Xbase and Open Plan can be used to produce effective project management solutions. Customized applications are easily obtainable allowing the user to gather information more timely and efficiently, produce customized reports, and analyze project management information more effectively.

  5. Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Brochure on Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility, featuring the Vehicle Modification Facility, Vehicle Test Pad and ReCharge Integrated Demonstration System. Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) offer the opportunity to shift transportation energy demands from petroleum to electricity, but broad adoption will require integration with other systems. While automotive experts work to reduce the cost of PEVs, fossil fueled cars and trucks continue to burn hundreds of billions of gallons of petroleum each year - not only to get from point A to point B, but also to keep passengers comfortable with air conditioning and heat. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), three installations form a research laboratory known as the Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF). At the VTIF, engineers are developing strategies to address two separate but equally crucial areas of research: meeting the demands of electric vehicle-grid integration and minimizing fuel consumption related to vehicle climate control. Part of NREL's Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems (CTTS), the VTIF is dedicated to renewable and energy efficient solutions. This facility showcases technology and systems designed to increase the viability of sustainably powered vehicles. NREL researchers instrument every class of on-road vehicle, conduct hardware and software validation for electric vehicle (EV) components and accessories, and develop analysis tools and technology for the Department of Energy, other government agencies and industry partners. Research conducted at the VTIF examines the interaction of building energy systems, utility grids, renewable energy sources and PEVs, integrating energy management solutions, and maximizing potential greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, while smoothing the transition and reducing costs for EV owners. NREL's collaboration with automakers, charging station manufacturers, utilities and fleet operators to assess technologies using VTIF resources is

  6. 1998 federal energy and water management award winners

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-28

    Energy is a luxury that no one can afford to waste, and many Federal Government agencies are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of using energy wisely. Thoughtful use of energy resources is important, not only to meet agency goals, but because energy efficiency helps improve air quality. Sound facility management offers huge savings that affect the agency`s bottom line, the environment, and workplace quality. In these fiscally-modest times, pursuing sound energy management programs can present additional challenges for energy and facility managers. The correct path to take is not always the easiest. Hard work, innovation, and vision are characteristic of those who pursue energy efficiency. That is why the Department of energy, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is proud to salute the winners of the 1998 Federal Energy and Water Management Award. The 1998 winners represent the kind of 21st century thinking that will help achieve widespread Federal energy efficiency. In one year, the winners, through a combination of public and private partnerships, saved more than $222 million and 10.5 trillion Btu by actively identifying and implementing energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. Through their dedication, hard work, ingenuity, and success, the award winners have also inspired others to increase their own efforts to save energy and water and to more aggressively pursue the use of renewable energy sources. The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize the winners` contributions and ability to inspire others to take action.

  7. Insights and Opportunities: Technologies, Policies, and Markets for Clean Energy Solutions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, D.

    2009-11-01

    A presentation highlighting how strategic energy analysis can affect technologies, policies, and markets for clean energy solutions. This includes an overview of some of NREL's models and tools as well as results from laboratory analysis.

  8. Energy Conservation Management for School Administrators: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukco, Bernard J.

    Information concerning energy conservation management is presented to aid school administrators in improving the energy efficiency of their buildings and programs. Three general topics are discussed: (1) the general nature and unique characteristics of school energy management; (2) initial steps in developing a conservation program, including…

  9. Total Energy Management: Award Winning Projects of Minnesota Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Energy and Economic Development, St. Paul.

    The Total Energy Management (TEM) for Minnesota Schools program is a unified, planned approach to reducing the energy use and costs of an individual school or school district. The program is designed to increase energy awareness and improve school energy efficiency through: (1) careful energy accounting; (2) changes in operations and maintenance…

  10. Energy Distribution of the Bianchi Type i Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radinschi, Irina

    We calculate the energy of an anisotropic model of universe based on the Bianchi type I metric in the Mo ller prescription. The total energy due to the matter and gravitational field is zero. This result supports the importance of the energy-momentum complexes in the localization of energy.

  11. Application of Harmony Search algorithm to the solution of groundwater management models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamer Ayvaz, M.

    2009-06-01

    This study proposes a groundwater resources management model in which the solution is performed through a combined simulation-optimization model. A modular three-dimensional finite difference groundwater flow model, MODFLOW is used as the simulation model. This model is then combined with a Harmony Search (HS) optimization algorithm which is based on the musical process of searching for a perfect state of harmony. The performance of the proposed HS based management model is tested on three separate groundwater management problems: (i) maximization of total pumping from an aquifer (steady-state); (ii) minimization of the total pumping cost to satisfy the given demand (steady-state); and (iii) minimization of the pumping cost to satisfy the given demand for multiple management periods (transient). The sensitivity of HS algorithm is evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis which aims to determine the impact of related solution parameters on convergence behavior. The results show that HS yields nearly same or better solutions than the previous solution methods and may be used to solve management problems in groundwater modeling.

  12. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, I.; Armstrong, R.; Jarvis, M.; Bertin, E.; Carlson, A.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; Daues, G.; Gower, M.; Gruendl, R.; Petravick, D.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Illinois U., Urbana /Chicago U. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-09-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a project with the goal of building, installing and exploiting a new 74 CCD-camera at the Blanco telescope, in order to study the nature of cosmic acceleration. It will cover 5000 square degrees of the southern hemisphere sky and will record the positions and shapes of 300 million galaxies up to redshift 1.4. The survey will be completed using 525 nights during a 5-year period starting in 2012. About O(1 TB) of raw data will be produced every night, including science and calibration images. The DES data management system has been designed for the processing, calibration and archiving of these data. It is being developed by collaborating DES institutions, led by NCSA. In this contribution, we describe the basic functions of the system, what kind of scientific codes are involved and how the Data Challenge process works, to improve simultaneously the Data Management system algorithms and the Science Working Group analysis codes.

  13. Nonautonomous discrete bright soliton solutions and interaction management for the Ablowitz-Ladik equation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fajun

    2015-03-01

    We present the nonautonomous discrete bright soliton solutions and their interactions in the discrete Ablowitz-Ladik (DAL) equation with variable coefficients, which possesses complicated wave propagation in time and differs from the usual bright soliton waves. The differential-difference similarity transformation allows us to relate the discrete bright soliton solutions of the inhomogeneous DAL equation to the solutions of the homogeneous DAL equation. Propagation and interaction behaviors of the nonautonomous discrete solitons are analyzed through the one- and two-soliton solutions. We study the discrete snaking behaviors, parabolic behaviors, and interaction behaviors of the discrete solitons. In addition, the interaction management with free functions and dynamic behaviors of these solutions is investigated analytically, which have certain applications in electrical and optical systems.

  14. 2008 Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tremper, C.

    2009-07-01

    This report assesses the market for Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) services as it existed in FY 2008. It discusses Federal energy management goal progress in FY 2008, and examines the environment in which agencies implemented energy management projects over the last three years. The report also discusses some recent events that will increase the market for FEMP services, and outlines FEMP's major strategies to address these changes in FY 2009 and beyond.

  15. Water Resources Management for Shale Energy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoxtheimer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the exploration and extraction of hydrocarbons, especially natural gas, from shale formations has been facilitated by advents in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies. Shale energy resources are very promising as an abundant energy source, though environmental challenges exist with their development, including potential adverse impacts to water quality. The well drilling and construction process itself has the potential to impact groundwater quality, however if proper protocols are followed and well integrity is established then impacts such as methane migration or drilling fluids releases can be minimized. Once a shale well has been drilled and hydraulically fractured, approximately 10-50% of the volume of injected fluids (flowback fluids) may flow out of the well initially with continued generation of fluids (produced fluids) throughout the well's productive life. Produced fluid TDS concentrations often exceed 200,000 mg/L, with elevated levels of strontium (Sr), bromide (Br), sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), barium (Ba), chloride (Cl), radionuclides originating from the shale formation as well as fracturing additives. Storing, managing and properly disposisng of these fluids is critical to ensure water resources are not impacted by unintended releases. The most recent data in Pennsylvania suggests an estimated 85% of the produced fluids were being recycled for hydraulic fracturing operations, while many other states reuse less than 50% of these fluids and rely moreso on underground injection wells for disposal. Over the last few years there has been a shift to reuse more produced fluids during well fracturing operations in shale plays around the U.S., which has a combination of economic, regulatory, environmental, and technological drivers. The reuse of water is cost-competitive with sourcing of fresh water and disposal of flowback, especially when considering the costs of advanced treatment to or disposal well injection and lessens

  16. Solutions Network Formulation Report. The Potential Contributions of the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission to Estuary Management in Acadia National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Daniel; Hilbert, Kent; Lewis, David

    2007-01-01

    This candidate solution suggests the use of GPM precipitation observations to enhance the Acadia National Park NLERDSS. Simulated GPM data should provide measurements that would enable analysis of how precipitation affects runoff and nutrient load in the park?s wetlands. This solution benefits society by aiding park and resource managers in making predictions based on hypothetical changes and in identifying effective mitigation scenarios. This solution supports the Coastal Management, Water Management, and Ecological Forecasting National Applications.

  17. Water and energy as inseparable twins for sustainable solutions.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jan; Hofman-Caris, Roberta; Nederlof, Maarten; Frijns, Jos; van Loosdrecht, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Although the water cycle is only a minor contributor to the energy demand in society, it is a matter of good housekeeping to minimize the energy need within a sustainable water cycle. Wastewater treatment should not only be applied to purify the water, but also recover the energy present in this water, as well as to recover essential elements like nitrogen and phosphorus. From an energy analysis of the Dutch water cycle it is concluded that creating an energy neutral water cycle by using the heat content or by making use of the organic load of wastewater is within hands. PMID:21245558

  18. The Library Manager's Deskbook: 102 Expert Solutions to 101 Common Dilemmas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Paula Phillips; And Others

    This is a handbook of advice for handling the everyday problems encountered in all types and sizes of libraries. It is designed to assist managers before, during, and after crises develop. Organized in an question-and-answer format, it tackles many dilemmas that can occur in the library, then offers solutions drawn from actual experience. The…

  19. Integrating energy and environmental management in wood furniture industry.

    PubMed

    Gordić, Dušan; Babić, Milun; Jelić, Dubravka; Konćalović, Davor; Vukašinović, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    As energy costs continue to rise, industrial plants (even those of energy nonintensive industries such as furniture industry) need effective way to reduce the amount of energy they consume. Besides, there are a number of economic and environmental reasons why a company should consider environmental management initiatives. This paper provides a detailed guideline for implementing joint energy and environmental management system in wood furniture industrial company. It covers in detail all essential aspects of the system: initial system assessment, organization, policy development, energy and environmental auditing, action plan development, system promotion, checking system performance, and management review.

  20. Integrating Energy and Environmental Management in Wood Furniture Industry

    PubMed Central

    Babić, Milun; Jelić, Dubravka; Konćalović, Davor; Vukašinović, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    As energy costs continue to rise, industrial plants (even those of energy nonintensive industries such as furniture industry) need effective way to reduce the amount of energy they consume. Besides, there are a number of economic and environmental reasons why a company should consider environmental management initiatives. This paper provides a detailed guideline for implementing joint energy and environmental management system in wood furniture industrial company. It covers in detail all essential aspects of the system: initial system assessment, organization, policy development, energy and environmental auditing, action plan development, system promotion, checking system performance, and management review. PMID:24587734

  1. Assessment of energy efficiency solutions in a commissary

    SciTech Connect

    Alereza, T.; Faramarzi, R.; Mort, D.; Reeves, P.

    1998-07-01

    An integrated approach was used to evaluate the cost effectiveness of various combinations of energy efficient end-use technologies for the Twenty nine Palms Marine Corps Base Commissary. The commissary's functional characteristics were similar to a large commercial supermarket. A detailed monitoring plan was developed and implemented to collect electrical end-use load data and other critical parameters such as indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity, and refrigeration systems' pressures. Sixty-two measurement points were recorded on five minute intervals for ten months. Additionally, a detailed on-site energy audit was conducted to develop appropriate inputs for the energy simulation model. The Department of Energy's hourly simulation program DOE-2.1E was utilized to analyze the building's energy systems. The DOE-2 model was calibrated with the end-use monitored data and used to evaluate the energy use and economics of a set of 28 Energy Efficiency Measures (EEMs). The most energy efficient package meeting governmental savings to investment ratio guidelines was comprised of 21 EEMs which produced a 58% reduction in the annual energy use of the site. This energy efficiency package saved 1,200,200 kWh/yr. and included the use of energy efficient lighting, daylighting controls, advanced refrigeration controls, multiplex refrigeration system, energy efficient condensers, liquid-to-suction heat exchangers, high efficiency display cases equipped with aluminum shields, and energy efficient air conditioning. The results obtained from this study were intended to assist the Defense Commissary in developing the most energy efficient and cost-effective platform for future designs.

  2. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 4: Review ofAdvanced Applications in Energy Management, Control, and InformationSystems

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2003-08-01

    In this article, the fourth in a series, we provide a review of advanced applications in Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems (EMCIS). The available features for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard to emerging trends in EMCIS and potential benefits to the Federal sector. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems. The second article [2] serves as a basic reference for building control system (BCS) networking fundamentals and includes an assessment of current approaches to open communications. The third article [3] evaluated several products that exemplify the current state of practice in EMCIS. It is important for energy managers in the Federal sector to have a high level of knowledge and understanding of these complex energy management systems. This series of articles provides energy practitioners with some basic informational and educational tools to help make decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings potential.

  3. Ocean acidification: Linking science to management solutions using the Great Barrier Reef as a case study.

    PubMed

    Albright, Rebecca; Anthony, Kenneth R N; Baird, Mark; Beeden, Roger; Byrne, Maria; Collier, Catherine; Dove, Sophie; Fabricius, Katharina; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Kelly, Ryan P; Lough, Janice; Mongin, Mathieu; Munday, Philip L; Pears, Rachel J; Russell, Bayden D; Tilbrook, Bronte; Abal, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Coral reefs are one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to ocean acidification. While our understanding of the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems is growing, gaps remain that limit our ability to translate scientific knowledge into management action. To guide solution-based research, we review the current knowledge of ocean acidification impacts on coral reefs alongside management needs and priorities. We use the world's largest continuous reef system, Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR), as a case study. We integrate scientific knowledge gained from a variety of approaches (e.g., laboratory studies, field observations, and ecosystem modelling) and scales (e.g., cell, organism, ecosystem) that underpin a systems-level understanding of how ocean acidification is likely to impact the GBR and associated goods and services. We then discuss local and regional management options that may be effective to help mitigate the effects of ocean acidification on the GBR, with likely application to other coral reef systems. We develop a research framework for linking solution-based ocean acidification research to practical management options. The framework assists in identifying effective and cost-efficient options for supporting ecosystem resilience. The framework enables on-the-ground OA management to be the focus, while not losing sight of CO2 mitigation as the ultimate solution.

  4. Ocean acidification: Linking science to management solutions using the Great Barrier Reef as a case study.

    PubMed

    Albright, Rebecca; Anthony, Kenneth R N; Baird, Mark; Beeden, Roger; Byrne, Maria; Collier, Catherine; Dove, Sophie; Fabricius, Katharina; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Kelly, Ryan P; Lough, Janice; Mongin, Mathieu; Munday, Philip L; Pears, Rachel J; Russell, Bayden D; Tilbrook, Bronte; Abal, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Coral reefs are one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to ocean acidification. While our understanding of the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems is growing, gaps remain that limit our ability to translate scientific knowledge into management action. To guide solution-based research, we review the current knowledge of ocean acidification impacts on coral reefs alongside management needs and priorities. We use the world's largest continuous reef system, Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR), as a case study. We integrate scientific knowledge gained from a variety of approaches (e.g., laboratory studies, field observations, and ecosystem modelling) and scales (e.g., cell, organism, ecosystem) that underpin a systems-level understanding of how ocean acidification is likely to impact the GBR and associated goods and services. We then discuss local and regional management options that may be effective to help mitigate the effects of ocean acidification on the GBR, with likely application to other coral reef systems. We develop a research framework for linking solution-based ocean acidification research to practical management options. The framework assists in identifying effective and cost-efficient options for supporting ecosystem resilience. The framework enables on-the-ground OA management to be the focus, while not losing sight of CO2 mitigation as the ultimate solution. PMID:27564868

  5. An Energy Management Programme for Grande Prairie Public School District. Energy Conservation: Energy Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calgary Univ. (Alberta).

    This report describes a pilot energy conservation project in Grande Prairie (Alberta) School District No. 2357. Extensive data collection and analysis were undertaken to provide a sound, quantitative basis for evaluation of the program. Energy conserving measures requiring capital outlays were not considered. During the project, electric demand…

  6. Topology optimisation for energy management in underwater sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Devesh K.; Wettergren, Thomas A.; Ray, Asok; Mukherjee, Kushal

    2015-09-01

    In general, battery-powered sensors in a sensor network are operable as long as they can communicate sensed data to a processing node. In this context, a sensor network has two competing objectives: (1) maximisation of the network performance with respect to the probability of successful search for a specified upper bound on the probability of false alarms, and (2) maximisation of the network's operable life. As both sensing and communication of data consume battery energy at the sensing nodes of the sensor network, judicious use of sensing power and communication power is needed to improve the lifetime of the sensor network. This paper presents an adaptive energy management policy that will optimally allocate the available energy between sensing and communication at each sensing node to maximise the network performance subject to specified constraints. Under the assumptions of fixed total energy allocation for a sensor network operating for a specified time period, the problem is reduced to synthesis of an optimal network topology that maximises the probability of successful search (of a target) over a surveillance region. In a two-stage optimisation, a genetic algorithm-based meta-heuristic search is first used to efficiently explore the global design space, and then a local pattern search algorithm is used for convergence to an optimal solution. The results of performance optimisation are generated on a simulation test bed to validate the proposed concept. Adaptation to energy variations across the network is shown to be manifested as a change in the optimal network topology by using sensing and communication models for underwater environment. The approximate Pareto-optimal surface is obtained as a trade-off between network lifetime and probability of successful search over the surveillance region.

  7. Plasmon-assisted radiolytic energy conversion in aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek Hyun; Kwon, Jae W.

    2014-01-01

    The field of conventional energy conversion using radioisotopes has almost exclusively focused on solid-state materials. Herein, we demonstrate that liquids can be an excellent media for effective energy conversion from radioisotopes. We also show that free radicals in liquid, which are continuously generated by beta radiation, can be utilized for electrical energy generation. Under beta radiation, surface plasmon obtained by the metallic nanoporous structures on TiO2 enhanced the radiolytic conversion via the efficient energy transfer between plasmons and free radicals. This work introduces a new route for the development of next-generation power sources. PMID:24918356

  8. A Possible Solution to the Smallness Problem of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin; Gu, Je-An; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2005-07-08

    The smallness of the dark energy density has been recognized as the most crucial difficulty in understanding dark energy and also one of the most important questions in the new century. In a recent paper[1], we proposed a new dark energy model in which the smallness of the cosmological constant is naturally achieved by invoking the Casimir energy in a supersymmetry-breaking brane-world. In this paper we review the basic notions of this model. Various implications, perspectives, and subtleties of this model are briefly discussed.

  9. Energy management system for a rotary machine and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Michael John; Sinha, Gautam; Sheldon, Karl Edward

    2004-11-09

    In energy management system is provided for a power generating device having a working fluid intake in which the energy management system comprises an electrical dissipation device coupled to the power generating device and a dissipation device cooling system configured to direct a portion of a working fluid to the electrical dissipation device so as to provide thermal control to the electrical dissipation device.

  10. Energy Management Lesson Plans for Vocational Agriculture Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Lowell E., Ed.; Miller, Larry E., Ed.

    This notebook provides vocational agricultural teachers with 10 detailed lesson plans on the major topic of energy management in agriculture. The lesson plans present information about energy and the need to manage it wisely, using a problem-solving approach. Each lesson plan follows this format: lesson topic, lesson performance objectives,…

  11. Elastic Energy Transfer in Turbulence of Dilute Polymer Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Xu, Haitao

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the energy transfer in the bulk of a turbulent flow with small amount long-chain polymer additives. By varying the Reynolds numbers Rλ, Wissenberg number Wi and polymer concentration φ. We test quantitively the elastic theory proposed by de Gennes and Tabor (Europhys. Lett., 1986; Physica A, 1986). The rate of energy transfer by polymer elasticity as inferred from the theory is consistent with that measured from the second order Eulerian structure functions. The unknown parameter n in the theory, which represents the flow topology of the stretching field, is found to be nearly 1. Based on energy transfer rate balance, We propose an elastic length scale, rɛ, which describes the effect of polymer elasticity on turbulence energy cascade and captures the scale dependence of the elastic energy transfer rate. We are grateful to the Max Planck Society, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft for their support.

  12. Energy conservation in rental housing: landlords' perceptions of problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, A.; Raab, J.; Astrein, B.; Bernstein, S.; Piernot, C.; Strahs, S.

    1982-03-01

    Rental housing owners have had little incentive to invest in energy conservation measures for their buildings. As the cost of energy continues to rise, market incentives increase. This research explores the decision processes and criteria of a purposive sample of landlords in four cities: Boston, Chicago, Denver, and San Francisco. The report outlines landlords' reasons for investing or not investing in energy conservation measures, the barriers they perceive to energy conservation, and their perceived solutions to energy problems in rental housing.

  13. Ermod: fast and versatile computation software for solvation free energy with approximate theory of solutions.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2014-08-01

    ERmod is a software package to efficiently and approximately compute the solvation free energy using the method of energy representation. Molecular simulation is to be conducted at two condensed-phase systems of the solution of interest and the reference solvent with test-particle insertion of the solute. The subprogram ermod in ERmod then provides a set of energy distribution functions from the simulation trajectories, and another subprogram slvfe determines the solvation free energy from the distribution functions through an approximate functional. This article describes the design and implementation of ERmod, and illustrates its performance in solvent water for two organic solutes and two protein solutes. Actually, the free-energy computation with ERmod is not restricted to the solvation in homogeneous medium such as fluid and polymer and can treat the binding into weakly ordered system with nano-inhomogeneity such as micelle and lipid membrane. ERmod is available on web at http://sourceforge.net/projects/ermod.

  14. Activation energy and entropy for viscosity of wormlike micelle solutions.

    PubMed

    Chandler, H D

    2013-11-01

    The viscosities of two surfactant solutions which form wormlike micelles (WLMs) were studied over a range of temperatures and strain rates. WLM solutions appear to differ from many other shear thinning systems in that, as the shear rate increases, stress-shear rate curves tend to converge with temperature rather than diverge and this can sometimes lead to higher temperature curves crossing those at lower. Behaviour was analysed in terms of activation kinetics. It is suggested that two mechanisms are involved: Newtonian flow, following an Arrhenius law superimposed on a non-Newtonian flow described by a stress assisted kinetic law, this being a more general form of the Arrhenius law. Anomalous flow is introduced into the kinetic equation via a stress dependent activation entropy term.

  15. Modeling Project Management Competences: An Ontology-Based Solution for Competency-Based Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodea, Constanţa-Nicoleta; Dascălu, Maria-Iuliana

    Due to growing requirements for skilled workers, the education should value the outcome and address students' real performance in life. A learning process turns out to be good when the degree of transformation made possible through that process is high or the degree of competences increases. Current paper indicates e-learning as a suitable activity for competences development. The authors also argue that a proper competences modeling solution would increase the efficiency of competence-based learning. Consequently, an ontology based solution is presented for project management domain.

  16. Comparative management of offshore posidonia residues: composting vs. energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Cocozza, Claudio; Parente, Angelo; Zaccone, Claudio; Mininni, Carlo; Santamaria, Pietro; Miano, Teodoro

    2011-01-01

    Residues of the marine plant posidonia (Posidonia oceanica, PO) beached in tourist zones represent a great environmental, economical, social and hygienic problem in the Mediterranean Basin, in general, and in the Apulia Region in particular, because of the great disturb to the bathers and population, and the high costs that the administrations have to bear for their removal and disposal. In the present paper, Authors determined the heating values of leaves and fibres of PO, the main offshore residues found on beaches, and, meantime, composted those residues with mowing and olive pruning wood. The final composts were characterized for pH, electrical conductivity, elemental composition, dynamic respiration index, phytotoxicity, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopic fingerprints. The aim of the paper was to investigate the composting and energy recovery of PO leaves and fibres in order to suggest alternative solutions to the landfill when offshore residues have to be removed from recreational beaches. The fibrous portion of PO residues showed heating values close to those of other biofuels, thus suggesting a possible utilization as source of energy. At the same time, compost obtained from both PO wastes showed high quality features on condition that the electrical conductivity and Na content are lowered by a correct management of wetting during the composting. PMID:20888211

  17. Comparative management of offshore posidonia residues: composting vs. energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Cocozza, Claudio; Parente, Angelo; Zaccone, Claudio; Mininni, Carlo; Santamaria, Pietro; Miano, Teodoro

    2011-01-01

    Residues of the marine plant posidonia (Posidonia oceanica, PO) beached in tourist zones represent a great environmental, economical, social and hygienic problem in the Mediterranean Basin, in general, and in the Apulia Region in particular, because of the great disturb to the bathers and population, and the high costs that the administrations have to bear for their removal and disposal. In the present paper, Authors determined the heating values of leaves and fibres of PO, the main offshore residues found on beaches, and, meantime, composted those residues with mowing and olive pruning wood. The final composts were characterized for pH, electrical conductivity, elemental composition, dynamic respiration index, phytotoxicity, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopic fingerprints. The aim of the paper was to investigate the composting and energy recovery of PO leaves and fibres in order to suggest alternative solutions to the landfill when offshore residues have to be removed from recreational beaches. The fibrous portion of PO residues showed heating values close to those of other biofuels, thus suggesting a possible utilization as source of energy. At the same time, compost obtained from both PO wastes showed high quality features on condition that the electrical conductivity and Na content are lowered by a correct management of wetting during the composting.

  18. Energy Management System Lowers U.S. Navy Energy Costs Through PV System Interconnection (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    To meet the U.S. Navy's energy goals, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) spent two years collaborating on demonstrations that tested market-ready energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration. One such technology - an energy management system - was identified as a promising method for reducing energy use and costs, and can contribute to increasing energy security.

  19. Biomass energy: Sustainable solution for greenhouse gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrul Islam, A. K. M.; Ahiduzzaman, M.

    2012-06-01

    Biomass is part of the carbon cycle. Carbon dioxide is produced after combustion of biomass. Over a relatively short timescale, carbon dioxide is renewed from atmosphere during next generation of new growth of green vegetation. Contribution of renewable energy including hydropower, solar, biomass and biofuel in total primary energy consumption in world is about 19%. Traditional biomass alone contributes about 13% of total primary energy consumption in the world. The number of traditional biomass energy users expected to rise from 2.5 billion in 2004 to 2.6 billion in 2015 and to 2.7 billion in 2030 for cooking in developing countries. Residential biomass demand in developing countries is projected to rise from 771 Mtoe in 2004 to 818 Mtoe in 2030. The main sources of biomass are wood residues, bagasse, rice husk, agro-residues, animal manure, municipal and industrial waste etc. Dedicated energy crops such as short-rotation coppice, grasses, sugar crops, starch crops and oil crops are gaining importance and market share as source of biomass energy. Global trade in biomass feedstocks and processed bioenergy carriers are growing rapidly. There are some drawbacks of biomass energy utilization compared to fossil fuels viz: heterogeneous and uneven composition, lower calorific value and quality deterioration due to uncontrolled biodegradation. Loose biomass also is not viable for transportation. Pelletization, briquetting, liquefaction and gasification of biomass energy are some options to solve these problems. Wood fuel production is very much steady and little bit increase in trend, however, the forest land is decreasing, means the deforestation is progressive. There is a big challenge for sustainability of biomass resource and environment. Biomass energy can be used to reduce greenhouse emissions. Woody biomass such as briquette and pellet from un-organized biomass waste and residues could be used for alternative to wood fuel, as a result, forest will be saved and

  20. Leading by Example with Smart Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-12-01

    The Federal Energy Management Program facilitates the Federal Government?s implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation?s energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of products grouped into project transaction services, applied technology services, and decision support services. This document outlines FEMP services and programs.

  1. Nanowires for thermal energy conversion and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renkun

    This dissertation presents the application of nanowires in two aspects of thermal energy conversion and management: (i) silicon (Si) nanowires as efficient and scalable thermoelectric materials due to the reduced thermal conductivity (k), and (ii) Si and copper (Cu) nanowire arrays for enhanced phase change heat transfer including boiling and evaporation and their applications in thermal management of microelectronics. In the first half of the thesis (chapter 2 and 3), we describe thermal and thermoelectric measurements of individual Si nanowires for studying phonon transport properties and their potential application in thermoelectrics. A theoretical model based on coherent phonon scattering was developed to explain the experiemental data, which suggests that phonon-boundary scattering is highly frequency dependent. For low frequency (long wavelength) phonons, the transport is nearly ballistic, whereas high frequency or short wavelength phonons scatter diffusively at nanowire boundary. The competition between the two phonon transmission regimes results in the unusual linear behavior of the thermal conductance of thin VLS Si nanowires at low temperature. Next, the thermal conductivity of EE Si nanowires, which have much rougher surface compared to VLS nanowires, was measured and found to be five-eight times lower than that of VLS counterparts with similar diameters. The substantial reduction in k is presumably due to the higher surface roughness, since both types of nanowires have single crystalline cores. In particular, for ˜ 50 nm EE Si nanowires etched from 0.1 O-cm B-doped p-Si <111> (˜2 x 1017 cm-3 dopant concentration), the k is around 1.6 Wm-1K-1 and the kL is ˜1.2 Wm-1 K-1 at room temperature, approaching that of amorphous Si. The single nanowire measurements show the great promise of using Si nanowire arrays as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials. As the second focus of the thesis (chapter 4 and 5), nanowire arrays were used for enhanced

  2. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Beldica, Cristina; Bertin, Emmanuel; Dora Cai, Y.; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; Darnell, J.Anthony; Daues, Gregory E.; Jarvis, Michael; Gower, Michelle; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

    2008-07-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  3. Stalk model of membrane fusion: solution of energy crisis.

