Science.gov

Sample records for energy supernova experiments

  1. Reducing Zero-point Systematics in Dark Energy Supernova Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, Lorenzo; Kim, Alex G; Miquel, Ramon; Bernstein, Gary; Bonissent, Alain; Brown, Matthew; Carithers, William; Christiansen, Jodi; Connolly, Natalia; Deustua, Susana; Gerdes, David; Gladney, Larry; Kushner, Gary; Linder, Eric; McKee, Shawn; Mostek, Nick; Shukla, Hemant; Stebbins, Albert; Stoughton, Chris; Tucker, David

    2011-04-01

    We study the effect of filter zero-point uncertainties on future supernova dark energy missions. Fitting for calibration parameters using simultaneous analysis of all Type Ia supernova standard candles achieves a significant improvement over more traditional fit methods. This conclusion is robust under diverse experimental configurations (number of observed supernovae, maximum survey redshift, inclusion of additional systematics). This approach to supernova fitting considerably eases otherwise stringent mission cali- bration requirements. As an example we simulate a space-based mission based on the proposed JDEM satellite; however the method and conclusions are general and valid for any future supernova dark energy mission, ground or space-based.

  2. Supernova / Acceleration Probe: a Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Fermilab /Paris U., VI-VII /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Marseille, CPPM /Indiana U. /American Astron. Society /Caltech /Case Western Reserve U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-15

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy

  3. Supernova/Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, C.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Craig, W.; Day, C.; DeJongh, F.; Deustua, S.; Diehl, T.; Dodelson, S.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmet, W.; Fouchez, D.; Frieman, J.; Fruchter, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Hoff, M.; Holland, S.; Huffer, M.; Hui, L.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jelinsky, P.; Karcher, A.; Kent, S.; Kahn, S.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Levi, M.; Limon, P.; Lin, H.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Lorenzon, W.; Malina, R.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, P.; Massey, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Peoples, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Roe, N.; Rusin, D.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Samdja, G.; Smith, R.M.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Stebbine, A.; Stoughton, C.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Tucker, D.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.; Wester, W.

    2004-05-12

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universes expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy

  4. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a separate White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties leads to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. With early R&D funding, we have achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction. Pre-JDEM AO R&D support will further reduce technical and cost risk. Specific details on the SNAP mission can be found in Aldering et al. (2004, 2005). The primary goal of the SNAP supernova program is to provide a dataset which gives tight constraints on parameters which characterize the dark-energy, e.g. w{sub 0} and w{sub a} where w(a) = w{sub 0} + w{sub a}(1-a). SNAP data can also be used to directly test and discriminate among specific dark energy models. We will do so by building the Hubble diagram of high-redshift supernovae, the same methodology used in the original discovery of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe that established the existence of dark energy (Perlmutter et al. 1998; Garnavich et al. 1998; Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999). The SNAP SN Ia program focuses on minimizing the systematic floor of the supernova method through the use of characterized supernovae that can be sorted into subsets based on subtle signatures of heterogeneity. Subsets may be defined based on host-galaxy morphology, spectral-feature strength and velocity, early-time behavior, inter alia. Independent cosmological analysis of each subset of ''like'' supernovae can be

  5. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments on the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Rubenchik, A.; Drake, R. P.; Fryxell, B. A.; Muller, E.

    1997-12-01

    The critical roles of hydrodynamic instabilities in SN 1987A and in ICF are well known; 2D-3D differences are important in both areas. In a continuing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using LLNL hydro codes, and astrophysics codes used to model supernovae. Initial investigations with two-layer planar packages having 2D sinusoidal interface perturbations are described in Ap.J. 478, L75 (1997). Early-time simulations done with the LLNL 1D radiation transport code HYADES are mapped into the 2D LLNL code CALE and into the multi-D supernova code PROMETHEUS. Work is underway on experiments comparing interface instability growth produced by 2D sinusoidal versus 3D cross-hatch and axisymmetric cylindrical perturbations. Results of the simulations will be presented and compared with experiment. Implications for interpreting supernova observations and for supernova modelling will be discussed. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48.

  6. Supernovae and Dark Energy -- What's Next?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2003-04-01

    The existing supernova measurements of the universe's (accelerating) expansion history have pointed the way to the next generation of experiments. This next generation of supernova measurements must be made with a dramatic step forward in constraints on systematic uncertainties, since the previous measurements already have statistical uncertainties that are close to the current systematics limits. I will show how some recent results set the stage for these advances, and describe a series of ground- and space-based projects and a new satellite experiment (the SuperNova / Acceleration Probe, "SNAP") that promise a systematics-controlled prize: a detailed expansion history of the universe that can teach us about the nature of the mysterious "dark energy" that accelerates the universe.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, N. C.; Abarzhi, S. I.; Kuranz, C. C.; Arnett, D.; Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.

    2015-10-15

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, Nora; Kuranz, Carolyn; Arnett, David; Hurricane, Omar; Remington, Bruce; Robey, Harry; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of RT flow in supernova experiments, and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By proper accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are identified to describe asymptotic dynamics of RT flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments, the RT flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; the mixing flow may keep order. Support of the National Science Foundation is warmly appreciated.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, N. C.; Kuranz, C. C.; Arnett, D.; Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2015-10-01

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order.

  10. LAD Early Career Prize Talk:Laboratory astrophysics experiments investigating the effects of high energy fluxes on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth relevant to young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Park, Hye Sook; Huntington, Channing; Miles, Aaron R.; Remington, Bruce A.; Plewa, Tomek; Trantham, Matt; Shvarts, Dov; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Steven; Wan, Wesley; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Flippos, Kirk; Malamud, Guy; Handy, Timothy; Prisbey, Shon; Grosskopf, Michael; Krauland, Christine; Klein, Sallee; Harding, Eric; Wallace, Russell; Marion, Donna; Kalantar, Dan

    2017-06-01

    Energy-transport effects can alter the structure that develops as a supernova evolves into a supernova remnant. The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability is thought to produce structure at the interface between the stellar ejecta and the circumstellar matter (CSM), based on simple models and hydrodynamic simulations. When a blast wave emerges from an exploding star, it drives a forward shock into the CSM and a reverse shock forms in the expanding stellar ejecta, creating a young supernova remnant (SNR). As mass accumulates in the shocked layers, the interface between these two shocks decelerates, becoming unstable to the RT instability. Simulations predict that RT produces structures at this interface, having a range of spatial scales. When the CSM is dense enough, as in the case of SN 1993J, the hot shocked matter can produce significant radiative fluxes that affect the emission from the SNR. Here we report experimental results from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to explore how large energy fluxes, which are present in supernovae such as SN 1993J, might affect this structure. The experiment used NIF to create a RT unstable interface subject to a high energy flux by the emergence of a blast wave into lower-density matter, in analogy to the SNR. We also preformed and with a low energy flux to compare the affect of the energy flux on the instability growth. We found that the RT growth was reduced in the experiments with a high energy flux. In analyzing the comparison with SN 1993J, we discovered that the energy fluxes produced by heat conduction appear to be larger than the radiative energy fluxes, and large enough to have dramatic consequences. No reported astrophysical simulations have included radiation and heat conduction self-consistently in modeling SNRs.

  11. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Estabrook, K. G.; London, R. A.; Wallace, R. J.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R. P.; Liang, E.; McCray, R.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-04-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser [1,2] to investigate two areas of physics relevant to core-collapse supernovae (SN): compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing and (2) radiative shock hydrodynamics. In the former, we are examining the differences between the 2D and 3D evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an issue critical to the observables emerging from SN in the first year after exploding. In the latter, we are investigating the evolution of a colliding plasma system relevant to the ejecta-stellar wind interactions of the early stages of SN remnant formation. The experiments and astrophysical implications will be discussed. *Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48. [1] J. Kane et al., in press, Astrophys. J. Lett. (March-April, 1997). [2] B.A. Remington et al., in press, Phys. Plasmas (May, 1997).

  12. Probing Dark Energy with High Redshift Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlmutter, S.

    2003-05-01

    The Hubble diagram of Type Ia Supernovae provides the most direct current measurement of the expansion history of the universe, including the present acceleration and the transition to matter-dominated deceleration. Recent measurements already yield statistical uncertainties small enough that we are close to being limited by systematics. I will review the anticipated improvement in systematics attainable by the next generations of experiments from ground and space that promise a systematics-controlled prize: a detailed expansion history of the universe that can teach us about the nature of the mysterious "dark energy" that accelerates the universe. This work is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  13. High energy survey of supernova remnants with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollough, M. L.; Wilson, C. A.; Zhang, S. N.; Harmon, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    The burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) survey of the high energy emission from supernova remnants is reported on. The ability of BATSE to continuously monitor the entire sky in the 20 keV to 2 MeV energy range enables a large group of remnants to by studied at high energies. Preliminary analysis indicates the likely detection of several supernova remnants other than the Crab nebula. Among these are MSH 15-52, Vela, Cas A and possibly HB 9. The techniques employed are discussed together with the status of the survey and its limitations.

  14. Supernova physics with a low-energy beta-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachowicz, Natalie; McLaughlin, Gail

    Core-collapse supernova neutrino-spectra are of interest not only for understanding the deep inte- rior of astrophysical explosions, but also for understanding the synthesis of many elements made primarily in this environment. A new type of neutrino beam, the beta-beam, is now under discus- sion as a next generation neutrino experiment. A low-energy version of this beam has been pro- posed for a number of astrophysical applications. The energy range of these low-energy neutrinos is the same as that of supernova neutrinos. We present a theoretical discussion of the importance of low-energy beta-beams for improving our interpretation of a future galactic supernova signal. We present a novel method, where fitting synthetic spectra, constructed by taking linear combina- tions of beta-beam spectra, to the original supernova-neutrino spectra reproduces the folded dif- ferential cross sections very accurately. Comparing the response in a terrestrial detector to these synthetic responses provides a direct way to determine the main parameters of the supernova- neutrino energy-distribution.

  15. Supernova Experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R. P.; Fryxell, B. A.

    2000-04-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported by Kane et al. in a recent paper. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few times 10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. We also present new analysis of the bubble velocity, a study of two-dimensional versus three-dimensional difference in growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A, and designs for two-dimensional versus three-dimensional hydro experiments. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  16. Supernova hydrodynamicas experiments using the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Estabrook, K.

    1997-07-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser to investigate (1) compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing relevant to the first few hours of the supernova (SN) explosion and (2) ejecta-ambient plasma interactions relevant to the early SN remnant phase. The experiments and astrophysical implications are discussed.

  17. Supernova experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-12-02

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in [l]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. New analysis of the bubble velocity is presented, as well as a study of 2D vs. 3D difference in growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  18. Neutrino Cross Sections at Supernova Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Neutrinos with energies between a few and a few tens of MeV are relevant for a number of physics topics. Notably, this is the energy range corresponding to emission of neutrinos from supernovae. In addition, it is relevant for studies of solar, reactor and atmospheric neutrinos, as well as for physics using accelerator-produced neutrinos from pions or radioactive nuclei decaying at rest. Surprisingly, with the exception of interactions on electrons and protons, the interactions of neutrinos with matter in this energy range are quite poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. This talk will describe neutrino physics and astrophysics in the supernova-neutrino energy range, the state of knowledge of cross sections on relevant nuclei, and initiatives for experimental measurements.

  19. High energy neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts with precursor supernovae.

    PubMed

    Razzaque, Soebur; Mészáros, Peter; Waxman, Eli

    2003-06-20

    The high energy neutrino signature from proton-proton and photo-meson interactions in a supernova remnant shell ejected prior to a gamma-ray burst provides a test for the precursor supernova, or supranova, model of gamma-ray bursts. Protons in the supernova remnant shell and photons entrapped from a supernova explosion or a pulsar wind from a fast-rotating neutron star remnant provide ample targets for protons escaping the internal shocks of the gamma-ray burst to interact and produce high energy neutrinos. We calculate the expected neutrino fluxes, which can be detected by current and future experiments.

  20. Supernova Remnants associated with high energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvidovich, L.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Dubner, G.

    2017-10-01

    We carried out a study of the distribution and kinematic of the molecular gas in the direction of the Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) G40.5-0.5 and G298.6-0.0, which have been associated with the gamma-ray sources MGRO J1908+06 and 3FGL J1214.0-6236, respectively. The aim of the present work is to establish the origin of the very high energy (VHE).

  1. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Estabrook, K.; Wallace, R.J.; Rubenchik, A.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R.P.; McCray, R.

    1997-04-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser to investigate two areas of physics relevant to core-collapse supernovae (SN): (1) compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing and (2) radiative shock hydrodynamics. In the former, we are examining the differences between the 2D and 3D evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an issue critical to the observables emerging from SN in the first year after exploding. In the latter, we are investigating the evolution of a colliding plasma system relevant to the ejecta-stellar wind interactions of the early stages of SN remnant formation. The experiments and astrophysical implications are discussed.

  2. Importance of Supernovae at z<0.1 for Probing Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Jeanne M; Linder, E.V.

    2007-02-20

    Supernova experiments to characterize dark energy require a well designed low redshift program; we consider this for both ongoing/near term (e.g. Supernova Legacy Survey) and comprehensive future (e.g., SNAP) experiments. The derived criteria are: a supernova sample centered near z=0.05 comprising 150-500 (in the former case) and 300-900 (in the latter case) well measured supernovae. Low redshift Type Ia supernovae play two important roles for cosmological use of the supernova distance-redshift relation: as an anchor for the Hubble diagram and as an indicator of possible systematics. An innate degeneracy in cosmological distances implies that 300 nearby supernovae nearly saturate their cosmological leverage for the first use, and their optimum central redshift is z=0.05. This conclusion is strengthened upon including velocity flow and magnitude offset systematics. Limiting cosmological parameter bias due to supernova population drift (evolution) systematics plausibly increases the requirement for the second use to less than about 900 supernovae.

  3. Late-time hohlraum pressure dynamics in supernova remnant experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Remington, B. A.; Drake, R. P.; Dannenberg, K. K.

    2001-06-01

    It is shown that laser driven hohlraums obtain significant internal pressures which affect the hydrodynamics of high-energy density shock-tube experiments. By incorporating this previously neglected hohlraum pressure effect (in addition to the usual x-ray drive) into computer simulations which model the NOVA laser driven supernova remnant experiment [R. P. Drake, S. G. Glendinning, K. Estabrook, B. A. Remington, R. McCray, R. J. Williams, L. J. Suter, T. B. Smith, J. J. Carroll III, R. A. London, and E. Liang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2068 (1998)], calculations are able to reproduce the observed structure of hydrodynamic features.

  4. Nonparametric dark energy reconstruction from supernova data.

    PubMed

    Holsclaw, Tracy; Alam, Ujjaini; Sansó, Bruno; Lee, Herbert; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2010-12-10

    Understanding the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe poses one of the greatest challenges in physics today. Lacking a compelling fundamental theory to test, observational efforts are targeted at a better characterization of the underlying cause. If a new form of mass-energy, dark energy, is driving the acceleration, the redshift evolution of the equation of state parameter w(z) will hold essential clues as to its origin. To best exploit data from observations it is necessary to develop a robust and accurate reconstruction approach, with controlled errors, for w(z). We introduce a new, nonparametric method for solving the associated statistical inverse problem based on Gaussian process modeling and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. Applying this method to recent supernova measurements, we reconstruct the continuous history of w out to redshift z=1.5.

  5. Supernova neutrinos in SK-Gd and other experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Now many detectors are waiting for core-collapse supernovae in or near our galaxy. If they occur in our galaxy we will be able to reveal the mechanism of supernova explosions and also be able to access the properties of neutrinos, such as mass hierarchy. Even dark mater detectors can reach them via coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering; however no supernova neutrinos have been observed since February 1987. Supernova explosions in our galaxy may be fairly rare, but supernovae themselves are not. On average, there is one supernova somewhere in the universe each second. The neutrinos emitted from all of these supernovae since the onset of stellar formation have suffused the universe. We refer to this unobserved flux as the “relic” supernova neutrinos. Theoretical models vary, but several supernova relic neutrinos (SRNs) per year above 10 MeV are expected to interact in Super-Kamiokande. However, in order to separate these signals from the much more common solar and atmospheric neutrinos and other backgrounds, we need a new detection method. On June 27 2015, the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration approved the SK-Gd project. It is the upgrade of the SK detector via the addition of gadolinium sulfate. This modification will enable it to efficiently identify low energy anti-neutrinos for the world’s first observation of the SRNs via inverse beta decay.

  6. Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    We live in a Universe that is getting bigger faster. This astonishing discovery of Universal acceleration was made in the late 1990s by two teams who made observations of a special type of exploded star known as a `Supernova Type Ia'. (SNeIa) Since the discovery of the accelerating Universe, one of the biggest questions in modern cosmology has been to determine the cause of that acceleration - the answer to this question will have far reaching implications for our theories of cosmology and fundamental physics more broadly. The two main competing explanations for this apparent late time acceleration of the Universe are modified gravity and dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) has been designed and commissioned to find to find answers to these questions about the nature of dark energy and modified gravity. The new 570 megapixel Dark Energy Camera is currently operating with the Cerro-Tololo Inter American Observatory's 4m Blanco teleccope, carrying out a systematic search for SNeIa, and mapping out the large scale structure of the Universe by making observations of galaxies. The DES science program program which saw first light in September 2013 will run for five years in total. DES SNeIa data in combination with the other DES observations of large scale structure will enable us to put increasingly accurate constraints on the expansion history of the Universe and will help us distinguish between competing theories of dark energy and modified gravity. As we draw to the close of the first observing season of DES in March 2014, we will report on the current status of the DES supernova survey, presenting first year supernovae data, preliminary results, survey strategy, discovery pipeline, spectroscopic target selection and data quality. This talk will give the first glimpse of the DES SN first year data and initial results as we begin our five year survey in search of dark energy. On behalf of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.