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Kozlov, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Membrane fusion proceeds via formation of intermediate nonbilayer structures. The stalk model of fusion intermediate is commonly recognized to account for the major phenomenology of the fusion process. However, in its current form, the stalk model poses a challenge. On one hand, it is able to describe qualitatively the modulation of the fusion reaction by the lipid composition of the membranes. On the other, it predicts very large values of the stalk energy, so that the related energy barrier for fusion cannot be overcome by membranes within a biologically reasonable span of time. We suggest a new structure for the fusion stalk, which resolves the energy crisis of the model. Our approach is based on a combined deformation of the stalk membrane including bending of the membrane surface and tilt of the hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules. We demonstrate that the energy of the fusion stalk is a few times smaller than those predicted previously and the stalks are feasible in real systems. We account quantitatively for the experimental results on dependence of the fusion reaction on the lipid composition of different membrane monolayers. We analyze the dependence of the stalk energy on the distance between the fusing membranes and provide the experimentally testable predictions for the structural features of the stalk intermediates. PMID:11806930

  4. Large energy entire solutions for the Yamabe equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino, Manuel; Musso, Monica; Pacard, Frank; Pistoia, Angela

    We consider the Yamabe equation Δu+n/(n-2)4|u=0 in R, n⩾3. Let k⩾1 and ξjk=(e,0)∈R=C×R. For all large k we find a solution of the form u(x)=U(x)-∑j=1kμk-n-2/2U×(μk-1(x-ξ))+o(1), where U(x)=()n-2/2, μ=c/k for n⩾4, μ=c/k( for n=3 and o(1)→0 uniformly as k→+∞.

  5. Privatizing policy: Market solutions to energy and environmental problems

    SciTech Connect

    Stroup, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses how and why privatization can improve policy, not only in terms of managing production, but also in terms of regulation. Three major aspects of privatization are discussed. The importance for the environment of economic efficiency and prosperity is examined. The role of private law and a rights-based policy for controlling pollution is considered. Finally the claim that privatization would replace farsighted government decisions with shortsighted decisions by owners is examined. 83 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Deep Energy Retrofit Guidance for the Building America Solutions Center

    SciTech Connect

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. DOE Building America program has established a research agenda targeting market-relevant strategies to achieve 40% reductions in existing home energy use by 2030. Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs) are part of the strategy to meet and exceed this goal. DERs are projects that create new, valuable assets from existing residences, by bringing homes into alignment with the expectations of the 21st century. Ideally, high energy using, dated homes that are failing to provide adequate modern services to their owners and occupants (e.g., comfortable temperatures, acceptable humidity, clean, healthy), are transformed through comprehensive upgrades to the building envelope, services and miscellaneous loads into next generation high performance homes. These guidance documents provide information to aid in the broader market adoption of DERs.

  7. Characterizing multiple solutions to the time-energy canonical commutation relation via internal symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Caballar, Roland Cristopher F.; Ocampo, Leonard R.; Galapon, Eric A.

    2010-06-15

    Internal symmetries can be used to classify multiple solutions to the time-energy canonical commutation relation (TE-CCR). The dynamical behavior of solutions to the TE-CCR possessing particular internal symmetries involving time reversal differ significantly from solutions to the TE-CCR without those particular symmetries, implying a connection between the internal symmetries of a quantum system, its internal unitary dynamics, and the TE-CCR.

  8. Total Energy Management: A Practical Handbook on Energy Conservation and Management. For Use of Owners and Managers of Office Buildings and Small Retail Stores. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Electrical Contractors Association, Washington, DC.

    Described in this guide for owners and managers of office buildings and small retail stores, is a program entitled Total Energy Management (TEM). The TEM program approach rests on the premise that buildings should be examined in terms of total energy consumption, rather than prescribing energy budgets for a building's separate systems. The…

  9. 1993 Department of Energy Records Management Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This document consists of viewgraphs from the presentations at the conference. Topics included are: DOE records management overview, NIRMA and ARMA resources, NARA records management training, potential quality assurance records, filing systems, organizing and indexing technical records, DOE-HQ initiatives, IRM reviews, status of epidemiologic inventory, disposition of records and personal papers, inactive records storage, establishing administrative records, managing records at Hanford, electronic mail -- legal and records issues, NARA-GAO reports status, consultive selling, automated indexing, decentralized approach to scheduling at a DOE office, developing specific records management programs, storage and retrieval at Savannah River Plant, an optical disk case study, and special interest group reports.

  10. Co-Leadership – A Management Solution for Integrated Health and Social Care

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Johan; Hasson, Henna; Sachs, Magna Andreen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Co-leadership has been identified as one approach to meet the managerial challenges of integrated services, but research on the topic is limited. In the present study, co-leadership, practised by pairs of managers – each manager representing one of the two principal organizations in integrated health and social care services – was explored. Aim: To investigate co-leadership in integrated health and social care, identify essential preconditions in fulfilling the management assignment, its operationalization and impact on provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Method: Interviews with eight managers exercising co-leadership were analysed using directed content analysis. Respondent validation was conducted through additional interviews with the same managers. Results: Key contextual preconditions were an organization-wide model supporting co-leadership and co-location of services. Perception of the management role as a collective activity, continuous communication and lack of prestige were essential personal and interpersonal preconditions. In daily practice, office sharing, being able to give and take and support each other contributed to provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Conclusion and discussion: Co-leadership promoted robust management by providing broader competence, continuous learning and joint responsibility for services. Integrated health and social care services should consider employing co-leadership as a managerial solution to achieve sustainability. PMID:27616963

  11. Co-Leadership – A Management Solution for Integrated Health and Social Care

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Johan; Hasson, Henna; Sachs, Magna Andreen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Co-leadership has been identified as one approach to meet the managerial challenges of integrated services, but research on the topic is limited. In the present study, co-leadership, practised by pairs of managers – each manager representing one of the two principal organizations in integrated health and social care services – was explored. Aim: To investigate co-leadership in integrated health and social care, identify essential preconditions in fulfilling the management assignment, its operationalization and impact on provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Method: Interviews with eight managers exercising co-leadership were analysed using directed content analysis. Respondent validation was conducted through additional interviews with the same managers. Results: Key contextual preconditions were an organization-wide model supporting co-leadership and co-location of services. Perception of the management role as a collective activity, continuous communication and lack of prestige were essential personal and interpersonal preconditions. In daily practice, office sharing, being able to give and take and support each other contributed to provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Conclusion and discussion: Co-leadership promoted robust management by providing broader competence, continuous learning and joint responsibility for services. Integrated health and social care services should consider employing co-leadership as a managerial solution to achieve sustainability.

  12. Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming Industry - December 2010

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-12-01

    AMO's research and development partnerships with industry have resulted in more than 220 technologies and other solutions that can be purchased today. This document includes a description of each solution, its benefits, and vendor contact information. The document also identifies emerging technologies and other resources to help industry save energy.

  13. Basic Energy Conservation and Management--Part 2: HVAC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Reducing school district energy expenditures has become a universal goal, and new technologies have brought greater energy efficiencies to the school environment. In Part 1 of this two-part series, the author discussed the steps required to establish an energy conservation and management program with an emphasis on lighting. In this article, he…

  14. The Energy Crisis in the Public Schools; Alternative Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossbach, Wilmar; Shaffer, William

    One hundred and eighty school personnel held a workshop with representatives of the petroleum, natural gas, and electrical power industries. The objectives of the workshop were (1) to provide participants with a common body of knowledge and a common understanding of the energy crisis and its implications for the public schools, (2) to delineate…

  15. Perspectives of Urban Corner Store Owners and Managers on Community Health Problems and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Young, Candace R.; Cannuscio, Carolyn C.; Karpyn, Allison; Kounaves, Sarah; Strupp, Emily; McDonough, Kevin; Shea, Judy A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urban corner store interventions have been implemented to improve access to and promote purchase of healthy foods. However, the perspectives of store owners and managers, who deliver and shape these interventions in collaboration with nonprofit, government, and academic partners, have been largely overlooked. We sought to explore the views of store owners and managers on the role of their stores in the community and their beliefs about health problems and solutions in the community. Methods During 2013 and 2014, we conducted semistructured, in-depth interviews in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Camden, New Jersey, with 23 corner store owners/managers who participated in the Healthy Corner Store Initiative spearheaded by The Food Trust, a nonprofit organization focused on food access in low-income communities. We oversampled high-performing store owners. Results Store owners/managers reported that their stores served multiple roles, including providing a convenient source of goods, acting as a community hub, supporting community members, working with neighborhood schools, and improving health. Owners/managers described many challenging aspects of running a small store, including obtaining high-quality produce at a good price and in small quantities. Store owners/managers believed that obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, and poor diet are major problems in their communities. Some owners/managers engaged with customers to discuss healthy behaviors. Conclusion Our findings suggest that store owners and managers are crucial partners for healthy eating interventions. Corner store owners/managers interact with community members daily, are aware of community health issues, and are community providers of access to food. Corner store initiatives can be used to implement innovative programs to further develop the untapped potential of store owners/managers. PMID:27736054

  16. Nonlinear predictive energy management of residential buildings with photovoltaics & batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chao; Sun, Fengchun; Moura, Scott J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies a nonlinear predictive energy management strategy for a residential building with a rooftop photovoltaic (PV) system and second-life lithium-ion battery energy storage. A key novelty of this manuscript is closing the gap between building energy management formulations, advanced load forecasting techniques, and nonlinear battery/PV models. Additionally, we focus on the fundamental trade-off between lithium-ion battery aging and economic performance in energy management. The energy management problem is formulated as a model predictive controller (MPC). Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed control scheme achieves 96%-98% of the optimal performance given perfect forecasts over a long-term horizon. Moreover, the rate of battery capacity loss can be reduced by 25% with negligible losses in economic performance, through an appropriate cost function formulation.

  17. The Solutions Project: Educating the Public and Policy Makers About Solutions to Global Warming, Air Pollution, and Energy Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Three major global problems of our times are global warming, air pollution mortality and morbidity, and energy insecurity. Whereas, policy makers with the support of the public must implement solutions to these problems, it is scientists and engineers who are best equipped to evaluate technically sound, optimal, and efficient solutions. Yet, a disconnect exists between information provided by scientists and engineers and policies implemented. Part of the reason is that scientific information provided to policy makers and the public is swamped out by information provided by lobbyists and another part is the difficulty in providing information to the hundreds of millions of people who need it rather than to just a few thousand. What other ways are available, aside from issuing press releases on scientific papers, for scientists to disseminate information? Three growing methods are through social media, creative media, and storytelling. The Solutions Project is a non-profit non-governmental organization whose goal is to bring forth scientific information about 100% clean, renewable energy plans to the public, businesses, and policy makers using these and related tools. Through the use of social media, the development of engaging internet and video content, and storytelling, the group hopes to increase the dissemination of information for social good. This talk discusses the history and impacts to date of this group and its methods. Please see www.thesolutionsproject.org and 100.org for more information.

  18. Energy Management in Small Commercial Buildings: A Look at How HVAC Contractors Can Deliver Energy Efficiency to this Segment

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin; Granderson, Jessica; Mathew, Paul

    2014-07-01

    While buildings smaller than 50,000 sq ft account for nearly half of the energy used in US commercial buildings, energy efficiency programs to-date have primarily focused on larger buildings. Interviews with stakeholders and a review of the literature indicate interest in energy efficiency from the small commercial building sector, provided solutions are simple and low-cost. An approach to deliver energy management to small commercial buildings via HVAC contractors and preliminary demonstration findings are presented. The energy management package (EMP) developed includes five technical elements: benchmarking and analysis of monthly energy use; analysis of interval electricity data (if available), a one-hour onsite walkthrough, communication with the building owner, and checking of results. This data-driven approach tracks performance and identifies low-cost opportunities, using guidelines and worksheets for each element to streamline the delivery process and minimize the formal training required. This energy management approach is unique from, but often complementary to conventional quality maintenance or retrofit-focused programs targeting the small commercial segment. Because HVAC contractors already serve these clients, the transaction cost to market and deliver energy management services can be reduced to the order of hundreds of dollars per year. This business model, outlined briefly in this report, enables the offering to benefit the contractor and client even at the modest expected energy savings in small buildings. Results from a small-scale pilot of this approach validated that the EMP could be delivered by contractors in 4-8 hours per building per year, and that energy savings of 3-5percent are feasible through this approach.

  19. Rail transit energy management program: Energy database. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Uher, R.A.

    1995-03-01

    The Rail Transportation Energy Management Program (EMP) is a private/public partnership whose objective is to reduce rail transit energy cost and improve energy efficiency. The Energy Database (EDB) was set up under the program. The purpose of the EDB is to provide information to the members of the program. This information includes rail transit energy and energy cost data and the results of implementation of energy cost reduction strategies. The EDB also includes a means for timely exchange of information among transit authorities as well as associated with energy management. The database is presently set up on a personal computer and is accessed by the users via an 800 telephone line.

  20. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  1. The 50 percent solution to reducing energy costs.

    PubMed

    Whitson, B Alan

    2012-11-01

    Hospitals can use a five-step process to achieve energy savings: Define a minimum acceptable ROI or hurdle rate. Seek incentives, rebates, and tax benefits. Set a 10-year investment horizon for all project portfolios. Create a system for tracking and reporting the operational and financial performance of the project portfolios. At the end of the year, return 50 percent of the savings to the facilities department and use the rest to fund additional projects. PMID:23173371

  2. The 50 percent solution to reducing energy costs.

    PubMed

    Whitson, B Alan

    2012-11-01

    Hospitals can use a five-step process to achieve energy savings: Define a minimum acceptable ROI or hurdle rate. Seek incentives, rebates, and tax benefits. Set a 10-year investment horizon for all project portfolios. Create a system for tracking and reporting the operational and financial performance of the project portfolios. At the end of the year, return 50 percent of the savings to the facilities department and use the rest to fund additional projects.

  3. Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Angelini, Tana; Masanet, Eric

    2010-07-27

    In the United States, industry spends over $100 billion annually to power its manufacturing plants. Companies also spend on maintenance, capital outlay, and energy services. Improving energy efficiency is vital to reduce these costs and increase earnings. Many cost-effective opportunities to reduce energy consumption are available, and this Energy Guide discusses energy-efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be applied over a broad spectrum of companies. Strategies in the guide address hot water and steam, compressed air, pumps, motors, fans, lighting, refrigeration, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. This guide includes descriptions of expected energy and cost savings, based on real-world applications, typical payback periods, and references to more detailed information. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers achieve cost-effective energy reductions while maintaining product quality. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  4. Energy consumption quota management of Wanda commercial buildings in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. B.; Xiao, H.; Wang, X.; Liu, J. J.; Wang, X.; Jin, X. Q.; Wang, J.; Xie, X. K.

    2016-08-01

    There is limited research of commercial buildings’ energy use data conducted based on practical analysis in China nowadays. Some energy consumption quota tools like Energy Star in U.S or VDI 3807 in Germany have limitation in China's building sector. This study introduces an innovative methodology of applying energy use quota model and empirical management to commercial buildings, which was in accordance of more than one hundred opened shopping centers of a real estate group in China. On the basis of statistical benchmarking, a new concept of “Modified coefficient”, which considers weather, occupancy, business layout, operation schedule and HVAC efficiency, is originally introduced in this paper. Our study shows that the average energy use quota increases from north to south. The average energy use quota of sample buildings is 159 kWh/(m2.a) of severe cold climate zone, 179 kWh/(m2.a) of cold zone, 188 kWh/(m2.a) of hot summer and cold winter zone, and 200 kWh/(m2.a) of hot summer and warm winter zone. The energy use quota model has been validated in the property management for year 2016, providing a new method of commercial building energy management to the industry. As a key result, there is 180 million energy saving potential based on energy quota management in 2016, equals to 6.2% saving rate of actual energy use in 2015.

  5. Effect of Cracow program elimination of low emission sources upon the energy management system in Cracow

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, J.; Goerlich, K.; Glowacki, K.

    1995-12-31

    At the end of the 1980s, the energy management at the local level-like the whole set of such utility services-was based upon respective enterprises subject to a certain supervision of the establishing body and to a control of the District Inspectorate of Energy Management. Those enterprises that deal with generation and supply of heat energy to the local market, with distribution of heat, natural gas and electricity, operated as state companies; the last two branches made a part of either regional or national companies. Irrespective of the aforesaid, the co-generation power plants existed usually outside the heat generation and supply system. The business economics of these enterprises was not subject to any market rules whatsoever, the prices were controlled and the customers had no right of choice of the energy supplier. From the very beginning the low emission elimination program assumed to have commercial rules introduced in the energy management. Thus, it turned out necessary to prepare the market - to draw up inventory of the conditions and needs related with heat supply and to take up market solutions as well. The management system, and in particular the items specified below, is discussed. The co-operation of energy distribution enterprises has been based upon a voluntary agreement (The Team for Energy Suppliers) so as to agree upon the basic actions of the respective partners; joint actions have been taken up more and more willingly.

  6. Data Management Solutions for Tracking Restoration Progress in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S. R.; Johnston, M.; Sweeney, J.

    2014-12-01

    The decline of the Chesapeake Bay estuarine ecosystem due to agricultural and industrial activities has been a great concern, where excess of dissolved nutrients combined with global climate change has lead to increased storm surges, habitat destruction, and low dissolved oxygen, reduced water clarity, and increased algal growth. In 2010 The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), which seeks to protect the Bay's living resources by reducing nutrient and sediment runoff to its waters, and sets pollution reduction targets for sediment, nitrogen and phosphorus across 64000 sq. miles watershed that includes parts of six states - Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia — and the entire District of Columbia. The Chesapeake Bay Program and the US EPA have developed a number of tools to track the progress of restoration. In this study we describe data management solutions, which were used in the integration of data such as land use, nutrient applications, management practices, policies among the bay jurisdictions, and a summary of a suite of tools that were developed and are being used to collect, process, and report data at various spatial scales for tracking the progress made by the seven Bay jurisdictions in achieving reductions in nutrient and sediment runoff. The described integration strategy and data management solutions can be used in the development and application of similar regulatory local or regional scale environmental management tools.

  7. Department of Energy Project Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-08

    This manual provides guidance to all appropriate personnel for implementation of DOE Project Management Policy. It sets forth the principles and requirements that govern the development, approval, and execution of DOE's outlay programs as embodied within the Project Management System (PMS). Its primary goal is to assure application of sound management principles providing a disciplined, systematic, and coordinated approach resulting in efficient planning, organization, coordination, budgeting, management, review, and control of DOE projects. The provisions of this manual are mandatory for the Department's Major Systems Acquisitions (MSA's) and Major Projects and will be used for other projects to the extent practicable. Department's project-management task is over 250 projects, with a total estimated cost in excess of $24 billion at completion. This diverse array of project activities requires a broad spectrum of scientific, engineering, and management skills to assure that they meet planned technical and other objectives and are accomplished on schedule, within cost and scope, and that they serve the purposes intended. In recognition of these requirements and the Department's ever-increasing magnitude of responsibilities, an interim Project Management System was established and has been in use for over a year. This manual constitutes an update of the system based on the experience gained and lessons learned during this initial period.

  8. Wormhole solutions in f(R) gravity satisfying energy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Halilsoy, M.

    2016-10-01

    Without reference to exotic sources construction of viable wormholes in Einstein’s general relativity remained ever a myth. With the advent of modified theories, however, specifically the f(R) theory, new hopes arose for the possibility of such objects. From this token, we construct traversable wormholes in f(R) theory supported by a fluid source which respects at least the weak energy conditions. We provide an example (Example 1) of asymptotically flat wormhole in f(R) gravity without ghosts.

  9. Peptide Conformational Preferences in Osmolyte Solutions: Transfer Free Energies of Decaalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Hu, Char Y.; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2011-02-16

    The nature in which the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and the denaturing osmolyte urea affect protein stability is investigated, simulating a decaalanine peptide model in multiple conformations of the denatured ensemble. Binary solutions of both osmolytes and mixed osmolyte solutions at physiologically relevant concentrations of 2:1 (urea:TMAO) are studied using standard molecular dynamics simulations and solvation free energy calculations. Component analysis reveals the differences in the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) and electrostatic interactions for protecting and denaturing osmolytes. We find that urea denaturation governed by transfer free energy differences is dominated by vdW attractions, whereas TMAO exerts its effect by causing unfavorable electrostatic interactions both in the binary solution and mixed osmolyte solution. Analysis of the results showed no evidence in the ternary solution of disruption of the correlations among the peptide and osmolytes, nor of significant changes in the strength of the water hydrogen bond network.

  10. Chemical Safety Management Program for Lockheed Martin Energy Systems operations at the Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    C.W. McMahon

    2000-03-24

    Operated by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems), the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is a manufacturing facility that plays an integral role in the DOE nuclear weapons complex. Fulfilling the national security mission at the Y-12 Plant, continuing to be the cornerstone of uranium and lithium technologies for DOE, and providing customers with solutions for challenging manufacturing needs requires usage of a variety of chemicals and chemical processes. Performing this work safely while protecting workers, the public, and the environment is their commitment. The purpose of this document is to provide a description of the essential components of chemical safety, the integration of these components into the Y-12 Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), and the functional integration of chemical safety issues across Y-12 organizations and programs managed by Energy Systems.

  11. 48 CFR 970.5223-6 - Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management. 970.5223-6 Section 970.5223-6... FEDERAL ENVIRONMENTAL, ENERGY, AND TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT (OCT 2010) Since this contract involves... MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Solicitation Provisions and Contract Clauses for Management and...

  12. Louisiana commercial energy-management workshops: malls and shopping centers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An energy management program for shopping centers and malls is discussed which includes five steps: performing an energy audit, undertaking a building walk-through survey, developing an understanding of utility rate structures, identifying and implementing energy conservation opportunities, and maintaining ongoing management and monitoring of the program. Forms and instructions are provided for the building and equipment survey. Energy conservation opportunities discussed include building operation and maintenance and retrofit projects. A case history illustrates the points discussed. Building systems discussed one-by-one include the building envelope, lighting, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, domestic water, elevators, and escalators. (LEW)

  13. A Targeted Management of the Nutrient Solution in a Soilless Tomato Crop According to Plant Needs.

    PubMed

    Signore, Angelo; Serio, Francesco; Santamaria, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of closed soilless systems is useful in minimizing the environmental impact of the greenhouse crops. Instead, a significant problem in closed soilless systems is represented by the accumulation of ions in the recycled nutrient solution (NS), in particular the unabsorbed or poorly absorbed ones. To overcome such problem, we: (1) studied the effect of several values of the electrical conductivity (EC) of NS in a NFT (Nutrient Film Technique) system on a cherry type tomato crop, and (2) define a NS (called recovery solution), based on the concept of "uptake concentration" and transpiration-biomass ratio, that fits the real needs of the plant with respect to water and nutrients. Three levels of EC set point (SP), above which the NS was completely replaced (SP5, SP7.5, and SP10 for the EC limit of 5, 7.5, and 10 dS m(-1), respectively), were established. The SP10 treatment yield was not different from other treatments, and it allowed a better quality of the berries (for dry matter and total soluble solids) and higher environmental sustainability due to a lower discharge of total nutrients into the environment (37 and 59% with respect to SP7.5 and SP5, respectively). The recovery solution used in the second trial allowed a more punctual NS management, by adapting to the real needs of the crop. Moreover, it allowed a lesser amount of water and nutrients to be discharged into the environment and a better use of brackish water, due to a more accurate management of the EC of the NS. The targeted management, based on transpiration-biomass ratio, indicates that, in some stages of the plant cycle, the NS used can be diluted, in order to save water and nutrients. With such management a closed cycle can be realized without affecting the yield, but improving the quality of the tomato berries. PMID:27242804

  14. A Targeted Management of the Nutrient Solution in a Soilless Tomato Crop According to Plant Needs

    PubMed Central

    Signore, Angelo; Serio, Francesco; Santamaria, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of closed soilless systems is useful in minimizing the environmental impact of the greenhouse crops. Instead, a significant problem in closed soilless systems is represented by the accumulation of ions in the recycled nutrient solution (NS), in particular the unabsorbed or poorly absorbed ones. To overcome such problem, we: (1) studied the effect of several values of the electrical conductivity (EC) of NS in a NFT (Nutrient Film Technique) system on a cherry type tomato crop, and (2) define a NS (called recovery solution), based on the concept of “uptake concentration” and transpiration–biomass ratio, that fits the real needs of the plant with respect to water and nutrients. Three levels of EC set point (SP), above which the NS was completely replaced (SP5, SP7.5, and SP10 for the EC limit of 5, 7.5, and 10 dS m-1, respectively), were established. The SP10 treatment yield was not different from other treatments, and it allowed a better quality of the berries (for dry matter and total soluble solids) and higher environmental sustainability due to a lower discharge of total nutrients into the environment (37 and 59% with respect to SP7.5 and SP5, respectively). The recovery solution used in the second trial allowed a more punctual NS management, by adapting to the real needs of the crop. Moreover, it allowed a lesser amount of water and nutrients to be discharged into the environment and a better use of brackish water, due to a more accurate management of the EC of the NS. The targeted management, based on transpiration–biomass ratio, indicates that, in some stages of the plant cycle, the NS used can be diluted, in order to save water and nutrients. With such management a closed cycle can be realized without affecting the yield, but improving the quality of the tomato berries. PMID:27242804

  15. Energy Management Workbook for Local Governments : Workbook 1, Electrical Energy, 1981.

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-01

    Descriptions are presented for 20 major categories of energy actions providing background information needed for communities to implement energy management programs and explaining where financial and technical help may be available. Chapter 1 provides background on the energy problem, discusses Federal, state and local roles, and outlines the planning process. Chapter 2 is a list of 20 questions to help identify a range of potential actions that could become part of the energy management plan. Chapter 3 will help evaluate each of the twenty potential activities, and chapters 4 and 5 discuss implementing and monitoring the energy management plan. (MCW)

  16. High energy and power density capacitors from solution-processed ternary ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Han, Kuo; Gadinski, Matthew Robert; Zhang, Guangzu; Wang, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Concurrent improvements in dielectric constant and breakdown strength are attained in a solution-processed ternary ferroelectric polymer nanocomposite incorporated with two-dimensional boron nitride nanosheets and zero-dimensional barium titanate nanoparticles that synergistically interact to enable a remarkable energy-storage capability, including large discharged energy density, high charge-discharge efficiency, and great power density.

  17. Keynote address: Reinventing fire: Physics + markets = energy solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lovins, Amory B.

    2015-03-30

    Rocky Mountain Institute's multi-year, 61-author, peer-reviewed Reinventing Fire synthesis showed how the U.S. can realistically run a 2.6× bigger U.S. economy in 2050 with no oil, coal, or nuclear energy, one-third less natural gas, tripled efficiency, and 74% renewable supplies (80% for electricity). This transition, at historically reasonable rates, could be led by business for profit, applying normal rates of return, with some innovative subnational and administrative policies but no Acts of Congress. Excluding carbon emissions and all other externalities, the net present value would be $5 trillion more favorable than business-as-usual, averaging a 14% Internal Rate of Return.

  18. Keynote address: Reinventing fire: Physics + markets = energy solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovins, Amory B.

    2015-03-01

    Rocky Mountain Institute's multi-year, 61-author, peer-reviewed Reinventing Fire synthesis showed how the U.S. can realistically run a 2.6× bigger U.S. economy in 2050 with no oil, coal, or nuclear energy, one-third less natural gas, tripled efficiency, and 74% renewable supplies (80% for electricity). This transition, at historically reasonable rates, could be led by business for profit, applying normal rates of return, with some innovative subnational and administrative policies but no Acts of Congress. Excluding carbon emissions and all other externalities, the net present value would be 5 trillion more favorable than business-as-usual, averaging a 14% Internal Rate of Return.

  19. Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

    1994-07-01

    This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

  20. Effects of internal inductance on the energy confinement time by using the solution of equilibrium problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, dependence of energy confinement time on plasma internal inductance has been studied by using the solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE) for circular cross-section HT-7 tokamak. For this, the Shafranov parameter (asymmetry factor) and poloidal beta were obtained from solution of GSE. Then we can find the dependence of energy confinement time, on plasma internal inductance. It is observed that the maximum energy confinement time is related to the low values of internal inductance (0.7 < li < 0.9).

  1. Energy Management at the University of Melbourne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A program to reduce energy consumption and limit fuel expenditures at the University of Melbourne involved a study of consumption and facility usage, installation of a central energy monitoring system, and a university and public relations effort to enlist student and staff help. (MSE)

  2. Automation Power Energy Management Strategy for Mobile Telecom Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jong-Ching; Chen, Jung-Chin; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Huang, Yi-Chao

    The aim of this research is to study the power energy cost reduction of the mobile telecom industry through the supervisor control and data acquisition (SCADA) system application during globalization and liberalization competition. Yet this management system can be proposed functions: operating monitors, the analysis on load characteristics and dropping the cost of management.

  3. Electrical Load and Energy Management. Course Outline and Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Paul

    Presented are 13 lecture outlines with accompanying handouts and reference lists for teaching school administrators and maintenance personnel the use of electrical load management as an energy conservation tool. To aid course participants in making cost effective use of electrical power, methods of load management in a variety of situations are…

  4. Energy Management in Higher Education: Value for Money Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Higher Education Funding Council, Edinburgh.

    This Value for Money project provides an update of the 1996 "Energy Management Study in the Higher Education Sector: National Report." It reviews the management arrangement for utilities in the higher education (HE) sector, and it identifies key actions and future issues that must be addressed by HE institutions in developing a strategic policy…

  5. The unavoidable uncertainty of renewable energy and its management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2016-04-01

    Conventional energy systems gave the luxury of a fully controllable and deterministically manageable energy production. Renewable energies are uncertain and often unavailable at the time of demand. Wind and solar energies are highly variable, dependent on atmospheric and climatic conditions and unpredictable. The related uncertainty is much higher than commonly thought, as both the wind and sunshine duration processes exhibit Hurst-Kolmogorov behaviour. Lack of proper modelling of this behaviour results in overestimation of wind and solar energy potentials, and frequent "surprises" of persisting low (or high) production. Proper modelling of the uncertainty is a necessary step for renewable energy management. This latter requires both structural measures - in particular integration with pumped storage hydropower systems - and optimization methodologies for the operation of large-scale hybrid renewable energy systems. These key ideas are illustrated with a case study for a big district of Greece.

  6. Helping Students Manage Their Energy: Taking Their Pulse with the Energy Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spreitzer, Gretchen M.; Grant, Traci

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a tool to help students learn to better manage their energy. The tool asks students to assess their energy levels for each waking hour over at least 2 days in order to identify patterns of activities associated with high energy and with depleted energy. The article describes how to use the tool in the classroom by…

  7. [Creation and evaluation of the respective rank problem solution worksheet for improvement pharmaceutical management quality].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayo; Orii, Takao; Kawai, Noriko; Kondo, Yoshiko

    2002-08-01

    A respective rank problem solution worksheet was developed focusing on problem solution in training in pharmaceutical management. How the training influenced the instructions given to patients was then evaluated in two pharmacists in the NTT East Kanto Medical Center and three in an Ofuna central hospital. After the five pharmacists underwent the training, the records of 10 medication instructions to patients given by each before and after the training were compared. The records were analyzed based on a point calculation table, and the number of acquisition points was computed. The acquisition points increased significantly after training for all five pharmacists, from a mean of 3.56 before training to a mean of 8.34 after training. Although the acquisition points related to patient education were high, those for intervention during therapeutic monitoring, such as for adverse drug reaction or the selection of appropriate pharmaceuticals were acceptable, increasing to a mean 8.4 items after training compared with 4.4 items before. The respective rank problem solution worksheet is therefore considered useful in improving the quality of training pharmaceutical management.