  7. EVOLUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN A LOW ENERGY SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2015-06-20

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼10{sup 50} erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  8. Evolution of the Crab Nebula in a Low Energy Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2015-06-01

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼1050 erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  9. Research Performance Progress Report: Diverging Supernova Explosion Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Plewa, Tomasz

    2016-10-25

    The aim of this project was to design a series of blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments of this kind are relevant to mixing in core-collapse supernovae (ccSNe) and have the potential to address previously unanswered questions in high-energy density physics (HEDP) and astrophysics. The unmatched laser power of the NIF laser offers a unique chance to observe and study “new physics” like the mass extensions observed in HEDP RT experiments performed on the Omega laser [1], which might be linked to self-generated magnetic fields [2] and so far could not be reproduced by numerical simulations. Moreover, NIF is currently the only facility that offers the possibility to execute a diverging RT experiment, which would allow to observe processes such as inter-shell penetration via turbulent mixing and shock-proximity effects (distortion of the shock by RT spikes).

  10. SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS AND STRATEGIES FOR THE DARK ENERGY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J. P.; Kuhlmann, S.; Biswas, R.; Kovacs, E.; Crane, I.; Hufford, T.; Kessler, R.; Frieman, J. A.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Nugent, P.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Nichol, R. C.; Finley, D. A.; Marriner, J.; Reis, R. R. R.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mukherjee, P.; Parkinson, D.; Sako, M.; and others

    2012-07-10

    We present an analysis of supernova light curves simulated for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova search. The simulations employ a code suite that generates and fits realistic light curves in order to obtain distance modulus/redshift pairs that are passed to a cosmology fitter. We investigated several different survey strategies including field selection, supernova selection biases, and photometric redshift measurements. Using the results of this study, we chose a 30 deg{sup 2} search area in the griz filter set. We forecast (1) that this survey will provide a homogeneous sample of up to 4000 Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range 0.05 supernova with an identified host galaxy will be obtained from spectroscopic observations of the host. A supernova spectrum will be obtained for a subset of the sample, which will be utilized for control studies. In addition, we have investigated the use of combined photometric redshifts taking into account data from both the host and supernova. We have investigated and estimated the likely contamination from core-collapse supernovae based on photometric identification, and have found that a Type Ia supernova sample purity of up to 98% is obtainable given specific assumptions. Furthermore, we present systematic uncertainties due to sample purity, photometric calibration, dust extinction priors, filter-centroid shifts, and inter-calibration. We conclude by estimating the uncertainty on the cosmological parameters that will be measured from the DES supernova data.

  11. Galaxy peculiar velocities from large-scale supernova surveys as a dark energy probe

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Kosowsky, Arthur; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2011-02-15

    Upcoming imaging surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will repeatedly scan large areas of sky and have the potential to yield million-supernova catalogs. Type Ia supernovae are excellent standard candles and will provide distance measures that suffice to detect mean pairwise velocities of their host galaxies. We show that when combining these distance measures with photometric redshifts for either the supernovae or their host galaxies, the mean pairwise velocities of the host galaxies will provide a dark energy probe which is competitive with other widely discussed methods. Adding information from this test to type Ia supernova photometric luminosity distances from the same experiment, plus the cosmic microwave background power spectrum from the Planck satellite, improves the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by a factor of 1.8. Pairwise velocity measurements require no additional observational effort beyond that required to perform the traditional supernova luminosity distance test, but may provide complementary constraints on dark energy parameters and the nature of gravity. Incorporating additional spectroscopic redshift follow-up observations could provide important dark energy constraints from pairwise velocities alone. Mean pairwise velocities are much less sensitive to systematic redshift errors than the luminosity distance test or weak lensing techniques, and also are only mildly affected by systematic evolution of supernova luminosity.

  12. Gamma-ray transfer and energy deposition in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Sutherland, Peter G.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to the energy-independent (gray) radiative transfer equations are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Ni-56 and Co-56 decay gamma-ray energy deposition in supernovae. The comparison shows that an effective, purely absorptive, gray opacity, kappa(sub gamma) approximately (0. 06 +/- 0.01)Y(sub e) sq cm/g, where Y is the total number of electrons per baryon, accurately describes the interaction of gamma-rays with the cool supernova gas and the local gamma-ray energy deposition within the gas. The nature of the gamma-ray interaction process (dominated by Compton scattering in the relativistic regime) creates a weak dependence of kappa(sub gamma) on the optical thickness of the (spherically symmetric) supernova atmosphere: The maximum value of kappa(sub gamma) applies during optically thick conditions when individual gamma-rays undergo multiple scattering encounters and the lower bound is reached at the phase characterized by a total Thomson optical depth to the center of the atmosphere tau(sub e) approximately less than 1. Gamma-ray deposition for Type Ia supernova models to within 10% for the epoch from maximum light to t = 1200 days. Our results quantitatively confirm that the quick and efficient solution to the gray transfer problem provides an accurate representation of gamma-ray energy deposition for a broad range of supernova conditions.

  13. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; wallace, R.; Mangan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-18

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. The target consists of two-layer planar package composed on 85 micron Cu backed by 500 micron CH2, having a single mode sinusoidal perturbation at the interface, with gamma = 200 microns, nuo + 20 microns. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar (10- 15x10{sup 12} dynes/cm2) shock at the interface, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshov instability followed by the Raleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at the intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamic codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. We are designing experiments to test the differences in the growth of 2D vs 3D single mode perturbations; such differences may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented.

  14. Simulations of supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-11-01

    The critical roles of hydrodynamic instabilities in SN 1987A and in ICF are well known; 2D-3D differences are important in both areas. In a continuing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using LLNL hydro codes, and astrophysics codes used to model supernovae. Initial investigations with two-layer planar packages having 2D sinusoidal interface perturbations are described in Ap.J. 478, L75 (1997). Early-time simulations done with the LLNL 1D radiation transport code HYADES are mapped into the 2D LLNL code CALE and into the multi-D supernova code PROMETHEUS. Work is underway on experiments comparing interface instability growth produced by 2D sinusoidal versus 3D cross-hatch and axisymmetric cylindrical perturbations. Results of the simulations will be presented and compared with experiment. Implications for interpreting supernova observations and for supernova modelling will be discussed. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48.

  15. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiment on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Castor, J.; Rubenchik, A.; Berning, M.

    1996-02-12

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. On quite a separate front, the detrimental effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has long been known. Tools from both areas are being tested on a common project. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using hydrodynamics codes at the Laboratory, and astrophysical codes successfully used to model the hydrodynamics of supernovae. A two-layer package composed of Cu and CH{sub 2} with a single mode sinusoidal 1D perturbation at the interface, shocked by indirect laser drive from the Cu side of the package, produced significant Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in the nonlinear regime. The scale and gross structure of the growth was successfully modeled, by mapping an early-time simulation done with 1D HYADES, a radiation transport code, into 2D CALE, a LLNL hydrodynamics code. The HYADES result was also mapped in 2D into the supernova code PROMETHEUS, which was also able to reproduce the scale and gross structure of the growth.

  16. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiment on the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Castor, J.; Rubenchik, A.

    1996-02-01

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. On quite a separate front, the detrimental effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has long been known. Tools from both areas are being tested on a common project. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using hydrodynamics codes at the Laboratory, and astrophysical codes successfully used to model the hydrodynamics of supernovae. A two-layer package composed of Cu and CH2 with a single mode sinusoidal 1D perturbation at the interface, shocked by indirect laser drive from the Cu side of the package, produced significant Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in the nonlinear regime. The scale and gross structure of the growth was successfully modeled, by mapping an early-time simulation done with 1D HYADES, a radiation transport code, into 2D CALE, a LLNL hydrodynamics code. The HYADES result was also mapped in 2D into the supernova code PROMETHEUS, which was also able to reproduce the scale and gross structure of the growth.

  17. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.; Managan, R.; Rubenchik, A. Rubenchik, A. Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-01

    Observations of Supernova 1987A suggest that hydrodynamic instabilities play a critical role in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, and to study instability issues which are difficult to model, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. We use the Nova laser to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface between an 85 {mu}m thick layer of Cu and a 500 {mu}m layer of CH{sub 2}; our first target is planar. We impose a single mode sinusoidal material perturbation at the interface with {lambda}=200{mu}m, {eta}{sub 0}=20{mu}m, causing perturbation growth by the RM instability as the shock accelerates the interface, and by RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. We use the supernova code PROMETHEUS and the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE to model the experiment. We are designing further experiments to compare results for 2D vs. 3D single mode perturbations; high resolution 3D modeling requires prohibitive time and computing resources, but we can perform and study 3D experiments as easily as 2D experiments. Low resolution simulations suggest that the perturbations grow 50{percent} faster in 3D than in 2D; such a difference may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. We present the results of the experiments and simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Wallace, R.; Managan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B. A.

    1997-04-15

    Observations of Supernova 1987A suggest that hydrodynamic instabilities play a critical role in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, and to study instability issues which are difficult to model, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. We use the Nova laser to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface between an 85 {mu}m thick layer of Cu and a 500 {mu}m layer of CH{sub 2}; our first target is planar. We impose a single mode sinusoidal material perturbation at the interface with {lambda}=200 {mu}m, {eta}{sub 0}=20 {mu}m, causing perturbation growth by the RM instability as the shock accelerates the interface, and by RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. We use the supernova code PROMETHEUS and the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE to model the experiment. We are designing further experiments to compare results for 2D vs. 3D single mode perturbations; high resolution 3D modeling requires prohibitive time and computing resources, but we can perform and study 3D experiments as easily as 2D experiments. Low resolution simulations suggest that the perturbations grow 50% faster in 3D than in 2D; such a difference may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. We present the results of the experiments and simulations.

  19. Nucleon self-energies for supernova equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Nucleon self-energies and interaction potentials in supernova (SN) matter, which are known to have an important effect on nucleosynthesis conditions in SN ejecta are investigated. Corresponding weak charged-current interaction rates with unbound nucleons that are consistent with existing SN equations of state (EOSs) are specified. The nucleon self-energies are made available online as electronic tables. The discussion is mostly restricted to relativistic mean-field models. In the first part of the article, the generic properties of this class of models at finite temperature and asymmetry are studied. It is found that the quadratic expansion of the EOS in terms of asymmetry works reasonably well at finite temperatures and deviations originate mostly from the kinetic part. The interaction part of the symmetry energy is found to be almost temperature independent. At low densities, the account of realistic nucleon masses requires the introduction of a linear term in the expansion. Finally, it is shown that the important neutron-to-proton potential difference is given approximately by the asymmetry of the system and the interaction part of the zero-temperature symmetry energy. The results of different interactions are then compared with constraints from nuclear experiments and thereby the possible range of the potential difference is limited. In the second part, for a certain class of SN EOS models, the formation of nuclei is considered. Only moderate modifications are found for the self-energies of unbound nucleons that enter the weak charged-current interaction rates. This is because in the present approach the binding energies of bound states do not contribute to the single-particle energies of unbound nucleons.

  20. Very low energy supernovae from neutrino mass loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2013-06-01

    It now seems likely that some percentage of more massive supernova progenitors do not explode by any of the currently discussed explosion mechanisms. This has led to speculation concerning the observable transients that might be produced if such a supernova fails. Even if a prompt outgoing shock fails to form in a collapsing presupernova star, one must still consider the hydrodynamic response of the star to the abrupt loss of mass via neutrinos as the core forms a protoneutron star. Following a suggestion by Nadezhin, we calculate the hydrodynamical responses of typical supernova progenitor stars to the rapid loss of approximately 0.2-0.5 M {sub ☉} of gravitational mass from their centers. In a red supergiant star, a very weak supernova with total kinetic energy ∼10{sup 47} erg results. The binding energy of a large fraction of the hydrogen envelope before the explosion is of the same order and, depending upon assumptions regarding the maximum mass of a neutron star, most of it is ejected. Ejection speeds are ∼100 km s{sup –1} and luminosities ∼10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1} are maintained for about a year. A significant part of the energy comes from the recombination of hydrogen. The color of the explosion is extremely red and the events bear some similarity to 'luminous red novae', but have much lower speeds.

  1. Very Low Energy Supernovae from Neutrino Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2013-06-01

    It now seems likely that some percentage of more massive supernova progenitors do not explode by any of the currently discussed explosion mechanisms. This has led to speculation concerning the observable transients that might be produced if such a supernova fails. Even if a prompt outgoing shock fails to form in a collapsing presupernova star, one must still consider the hydrodynamic response of the star to the abrupt loss of mass via neutrinos as the core forms a protoneutron star. Following a suggestion by Nadezhin, we calculate the hydrodynamical responses of typical supernova progenitor stars to the rapid loss of approximately 0.2-0.5 M ⊙ of gravitational mass from their centers. In a red supergiant star, a very weak supernova with total kinetic energy ~1047 erg results. The binding energy of a large fraction of the hydrogen envelope before the explosion is of the same order and, depending upon assumptions regarding the maximum mass of a neutron star, most of it is ejected. Ejection speeds are ~100 km s-1 and luminosities ~1039 erg s-1 are maintained for about a year. A significant part of the energy comes from the recombination of hydrogen. The color of the explosion is extremely red and the events bear some similarity to "luminous red novae," but have much lower speeds.

  2. Energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is increasing with time

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2008-01-01

    It is shown, using the Zeldovich integral relations, that the energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is strongly growing with time, approximately as t1/3. This growth can be attributed to the exothermic reactions going inside the remnant. The use of the assumption of the adiabaticity of the motion inside of the shock front, and no losses or gain of energy at the front, seems therefore unjustified. PMID:18202174

  3. Design study for a diverging supernova explosion experiment on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaig, Markus; Plewa, Tomasz; Keiter, Paul; Grosskopf, Michael; Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, Paul; Park, Hye-Sook

    2013-10-01

    We report on design simulations of a spherically-diverging, multi-interface, supernova-relevant Rayleigh-Taylor experiment (DivSNRT) to be carried out at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The simulations are performed in two and three dimensions using the block-adaptive, multi-group radiative diffusion hydrodynamics code CRASH and the FLASH-based MHD code Proteus. In the present study, we concentrate mainly on a planar variant of the experiment. We assess the sensitivity of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth on numerical discretization, variations in the laser drive energy and the manufacturing noise at the material interfaces. We find that a simple buoyancy-drag model accurately predicts the mixed-layer width obtained in the simulations. We use synthetic radiographs to optimize the diagnostic system and the experimental setup. Finally, we perform a series of exploratory MHD simulations and investigate the self-generation of magnetic fields and their role in the system evolution. Supported by the DOE grant DE-SC0008823.

  4. Nearby supernova remnants and the cosmic ray spectral hardening at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoudam, Satyendra; Hörandel, Jörg R.

    2012-04-01

    Recent measurements of cosmic ray spectra of several individual nuclear species by the CREAM, TRACER and ATIC experiments indicate a change in the spectral index of the power laws at TeV energies. Possible explanations among others include non-linear diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays, different cosmic ray propagation properties at higher and lower energies in the Galaxy and the presence of nearby sources. In this paper, we show that if supernova remnants are the main sources of cosmic rays in our Galaxy, the effect of the nearby remnants can be responsible for the observed spectral changes. Using a rigidity-dependent escape of cosmic rays from the supernova remnants, we explain the apparent observed property that the hardening of the helium spectrum occurs at relatively lower energies as compared to the protons and also that the spectral hardening does not persist beyond ˜(20-30) TeV energies.

  5. Does energy of type IIP supernovae depend on progenitor mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugai, Nikolai

    The oxygen [O I] 6300 A emission doublet, seen in nebular spectra of core-collapse supernovae, is used to obtain oxygen density in central zone of a sample of SN IIP. The inferred values of the oxygen density on day 300 turn out to fall into rather narrow range. This result does not depend on the distance, extinction, or model assumptions. The found density distribution led us to conclude that the SN IIP explosion energy monotonically increases with the progenitor mass.

  6. Constraints on holographic dark energy from type Ia supernova observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xin; Wu Fengquan

    2005-08-15

    In this paper, we use the type Ia supernovae data to constrain the holographic dark energy model proposed by Li. We also apply a cosmic age test to this analysis. We consider in this paper a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with a matter component and a holographic dark energy component. The fit result shows that the case c<1 (c=0.21) is favored, which implies that the holographic dark energy behaves as a quintom-type dark energy. Furthermore, we also perform a joint analysis of SNe+CMB+LSS to this model; the result is well improved and still upholds the quintom dark energy conclusion. The best fit results in our analysis are c=0.81, {omega}{sub m}{sup 0}=0.28, and h=0.65, which lead to the present equation of state of dark energy w{sub 0}=-1.03 and the deceleration/acceleration transition redshift z{sub T}=0.63. Finally, an expected supernova/acceleration probe simulation using {lambda}CDM as a fiducial model is performed on this model, and the result shows that the holographic dark energy model takes on c<1 (c=0.92) even though the dark energy is indeed a cosmological constant.