  8. Product Lifecycle Management and the Quest for Sustainable Space Exploration Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Pamela W.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Grieves, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) is an outcome of lean thinking to eliminate waste and increase productivity. PLM is inextricably tied to the systems engineering business philosophy, coupled with a methodology by which personnel, processes and practices, and information technology combine to form an architecture platform for product design, development, manufacturing, operations, and decommissioning. In this model, which is being implemented by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Engineering Directorate, total lifecycle costs are important variables for critical decision-making. With the ultimate goal to deliver quality products that meet or exceed requirements on time and within budget, PLM is a powerful concept to shape everything from engineering trade studies and testing goals, to integrated vehicle operations and retirement scenarios. This briefing will demonstrate how the MSFC Engineering Directorate is implementing PLM as part of an overall strategy to deliver safe, reliable, and affordable space exploration solutions and how that strategy aligns with the Agency and Center systems engineering policies and processes. Sustainable space exploration solutions demand that all lifecycle phases be optimized, and engineering the next generation space transportation system requires a paradigm shift such that digital tools and knowledge management, which are central elements of PLM, are used consistently to maximum effect. Adopting PLM, which has been used by the aerospace and automotive industry for many years, for spacecraft applications provides a foundation for strong, disciplined systems engineering and accountable return on investment. PLM enables better solutions using fewer resources by making lifecycle considerations in an integrative decision-making process.

  9. Ab initio calculations of free energy barriers for chemical reactions in solution: proton transfer in [FHF]-.

    PubMed

    Muller, R P; Warshel, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method for calculating activation free energies of chemical reactions in solution, using molecular mechanics force fields for the solvent and an ab initio technique that incorporates the potential from the solvent in its Hamiltonian for the solute. The empirical valence bond (EVB) method is used as a reference potential for the ab initio free energy calculation, and drives the reaction along the proper coordinate, thus overcoming problems encountered by direct attempts to use molecular orbital methods in calculations of activation free energies. The utility of our method is illustrated by calculating the activation free energy for proton transfer between fluoride ions in the [FHF]-system, in both polar and nonpolar solution.

  10. Mixed addenda polyoxometalate "solutions" for stationary energy storage.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Harry D; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-11-28

    A series of redox flow batteries utilizing mixed addenda (vanadium and tungsten), phosphorus-based polyoxometalates (A-α-PV3W9O40(6-), B-α-PV3W9O40(6-), and P2V3W15O62(9-)) were prepared and tested. Cyclic voltammetry and bulk electrolysis experiments on the Keggin compounds (A-α-PV3W9O40(6-) and B-α-PV3W9O40(6-)) established that the vanadium centers of these compounds could be used as the positive electrode (PV(IV)3W(VI)9O40(9-)/PV(V)3W(VI)9O40(6-)), and the tungsten centers could be used as the negative electrode (PV(IV)3W(VI)9O40(9-)/PV(IV)3W(V)3W(VI)6O40(12-)) since these electrochemical processes are separated by about 1 V. The results showed that A-α-PV3W9O40(6-) (where A indicates adjacent, corner-sharing vanadium atoms) had coulombic efficiencies (charge in divided by charge out) above 80%, while the coulombic efficiency of B-α-PV3W9O40(6-) (where B indicates adjacent edge-sharing vanadium atoms) fluctuated between 50% and 70% during cycling. The electrochemical yield, a measurement of the actual charge or discharge observed in comparison with the theoretical charge, was between 40% and 50% for A-α-PV3W9O40(6-), and (31)P NMR showed small amounts of PV2W10O40(5-) and PVW11O40(4-) formed with cycling. The electrochemical yield for B-α-PV3W9O40(6-) decreased from 90% to around 60% due to precipitation of the compound on the electrode, but there were no decomposition products detected in the solution by (31)P NMR, and infrared data on the electrode suggested that the cluster remained intact. Testing of P2V3W15O62(9-) (Wells-Dawson structure) suggested higher charge density clusters were not as suitable as the Keggin structures for a redox flow battery due to the poor stability and inaccessibility of the highly reduced materials.

  11. Energy management at Hewlett-Packard Company, Loveland, Colorado, Site

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, E.E.

    1998-07-01

    The Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) Facility in Loveland, Colorado is an office and manufacturing complex of approximately 1.1 million sq. ft. It consists of six major and several minor buildings. Energy management is a multi-faceted effort with emphasis on: (1) electrical and natural gas rate structures, (2) lighting improvements, (3) lighting control, (4) demand side management, specifically chilled water plant optimization, (5) utility system monitoring and control, (6) tax incentives, (7) internal billing--energy surcharges, (8) control system optimization, and (9) auditing. Anticipated energy cost savings have been forecast for each area mentioned. The paper discusses utility management, energy auditing, natural gas pricing, and energy and utility monitoring.

  12. An SNMP-based solution to enable remote ISO/IEEE 11073 technical management.

    PubMed

    Lasierra, Nelia; Alesanco, Alvaro; García, José

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an architecture based on the integration of simple network management protocol version 3 (SNMPv3) and the standard ISO/IEEE 11073 (X73) to manage technical information in home-based telemonitoring scenarios. This architecture includes the development of an SNMPv3-proxyX73 agent which comprises a management information base (MIB) module adapted to X73. In the proposed scenario, medical devices (MDs) send information to a concentrator device [designated as compute engine (CE)] using the X73 standard. This information together with extra information collected in the CE is stored in the developed MIB. Finally, the information collected is available for remote access via SNMP connection. Moreover, alarms and events can be configured by an external manager in order to provide warnings of irregularities in the MDs' technical performance evaluation. This proposed SNMPv3 agent provides a solution to integrate and unify technical device management in home-based telemonitoring scenarios fully adapted to X73.

  13. 77 FR 28594 - Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC's application for...

  14. 77 FR 64980 - Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC's application for...

  15. Public sector energy management: A strategy for catalyzing energy efficiency in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anish Kumar

    To date the public sector role in facilitating the transition to a sustainable energy future has been envisaged mainly from a regulatory perspective. In such a role, the public sector provides the push factors---enforcing regulations and providing incentives---to correct market imperfections that impede energy transitions. An alternative and complementary role of the public sector that is now gaining increasing attention is that of catalyzing energy transitions through public sector energy management initiatives. This dissertation offers a conceptual framework to rationalize such a role for the public sector by combining recent theories of sustainable energy transition and public management. In particular, the framework identifies innovative public management strategies (such as performance contracting and procurement) for effectively implementing sustainable energy projects in government facilities. The dissertation evaluates a model of sustainable public sector energy management for promoting energy efficiency in Malaysia. The public sector in Malaysia can be a major player in leading and catalyzing energy efficiency efforts as it is not only the largest and one of the most influential energy consumers, but it also plays a central role in setting national development strategy. The dissertation makes several recommendations on how a public sector energy management strategy can be implemented in Malaysia. The US Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is used as a practical model. The analysis, however, shows that in applying the FEMP model to the Malaysian context, there are a number of limitations that will have to be taken into consideration to enable a public sector energy management strategy to be effectively implemented. Overall the analysis of this dissertation contributes to a rethinking of the public sector role in sustainable energy development that can strengthen the sector's credibility both in terms of governance and institutional performance. In

  16. Power Contro Energy Management and Market Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Addison; Andrew Stanbury

    2005-12-15

    More efficient use of the nation's electrical energy infrastructure will result in minimizing the cost of energy to the end user. Using real time electrical market information coupled with defined rules, market opportunities can be identified that provide economic benefit for both users and marketers of electricity. This report describes the design of one such system and the features a fully functional system would provide. This report documents several investigated methods of controlling load diversity or shifting.

  17. 10 CFR 905.1 - What are the purposes of the Energy Planning and Management Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Management Program? 905.1 Section 905.1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM General Provisions § 905.1 What are the purposes of the Energy Planning and Management Program? The purposes of the Energy Planning and Management Program (EPAMP) are to meet the objectives of Section 114...

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Reimund, Kevin K.; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R.; Wilson, Aaron D.

    2015-08-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π/(1+√w⁻¹), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at “maximum power density operating pressure” requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  19. Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    Annual reports on Federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in Federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities conducted by Federal agencies under the: Energy management and energy consumption requirements of section 543 of NECPA, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 8253); Energy savings performance contract authority of section 801 of NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619, as amended (42 U.S.C. §§ 8287-8287d); Renewable energy purchase goal of section 203 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 15852); Federal building performance standard requirements under Section 109 of EPAct 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 6834(a)); Requirements on the procurement and identification of energy efficient products under section 161 of EPAct 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-486 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 8262g); Sections 431, 432, and 434 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Pub. L. No. 110-140 (42 U.S.C. § 8253) and section 527 of EISA (42 U.S.C. § 17143); Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, 72 Fed. Reg. 3,919 (Jan. 26, 2007); Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, 74 Fed. Reg. 52,117 (Oct. 5, 2009).

  20. Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    Annual reports on Federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in Federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities conducted by Federal agencies under the: Energy management and energy consumption requirements of section 543 of NECPA, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 8253); Energy savings performance contract authority of section 801 of NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619, as amended (42 U.S.C. §§ 8287-8287d); Renewable energy purchase goal of section 203 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 15852); Federal building performance standard requirements under Section 109 of EPAct 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 6834(a)); Requirements on the procurement and identification of energy efficient products under section 161 of EPAct 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-486 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 8262g); Sections 431, 432, and 434 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Pub. L. No. 110-140 (42 U.S.C. § 8253) and section 527 of EISA (42 U.S.C. § 17143); Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, 72 Fed. Reg. 3,919 (Jan. 26, 2007); Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, 74 Fed. Reg. 52,117 (Oct. 5, 2009).

  1. Design of System Architecture and Thermal Management Components for an Underwater Energy Storage Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Brian C.

    The electricity industry is currently experiencing a significant paradigm shift in managing electrical resources. With the onset of aging infrastructure and growing power demands, and the influx of intermittent renewable energy generation, grid system operators are looking towards energy storage as a solution for mitigating industry challenges. An emerging storage solution is underwater compressed air energy storage (UWCAES), where air compressors and turbo-expanders are used to convert electricity to and from compressed air stored in submerged accumulators. This work presents three papers that collectively focus on the design and optimization of an UWCAES system. In the first paper, the field performance of a distensible air accumulator is studied for application in UWCAES systems. It is followed by a paper that analyzed the energetic and exergetic performance of a theoretical UWCAES system. The final paper presents a multi-objective UWCAES optimization model utilizing a genetic algorithm to determine optimum system configurations.

  2. Energy Management for Human Service Agencies. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    Concerned about the effect rising energy costs would have on their local affiliates, building consultants for national social welfare agencies have been advocating the initiation of energy management and conservation programs. This manual, a three-part educational and planning tool, is a key element in a program developed to help local agencies…

  3. 77 FR 32994 - Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... Register on March 30, 2012 (see 77 FR 19321) opening a 60-day comment period originally scheduled to close... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf; Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  4. Implicit Solution of Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion Including Reactive Heating Source in Material Energy Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Shumaker, D E; Woodward, C S

    2005-05-03

    In this paper, the authors investigate performance of a fully implicit formulation and solution method of a diffusion-reaction system modeling radiation diffusion with material energy transfer and a fusion fuel source. In certain parameter regimes this system can lead to a rapid conversion of potential energy into material energy. Accuracy in time integration is essential for a good solution since a major fraction of the fuel can be depleted in a very short time. Such systems arise in a number of application areas including evolution of a star and inertial confinement fusion. Previous work has addressed implicit solution of radiation diffusion problems. Recently Shadid and coauthors have looked at implicit and semi-implicit solution of reaction-diffusion systems. In general they have found that fully implicit is the most accurate method for difficult coupled nonlinear equations. In previous work, they have demonstrated that a method of lines approach coupled with a BDF time integrator and a Newton-Krylov nonlinear solver could efficiently and accurately solve a large-scale, implicit radiation diffusion problem. In this paper, they extend that work to include an additional heating term in the material energy equation and an equation to model the evolution of the reactive fuel density. This system now consists of three coupled equations for radiation energy, material energy, and fuel density. The radiation energy equation includes diffusion and energy exchange with material energy. The material energy equation includes reaction heating and exchange with radiation energy, and the fuel density equation includes its depletion due to the fuel consumption.

  5. Energy Management: An Important Component of Quality Control in School Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Peter B.

    1984-01-01

    The cost of energy will continue to rise. Energy conservation, by reducing usage, will at least maintain energy costs. Energy management is an important part of the school food service manager's job. Guidelines are provided. (MLF)

  6. Zebrafish Database: Customizable, Free, and Open-Source Solution for Facility Management.

    PubMed

    Yakulov, Toma Antonov; Walz, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Zebrafish Database is a web-based customizable database solution, which can be easily adapted to serve both single laboratories and facilities housing thousands of zebrafish lines. The database allows the users to keep track of details regarding the various genomic features, zebrafish lines, zebrafish batches, and their respective locations. Advanced search and reporting options are available. Unique features are the ability to upload files and images that are associated with the respective records and an integrated calendar component that supports multiple calendars and categories. Built on the basis of the Joomla content management system, the Zebrafish Database is easily extendable without the need for advanced programming skills.

  7. Evaluation of a commercial AdvancedTCA board management controller solution (IPMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J.; Bobillier, V.; Haas, S.; Joos, M.; Vasey, F.

    2016-02-01

    The MicroTCA (MTCA) and AdvancedTCA (ATCA) industry standards have been selected as the hardware platform for the upgrade of the electronic systems of some of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . In this context, the electronics support group for experiments at CERN is running a project to perform technical evaluations of MTCA and ATCA equipment. As part of this activity, a commercial solution for an Intelligent Platform Management Controller (IPMC), an essential component of any ATCA blade design, is being evaluated. We validated the supported IPMC features, checked the interoperability and adapted the reference design for use on an existing ATCA carrier board.

  8. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  9. Personal Genomic Information Management and Personalized Medicine: Challenges, Current Solutions, and Roles of HIM Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Alzu'bi, Amal; Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the term personalized medicine has received more and more attention in the field of healthcare. The increasing use of this term is closely related to the astonishing advancement in DNA sequencing technologies and other high-throughput biotechnologies. A large amount of personal genomic data can be generated by these technologies in a short time. Consequently, the needs for managing, analyzing, and interpreting these personal genomic data to facilitate personalized care are escalated. In this article, we discuss the challenges for implementing genomics-based personalized medicine in healthcare, current solutions to these challenges, and the roles of health information management (HIM) professionals in genomics-based personalized medicine. PMID:24808804

  10. A System for Managing Replenishment of a Nutrient Solution Using an Electrical Conductivity Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D.; Dogan, N.; Aglan, H.; Mortley, D.; Loretan, P.

    1998-01-01

    Control of nutrient solution parameters is very important for the growth and development of plants grown hydroponically. Protocols involving different nutrient solution replenishment times (e.g. one-week, two-week, or two-day replenishment) provide manual periodic control of the nutrient solution's electrical conductivity (EC). Since plants take-up nutrients as they grow, manual control has a drawback in that EC is not held constant between replenishments. In an effort to correct this problem the Center for Food and Environmental Systems for Human Exploration of Space at Tuskegee University has developed a system for managing and controlling levels of EC over a plant's entire growing cycle. A prototype system is being tested on sweetpotato production using the nutrient film technique (NFT), and it is being compared to a system in which sweetpotatoes are grown using NFT with manual control. NASA has played an important role in the development of environmental control systems. They have become a forerunner in growing plants hydroponically with some control systems through the use of networked data acquisition and control using environmental growth chambers. Data acquisition systems which involve the use of real-time, calibration, set points, user panel, and graphical representation programming provide a good method of controlling nutrient solution parameters such as EC and pH [Bledsoe, 19931]. In NASA's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) at Kennedy Space Center, control is provided by a programmable logic controller (PLC). This is an industrial controller which combines ladder computer logic which has the ability to handle various levels of electrical power. The controller controls temperature, light and other parameters that affect the plant's environment, in the BPC, the Nutrient Delivery System (NIX), a sub-system of the PLC, controls nutrient solution parameters such as EC, pH, and solution levels. When the nutrient EC measurement goes outside a preset range (120

  11. Freescale Semiconductor Successfully Implements an Energy Management System

    SciTech Connect

    2011-06-30

    Through the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) plant certification program, Freescale Semiconductor implemented projects at the company's Oak Hill Fab plant that reduced annual energy consumption by 28 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity and 26,000 million British thermal units (Btu) of natural gas between 2006 and 2009, saving more than $2 million each year. The plant is now certified at the SEP silver level, and has a management system in place to proactively manage the facility's energy resources in the future.

  12. Fuzzy-Logic Subsumption Controller for Home Energy Management Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, Nathan; Johnson, Brian; Lundstrom, Blake

    2015-10-06

    Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS) are controllers that manage and coordinate the generation, storage, and loads in a home. These controllers are increasingly necessary to ensure that increasing penetrations of distributed energy resources are used effectively and do not disrupt the operation of the grid. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to HEMS design based on behavioral control methods, which do not require accurate models or predictions and are very responsive to changing conditions. We develop a proof-of-concept behavioral HEMS controller and show by simulation on an example home energy system that it capable of making context-dependent tradeoffs between goals under challenging conditions.

  13. Coordination of energy and air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The project had two goals: first, to demonstrate industrial firms can improve plant energy efficiency as air pollution emissions are reduced; second, to demonstrate that both Seattle City Light and PSAPCA could more effectively accomplish their individual objectives through mutual cooperation, even though the two agencies have very different missions. The cooperative efforts promised benefits for all the parties involved. Seattle City Light hoped that PSAPCA`s knowledge of the likely developments in air pollution controls would help the utility better target energy conservation opportunities among its industrial customers. PSAPCA hoped that the financial assistance offer by Seattle City Light through its conservation programs would make industry less resistant to PSAPCA enforcement of new air pollution control regulations. Finally, individual industrial firms could mitigate some of the cost of meeting the new air pollution control standards. The results of the project were mixed. CEAM did demonstrate that industrial plants can improve energy efficiency as they reduce air pollution emissions, but the relationship between air pollution reduction and energy consumption is complicated; and the project was less successful in meeting its second goal. The project design did not include a measure by which results could be compared against what the two agencies would have accomplished had they not collaborated. Moreover, the project could have benefited substantially from a more complete implementation plan and the production of data quantifying the energy conservation potential resulting from the development of more stringent air pollution control regulations for each of Seattle`s major industries.

  14. Solution-Processed Two-Dimensional Metal Dichalcogenide-Based Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Conversion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiehong; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The development of renewable energy storage and conversion devices is one of the most promising ways to address the current energy crisis, along with the global environmental concern. The exploration of suitable active materials is the key factor for the construction of highly efficient, highly stable, low-cost and environmentally friendly energy storage and conversion devices. The ability to prepare two-dimensional (2D) metal dichalcogenide (MDC) nanosheets and their functional composites in high yield and large scale via various solution-based methods in recent years has inspired great research interests in their utilization for renewable energy storage and conversion applications. Here, we will summarize the recent advances of solution-processed 2D MDCs and their hybrid nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion applications, including rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, electrocatalytic hydrogen generation and solar cells. Moreover, based on the current progress, we will also give some personal insights on the existing challenges and future research directions in this promising field.

  15. Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide. [Contains special sections on analytical energy forecasting, renewable energy resource assessment, demand-side energy management, energy vulnerability assessment, and energy strategy integration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii's energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii's energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

  16. Energy storage management system with distributed wireless sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Bandhauer, Todd M.

    2015-12-08

    An energy storage system having a multiple different types of energy storage and conversion devices. Each device is equipped with one or more sensors and RFID tags to communicate sensor information wirelessly to a central electronic management system, which is used to control the operation of each device. Each device can have multiple RFID tags and sensor types. Several energy storage and conversion devices can be combined.

  17. Proton and hydride transfers in solution: hybrid QMmm/MM free energy perturbation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L. Lawrence |; Bash, P.A.; Kerell, A.D., Jr

    1996-03-01

    A hybrid quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy perturbation (FEP) method is implemented in the context of molecular dynamics (MD). The semiempirical quantum mechanical (QM) Hamiltonian (Austin Model 1) represents solute molecules, and the molecular mechanical (MM) CHARMM force field describes the water solvent. The QM/MM FEP method is used to calculate the free energy changes in aqueous solution for (1) a proton transfer from methanol to imidazole and (2) a hydride transfer from methoxide to nicotinamide. The QM/MM interaction energies between the solute and solvent arc calibrated to emulate the solute-solvent interaction energies determined at the Hartee-Fock 6-31G(d) level of ab initio theory. The free energy changes for the proton and hydride transfers are calculated to be 15.1 and {minus}6.3 kcal/mol, respectively, which compare favorably with the corresponding experimental values of 12.9 and {minus}7.4 kcal/mol. An estimate of the reliability of the calculations is obtained through the computation of the forward (15.1 and {minus}6.3 kcal/mol) and backward ({minus}14.1 and 9.1 kcal/mol)free energy changes. The reasonable correspondence between these two independent calculations suggests that adequate phase space sampling is obtained along the reaction pathways chosen to transform the proton and hydride systems between their respective reactant and product states.

  18. Solutions and reductions for radiative energy transport in laser-heated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbridge, P.; Ivanova, N. M.

    2015-01-15

    A full symmetry classification is given for models of energy transport in radiant plasma when the mass density is spatially variable and the diffusivity is nonlinear. A systematic search for conservation laws also leads to some potential symmetries and to an integrable nonlinear model. Classical point symmetries, potential symmetries, and nonclassical symmetries are used to effect variable reductions and exact solutions. The simplest time-dependent solution is shown to be stable and relevant to a closed system.

  19. High energy particle background at neutron spallation sources and possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashyna, N.; Kanaki, K.; Kittelmann, T.; Filges, U.; Deen, P.; Herwig, K.; Ehlers, G.; Greene, G.; Carpenter, J.; Connatser, R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Bentley, P. M.

    2014-07-01

    Modern spallation neutron sources are driven by proton beams ~ GeV energies. Whereas low energy particle background shielding is well understood for reactors sources of neutrons (~20 MeV), for high energies (100s MeV to multiple GeV) there is potential to improve shielding solutions and reduce instrument backgrounds significantly. We present initial measured data on high energy particle backgrounds, which illustrate the results of particle showers caused by high energy particles from spallation neutron sources. We use detailed physics models of different materials to identify new shielding solutions for such neutron sources, including laminated layers of multiple materials. In addition to the steel and concrete, which are used traditionally, we introduce some other options that are new to the neutron scattering community, among which there are copper alloys as used in hadronic calorimeters in high energy physics laboratories. These concepts have very attractive energy absorption characteristics, and simulations predict that the background suppression could be improved by one or two orders of magnitude. These solutions are expected to be great benefit to the European Spallation Source, where the majority of instruments are potentially affected by high energy backgrounds, as well as to existing spallation sources.

  20. Energy Management Programs at the John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Management internship over the summer of 2011 involved a series of projects related to energy management on the John. F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This internship saved KSC $14.3 million through budgetary projections, saved KSC $400,000 through implementation of the recycling program, updated KSC Environmental Management System's (EMS) water and energy-related List of Requirements (LoR) which changed 25.7% of the list, provided a incorporated a 45% design review of the Ordnance Operations Facility (OOF) which noted six errors within the design plans, created a certification system and timeline for implementation regarding compliance to the federal Guiding Principles, and gave off-shore wind as the preferred alternative to on-site renewable energy generation.

  1. Efficiency Mode of Energy Management based on Optimal Flight Path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling-xiao

    2016-07-01

    One new method of searching the optimal flight path in target function is put forward, which is applied to energy section for reentry flight vehicle, and the optimal flight path in which the energy is managed to decline rapidly, is settled by this design. The research for energy management is meaningful for engineering, it can also improve the applicability and flexibility for vehicle. The angle-of-attack and the bank angle are used to regulate energy and range at unpowered reentry flight as control variables. Firstly, the angle-of-attack section for minimum lift-to-drag ratio is ensured by the relation of range and lift-to-drag ratio. Secondly, build the secure boundary for flight corridor by restrictions in flight. Thirdly, the D-e section is optimized for energy expending in corridor by the influencing rule of the D-e section and range. Finally, compare this design method with the traditional Pseudo-spectral method. Moreover, energy-managing is achieved by cooperating lateral motion, and the optimized D-e section is tracked to prove the practicability of programming flight path with energy management.

  2. Energy management study: A proposed case of government building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Mohamad Zamhari; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Baharum, Mohd Faizal

    2015-05-01

    Align with the current needs of the sustainable and green technology in Malaysian construction industry, this research is conducted to seek and identify opportunities to better manage energy use including the process of understand when, where, and how energy is used in a building. The purpose of this research is to provide a best practice guideline as a practical tool to assist construction industry in Malaysia to improve the energy efficiency of the office building during the post-production by reviewing the current practice of the building operation and maintenance in order to optimum the usage and reduce the amount of energy input into the building. Therefore, this paper will review the concept of maintenance management, current issue in energy management, and on how the research process will be conducted. There are several process involves and focuses on technical and management techniques such as energy metering, tracing, harvesting, and auditing based on the case study that will be accomplish soon. Accordingly, a case study is appropriate to be selected as a strategic research approach in which involves an empirical investigation of a particular contemporary phenomenon within its real life context using multiple sources of evidence for the data collection process. A Government office building will be selected as an appropriate case study for this research. In the end of this research, it will recommend a strategic approach or model in a specific guideline for enabling energy-efficient operation and maintenance in the office building.

  3. Energy management study: A proposed case of government building

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, Mohamad Zamhari; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Baharum, Mohd Faizal

    2015-05-15

    Align with the current needs of the sustainable and green technology in Malaysian construction industry, this research is conducted to seek and identify opportunities to better manage energy use including the process of understand when, where, and how energy is used in a building. The purpose of this research is to provide a best practice guideline as a practical tool to assist construction industry in Malaysia to improve the energy efficiency of the office building during the post-production by reviewing the current practice of the building operation and maintenance in order to optimum the usage and reduce the amount of energy input into the building. Therefore, this paper will review the concept of maintenance management, current issue in energy management, and on how the research process will be conducted. There are several process involves and focuses on technical and management techniques such as energy metering, tracing, harvesting, and auditing based on the case study that will be accomplish soon. Accordingly, a case study is appropriate to be selected as a strategic research approach in which involves an empirical investigation of a particular contemporary phenomenon within its real life context using multiple sources of evidence for the data collection process. A Government office building will be selected as an appropriate case study for this research. In the end of this research, it will recommend a strategic approach or model in a specific guideline for enabling energy-efficient operation and maintenance in the office building.

  4. Optimal Management and Design of Energy Systems under Atmospheric Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitescu, M.; Constantinescu, E. M.; Zavala, V.

    2010-12-01

    The generation and distpatch of electricity while maintaining high reliability levels are two of the most daunting engineering problems of the modern era. This was demonstrated by the Northeast blackout of August 2003, which resulted in the loss of 6.2 gigawatts that served more than 50 million people and which resulted in economic losses on the order of $10 billion. In addition, there exist strong socioeconomic pressures to improve the efficiency of the grid. The most prominent solution to this problem is a substantial increase in the use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. In turn, its uncertain availability—which is due to the intrinsic weather variability—will increase the likelihood of disruptions. In this endeavors of current and next-generation power systems, forecasting atmospheric conditions with uncertainty can and will play a central role, at both the demand and the generation ends. User demands are strongly correlated to physical conditions such as temperature, humidity, and solar radiation. The reason is that the ambient temperature and solar radiation dictate the amount of air conditioning and lighting needed in residential and commercial buildings. But these potential benefits would come at the expense of increased variability in the dynamics of both production and demand, which would become even more dependent on weather state and its uncertainty. One of the important challenges for energy in our time is how to harness these benefits while “keeping the lights on”—ensuring that the demand is satisfied at all times and that no blackout occurs while all energy sources are optimally used. If we are to meet this challenge, accounting for uncertainty in the atmospheric conditions is essential, since this will allow minimizing the effects of false positives: committing too little baseline power in anticipation of demand that is underestimated or renewable energy levels that fail to materialize. In this work we describe a framework for the

  5. Plant Profiles - Industrial Energy Management in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    This 24-page brochure profiles industrial manufacturing firms who are achieving significant energy savings in their plants. The DOE Office of Industrial Technologies six plant-of-the-year nominees are featured, and an additional 10 projects from other companies are also highlighted. Information on OIT's awards and recognition process, and information on OIT and BestPractices is also included.

  6. Public Schools Energy Conservation Measures: Management Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This report is a summary of the first of five phases of a demonstration project of energy conservation school building modifications. The ten schools studied in this phase were selected as typical of the variations of building design, construction, and location for schools in this country. Given in this report are: (1) descriptions of the schools…

  7. Purchasing Energy. Managing School Facilities, Guide 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbell, Paul

    This booklet examines the purchasing choices which will be available with the introduction of full competition for all electricity and gas supplies in the United Kingdom, giving schools the chance to make significant savings on energy costs. The guide offers detailed purchasing information on such topics as tariff structures, contract energy…

  8. Creative Energy Management Can Save Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Patricia

    1984-01-01

    Schools can launch energy conservation programs with simple money-saving measures like improving boiler maintenance, recalibrating utility meters, and obtaining preferred utility rates. Becoming more assertive in the marketplace and using "creative financing" when needed, they can then reinvest their savings in more extensive projects. (MCG)

  9. Indoor Air Pollution: An Energy Management Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, David M.; Kulba, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Energy conservation measures have led to airtight buildings and reduced levels of ventilation resulting in indoor air pollution. Five kinds of contaminants--tobacco smoke, combustion products, microorganisms, organic compounds, and radon--are described, their hazards considered, and countermeasures outlined. (MLF)

  10. Data of cost-optimality and technical solutions for high energy performance buildings in warm climate

    PubMed Central

    Zacà, Ilaria; D’Agostino, Delia; Maria Congedo, Paolo; Baglivo, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The data reported in this article refers to input and output information related to the research articles entitled Assessment of cost-optimality and technical solutions in high performance multi-residential buildings in the Mediterranean area by Zacà et al. (Assessment of cost-optimality and technical solutions in high performance multi-residential buildings in the Mediterranean area, in press.) and related to the research article Cost-optimal analysis and technical comparison between standard and high efficient mono residential buildings in a warm climate by Baglivo et al. (Energy, 2015, 10.1016/j.energy.2015.02.062, in press). PMID:26217793

  11. Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, Ms. Anna; Hampson, Anne; Hedman, Mr. Bruce; Garland, Patricia W; Bautista, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. Using CHP today, the United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions annually compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. This CO{sub 2} reduction is the equivalent of removing more than 45 million cars from the road. In addition, CHP is one of the few options in the portfolio of energy alternatives that combines environmental effectiveness with economic viability and improved competitiveness. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future as an: (1) Environmental Solution: Significantly reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through greater energy efficiency; (2) Competitive Business Solution: Increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; (3) Local Energy Solution: Deployable throughout the US; and (4) Infrastructure Modernization Solution: Relieving grid congestion and improving energy security. CHP should be one of the first technologies deployed for near-term carbon reductions. The cost-effectiveness and near-term viability of widespread CHP deployment place the technology at the forefront of practical alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar, clean coal, biofuels, and nuclear power. Clear synergies exist between CHP and most other technologies that dominate the energy and environmental policy dialogue in the country today. As the Nation transforms how it produces, transports, and uses the many forms of energy, it must seize the clear opportunity afforded by CHP in terms of climate change, economic competitiveness, energy security, and infrastructure

  12. Geothermal energy projects - Planning and management

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, L.J.; Love, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    A presentation is made of management requirements for the development of geothermal resources by citing three major, and successful, projects: the Wairakei geothermal power project of New Zealand, the Hawaii geothermal project of the United States, and the Tiwi geothermal project of the Philippines. The three case studies are presented according to a format in which the history of each project falls into four phases: (1) planning, appraisal and design (2) section, approval and activation (3) operation, control and handover and (4) evaluation and refinement. Each case study furnishes extensive performance and economic figures, along with consideration of such related issues as geothermal effluent chemical content, infrastructural requirements, and environmental impact.