  7. IceCube Sensitivity for Low-Energy Neutrinos from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatikos, M.; Abbasi, R.; Berghaus, P.; Chirkin, D.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Eisch, J.; Feintzeig, J.; Hanson, K.; hide

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the response of the IceCube neutrino telescope located at the geographic South Pole to outbursts of MeV neutrinos from the core collapse of nearby massive stars. IceCube was completed in December 2010 forming a lattice of 5160 photomultiplier tubes that monitor a volume of approx. 1 cu km in the deep Antarctic ice for particle induced photons. The telescope was designed to detect neutrinos with energies greater than 100 GeV. Owing to subfreezing ice temperatures, the photomultiplier dark noise rates are particularly low. Hence IceCube can also detect large numbers of MeV neutrinos by observing a collective rise in all photomultiplier rates on top of the dark noise. With 2 ms timing resolution, IceCube can detect subtle features in the temporal development of the supernova neutrino burst. For a supernova at the galactic center, its sensitivity matches that of a background-free megaton-scale supernova search experiment. The sensitivity decreases to 20 standard deviations at the galactic edge (30 kpc) and 6 standard deviations at the Large Magellanic Cloud (50 kpc). IceCube is sending triggers from potential supernovae to the Supernova Early Warning System. The sensitivity to neutrino properties such as the neutrino hierarchy is discussed, as well as the possibility to detect the neutronization burst, a short outbreak's released by electron capture on protons soon after collapse. Tantalizing signatures, such as the formation of a quark star or a black hole as well as the characteristics of shock waves, are investigated to illustrate IceCube's capability for supernova detection.

  8. IceCube sensitivity for low-energy neutrinos from nearby supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; de Clercq, C.; Degner, T.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jakobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richard, A. S.; Richman, M.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Singh, K.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Stüer, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the response of the IceCube neutrino telescope located at the geographic south pole to outbursts of MeV neutrinos from the core collapse of nearby massive stars. IceCube was completed in December 2010 forming a lattice of 5160 photomultiplier tubes that monitor a volume of ~1 km3 in the deep Antarctic ice for particle induced photons. The telescope was designed to detect neutrinos with energies greater than 100 GeV. Owing to subfreezing ice temperatures, the photomultiplier dark noise rates are particularly low. Hence IceCube can also detect large numbers of MeV neutrinos by observing a collective rise in all photomultiplier rates on top of the dark noise. With 2 ms timing resolution, IceCube can detect subtle features in the temporal development of the supernova neutrino burst. For a supernova at the galactic center, its sensitivity matches that of a background-free megaton-scale supernova search experiment. The sensitivity decreases to 20 standard deviations at the galactic edge (30 kpc) and 6 standard deviations at the Large Magellanic Cloud (50 kpc). IceCube is sending triggers from potential supernovae to the Supernova Early Warning System. The sensitivity to neutrino properties such as the neutrino hierarchy is discussed, as well as the possibility to detect the neutronization burst, a short outbreak of \\barνe's released by electron capture on protons soon after collapse. Tantalizing signatures, such as the formation of a quark star or a black hole as well as the characteristics of shock waves, are investigated to illustrate IceCube's capability for supernova detection.

  9. Search for Kilonovae in Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Zoheyr; DES-GW Team; DES-SN Team

    2016-03-01

    The Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4-m Telescope is an ideal instrument for identifying rapid optical transients with its large field of view and four optical filters. We utilize two seasons of data from the Dark Energy Survey to search for kilonovae, an optical counterpart to gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers. Kilonova lightcurves from Barnes and Kasen inform our analysis for removing background signals such as supernovae. We simulate DES observations of kilonovae with the SNANA software package to estimate our search efficiency and optimize cuts. Finally, we report rate limits for binary neutron star mergers and compare to existing rate estimates.

  10. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter.

  11. Simulations of Supernova-relevant Hydrodynamic Instability Experiments on the Nova Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Rubenchik, A.

    1996-12-01

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae (Arnett, D., Fryxell, B.A., and Muller, E., 1989, ApJ, 341, L63.) The earlier than expected detection of gamma rays from the core elements (56) Ni and (56) Co and their anomalously high velocities, together with the spectroscopic puzzle referred to as the Bochum event (Hanuschik. R.W. and Dachs, J., 1987, A&A, 192, L29; Shigeyama, T., and Nomoto, K., 1990, ApJ, 360, 242), all suggest strong mixing of the core outwards into the hydrogen envelope due to the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. We are developing an experiment using the Nova laser to test the modeling of shock induced RT instabilties under SN-relevant conditions, both in 2D (Kane, J., et al., submitted, ApJ Lett., Oct. 1996) and 3D (Marinak, M.M., Remington, B.A., et al., 1995, PRL, 75, 3677.) The target consists of a two-layer planar package composed of 85 mu m Cu backed by 500 mu m CH_2 with a well defined ripple at the interface. The Nova laser is used to launch a 10-15 Mbar shock across the interface, which initiates the RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the situation at the O-He, and He-H interfaces of a core collapse supernova at intermediate times, ~ 10(3) - 10(4) s. Modeling of the experiment is done using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations will be presented, and possible implications for supernova modeling will be discussed. *Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48.

  12. What We Know About Dark Energy From Supernovae

    ScienceCinema

    Filippenko, Alex [University of California, Berkeley, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The measured distances of type Ia (white dwarf) supernovae as a function of redshift (z) have shown that the expansion of the Universe is currently accelerating, probably due to the presence of dark energy (X) having a negative pressure. Combining all of the data with existing results from large-scale structure surveys, we find a best fit for Omega M and Omega X of 0.28 and 0.72 (respectively), in excellent agreement with the values derived independently from WMAP measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation. Thus far, the best-fit value for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter is -1, and its first derivative is consistent with zero, suggesting that the dark energy may indeed be Einstein's cosmological constant.

  13. Very low energy supernovae and their resulting transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth

    Core-collapse supernovae play a key role in many of astrophysical processes, but the details of how these explosive events work remain elusive. Many questions about the CCSN explosion mechanism and progenitor stars could be answered by either detecting very-low-energy supernovae (VLE SNe) or alternately placing a tight upper bound on their fraction of the CCSN population. However, VLE SNe are by definition dim events. Many VLE SNe result from the failure of the standard CCSN explosion mechanism, meaning that any observable signature must be created by secondary processes either before or during the collapse. In this dissertation I examine alternate means of producing transients in otherwise-failed CCSNe and consider the use of shock breakout flashes to both detect VLE SNe and retrieve progenitor star information. I begin by simulating neutrino-mediated mass loss in CCSNe progenitors to show that a dim, unusual, but still observable transient can be produced. I then simulate shock breakout flashes in VLE SNe for both the purposes of detection as well as extracting information about the exploding star. I discuss particular challenges of modeling shock breakout at low energies and behaviors unique to this regime, in particular the behavior of the spectral temperature. All simulations in this dissertation were done with the CASTRO radiation-hydrodynamic code.

  14. Systematic search for molecular clouds near supernova remnants as sources of very-high-energy γ-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häffner, Stephanie; Stegmann, Christian; Jung-Richardt, Ira

    2015-12-01

    Supernova remnants accelerate particles up to energies of at least 100 TeV as established by observations in very-high-energy γ-ray astronomy. Molecular clouds in their vicinity provide an increased amount of target material for proton-proton interaction and subsequent neutral pion decay into γ-rays of accelerated hadrons escaping the remnant. Therefore, these molecular clouds are potential γ-ray sources. The γ-ray emission from these clouds provides a unique environment to derive information on the propagation of very-high-energy particles through the interstellar medium as well as on the acceleration of hadrons in supernova remnants. Current Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope systems are suitable to explore a large parameter space of the propagation properties depending on the age of the supernova remnant and the distance between the remnant and the nearby molecular cloud. In this paper we present our strategy and results of a systematic search for γ-ray emitting molecular clouds near supernova remnants which are potentially detectable with current experiments in the TeV energy range and explore the prospects of future experiments.

  15. Cosmic rays, supernova and the origin of ultrahigh energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1985-07-01

    The acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10(15 to 20) eV, is still an unsolved problem in high-energy astrophysics. The now classical mechanism of stochastic acceleration of cosmic rays in a strong shock in the interstellar or intergalactic medium is limited in time and dimension for all likely acceleration sites, particularly for the highest energies. Acceleration of cosmic rays across a plasma shock of velocity, (BETA)/sub s/ ((BETA)/sub s/ = v/sub shock//c), requires 1/(BETA)/sub s/ number of crossings and therefore (1/(BETA)/sub s/) (2) number of scatterings for doubling the energy of a particle. This requires space of the order of 1/9BETA)/sub s/ x the scattering length, or a multiple of the Larmor radius and hence, the space requirements to cosmic ray acceleration are very many Larmor orbits in dimension, as well as times that are larger by (1/(BETA)/sub s/) (2) x t/sub Larmor/. The acceleration of cosmic rays by the shock in the envelope of a Type 1 supernova is reviewed, and the interaction of the accelerated matter with the nearby ISM is considered.

  16. Supernova constraints on multi-coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Piloyan, Arpine; Marra, Valerio; Amendola, Luca; Baldi, Marco E-mail: valerio.marra@me.com E-mail: l.amendola@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2013-07-01

    The persisting consistency of ever more accurate observational data with the predictions of the standard ΛCDM cosmological model puts severe constraints on possible alternative scenarios, but still does not shed any light on the fundamental nature of the cosmic dark sector. As large deviations from a ΛCDM cosmology are ruled out by data, the path to detect possible features of alternative models goes necessarily through the definition of cosmological scenarios that leave almost unaffected the background and — to a lesser extent — the linear perturbations evolution of the universe. In this context, the Multi-coupled DE (McDE) model was proposed by Baldi [9] as a particular realization of an interacting Dark Energy field characterized by an effective screening mechanism capable of suppressing the effects of the coupling at the background and linear perturbation level. In the present paper, for the first time, we challenge the McDE scenario through a direct comparison with real data, in particular with the luminosity distance of Type Ia supernovae. By studying the existence and stability conditions of the critical points of the associated background dynamical system, we select only the cosmologically consistent solutions, and confront their background expansion history with data. Confirming previous qualitative results, the McDE scenario appears to be fully consistent with the adopted sample of Type Ia supernovae, even for coupling values corresponding to an associated scalar fifth-force about four orders of magnitude stronger than standard gravity. Our analysis demonstrates the effectiveness of the McDE background screening, and shows some new non-trivial asymptotic solutions for the future evolution of the universe. Clearly, linear perturbation data and, even more, nonlinear structure formation properties are expected to put much tighter constraints on the allowed coupling range. Nonetheless, our results show how the background expansion history might be

  17. A study of low-energy type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2015-08-01

    All stars with an initial mass greater than 8Msun, but not massive enough to encounter the pair-production instability, eventually form a degenerate core and collapse to form a compact object, either a neutron star or a black hole.At the lower mass end, these massive stars die as red-supergiant stars and give rise to Type II supernovae (SNe). The diversity of observed properties of SNe II suggests a range of progenitor mass, radii, but also explosion energy.We have performed a large grid simulations designed to cover this range of progenitor and explosion properties. Using MESA STAR, we compute a set of massive star models (12-30Msun) from the main sequence until core collapse. We then generate explosions with V1D to produce ejecta with a range of explosion energies and yields. Finally, all ejecta are evolved with CMFGEN to generate multi-band light curves and spectra.In this poster, we focus our attention on the properties of low-energy explosions that give rise to low-luminosity Type II Plateau (II-P) SNe. In particular, we present a detailed study of SN 2008bk, but also include other notorious low-energy SNe II-P like 2005cs, emphasising their non-standard properties by comparing to models that match well events like SN 1999em. Such low-energy explosions, characterised by low ejecta expansion rates, are more suitable for reliable spectral line identifications.Based on our models, we discuss the distinct signatures of low-energy explosions in lower and higher mass models. One important goal is to identify whether there is a progenitor-mass bias leading to such events.

  18. Low-energy spectral features of supernova (anti)neutrinos in inverted hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Marrone, A.; Tamborra, I.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.

    2008-11-01

    In the dense supernova core, self-interactions may align the flavor polarization vectors of {nu} and {nu} and induce collective flavor transformations. Different alignment Ansaetze are known to describe approximately the phenomena of synchronized or bipolar oscillations and the split of {nu} energy spectra. We discuss another phenomenon observed in some numerical experiments in inverted hierarchy, showing features akin to a low-energy split of {nu} spectra. The phenomenon appears to be approximately described by another alignment Ansatz which, in the considered scenario, reduces the (nonadiabatic) dynamics of all energy modes to only two {nu} plus two {nu} modes. The associated spectral features, however, appear to be fragile when passing from single to multiangle simulations.

  19. Distance measurements from supernovae and dark energy constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yun

    2009-12-15

    Constraints on dark energy from current observational data are sensitive to how distances are measured from Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data. We find that flux averaging of SNe Ia can be used to test the presence of unknown systematic uncertainties, and yield more robust distance measurements from SNe Ia. We have applied this approach to the nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST set of 288 SNe Ia, and the 'Constitution' set of 397 SNe Ia. Combining the SN Ia data with cosmic microwave background anisotropy data from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5 yr observations, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, the data of 69 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) , and the Hubble constant measurement from the Hubble Space Telescope project SHOES, we measure the dark energy density function X(z){identical_to}{rho}{sub X}(z)/{rho}{sub X}(0) as a free function of redshift (assumed to be a constant at z>1 or z>1.5). Without the flux averaging of SNe Ia, the combined data using the Constitution set of SNe Ia seem to indicate a deviation from a cosmological constant at {approx}95% confidence level at 0 < or apporx. z < or approx. 0.8; they are consistent with a cosmological constant at {approx}68% confidence level when SNe Ia are flux averaged. The combined data using the nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST data set of SNe Ia are consistent with a cosmological constant at 68% confidence level with or without flux averaging of SNe Ia, and give dark energy constraints that are significantly more stringent than that using the Constitution set of SNe Ia. Assuming a flat Universe, dark energy is detected at >98% confidence level for z{<=}0.75 using the combined data with 288 SNe Ia from nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST, independent of the assumptions about X(z{>=}1). We quantify dark energy constraints without assuming a flat Universe using the dark energy figure of merit for both X(z) and a dark energy equation-of-state linear in the cosmic scale factor.

  20. A low-energy core-collapse supernova without a hydrogen envelope.

    PubMed

    Valenti, S; Pastorello, A; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mazzali, P A; Manteca, J; Taubenberger, S; Elias-Rosa, N; Ferrando, R; Harutyunyan, A; Hentunen, V P; Nissinen, M; Pian, E; Turatto, M; Zampieri, L; Smartt, S J

    2009-06-04

    The final fate of massive stars depends on many factors. Theory suggests that some with initial masses greater than 25 to 30 solar masses end up as Wolf-Rayet stars, which are deficient in hydrogen in their outer layers because of mass loss through strong stellar winds. The most massive of these stars have cores which may form a black hole and theory predicts that the resulting explosion of some of them produces ejecta of low kinetic energy, a faint optical luminosity and a small mass fraction of radioactive nickel. An alternative origin for low-energy supernovae is the collapse of the oxygen-neon core of a star of 7-9 solar masses. No weak, hydrogen-deficient, core-collapse supernovae have hitherto been seen. Here we report that SN 2008ha is a faint hydrogen-poor supernova. We propose that other similar events have been observed but have been misclassified as peculiar thermonuclear supernovae (sometimes labelled SN 2002cx-like events). This discovery could link these faint supernovae to some long-duration gamma-ray bursts, because extremely faint, hydrogen-stripped core-collapse supernovae have been proposed to produce such long gamma-ray bursts, the afterglows of which do not show evidence of associated supernovae.

  1. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.

  2. Reconstructing supernova-neutrino spectra using low-energy beta beams.

    PubMed

    Jachowicz, N; McLaughlin, G C

    2006-05-05

    Neutrinos are the principal messengers reaching us from the center of a supernova. Terrestrial neutrino telescopes can provide precious information about the processes in the core of the star. But the information that a neutrino detector can supply is restricted by the fact that little experimental data on the neutrino-nucleus cross sections exist and by the uncertainties in theoretical calculations. In this Letter, we propose a novel procedure that determines the response of a target nucleus in a supernova-neutrino detector, by using low-energy beta beams. We show that fitting "synthetic" spectra, constructed by taking linear combinations of beta-beam spectra, to the original supernova-neutrino spectra reproduces the folded differential cross sections very accurately. Comparing the response in a detector to these synthetic responses provides a direct way to determine the main parameters of the supernova-neutrino energy distribution.

  3. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; ...

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernovamore » remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.« less

  4. The SHOES Program: Supernovae and HO for the Dark Energy Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam G.; Macri, L.

    2007-12-01

    The present uncertainty in the value of the Hubble constant (resulting in an uncertainty in OmegaM) and the paucity of Type Ia supernovae at redshifts exceeding 1 are leading obstacles to determining the nature of dark energy. We conducted a single, integrated set of observations in Cycle 15 to provide a 40% improvement in constraints on dark energy. This program observed known Cepheids in six reliable hosts of Type Ia supernovae with NICMOS, to reduce the uncertainty in H0 by a factor of two because of the smaller dispersion along the instability strip, the diminished extinction, and the weaker metallicity dependence in the infrared. In parallel with ACS, at the same time the NICMOS observations were underway, we discovered and followed a sample of Type Ia supernovae at z > 1. Together, these measurements, along with prior constraints from WMAP, should provide a significant improvement in our ability to distinguish between a static, cosmological constant and dynamical dark energy.

  5. High energy neutrinos and gamma-ray emission from supernovae in compact star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Ellison, D. C.; Gladilin, P. E.; Osipov, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Compact clusters of young massive stars are observed in the Milky Way and in starburst galaxies. The compact clusters with multiple powerful winds of young massive stars and supernova shocks are favorable sites for high-energy particle acceleration. We argue that expanding young supernova (SN) shells in compact stellar clusters can be very efficient PeV CR accelerators. At a stage when a supernova shock is colliding with collective fast winds from massive stars in a compact cluster the Fermi mechanism allows particle acceleration to energies well above the standard limits of diffusive shock acceleration in an isolated SNR. The energy spectrum of protons in such an accelerator is a hard power-law with a broad spectral upturn above TeV before a break at multi-PeV energies, providing a large energy flux in the high-energy end of the spectrum. The acceleration stage in the colliding shock flow lasts for a few hundred years after the supernova explosion producing high-energy CRs that escape the accelerator and diffuse through the ambient matter producing γ-rays and neutrinos in inelastic nuclear collisions. In starburst galaxies a sizeable fraction of core collapse supernovae is expected to occur in compact star clusters and therefore their high energy gamma-ray and neutrino spectra in the PeV energy regime may differ strongly from that of our Galaxy. To test the model with individual sources we briefly discuss the recent H.E.S.S. detections of gamma-rays from two potential candidate sources, Westerlund 1 and HESS J1806-204 in the Milky Way. We argue that this model of compact star clusters, with typical parameters, could produce a neutrino flux sufficient to explain a fraction of the recently detected IceCube South Pole Observatory neutrinos.

  6. Supernova Registration in Water Cherenkov Veto of Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinovich, E. A.; Machulin, I. N.; Pugachev, D. A.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Registration of supernova neutrinos is one of the main goals of large underground neutrino detectors. We consider the possibility of using the large water veto tanks of future dark matter experiments as the additional facilities for supernova detection. Simulations were performed for registration of Cherenkov light in 2 kt water veto of Darkside-20k from high energy positrons created by supernova electron antineutrinos via inverse beta decay reaction. Comparison between characteristics of different supernova neutrino detectors are presented.

  7. Final Technical Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Saurabh W. Jha

    2012-10-03

    The final technical report from the project "Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae" led at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey by Prof. Saurabh W. Jha is presented, including all publications resulting from this award.

  8. Analysis of energy and time dependence of supernova shock effects on neutrino crossing probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.

    2003-08-01

    It has recently been realized that supernova neutrino signals may be affected by shock propagation over a time interval of a few seconds after bounce. In the standard three-neutrino oscillation scenario, such effects crucially depend on the neutrino level crossing probability PH in the 1-3 sector. By using a simplified parametrization of the time-dependent supernova radial density profile, we explicitly show that simple analytical expressions for PH accurately reproduce the phase-averaged results of numerical calculations in the relevant parameter space. Such expressions are then used to study the structure of PH as a function of energy and time, with particular attention to cases involving multiple crossing along the shock profile. Illustrative applications are given in terms of positron spectra generated by supernova electron antineutrinos through inverse beta decay.

  9. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  10. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    ScienceCinema

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  11. Connecting the high- and low-energy Universe: dust processing inside Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    The recent detection of large amounts of dust (> 10(7) M_⊙) at very high redshift (z > 6) raises a fundamental question about the origin of such dust. The main dust producers, i. e., the stars populating the Red Giant Branch and the Asymptotic Giant Branch (RGB and AGB stars) did not have time to evolve. From an evolutionary point of view, young supernovae (SNe) could represent a viable source of dust in high-redshift galaxies, however, a critical issue still needs to be addressed. While recent observations have demonstrated that supernovae are indeed efficient dust factories, at the same time SNe represent the major agent responsible for dust destruction. Supernova blast waves propagating into the interstellar medium destroy the dust residing there, while the fresh dust produced by the supernova itself is threatened by the reverse shock which propagates through the expanding ejecta towards the center of the remnant. We focus here on this second destruction mechanism, with the aim of quantifying the amount of dust able to survive the heavy processing by the reverse shock and to reach the interstellar medium. We present our results for the textbook supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). Using recent X-ray and infrared observations, we have developed a model for the evolution of the remnant and the simultaneous processing of the dust by the reverse shock, and derived the expected amount of surviving dust. In addition, we will briefly illustrate the impact of the capabilities of the Athena mission on the variety of astrophysical problems involving the processing of dust particles in extreme environments characterized by the presence of shocked X-ray emitting gas. These range from individual supernova remnants, to starburst super winds up to AGN outflows and the hot intra-cluster medium. The study of dust processing by a shocked gas truly connects the high-energy Universe with the low-energy Universe, and Athena will play a major role in it.

  12. Enhancement of high-energy cosmic-ray spectrum by type-II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Miyaji, S.; Parnell, T. A.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    The cosmic-ray spectrum has an intensity enhancement in the energy range 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 16th eV per nucleus. Recent observations of heavy cosmic rays in this energy range indicate that the Ca/Fe ratio may be as large as 10 times the solar value. It is suggested that pulsars in type-II supernova remnants are the origin of this component of the cosmic-ray spectrum.

  13. SHOES-Supernovae, HO, for the Equation of State of Dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam

    2006-07-01

    The present uncertainty in the value of the Hubble constant {resulting in anuncertainty in Omega_M} and the paucity of Type Ia supernovae at redshiftsexceeding 1 are now the leading obstacles to determining the nature of darkenergy. We propose a single, integrated set of observations for Cycle 15 thatwill provide a 40% improvement in constraints on dark energy. This programwill observe known Cepheids in six reliable hosts of Type Ia supernovae withNICMOS, reducing the uncertainty in H_0 by a factor of two because of thesmaller dispersion along the instability strip, the diminished extinction, andthe weaker metallicity dependence in the infrared. In parallel with ACS, atthe same time the NICMOS observations are underway, we will discover andfollow a sample of Type Ia supernovae at z > 1. Together, these measurements,along with prior constraints from WMAP, will provide a great improvement inHST's ability to distinguish between a static, cosmological constant anddynamical dark energy. The Hubble Space Telescope is the only instrument inthe world that can make these IR measurements of Cepheids beyond the LocalGroup, and it is the only telescope in the world that can be used to find andfollow supernovae at z > 1. Our program exploits both of these uniquecapabilities of HST to learn more about one of the greatest mysteries inscience.

  14. Supernova Discoveries from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory)

    DOE Data Explorer

    SNfactory International Collaboration,

    The Nearby Supernova Factory is an experiment designed to collect data on more Type Ia supernovae than have ever been studied in a single project before, and in so doing, to answer some fundamental questions about the nature of the universe. Type Ia supernovae are extraordinarily bright, remarkably uniform objects which make excellent "standard candles" for measuring the expansion rate of the universe. However, such stellar explosions are very rare, occurring only a couple of times per millenium in a typical galaxy, and remaining bright enough to detect only for a few weeks. Previous studies of Type Ia supernovae led to the discovery of the mysterious "dark energy" that is causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate. To reduce the statistical uncertainties in previous experimental data, extensive spectral and photometric monitoring of more Type Ia supernovae is required. The SNfactory collaboration has built an automated system consisting of specialized software and custom-built hardware that systematically searches the sky for new supernovae, screens potential candidates, then performs multiple spectral and photometric observations on each supernova. These observations are stored in a database to be made available to supernova researchers world-wide for further study and analysis [copied from http://snfactory.lbl.gov/snf/snf-about.html]. Users must register and agree to the open access honor system. Finding charts are in FITS format and may not be accessible through normal browser settings.

  15. Observations of supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae at gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John W.; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    In the past few years, gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age thanks to two major breakthroughs: Cherenkov telescopes on the ground and the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite. The sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) detected at gamma-ray energies is now much larger: it goes from evolved supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds up to young shell-type supernova remnants and historical supernova remnants. Studies of SNRs are of great interest, as these analyses are directly linked to the long standing issue of the origin of the Galactic cosmic rays. In this context, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) need also to be considered since they evolve in conjunction with SNRs. As a result, they frequently complicate interpretation of the gamma-ray emission seen from SNRs and they could also contribute directly to the local cosmic ray spectrum, particularly the leptonic component. This paper reviews the current results and thinking on SNRs and PWNe and their connection to cosmic ray production.

  16. CEBAF Energy Recovery Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, S. Alex; Hutton, Andrew M.

    2003-04-01

    High current CW energy recovery linacs (ERLs) are seen as important elements in planned future facilities such as: next-generation light sources, electron coolers and electron-ion colliders. The Jefferson Lab FEL (5 mA, 50 MeV) has been the highest power superconducting ERL so far in operation. Full-scale demonstration of this technology with multiple cavities at the GeV energy scale is highly desirable. Such an experiment (E-02-102)¨ has recently been approved at Jefferson Lab. There are two phases to the proposed experiment. In the first, the beam would be accelerated in the North and South linacs to about 1 GeV and then decelerated in the North and South linacs to be dumped at the injection energy. This experiment requires a new half-wavelength (RF) magnetic chicane at the end of the South linac. The second phase is a current doubling experiment. The beam would be accelerated in the North and South linacs; it would then pass through a quarter-wavelength chicane, drift through the North and South linacs with no energy change, pass throughout the chicane a second time, and be decelerated in the North and South linacs and dumped. The effective gun current would thus be doubled. The experiments will involve careful measurements of all beam properties: energy, current, emittance, and beam halo. These are important parameters, crucial in characterizing the performance of energy recovery. Furthermore, this information will be valuable in advancing the planning, design and operation of future high-energy, high-current ERLs.

  17. Investigating the Nature of Dark Energy using Type Ia Supernovae with WFIRST-AFTA Space Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    Scientifically, the WFIRST supernova program is unique: it makes possible a dark energy measurement that no other space mission or ground-based project is addressing, a measurement that will set the standard in determining the expansion history of the universe continuously from low to high redshifts (0.1 < z < 1.7). In the context of the WFIRST Science Definition Team several participants in this proposal have developed a first version of a supernova program, described in the WFIRST SDT Report. While this program was judged to be a robust one, and the estimates of the sensitivity to the cosmological parameters were felt to be reliable, due to limitations of time the analysis was clearly limited in depth on a number of issues. The objective of this proposal is to further develop this program. Technically this is the WFIRST measurement that arguably requires the most advanced project development, since it requires near-real-time analysis and follow-up with WFIRST, and since it is using the IFU spectrograph in the WFI package, the IFU being the WFIRST instrument that does not yet have a completely consistent set of specifications in the design iteration of the SDT report. In this proposal for the WFIRST Scientific Investigation Team, focused primarily on the supernova dark energy measurements, we address these crucial technical needs by bringing the larger supernova community's expertise on the science elements together with a smaller focused team that can produce the specific deliverables. Thus the objectives of this 5 year proposal are the following: 1. Development of scientific performance requirements for the study of Dark Energy using Type Ia supernovae 2. Design an observing strategy using the Wide Field Instrument (WFI) and the Integral Field Spectrometer Unit (IFU) 3. Development of science data analysis techniques and data analysis software 4. Development of ground and space calibration requirements and estimating realistic correlated errors, both statistical

  18. Inference for the dark energy equation of state using Type IA supernova data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Christopher; Freeman, Peter; Wasserman, Larry; Nichol, Robert; Miller, Christopher

    The surprising discovery of an accelerating universe led cosmologists to posit the existence of "dark energy" - a mysterious energy field that permeates the universe. Understanding dark energy has become the central problem of modern cosmology. After describing the scientific background in depth, we formulate the task as a nonlinear inverse problem that expresses the comoving distance function in terms of the dark-energy equation of state. We present two classes of methods for making sharp statistical inferences about the equation of state from observations of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe). First, we derive a technique for testing hypotheses about the equation of state that requires no assumptions about its form and can distinguish among competing theories. Second, we present a framework for computing parametric and nonparametric estimators of the equation of state, with an associated assessment of uncertainty. Using our approach, we evaluate the strength of statistical evidence for various competing models of dark energy. Consistent with current studies, we find that with the available Type Ia SNe data, it is not possible to distinguish statistically among popular dark-energy models, and that, in particular, there is no support in the data for rejecting a cosmological constant. With much more supernova data likely to be available in coming years (e.g., from the DOE/NASA Joint Dark Energy Mission), we address the more interesting question of whether future data sets will have sufficient resolution to distinguish among competing theories.

  19. Interaction of Supernova Reminants with Interstellar Cloud: Experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Budil, K S; Perry. T S; Bach, D R

    2002-04-18

    The interaction of strong shock waves, such as those generated by the explosion of supernovae with interstellar clouds, is a problem of fundamental importance in understanding the evolution and the dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) as it is disrupted by shock waves. Here we present the results of a series of Nova laser experiments investigating the evolution of a high density sphere embedded in a low density medium after the passage of a strong shock wave, thereby emulating the supernova shock-cloud interaction. The Nova laser was utilized to generate a strong ({approx}Mach 10) shock wave that traveled along a miniature beryllium shock tube, 750 {micro}m in diameter, filled with a low-density plastic emulating the ISM. Embedded in the plastic was a copper microsphere (100 {micro}m in diameter) emulating the interstellar cloud. The morphology and evolution as well as the shock wave trajectory were diagnosed via side-on X-ray radiography.

  20. 40Ca(alpha, gamma)44Ti reaction in the energy regime of supernova nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nassar, H; Paul, M; Ahmad, I; Ben-Dov, Y; Caggiano, J; Ghelberg, S; Goriely, S; Greene, J P; Hass, M; Heger, A; Heinz, A; Henderson, D J; Janssens, R V F; Jiang, C L; Kashiv, Y; Nara Singh, B S; Ofan, A; Pardo, R C; Pennington, T; Rehm, K E; Savard, G; Scott, R; Vondrasek, R

    2006-02-03

    The 44Ti(t1/2=59 yr) nuclide, an important signature of supernova nucleosynthesis, has recently been observed as live radioactivity by gamma-ray astronomy from the Cas A remnant. We investigate in the laboratory the major 44Ti production reaction 40Ca(alpha, gamma)44Ti (Ec.m. approximately 0.6-1.2 MeV/u by direct off-line counting of 44Ti nuclei. The yield, significantly higher than inferred from previous experiments, is analyzed in terms of a statistical model using microscopic nuclear inputs. The associated stellar rate has important astrophysical consequences, increasing the calculated supernova 44Ti yield by a factor approximately 2 over previous estimates and bringing it closer to Cas A observations.

  1. Energy Dependence of Synchrotron X-Ray Rims in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Ressler, Sean M.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Several young supernova remnants exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's supernova remnant in 5 energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths approximately 1-5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths approximately 50-400 micron G assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are approximately 1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields approximately greater than 20 micron G, arming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  2. Effects of Initial Conditions on Compressible Mixing in Supernova-Relevant Laboratory Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M; Greenough, J

    2004-04-30

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this paper, we summarize recent results from our computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. For planar multimode systems, compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. Initial conditions predicted by some recent stellar calculations are incompatible with self-similarity.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    James Glimm

    2009-06-04

    The three year plan for this project was to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), Large Eddy Simulations (LES), full two fluid simulations and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar or circular interfaces. We compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. Multiple layers and reshock are considered here.

  4. Supernova pointing with low- and high-energy neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomàs, R.; Semikoz, D.; Raffelt, G. G.; Kachelrieß, M.; Dighe, A. S.

    2003-11-01

    A future galactic SN can be located several hours before the optical explosion through the MeV-neutrino burst, exploiting the directionality of ν-e scattering in a water Cherenkov detector such as Super-Kamiokande. We study the statistical efficiency of different methods for extracting the SN direction and identify a simple approach that is nearly optimal, yet independent of the exact SN neutrino spectra. We use this method to quantify the increase in the pointing accuracy by the addition of gadolinium to water, which tags neutrons from the inverse beta decay background. We also study the dependence of the pointing accuracy on neutrino mixing scenarios and initial spectra. We find that in the “worst case” scenario the pointing accuracy is 8° at 95% C.L. in the absence of tagging, which improves to 3° with a tagging efficiency of 95%. At a megaton detector, this accuracy can be as good as 0.6°. A TeV-neutrino burst is also expected to be emitted contemporaneously with the SN optical explosion, which may locate the SN to within a few tenths of a degree at a future km2 high-energy neutrino telescope. If the SN is not seen in the electromagnetic spectrum, locating it in the sky through neutrinos is crucial for identifying the Earth matter effects on SN neutrino oscillations.

  5. New dark energy constraints from supernovae, microwave background, and galaxy clustering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Tegmark, Max

    2004-06-18

    Using supernova, cosmic microwave background, and galaxy clustering data, we make the most accurate measurements to date of the dark energy density rho(X) as a function of cosmic time, constraining it in a rather model-independent way, assuming a flat universe. We find that Einstein's simplest scenario, where rho(X)(z) is constant, remains consistent with these new tight constraints and that a big crunch or big rip is more than 50 Gyr away for a broader class of models allowing such cataclysmic events. We discuss popular pitfalls and hidden priors.

  6. Untangling supernova-neutrino oscillations with β-beam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachowicz, N.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Volpe, C.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, we suggested that low-energy β-beam neutrinos can be very useful for the study of supernova-neutrino interactions. In this article, we examine the use of a such experiment for the analysis of a supernova-neutrino signal. Because supernova neutrinos are oscillating, it is very likely that the terrestrial spectrum of supernova neutrinos of a given flavor will not be the same as the energy distribution with which these neutrinos were first emitted. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method for untangling multiple neutrino spectra. This is an essential feature of any model aiming at gaining information about the supernova mechanism, probing proto-neutron star physics, and understanding supernova nucleosynthesis, such as the neutrino process and the r-process. We also consider the efficacy of different experimental approaches including measurements at multiple beam energies and detector configurations.

  7. Ultra-high-energy cosmic ray acceleration in engine-driven relativistic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, S; Ray, A; Soderberg, A M; Loeb, A; Chandra, P

    2011-02-01

    The origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remains an enigma. They offer a window to new physics, including tests of physical laws at energies unattainable by terrestrial accelerators. They must be accelerated locally, otherwise, background radiations would severely suppress the flux of protons and nuclei, at energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit. Nearby, gamma ray bursts (GRBs), hypernovae, active galactic nuclei and their flares have all been suggested and debated as possible sources. A local sub-population of type Ibc supernovae (SNe) with mildly relativistic outflows have been detected as sub-energetic GRBs, X-ray flashes and recently as radio afterglows without detected GRB counterparts. Here, we measure the size-magnetic field evolution, baryon loading and energetics, using the observed radio spectra of SN 2009bb. We place such engine-driven SNe above the Hillas line and establish that they can readily explain the post-GZK UHECRs.