  13. Smart Energy Management of Multiple Full Cell Powered Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MOhammad S. Alam

    2007-04-23

    In this research project the University of South Alabama research team has been investigating smart energy management and control of multiple fuel cell power sources when subjected to varying demands of electrical and thermal loads together with demands of hydrogen production. This research has focused on finding the optimal schedule of the multiple fuel cell power plants in terms of electric, thermal and hydrogen energy. The optimal schedule is expected to yield the lowest operating cost. Our team is also investigating the possibility of generating hydrogen using photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells through finding materials for efficient light harvesting photoanodes. The goal is to develop an efficient and cost effective PEC solar cell system for direct electrolysis of water. In addition, models for hydrogen production, purification, and storage will be developed. The results obtained and the data collected will be then used to develop a smart energy management algorithm whose function is to maximize energy conservation within a managed set of appliances, thereby lowering O/M costs of the Fuel Cell power plant (FCPP), and allowing more hydrogen generation opportunities. The Smart Energy Management and Control (SEMaC) software, developed earlier, controls electrical loads in an individual home to achieve load management objectives such that the total power consumption of a typical residential home remains below the available power generated from a fuel cell. In this project, the research team will leverage the SEMaC algorithm developed earlier to create a neighborhood level control system.

  14. SPS Energy Conversion Power Management Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Energy technology concerning photovoltaic conversion, solar thermal conversion systems, and electrical power distribution processing is discussed. The manufacturing processes involving solar cells and solar array production are summarized. Resource issues concerning gallium arsenides and silicon alternatives are reported. Collector structures for solar construction are described and estimates in their service life, failure rates, and capabilities are presented. Theories of advanced thermal power cycles are summarized. Power distribution system configurations and processing components are presented.

  15. Closing the Loop--Improving Energy Management in Schools. Energy Research Group Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Nigel; Donn, Michael

    A study of the energy savings potential in New Zealand schools demonstrates that considerable reductions in energy costs can be achieved through energy management. An initial examination of available 1985 light, heat, and water expenditures for 268 secondary schools (84 percent of the secondary schools in New Zealand) is followed by the selection…

  16. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in concentrated solid solution alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanwen; Stocks, G Malcolm; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Bei, Hongbin; Sales, Brian C; Wang, Lumin; Béland, Laurent K; Stoller, Roger E; Samolyuk, German D; Caro, Magdalena; Caro, Alfredo; Weber, William J

    2015-01-01

    A grand challenge in materials research is to understand complex electronic correlation and non-equilibrium atomic interactions, and how such intrinsic properties and dynamic processes affect energy transfer and defect evolution in irradiated materials. Here we report that chemical disorder, with an increasing number of principal elements and/or altered concentrations of specific elements, in single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys can lead to substantial reduction in electron mean free path and orders of magnitude decrease in electrical and thermal conductivity. The subsequently slow energy dissipation affects defect dynamics at the early stages, and consequentially may result in less deleterious defects. Suppressed damage accumulation with increasing chemical disorder from pure nickel to binary and to more complex quaternary solid solutions is observed. Understanding and controlling energy dissipation and defect dynamics by altering alloy complexity may pave the way for new design principles of radiation-tolerant structural alloys for energy applications. PMID:26507943

  17. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in concentrated solid solution alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Bei, Hongbin; Sales, Brian C.; Wang, Lumin; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.; Samolyuk, German D.; Caro, Magdalena; Caro, Alfredo; Weber, William J.

    2015-10-01

    A grand challenge in materials research is to understand complex electronic correlation and non-equilibrium atomic interactions, and how such intrinsic properties and dynamic processes affect energy transfer and defect evolution in irradiated materials. Here we report that chemical disorder, with an increasing number of principal elements and/or altered concentrations of specific elements, in single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys can lead to substantial reduction in electron mean free path and orders of magnitude decrease in electrical and thermal conductivity. The subsequently slow energy dissipation affects defect dynamics at the early stages, and consequentially may result in less deleterious defects. Suppressed damage accumulation with increasing chemical disorder from pure nickel to binary and to more complex quaternary solid solutions is observed. Understanding and controlling energy dissipation and defect dynamics by altering alloy complexity may pave the way for new design principles of radiation-tolerant structural alloys for energy applications.

  18. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in concentrated solid solution alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanwen; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Bei, Hongbin; Sales, Brian C.; Wang, Lumin; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.; Samolyuk, German D.; Caro, Magdalena; Caro, Alfredo; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-01

    A grand challenge in materials research is to understand complex electronic correlation and non-equilibrium atomic interactions, and how such intrinsic properties and dynamic processes affect energy transfer and defect evolution in irradiated materials. Here we report that chemical disorder, with an increasing number of principal elements and/or altered concentrations of specific elements, in single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys can lead to substantial reduction in electron mean free path and orders of magnitude decrease in electrical and thermal conductivity. The subsequently slow energy dissipation affects defect dynamics at the early stages, and consequentially may result in less deleterious defects. Suppressed damage accumulation with increasing chemical disorder from pure nickel to binary and to more complex quaternary solid solutions is observed. Understanding and controlling energy dissipation and defect dynamics by altering alloy complexity may pave the way for new design principles of radiation-tolerant structural alloys for energy applications. PMID:26507943

  19. A systems approach to energy management and policy in commuter rail transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owan, Ransome Egimine

    1998-12-01

    This research is motivated by a recognition of energy as a significant part of the transportation problem. Energy is a long-term variable cost that is controllable. The problem is comprised of: the limited supply of energy, chronic energy deficits and oil imports, energy cost, poor fuel substitution, and the undesirable environmental effects of transportation fuels (Green House Gases and global warming). Mass transit systems are energy intensive networks and energy is a direct constraint to the supply of affordable transportation. Commuter railroads are also relatively unresponsive to energy price changes due to travel demand patterns, firm power needs and slow adoption of efficient train technologies. However, the long term energy demand is lacking in existing transportation planning philosophy. In spite of the apparent oversight, energy is as important as urban land use, funding and congestion, all of which merit explicit treatment. This research was conducted in the form of a case study of New Jersey Transit in an attempt to broaden the understanding of the long-term effects of energy in a transportation environment. The systems approach method that is driven by heuristic models was utilized to investigate energy usage, transit peer group efficiency, energy management regimes, and the tradeoffs between energy and transportation, a seldom discussed topic in the field. Implicit in systems thinking is the methodological hunt for solutions. The energy problem was divided into thinking is the methodological hunt for solutions. The energy problem was divided into smaller parts that in turn were simpler to solve. The research presented five heuristic models: Transit Energy Aggregation Model, Structural Energy Consumption Model, Traction Power Consumption Model, Conjunctive Demand Model, and a Managerial Action Module. A putative relationship was established between traction energy, car-miles, seasonal and ambient factors, without inference of direct causality. The co

  20. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 5.1: Expand the Number of Faculty Working in Wind Energy: Wind Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Energy storage to reduce peak-load demands on utilities is emerging as an important way to address the intermittency of renewable energy resources. Wind energy produced in the middle of the night may be wasted unless it can be stored, and conversely, solar energy production could be used after the sun goes down if we had an efficient way to store it. It is uses an electrochemical process to convert hydrogen gas into electricity. The role of fuel cells in energy storage is a very important criteria and it is compared with regular batteries for the advantages of fuel cells over the latter. For this reason fuel cells can be employed. PEM fuel cells can be effectively used for this reason. But the performance and durability of PEM fuel cells are significantly affected by the various components used in a PEM cell. Several parameters affect the performance and durability of fuel cells. They are water management, degradation of components, cell contamination, reactant starvation and thermal management. Water management is the parameter which plays a major role in the performance of a fuel cell. Based on the reviews, improvement of condensation on the cathode side of a fuel cell is expected to improve the performance of the fuel cell by reducing cathode flooding. Microchannels and minichannels can enhance condensation on the cathode side of a fuel cell. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the condensation of steam in mini and microchannels with hydraulic diameter of 2mm, 2.66mm, 200µm and 266µm respectively. The simulation was run at various mass flux values ranging from 0.5 kg/m2s and 4 kg/m2s. The length of the mini and microchannels were in the range of 20 mm to 100 mm. CFD software’s GAMBIT and FLUENT were used for simulating the condensation process through the mini and microchannels. Steam flowed through the channels, whose walls were cooled by natural convection of air at room temperature. The

  1. Benchmark solutions for the galactic heavy-ion transport equations with energy and spatial coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Lamkin, Stanley L.; Wilson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic heavy ion transport equations in the straightahead approximation with energy and spatial coupling. Analytical representations of the ion fluxes are obtained for a variety of sources with the assumption that the nuclear interaction parameters are energy independent. The method utilizes an analytical LaPlace transform inversion to yield a closed form representation that is computationally efficient. The flux profiles are then used to predict ion dose profiles, which are important for shield design studies.

  2. Power management for energy harvesting wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arms, S. W.; Townsend, C. P.; Churchill, D. L.; Galbreath, J. H.; Mundell, S. W.

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate smart wireless sensing nodes capable of operation at extremely low power levels. These systems were designed to be compatible with energy harvesting systems using piezoelectric materials and/or solar cells. The wireless sensing nodes included a microprocessor, on-board memory, sensing means (1000 ohm foil strain gauge), sensor signal conditioning, 2.4 GHz IEEE 802.15.4 radio transceiver, and rechargeable battery. Extremely low power consumption sleep currents combined with periodic, timed wake-up was used to minimize the average power consumption. Furthermore, we deployed pulsed sensor excitation and microprocessor power control of the signal conditioning elements to minimize the sensors" average contribution to power draw. By sleeping in between samples, we were able to demonstrate extremely low average power consumption. At 10 Hz, current consumption was 300 microamps at 3 VDC (900 microwatts); at 5 Hz: 400 microwatts, at 1 Hz: 90 microwatts. When the RF stage was not used, but data were logged to memory, consumption was further reduced. Piezoelectric strain energy harvesting systems delivered ~2000 microwatts under low level vibration conditions. Output power levels were also measured from two miniature solar cells; which provided a wide range of output power (~100 to 1400 microwatts), depending on the light type & distance from the source. In summary, system power consumption may be reduced by: 1) removing the load from the energy harvesting & storage elements while charging, 2) by using sleep modes in between samples, 3) pulsing excitation to the sensing and signal conditioning elements in between samples, and 4) by recording and/or averaging, rather than frequently transmitting, sensor data.

  3. Specification of Energy Assessment Methodologies to Satisfy ISO 50001 Energy Management Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanneganti, Harish

    Energy management has become more crucial for industrial sector as a way to lower their cost of production and in reducing their carbon footprint. Environmental regulations also force the industrial sector to increase the efficiency of their energy usage. Hence industrial sector started relying on energy management consultancies for improvements in energy efficiency. With the development of ISO 50001 standard, the entire energy management took a new dimension involving top level management and getting their commitment on energy efficiency. One of the key requirements of ISO 50001 is to demonstrate continual improvement in their (industry) energy efficiency. The major aim of this work is to develop an energy assessment methodology and reporting format to tailor the needs of ISO 50001. The developed methodology integrates the energy reduction aspect of an energy assessment with the requirements of sections 4.4.3 (Energy Review) to 4.4.6 (Objectives, Targets and Action Plans) in ISO 50001 and thus helping the facilities in easy implementation of ISO 50001.

  4. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    SciTech Connect

    McKane, Aimee; Desai, Deann; Matteini, Marco; Meffert, William; Williams, Robert; Risser, Roland

    2009-08-01

    Industry utilizes very complex systems, consisting of equipment and their human interface, which are organized to meet the production needs of the business. Effective and sustainable energy efficiency programs in an industrial setting require a systems approach to optimize the integrated whole while meeting primary business requirements. Companies that treat energy as a manageable resource and integrate their energy program into their management practices have an organizational context to continually seek opportunities for optimizing their energy use. The purpose of an energy management system standard is to provide guidance for industrial and commercial facilities to integrate energy efficiency into their management practices, including fine-tuning production processes and improving the energy efficiency of industrial systems. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has identified energy management as one of its top five priorities for standards development. The new ISO 50001 will establish an international framework for industrial, commercial, or institutional facilities, or entire companies, to manage their energy, including procurement and use. This standard is expected to achieve major, long-term increases in energy efficiency (20percent or more) in industrial, commercial, and institutional facilities and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide.This paper describes the impetus for the international standard, its purpose, scope and significance, and development progress to date. A comparative overview of existing energy management standards is provided, as well as a discussion of capacity-building needs for skilled individuals to assist organizations in adopting the standard. Finally, opportunities and challenges are presented for implementing ISO 50001 in emerging economies and developing countries.

  5. Informational webinar for EPA STAR RFA on "Air, Climate and Energy (ACE) Centers: Science Supporting Solutions"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this webinar presentation is to discuss the application process and required elements for the Air, Climate and Energy (ACE) Centers: Science Supporting Solutions RFA. EPA is seeking research on the development of sound science to systematically inform policy makers...

  6. Modifying Poisson equation for near-solute dielectric polarization and solvation free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pei-Kun

    2016-06-01

    The dielectric polarization P is important for calculating the stability of protein conformation and the binding affinity of protein-protein/ligand interactions and for exploring the nonthermal effect of an external electric field on biomolecules. P was decomposed into the product of the electric dipole moment per molecule p; bulk solvent density Nbulk; and relative solvent molecular density g. For a molecular solute, 4πr2p(r) oscillates with the distance r to the solute, and g(r) has a large peak in the near-solute region, as observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Herein, the Poisson equation was modified for computing p based on the modified Gauss's law of Maxwell's equations, and the potential of the mean force was used for computing g. For one or two charged atoms in a water cluster, the solvation free energies of the solutes obtained by these equations were similar to those obtained from MD simulations.

  7. Environmental Management Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental management assessment performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from September 14 through September 27, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The environmental management assessment of NREL focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems and assessed the formality of programs employing an approach that recognizes the level of formality implementing environmental programs may vary commensurate with non-nuclear research and development operations. The Assessment Team evaluated environmental monitoring, waste management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities at NREL, from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section of this report. The scope of the NREL Environmental Management Assessment was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management. At the same time, environmental monitoring, waste management, and NEPA activities were evaluated to develop a programmatic understanding of these environmental disciplines, building upon the results of previous appraisals, audits, and reviews performed at the NREL.

  8. Managing Your Home's Energy Dollar: An Energy Management Workbook for the Homeowner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Information Associates, Inc., Littleton, CO.

    This workbook is intended to teach the homeowner some actions to be taken in the home to conserve energy and reduce energy-related costs. The workbook is arranged around five steps: (1) read utility meters, (2) study utility bills, (3) "tune-up" home energy systems, (4) make informed decisions about energy conservation products, and (5) compare…

  9. Building America Solution Center Shows Builders How to Save Materials Costs While Saving Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2015-06-15

    This short article was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Update newsletter. The article identifies energy and cost-saving benefits of using advanced framing techniques in new construction identified by research teams working with the DOE's Building America program. The article also provides links to guides in the Building America Solution Center that give how-to instructions for builders who want to implement advanced framing construction. The newsletter is issued monthly and can be accessed at http://energy.gov/eere/buildings/building-america-update-newsletter

  10. Innovative systems for sustainable nuclear energy generation and waste management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseaux, Jm; David, S.

    2006-05-01

    The limited amount of fossil resources, the impact of green-house gas emissions on the world climate, the rising demand of primary energy projected to 2050, lead to a potentially critical situation for the world energy supply. The need for alternative (to fossil energies) massive energy production is evaluated to 10 Gtoe. The potential of Nuclear Energy generation at the level of 5 Gtoe is examined. Such a sustainable production can only be met by a breeder reactor fleet for which a deployment scenario is described with the associated constraints. Waste management is discussed in connection with different nuclear energy development scenarios according to the point in time when breeder reactors are started. At the world level, it appears that the optimal handling of today's wastes rests on an early decision to develop tomorrow's breeder reactors.

  11. Managing state energy conservation programs - The Minnesota experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.; Armstrong, J. R.

    1980-11-01

    The development and operation of energy conservation programs in the Minnesota Energy Agency (MEA) are discussed. The MEA has responsibility for voluntary conservation efforts, regulating energy efficient devices, and grant programs to audit and retrofit public buildings. The MEA has developed the plan under which the Minnesota utilities will provide conservation services to residential customers, including an on-site home energy audit. The relation between the Department of Energy (DOE) and state energy offices in implementing programs is considered. The DOE has provided technical assistance to the states through the development of a model audit. Steps are discussed to reduce the burdens imposed on the states by program planning, funding, and management responsibilities, including the consolidation of several existing state conservation programs. Improved policy analysis is suggested to correct inefficiencies in government programs.

  12. Energy management and control system verification study. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Boulware, K.E.; Williamson, G.C.

    1983-09-01

    Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCS) are being installed and operated throughout the Air Force. Millions of dollars have been spent on EMCS, but no study has conclusively proved that EMCS has actually saved the Air Force energy. This thesis used the Regression subprogram of Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to determine if these systems are indeed saving the Air Force energy. Previous studies have shown that Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) is the best statistical predictor of base energy consumption. Eight bases were selected that had an operational EMCS. Two EMCS bases were compared with one control base for each of four CONUS winter heating zones. The results indicated small (less than 2%) energy savings have occurred at half of the EMCS bases studied. Therefore, this study does not conclusively prove that EMCS's have saved energy on Air Force bases. However, the methodology developed in this report could be applied on a broader scale to develop a more conclusive result.

  13. Advanced Energy Storage Management in Distribution Network

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Ceylan, Oguzhan; Xiao, Bailu; Starke, Michael R; Ollis, T Ben; King, Daniel J; Irminger, Philip; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    With increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG) in the distribution networks (DN), the secure and optimal operation of DN has become an important concern. In this paper, an iterative mixed integer quadratic constrained quadratic programming model to optimize the operation of a three phase unbalanced distribution system with high penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) panels, DG and energy storage (ES) is developed. The proposed model minimizes not only the operating cost, including fuel cost and purchasing cost, but also voltage deviations and power loss. The optimization model is based on the linearized sensitivity coefficients between state variables (e.g., node voltages) and control variables (e.g., real and reactive power injections of DG and ES). To avoid slow convergence when close to the optimum, a golden search method is introduced to control the step size and accelerate the convergence. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on modified IEEE 13 nodes test feeders with multiple PV panels, DG and ES. Numerical simulation results validate the proposed algorithm. Various scenarios of system configuration are studied and some critical findings are concluded.

  14. An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

    2011-04-30

    This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

  15. Dark matter and dark energy from the solution of the strong CP problem.

    PubMed

    Mainini, Roberto; Bonometto, Silvio A

    2004-09-17

    The Peccei-Quinn (PQ) solution of the strong CP problem requires the existence of axions, which are viable candidates for dark matter. If the Nambu-Goldstone potential of the PQ model is replaced by a potential V(|Phi|) admitting a tracker solution, the scalar field |Phi| can account for dark energy, while the phase of Phi yields axion dark matter. If V is a supergravity (SUGRA) potential, the model essentially depends on a single parameter, the energy scale Lambda. Once we set Lambda approximately equal to 10(10) GeV at the quark-hadron transition, |Phi| naturally passes through values suitable to solve the strong CP problem, later growing to values providing fair amounts of dark matter and dark energy.

  16. On-line energy management for HEV based on particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caux, S.; Wanderley-Honda, D.; Hissel, D.; Fadel, M.

    2011-05-01

    This study considers a Hybrid Electrical Vehicle supplied by a Fuel Cell stack and supercapacitors used as Storage Element. In such an application, real time energy management is of paramount importance in order to increase autonomy and be able to deal on-line with perturbed power demand. Many offline power flow optimization principles are available but online algorithms are preferred and should be derived for optimal management of the instantaneous power splitting between the different available power sources. Based on particle swarm optimization algorithm, this study defines the parameters tuning of such algorithm. The final power splitting allows not only recovering energy braking but also is robust to some disturbances occurring during the trip. The solution provides good-quality and high-robustness results in a certain class of mission profile and power disturbance.

  17. Automatically high accurate and efficient photomask defects management solution for advanced lithography manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Chen, Lijun; Ma, Lantao; Li, Dejian; Jiang, Wei; Pan, Lihong; Shen, Huiting; Jia, Hongmin; Hsiang, Chingyun; Cheng, Guojie; Ling, Li; Chen, Shijie; Wang, Jun; Liao, Wenkui; Zhang, Gary

    2014-04-01

    Defect review is a time consuming job. Human error makes result inconsistent. The defects located on don't care area would not hurt the yield and no need to review them such as defects on dark area. However, critical area defects can impact yield dramatically and need more attention to review them such as defects on clear area. With decrease in integrated circuit dimensions, mask defects are always thousands detected during inspection even more. Traditional manual or simple classification approaches are unable to meet efficient and accuracy requirement. This paper focuses on automatic defect management and classification solution using image output of Lasertec inspection equipment and Anchor pattern centric image process technology. The number of mask defect found during an inspection is always in the range of thousands or even more. This system can handle large number defects with quick and accurate defect classification result. Our experiment includes Die to Die and Single Die modes. The classification accuracy can reach 87.4% and 93.3%. No critical or printable defects are missing in our test cases. The missing classification defects are 0.25% and 0.24% in Die to Die mode and Single Die mode. This kind of missing rate is encouraging and acceptable to apply on production line. The result can be output and reloaded back to inspection machine to have further review. This step helps users to validate some unsure defects with clear and magnification images when captured images can't provide enough information to make judgment. This system effectively reduces expensive inline defect review time. As a fully inline automated defect management solution, the system could be compatible with current inspection approach and integrated with optical simulation even scoring function and guide wafer level defect inspection.

  18. Calculating solution redox free energies with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Hu, Hao; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, Weitao

    2009-04-01

    A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path (QM/MM-MFEP) method was developed to calculate the redox free energies of large systems in solution with greatly enhanced efficiency for conformation sampling. The QM/MM-MFEP method describes the thermodynamics of a system on the potential of mean force surface of the solute degrees of freedom. The molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is only carried out with the QM subsystem fixed. It thus avoids "on-the-fly" QM calculations and thus overcomes the high computational cost in the direct QM/MM MD sampling. In the applications to two metal complexes in aqueous solution, the new QM/MM-MFEP method yielded redox free energies in good agreement with those calculated from the direct QM/MM MD method. Two larger biologically important redox molecules, lumichrome and riboflavin, were further investigated to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. The enhanced efficiency and uncompromised accuracy are especially significant for biochemical systems. The QM/MM-MFEP method thus provides an efficient approach to free energy simulation of complex electron transfer reactions.

  19. Calculating solution redox free energies with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path method

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Xiancheng; Hu Hao; Hu Xiangqian; Yang Weitao

    2009-04-28

    A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path (QM/MM-MFEP) method was developed to calculate the redox free energies of large systems in solution with greatly enhanced efficiency for conformation sampling. The QM/MM-MFEP method describes the thermodynamics of a system on the potential of mean force surface of the solute degrees of freedom. The molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is only carried out with the QM subsystem fixed. It thus avoids 'on-the-fly' QM calculations and thus overcomes the high computational cost in the direct QM/MM MD sampling. In the applications to two metal complexes in aqueous solution, the new QM/MM-MFEP method yielded redox free energies in good agreement with those calculated from the direct QM/MM MD method. Two larger biologically important redox molecules, lumichrome and riboflavin, were further investigated to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. The enhanced efficiency and uncompromised accuracy are especially significant for biochemical systems. The QM/MM-MFEP method thus provides an efficient approach to free energy simulation of complex electron transfer reactions.

  20. A time-resolved fluorescence study of electronic excitation energy transport in concentrated dye solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, A. D.; Matsumoto, A.; Hirayama, S.

    1991-11-01

    Singlet-state radiative and nonradiative energy transport among randomly distributed donor and acceptor molecules in solutions of ethylene glycol has been investigated by using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Radiative energy transfer in moderately concentrated solutions of rhodamine 6G contained in a 1 cm pathlength cuvette results in nonexponential fluorescence decay curves which can be described in terms of the relative fluorescence emission yield of the ith transfer process, φ i, the average number of transfer steps, < n >, and the apparent fluorescence lifetime, <τ >. The fluorescence decay profiles measured from thin films (⩽ 20 μm) of solutions of rhodamine 6G donors in the presence of malachite green acceptors are also nonexponential and at low donor concentrations (1.0 × 10 -4 M) the decay curves can be described by using Förster's dipole-dipole model for nonradiative energy transfer, where the value for the critical transfer distance, R0, is calculated to be (5.9±0.1) nm. At higher donor concentrations (3.0 × 10 -3 M) the Förster model is inappropriate. However, the model proposed by Loring, Anderson and Fayer (LAF), which allows for the effects of nonradiative energy transfer among donors, provides excellent fits to the experimentally determined fluorescence decay curves for this donor concentration and results in a value of R0 for nonradiative energy transfer between rhodamine 6G chromophores of (5.8±0.1) nm. The LAF model also provides a satisfactory description of the kinetics of the quenching by rhodamine 6G dimers of the fluorescence from thin films of highly concentrated solutions of rhodamine 6G. The value of R0 for nonradiative energy transfer from monomer to dimer and the equilibrium constant for rhodamine 6G dimerization are calculated to be (3.2±0.1) nm and 19 M -1, respectively.

  1. A community pain service solution-focused pain management programme: delivery and preliminary outcome data

    PubMed Central

    Iddon, Joanne; Barker, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Summary points 1. This article introduces a rationale for a solution-focused approach to a community-based pain management programme (PMP), describing delivery and preliminary outcome data. 2. It suggests PMPs can be feasibly run in the community without necessity for hospital care setting. 3. A community setting is also advantageous in that it allows maintenance of social networks and close third-sector links to support long-term, sustained mental well-being. 4. Solution-focused psychological approaches help the clinician tap into patient expertise and develop rich descriptions of the patient’s preferred future, enhancing self-efficacy and empowerment. 5. Evaluation found significant statistical and clinical improvements in pre–post pain self-efficacy, mental well-being and function (but findings were limited by internal and external validity and no significant effect was found on pain levels). 6. Statistically significant change was maintained at 10 weeks for self-efficacy and function (and for the latter, clinically significant change was also maintained); improvements in mental well-being showed maintenance at all measured time points (up to 12 months) in terms of both statistical and clinical significant changes. PMID:26516534

  2. Improving energy efficiency via smart building energy management systems. A comparison with policy measures

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Paula; Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael

    2014-12-09

    In this study, to foster the transition to more sustainable energy systems, policymakers have been approving measures to improve energy efficiency as well as promoting smart grids. In this setting, building managers are encouraged to adapt their energy operations to real-time market and weather conditions. Yet, most fail to do so as they rely on conventional building energy management systems (BEMS) that have static temperature set points for heating and cooling equipment. In this paper, we investigate how effective policy measures are at improving building-level energy efficiency compared to a smart BEMS with dynamic temperature set points. To this end, we present an integrated optimisation model mimicking the smart BEMS that combines decisions on heating and cooling systems operations with decisions on energy sourcing. Using data from an Austrian and a Spanish building, we find that the smart BEMS results in greater reduction in energy consumption than a conventional BEMS with policy measures.

  3. Forward and pressure retarded osmosis: potential solutions for global challenges in energy and water supply.

    PubMed

    Klaysom, Chalida; Cath, Tazhi Y; Depuydt, Tom; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2013-08-21

    Osmotically driven membrane processes (ODMP) have gained renewed interest in recent years and they might become a potential solution for the world's most challenging problems of water and energy scarcity. Though the concept of utilizing osmotic pressure difference between high and low salinity streams across semipermeable membranes has been explored for several decades, lack of optimal membranes and draw solutions hindered competition between forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) with existing water purification and power generation technologies, respectively. Driven by growing global water scarcity and by energy cost and negative environmental impacts, novel membranes and draw solutions are being developed for ODMPs, mass and heat transfer in osmotic process are becoming better understood, and new applications of ODMPs are emerging. Therefore, OMDPs might become promising green technologies to provide clean water and clean energy from abundantly available renewable resources. This review focuses primarily on new insights into osmotic membrane transport mechanisms and on novel membranes and draw solutions that are currently being developed. Furthermore, the effects of operating conditions on the overall performance of osmotic membranes will be highlighted and future perspectives will be presented.

  4. Energy Management System Successful in Indiana Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The new Oregon-Davis Elementary School in rural Indiana embodies state-of-the-art energy management. Its environmental systems include thorough insulation, dual heating and cooling equipment for flexible loads, and decentralized computer controls. A heat recovery unit and variable-air-volume discharge ducts also contribute to conservation. (MCG)

  5. Waste Material Management: Energy and materials for industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This booklet describes DOE`s Waste Material Management (WMM) programs, which are designed to help tap the potential of waste materials. Four programs are described in general terms: Industrial Waste Reduction, Waste Utilization and Conversion, Energy from Municipal Waste, and Solar Industrial Applications.

  6. Causes and Solutions for High Energy Consumption in Traditional Buildings Located in Hot Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barayan, Olfat Mohammad

    A considerable amount of money for high-energy consumption is spent in traditional buildings located in hot climate regions. High-energy consumption is significantly influenced by several causes, including building materials, orientation, mass, and openings' sizes. This paper aims to identify these causes and find practical solutions to reduce the annual cost of bills. For the purpose of this study, simulation research method has been followed. A comparison between two Revit models has also been created to point out the major cause of high-energy consumption. By analysing different orientations, wall insulation, and window glazing and applying some other high performance building techniques, a conclusion was found to confirm that appropriate building materials play a vital role in affecting energy cost. Therefore, the ability to reduce the energy cost by more than 50% in traditional buildings depends on a careful balance of building materials, mass, orientation, and type of window glazing.