  8. Very Low-energy Supernovae: Light Curves and Spectra of Shock Breakout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.; Zhang, Weiqun

    2017-08-01

    The brief transient emitted as a shock wave erupts through the surface of a pre-supernova star carrying information about the stellar radius and explosion energy. Here, the CASTRO code, which treats radiation transport using multigroup flux-limited diffusion, is used to simulate the light curves and spectra of shock breakout in very low-energy supernovae (VLE SNe), explosions in giant stars with final kinetic energy much less than 1051 erg. VLE SN light curves, computed here with the KEPLER code, are distinctively faint, red, and long-lived, making them challenging to find with transient surveys. The accompanying shock breakouts are brighter, though briefer, and potentially easier to detect. Previous analytic work provides general guidance, but numerical simulations are challenging, due to the range of conditions and lack of equilibration between color and effective temperatures. We consider previous analytic work and extend discussions of color temperature and opacity to the lower energy range explored by these events. Since this is the first application of the CASTRO code to shock breakout, test simulations of normal energy shock breakout of SN 1987A are carried out and compared with the literature. A set of breakout light curves and spectra are then calculated for VLE SNe with final kinetic energies in the range {10}47{--}{10}50 erg for red supergiants with main-sequence masses of 15 and 25 {M}⊙ . The importance of uncertainties in stellar atmosphere model, opacity, and ambient medium is discussed, as are observational prospects with current and forthcoming missions.

  9. Supernova-Driven Interstellar Medium Simulations: Turbulent Pressure Distribution and Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, M. K. R.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2005-12-01

    We construct three-dimensional models of stratified interstellar medium stirred by discrete supernova explosions, including vertical gravitational field and parameterized heating and cooling, with sufficient spatial resolution to follow detailed gas dynamics using a grid-based adaptive mesh refinement code, Flash. The models reproduce observed characteristics of the Galaxy such as the galactic fountain and cold dense clouds in the galactic disk. We find: (1) Kinetic energy is distributed over a broad range of lengths, but 90% of the total kinetic energy is contained in wavelengths shortward of 150 pc; (2) Turbulent velocity dispersion is inversely proportional to the square root of the local density, making the turbulent pressure nearly constant; (3) The global gas structure depends sensitively on the assumed background diffuse heating rate. We discuss how these high-resolution models can be used as a subgrid model for supernova feedback in global simulations of galaxies. MKRJ was supported by an AMNH Graduate Student Fellowship. M-MML acknowledges support by NSF Career grant AST99-85392, and NSF grants AST03-07793, AST03-07854. The software used in this work was in part developed by the DOE-supported ASCI/Alliance Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. Computations were performed at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center supported by the NSF.

  10. Combing Large Samples of Type Ia Supernovae To Constrain Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolnic, Daniel; Riess, A. G.; PS1 Transients Group

    2014-01-01

    SNe Ia remain one of the best tools to determine whether the dark energy is a static, cosmological constant (w(z) = -1) in the local volume because they can be discovered in large sample sizes and their individual measurement precision is high. Future progress in this field depends on solving two questions: how to reduce the nearly-dominant systematic uncertainties in SN Ia distance measurements, and how to take advantage of the 100-1000x more supernovae that will be found in the next ten years for which we cannot follow-up with spectroscopy. This thesis addresses both of these efforts. One of the largest systematic uncertainties in using SNIa measurements as a cosmological probe has been how to understand the diversity of SNIa color. We discuss how there is a degeneracy between models in which SNIa color is and is not consistent with a Milky Way reddening law. Misattribution of the source of SNIa color leads to significant biases 5%) in our measurements of the equation-of-state of dark energy. We review our derived cosmological parameters with the Pan-STARRS supernova sample, and discuss the limiting systematic uncertainties (e.g., calibration, supernova color, dependence on host properties, Milky Way extinction, coherent flows). This sample is one of the largest analyzed samples of SNIa and we show how many of the uncertainties may be reduced for future surveys like DES and LSST. To address the question of how to benefit from the orders of magnitude more supernova discoveries, we propose a method of SN observation using 'comb' filters with narrow passbands on a single substrate to retain the speed of photometric observations with most of the accuracy of spectroscopic observations. This approach determines the type of SN and for SNe Ia, their redshifts. We discuss how we use this `SNACC’ method to more fully harvest the yield expected from large-scale SN surveys. We find that we can achieve a sample with >90% high purity and redshift accuracy to d 0.01.

  11. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  12. Observational Constraints on the Nature of the Dark Energy: First Cosmological Results From the ESSENCE Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Miknaitis, G.; Stubbs, C.W.; Jha, S.; Riess, A.G.; Garnavich, P.M.; Kirshner, R.P.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blackman, J.W.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Conley, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garg, A.; Hicken, M.; Krisciunas, K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Fermilab /Harvard U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Notre Dame U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Chile U., Catolica /Toronto U., Astron. Dept. /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /NOAO, Tucson /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Inst. Astron., Honolulu

    2007-01-05

    We present constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, w = P/({rho}c{sup 2}), using 60 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the ESSENCE supernova survey. We derive a set of constraints on the nature of the dark energy assuming a flat Universe. By including constraints on ({Omega}{sub M}, w) from baryon acoustic oscillations, we obtain a value for a static equation-of-state parameter w = -1.05{sub -0.12}{sup +0.13} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys) and {Omega}{sub M} = 0.274{sub -0.020}{sup +0.033} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.96. These results are consistent with those reported by the Super-Nova Legacy Survey in a similar program measuring supernova distances and redshifts. We evaluate sources of systematic error that afflict supernova observations and present Monte Carlo simulations that explore these effects. Currently, the largest systematic currently with the potential to affect our measurements is the treatment of extinction due to dust in the supernova host galaxies. Combining our set of ESSENCE SNe Ia with the SuperNova Legacy Survey SNe Ia, we obtain a joint constraint of w = -1.07{sub -0.09}{sup +0.09} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys), {Omega}{sub M} = 0.267{sub -0.018}{sup +0.028} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.91. The current SNe Ia data are fully consistent with a cosmological constant.

  13. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CLUSTER SUPERNOVA SURVEY. V. IMPROVING THE DARK-ENERGY CONSTRAINTS ABOVE z > 1 AND BUILDING AN EARLY-TYPE-HOSTED SUPERNOVA SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, N.; Rubin, D.; Aldering, G.; Barbary, K.; Faccioli, L.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Lidman, C.; Amanullah, R.; Botyanszki, J.; Barrientos, L. F.; Brodwin, M.; Connolly, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Dey, A.; Doi, M.; Donahue, M.; Deustua, S.; Eisenhardt, P.; Ellingson, E.; Fadeyev, V. E-mail: rubind@berkeley.edu; Collaboration: Supernova Cosmology Project; and others

    2012-02-10

    We present Advanced Camera for Surveys, NICMOS, and Keck adaptive-optics-assisted photometry of 20 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey. The SNe Ia were discovered over the redshift interval 0.623 < z < 1.415. Of these SNe Ia, 14 pass our strict selection cuts and are used in combination with the world's sample of SNe Ia to derive the best current constraints on dark energy. Of our new SNe Ia, 10 are beyond redshift z = 1, thereby nearly doubling the statistical weight of HST-discovered SNe Ia beyond this redshift. Our detailed analysis corrects for the recently identified correlation between SN Ia luminosity and host galaxy mass and corrects the NICMOS zero point at the count rates appropriate for very distant SNe Ia. Adding these SNe improves the best combined constraint on dark-energy density, {rho}{sub DE}(z), at redshifts 1.0 < z < 1.6 by 18% (including systematic errors). For a flat {Lambda}CDM universe, we find {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.729 {+-} 0.014 (68% confidence level (CL) including systematic errors). For a flat wCDM model, we measure a constant dark-energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.013{sup +0.068}{sub -0.073} (68% CL). Curvature is constrained to {approx}0.7% in the owCDM model and to {approx}2% in a model in which dark energy is allowed to vary with parameters w{sub 0} and w{sub a} . Further tightening the constraints on the time evolution of dark energy will require several improvements, including high-quality multi-passband photometry of a sample of several dozen z > 1 SNe Ia. We describe how such a sample could be efficiently obtained by targeting cluster fields with WFC3 on board HST. The updated supernova Union2.1 compilation of 580 SNe is available at http://supernova.lbl.gov/Union.

  14. The Fascinating High-Energy World of Neutron Stars and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2006-06-01

    The past few years have witnessed a fast growth in the high-energy astrophysics community in Canada, thanks to new opportunities including the University Faculty Award (UFA) program introduced by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) to appoint promising female researchers to faculty positions in science and engineering. As a UFA fellow at the University of Manitoba, I have had the unique opportunity to contribute to the launch of a new astronomy program in the department of Physics (renamed to Physics and Astronomy). My research focuses on observational studies of neutron stars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. The study of these exotic objects helps address the physics of the extreme and probe some of the most energetic events in the Universe. I will highlight exciting discoveries in this field and some of the questions to be addressed with current and future high-energy missions.

  15. CEBAF Energy Recovery Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir; Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir; Beard, Kevin; Bengtsson, Johan; Butler, Corey; Chao, Yu-Chiu; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; Dong, Hai; Douglas, David; Freyberger, Arne; Guerra, Al; Hicks, William; Hofler, Alicia; Hovater, J.; Hutton, Andrew; Lauze, Ronald; Merminga, Nikolitsa; Plawski, Tomasz; Roblin, Yves; Spata, Michael; Tennant, Christopher; Tiefenback, Michael; Bernard, A.; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-05-01

    A successful GeV scale energy recovery demonstration with high ratio of accelerated-to-recovered energies (50:1) was recently carried out on the CEBAF recirculating linear accelerator. Future high energy (multi-GeV), high current (hundreds of milli-Amperes) beams would require gigaWatt-class RF systems in conventional linacs - a prohibitively expensive proposition. However, invoking energy recovery [1] alleviates extreme RF power demands; required RF power becomes nearly independent of beam current, which improves linac efficiency and increases cost effectiveness. Furthermore, energy recovering linacs promise efficiencies of storage rings, while maintaining beam quality of linacs: superior emittance and energy spread and short bunches (sub-pico sec.). Finally, energy recovery alleviates shielding, if the beam is dumped below the neutron production threshold. Jefferson Lab has demonstrated its expertise in the field of Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) with the successful operation of the

  16. Unbiased Estimate of Dark Energy Density from Type Ia Supernova Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2001-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are currently the best probes of the dark energy in the universe. To constrain the nature of dark energy, we assume a flat universe and that the weak energy condition is satisfied, and we allow the density of dark energy, ρX(z), to be an arbitrary function of redshift. Using simulated data from a space-based SN pencil-beam survey, we find that by optimizing the number of parameters used to parameterize the dimensionless dark energy density, f(z)=ρX(z)/ρX(z=0), we can obtain an unbiased estimate of both f(z) and the fractional matter density of the universe, Ωm. A plausible SN pencil-beam survey (with a square degree field of view and for an observational duration of 1 yr) can yield about 2000 SNe Ia with 0<=z<=2. Such a survey in space would yield SN peak luminosities with a combined intrinsic and observational dispersion of σ(mint)=0.16 mag. We find that for such an idealized survey, Ωm can be measured to 10% accuracy, and the dark energy density can be estimated to ~20% to z~1.5, and ~20%-40% to z~2, depending on the time dependence of the true dark energy density. Dark energy densities that vary more slowly can be more accurately measured. For the anticipated Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission, Ωm can be measured to 14% accuracy, and the dark energy density can be estimated to ~20% to z~1.2. Our results suggest that SNAP may gain much sensitivity to the time dependence of the dark energy density and Ωm by devoting more observational time to the central pencil-beam fields to obtain more SNe Ia at z>1.2. We use both a maximum likelihood analysis and a Monte Carlo analysis (when appropriate) to determine the errors of estimated parameters. We find that the Monte Carlo analysis gives a more accurate estimate of the dark energy density than the maximum likelihood analysis.

  17. Numerical simulatin of supernova-relevant laser-driven hydro experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Leibrandt, D; Robey, H F; Edwards, M J; Braun, D G; Miles, A R; Drake, R P

    2004-02-10

    In ongoing experiments performed on the OMEGA laser [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2108 (1996)] at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), nanosecond laser pulses are used to drive strong blast waves into two-layer targets. Perturbations on the interface between the two materials are unstable to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability as a result of shock transit and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability during the deceleration-phase behind the shock front. These experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. The authors are, at present, particularly interested in the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability through the late nonlinear stage, the transition to turbulence, and the subsequent transport of material within the turbulent region. In this paper, the results of numerical simulations of 2D single and multimode experiments are presented. These simulations are run using the 2D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) radiation hydrodynamics code CALE [R. T. Barton, Numerical Astrophysics (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985)]. The simulation results are shown to compare well with experimental radiography. A buoyancy-drag model captures the behavior of the single-mode interface, but gives only partial agreement in the multi-mode cases. The Richtmyer-Meshkov and target decompression contributions to the perturbation growth are both estimated and shown to be significant. Significant dependence of the simulation results on the material equation of state (EOS) is demonstrated, and the prospect of continuing the experiments to conclusively demonstrate the transition to turbulence is discussed.

  18. Superluminous Supernovae hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, M.

    2017-07-01

    We use our radiation hydrodynamic code in order to simulate magnetar powered Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe). It is assumed that a central rapidly rotating magnetar deposits all its rotational energy into the ejecta where is added to the usual power. The magnetar luminosity and spin-down timescale are adopted as the free parameters of the model. For the case of ASASSN-15lh, which has been claimed as the most luminous supernova ever discovered, we have found physically plausible magnetar parameters can reproduce the overall shape of the bolometric light curve (LC) provided the progenitor mass is ≍ 8M⊙. The ejecta dynamics of this event shows signs of the magnetar energy input which deviates the expansion from the usually assumed homologous behaviour. Our numerical experiments lead us to conclude that the hydrodynamical modeling is necessary in order to derive the properties of powerful magnetars driving SLSNe.

  19. ENERGY DEPENDENCE OF SYNCHROTRON X-RAY RIMS IN TYCHO’S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-10-20

    Several young supernova remnants (SNRs) exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's SNR in five energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths ∼1%–5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths ∼50–400 μG assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are ∼1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields ≳20 μG, affirming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  20. Very-high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Type Ia Supernova SN 2014J with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Arcaro, C.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.

    2017-06-01

    Context. In this work we present data from observations with the MAGIC telescopes of SN 2014J detected on January 21 2014, the closest Type Ia supernova since Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes started to operate. Aims: We aim to probe the possibility of very-high-energy (VHE; E ≥ 100 GeV) gamma rays produced in the early stages of Type Ia supernova explosions. Methods: We performed follow-up observations after this supernova (SN) explosion for five days, between January 27 and February 2 2014. We searched for gamma-ray signals in the energy range between 100 GeV and several TeV from the location of SN 2014J using data from a total of 5.5 h of observations. Prospects for observing gamma rays of hadronic origin from SN 2014J in the near future are also being addressed. Results: No significant excess was detected from the direction of SN 2014J. Upper limits at 95% confidence level on the integral flux, assuming a power-law spectrum, dF/dE ∝ E- Γ, with a spectral index of Γ = 2.6, for energies higher than 300 GeV and 700 GeV, are established at 1.3 × 10-12 and 4.1 × 10-13 photons cm-2 s-1, respectively. Conclusions: For the first time, upper limits on the VHE emission of a Type Ia supernova are established. The energy fraction isotropically emitted into TeV gamma rays during the first 10 days after the supernova explosion for energies greater than 300 GeV is limited to 10-6 of the total available energy budget ( 1051 erg). Within the assumed theoretical scenario, the MAGIC upper limits on the VHE emission suggest that SN 2014J will not be detectable in the future by any current or planned generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes.

  1. Experimenting with Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the author has had the opportunity to study the subject of solar energy and to get involved with the installation, operation, and testing of solar energy systems. His work has taken him all over the United States and put him in contact with solar experts from around the world. He has also had the good fortune of seeing some…

  2. Experimenting with Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the author has had the opportunity to study the subject of solar energy and to get involved with the installation, operation, and testing of solar energy systems. His work has taken him all over the United States and put him in contact with solar experts from around the world. He has also had the good fortune of seeing some…

  3. Observation of new trans-Neptunian Objects in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Ross; Zhang, Zhilu; Gerdes, David W.; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a five-year optical imaging survey intended to measure the growth of structure and expansion history of the universe over a wide span of cosmic time. As part of this effort, the survey images ten separate 3 sq. deg. fields approximately weekly to search for Type Ia supernovae. These fields generate a rich time series of data that can be used to search for other interesting objects, such as moving transients. Among these are trans-Neptunian objects, including classical Kuiper Belt objects as well as scattered and detached disk objects. We have searched the data collected during DES's two and a half seasons for such objects. Our analysis revealed sixteen previously unknown outer solar system objects, including one Neptune trojan, several objects in mean motion resonances with Neptune, and a distant scattered disk object whose 1200-year orbital period is among the 50 longest known.