  7. A Holistic, rapid-deployment, solution for safe used nuclear fuel management in the United States of America

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.G.

    2007-07-01

    Recent political initiatives and increased willingness in the United States of America (U.S. or USA) to consider federal storage and recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF), augmented by expressed private interest in developing 31 new nuclear power plants, strongly suggest that the U.S. is on the brink of a nuclear-energy renaissance. Unfortunately, the related UNF-management and -disposition research, technology, and facility developments have been virtually dormant for 25 years. Fortunately, other countries have pursued safe UNF-management and -disposition solutions during this period that the U.S. now can take advantage of to develop the required UNF-management technologies and facilities in a timely and cost-effective manner. The following criteria/concepts for the timely and cost-effective development of safe and secure nuclear facilities were applied to current and planned UNF-management in the U.S. to formulate a potential, holistic, 'rapid-deployment' UNF-management solution at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), referred to as the Nevada National Nuclear Fuel Management Center (3NFMC): - Locate pending UNF-storage and -recycling facilities on the NTS in the vicinity of the Nation's candidate deep geological disposal system (repository) for UNF and other high level radioactive waste (HLW) at the Yucca Mountain (YM) site; - Locate all main UNF-management facilities underground; and - Use best-available technology to site, design, and construct the pending facilities. Three main challenges to the timely and cost-effective development of the 3NFMC are: (1) Statutory restrictions preventing the UNF-storage and -disposal facilities from being co-located and co-developed by federal and civilian/private parties; (2) Long-standing, scientific, local-political, key-Congressional, and national-ideological opposition to the YM UNF/HLW repository; and (3) The discouraging track record, and the related lack of trust in, and credibility of the organization currently responsible for

  8. Cosmological and wormhole solutions in low-energy effective string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cadoni, M. INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Via Ada Negri 18, I---09127 Cagliari ); Cavaglia, M. INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Via Ada Negri 18, I-09127 Cagliari )

    1994-11-15

    We derive and study a class of cosmological and wormhole solutions of low-energy effective string field theory. We consider a general four-dimensional string effective action where moduli of the compactified manifold and the electromagnetic field are present. The cosmological solutions of the two-dimensional effective theory obtained by dimensional reduction of the former are discussed. In particular we demonstrate that the two-dimensional theory possesses a scale-factor duality invariance. Eucidean four-dimensional instantons describing the nucleation of the baby universes are found and the probability amplitude for the nucleation process given.

  9. The effect of high-energy radiation on aqueous solution of Acid Red 1 textile dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földváry, Cs. M.; Wojnárovits, L.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of high-energy radiation on Acid Red 1 (AR1) azo-dye solution was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy and chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements. Doses in the order of 10 kGy cause complete decolouration of the 10 -3-10 -4 mol dm -3 solutions; however, for complete mineralization doses higher by 1-2 order of magnitude are needed. Hydrated electrons and H rad atom are more effective in fading reaction, while the rad OH radicals have higher efficiency in mineralization. The HO 2•/O 2•- radical-radical anion pair is rather inefficient in fading reaction.

  10. From generalized stacking fault energies to dislocation properties: Five-energy-point approach and solid solution effects in magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zongrui; Ma, Duancheng; Friák, Martin; Svendsen, Bob; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Using ab initio calculations and symmetrized plane waves, we analyze the basal-plane generalized stacking fault energies in pure Mg and Mg-Y alloys and show that the knowledge of energies of only five specific points is sufficient to accurately predict the core structures and Peierls stresses of -type edge dislocations in these alloys. Our five-point approach substantially reduces the computational cost related to the Peierls-Nabarro (PN) model and allows for a high-throughput application of the PN model to study Peierls stress changes in Mg upon alloying. We employ our approach to study Mg binary alloys containing nine rare-earth (RE) and 11 other solutes. Based on the Peierls stresses of these 20 Mg alloys calculated from the Peierls-Nabarro model, the solutes are divided into three groups: (i) the first group, consisting of Be, Zn, Tl, Tc, Os, Ru, Re, and Co, when added as solutes into Mg, lead to more compact dislocation core structures and larger Peierls stresses than found for pure Mg. (ii) Elements in the second group, including Ti, Nd, Lu, Zr, Hf, La, and Pr change the core widths and Peierls stresses moderately. (iii) The solutes in the third group containing Y, Er, Tm, Ho, and Sc extend the stacking fault width, and the resulting Peierls stresses are generally very low. Based on an error analysis, we conclude that the first group has a clear solute strengthening effect and the third group has a clear solute softening effect, while the effects of the elements in the second group are too small to be resolved by the present approach.

  11. MARSOL: Demonstrating Managed Aquifer Recharge as a Solution to Water Scarcity and Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtzman, D.; Schüth, C.; Kallioras, A.; Rossetto, R.; Lobo-Ferreira, J.; Escalante, E.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Foglia, L.

    2013-12-01

    Southern Europe and the Mediterranean region are facing the challenge of managing its water resources under conditions of increasing scarcity and concerns about water quality. Already, the availability of fresh water in sufficient quality and quantity is one of the major factors limiting socio-economic development. Innovative water management strategies such as the storage of reclaimed water or excess water from different sources in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) schemes can greatly increase water availability and therefore improve water security. Main objective of the proposed project MARSOL is to demonstrate that MAR is a sound, safe and sustainable strategy that can be applied with great confidence and therefore offering a key approach for tackling water scarcity in Southern Europe. For this, eight field sites were selected that will demonstrate the applicability of MAR using various water sources, ranging from treated wastewater to desalinated seawater, and a variety of technical solutions. Targets are the alleviation of the effect of climate change on water resources, the mitigation of droughts, to countermeasure temporal and spatial misfit of water availability, to sustain agricultural water supply and rural socio-economic development, to combat agricultural related pollutants, to sustain future urban and industrial water supply and to limit seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers. Results of the demonstration sites will be used to develop guidelines for MAR site selection, technical realization, monitoring strategies, and modeling approaches, to offer stakeholders a comprehensive, state of the art and proven toolbox for MAR implementation. Further, the economic and legal aspects of MAR will be analyzed to enable and accelerate market penetration. The MARSOL consortium combines the expertise of consultancies, water suppliers, research institutions, and public authorities, ensuring high practical relevance and market intimacy.

  12. MARSOL: Demonstrating Managed Aquifer Recharge as a Solution to Water Scarcity and Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueth, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Southern Europe and the Mediterranean region are facing the challenge of managing its water resources under conditions of increasing scarcity and concerns about water quality. Already, the availability of fresh water in sufficient quality and quantity is one of the major factors limiting socio economic development. Innovative water management strategies such as the storage of reclaimed water or excess water from different sources in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) schemes can greatly increase water availability and therefore improve water security. Main objective of the proposed project MARSOL is to demonstrate that MAR is a sound, safe and sustainable strategy that can be applied with great confidence and therefore offering a key approach for tackling water scarcity in Southern Europe. For this, eight field sites were selected that will demonstrate the applicability of MAR using various water sources, ranging from treated wastewater to desalinated seawater, and a variety of technical solutions. Targets are the alleviation of the effect of climate change on water resources, the mitigation of droughts, to countermeasure temporal and spatial misfit of water availability, to sustain agricultural water supply and rural socio-economic development, to combat agricultural related pollutants, to sustain future urban and industrial water supply and to limit seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers. Results of the demonstration sites will be used to develop guidelines for MAR site selection, technical realization, monitoring strategies, and modeling approaches, to offer stakeholders a comprehensive, state of the art and proven toolbox for MAR implementation. Further, the economic and legal aspects of MAR will be analyzed to enable and accelerate market penetration. The MARSOL consortium combines the expertise of consultancies, water suppliers, research institutions, and public authorities, ensuring high practical relevance and market intimacy.

  13. Managing total corporate electricity/energy market risks

    SciTech Connect

    Henney, A.; Keers, G.

    1998-10-01

    The banking industry has developed a tool kit of very useful value at risk techniques for hedging risk, but these techniques must be adapted to the special complexities of the electricity market. This paper starts with a short history of the use of value-at-risk (VAR) techniques in banking risk management and then examines the specific and, in many instances, complex risk management challenges faced by electric companies from the behavior of prices in electricity markets and from the character of generation and electric retailing risks. The third section describes the main methods for making VAR calculations along with an analysis of their suitability for analyzing the risks of electricity portfolios and the case for using profit at risk and downside risk as measures of risk. The final section draws the threads together and explains how to look at managing total corporate electricity market risk, which is a big step toward managing total corporate energy market risk.

  14. FEMP (Federal Energy Management Program) presents alternative financing guidance memoranda

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    Utility financing of energy efficient measures becomes easier to accomplish with the two new alternative financing guidance memoranda, released April 17, 1998, that address the use of utility incentives for Federal facilities. The memoranda have been approved by the Alternative Financing Guidance Committee on the Interagency Energy Management Task Force. The memoranda include: (1) Policy Statement No. 001: Authority to Sole Source Utility Service Contracts as Referenced in Section 152 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 1992; and (2) Policy Statement No. 002: Congressional Notification for Utility Projects Under the Authority of Section 152 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 1992. The purpose for developing the financing memoranda was to address specific issues within current Federal procurement regulations that require clarification or guidance. This new guidance will allow for increased use of utility incentives as a means of financing energy efficient and life cycle cost-effective projects in Federal facilities.

  15. Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Lukes, G.C.; Willoughby, O.H.

    2007-07-01

    A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay

  16. Finite element solution for energy conservation using a highly stable explicit integration algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical derivation of a finite element solution algorithm for the transient energy conservation equation in multidimensional, stationary multi-media continua with irregular solution domain closure is considered. The complete finite element matrix forms for arbitrarily irregular discretizations are established, using natural coordinate function representations. The algorithm is embodied into a user-oriented computer program (COMOC) which obtains transient temperature distributions at the node points of the finite element discretization using a highly stable explicit integration procedure with automatic error control features. The finite element algorithm is shown to posses convergence with discretization for a transient sample problem. The condensed form for the specific heat element matrix is shown to be preferable to the consistent form. Computed results for diverse problems illustrate the versatility of COMOC, and easily prepared output subroutines are shown to allow quick engineering assessment of solution behavior.

  17. Masters Study in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Kanchan

    2014-12-08

    There are currently three key drivers for the US energy sector a) increasing energy demand and b) environmental stewardship in energy production for sustainability and c) general public and governmental desire for domestic resources. These drivers are also true for energy nation globally. As a result, this sector is rapidly diversifying to alternate sources that would supplement or replace fossil fuels. These changes have created a need for a highly trained workforce with a the understanding of both conventional and emerging energy resources and technology to lead and facilitate the reinvention of the US energy production, rational deployment of alternate energy technologies based on scientific and business criteria while invigorating the overall economy. In addition, the current trends focus on the the need of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) graduate education to move beyond academia and be more responsive to the workforce needs of businesses and the industry. The SIUC PSM in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management (AEFM) program was developed in response to the industries stated need for employees who combine technical competencies and workforce skills similar to all PSM degree programs. The SIUC AEFM program was designed to provide the STEM graduates with advanced technical training in energy resources and technology while simultaneously equipping them with the business management skills required by professional employers in the energy sector. Technical training include core skills in energy resources, technology and management for both conventional and emerging energy technologies. Business skills training include financial, personnel and project management. A capstone internship is also built into the program to train students such that they are acclimatized to the real world scenarios in research laboratories, in energy companies and in government agencies. The current curriculum in the SIUC AEFM will help fill the need for training both recent

  18. Energy Management Control Systems: Tools for Energy Savings and Environmental Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zsebik, Albin; Zala, Laszlo F.

    2002-01-01

    The change in the price of energy has encouraged the increase of energy efficiency. This report will discuss a tool to promote energy efficiency in intelligent buildings, energy management control systems (EMCS). In addition to the online control of energy production, supply, and consumption, the function of the EMCS is to support short- and long-term planning of the system operation as well as to collect, store, and regularly evaluate operation data. The strategies behind planning and implementing the EMCS as well as the manipulating the resulting data are discussed in this report.

  19. Adaptive Critic Neural Network-Based Terminal Area Energy Management and Approach and Landing Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, Katie

    2003-01-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) have different mission requirements than the Space Shuttle, which is used for benchmark guidance design. Therefore, alternative Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) and Approach and Landing (A/L) Guidance schemes can be examined in the interest of cost reduction. A neural network based solution for a finite horizon trajectory optimization problem is presented in this paper. In this approach the optimal trajectory of the vehicle is produced by adaptive critic based neural networks, which were trained off-line to maintain a gradual glideslope.

  20. 'Part of the solution': Developing sustainable energy through co-operatives and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguid, Fiona C. B.

    and understanding of WindShare's role in sustainable energy. WindShare Co-operative provided the structure whereby members felt a part of the solution in terms of sustainable energy development. Policies and practices at all levels of government should encourage the advancement of green energy co-operatives to support Canada's efforts at public involvement in combating climate change and pollution.

  1. Updated analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitation - II. Mixed energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Dobranskis, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider simultaneous analytical solutions of continuity equations for electron beam precipitation (a) in collisional losses and (b) in ohmic losses, or mixed energy losses (MEL) by applying the iterative method to calculate the resulting differential densities at given precipitation depth. The differential densities of precipitating electrons derived from the analytical solutions for MELs reveal increased flattening at energies below 10-30 keV compared to a pure collisional case. This flattening becomes stronger with an increasing precipitation depth turning into a positive slope at greater precipitation depths in the chromosphere resulting in a differential density distribution with maximum that shifts towards higher energies with increase in column depth, while the differential densities combining precipitating and returning electrons are higher at lower energies than those for a pure collisional case. The resulting hard X-ray (HXR) emission produced by the beams with different initial energy fluxes and spectral indices is calculated using the MEL approach for different ratios between the differential densities of precipitating and returning electrons. The number of returning electrons can be even further enhanced by a magnetic mirroring, not considered in the present model, while dominating at lower atmospheric depths where the magnetic convergence and magnitude are the highest. The proposed MEL approach provides an opportunity to account simultaneously for both collisional and ohmic losses in flaring events, which can be used for a quick spectral fitting of HXR spectra and evaluation of a fraction of returning electrons versus precipitating ones. The semi-analytical MEL approach is used for spectral fitting to Reuven High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations of nine C, M and X class flares revealing a close fit to the observations and good resemblance to numerical FP solutions.

  2. Specific transport and storage solutions : waste management facing current and future stakes of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Choho, T.; Blachet, L.; Deniau, H.; Gagner, L.; Gendreau, F.; Presta, A.

    2007-07-01

    With major projects ongoing or being planned, and also with the daily management of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, the role of transport and/or storage packaging has been often overlooked. Indeed, the packaging development process and transport solutions implemented are a key part of the waste management challenge : protection of people and of the environment. During over four decades, the AREVA Group has developed a complete and coherent system for the transport of waste produced by nuclear industries. The transport solutions integrate the factors to consider, as industrial transportation needs, various waste forms, associated hazards and current regulations. Thus, TN International has designed, licensed and manufactured a large number of different transport, storage and dual purpose cask models for residues and all kinds of radioactive wastes. The present paper proposes to illustrate how a company acting both as a cask designer and a carrier is key to the waste management issue and how it can support the waste management policy of nuclear waste producers through their operational choices. We will focus on the TN International technical solutions implemented to guarantee safe and secure transportation and storage solutions. We will describe different aspects of the cask design process, insisting on how it enables to fulfil both customer needs and regulation requirements. We will also mention the associated services developed by the AREVA Business Unit Logistics (TN International, TRANSNUCLEAR, MAINCO, and LMC) in order to manage transportation of liquid and solid waste towards interim or final storage sites. (authors)

  3. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in concentrated solid solution alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Stocks, George Malcolm; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Bei, Hongbin; Sales, Brian C.; Wang, Lumin; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.; Samolyuk, German D.; Caro, Magdalena; Caro, Alfredo; Weber, William J.

    2015-10-28

    A long-standing objective in materials research is to understand how energy is dissipated in both the electronic and atomic subsystems in irradiated materials, and how related non-equilibrium processes may affect defect dynamics and microstructure evolution. Here we show that alloy complexity in concentrated solid solution alloys having both an increasing number of principal elements and altered concentrations of specific elements can lead to substantial reduction in the electron mean free path and thermal conductivity, which has a significant impact on energy dissipation and consequentially on defect evolution during ion irradiation. Enhanced radiation resistance with increasing complexity from pure nickel to binary and to more complex quaternary solid solutions is observed under ion irradiation up to an average damage level of 1 displacement per atom. Understanding how materials properties can be tailored by alloy complexity and their influence on defect dynamics may pave the way for new principles for the design of radiation tolerant structural alloys.

  4. Determination of Gibbs energies of formation in aqueous solution using chemical engineering tools.

    PubMed

    Toure, Oumar; Dussap, Claude-Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Standard Gibbs energies of formation are of primary importance in the field of biothermodynamics. In the absence of any directly measured values, thermodynamic calculations are required to determine the missing data. For several biochemical species, this study shows that the knowledge of the standard Gibbs energy of formation of the pure compounds (in the gaseous, solid or liquid states) enables to determine the corresponding standard Gibbs energies of formation in aqueous solutions. To do so, using chemical engineering tools (thermodynamic tables and a model enabling to predict activity coefficients, solvation Gibbs energies and pKa data), it becomes possible to determine the partial chemical potential of neutral and charged components in real metabolic conditions, even in concentrated mixtures.

  5. Energy solutions, neo-liberalism, and social diversity in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Teelucksingh, Cheryl; Poland, Blake

    2011-01-01

    In response to the dominance of green capitalist discourses in Canada's environmental movement, in this paper, we argue that strategies to improve energy policy must also provide mechanisms to address social conflicts and social disparities. Environmental justice is proposed as an alternative to mainstream environmentalism, one that seeks to address systemic social and spatial exclusion encountered by many racialized immigrants in Toronto as a result of neo-liberal and green capitalist municipal policy and that seeks to position marginalized communities as valued contributors to energy solutions. We examine Toronto-based municipal state initiatives aimed at reducing energy use while concurrently stimulating growth (specifically, green economy/green jobs and 'smart growth'). By treating these as instruments of green capitalism, we illustrate the utility of environmental justice applied to energy-related problems and as a means to analyze stakeholders' positions in the context of neo-liberalism and green capitalism, and as opening possibilities for resistance. PMID:21318023

  6. Energy solutions, neo-liberalism, and social diversity in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Teelucksingh, Cheryl; Poland, Blake

    2011-01-01

    In response to the dominance of green capitalist discourses in Canada's environmental movement, in this paper, we argue that strategies to improve energy policy must also provide mechanisms to address social conflicts and social disparities. Environmental justice is proposed as an alternative to mainstream environmentalism, one that seeks to address systemic social and spatial exclusion encountered by many racialized immigrants in Toronto as a result of neo-liberal and green capitalist municipal policy and that seeks to position marginalized communities as valued contributors to energy solutions. We examine Toronto-based municipal state initiatives aimed at reducing energy use while concurrently stimulating growth (specifically, green economy/green jobs and 'smart growth'). By treating these as instruments of green capitalism, we illustrate the utility of environmental justice applied to energy-related problems and as a means to analyze stakeholders' positions in the context of neo-liberalism and green capitalism, and as opening possibilities for resistance.

  7. The Energy Distribution of Hořava-Lifshitz Black Hole Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radinschi, I.; Rahaman, F.; Banerjee, A.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we continue our study about the energy distribution of the Park, Kehagias-Sfetsos and Lü-Mei-Pope black hole solutions in the Hořava-Lifshitz theory of gravity. These gravitational backgrounds correspond to the standard Einstein-Hilbert action in the infrared limit. We perform the calculations in the Landau-Lifshitz and Weinberg prescriptions. In addition, we study some limiting and particular cases. Finally, we have made a comparison between the expressions for energy obtained in the Einstein, Møller, Landau-Lifshitz and Weinberg prescriptions, respectively.

  8. Assistance Focus: Asia/Pacific Region; Clean Energy Solutions Center (CESC)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-11

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center Ask an Expert service connects governments seeking policy information and advice with one of more than 30 global policy experts who can provide reliable and unbiased quick-response advice and information. The service is available at no cost to government agency representatives from any country and the technical institutes assisting them. This publication presents summaries of assistance provided to governments in the Asia/Pacific region, including the benefits of that assistance.

  9. The energy balance relation for weak solutions of the density-dependent Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, T. M.; Shvydkoy, R.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with constant viscosity coefficient and density which is bounded and bounded away from zero. We show that the energy balance relation for this system holds for weak solutions if the velocity, density, and pressure belong to a range of Besov spaces of smoothness 1/3. A density-dependent version of the classical Kármán-Howarth-Monin relation is derived.

  10. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  11. Special solutions for magnetic separation problems using force and energy conditions for ferro-particles capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandulyak, Anna; Sandulyak, Alexander; Belgacem, Fethi B. M.; Kiselev, Dmitriy

    2016-03-01

    While trying to solve the equation for the ferro-particle movement in the zone of magnetic separation, it is necessary to provisionally perform a comparative evaluation of forces influencing the ferro-particle in order to define the dominating ones, and specify the task at hand. Here, we consider various solutions of the problem and definitions of magnetic separation parameters based on the traditionally used forces and/or energy conditions of ferro-particle capture.

  12. The middle manager role in energy company environmental efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischhoff, Maya E.

    2005-12-01

    This research examines the internal organizational processes determining corporate environmental action. Corporations have a tremendous environmental impact, yet relatively little is known about how employees within them view and work on these issues. The research focused on middle managers, a level of the company whose value is often questioned. Interviews were conducted with 70 middle managers at two energy companies (comprising utilities and unregulated businesses). Interviews examined the shape and significance of middle manager involvement in environmental issues, looking specifically at what issues middle managers deal with, what goals they pursue, and what approaches they use. The research finds middle managers' roles with respect to environmental issues to be far-reaching and complex. Much of their effort is focused on meeting regulatory requirements ("complying"). They are committed to compliance, in part for ethical reasons, but often find regulations frustrating and costly. Compliance is more challenging than commonly thought; it demands time, knowledge, and substantial creativity. In pursuing it, interviewees work with employees throughout the organization. This research shows middle managers interacting with those hierarchically above and below them in ways that greatly modify earlier portrayals of middle managers. Earlier portrayals often emphasized struggles for power within the organization. Here, middle managers work in ways best characterized as collaborative and supportive. Middle managers also have extensive involvement laterally within the company and with groups outside the company. These links have received modest attention in literature, yet are found to be terribly important. Middle managers' lateral efforts inside the company, often on teams, allow diverse expertise (e.g., from people in different functions) to be applied to environmental issues. Documenting middle managers' involvement externally, with governmental officials and sectors

  13. High energy supercapattery with an ionic liquid solution of LiClO4.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z

    2016-08-15

    A supercapattery combining an ideally polarized capacitor-like electrode and a battery-like electrode is demonstrated theoretically and practically using an ionic liquid electrolyte containing 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tri(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (BMPyrrFAP), gamma-butyrolactone (γ-GBL) and LiClO4. The electrochemical deposition and dissolution of lithium metal on a platinum and glass carbon electrode were investigated in this ionic liquid solution. The CVs showed that the fresh electrochemically deposited lithium metal was stable in the electrolyte, which encouraged the investigation of this ionic liquid solution in a supercapattery with a lithium battery negative electrode. The active material counted specific energy of the supercapattery based on a lithium negative electrode and an activated carbon (Act-C) positive electrode could reach 230 W h kg(-1) under a galvanostatic charge-discharge current density of 1 mA cm(-2). The positive electrode material (Act-C) was also investigated by CV, AC impedance, SEM and BET. The non-uniform particle size and micropores dominated porous structure of the Act-C enabled its electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) behavior in the ionic liquid solution. The measured specific capacitance of the Act-C in this ionic liquid solution is higher than the same Act-C in aqueous solution, which indicates the Act-C can also perform well in the ionic liquid electrolyte. PMID:27228429

  14. Self-similar cosmological solutions with dark energy. II. Black holes, naked singularities, and wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hideki; Harada, Tomohiro; Carr, B. J.

    2008-01-15

    We use a combination of numerical and analytical methods, exploiting the equations derived in a preceding paper, to classify all spherically symmetric self-similar solutions which are asymptotically Friedmann at large distances and contain a perfect fluid with equation of state p=({gamma}-1){mu} with 0<{gamma}<2/3. The expansion of the Friedmann universe is accelerated in this case. We find a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions representing a black hole embedded in a Friedmann background. This suggests that, in contrast to the positive pressure case, black holes in a universe with dark energy can grow as fast as the Hubble horizon if they are not too large. There are also self-similar solutions which contain a central naked singularity with negative mass and solutions which represent a Friedmann universe connected to either another Friedmann universe or some other cosmological model. The latter are interpreted as self-similar cosmological white hole or wormhole solutions. The throats of these wormholes are defined as two-dimensional spheres with minimal area on a spacelike hypersurface and they are all nontraversable because of the absence of a past null infinity.

  15. Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    The Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) was originally constructed during 1980 and was designed to be a clean free-field geometry, right-circular, cylindrically symmetric critical assembly employing U(5%)O{sub 2}F{sub 2} solution as fuel. A second version of SHEBA, employing the same fuel but equipped with a fuel pump and shielding pit, was commissioned in 1993. This report includes data and operating experience for the 1993 SHEBA only. Solution-fueled benchmark work focused on the development of experimental measurements of the characterization of SHEBA; a summary of the results are given. A description of the system and the experimental results are given in some detail in the report. Experiments were designed to: (1) study the behavior of nuclear excursions in a low-enrichment solution, (2) evaluate accidental criticality alarm detectors for fuel-processing facilities, (3) provide radiation spectra and dose measurements to benchmark radiation transport calculations on a low-enrichment solution system similar to centrifuge enrichment plants, and (4) provide radiation fields to calibrate personnel dosimetry. 15 refs., 37 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Product Lifecycle Management and the Quest for Sustainable Space Exploration Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Pamela W.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) is an outcome of lean thinking to eliminate waste and increase productivity. PLM is inextricably tied to the systems engineering business philosophy, coupled with a methodology by which personnel, processes and practices, and information technology combine to form an architecture platform for product design, development, manufacturing, operations, and decommissioning. In this model, which is being implemented by the Engineering Directorate at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center, total lifecycle costs are important variables for critical decisionmaking. With the ultimate goal to deliver quality products that meet or exceed requirements on time and within budget, PLM is a powerful tool to shape everything from engineering trade studies and testing goals, to integrated vehicle operations and retirement scenarios. This paper will demonstrate how the Engineering Directorate is implementing PLM as part of an overall strategy to deliver safe, reliable, and affordable space exploration solutions. It has been 30 years since the United States fielded the Space Shuttle. The next generation space transportation system requires a paradigm shift such that digital tools and knowledge management, which are central elements of PLM, are used consistently to maximum effect. The outcome is a better use of scarce resources, along with more focus on stakeholder and customer requirements, as a new portfolio of enabling tools becomes second nature to the workforce. This paper will use the design and manufacturing processes, which have transitioned to digital-based activities, to show how PLM supports the comprehensive systems engineering and integration function. It also will go through a launch countdown scenario where an anomaly is detected to show how the virtual vehicle created from paperless processes will help solve technical challenges and improve the likelihood of launching on schedule, with

  17. Dynamic Energy Management System for a Smart Microgrid.

    PubMed

    Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar; Sharma, Ratnesh K; Gautam, Prajwal K; Ahmadi, Afshin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the development of an intelligent dynamic energy management system (I-DEMS) for a smart microgrid. An evolutionary adaptive dynamic programming and reinforcement learning framework is introduced for evolving the I-DEMS online. The I-DEMS is an optimal or near-optimal DEMS capable of performing grid-connected and islanded microgrid operations. The primary sources of energy are sustainable, green, and environmentally friendly renewable energy systems (RESs), e.g., wind and solar; however, these forms of energy are uncertain and nondispatchable. Backup battery energy storage and thermal generation were used to overcome these challenges. Using the I-DEMS to schedule dispatches allowed the RESs and energy storage devices to be utilized to their maximum in order to supply the critical load at all times. Based on the microgrid's system states, the I-DEMS generates energy dispatch control signals, while a forward-looking network evaluates the dispatched control signals over time. Typical results are presented for varying generation and load profiles, and the performance of I-DEMS is compared with that of a decision tree approach-based DEMS (D-DEMS). The robust performance of the I-DEMS was illustrated by examining microgrid operations under different battery energy storage conditions. PMID:26800554

  18. Dynamic Energy Management System for a Smart Microgrid.

    PubMed

    Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar; Sharma, Ratnesh K; Gautam, Prajwal K; Ahmadi, Afshin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the development of an intelligent dynamic energy management system (I-DEMS) for a smart microgrid. An evolutionary adaptive dynamic programming and reinforcement learning framework is introduced for evolving the I-DEMS online. The I-DEMS is an optimal or near-optimal DEMS capable of performing grid-connected and islanded microgrid operations. The primary sources of energy are sustainable, green, and environmentally friendly renewable energy systems (RESs), e.g., wind and solar; however, these forms of energy are uncertain and nondispatchable. Backup battery energy storage and thermal generation were used to overcome these challenges. Using the I-DEMS to schedule dispatches allowed the RESs and energy storage devices to be utilized to their maximum in order to supply the critical load at all times. Based on the microgrid's system states, the I-DEMS generates energy dispatch control signals, while a forward-looking network evaluates the dispatched control signals over time. Typical results are presented for varying generation and load profiles, and the performance of I-DEMS is compared with that of a decision tree approach-based DEMS (D-DEMS). The robust performance of the I-DEMS was illustrated by examining microgrid operations under different battery energy storage conditions.

  19. Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2008-10-03

    Advances in communications and control technology, the strengthening of the Internet, and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto-DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (Open Auto-DR or OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components, systems, end-uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems, granularity of control, and speed of telemetry. DR, when defined as a discrete event, requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

  20. A Framework for Understanding and Generating Integrated Solutions for Residential Peak Energy Demand

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Laurie; Vine, Desley; Ledwich, Gerard; Bell, John; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morris, Peter; Lewis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Supplying peak energy demand in a cost effective, reliable manner is a critical focus for utilities internationally. Successfully addressing peak energy concerns requires understanding of all the factors that affect electricity demand especially at peak times. This paper is based on past attempts of proposing models designed to aid our understanding of the influences on residential peak energy demand in a systematic and comprehensive way. Our model has been developed through a group model building process as a systems framework of the problem situation to model the complexity within and between systems and indicate how changes in one element might flow on to others. It is comprised of themes (social, technical and change management options) networked together in a way that captures their influence and association with each other and also their influence, association and impact on appliance usage and residential peak energy demand. The real value of the model is in creating awareness, understanding and insight into the complexity of residential peak energy demand and in working with this complexity to identify and integrate the social, technical and change management option themes and their impact on appliance usage and residential energy demand at peak times. PMID:25807384

  1. A framework for understanding and generating integrated solutions for residential peak energy demand.

    PubMed

    Buys, Laurie; Vine, Desley; Ledwich, Gerard; Bell, John; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morris, Peter; Lewis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Supplying peak energy demand in a cost effective, reliable manner is a critical focus for utilities internationally. Successfully addressing peak energy concerns requires understanding of all the factors that affect electricity demand especially at peak times. This paper is based on past attempts of proposing models designed to aid our understanding of the influences on residential peak energy demand in a systematic and comprehensive way. Our model has been developed through a group model building process as a systems framework of the problem situation to model the complexity within and between systems and indicate how changes in one element might flow on to others. It is comprised of themes (social, technical and change management options) networked together in a way that captures their influence and association with each other and also their influence, association and impact on appliance usage and residential peak energy demand. The real value of the model is in creating awareness, understanding and insight into the complexity of residential peak energy demand and in working with this complexity to identify and integrate the social, technical and change management option themes and their impact on appliance usage and residential energy demand at peak times. PMID:25807384

  2. Special Report Management Challenges at the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    With an annual appropriation of approximately $24 billion, the Department of Energy (Department) is a multi-faceted agency that encompasses a broad range of national security, scientific, and environmental activities. Since the passage of the Department of Energy Organization Act in 1977, the Department has shifted its emphasis and priorities over time as the energy and security needs of the Nation have changed. In recent years, the Department has refocused its efforts in areas such as energy efficiency and conservation, environmental cleanup, nuclear nonproliferation, and weapons stewardship. In order to accomplish its mission, the Department employs approximately 110,000 Federal and contractor personnel and manages assets valued at more than $134 billion, including a complex of national laboratories.

  3. Process models: analytical tools for managing industrial energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S O; Pilati, D A; Balzer, C; Sparrow, F T

    1980-01-01

    How the process models developed at BNL are used to analyze industrial energy systems is described and illustrated. Following a brief overview of the industry modeling program, the general methodology of process modeling is discussed. The discussion highlights the important concepts, contents, inputs, and outputs of a typical process model. A model of the US pulp and paper industry is then discussed as a specific application of process modeling methodology. Applications addressed with the case study results include projections of energy demand, conservation technology assessment, energy-related tax policies, and sensitivity analysis. A subsequent discussion of these results supports the conclusion that industry process models are versatile and powerful tools for managing industrial energy systems.

  4. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP): What`s new in federal energy management: Program overview: Energy savings performance contracting

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive Order 12902 require that Federal agencies reduce the energy consumed in Federal buildings. Goal was increased to 30% by 2005, compared with 1985. Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) offers a means of achieving this energy reduction goal at no capital cost to the government. ESPC is an alternative to the traditional method of financing energy efficiency improvement in Federal buildings; it involves contracting with energy service companies.

  5. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 1.0: Networked Monitoring and Control of Small Interconnected Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janet.twomey@wichita.edu

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY This report presents accomplishments, results, and future work for one task of five in the Wichita State University Sustainable Energy Solutions Project: To develop a scale model laboratory distribution system for research into questions that arise from networked control and monitoring of low-wind energy systems connected to the AC distribution system. The lab models developed under this task are located in the Electric Power Quality Lab in the Engineering Research Building on the Wichita State University campus. The lab system consists of four parts: 1. A doubly-fed induction generator 2. A wind turbine emulator 3. A solar photovoltaic emulator, with battery energy storage 4. Distribution transformers, lines, and other components, and wireless and wired communications and control These lab elements will be interconnected and will function together to form a complete testbed for distributed resource monitoring and control strategies and smart grid applications testing. Development of the lab system will continue beyond this project.

  6. A novel multimode hybrid energy storage system and its energy management strategy for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Xu, Jun; Cao, Binggang; Zhou, Xuan

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel topology of multimode hybrid energy storage system (HESS) and its energy management strategy for electric vehicles (EVs). Compared to the conventional HESS, the proposed multimode HESS has more operating modes and thus it could in further enhance the efficiency of the system. The rule-based control strategy and the power-balancing strategy are developed for the energy management strategy to realize mode selection and power distribution. Generally, the DC-DC converter will operate at peak efficiency to convey the energy from the batteries to the UCs. Otherwise, the pure battery mode or the pure ultracapacitors (UCs) mode will be utilized without the DC-DC converter. To extend the battery life, the UCs have the highest priority to recycle the energy and the batteries are isolated from being recharged directly during regenerative braking. Simulations and experiments are established to validate the proposed multimode HESS and its energy management strategy. The results reveal that the energy losses in the DC-DC converter, the total energy consumption and the overall system efficiency of the proposed multimode HESS are improved compared to the conventional HESS.

  7. Resource file: practical publications for energy management, edition III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The Resource File is an in-depth bibliography of 166 practical and action-oriented energy conservation publications and materials. It is a reference tool, designed for Federal, state, and local energy managers or people who are asked to recommend how-to conservation guides to the public. Each listing describes a publication's intended audience and provides a summary of its contents. Included are operations and maintenance manuals, life-cycle costing handbooks, home insulation manuals, films on fuel-saving driving techniques, and courses devoted exclusively to home weatherization. 166 items.

  8. Conceptual Architecture of Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Khamphanchai, Warodom; Saha, Avijit; Rathinavel, Kruthika; Kuzlu, Murat; Pipattanasomporn, Manisa; Rahman, Saifur; Akyol, Bora A.; Haack, Jereme N.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a conceptual architecture of a Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS) platform. The proposed BEMOSS platform is expected to improve sensing and control of equipment in small- and medium-sized buildings, reduce energy consumption and help implement demand response (DR). It aims to offer: scalability, robustness, plug and play, open protocol, interoperability, cost-effectiveness, as well as local and remote monitoring. In this paper, four essential layers of BEMOSS software architecture -- namely User Interface, Application and Data Management, Operating System and Framework, and Connectivity layers -- are presented. A laboratory test bed to demonstrate the functionality of BEMOSS located at the Advanced Research Institute of Virginia Tech is also briefly described.

  9. Heart of the Solution - Energy Frontiers (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Green, Peter F. (Director, Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, University of Michigan); CSTEC Staff

    2016-07-12

    'Heart of the Solution - Energy Frontiers' was submitted by the Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion (CSTEC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was both the People's Choice Award winner and selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'exemplary explanation of the role of an Energy Frontier Research Center'. The Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion is directed by Peter F. Green at the University of Michigan. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion is 'to study complex material structures on the nanoscale to identify key features for their potential use as materials to convert solar energy and heat to electricity.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, optics, solar thermal, thermoelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, defects, ultrafast physics, interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and self-assembly.

  10. Energy management and control of active distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatzadeh, Farshid

    Advancements in the communication, control, computation and information technologies have driven the transition to the next generation active power distribution systems. Novel control techniques and management strategies are required to achieve the efficient, economic and reliable grid. The focus of this work is energy management and control of active distribution systems (ADS) with integrated renewable energy sources (RESs) and demand response (DR). Here, ADS mean automated distribution system with remotely operated controllers and distributed energy resources (DERs). DER as active part of the next generation future distribution system includes: distributed generations (DGs), RESs, energy storage system (ESS), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and DR. Integration of DR and RESs into ADS is critical to realize the vision of sustainability. The objective of this dissertation is the development of management architecture to control and operate ADS in the presence of DR and RES. One of the most challenging issues for operating ADS is the inherent uncertainty of DR and RES as well as conflicting objective of DER and electric utilities. ADS can consist of different layers such as system layer and building layer and coordination between these layers is essential. In order to address these challenges, multi-layer energy management and control architecture is proposed with robust algorithms in this work. First layer of proposed multi-layer architecture have been implemented at the system layer. Developed AC optimal power flow (AC-OPF) generates fair price for all DR and non-DR loads which is used as a control signal for second layer. Second layer controls DR load at buildings using a developed look-ahead robust controller. Load aggregator collects information from all buildings and send aggregated load to the system optimizer. Due to the different time scale at these two management layers, time coordination scheme is developed. Robust and deterministic controllers

  11. The management of central diabetes insipidus in infancy: desmopressin, low renal solute load formula, thiazide diuretics.

    PubMed

    Rivkees, Scott A; Dunbar, Nancy; Wilson, Thomas A

    2007-04-01

    Infants consume most of their calories as formula. Because of this large fluid intake, infants normally produce dilute urine, not far off from that seen in individuals with diabetes insipidus (DI). Infants with DI are therefore prone to water intoxication if fixed antidiuresis is achieved using the long-acting vasopressin analog desmopressin (DDAVP), which induces a state of high urine concentration. DI treatment approaches applied to older children and adults, who consume the their calories as solids, are difficult to apply to infants with DI. When used in infants, oral and intranasal DDAVP can be associated with wide swings in serum sodium concentration (SNA). In comparison, precisely administered subcutaneous doses of DDAVP can be successfully used in infants with DI, and appear to be superior to oral or intranasal DDAVP therapy. Alternatively, consistent eunatremia can be simply achieved in infantile DI using low renal solute load (RSL) formula and thiazide diuretics. Low RSL formula reduces obligatory urinary water losses, and thiazide diuretics concentrate the urine to levels seen in normal formula-fed infants. This report addresses treatment options of DI in infancy and the delicate management issues involved.

  12. Green wireless body area nanonetworks: energy management and the game of survival.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sudip; Islam, Nabiul; Mahapatro, Judhistir; Rodrigues, Joel Jose P C

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we envisage the architecture of Green Wireless Body Area Nanonetwork (GBAN) as a collection of nanodevices, in which each device is capable of communicating in both the molecular and wireless electromagnetic communication modes. The term green refers to the fact that the nanodevices in such a network can harvest energy from their surrounding environment, so that no nanodevice gets old solely due to the reasons attributed to energy depletion. However, the residual energy of a nanodevice can deplete substantially with the lapse of time, if the rate of energy consumption is not comparable with the rate of energy harvesting. It is observed that the rate of energy harvesting is nonlinear and sporadic in nature. So, the management of energy of the nanodevices is fundamentally important. We specifically address this problem in a ubiquitous healthcare monitoring scenario and formulate it as a cooperative Nash Bargaining game. The optimal strategy obtained from the Nash equilibrium solution provides improved network performance in terms of throughput and delay.

  13. A Qualitative Study on Classroom Management and Classroom Discipline Problems, Reasons, and Solutions: A Case of Information Technologies Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Kursun, Engin; Sisman, Gulcin Tan; Saltan, Fatih; Gok, Ali; Yildiz, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate classroom management and discipline problems that Information Technology teachers have faced, and to reveal underlying reasons and possible solutions of these problems by considering the views of parents, teachers, and administrator. This study was designed as qualitative study. Subjects of this study…

  14. Real Time Energy Management Control Strategies for Hybrid Powertrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaher, Mohamed Hegazi Mohamed

    In order to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions of mobile vehicles, various hybrid power-train concepts have been developed over the years. This thesis focuses on embedded control of hybrid powertrain concepts for mobile vehicle applications. Optimal robust control approach is used to develop a real time energy management strategy for continuous operations. The main idea is to store the normally wasted mechanical regenerative energy in energy storage devices for later usage. The regenerative energy recovery opportunity exists in any condition where the speed of motion is in opposite direction to the applied force or torque. This is the case when the vehicle is braking, decelerating, or the motion is driven by gravitational force, or load driven. There are three main concepts for regernerative energy storing devices in hybrid vehicles: electric, hydraulic, and flywheel. The real time control challenge is to balance the system power demand from the engine and the hybrid storage device, without depleting the energy storage device or stalling the engine in any work cycle, while making optimal use of the energy saving opportunities in a given operational, often repetitive cycle. In the worst case scenario, only engine is used and hybrid system completely disabled. A rule based control is developed and tuned for different work cycles and linked to a gain scheduling algorithm. A gain scheduling algorithm identifies the cycle being performed by the machine and its position via GPS, and maps them to the gains.

  15. Effective management of combined renewable energy resources in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Karimov, Khasan S; Akhmedov, Khakim M; Abid, Muhammad; Petrov, Georgiy N

    2013-09-01

    Water is needed mostly in summer time for irrigation and in winter time for generation of electric power. This results in conflicts between downstream countries that utilize water mostly for irrigation and those upstream countries, which use water for generation of electric power. At present Uzbekistan is blocking railway connection that is going to Tajikistan to interfere to transportation of the equipment and materials for construction of Rogun hydropower plant. In order to avoid conflicts between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan a number of measures for the utilization of water resources of the trans-boundary Rivers Amu-Darya and Sir-Darya are discussed. In addition, utilization of water with the supplement of wind and solar energy projects for proper and efficient management of water resources in Central Asia; export-import exchanges of electric energy in summer and winter time between neighboring countries; development of small hydropower project, modern irrigation system in main water consuming countries and large water reservoir hydropower projects for control of water resources for hydropower and irrigation are also discussed. It is also concluded that an effective management of water resources can be achieved by signing Water treaty between upstream and downstream countries, first of all between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. In this paper management of water as renewable energy resource in Tajikistan and Central Asian Republics are presented. PMID:23800621

  16. SPS energy conversion and power management workshop. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    In 1977 a four year study, the concept Development and Evaluation Program, was initiated by the US Department of Energy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. As part of this program, a series of peer reviews were carried out within the technical community to allow available information on SPS to be sifted, examined and, if need be, challenged. The SPS Energy Conversion and Power Management Workshop, held in Huntsville, Alabama, February 5 to 7, 1980, was one of these reviews. The results of studies in this particular field were presented to an audience of carefully selected scientists and engineers. This first report summarizes the results of that peer review. It is not intended to be an exhaustive treatment of the subject. Rather, it is designed to look at the SPS energy conversion and power management options in breadth, not depth, to try to foresee any troublesome and/or potentially unresolvable problems and to identify the most promising areas for future research and development. Topics include photovoltaic conversion, solar thermal conversion, and electric power distribution processing and power management. (WHK)

  17. Effective management of combined renewable energy resources in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Karimov, Khasan S; Akhmedov, Khakim M; Abid, Muhammad; Petrov, Georgiy N

    2013-09-01

    Water is needed mostly in summer time for irrigation and in winter time for generation of electric power. This results in conflicts between downstream countries that utilize water mostly for irrigation and those upstream countries, which use water for generation of electric power. At present Uzbekistan is blocking railway connection that is going to Tajikistan to interfere to transportation of the equipment and materials for construction of Rogun hydropower plant. In order to avoid conflicts between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan a number of measures for the utilization of water resources of the trans-boundary Rivers Amu-Darya and Sir-Darya are discussed. In addition, utilization of water with the supplement of wind and solar energy projects for proper and efficient management of water resources in Central Asia; export-import exchanges of electric energy in summer and winter time between neighboring countries; development of small hydropower project, modern irrigation system in main water consuming countries and large water reservoir hydropower projects for control of water resources for hydropower and irrigation are also discussed. It is also concluded that an effective management of water resources can be achieved by signing Water treaty between upstream and downstream countries, first of all between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. In this paper management of water as renewable energy resource in Tajikistan and Central Asian Republics are presented.

  18. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.

    2009-11-05

    The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5

  19. On Energy Trading Decision Methods in Distributed Energy Management Systems with Multiple Customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Yohei; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    This paper addresses an operation and energy purchase planning problem under the CO2 emissions regulation for corporate entities. Considering energy trading, more efficient energy consumption may be possible. We have studied an agent-based planning system, called Distributed Energy Management Systems (DEMSs), which intends to reduce energy consumption. In the DEMSs, CO2 emissions regulation is imposed on each corporate entity, and electrical and thermal energy trading among the entities are allowed. We have proposed an energy trading decision method based on the Market Oriented Programming (MOP). In this paper, we propose trading decision methods for the group composed of several customers and several suppliers. Experimental results show effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. A free energy analysis of nucleic acid base stacking in aqueous solution.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, R A; Honig, B

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports a theoretical study of the free energy contributions to nucleic acid base stacking in aqueous solution. Electrostatic interactions are treated by using the finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann method and nonpolar effects are treated with explicit calculation of van der Waals interactions and/or free energy-surface area relationships. Although for some pairs of bases there is a favorable Coulombic interaction in the stacked conformation, generally the net effect of electrostatic interactions is to oppose stacking. This result is caused by the loss of favorable base-solvent electrostatic interactions, that accompany the partial removal of polar atoms from water in the stacked conformation. Nonpolar interactions, involving the hydrophobic effect and enhancement of van der Waals interactions caused by close-packing, drive stacking. The calculations qualitatively reproduce the experimental dependence of stacking free energy on purine-pyrimidine composition. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8534823

  1. Correction of energy shift in measurements of solute segregation by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.

    1991-02-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is a sensitive technique for measuring the elemental composition of a specimen in the near-surface region. Studies of radiation effects in materials, such as radiation-induced segregation of solute elements to the external surface, often employ RBS to measure specimen composition because the high-energy ions can be used to produce radiation damage and also serve as the RBS profile ions. When small amounts of segregation are being measured, a shift in energy calibration renders the acquired data meaningless: the resulting edge shift in the spectra produces spurious contributions near the elemental leading edges that may greatly exceed the amount of segregation being measured. A simple method is proposed for correcting errors in measurement due to energy shift.

  2. Challenges and solutions of remote sensing at offshore wind energy developments.

    PubMed

    Kelly, T A; West, T E; Davenport, J K

    2009-11-01

    Radar is becoming an important tool used to gather data on bird and bat activity at proposed and existing land-based wind energy sites. Radar will likely play an even more important role at the increasing development of wind energy offshore, given both the lack of knowledge about bird and bat activity offshore and the increased difficulty in obtaining offshore information. Most radar studies to date have used off-the-shelf or modified marine radars. However, there are several issues that continue to hinder the potential usefulness of radar at wind energy sites, with offshore sites providing a particular suite of challenges. We identify these challenges along with current or developing solutions.

  3. Ultrafast Energy Transfer from Solvent to Solute Induced by Subpicosecond Highly Intense THz Pulses.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pankaj Kr; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2015-06-25

    The ultrafast energy transfer from an intense, subpicosecond THz pulse to bulk water at 300 K and density 1 g/cm(3) is simulated by ab initio molecular dynamics with explicit inclusion of the laser pulse. A 200 fs subcycle pulse of intensity 5 × 10(12) W/cm(2) corresponding to a peak field amplitude of 0.6 V/Å and achievable nowadays using optical rectification techniques results in a temperature jump from 300 K up to ∼1000 K within the first picosecond after the pulse. We discuss in detail the time-dependent structural changes caused by the THz pulse in the water medium and suggest possible ways to measure those changes by pump-probe experimental techniques. The ultrafast energy transfer from the energized water molecules to a solute molecule is studied on a test system, phenol. We find that phenol is, in the gas phase, insensitive to the THz pulse and only gains energy in solution via collisional energy transfer with the water molecules in its environment. The reason for this is found in the mode of interaction of the THz pulse with the aqueous medium. In short, water molecules respond mainly through their permanent dipole moments trying to orient themselves in the strong electric field of the pulse and disrupting their hydrogen-bonding structure. As compared with the water molecule, phenol has a smaller but still substantial permanent dipole moment. The moments of inertia of phenol are, however, too large for it to rotate in the short duration of the THz pulse. Therefore, the direct heating-up mechanism is mostly selective to the solvent molecules, whereas the solute heats up indirectly via collisions with its hot environment in about 1 to 2 ps. PMID:26000640

  4. Effect of Solution Composition on the Energy Production by Capacitive Mixing in Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we consider the extent to which the presence of multivalent ions in solution modifies the equilibrium and dynamics of the energy production in a capacitive cell built with ion-exchange membranes in contact with high surface area electrodes. The cell potential in open circuit (OCV) is controlled by the difference between both membrane potentials, simulated as constant volume charge regions. A theoretical model is elaborated for steady state OCV, first in the case of monovalent solutions, as a reference. This is compared to the results in multi-ionic systems, containing divalent cations in concentrations similar to those in real seawater. It is found that the OCV is reduced by about 25% (as compared to the results in pure NaCl solutions) due to the presence of the divalent ions, even in low concentrations. Interestingly, this can be related to the “uphill” transport of such ions against their concentration gradients. On the contrary, their effect on the dynamics of the cell potential is negligible in the case of highly charged membranes. The comparison between model predictions and experimental results shows a very satisfactory agreement, and gives clues for the practical application of these recently introduced energy production methods. PMID:25089164

  5. Energy-management financing for state facilities and public schools

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has committed to facilitate comprehensive energy management for state facilities, schools, hospitals, local governments, and other nonprofit organizations. The goal is to install all cost effective improvements, those with an aggregate payback of 6 years or less, by using private sector financing. To meet this goal, several programs were developed under Iowa's Building Energy Management Program. The DNR established a nonprofit corporation, the State of Iowa Facilities Improvement Corporation. The corporation finances, installs, and leases improvements to state agencies. The savings from improvements are used to make the lease payment. The Iowa School Energy Bank was established to serve Iowa public schools and community colleges. Six-month interest-free loans are offered to the schools for engineering analyses. Lease financing is offered for improvements under a master lease agreement with a regional bank at a group municipal financing rate. The publication documents the development of both the State of Iowa Facilities Improvement Corporation and the Iowa School Energy Bank Program.

  6. NEPA implementation: The Department of Energy`s program to manage spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) in its management of spent nuclear fuel. The DOE strategy is to address the short-term safety concerns about existing spent nuclear fuel, to study alternatives for interim storage, and to develop a long-range program to manage spent nuclear fuel. This paper discusses the NEPA process, the environmental impact statements for specific sites as well as the overall program, the inventory of DOE spent nuclear fuel, the alternatives for managing the fuel, and the schedule for implementing the program.

  7. Design of New Power Management Circuit for Light Energy Harvesting System.

    PubMed

    Jafer, Issa; Stack, Paul; MacNamee, Kevin

    2016-02-23

    Nowadays, it can be observed that Wireless Sensors Networks (WSN) are taking increasingly vital roles in many applications, such as building energy monitoring and control, which is the focus of the work in this paper. However, the main challenging issue with adopting WSN technology is the use of power sources such as batteries, which have a limited lifetime. A smart solution that could tackle this problem is using Energy Harvesting technology. The work in this paper will be focused on proposing a new power management design through harvesting indoor light intensity. The new approach is inspired by the use of the Fractional Open Circuit Voltage based Maximum Power Point tracking (MPPT) concept for sub mw Photo Voltaic (PV) cells. The new design adopts two main features: First, it minimizes the power consumed by the power management section; and second, it maximizes the MPPT-converted output voltage and consequently improves the efficiency of the power conversion in the sub mw power level. The new experimentally-tested design showed an improvement of 81% in the efficiency of MPPT conversion using 0.5 mW input power in comparison with the other presented solutions that showed less efficiency with higher input power.

  8. Design of New Power Management Circuit for Light Energy Harvesting System.

    PubMed

    Jafer, Issa; Stack, Paul; MacNamee, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, it can be observed that Wireless Sensors Networks (WSN) are taking increasingly vital roles in many applications, such as building energy monitoring and control, which is the focus of the work in this paper. However, the main challenging issue with adopting WSN technology is the use of power sources such as batteries, which have a limited lifetime. A smart solution that could tackle this problem is using Energy Harvesting technology. The work in this paper will be focused on proposing a new power management design through harvesting indoor light intensity. The new approach is inspired by the use of the Fractional Open Circuit Voltage based Maximum Power Point tracking (MPPT) concept for sub mw Photo Voltaic (PV) cells. The new design adopts two main features: First, it minimizes the power consumed by the power management section; and second, it maximizes the MPPT-converted output voltage and consequently improves the efficiency of the power conversion in the sub mw power level. The new experimentally-tested design showed an improvement of 81% in the efficiency of MPPT conversion using 0.5 mW input power in comparison with the other presented solutions that showed less efficiency with higher input power. PMID:26907300

  9. Design of New Power Management Circuit for Light Energy Harvesting System

    PubMed Central

    Jafer, Issa; Stack, Paul; MacNamee, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, it can be observed that Wireless Sensors Networks (WSN) are taking increasingly vital roles in many applications, such as building energy monitoring and control, which is the focus of the work in this paper. However, the main challenging issue with adopting WSN technology is the use of power sources such as batteries, which have a limited lifetime. A smart solution that could tackle this problem is using Energy Harvesting technology. The work in this paper will be focused on proposing a new power management design through harvesting indoor light intensity. The new approach is inspired by the use of the Fractional Open Circuit Voltage based Maximum Power Point tracking (MPPT) concept for sub mw Photo Voltaic (PV) cells. The new design adopts two main features: First, it minimizes the power consumed by the power management section; and second, it maximizes the MPPT-converted output voltage and consequently improves the efficiency of the power conversion in the sub mw power level. The new experimentally-tested design showed an improvement of 81% in the efficiency of MPPT conversion using 0.5 mW input power in comparison with the other presented solutions that showed less efficiency with higher input power. PMID:26907300

  10. Wireless Sensors and Networks for Advanced Energy Management

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.

    2005-05-06

    Numerous national studies and working groups have identified low-cost, very low-power wireless sensors and networks as a critical enabling technology for increasing energy efficiency, reducing waste, and optimizing processes. Research areas for developing such sensor and network platforms include microsensor arrays, ultra-low power electronics and signal conditioning, data/control transceivers, and robust wireless networks. A review of some of the research in the following areas will be discussed: (1) Low-cost, flexible multi-sensor array platforms (CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, humidity, NH{sub 3}, O{sub 2}, occupancy, etc.) that enable energy and emission reductions in applications such as buildings and manufacturing; (2) Modeling investments (energy usage and savings to drive capital investment decisions) and estimated uptime improvements through pervasive gathering of equipment and process health data and its effects on energy; (3) Robust, self-configuring wireless sensor networks for energy management; and (4) Quality-of-service for secure and reliable data transmission from widely distributed sensors. Wireless communications is poised to support technical innovations in the industrial community, with widespread use of wireless sensors forecasted to improve manufacturing production and energy efficiency and reduce emissions. Progress being made in wireless system components, as described in this paper, is helping bring these projected improvements to reality.

  11. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Evaluating Energy Savings in All-Electric Public Housing in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    This project analyzes the cost effectiveness of energy-saving measures installed by a large public housing authority in Salishan, and evaluates those solutions to improve efficiency of affordable housing for new and existing homes. Research focuses on the modeled and measured energy usage of the first six phases of construction, and compares the energy usage of those phases to phase 7.

  12. Benchmark solutions for the galactic ion transport equations: Energy and spatially dependent problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-03-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic ion transport (GIT) equations in the straight-ahead approximation. These equations are used to predict potential radiation hazards in the upper atmosphere and in space. Two levels of difficulty are considered: (1) energy independent, and (2) spatially independent. The analysis emphasizes analytical methods never before applied to the GIT equations. Most of the representations derived have been numerically implemented and compared to more approximate calculations. Accurate ion fluxes are obtained (3 to 5 digits) for nontrivial sources. For monoenergetic beams, both accurate doses and fluxes are found. The benchmarks presented are useful in assessing the accuracy of transport algorithms designed to accommodate more complex radiation protection problems. In addition, these solutions can provide fast and accurate assessments of relatively simple shield configurations.

  13. Detection of β-Amyloid Peptide Dimer in Solution by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun; Mei, Erwen; Kung, Mei-Ping; Kung, Hank; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2006-03-01

    Studies have suggested that there is a connection between ß-amyloid-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs), small oligomers formed from clustering of peptides with 39-42 amino acid units, and pathogenicity of Alzheimer's disease. It is believed that the soluble ADDL oligomers eventually coagulate and precipitate into fibrils that cause neurotoxicity. Although there have been studies characterizing the fibrils structure and the large coagulate formation kinetics, little experimental information exists for the oligomers in the solution phase. We report here the use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer detected through a confocal microscope under single molecule conditions for the detection of the β-amyloid (1-40) peptide dimer in solution. The structure of the dimer is characterized in terms of the distance of the two N-terminals.

  14. Benchmark solutions for the galactic ion transport equations: Energy and spatially dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic ion transport (GIT) equations in the straight-ahead approximation. These equations are used to predict potential radiation hazards in the upper atmosphere and in space. Two levels of difficulty are considered: (1) energy independent, and (2) spatially independent. The analysis emphasizes analytical methods never before applied to the GIT equations. Most of the representations derived have been numerically implemented and compared to more approximate calculations. Accurate ion fluxes are obtained (3 to 5 digits) for nontrivial sources. For monoenergetic beams, both accurate doses and fluxes are found. The benchmarks presented are useful in assessing the accuracy of transport algorithms designed to accommodate more complex radiation protection problems. In addition, these solutions can provide fast and accurate assessments of relatively simple shield configurations.

  15. Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

    2003-04-18

    Energy Information Systems (EIS) for buildings are becoming widespread in the U.S., with more companies offering EIS products every year. As a result, customers are often overwhelmed by the quickly expanding portfolio of EIS feature and application options, which have not been clearly identified for consumers. The object of this report is to provide a technical overview of currently available EIS products. In particular, this report focuses on web-based EIS products for large commercial buildings, which allow data access and control capabilities over the Internet. EIS products combine software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to collect, analyze and display building information to aid commercial building energy managers, facility managers, financial managers and electric utilities in reducing energy use and costs in buildings. Data types commonly processed by EIS include energy consumption data; building characteristics; building system data, such as heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and lighting data; weather data; energy price signals; and energy demand-response event information. This project involved an extensive review of research and trade literature to understand the motivation for EIS technology development. This study also gathered information on currently commercialized EIS. This review is not an exhaustive analysis of all EIS products; rather, it is a technical framework and review of current products on the market. This report summarizes key features available in today's EIS, along with a categorization framework to understand the relationship between EIS, Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCSs), and similar technologies. Four EIS types are described: Basic Energy Information Systems (Basic-EIS); Demand Response Systems (DRS); Enterprise Energy Management (EEM); and Web-based Energy Management and Control Systems (Web-EMCS). Within the context of these four categories, the following characteristics of EIS are

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  17. Free-energy landscape of alcohol driven coacervation transition in aqueous gelatin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amarnath; Reena, Bohidar, H. B.

    2006-08-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation of a homogeneous polyampholyte (gelatin) solution into a dense polymer-rich coacervate and the dilute supernatant phase is discussed through free-energy landscape formalism. We have evaluated the free energy and entropy of the system as it undergoes the phenomenon of simple coacervation, driven by the addition of a nonsolvent. Electrophoretic mobility (μ) and turbidity measurements were performed on 0.01% and 0.05%(w/v) aqueous gelatin solutions that were driven towards coacervation by the addition of ethanol. The mobility of the polyampholyte molecules, which was typically μ ≈0.38±0.02μm/scm/V in water, gradually reduced for the soluble intermolecular complexes to a plateau value of μ ≈0.11±0.01μm/scm/V as the ethanol volume fraction equaled φns≈0.47±0.03, which coincided with the first appearance of coacervate droplets (coacervation transition) observed from turbidity measurements, a behavior found to be invariant of gelatin concentration. These results were used as input to the theoretical model to explicitly construct the free-energy landscape for a single gelatin chain and the global system comprising the polymer-rich coacervate and the dilute supernatant phase.