  4. PREFACE: 5th Symposium on Large TPCs for Low Energy Rare Event Detection and Workshop on Neutrinos from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irastorza, Igor G.; Scholberg, Kate; Colas, Paul; Giomataris, Ioannis

    2011-08-01

    The Fifth International Symposium on large TPCs for low-energy rare-event detection was held at the auditorium of the Astroparticle and Cosmology (APC) Laboratory in Paris, on 14-17 December 2010. As for all previous meetings, always held in Paris in 2008, 2006, 2004 and 2002, it brought together a significant community of physicists involved in rare event searches and/or development of time projection chambers (TPCs). As a novelty this year, the meeting was extended with two half-day sessions on Supernova physics. These proceedings also include the contributions corresponding to the supernova sessions. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss the status of current experiments or projects involving the use of TPCs to search for rare events, like low-energy neutrinos, double beta decay, dark matter or axion experiments, as well as to discuss new results and ideas in the framework of the last developments of Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD), and how these are being - or could be - applied to these searches. As in previous meetings in this series, the format included an informal program with some recent highlighted results, rather than exhaustive reviews, with time for discussion and interaction. The symposium, the fifth of the series, is becoming consolidated as a regular meeting place for the synergic interplay between the fields of rare events and TPC development. The meeting started with a moving tribute by Ioannis Giomataris to the memory of George Charpak, who recently passed away. We then moved on to the usual topics like the status of some low-energy neutrino physics and double beta decay experiments, dark matter experiments with directional detectors, axion searches, or development results. A relevant subject this time was the electroluminescence in Xe TPCs, covered by several speakers. Every time the conference program is enriched with original slightly off-topic contributions that trigger the curiosity and stimulate further thought. As

  5. Farthest Supernova Bolsters Proof for a Mysterious Form of Energy Pervading the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    Computerized animations show the following: (1) the acceleration and deceleration of the universe; (2) an image subtraction of the 1995 and 1997 images of the Hubble Deep Field to reveal a supernova in the 1997 image; (3) a pie-chart of the mass composition of the universe; (4) the universe's expansion after the Big Bang; (5) a supernova detonating; and (6) the lightbulb test (to determine distance by comparing light intensity). Zoom shots show the Hubble Deep Field (from ground-based observations to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image) and the Hubble Deep Field with a supernova (from an artist's conception animation to a ground-based view). Dr. Ron Gilliland explains that he looked for a supernova in the Hubble Deep Field and how supernova are useful as standard candles. Dr. Adam Riess describes how astronomers used supernovae to discover that the universe is expanding and why it might be expanding.

  6. An Experiment on Wind Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; Fiordilino, Emilio; Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Aglieco, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    We discuss an experiment on wind energy performed with home-made apparatus. The experiment reproduces a laboratory windmill, which can pump water from a lower level to a higher one. By measuring the gain of the gravitational potential energy of the pumped water, one can determine the power extracted from the wind. The activity was carried out with…

  7. An Experiment on Wind Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; Fiordilino, Emilio; Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Aglieco, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    We discuss an experiment on wind energy performed with home-made apparatus. The experiment reproduces a laboratory windmill, which can pump water from a lower level to a higher one. By measuring the gain of the gravitational potential energy of the pumped water, one can determine the power extracted from the wind. The activity was carried out with…

  8. Energy Experiments for STEM Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanchi, John

    2011-03-01

    Texas Christian University (TCU) is developing an undergraduate program that prepares students to become engineers with an emphasis in energy systems. One of the courses in the program is a technical overview of traditional energy (coal, oil and gas), nuclear energy, and renewable energy that requires as a pre-requisite two semesters of calculus-based physics. Energy experiments are being developed that will facilitate student involvement and provide hands-on learning opportunities. Students participating in the course will improve their understanding of energy systems; be introduced to outstanding scientific and engineering problems; learn about the role of energy in a global and societal context; and evaluate contemporary issues associated with energy. This talk will present the status of experiments being developed for the technical energy survey course.

  9. Kinetic Energy from Supernova Feedback in High-resolution Galaxy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Bryan, Greg L.; Hummels, Cameron; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a new method for adding a prescribed amount of kinetic energy to simulated gas modeled on a cartesian grid by directly altering grid cells’ mass and velocity in a distributed fashion. The method is explored in the context of supernova (SN) feedback in high-resolution (˜10 pc) hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation. Resolution dependence is a primary consideration in our application of the method, and simulations of isolated explosions (performed at different resolutions) motivate a resolution-dependent scaling for the injected fraction of kinetic energy that we apply in cosmological simulations of a 109 M⊙ dwarf halo. We find that in high-density media (≳50 cm-3) with coarse resolution (≳4 pc per cell), results are sensitive to the initial kinetic energy fraction due to early and rapid cooling. In our galaxy simulations, the deposition of small amounts of SN energy in kinetic form (as little as 1%) has a dramatic impact on the evolution of the system, resulting in an order-of-magnitude suppression of stellar mass. The overall behavior of the galaxy in the two highest resolution simulations we perform appears to converge. We discuss the resulting distribution of stellar metallicities, an observable sensitive to galactic wind properties, and find that while the new method demonstrates increased agreement with observed systems, significant discrepancies remain, likely due to simplistic assumptions that neglect contributions from SNe Ia and stellar winds.

  10. KINETIC ENERGY FROM SUPERNOVA FEEDBACK IN HIGH-RESOLUTION GALAXY SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Christine M.; Bryan, Greg L.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Hummels, Cameron

    2015-08-10

    We describe a new method for adding a prescribed amount of kinetic energy to simulated gas modeled on a cartesian grid by directly altering grid cells’ mass and velocity in a distributed fashion. The method is explored in the context of supernova (SN) feedback in high-resolution (∼10 pc) hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation. Resolution dependence is a primary consideration in our application of the method, and simulations of isolated explosions (performed at different resolutions) motivate a resolution-dependent scaling for the injected fraction of kinetic energy that we apply in cosmological simulations of a 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙} dwarf halo. We find that in high-density media (≳50 cm{sup −3}) with coarse resolution (≳4 pc per cell), results are sensitive to the initial kinetic energy fraction due to early and rapid cooling. In our galaxy simulations, the deposition of small amounts of SN energy in kinetic form (as little as 1%) has a dramatic impact on the evolution of the system, resulting in an order-of-magnitude suppression of stellar mass. The overall behavior of the galaxy in the two highest resolution simulations we perform appears to converge. We discuss the resulting distribution of stellar metallicities, an observable sensitive to galactic wind properties, and find that while the new method demonstrates increased agreement with observed systems, significant discrepancies remain, likely due to simplistic assumptions that neglect contributions from SNe Ia and stellar winds.

  11. DES13S2cmm: the first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, A.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; Gupta, R. R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Spinka, H.; Bernstein, J. P.

    2015-05-11

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 +/- 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (Type I). Using this redshift, we find M-U(peak) = -21.05(-0.09)(+0.10) for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (subsolar), low stellar-mass host galaxy (log (M/M-circle dot) = 9.3 +/- 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to 14 similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find that it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 d rest-frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2-0.3 mag between +25 and +30 d after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for 'standardizing' such supernovae, as is done with the more common Type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I-the radioactive decay of Ni-56, and a magnetar - and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 d in the rest frame of the supernova.

  12. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, A.; Plazas, A. A.; D"Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; Foley, R. J.; Goldstein, D.; Gupta, R. R.; Kessler, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Lidman, C.; March, M.; Nugent, P. E.; Sako, M.; Smith, R. C.; Spinka, H.; Wester, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Carnero, A.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Roe, N. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, L. D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 ± 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MpeakU = –21.05+0.10–0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass host galaxy (log(M/M⊙) = 9.3 ± 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2–0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for ‘standardising’ such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I – the radioactive decay of ⁵⁶Ni, and a magnetar – and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.

  13. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Papadopoulos, A.; Plazas, A. A.; D"Andrea, C. B.; ...

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 ± 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MpeakU = –21.05+0.10–0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass hostmore » galaxy (log(M/M⊙) = 9.3 ± 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2–0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for ‘standardising’ such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I – the radioactive decay of ⁵⁶Ni, and a magnetar – and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.« less

  14. New Trans-Neptunian Objects in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, David W.

    2015-05-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) observes ten separate 3 sq. deg. fields approximately weekly for six months each year. Although intended primarily to detect Type Ia supernovae, this data set provides a rich time series that is well suited for the detection of objects in the outer solar system, which move slowly enough that they can remain in the same field of view for weeks, months, or even across multiple DES observing seasons. Because the supernova fields have ecliptic latitudes ranging from -15 to -45 degrees, DES is particularly sensitive to the dynamically hot population of Kuiper Belt objects, as well as detached/inner Oort cloud objects. Here I report the results of a search for new trans-Neptunian objects in the first two seasons of DES data, to limiting magnitudes of r~23.8 in the eight shallow fields and ~24.5 in the two deep fields. The 22 objects discovered to date include two new Neptune trojans, a number of objects in mean motion resonances with Neptune, two objects with orbital inclinations above 45 degrees, a Uranian resonator, and several distant scattered disk objects including one with an orbital period of nearly 6000 years. This latter object is among the half-dozen longest-period trans-Neptunian objects known, and like the other such objects has an argument of perihelion near zero degrees. I will discuss the properties and orbital dynamics of objects discovered to date, and will also discuss prospects for extending the search to the full 5000 sq. deg. DES wide survey.

  15. HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO AND GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Gao, Shan; Meszaros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2013-05-20

    Trans-relativistic shocks that accompany some supernovae (SNe) produce X-ray burst emissions as they break out in the dense circumstellar medium around the progenitors. This phenomenon is sometimes associated with peculiar low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (LL GRBs). Here, we investigate the high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray counterparts of such a class of SNe. Just beyond the shock breakout radius, particle acceleration in the collisionless shock starts to operate in the presence of breakout photons. We show that protons may be accelerated to sufficiently high energies and produce high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays via the photomeson interaction. These neutrinos and gamma rays may be detectable from {approx}< 10 Mpc away by IceCube/KM3Net as multi-TeV transients almost simultaneously with the X-ray breakout, and even from {approx}< 100 Mpc away with follow-up observations by the Cherenkov Telescope Array using a wide-field sky monitor like Swift as a trigger. A statistical technique using a stacking approach could also be possible for the detection, with the aid of the SN optical/infrared counterparts. Such multi-messenger observations offer the possibility to probe the transition of trans-relativistic shocks from radiation-mediated to collisionless ones, and would also constrain the mechanisms of particle acceleration and emission in LL GRBs.

  16. A single low-energy, iron-poor supernova as the source of metals in the star SMSS J031300.36-670839.3.

    PubMed

    Keller, S C; Bessell, M S; Frebel, A; Casey, A R; Asplund, M; Jacobson, H R; Lind, K; Norris, J E; Yong, D; Heger, A; Magic, Z; Da Costa, G S; Schmidt, B P; Tisserand, P

    2014-02-27

    The element abundance ratios of four low-mass stars with extremely low metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium) indicate that the gas out of which the stars formed was enriched in each case by at most a few--and potentially only one--low-energy supernova. Such supernovae yield large quantities of light elements such as carbon but very little iron. The dominance of low-energy supernovae seems surprising, because it had been expected that the first stars were extremely massive, and that they disintegrated in pair-instability explosions that would rapidly enrich galaxies in iron. What has remained unclear is the yield of iron from the first supernovae, because hitherto no star has been unambiguously interpreted as encapsulating the yield of a single supernova. Here we report the optical spectrum of SMSS J031300.36-670839.3, which shows no evidence of iron (with an upper limit of 10(-7.1) times solar abundance). Based on a comparison of its abundance pattern with those of models, we conclude that the star was seeded with material from a single supernova with an original mass about 60 times that of the Sun (and that the supernova left behind a black hole). Taken together with the four previously mentioned low-metallicity stars, we conclude that low-energy supernovae were common in the early Universe, and that such supernovae yielded light-element enrichment with insignificant iron. Reduced stellar feedback both chemically and mechanically from low-energy supernovae would have enabled first-generation stars to form over an extended period. We speculate that such stars may perhaps have had an important role in the epoch of cosmic reionization and the chemical evolution of early galaxies.

  17. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for

  18. Very high energy gamma-ray emission from Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxon, Dana Boltuch

    Supernova remnant (SNR) G120.1+1.4 (also known as Tycho's SNR) is the remnant of one of only five confirmed historical supernovae. As such, it has been well studied across the electromagnetic spectrum. This thesis describes the first statistically significant detection of very high energy (VHE) (˜ 100 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays from Tycho's SNR, reported in 2011 by the VERITAS collaboration. The analysis that led to that detection was performed by this author, and this dissertation will discuss the process in detail. Subsequently, a statistically significant detection in high energy (HE) (˜ 30 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma rays was reported by other authors using data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Comparison of models to the spectral energy distribution of the photon flux from this remnant in HE and VHE gamma rays favors a hadronic origin for the emission, particularly when combined with current X-ray data, although a leptonic origin cannot be ruled out at this time. This is significant because a confirmed hadronic origin for the gamma-ray emission would identify this SNR as a site of cosmic ray acceleration, providing observational evidence for the idea that SNRs are the source of the Galactic cosmic ray population. Chapter 1 of this dissertation will provide historical background on Tycho's SNR, along with a summary of modern observations of the remnant across the electromagnetic spectrum. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the role played by SNRs in the process of cosmic ray acceleration, including both theoretical underpinnings and observational evidence. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the field of VHE gamma-ray astronomy, with discussions of gamma-ray production mechanisms and gamma-ray source classes. Chapter 4 describes the instruments used to observe HE and VHE gamma rays. Chapter 5 is a discussion of general analysis methods and techniques for data from Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). Chapter 6 provides details about the specific

  19. Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae -- Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Filippenko, Alexei Vladimir

    2014-05-09

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; exploding white-dwarf stars) were the key to the Nobel-worthy 1998 discovery and subsequent verification that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, driven by the effects of dark energy. Understanding the nature of this mysterious, yet dominant, component of the Universe is at the forefront of research in cosmology and fundamental physics. SNe Ia will continue to play a leading role in this enterprise, providing precise cosmological distances that improve constraints on the nature of dark energy. However, for this effort to succeed, we need to more thoroughly understand relatively nearby SNe Ia, because our conclusions come only from comparisons between them and distant (high-redshift) SNe Ia. Thus, detailed studies of relatively nearby SNe Ia are the focus of this research program. Many interesting results were obtained during the course of this project; these were published in 32 refereed research papers that acknowledged the grant. A major accomplishment was the publication of supernova (SN) rates derived from about a decade of operation of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) with the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT). We have determined the most accurate rates for SNe of different types in large, nearby galaxies in the present-day Universe, and these can be compared with SN rates far away (and hence long ago in the past) to set constraints on the types of stars that explode. Another major accomplishment was the publication of the light curves (brightness vs. time) of 165 SNe Ia, along with optical spectroscopy of many of these SNe as well as other SNe Ia, providing an extensive, homogeneous database for detailed studies. We have conducted intensive investigations of a number of individual SNe Ia, including quite unusual examples that allow us to probe the entire range of SN explosions and provide unique insights into these objects and the stars before they explode. My team's studies have also led

  20. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  1. Point-source and diffuse high-energy neutrino emission from Type IIn supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, M.; Coenders, S.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Kamble, A.; Sironi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Type IIn supernovae (SNe), a rare subclass of core collapse SNe, explode in dense circumstellar media that have been modified by the SNe progenitors at their last evolutionary stages. The interaction of the freely expanding SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium gives rise to a shock wave propagating in the dense SN environment, which may accelerate protons to multi-PeV energies. Inelastic proton-proton collisions between the shock-accelerated protons and those of the circumstellar medium lead to multimessenger signatures. Here, we evaluate the possible neutrino signal of Type IIn SNe and compare with IceCube observations. We employ a Monte Carlo method for the calculation of the diffuse neutrino emission from the SN IIn class to account for the spread in their properties. The cumulative neutrino emission is found to be ∼10 per cent of the observed IceCube neutrino flux above 60 TeV. Type IIn SNe would be the dominant component of the diffuse astrophysical flux, only if 4 per cent of all core collapse SNe were of this type and 20-30 per cent of the shock energy was channeled to accelerated protons. Lower values of the acceleration efficiency are accessible by the observation of a single Type IIn SN as a neutrino point source with IceCube using up-going muon neutrinos. Such an identification is possible in the first year following the SN shock breakout for sources within 20 Mpc.

  2. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  3. On the diversity of compact objects within supernova remnants - II. Energy-loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2017-02-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are commonly attributed to the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This emission mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori, typically causing a discrepancy between the characteristic age and the associated supernova remnant (SNR) age. We focus on neutron stars with `anomalous' magnetic fields that have established SNR associations and known ages. Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are usually described in terms of the magnetar model that posits a large magnetic field established by dynamo action. The high magnetic field pulsars (HBPs) have extremely large magnetic fields just above quantum electrodynamics scale (but below that of the AXPs and SGRs), and central compact objects (CCOs) may have buried fields that will emerge in the future as nascent magnetars. In the first part of this series, we examined magnetic field growth as a method of uniting the CCOs with HBPs and X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) through evolution. In this work, we constrain the characteristic age of these neutron stars using the related SNR age for a variety of energy-loss mechanisms and allowing for arbitrary initial spin periods. In addition to the SNR age, we also use the observed braking indices and X-ray luminosities to constrain the models.

  4. A high-energy catalogue of Galactic supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar; Ferrand, Gilles; Matheson, Heather

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by the wealth of past, existing, and upcoming X-ray and gamma-ray missions, we have developed the first public database of high-energy observations of all known Galactic Supernova Remnants (SNRs): http://www.physics.umanitoba.ca/snr/SNRcat The catalogue links to, and complements, other existing related catalogues, including Dave Green's radio SNRs catalogue. We here highlight the features of the high-energy catalogue, including allowing users to filter or sort data for various purposes. The catalogue is currently targeted to Galactic SNR observations with X-ray and gamma-ray missions, and is timely with the upcoming launch of X-ray missions (including Astro-H in 2014). We are currently developing the existing database to include an up-to-date Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe)-dedicated webpage, with the goal to provide a global view of PWNe and their associated neutron stars/pulsars. This extensive database will be useful to both theorists to apply their models or design numerical simulations, and to observers to plan future observations or design new instruments. We welcome input and feedback from the SNR/PWN/neutron stars community.

  5. Supernovae neutrino pasta interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zidu; Horowitz, Charles; Caplan, Matthew; Berry, Donald; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, the neutron rich matter is believed to have complex structures, such as spherical, slablike, and rodlike shapes. They are collectively called ``nuclear pasta''. Supernovae neutrinos may scatter coherently on the ``nuclear pasta'' since the wavelength of the supernovae neutrinos are comparable to the nuclear pasta scale. Consequently, the neutrino pasta scattering is important to understand the neutrino opacity in the supernovae. In this work we simulated the ``nuclear pasta'' at different temperatures and densities using our semi-classical molecular dynamics and calculated the corresponding static structure factor that describes ν-pasta scattering. We found the neutrino opacities are greatly modified when the ``pasta'' exist and may have influence on the supernovae neutrino flux and average energy. Our neutrino-pasta scattering effect can finally be involved in the current supernovae simulations and we present preliminary proto neutron star cooling simulations including our pasta opacities.

  6. Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, J. Anthony

    2013-08-26

    Next generation “Stage IV” dark energy experiments under design during this grant, and now under construction, will enable the determination of the properties of dark energy and dark matter to unprecedented precision using multiple complementary probes. The most pressing challenge in these experiments is the characterization and understanding of the systematic errors present within any given experimental configuration and the resulting impact on the accuracy of our constraints on dark energy physics. The DETF and the P5 panel in their reports recommended “Expanded support for ancillary measurements required for the long-term program and for projects that will improve our understanding and reduction of the dominant systematic measurement errors.” Looking forward to the next generation Stage IV experiments we have developed a program to address the most important potential systematic errors within these experiments. Using data from current facilities it has been feasible and timely to undertake a detailed investigation of the systematic errors. In this DOE grant we studied of the source and impact of the dominant systematic effects in dark energy measurements, and developed new analysis tools and techniques to minimize their impact. Progress under this grant is briefly reviewed in this technical report. This work was a necessary precursor to the coming generations of wide-deep probes of the nature of dark energy and dark matter. The research has already had an impact on improving the efficiencies of all Stage III and IV dark energy experiments.

  7. NON-EQUIPARTITION OF ENERGY, MASSES OF NOVA EJECTA, AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Yaron, Ofer; Prialnik, Dina; Kovetz, Attay

    2010-04-01

    The total masses ejected during classical nova (CN) eruptions are needed to answer two questions with broad astrophysical implications: can accreting white dwarfs be 'pushed over' the Chandrasekhar mass limit to yield type Ia supernovae? Are ultra-luminous red variables a new kind of astrophysical phenomenon, or merely extreme classical novae? We review the methods used to determine nova ejecta masses. Except for the unique case of BT Mon (nova 1939), all nova ejecta mass determinations depend on untested assumptions and multi-parameter modeling. The remarkably simple assumption of equipartition between kinetic and radiated energy (E {sub kin} and E {sub rad}, respectively) in nova ejecta has been invoked as a way around this conundrum for the ultra-luminous red variable in M31. The deduced mass is far larger than that produced by any CN model. Our nova eruption simulations show that radiation and kinetic energy in nova ejecta are very far from being in energy equipartition, with variations of 4 orders of magnitude in the ratio E {sub kin}/E {sub rad} being commonplace. The assumption of equipartition must not be used to deduce nova ejecta masses; any such 'determinations' can be overestimates by a factor of up to 10,000. We data-mined our extensive series of nova simulations to search for correlations that could yield nova ejecta masses. Remarkably, the mass ejected during a nova eruption is dependent only on (and is directly proportional to) E {sub rad}. If we measure the distance to an erupting nova and its bolometric light curve, then E {sub rad} and hence the mass ejected can be directly measured.

  8. Evolution of High-energy Particle Distribution in Mature Shell-type Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Xin, Yuliang; Liu, Siming; Jokipii, J. R.; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuinai

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wavelength observations of mature supernova remnants (SNRs), especially with recent advances in γ-ray astronomy, make it possible to constrain energy distribution of energetic particles within these remnants. In consideration of the SNR origin of Galactic cosmic rays and physics related to particle acceleration and radiative processes, we use a simple one-zone model to fit the nonthermal emission spectra of three shell-type SNRs located within 2° on the sky: RX J1713.7-3946, CTB 37B, and CTB 37A. Although radio images of these three sources all show a shell (or half-shell) structure, their radio, X-ray, and γ-ray spectra are quite different, offering an ideal case to explore evolution of energetic particle distribution in SNRs. Our spectral fitting shows that (1) the particle distribution becomes harder with aging of these SNRs, implying a continuous acceleration process, and the particle distributions of CTB 37A and CTB 37B in the GeV range are harder than the hardest distribution that can be produced at a shock via the linear diffusive shock particle acceleration process, so spatial transport may play a role; (2) the energy loss timescale of electrons at the high-energy cutoff due to synchrotron radiation appears to be always a bit (within a factor of a few) shorter than the age of the corresponding remnant, which also requires continuous particle acceleration; (3) double power-law distributions are needed to fit the spectra of CTB 37B and CTB 37A, which may be attributed to shock interaction with molecular clouds.

  9. Image of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This x-ray photograph of the Supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 2/Einstein Observatory, shows that the regions with fast moving knots of material in the expanding shell are bright and clear. A faint x-ray halo, just outside the bright shell, is interpreted as a shock wave moving ahead of the expanding debris. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  10. Image of the Supernova Cassiopeia Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This supernova in the constellation Cassiopeia was observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572. In this x-ray image from the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-2/Einstein Observatory produced by nearly a day of exposure time, the center region appears filled with emissions that can be resolved into patches or knots of material. However, no central pulsar or other collapsed object can be seen. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  11. Image of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This x-ray photograph of the Supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 2/Einstein Observatory, shows that the regions with fast moving knots of material in the expanding shell are bright and clear. A faint x-ray halo, just outside the bright shell, is interpreted as a shock wave moving ahead of the expanding debris. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  12. New trans-Neptunian Objects in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, David; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) observes ten separate 3 sq. deg. fields approximately weekly for six months each year. Although intended primarily to detect Type Ia supernovae, this data set provides a rich time series that is well suited for the detection of objects in the outer solar system, which move slowly enough that they can remain in the same field of view for weeks, months, or even across multiple DES observing seasons. With ecliptic latitudes ranging from -15 to -45 degrees, DES is particularly sensitive to the dynamically hot population of Kuiper Belt object, as well as detached/inner Oort cloud objects. Here I report the results of a search for new trans-Neptunian objects in the first two seasons of DES data. The objects discovered to date include a new Neptune trojan, a number of objects in mean motion resonances with Neptune, an object with an orbital inclination of 48 degrees, and several distant scattered disk objects including one with an orbital period of nearly 1200 years. I will also discuss prospects for extending the search to the full 5000 sq. deg. DES wide survey.

  13. Supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation constraints on (new) polynomial dark energy parametrizations: current results and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendra, Irene; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2012-05-01

    In this work we introduce two new polynomial parametrizations of dark energy and explore their correlation properties. The parameters to fit are the equation-of-state values at z= 0 and z= 0.5, which have naturally low correlation and have already been shown to improve the popular Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parametrization. We test our models with low-redshift astronomical probes: type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), in the form of both current and synthetic data. Specifically, we present simulations of measurements of the radial and transversal BAO scales similar to those expected in a BAO high-precision spectroscopic redshift survey such as EUCLID. According to the Bayesian deviance information criterion (DIC), which penalizes large errors and correlations, we show that our models perform better than the CPL reparametrization proposed by Wang (in terms of z= 0 and z= 0.5). This is due to the combination of lower correlation and smaller relative errors. The same holds for a frequentist perspective: the figure-of-merit is larger for our parametrizations.

  14. A Study of Quasar Selection in the Supernova Fields of the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, S. S.; Martini, P.; Mudd, D.; Ostrovski, F.; Reed, S. L.; Lidman, C.; Kochanek, C.; Davis, T. M.; Sharp, R.; Uddin, S.; King, A.; Wester, W.; Tucker, B. E.; Tucker, D. L.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carollo, D.; Childress, M.; Glazebrook, K.; Hinton, S. R.; Lewis, G.; Macaulay, E.; O'Neill, C. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We present a study of quasar selection using the supernova fields of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. In all cases, we considered only objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. We examine color selection methods based on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mid-IR W1-W2 color, a mixture of WISE and DES colors (g - i and i-W1), and a mixture of Vista Hemisphere Survey and DES colors (g - i and i - K). For probabilistic quasar selection, we used XDQSO, an algorithm that employs an empirical multi-wavelength flux model of quasars to assign quasar probabilities. Our variability selection uses the multi-band χ 2-probability that sources are constant in the DES Year 1 griz-band light curves. The completeness and efficiency are calculated relative to an underlying sample of point sources that are detected in the required selection bands and pass our data quality and photometric error cuts. We conduct our analyses at two magnitude limits, i < 19.8 mag and i < 22 mag. For the subset of sources with W1 and W2 detections, the W1-W2 color or XDQSOz method combined with variability gives the highest completenesses of >85% for both i-band magnitude limits and efficiencies of >80% to the bright limit and >60% to the faint limit; however, the giW1 and giW1+variability methods give the highest quasar surface densities. The XDQSOz method and combinations of W1W2/giW1/XDQSOz with variability are among the better selection methods when both high completeness and high efficiency are desired. We also present the OzDES Quasar Catalog of 1263 spectroscopically confirmed quasars from three years of OzDES observation in the 30 deg2 of the DES supernova fields. The catalog includes quasars with redshifts up

  15. Neutral Current {nu} Induced Reactions in Nuclei at Supernova Neutrino Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2011-11-23

    We calculate cross sections for the neutral current induced neutrino/antineutrino reaction from {sup 208}Pb target and applied it to study Supernova neutrino event rates. The calculations are done in local density approximation taking into account Pauli blocking, Fermi motion effects and renormalization of weak transition strengths in the nuclear medium. The numerical results for the neutrino nucleus total cross sections have been averaged over the various Supernova neutrino/antineutrino fluxes available in literature.

  16. H I ZEEMAN EXPERIMENTS OF SHOCKED ATOMIC GAS IN TWO SUPERNOVA REMNANTS INTERACTING WITH MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Heiles, Carl; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Troland, Tom

    2010-07-15

    We have carried out observations of Zeeman splitting of the H I 21 cm emission line from shocked atomic gas in the supernova remnants (SNRs) IC 443 and W51C using the Arecibo telescope. The observed shocked atomic gas is expanding at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} and this is the first Zeeman experiment of such fast-moving, shocked atomic gas. The emission lines, however, are very broad and the systematic error due to baseline curvature hampers an accurate measurement of field strengths. We derive an upper limit of 100-150 {mu}G on the strength of the line-of-sight field component. These two SNRs are interacting with molecular clouds, but the derived upper limits are considerably smaller than the field strengths expected from a strongly shocked dense cloud. We discuss the implications and conclude that either the magnetic field within the telescope beam is mostly randomly oriented or the high-velocity H I emission is from a shocked interclump medium of relatively low density.

  17. Maximum Energies of Shock-Accelerated Electrons in Young Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Keohane, Jonathan W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Young supernova remnants (SNRs) are often assumed to be the source of cosmic rays up to energies approaching the slight steepening in the cosmic ray spectrum at around 1000 TeV, known as the "knee." We show that the observed X-ray emission of 14 radio-bright shell remnants, including all five historical shells, can be used to put limits on E(sub max), the energy at which the electron energy distribution must steepen from its slope at radio-emitting energies. Most of the remnants show thermal spectra, so any synchrotron component must fall below the observed X-ray fluxes. We obtain upper limits on E(sub max) by considering the most rapid physically plausible cutoff in the relativistic electron distribution, an exponential, which is as sharp or sharper than found in any more elaborate models. This maximally curved model then gives us the highest possible E(sub max) consistent with not exceeding observed X-rays. Our results are thus independent of particular models for the electron spectrum in SNRs. Assuming homogeneous emitting volumes with a constant magnetic field strength of 10 uG, no object could reach 1000 TeV, and only one, Kes 73, has an upper limit on E(sub max), above 100 TeV. All the other remnants have limits at or below 80 TeV. E(sub max) is probably set by the finite remnant lifetime rather than by synchrotron losses for remnants younger than a few thousand years, so that an observed electron steepening should be accompanied by steepening at the same energy for protons. More complicated, inhomogeneous models could allow higher values of E(sub max) in parts of the remnant, but the emission-weighted average value, that characteristic of typical electrons, should obey these limits. The young remnants are not expected to improve much over their remaining lives at producing the highest energy Galactic cosmic rays; if they cannot, this picture of cosmic-ray origin may need major alteration.

  18. Maximum Energies of Shock-Accelerated Electrons in Young Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Keohane, Jonathan W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Young supernova remnants (SNRs) are often assumed to be the source of cosmic rays up to energies approaching the slight steepening in the cosmic ray spectrum at around 1000 TeV, known as the "knee." We show that the observed X-ray emission of 14 radio-bright shell remnants, including all five historical shells, can be used to put limits on E(sub max), the energy at which the electron energy distribution must steepen from its slope at radio-emitting energies. Most of the remnants show thermal spectra, so any synchrotron component must fall below the observed X-ray fluxes. We obtain upper limits on E(sub max) by considering the most rapid physically plausible cutoff in the relativistic electron distribution, an exponential, which is as sharp or sharper than found in any more elaborate models. This maximally curved model then gives us the highest possible E(sub max) consistent with not exceeding observed X-rays. Our results are thus independent of particular models for the electron spectrum in SNRs. Assuming homogeneous emitting volumes with a constant magnetic field strength of 10 uG, no object could reach 1000 TeV, and only one, Kes 73, has an upper limit on E(sub max), above 100 TeV. All the other remnants have limits at or below 80 TeV. E(sub max) is probably set by the finite remnant lifetime rather than by synchrotron losses for remnants younger than a few thousand years, so that an observed electron steepening should be accompanied by steepening at the same energy for protons. More complicated, inhomogeneous models could allow higher values of E(sub max) in parts of the remnant, but the emission-weighted average value, that characteristic of typical electrons, should obey these limits. The young remnants are not expected to improve much over their remaining lives at producing the highest energy Galactic cosmic rays; if they cannot, this picture of cosmic-ray origin may need major alteration.

  19. The energy and momentum input of supernova explosions in structured and ionized molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the early impact of single and binary supernova (SN) explosions on dense gas clouds with three-dimensional, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations. The effect of cloud structure, radiative cooling and ionizing radiation from the progenitor stars on the net input of kinetic energy, fkin = Ekin/ESN, thermal energy, ftherm = Etherm/ESN, and gas momentum, fP = P/PSN, to the interstellar medium (ISM) is tested. For clouds with bar{n} = 100cm^{-3}, the momentum generating Sedov and pressure-driven snowplough phases are terminated early (∝0.01 Myr) and radiative cooling limits the coupling to ftherm ˜ 0.01, fkin ˜ 0.05, and fP ˜ 9, significantly lower than for the case without cooling. For pre-ionized clouds, these numbers are only increased by ˜50 per cent, independent of the cloud structure. This only suffices to accelerate ˜5 per cent of the cloud to radial velocities ≳30 km s-1. A second SN might enhance the coupling efficiencies if delayed past the Sedov phase of the first explosion. Such very low coupling efficiencies cast doubts on many subresolution models for SN feedback, which are, in general, validated a posteriori. Ionizing radiation appears not to significantly enhance the coupling of SNe to the surrounding gas as it drives the ISM into inert dense shells and cold clumps, a process which is unresolved in galaxy-scale simulations. Our results indicate that the momentum input of SNe in ionized, structured clouds is larger (more than a factor of 10) than the corresponding momentum yield of the progenitor's stellar winds.

  20. Energy: Simple Experiments for Young Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry

    This book contains simple experiments through which students can learn about the properties of energy. These experiments include making a kitchen "volcano," a soda-pop "cannon," and a puffed-rice "scooter." Topics include: energy and work, fossil fuels, solar energy, kinetic energy, potential energy, mechanical energy, heat energy, sound energy,…

  1. Energy: Simple Experiments for Young Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry

    This book contains simple experiments through which students can learn about the properties of energy. These experiments include making a kitchen "volcano," a soda-pop "cannon," and a puffed-rice "scooter." Topics include: energy and work, fossil fuels, solar energy, kinetic energy, potential energy, mechanical energy, heat energy, sound energy,…

  2. Decontaminating Cosmology: Towards Measuring Dark Energy with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David; Riess, Adam G.; Scolnic, Daniel; Kessler, Richard; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert P.; Berger, Edo; Ortega, Carolyn; Foley, Ryan; Chornock, Ryan; Challis, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Pan-STARRS (PS1) Medium Deep Survey discovered over 5,000 likely supernovae (SNe) but obtained spectral classifications for just 10% of its SN candidates. We measured spectroscopic host galaxy redshifts for 2,979 of these likely SNe and estimate that ˜1,100 are Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) with light-curve quality sufficient for a cosmological analysis. We then use these data with simulations to determine the impact of core-collapse SN (CC SN) contamination on measurements of the dark energy equation of state, w. With the method of Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS), we can simultaneously determine distances to SNe Ia and the contaminating CC SN distribution as a function of redshift. We use light-curve based SN classification priors for BEAMS as well as a new classification method based on host galaxy spectra and the association of SN type with host type. From simulations of 1,000 PS1 SNe, we find that w is biased by just -0.005 due to CC SN contamination, 10% of its statistical uncertainty. By applying several independent SN classification methods and CC SN parameterizations, we estimate w can be measured with a systematic error of 0.014, 30% of the statistical uncertainty on w. We find that BEAMS determines the SALT2 color and shape coefficients, α and β, and the SNIa dispersion with ~1σ bias. We also draw Monte Carlo samples from real PS1 SNe without spectroscopic classifications and find measurements of w from these SNe are fully consistent with the PS1 spectroscopic sample. Finally, the abundance of bright CC SNe in our sample implies that the luminosity functions of Ia-like CC SNe may be ~1 mag brighter than expected from previous measurements.