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Stand-Off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using "L" clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and "picture framing" the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing.

  19. Energy management and multi-layer control of networked microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Ramon

    Networked microgrids is a group of neighboring microgrids that has ability to interchange power when required in order to increase reliability and resiliency. Networked microgrid can operate in different possible configurations including: islanded microgrid, a grid-connected microgrid without a tie-line converter, a grid-connected microgrid with a tie-line converter, and networked microgrids. These possible configurations and specific characteristics of renewable energy offer challenges in designing control and management algorithms for voltage, frequency and power in all possible operating scenarios. In this work, control algorithm is designed based on large-signal model that enables microgrid to operate in wide range of operating points. A combination between PI controller and feed-forward measured system responses will compensate for the changes in operating points. The control architecture developed in this work has multi-layers and the outer layer is slower than the inner layer in time response. The main responsibility of the designed controls are to regulate voltage magnitude and frequency, as well as output power of the DG(s). These local controls also integrate with a microgrid level energy management system or microgrid central controller (MGCC) for power and energy balance for. the entire microgrid in islanded, grid-connected, or networked microgid mode. The MGCC is responsible to coordinate the lower level controls to have reliable and resilient operation. In case of communication network failure, the decentralized energy management will operate locally and will activate droop control. Simulation results indicate the superiority of designed control algorithms compared to existing ones.

  20. A Grid-based solution for management and analysis of microarrays in distributed experiments

    PubMed Central

    Porro, Ivan; Torterolo, Livia; Corradi, Luca; Fato, Marco; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Scaglione, Silvia; Schenone, Andrea; Viti, Federica

    2007-01-01

    Several systems have been presented in the last years in order to manage the complexity of large microarray experiments. Although good results have been achieved, most systems tend to lack in one or more fields. A Grid based approach may provide a shared, standardized and reliable solution for storage and analysis of biological data, in order to maximize the results of experimental efforts. A Grid framework has been therefore adopted due to the necessity of remotely accessing large amounts of distributed data as well as to scale computational performances for terabyte datasets. Two different biological studies have been planned in order to highlight the benefits that can emerge from our Grid based platform. The described environment relies on storage services and computational services provided by the gLite Grid middleware. The Grid environment is also able to exploit the added value of metadata in order to let users better classify and search experiments. A state-of-art Grid portal has been implemented in order to hide the complexity of framework from end users and to make them able to easily access available services and data. The functional architecture of the portal is described. As a first test of the system performances, a gene expression analysis has been performed on a dataset of Affymetrix GeneChip® Rat Expression Array RAE230A, from the ArrayExpress database. The sequence of analysis includes three steps: (i) group opening and image set uploading, (ii) normalization, and (iii) model based gene expression (based on PM/MM difference model). Two different Linux versions (sequential and parallel) of the dChip software have been developed to implement the analysis and have been tested on a cluster. From results, it emerges that the parallelization of the analysis process and the execution of parallel jobs on distributed computational resources actually improve the performances. Moreover, the Grid environment have been tested both against the possibility of

  1. Copper Oxide Thin Films through Solution Based Methods for Electrical Energy Conversion and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changqiong

    Copper oxides (Cu2O and CuO), composed of non-toxic and earth abundant elements, are promising materials for electrical energy generation and storage devices. Solution based techniques for creating thin films of these materials, such as electrodeposition, are important to understand and develop because of their potential for realizing substantial energy savings compared to traditional fabrication methods. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O), with its direct band gap, is a p-type semiconductor that is well suited for creating solution-processed photovoltaic devices (solar cells); several key advancements made toward this application are the primary focus of this thesis. Electrodeposition of single-phase, crystalline Cu2O thin films is demonstrated using previously unexplored, acidic lactate/Cu2+ solutions, which has provided additional understanding of the impacts of growth solution chemistry on film formation. The influence of pH on the resulting Cu2O thin film properties is revealed by using the same ligand (sodium lactate) at various solution pH values. Cu2O films grown from acidic lactate solutions can exhibit a distinctive flowerlike, dendritic morphology, in contrast to the faceted, dense films obtained using alkaline lactate solutions. Relative speciation distributions of the various metal complex ions present under different growth conditions are calculated using reported equilibrium association constants and experimentally supported by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Dependence of thin film morphology on the lactate/Cu2+ molar ratio and applied potential is described. Cu2O/eutectic gallium-indium Schottky junction devices are formed and devices are tested under monochromatic green LED illumination. Further surface examination of the Cu2O films using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the fact that films grown from acidic lactate solution with a small lactate/Cu2+ molar ratio, which exhibit improved photovoltaic performance compared to films grown from

  2. Identifying low variance pathways for free energy calculations of molecular transformations in solution phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tri T.; Shirts, Michael R.

    2011-07-01

    Improving the efficiency of free energy calculations is important for many biological and materials design applications, such as protein-ligand binding affinities in drug design, partitioning between immiscible liquids, and determining molecular association in soft materials. We show that for any pair potential, moderately accurate estimation of the radial distribution function for a solute molecule is sufficient to accurately estimate the statistical variance of a sampling along a free energy pathway. This allows inexpensive analytical identification of low statistical error free energy pathways. We employ a variety of methods to estimate the radial distribution function (RDF) and find that the computationally cheap two-body "dilute gas" limit performs as well or better than 3D-RISM theory and other approximations for identifying low variance free energy pathways. With a RDF estimate in hand, we can search for pairwise interaction potentials that produce low variance. We give an example of a search minimizing statistical variance of solvation free energy over the entire parameter space of a generalized "soft core" potential. The free energy pathway arising from this optimization procedure has lower curvature in the variance and reduces the total variance by at least 50% compared to the traditional soft core solvation pathway. We also demonstrate that this optimized pathway allows free energies to be estimated with fewer intermediate states due to its low curvature. This free energy variance optimization technique is generalizable to solvation in any homogeneous fluid and for any type of pairwise potential and can be performed in minutes to hours, depending on the method used to estimate g(r).

  3. New solutions for standardization, monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Arnaud; Papon, Gautier

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopes have become ubiquitous in life sciences laboratories, including those focused on pharmaceuticals, diagnosis, and forensics. For the past few years, the need for both performance guarantees and quantifiable results has driven development in this area. However, the lack of appropriate standards and reference materials makes it difficult or impossible to compare the results of two fluorescence microscopes, or to measure performance fluctuations of one microscope over time. Therefore, the operation of fluorescence microscopes is not monitored as often as their use warrants - an issue that is recognized by both systems manufacturers and national metrology institutes. We have developed a new process that enables the etching of long-term stable fluorescent patterns with sub-micrometer sizes in three dimensions inside glass. In this paper, we present, based on this new process, a fluorescent multi-dimensional ruler and a dedicated software that are suitable for monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (wide-field, confocal, multiphoton, high content machines). In addition to fluorescence, the same patterns exhibit bright- and dark-field contrast, DIC, and phase contrast, which make them also relevant to monitor these types of microscopes. Non-exhaustively, this new solution enables the measurement of: The stage repositioning accuracy; The illumination and detection homogeneities; The field flatness; The detectors' characteristics; The lateral and axial spatial resolutions; The spectral response (spectrum, intensity and lifetime) of the system. Thanks to the stability of the patterns, microscope performance assessment can be carried out as well in a daily basis as in the long term.

  4. Advantages of an electrical control and energy management system

    PubMed

    Pal; Huff

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses an electrical control and energy management system (ECEMS) that was installed at Indian Petrochemicals Corporation Limited (IPCL) Nagathone Gas Cracker complex located in Maharashtra, India. This distributed control system (DCS) provided computer assisted control in the areas of: Demand control; Automatic generation control, including MW and MVAR management; Power factor control; Automatic tap changer control; Load shedding; Automatic synchronization of generator and ties; Remote control of breakers. Previously, IPCL, like most other petrochemical companies in India, relied on operator control for power house functions. The process is always automated, but the power house equipment is usually manually controlled. Electrical control and energy management systems are not thought to be necessary. However, in this case the consultants for IPCL and the DCS supplier convinced IPCL that an ECEMS would save them enough money in operating costs to pay for the new control system. The control system discussed in this paper reduced operating costs by satisfying the process steam and power demands in the most cost-effective manner. In addition, the system took action to respond to electrical disturbances, such as loss of tie line and generator tripping, so that stable conditions were restored. PMID:10826290

  5. System design and power management for ultra low energy applications using energy harvesting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hui

    Micro-systems with features of tiny volume and wireless communications are developed for different applications. To prolong devices' lifetime, energy harvesting techniques which use environmental energy as the power source are proposed. Although the amount of environmental energy is theoretically infinite, it is usually unstable and the instantaneous power available is limited. To utilize the environmental energy efficiently, power management circuits have to be built to track the unstable energy status and extract maximum power from the energy transducer. In this work, we use solar energy as an example and demonstrate the design of power management circuit for micro-systems that use energy harvesting techniques. An inductor-less solar power management system was proposed and built. The system targets to operate in all lighting environments. When the light intensity is low, a charge pump is used to step up the output voltage from the photovoltaic cell. Meanwhile, charge pump switching frequency can be auto-adjusted to transfer maximum solar power to the load. Another power management circuit was proposed and designed for solar energy harvesting systems. It is based on single inductor dual-input dual-output DC-DC converter. The converter clamps photovoltaic cells to a point where maximum solar power is extracted. At the same time, it generates a stable output voltage to power the load. Also, the converter schedules energy utilization among different energy sources and consumers. The single inductor implementation can reduce the devices' volume and cost. For devices that have very stringent volume requirement, it may not be possible to have built-in battery, and the load is powered by environmental energy only. To cater for the source characteristic, power management is executed in the load side. A charge based computation methodology was proposed where the load operation is controlled by the source energy status. Moreover, a control strategy was derived to improve

  6. Novel solar energy harvesting options based on solution-processable inorganic/organic hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stingelin, Natalie

    2015-03-01

    The growing demand for energy and increasing concerns for the effect of the excessive abuse of fossil fuels on the environment force the scientific world to search for alternative, clean and safe energy sources. Finding ways to harvest solar energy is thereby one of the most appealing options. Here, we present a novel approach that exploits the versatile properties of recently developed, photoactive organic/inorganic hybrid fluids based on titanium oxide hydrates and polyalcohols for the production of versatile solar fuels. We will show that such systems can absorb light in the UV-near visible wave-length range. The sunlight's energy is then converted into chemical energy in the form of reduced titanium species, which can be re-oxidised by oxygen when required. Therefore, the absorbed energy is stored as long as oxygen is excluded by the hybrid system. We, furthermore, demonstrate that once discharged, the fluid can be activated again by exposing it to sunlight and recycled - a property that is important technologically. The same hybrids can also be exploited to produce structures that permit efficient management of light. We will illustrate the potential of this class of materials based on some of our recent approaches to fabricate light-scattering and light in-coupling structures, and discuss future opportunities they open up.

  7. Toward Femtosecond Time-Resolved Studies of Solvent-Solute Energy Transfer in Doped Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacellar, C.; Ziemkiewicz, M. P.; Leone, S. R.; Neumark, D. M.; Gessner, O.

    2015-05-01

    Superfluid helium nanodroplets provide a unique cryogenic matrix for high resolution spectroscopy and ultracold chemistry applications. With increasing photon energy and, in particular, in the increasingly important Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) regime, the droplets become optically dense and, therefore, participate in the EUV-induced dynamics. Energy- and charge-transfer mechanisms between the host droplets and dopant atoms, however, are poorly understood. Static energy domain measurements of helium droplets doped with noble gas atoms (Xe, Kr) indicate that Penning ionization due to energy transfer from the excited droplet to dopant atoms may be a significant relaxation channel. We have set up a femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging experiment to probe these dynamics directly in the time-domain. Droplets containing 104 to 106 helium atoms and a small percentage (<10-4) of dopant atoms (Xe, Kr, Ne) are excited to the 1s2p Rydberg band by 21.6 eV photons produced by high harmonic generation (HHG). Transiently populated states are probed by 1.6 eV photons, generating time-dependent photoelectron kinetic energy distributions, which are monitored by velocity map imaging (VMI). The results will provide new information about the dynamic timescales and the different relaxation channels, giving access to a more complete physical picture of solvent-solute interactions in the superfluid environment. Prospects and challenges of the novel experiment as well as preliminary experimental results will be discussed.

  8. Sound energy decay in coupled spaces using a parametric analytical solution of a diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Luizard, Paul; Polack, Jean-Dominique; Katz, Brian F G

    2014-05-01

    Sound field behavior in performance spaces is a complex phenomenon. Issues regarding coupled spaces present additional concerns due to sound energy exchanges. Coupled volume concert halls have been of increasing interest in recent decades because this architectural principle offers the possibility to modify the hall's acoustical environment in a passive way by modifying the coupling area. Under specific conditions, the use of coupled reverberation chambers can provide non-exponential sound energy decay in the main room, resulting in both high clarity and long reverberation which are antagonistic parameters in a single volume room. Previous studies have proposed various sound energy decay models based on statistical acoustics and diffusion theory. Statistical acoustics assumes a perfectly uniform sound field within a given room whereas measurements show an attenuation of energy with increasing source-receiver distance. While previously proposed models based on diffusion theory use numerical solvers, the present study proposes a heuristic model of sound energy behavior based on an analytical solution of the commonly used diffusion equation and physically justified approximations. This model is validated by means of comparisons to scale model measurements and numerical geometrical acoustics simulations, both applied to the same simple concert hall geometry.

  9. Electron transport and energy degradation in the ionosphere: Evaluation of the numerical solution, comparison with laboratory experiments and auroral observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Lilensten, J.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral electron transport calculations are a critical part of auroral models. We evaluate a numerical solution to the transport and energy degradation problem. The numerical solution is verified by reproducing simplified problems to which analytic solutions exist, internal self-consistency tests, comparison with laboratory experiments of electron beams penetrating a collision chamber, and by comparison with auroral observations, particularly the emission ratio of the N2 second positive to N2(+) first negative emissions. Our numerical solutions agree with range measurements in collision chambers. The calculated N(2)2P to N2(+)1N emission ratio is independent of the spectral characteristics of the incident electrons, and agrees with the value observed in aurora. Using different sets of energy loss cross sections and different functions to describe the energy distribution of secondary electrons that emerge from ionization collisions, we discuss the uncertainties of the solutions to the electron transport equation resulting from the uncertainties of these input parameters.

  10. End-To-End Solution for Integrated Workload and Data Management using GlideinWMS and Globus Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Miller, Zachary; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Holzman, Burt; Weiss, Cathrin; Duan, Xi; Lacinski, Lukasz

    2012-12-01

    Grid computing has enabled scientific communities to effectively share computing resources distributed over many independent sites. Several such communities, or Virtual Organizations (VO), in the Open Science Grid and the European Grid Infrastructure use the GlideinWMS system to run complex application work-flows. GlideinWMS is a pilot-based workload management system (WMS) that creates an on-demand, dynamically-sized overlay Condor batch system on Grid resources. While the WMS addresses the management of compute resources, however, data management in the Grid is still the responsibility of the VO. In general, large VOs have resources to develop complex custom solutions, while small VOs would rather push this responsibility to the infrastructure. The latter requires a tight integration of the WMS and the data management layers, an approach still not common in modern Grids. In this paper we describe a solution developed to address this shortcoming in the context of Center for Enabling Distributed Peta-scale Science (CEDPS) by integrating GlideinWMS with Globus Online (GO). Globus Online is a fast, reliable file transfer service that makes it easy for any user to move data. The solution eliminates the need for the users to provide custom data transfer solutions in the application by making this functionality part of the GlideinWMS infrastructure. To achieve this, GlideinWMS uses the file transfer plug-in architecture of Condor. The paper describes the system architecture and how this solution can be extended to support data transfer services other than Globus Online when used with Condor or GlideinWMS.

  11. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project

  12. Intelligent demand side management of residential building energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Maruti N.

    Advent of modern sensing technologies, data processing capabilities and rising cost of energy are driving the implementation of intelligent systems in buildings and houses which constitute 41% of total energy consumption. The primary motivation has been to provide a framework for demand-side management and to improve overall reliability. The entire formulation is to be implemented on NILM (Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring System), a smart meter. This is going to play a vital role in the future of demand side management. Utilities have started deploying smart meters throughout the world which will essentially help to establish communication between utility and consumers. This research is focused on investigation of a suitable thermal model of residential house, building up control system and developing diagnostic and energy usage forecast tool. The present work has considered measurement based approach to pursue. Identification of building thermal parameters is the very first step towards developing performance measurement and controls. The proposed identification technique is PEM (Prediction Error Method) based, discrete state-space model. The two different models have been devised. First model is focused toward energy usage forecast and diagnostics. Here one of the novel idea has been investigated which takes integral of thermal capacity to identify thermal model of house. The purpose of second identification is to build up a model for control strategy. The controller should be able to take into account the weather forecast information, deal with the operating point constraints and at the same time minimize the energy consumption. To design an optimal controller, MPC (Model Predictive Control) scheme has been implemented instead of present thermostatic/hysteretic control. This is a receding horizon approach. Capability of the proposed schemes has also been investigated.

  13. Strategic Energy Management Plan For Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Steven A.; Hunt, W. D.

    2001-10-31

    This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Site. A strategy has been developed with three major elements in mind: 1) development of a strong foundation from which to build, 2) understanding technologies that are available, and 3) exploring financing options to fund the implementation of improvements. The objective of this report is to outline a strategy that can be used by Fort Buchanan to further establish an effective energy management program. Once a strategy is accepted, the next step is to take action. Some of the strategies defined in this Plan may be implemented directly. Other strategies may require the development of a more sophisticated tactical, or operational, plan to detail a roadmap that will lead to successful realization of the goal. Similarly, some strategies are not single events. Rather, some strategies will require continuous efforts to maintain diligence or to change the culture of the Base occupants and their efforts to conserve energy resources.

  14. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Paul H. Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas.

  15. Radio Frequency Identification Queuing & Geo-Location (RAQGEO): A spatial solution to inventory management at XYZ Logistics, Inc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Bradley Joseph

    New supply chain management methods using radio frequency identification (RFID) and global positioning system (GPS) technology are quickly being adopted by companies as various inventory management benefits are being realized. For example, companies such as Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK) Logistics use the technology coupled with geospatial support systems for distributors to quickly find and manage freight containers. Traditional supply chain management methods require pen-to-paper reporting, searching inventory on foot, and human data entry. Some companies that prioritize supply chain management have not adopted the new technology, because they may feel that their traditional methods save the company expenses. This thesis serves as a pilot study that examines how information technology (IT) utilizing RFID and GPS technology can serve to increase workplace productivity, decrease human labor associated with inventorying, plus be used for spatial analysis by management. This pilot study represents the first attempt to couple RFID technology with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in supply chain management efforts to analyze and locate mobile assets by exploring costs and benefits of implementation plus how the technology can be employed. This pilot study identified a candidate to implement a new inventory management method as XYZ Logistics, Inc. XYZ Logistics, Inc. is a fictitious company but represents a factual corporation. The name has been changed to provide the company with anonymity and to not disclose confidential business information. XYZ Logistics, Inc., is a nation-wide company that specializes in providing space solutions for customers including portable offices, storage containers, and customizable buildings.

  16. Nuclear energy and waste management pyroprocess for system symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishihara, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    The actinide management has become a key issue in nuclear energy. Recovering and fissioning transuranium elements reduce the long-term proliferation risks and the environmental burden. The better way of waste management will be made by system symbiosis: a combination of light-water reactor and fast reactor and/or accelerator-driven transmutation system should be sought. The new recycling technology should be able to achieve good economy with smaller plants, which can process fuels from different types of reactors on a common technical basis. Ease in handling the higher heat load of transuranium nuclides is also important. Pyroprocesses with the use of molten salts are regarded as the strong candidate for such recycling technology. In JAEA, the first laboratory for the high-temperature chemistry of Am and Cm has been established. The fundamental data will be combined with the computer code for predicting the molten-salts electrolytic processes.

  17. Copper Oxide Thin Films through Solution Based Methods for Electrical Energy Conversion and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changqiong

    Copper oxides (Cu2O and CuO), composed of non-toxic and earth abundant elements, are promising materials for electrical energy generation and storage devices. Solution based techniques for creating thin films of these materials, such as electrodeposition, are important to understand and develop because of their potential for realizing substantial energy savings compared to traditional fabrication methods. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O), with its direct band gap, is a p-type semiconductor that is well suited for creating solution-processed photovoltaic devices (solar cells); several key advancements made toward this application are the primary focus of this thesis. Electrodeposition of single-phase, crystalline Cu2O thin films is demonstrated using previously unexplored, acidic lactate/Cu2+ solutions, which has provided additional understanding of the impacts of growth solution chemistry on film formation. The influence of pH on the resulting Cu2O thin film properties is revealed by using the same ligand (sodium lactate) at various solution pH values. Cu2O films grown from acidic lactate solutions can exhibit a distinctive flowerlike, dendritic morphology, in contrast to the faceted, dense films obtained using alkaline lactate solutions. Relative speciation distributions of the various metal complex ions present under different growth conditions are calculated using reported equilibrium association constants and experimentally supported by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Dependence of thin film morphology on the lactate/Cu2+ molar ratio and applied potential is described. Cu2O/eutectic gallium-indium Schottky junction devices are formed and devices are tested under monochromatic green LED illumination. Further surface examination of the Cu2O films using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the fact that films grown from acidic lactate solution with a small lactate/Cu2+ molar ratio, which exhibit improved photovoltaic performance compared to films grown from

  18. Improving energy efficiency via smart building energy management systems. A comparison with policy measures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rocha, Paula; Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael

    2014-12-09

    In this study, to foster the transition to more sustainable energy systems, policymakers have been approving measures to improve energy efficiency as well as promoting smart grids. In this setting, building managers are encouraged to adapt their energy operations to real-time market and weather conditions. Yet, most fail to do so as they rely on conventional building energy management systems (BEMS) that have static temperature set points for heating and cooling equipment. In this paper, we investigate how effective policy measures are at improving building-level energy efficiency compared to a smart BEMS with dynamic temperature set points. To this end,more » we present an integrated optimisation model mimicking the smart BEMS that combines decisions on heating and cooling systems operations with decisions on energy sourcing. Using data from an Austrian and a Spanish building, we find that the smart BEMS results in greater reduction in energy consumption than a conventional BEMS with policy measures.« less

  19. Free Energy and Equilibrium: The Basis of Change in G Degrees = -RT In K for Reactions in Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Gordon M.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the derivation of a thermodynamic relation. The relation is derived, for reactants in solution, from a treatment of the free energy of the reducing system as a function of the degree of advancement of the solution. Includes microcomputer figures/diagrams produced by programs developed to simulate this study. (JN)

  20. 77 FR 58424 - Drucker, Inc., DynaMotive Energy Systems Corp., and Gate to Wire Solutions, Inc., Order of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Drucker, Inc., DynaMotive Energy Systems Corp., and Gate to Wire Solutions, Inc., Order of... current and accurate information concerning the securities of Gate to Wire Solutions, Inc. because it...

  1. Interrelationships between information and energy using knowledge management tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizcano, D.; Martínez, A. María

    2014-10-01

    Edward Fredkin was an enthusiastic advocate of information-based theoretical physics, who, in the early 1980s, proposed a new theory of physics based on the idea that the universe is ultimately composed of software. According to Fredkin, reality should be considered as being composed not of particles, matter and forces or energy but of bits of data or information modified according to computational rules. Fredkin went on to demonstrate that, while energy is necessary for storing and retrieving information, it can be arbitrarily reduced in order to carry out any particular instance of information processing, and this operation does not have a lower bound. This implies that it is information rather than matter or energy that should be considered at the ultimate fundamental constituent of reality. This possibility had already been suggested by other scientists. Norbert Wiener heralded a fundamental shift from energy to information and suggested that the universe was founded essentially on the transformation of information, not energy. However, Konrad Zuse was the first, back in 1967, to defend the idea that a digital computer is computing the universe. Richard P. Feynman showed this possibility in a similar light in his reflections on how information related to matter and energy. Other pioneering research on the theory of digital physics was published by Kantor in 1977 and more recently by Stephen Wolfram in 2002, who thereby joined the host of voices upholding that it is patterns of information, not matter and energy, that constitute the cornerstones of reality. In this paper, we introduce the use of knowledge management tools for the purpose of analysing this topic.

  2. Interrelationships between information and energy using knowledge management tools

    SciTech Connect

    Lizcano, D. E-mail: mariaaurora.martinez@udima.es; Martínez, A. María E-mail: mariaaurora.martinez@udima.es

    2014-10-06

    Edward Fredkin was an enthusiastic advocate of information-based theoretical physics, who, in the early 1980s, proposed a new theory of physics based on the idea that the universe is ultimately composed of software. According to Fredkin, reality should be considered as being composed not of particles, matter and forces or energy but of bits of data or information modified according to computational rules. Fredkin went on to demonstrate that, while energy is necessary for storing and retrieving information, it can be arbitrarily reduced in order to carry out any particular instance of information processing, and this operation does not have a lower bound. This implies that it is information rather than matter or energy that should be considered at the ultimate fundamental constituent of reality. This possibility had already been suggested by other scientists. Norbert Wiener heralded a fundamental shift from energy to information and suggested that the universe was founded essentially on the transformation of information, not energy. However, Konrad Zuse was the first, back in 1967, to defend the idea that a digital computer is computing the universe. Richard P. Feynman showed this possibility in a similar light in his reflections on how information related to matter and energy. Other pioneering research on the theory of digital physics was published by Kantor in 1977 and more recently by Stephen Wolfram in 2002, who thereby joined the host of voices upholding that it is patterns of information, not matter and energy, that constitute the cornerstones of reality. In this paper, we introduce the use of knowledge management tools for the purpose of analysing this topic.

  3. Community energy auditing: experience with the comprehensive community energy management program

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.L.; Berger, D.A.; Rubin, C.B.; Hutchinson, P.A. Sr.; Griggs, H.M.

    1980-09-01

    The report provides local officials and staff with information on lessons from the audit, projection, and general planning experiences of the Comprehensive Community Energy Management Program (CCEMP) communities and provides ANL and US DOE with information useful to the further development of local energy management planning methods. In keeping with the objectives, the report is organized into the following sections: Section II presents the evaluation issues and key findings based on the communities' experiences from Spring of 1979 to approximately March of 1980; Section III gives an organized review of experience of communities in applying the detailed audit methodology for estimating current community energy consumption and projecting future consumption and supply; Section IV provides a preliminary assessment of how audit information is being used in other CCEMP tasks; Section V presents an organized review of preliminary lessons from development of the community planning processes; and Section VI provides preliminary conclusions on the audit and planning methodology. (MCW)

  4. Comparing Linear Free Energy Relationships for Organic Chemicals in Soils: Effects of Soil and Solute Properties

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Isabel R.; Young, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Sorption isotherm data were determined for a set of 8 aromatic organic compounds with varying physical chemical properties in three soils with organic matter of differing quantity and composition. The primary goals of this study were to test single and multi-parameter linear free energy relationships on their ability to predict the observed sorption behavior on different types of natural sorbents across a range of solutes and concentrations and to relate the accuracy of the predictions to sorbent and solute structural descriptors. Organic carbon normalized sorption coefficients (KOC) predicted using both single and multi-parameter LFERs were in good agreement with experimental data obtained at the highest tested aqueous concentrations (average deviation less than 0.1 log units over all solutes and sorbents) but deviations were more substantial (0.59–0.65 log units) at the lowest tested concentrations. For chlorinated benzenes there was a significant correlation between experiment-prediction discrepancies and the aromatic content of the soil organic matter measured by 13C NMR and the magnitude of the effect was similar to that observed previously for dissolved organic matter. PMID:20726509

  5. Evaluating Battery-like Reactions to Harvest Energy from Salinity Differences using Ammonium Bicarbonate Salt Solutions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Rahimi, Mohammad; Logan, Bruce E; Gorski, Christopher A

    2016-05-10

    Mixing entropy batteries (MEBs) are a new approach to generate electricity from salinity differences between two aqueous solutions. To date, MEBs have only been prepared from solutions containing chloride salts, owing to their relevance in natural salinity gradients created from seawater and freshwater. We hypothesized that MEBs could capture energy using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB), a thermolytic salt that can be used to convert waste heat into salinity gradients. We examined six battery electrode materials. Several of the electrodes were unstable in AmB solutions or failed to produce expected voltages. Of the electrode materials tested, a cell containing a manganese oxide electrode and a metallic lead electrode produced the highest power density (6.3 mW m(-2) ). However, this power density is still low relative to previously reported NaCl-based MEBs and heat recovery systems. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that MEBs could indeed be used to generate electricity from AmB salinity gradients. PMID:27030080

  6. Air turbine - an interesting solution for straw energy conversion into electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bălănescu, D. T.; Homutescu, V. M.; Atanasiu, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Straw is a non-hazardous by-product of crop plants processing. Currently, it represent one of the most important biomass resource. The huge quantities of straw annually produced generate big problems in what concerns their disposal. The traditional field burning is no longer accepted, so another disposal solutions must be found and recycling is the most attractive. The paper refers to such a solution consisting in the conversion of the straw energy potential into electricity in a power plant based on an air turbine. This power system it is in fact an external combustion engine, derived from a gas turbine engine and operating with air as working fluid instead of combustion gases. In order to make possible the use of straw as fuel, the conventional combustion chamber is substituted by a hot air generator. Schematic of this power system and the results of its energetic analysis are presented in the paper. There are analysed the main performance indicators, namely thermal efficiency, output power, fuel consumption and specific fuel consumption. The results of the study indicate the analysed power system as an interesting solution for straw recycling.

  7. The 727 approach energy management system avionics specification (preliminary)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, D. O.; Lambregts, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    Hardware and software requirements for an Approach Energy Management System (AEMS) consisting of an airborne digital computer and cockpit displays are presented. The displays provide the pilot with a visual indication of when to manually operate the gear, flaps, and throttles during a delayed flap approach so as to reduce approach time, fuel consumption, and community noise. The AEMS is an independent system that does not interact with other navigation or control systems, and is compatible with manually flown or autopilot coupled approaches. Operational use of the AEMS requires a DME ground station colocated with the flight path reference.

  8. Data management in a fusion energy research experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Glad, A.; Drobnis, D.; McHarg, B.

    1981-07-01

    Present-day fusion research requires extensive support for the large amount of scientific data generated, bringing about three distinct problems computer systems must solve: (1) the processing of large amounts of data in very small time frames; (2) the archiving, analyzing and managing of the entire data output for the project's lifetime; (3) the standardization of data for the exchange of information between laboratories. The computer system supporting General Atomic's Doublet III tokamak, a project funded by the United States Department of Energy, is the first to encounter and address these problems through a system-wide data base structure.

  9. 48 CFR 970.5223-6 - Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management. 970.5223-6 Section 970.5223-6 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE... Contracts 970.5223-6 Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and...

  10. Smart grids: A paradigm shift on energy generation and distribution with the emergence of a new energy management business model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Jesus Alvaro

    An energy and environmental crisis will emerge throughout the world if we continue with our current practices of generation and distribution of electricity. A possible solution to this problem is based on the Smart grid concept, which is heavily influenced by Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Although the electricity industry is mostly regulated, there are global models used as roadmaps for Smart Grids' implementation focusing on technologies and the basic generation-distribution-transmission model. This project aims to further enhance a business model for a future global deployment. It takes into consideration the many factors interacting in this energy provision process, based on the diffusion of technologies and literature surveys on the available documents in the Internet as well as peer-reviewed publications. Tariffs and regulations, distributed energy generation, integration of service providers, consumers becoming producers, self-healing devices, and many other elements are shifting this industry into a major change towards liberalization and deregulation of this sector, which has been heavily protected by the government due to the importance of electricity for consumers. We propose an Energy Management Business Model composed by four basic elements: Supply Chain, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Stakeholders Response, and the resulting Green Efficient Energy (GEE). We support the developed model based on the literature survey, we support it with the diffusion analysis of these elements, and support the overall model with two surveys: one for peers and professionals, and other for experts in the field, based on the Smart Grid Carnegie Melon Maturity Model (CMU SEI SGMM). The contribution of this model is a simple path to follow for entities that want to achieve environmental friendly energy with the involvement of technology and all stakeholders.

  11. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in concentrated solid solution alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yanwen; Stocks, George Malcolm; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Bei, Hongbin; Sales, Brian C.; Wang, Lumin; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.; Samolyuk, German D.; et al

    2015-10-28

    A long-standing objective in materials research is to understand how energy is dissipated in both the electronic and atomic subsystems in irradiated materials, and how related non-equilibrium processes may affect defect dynamics and microstructure evolution. Here we show that alloy complexity in concentrated solid solution alloys having both an increasing number of principal elements and altered concentrations of specific elements can lead to substantial reduction in the electron mean free path and thermal conductivity, which has a significant impact on energy dissipation and consequentially on defect evolution during ion irradiation. Enhanced radiation resistance with increasing complexity from pure nickel tomore » binary and to more complex quaternary solid solutions is observed under ion irradiation up to an average damage level of 1 displacement per atom. Understanding how materials properties can be tailored by alloy complexity and their influence on defect dynamics may pave the way for new principles for the design of radiation tolerant structural alloys.« less

  12. DIFFUSED SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE WITH POISSON–BOLTZMANN ELECTROSTATICS: FREE-ENERGY VARIATION AND SHARP-INTERFACE LIMIT

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; LIU, YUAN

    2015-01-01

    A phase-field free-energy functional for the solvation of charged molecules (e.g., proteins) in aqueous solvent (i.e., water or salted water) is constructed. The functional consists of the solute volumetric and solute-solvent interfacial energies, the solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and the continuum electrostatic free energy described by the Poisson–Boltzmann theory. All these are expressed in terms of phase fields that, for low free-energy conformations, are close to one value in the solute phase and another in the solvent phase. A key property of the model is that the phase-field interpolation of dielectric coefficient has the vanishing derivative at both solute and solvent phases. The first variation of such an effective free-energy functional is derived. Matched asymptotic analysis is carried out for the resulting relaxation dynamics of the diffused solute-solvent interface. It is shown that the sharp-interface limit is exactly the variational implicit-solvent model that has successfully captured capillary evaporation in hydrophobic confinement and corresponding multiple equilibrium states of underlying biomolecular systems as found in experiment and molecular dynamics simulations. Our phase-field approach and analysis can be used to possibly couple the description of interfacial fluctuations for efficient numerical computations of biomolecular interactions. PMID:26877556

  13. Energy Solutions, Neo-Liberalism, and Social Diversity in Toronto, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Teelucksingh, Cheryl; Poland, Blake

    2011-01-01

    In response to the dominance of green capitalist discourses in Canada’s environmental movement, in this paper, we argue that strategies to improve energy policy must also provide mechanisms to address social conflicts and social disparities. Environmental justice is proposed as an alternative to mainstream environmentalism, one that seeks to address systemic social and spatial exclusion encountered by many racialized immigrants in Toronto as a result of neo-liberal and green capitalist municipal policy and that seeks to position marginalized communities as valued contributors to energy solutions. We examine Toronto-based municipal state initiatives aimed at reducing energy use while concurrently stimulating growth (specifically, green economy/green jobs and ‘smart growth’). By treating these as instruments of green capitalism, we illustrate the utility of environmental justice applied to energy-related problems and as a means to analyze stakeholders’ positions in the context of neo-liberalism and green capitalism, and as opening possibilities for resistance. PMID:21318023

  14. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gilca, Alex; Cole, Charles R.; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2006-07-20

    The CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator described in this User’s Guide is a three-dimensional finite-element model used to evaluate groundwater flow and solute mass transport. Confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows can be represented with CFEST. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentra¬tion of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Although several thermal parameters described in this User’s Guide are required inputs, thermal transport has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. The CFEST simulator is written in the FORTRAN 77 language, following American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. Execution of the CFEST simulator is controlled through three required text input files. These input file use a structured format of associated groups of input data. Example input data lines are presented for each file type, as well as a description of the structured FORTRAN data format. Detailed descriptions of all input requirements, output options, and program structure and execution are provided in this User’s Guide. Required inputs for auxillary CFEST utilities that aide in post-processing data are also described. Global variables are defined for those with access to the source code. Although CFEST is a proprietary code (CFEST, Inc., Irvine, CA), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory retains permission to maintain its own source, and to distribute executables to Hanford subcontractors.

  15. 75 FR 78231 - Management of Energy and Water Efficiency in Federal Buildings: Availability of Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Management of Energy and Water Efficiency in Federal Buildings: Availability of Guidance AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... Subsection (f), Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings) is available at:...

  16. A Human-Dimensions Review of Human-WildlifeDisturbance: A Literature Review of Impacts, Frameworks, and Management Solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cline, Robert; Sexton, Natalie; Stewart, Susan C.

    2007-01-01

    Preface The following report was prepared for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Refuge System in support of their Comprehensive Conservation Planning (CCP) efforts by the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch (PASA), Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey. While this document provides a summary of contemporary recreation management literature and methodologies, relevant to the subject of managing wildlife disturbances on national wildlife refuges, this document should be viewed as a starting point for management administrators. This document identifies general issues relating to wildlife disturbance and visitor impacts including a description of disturbance, recreational impacts, related human dimensions applications, management frameworks, and a general summary of management solutions. The section on descriptions of wildlife disturbance and impacts draws heavily from the report entitled 'Managing the Impacts of Visitor Use on Waterbirds -- A Literature Review of Impacts and Mitigation' (DeLong, 2002; Delong and Adamcik, in press) and is referenced in the text. This document is more comprehensive in its review of wildlife response to disturbance. This document is intended to discuss the human-dimensions aspect of wildlife disturbance, summarizing human dimensions and recreation management literature as it applies to this topic.

  17. Air transportation and energy: a systems-management approach

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, A.H.; Brown, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Considerable fuel savings could be achieved through research and development, especially in the area of discovering new fuel (synthetics). At the moment, there is some development in this area; it has already been introduced to the market, especially in Canada and the United States, and many users and organizations have been taking advantage of this new energy source. Successful synthetic-fuel development would greatly decrease an airline's fuel expense; hence a larger profit could be realized. New technology in aircraft design will improve fuel efficiency. The use of improved fuel-efficient aircraft would realize significant savings in fuel costs. Such a breakthrough could completely revolutionize the airline industry. Unfortunately, with today's high cost of financing and with the operating losses being incurred by many airline companies, immediate investment in these new aircraft cannot be expected. It becomes difficult to determine whether new energy-saving systems should be developed or existing systems should be updated and refined to maximize all energy-saving techniques at their disposal without huge capital outlays. It is evident that the airline industry is now at a crossroad. Future prosperity of the system will ultimately depend on careful management techniques with all present energy-saving systems being used to the optimum degree. 7 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  18. Scale dependency of fracture energy and estimates thereof via dynamic rupture solutions with strong thermal weakening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Garagash, D.

    2013-12-01

    Seismological estimates of fracture energy show a scaling with the total slip of an earthquake [e.g., Abercrombie and Rice, GJI 2005]. Potential sources for this scale dependency are coseismic fault strength reductions that continue with increasing slip or an increasing amount of off-fault inelastic deformation with dynamic rupture propagation [e.g., Andrews, JGR 2005; Rice, JGR 2006]. Here, we investigate the former mechanism by solving for the slip dependence of fracture energy at the crack tip of a dynamically propagating rupture in which weakening takes place by strong reductions of friction via flash heating of asperity contacts and thermal pressurization of pore fluid leading to reductions in effective normal stress. Laboratory measurements of small characteristic slip evolution distances for friction (~10 μm at low slip rates of μm-mm/s, possibly up to 1 mm for slip rates near 0.1 m/s) [e.g., Marone and Kilgore, Nature 1993; Kohli et al., JGR 2011] imply that flash weakening of friction occurs at small slips before any significant thermal pressurization and may thus have a negligible contribution to the total fracture energy [Brantut and Rice, GRL 2011; Garagash, AGU 2011]. The subsequent manner of weakening under thermal pressurization (the dominant contributor to fracture energy) spans a range of behavior from the deformation of a finite-thickness shear zone in which diffusion is negligible (i.e., undrained-adiabatic) to that in which large-scale diffusion obscures the existence of a thin shear zone and thermal pressurization effectively occurs by the heating of slip on a plane. Separating the contribution of flash heating, the dynamic rupture solutions reduce to a problem with a single parameter, which is the ratio of the undrained-adiabatic slip-weakening distance (δc) to the characteristic slip-on-a-plane slip-weakening distance (L*). However, for any value of the parameter, there are two end-member scalings of the fracture energy: for small slip

  19. Strategies for Energy Efficient Resource Management of Hybrid Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dong; Supinski, Bronis de; Schulz, Martin; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S; Cameron, Kirk W.

    2013-01-01

    Many scientific applications are programmed using hybrid programming models that use both message-passing and shared-memory, due to the increasing prevalence of large-scale systems with multicore, multisocket nodes. Previous work has shown that energy efficiency can be improved using software-controlled execution schemes that consider both the programming model and the power-aware execution capabilities of the system. However, such approaches have focused on identifying optimal resource utilization for one programming model, either shared-memory or message-passing, in isolation. The potential solution space, thus the challenge, increases substantially when optimizing hybrid models since the possible resource configurations increase exponentially. Nonetheless, with the accelerating adoption of hybrid programming models, we increasingly need improved energy efficiency in hybrid parallel applications on large-scale systems. In this work, we present new software-controlled execution schemes that consider the effects of dynamic concurrency throttling (DCT) and dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) in the context of hybrid programming models. Specifically, we present predictive models and novel algorithms based on statistical analysis that anticipate application power and time requirements under different concurrency and frequency configurations. We apply our models and methods to the NPB MZ benchmarks and selected applications from the ASC Sequoia codes. Overall, we achieve substantial energy savings (8.74% on average and up to 13.8%) with some performance gain (up to 7.5%) or negligible performance loss.

  20. Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program Situational Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge management (KM) has been a high priority for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the past several years. NE Programs are moving toward well-established knowledge management practices and a formal knowledge management program has been established. Knowledge management is being practiced to some level within each of the NE programs. Although it continues to evolve as NE programs evolve, a formal strategic plan that guides the implementation of KM has been developed. Despite the acceptance of KM within DOE NE, more work is necessary before the NE KM program can be considered fully successful. Per Dr. David J. Skyrme[1], an organization typically moves through the following evolutionary phases: (1) Ad-hoc - KM is being practiced to some level in some parts of the organization; (2) Formal - KM is established as a formal project or program; (3) Expanding - the use of KM as a discipline grows in practice across different parts of the organization; (4) Cohesive - there is a degree of coordination of KM; (5) Integrated - there are formal standards and approaches that give every individual access to most organizational knowledge through common interfaces; and (6) Embedded - KM is part-and-parcel of everyday tasks; it blends seamlessly into the background. According to the evolutionary phases, the NE KM program is operating at the two lower levels, Ad-hoc and Formal. Although KM is being practiced to some level, it is not being practiced in a consistent manner across the NE programs. To be fully successful, more emphasis must be placed on establishing KM standards and processes for collecting, organizing, sharing and accessing NE knowledge. Existing knowledge needs to be prioritized and gathered on a routine basis, its existence formally recorded in a knowledge inventory. Governance to ensure the quality of the knowledge being used must also be considered. For easy retrieval, knowledge must be organized according to a taxonomy that

  1. Analytical Solutions to the Near-Neutral Atmospheric Surface Energy Balance with and without Heat Storage for Urban Climatological Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, C. P.; Chan, B. K.; Hashim, M. A.

    1991-04-01

    Analytical solutions are presented to the near-neutral atmospheric surface energy balance with the new approach of including the participation of heat storage in the building substrate. Analytical solutions are also presented for the first time for the case without heat storage effect. By a linearization process, the governing equations are simplified to a set of time-dependent, linear, first-order equations from which explicit solutions are readily obtainable. The results compare well with those obtained by numerical solutions upon the set without linearization when applied to the tropical city of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

  2. Waste to energy--key element for sustainable waste management.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Paul H; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of "protection of men and environment" and "resource conservation". Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas.

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  4. The Energy-Water Nexus: Managing the Links between Energy and Water for a Sustainable Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, Karen; Petit, Carine

    2010-05-01

    Water and energy are both indispensable inputs to modern economies but currently both resources are under threat owing to the impacts of an ever-increasing population and associated demand, unsustainable practices in agriculture and manufacturing, and the implications of a changing climate. However, it is where water and energy rely on each other that pose the most complex challenges for policy-makers. Water is needed for mining coal, drilling oil, refining gasoline, and generating and distributing electricity; and, conversely, vast amounts of energy are needed to pump, transport, treat and distribute water, particularly in the production of potable water through the use of desalination plants and waste water treatment plants. Despite the links, and the urgency in both sectors for security of supply, in existing policy frameworks energy and water policies are developed largely in isolation from one another. Worse still, some policies designed to encourage alternative energy supplies give little thought to the resultant consequences on water resources, and, similarly, policies designed to secure water supplies pay little attention to the resultant consequences on energy use. The development of new technologies presents both opportunities and challenges for managing the energy-water nexus but a better understanding of the links between energy and water is essential in any attempt to formulate policies for more resilient and adaptable societies. The energy-water nexus must be adequately integrated into policy and decision-making or governments run the risk of contradicting their efforts, and therefore failing in their objectives, in both sectors. A series of COST Exploratory Workshops, drawing on on-going research in the energy-water nexus from a number of international teams, identified the implications of the energy-water nexus on the development of (i) energy policies (ii) water resource management policies and (iii) climate adaptation and mitigation policies. A

  5. First estimation of C4-H bond dissociation energies of NADH and its radical cation in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Min; Cheng, Jin-Pei; Zhang, Ming

    2003-12-17

    The heterolytic and homolytic C4-H bond dissociation energies of NADH and its radical cation (NADH*+) in aqueous solution were estimated according to the reaction of NADH with N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine radical cation perchlorate (TMPA*+) in aqueous solution. The results show that the values of the heterolytic and homolytic C4-H bond dissociation energies of NADH in aqueous solution are 53.6 and 79.3 kcal/mol, respectively; the values of the heterolytic and homolytic C4-H bond dissociation energies of NADH*+*+ in aqueous solution are 5.1 and 36.3 kcal/mol, respectively, which, to our knowledge, is first reported. This energetic information disclosed in the present work should be believed to furnish hints to the understanding of the mechanisms for the redox interconversions of coenzyme couple NADH/NAD+ in vivo.

  6. New self-similar radiation-hydrodynamics solutions in the high-energy density, equilibrium diffusion limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Taylor K.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2013-09-01

    This work presents semi-analytic solutions to a radiation-hydrodynamics problem of a radiation source driving an initially cold medium. Our solutions are in the equilibrium diffusion limit, include material motion and allow for radiation-dominated situations where the radiation energy is comparable to (or greater than) the material internal energy density. As such, this work is a generalization of the classical Marshak wave problem that assumes no material motion and that the radiation energy is negligible. Including radiation energy density in the model serves to slow down the wave propagation. The solutions provide insight into the impact of radiation energy and material motion, as well as present a novel verification test for radiation transport packages. As a verification test, the solution exercises the radiation-matter coupling terms and their v/c treatment without needing a hydrodynamics solve. An example comparison between the self-similar solution and a numerical code is given. Tables of the self-similar solutions are also provided.

  7. Impediments and solutions to sustainable, watershed-scale urban stormwater management: lessons from Australia and the United States.

    PubMed

    Roy, Allison H; Wenger, Seth J; Fletcher, Tim D; Walsh, Christopher J; Ladson, Anthony R; Shuster, William D; Thurston, Hale W; Brown, Rebekah R

    2008-08-01

    In urban and suburban areas, stormwater runoff is a primary stressor on surface waters. Conventional urban stormwater drainage systems often route runoff directly to streams and rivers, thus exacerbating pollutant inputs and hydrologic disturbance, and resulting in the degradation of ecosystem structure and function. Decentralized stormwater management tools, such as low impact development (LID) or water sensitive urban design (WSUD), may offer a more sustainable solution to stormwater management if implemented at a watershed scale. These tools are designed to pond, infiltrate, and harvest water at the source, encouraging evaporation, evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge, and re-use of stormwater. While there are numerous demonstrations of WSUD practices, there are few examples of widespread implementation at a watershed scale with the explicit objective of protecting or restoring a receiving stream. This article identifies seven major impediments to sustainable urban stormwater management: (1) uncertainties in performance and cost, (2) insufficient engineering standards and guidelines, (3) fragmented responsibilities, (4) lack of institutional capacity, (5) lack of legislative mandate, (6) lack of funding and effective market incentives, and (7) resistance to change. By comparing experiences from Australia and the United States, two developed countries with existing conventional stormwater infrastructure and escalating stream ecosystem degradation, we highlight challenges facing sustainable urban stormwater management and offer several examples of successful, regional WSUD implementation. We conclude by identifying solutions to each of the seven impediments that, when employed separately or in combination, should encourage widespread implementation of WSUD with watershed-based goals to protect human health and safety, and stream ecosystems.

  8. Product Lifecycle Management and the Quest for Sustainable Space Transportation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Pamela W.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Marshall's effort to sustain space transportation solutions through product lines that include: 1) Propulsion and Transportation Systems; 2) Life Support Systems; and 3) and Earth and Space Science Spacecraft Systems, and Operations.

  9. Solution combustion synthesis of metal oxide nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Li, Fa-tang; Ran, Jingrun; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2015-11-14

    The design and synthesis of metal oxide nanomaterials is one of the key steps for achieving highly efficient energy conversion and storage on an industrial scale. Solution combustion synthesis (SCS) is a time- and energy-saving method as compared with other routes, especially for the preparation of complex oxides which can be easily adapted for scale-up applications. This review summarizes the synthesis of various metal oxide nanomaterials and their applications for energy conversion and storage, including lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen and methane production, fuel cells and solar cells. In particular, some novel concepts such as reverse support combustion, self-combustion of ionic liquids, and creation of oxygen vacancies are presented. SCS has some unique advantages such as its capability for in situ doping of oxides and construction of heterojunctions. The well-developed porosity and large specific surface area caused by gas evolution during the combustion process endow the resulting materials with exceptional properties. The relationship between the structural properties of the metal oxides studied and their performance is discussed. Finally, the conclusions and perspectives are briefly presented.

  10. Solution combustion synthesis of metal oxide nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fa-Tang; Ran, Jingrun; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2015-10-01

    The design and synthesis of metal oxide nanomaterials is one of the key steps for achieving highly efficient energy conversion and storage on an industrial scale. Solution combustion synthesis (SCS) is a time- and energy-saving method as compared with other routes, especially for the preparation of complex oxides which can be easily adapted for scale-up applications. This review summarizes the synthesis of various metal oxide nanomaterials and their applications for energy conversion and storage, including lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen and methane production, fuel cells and solar cells. In particular, some novel concepts such as reverse support combustion, self-combustion of ionic liquids, and creation of oxygen vacancies are presented. SCS has some unique advantages such as its capability for in situ doping of oxides and construction of heterojunctions. The well-developed porosity and large specific surface area caused by gas evolution during the combustion process endow the resulting materials with exceptional properties. The relationship between the structural properties of the metal oxides studied and their performance is discussed. Finally, the conclusions and perspectives are briefly presented.

  11. Solution combustion synthesis of metal oxide nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Li, Fa-tang; Ran, Jingrun; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2015-11-14

    The design and synthesis of metal oxide nanomaterials is one of the key steps for achieving highly efficient energy conversion and storage on an industrial scale. Solution combustion synthesis (SCS) is a time- and energy-saving method as compared with other routes, especially for the preparation of complex oxides which can be easily adapted for scale-up applications. This review summarizes the synthesis of various metal oxide nanomaterials and their applications for energy conversion and storage, including lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen and methane production, fuel cells and solar cells. In particular, some novel concepts such as reverse support combustion, self-combustion of ionic liquids, and creation of oxygen vacancies are presented. SCS has some unique advantages such as its capability for in situ doping of oxides and construction of heterojunctions. The well-developed porosity and large specific surface area caused by gas evolution during the combustion process endow the resulting materials with exceptional properties. The relationship between the structural properties of the metal oxides studied and their performance is discussed. Finally, the conclusions and perspectives are briefly presented. PMID:26457657

  12. Material resources, energy, and nutrient recovery from waste: are waste refineries the solution for the future?

    PubMed

    Tonini, Davide; Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-08-01

    Waste refineries focusing on multiple outputs of material resources, energy carriers, and nutrients may potentially provide more sustainable utilization of waste resources than traditional waste technologies. This consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluated the environmental performance of a Danish waste refinery solution against state-of-the-art waste technology alternatives (incineration, mechanical-biological treatment (MBT), and landfilling). In total, 252 scenarios were evaluated, including effects from source-segregation, waste composition, and energy conversion pathway efficiencies. Overall, the waste refinery provided global warming (GW) savings comparable with efficient incineration, MBT, and bioreactor landfilling technologies. The main environmental benefits from waste refining were a potential for improved phosphorus recovery (about 85%) and increased electricity production (by 15-40% compared with incineration), albeit at the potential expense of additional toxic emissions to soil. Society's need for the outputs from waste, i.e., energy products (electricity vs transport fuels) and resources (e.g., phosphorus), and the available waste composition were found decisive for the selection of future technologies. On the basis of the results, it is recommended that a narrow focus on GW aspects should be avoided as most waste technologies may allow comparable performance. Rather, other environmental aspects such as resource recovery and toxic emissions should receive attention in the future.

  13. Heats of solution and lattice-expansion and trapping energies of hydrogen in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessen, R.

    1988-08-01

    The heat of hydrogen solution in a metal at infinite dilution ΔH¯∞ is shown to depend on (1) the distance R between a hydrogen atom and its metallic nearest neighbors, (2) the characteristic band-structure energy ΔE=EF-Es, where EF is the Fermi energy and Es basically the center of the lowest conduction band of the host metal, and (3) the width Wd of the d band of the host metal. The semiempirical relation ΔH¯∞=αΔE W1/2d [with α=18.6 (kJ/mol H)(AṨ eV-3/2) and β=-90 kJ/mol H if ΔE, Wd, and R are given in units of eV and Å, respectively] reproduces the experimental values of ΔH¯∞ remarkably well. It also reproduces the volume expansion accompanying hydrogen absorption and predicts the correct interstitial site occupancy of hydrogen in a transition metal. Furthermore, it makes it possible to estimate the binding energy of hydrogen to a vacancy.

  14. Encouraging School Transportation Effective Energy Management (ESTEEM). Fuel Economy Management Handbook for Directors of Pupil Transportation; School District Administrators; Transportation Department Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRI Systems, Inc., Phoenix, AZ.

    This handbook offers a practical approach for pupil transportation energy management by suggesting ideas to save fuel in the purchasing, planning, routing, scheduling, driving, and maintenance areas of the pupil transportation operation. The handbook is divided into seven parts. Part 1 and 2 provide insight into energy management in pupil…

  15. Analysis of aqueous and organic fission-product solutions by energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brooksbank, R.D.; Stewart, J.H. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Because of a revival of interest in reprocessing spent nuclear reactor fuel, ORNL is re-evaluating existing data on extractions. Organic degradation products and new organic extractant systems must also be investigated. Analysis of these solutions present several problems for the analytical chemist. Conventional wet chemical techniques usually require aqueous solutions. Organic solutions must be stripped or wet ashed to convert them to an aqueous system. Stripping is not always quantitative, and the high phosphorus content of organic extractants makes wet ashing difficult. Radiolysis degrades many organic solutions. In aqueous solutions, low acid concentrations cause Pu to polymerize and Zr and Mo to form colloids or precipitate; therefore, sample pretreatment becomes necessary. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a multi-element technique, unaffected by chemical states, capable of analyzing both aqueous and organic solutions. Thie technique has been applied to the determination of U, Pu, Th, Mo, Zr and Re in cold flow sheet development.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Water-Ethanol Solutions: The Estimation of Hydrogen Bonding Energy and the Appearance of Clathrate-like Structures in Solutions.

    PubMed

    Dolenko, Tatiana A; Burikov, Sergey A; Dolenko, Sergey A; Efitorov, Alexander O; Plastinin, Ivan V; Yuzhakov, Viktor I; Patsaeva, Svetlana V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of aqueous alcohol solutions at the molecular level for many decades has remained an intriguing topic in numerous theoretical and practical investigations. The aberrant thermodynamic properties of water-alcohol mixtures are believed to be caused by the differences in energy of hydrogen bonding between water-water, alcohol-alcohol, and alcohol-water molecules. We present the Raman scattering spectra of water, ethanol, and water-ethanol solutions with 20 and 70 vol % of ethanol thoroughly measured and analyzed at temperatures varying from -10 to +70 °C. Application of the MCR-ALS method allowed for each spectrum to extract contributions of molecules with different strengths of hydrogen bonding. The energy (enthalpy) of formation/weakening of hydrogen bonds was calculated using the slope of Van't Hoff plot. The energy of hydrogen bonding in 20 vol % of ethanol was found the highest among all the samples. This finding further supports appearance of clathrate-like structures in water-ethanol solutions with concentrations around 20 vol % of ethanol. PMID:26465255

  17. Building Asynchronous & Synchronous Teaching-Learning Environments: Exploring a Course/Classroom Management System Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziadei, William D.; And Others

    The State University of New York (SUNY) established the need among faculty for an Internet-based course/classroom management system (CMS) to provide the means to customize and manage the instructional process in teaching and learning and to integrate the content from a variety of sources including instructors both local and remote, students, and…

  18. The SOLUTIONS project: challenges and responses for present and future emerging pollutants in land and water resources management.

    PubMed

    Brack, Werner; Altenburger, Rolf; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Krauss, Martin; López Herráez, David; van Gils, Jos; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; Munthe, John; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; van Wezel, Annemarie; Schriks, Merijn; Hollender, Juliane; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Mekenyan, Ovanes; Dimitrov, Saby; Bunke, Dirk; Cousins, Ian; Posthuma, Leo; van den Brink, Paul J; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Faust, Michael; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Scrimshaw, Mark; Ignatova, Svetlana; Engelen, Guy; Massmann, Gudrun; Lemkine, Gregory; Teodorovic, Ivana; Walz, Karl-Heinz; Dulio, Valeria; Jonker, Michiel T O; Jäger, Felix; Chipman, Kevin; Falciani, Francesco; Liska, Igor; Rooke, David; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hollert, Henner; Vrana, Branislav; Hilscherova, Klara; Kramer, Kees; Neumann, Steffen; Hammerbacher, Ruth; Backhaus, Thomas; Mack, Juliane; Segner, Helmut; Escher, Beate; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela

    2015-01-15

    SOLUTIONS (2013 to 2018) is a European Union Seventh Framework Programme Project (EU-FP7). The project aims to deliver a conceptual framework to support the evidence-based development of environmental policies with regard to water quality. SOLUTIONS will develop the tools for the identification, prioritisation and assessment of those water contaminants that may pose a risk to ecosystems and human health. To this end, a new generation of chemical and effect-based monitoring tools is developed and integrated with a full set of exposure, effect and risk assessment models. SOLUTIONS attempts to address legacy, present and future contamination by integrating monitoring and modelling based approaches with scenarios on future developments in society, economy and technology and thus in contamination. The project follows a solutions-oriented approach by addressing major problems of water and chemicals management and by assessing abatement options. SOLUTIONS takes advantage of the access to the infrastructure necessary to investigate the large basins of the Danube and Rhine as well as relevant Mediterranean basins as case studies, and puts major efforts on stakeholder dialogue and support. Particularly, the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) Common Implementation Strategy (CIS) working groups, International River Commissions, and water works associations are directly supported with consistent guidance for the early detection, identification, prioritisation, and abatement of chemicals in the water cycle. SOLUTIONS will give a specific emphasis on concepts and tools for the impact and risk assessment of complex mixtures of emerging pollutants, their metabolites and transformation products. Analytical and effect-based screening tools will be applied together with ecological assessment tools for the identification of toxicants and their impacts. The SOLUTIONS approach is expected to provide transparent and evidence-based candidates or River Basin Specific Pollutants in the case

  19. Boundary element solution of macromolecular electrostatics: interaction energy between two proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H X

    1993-01-01

    The boundary element technique is implemented to solve for the electrostatic potential of macromolecules in an ionic solution. This technique entails solving surface integral equations that are equivalent to the Poisson and the Poisson-Boltzmann equations governing the electrostatic potential inside the macromolecules and and in the solvent. A simple but robust method is described for discretizing the macromolecular surfaces in order to approximate the integral equations by linear algebraic equations. Particular attention is paid to the interaction energy between two macromolecules, and an iterative procedure is devised to make the calculation more efficient. This iterative procedure is illustrated in the electron transfer system of cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase. PMID:8218918

  20. Steady-state solutions of a diffusive energy-balance climate model and their stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghil, M.

    1975-01-01

    A diffusive energy-balance climate model, governed by a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation, was studied. Three positive steady-state solutions of this equation are found; they correspond to three possible climates of our planet: an interglacial (nearly identical to the present climate), a glacial, and a completely ice-covered earth. Models similar to the main one are considered, and the number of their steady states was determined. All the models have albedo continuously varying with latitude and temperature, and entirely diffusive horizontal heat transfer. The stability under small perturbations of the main model's climates was investigated. A stability criterion is derived, and its application shows that the present climate and the deep freeze are stable, whereas the model's glacial is unstable. The dependence was examined of the number of steady states and of their stability on the average solar radiation.