  3. Low-energy Population III supernovae and the origin of extremely metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Heger, Alexander; Whalen, Daniel J.; Moriya, Takashi J.; Bromm, Volker; Woosley, S. E.

    2017-06-01

    Some ancient, dim, metal-poor stars may have formed in the ashes of the first supernovae (SNe). If their chemical abundances can be reconciled with the elemental yields of specific Population III (Pop III) explosions, they could reveal the properties of primordial stars. But multidimensional simulations of such explosions are required to predict their yields because dynamical instabilities can dredge material up from deep in the ejecta that would otherwise be predicted to fall back on to the central remnant and be lost in one-dimensional (1D) models. We have performed two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations of two low-energy Pop III SNe, a 12.4 M⊙ explosion and a 60 M⊙ explosion, and find that they produce elemental yields that are a good fit to those measured in the most iron-poor star discovered to date, SMSS J031300.36-670839.3 (J031300). Fallback on to the compact remnant in these weak explosions accounts for the lack of measurable iron in J031300 and its low iron-group abundances in general. Our 2D explosions produce higher abundances of heavy elements (atomic number Z > 20) than their 1D counterparts due to dredge-up by fluid instabilities. Since almost no 56Ni is ejected by these weak SNe, their low luminosities will prevent their detection in the near-infrared with the James Webb Space Telescope and future 30-m telescopes on the ground. The only evidence that they ever occurred will be in the fossil abundance record.

  4. DUST PROCESSING IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: SPITZER MIPS SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION AND INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, M.; Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Bernard, J. P.

    2011-11-20

    We present Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) spectral energy distribution (SED) and Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of 14 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) previously identified in the GLIMPSE survey. We find evidence for SNR/molecular cloud interaction through detection of [O I] emission, ionic lines, and emission from molecular hydrogen. Through blackbody fitting of the MIPS SEDs we find the large grains to be warm, 29-66 K. The dust emission is modeled using the DUSTEM code and a three-component dust model composed of populations of big grains (BGs), very small grains (VSGs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We find the dust to be moderately heated, typically by 30-100 times the interstellar radiation field. The source of the radiation is likely hydrogen recombination, where the excitation of hydrogen occurred in the shock front. The ratio of VSGs to BGs is found for most of the molecular interacting SNRs to be higher than that found in the plane of the Milky Way, typically by a factor of 2-3. We suggest that dust shattering is responsible for the relative overabundance of small grains, in agreement with the prediction from dust destruction models. However, two of the SNRs are best fitted with a very low abundance of carbon grains to silicate grains and with a very high radiation field. A likely reason for the low abundance of small carbon grains is sputtering. We find evidence for silicate emission at 20 {mu}m in their SEDs, indicating that they are young SNRs based on the strong radiation field necessary to reproduce the observed SEDs.

  5. Thermal energy storage flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of an experimental program to study heat transfer, energy storage, fluid movement, and void location under microgravity. Plans for experimental flight packages containing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) material applicable for advanced solar heat receivers are discussed. Candidate materials for TES include fluoride salts, salt eutectics, silicides, and metals. The development of a three-dimensional computer program to describe TES material behavior undergoing melting and freezing under microgravity is also discussed. The TES experiment concept and plans for ground and flight tests are outlined.

  6. SN 2008ha: AN EXTREMELY LOW LUMINOSITY AND EXCEPTIONALLY LOW ENERGY SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter J.; Friedman, Andrew S.; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Modjaz, Maryam; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael

    2009-08-15

    We present ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry as well as optical spectra of the peculiar supernova (SN) 2008ha. SN 2008ha had a very low peak luminosity, reaching only M{sub V} = -14.2 mag, and low line velocities of only {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} near maximum brightness, indicating a very small kinetic energy per unit mass of ejecta. Spectroscopically, SN 2008ha is a member of the SN 2002cx-like class of SNe, a peculiar subclass of SNe Ia; however, SN 2008ha is the most extreme member, being significantly fainter and having lower line velocities than the typical member, which is already {approx}2 mag fainter and has line velocities {approx}5000 km s{sup -1} smaller (near maximum brightness) than a normal SN Ia. SN 2008ha had a remarkably short rise time of only {approx}10 days, significantly shorter than either SN 2002cx-like objects ({approx}15 days) or normal SNe Ia ({approx}19.5 days). The bolometric light curve of SN 2008ha indicates that SN 2008ha peaked at L {sub peak} = (9.5 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, making SN 2008ha perhaps the least luminous SN ever observed. From its peak luminosity and rise time, we infer that SN 2008ha generated (3.0 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -3} M {sub sun} of {sup 56}Ni, had a kinetic energy of {approx}2 x 10{sup 48} erg, and ejected 0.15 M {sub sun} of material. The host galaxy of SN 2008ha has a luminosity, star formation rate, and metallicity similar to those of the Large magellanic Cloud. We classify three new (and one potential) members of the SN 2002cx-like class, expanding the sample to 14 (and one potential) members. The host-galaxy morphology distribution of the class is consistent with that of SNe Ia, Ib, Ic, and II. Several models for generating low-luminosity SNe can explain the observations of SN 2008ha; however, if a single model is to describe all SN 2002cx-like objects, deflagration of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, with SN 2008ha being a partial deflagration and not unbinding the progenitor star, is

  7. Study of TeV shell supernova remnants at gamma-ray energies

    DOE PAGES

    Acero, F.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Renaud, M.; ...

    2015-08-05

    The breakthrough developments of Cherenkov telescopes in the past decade have led to angular resolution of 0.1° and an unprecedented sensitivity. This has allowed the current generation of Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS) to discover a population of supernova remnants (SNRs) radiating in very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-rays. A number of those VHE SNRs exhibit a shell-type morphology that is spatially coincident with the shock front of the SNR. The members of this VHE shell SNR club are RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, RCW 86, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347. The last two objects have been poorly studiedmore » in high-energy (HE; 0.1 < E < 100 GeV) γ-rays and need to be investigated in order to draw the overall picture of this class of SNRs and to constrain the characteristics of the underlying population of accelerated particles. Using 6 years of Fermi-LAT P7 reprocessed data, we studied the GeV counterpart of the SNRs HESS J1731-347 and SN 1006. The two SNRs are not detected in the data set, and given that there is no hint of detection, we do not expect any detection in coming years from the SNRs. However in both cases, we derived upper limits that significantly constrain the γ-ray emission mechanism and can rule out a standard hadronic scenario with a confidence level >5σ. In conclusion, with this Fermi analysis, we now have a complete view of the HE to VHE γ-ray emission of TeV shell SNRs. All five sources have a hard HE photon index (Γ < 1.8), which suggests a common scenario where the bulk of the emission is produced by accelerated electrons radiating from radio to VHE γ-rays through synchrotron and inverse Compton processes. In addition when correcting for the distance, all SNRs show a surprisingly similar γ-ray luminosity supporting the idea of a common emission mechanism. While the γ-ray emission is likely to be leptonic-dominated at the scale of the whole SNR, this does not rule out efficient hadron acceleration in those

  8. Study of TeV shell supernova remnants at gamma-ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Renaud, M.; Ballet, J.; Hewitt, J. W.; Rousseau, R.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-08-05

    The breakthrough developments of Cherenkov telescopes in the past decade have led to angular resolution of 0.1° and an unprecedented sensitivity. This has allowed the current generation of Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS) to discover a population of supernova remnants (SNRs) radiating in very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-rays. A number of those VHE SNRs exhibit a shell-type morphology that is spatially coincident with the shock front of the SNR. The members of this VHE shell SNR club are RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, RCW 86, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347. The last two objects have been poorly studied in high-energy (HE; 0.1 < E < 100 GeV) γ-rays and need to be investigated in order to draw the overall picture of this class of SNRs and to constrain the characteristics of the underlying population of accelerated particles. Using 6 years of Fermi-LAT P7 reprocessed data, we studied the GeV counterpart of the SNRs HESS J1731-347 and SN 1006. The two SNRs are not detected in the data set, and given that there is no hint of detection, we do not expect any detection in coming years from the SNRs. However in both cases, we derived upper limits that significantly constrain the γ-ray emission mechanism and can rule out a standard hadronic scenario with a confidence level >5σ. In conclusion, with this Fermi analysis, we now have a complete view of the HE to VHE γ-ray emission of TeV shell SNRs. All five sources have a hard HE photon index (Γ < 1.8), which suggests a common scenario where the bulk of the emission is produced by accelerated electrons radiating from radio to VHE γ-rays through synchrotron and inverse Compton processes. In addition when correcting for the distance, all SNRs show a surprisingly similar γ-ray luminosity supporting the idea of a common emission mechanism. While the γ-ray emission is likely to be leptonic-dominated at the scale of the whole SNR, this does not rule out efficient hadron acceleration in those objects.

  9. Determination of neutrino incoming direction in the CHOOZ experiment and its application to supernova explosion location by scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, M.; Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Caffau, E.; Cei, F.; Déclais, Y.; de Kerret, H.; Dieterle, B.; Etenko, A.; Foresti, L.; George, J.; Giannini, G.; Grassi, M.; Kozlov, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kryn, D.; Laiman, M.; Lane, C. E.; Lefièvre, B.; Machulin, I.; Martemyanov, A.; Martemyanov, V.; Mikaelyan, L.; Nicolò, D.; Obolensky, M.; Pazzi, R.; Pieri, G.; Price, L.; Riley, S.; Reeder, R.; Sabelnikov, A.; Santin, G.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Sobel, H.; Steele, J.; Steinberg, R.; Sukhotin, S.; Tomshaw, S.; Veron, D.; Vyrodov, V.

    2000-01-01

    The CHOOZ experiment has measured the antineutrino flux at about 1 km from two nuclear reactors to search for possible ν¯e-->ν¯x oscillations with mass-squared differences as low as 10-3 eV2 for full mixing. We show that the analysis of the ~2700 ν¯e events, collected by our liquid scintillation detector, locates the antineutrino source within a cone of half-aperture ~18° at the 68 % C.L. We discuss the implications of this result for locating a supernova explosion.

  10. Supernova Flashback

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-01

    The Cassiopeia A supernova first flash of radiation makes six clumps of dust circled in annotated version unusually hot. The supernova remnant is the large white ball in the center. This infrared picture was taken by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  11. Matching Supernovae to Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    One of the major challenges for modern supernova surveys is identifying the galaxy that hosted each explosion. Is there an accurate and efficient way to do this that avoids investing significant human resources?Why Identify Hosts?One problem in host galaxy identification. Here, the supernova lies between two galaxies but though the centroid of the galaxy on the right is closer in angular separation, this may be a distant background galaxy that is not actually near the supernova. [Gupta et al. 2016]Supernovae are a critical tool for making cosmological predictions that help us to understand our universe. But supernova cosmology relies on accurately identifying the properties of the supernovae including their redshifts. Since spectroscopic followup of supernova detections often isnt possible, we rely on observations of the supernova host galaxies to obtain redshifts.But how do we identify which galaxy hosted a supernova? This seems like a simple problem, but there are many complicating factors a seemingly nearby galaxy could be a distant background galaxy, for instance, or a supernovas host could be too faint to spot.The authors algorithm takes into account confusion, a measure of how likely the supernova is to be mismatched. In these illustrations of low (left) and high (right) confusion, the supernova is represented by a blue star, and the green circles represent possible host galaxies. [Gupta et al. 2016]Turning to AutomationBefore the era of large supernovae surveys, searching for host galaxies was done primarily by visual inspection. But current projects like the Dark Energy Surveys Supernova Program is finding supernovae by the thousands, and the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will likely discover hundreds of thousands. Visual inspection will not be possible in the face of this volume of data so an accurate and efficient automated method is clearly needed!To this end, a team of scientists led by Ravi Gupta (Argonne National Laboratory) has recently

  12. Supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    John Beacom

    2003-01-23

    We propose that neutrino-proton elastic scattering, {nu} + p {yields} {nu} + p, can be used for the detection of supernova neutrinos. Though the proton recoil kinetic energy spectrum is soft, with T{sub p} {approx_equal} 2E{sub {nu}}{sup 2}/M{sub p}, and the scintillation light output from slow, heavily ionizing protons is quenched, the yield above a realistic threshold is nearly as large as that from {bar {nu}}{sub e} + p {yields} e{sup +} + n. In addition, the measured proton spectrum is related to the incident neutrino spectrum, which solves a long-standing problem of how to separately measure the total energy release and temperature of {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}, {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, and {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. The ability to detect this signal would give detectors like KamLAND and Borexino a crucial and unique role in the quest to detect supernova neutrinos.

  13. Searching for High-energy Neutrinos from Supernovae with IceCube and an Optical Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franckowiak, Anna

    2011-08-01

    In violent astrophysical processes high-energy neutrinos of TeV to PeV energies are expected to be produced along with the highest energy cosmic rays. The acceleration of nuclei to very high energies is assumed to takes place in astrophysical shocks and neutrinos are produced in the interaction of these cosmic rays with ambient baryons or photons. The neutrinos then escape the acceleration region and propagate through space without interaction, while the nuclei are deflected in magnetic fields and no longer carry information about their source position. Unlike gamma-rays, neutrinos are solely produced in hadronic processes and can therefore reveal the sources of charged cosmic rays. The IceCube neutrino detector, which is located at the geographical South Pole, has been build to detect these high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. The deep clear Antarctic ice is instrumented with light sensors on a grid, thus forming a Cherenkov particle detector, which is capable of detecting charged particles induced by neutrinos above 100 GeV. Transient neutrino sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of = 100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in the high relativistic jets driven by the central engine, corecollapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star and lead to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. This work aims for an increased sensitivity for these neutrinos and for a possible identification of their sources. Towards this goal, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with IceCube has been implemented. If a neutrino multiplet - i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s - is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE). The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the

  14. Weak interaction processes in supernovae: New probes using charge exchange reaction at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, Dieter

    2005-04-01

    Spin-isospin-flip excitations in nuclei at vanishing momentum transfer are generally referred to as Gamov-Teller (GT) transitions. They are being studied because the simplicity of the excitation makes them an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. GT transitions in the β- direction (also referred to as isospin lowering T< transitions) have extensively been studied through (p,n) and (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions [B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 36 (1987) 2195, B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 43 (1991) 50, J. Rapaport et al., Phys. Rev. C 24 (1981) 335, H. Akimune et al., Nucl. Phys. A 569 (1994) 245c, Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Lett. B 365 (1996) 29]. The generally good resolution allows easy extraction of the GT distribution and the total B(GT-) strength in the final nucleus. On the other hand, determination of B(GT+) strength through a charge-exchange reaction in the T> direction were mostly done with secondary neutron beams, and as such, they come with significant experimental difficulties. TRIUMF has pioneered this field in the late 80's and early 90's with a rich and highly successful (n,p) program using a several hundred MeV neutron beam from a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction [R. Helmer, Can. J. Phys. 65 (1987) 588]. In this paper we present the (d,2He) reaction at intermediate energies as another and potentially even more powerful tool for charge-exchange reactions in the T>, resp. β+ direction. The key issue here will be the high resolution of order 100 keV, which provides new and sometimes unexpected insight into nuclear structure phenomena. This program has been launched at the AGOR Superconducting Cyclotron Facility at the KVI Groningen. By now, it covers a wide field of physics questions ranging from few-body physics, the structure of halo-nuclei, to questions pertaining

  15. IMPROVED DARK ENERGY CONSTRAINTS FROM {approx}100 NEW CfA SUPERNOVA TYPE Ia LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Blondin, Stephane; Jha, Saurabh; Kelly, Patrick L.; Rest, Armin E-mail: kirshner@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-08-01

    We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1 + w = 0.013{sup +0.066} {sub -0.068} (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light-curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < {delta} < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R{sub V} = 3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R{sub V} {approx} 1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2{sigma}, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.

  16. Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Blondin, Stephane; Challis, Peter; Jha, Saurabh; Kelly, Patrick L.; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-04-06

    We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1 + w = 0.013{sub -0.068}{sup +0.066} (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light-curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < {Delta} < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R{sub V} = 3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R{sub V} {approx} 1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2{sigma}, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.

  17. Thermal energy management process experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal energy management processes experiment (TEMP) will demonstrate that through the use of two-phase flow technology, thermal systems can be significantly enhanced by increasing heat transport capabilities at reduced power consumption while operating within narrow temperature limits. It has been noted that such phenomena as excess fluid puddling, priming, stratification, and surface tension effects all tend to mask the performance of two-phase flow systems in a 1-g field. The flight experiment approach would be to attack the experiment to an appropriate mounting surface with a 15 to 20 meter effective length and provide a heat input and output station in the form of heaters and a radiator. Using environmental data, the size, location, and orientation of the experiment can be optimized. The approach would be to provide a self-contained panel and mount it to the STEP through a frame. A small electronics package would be developed to interface with the STEP avionics for command and data handling. During the flight, heaters on the evaporator will be exercised to determine performance. Flight data will be evaluated against the ground tests to determine any anomalous behavior.

  18. Measuring the Properties of Dark Energy with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae. I. Systematic Uncertainty from Core-collapse Supernova Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. O.; Scolnic, D. M.; Riess, A. G.; Kessler, R.; Rest, A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Berger, E.; Ortega, C. A.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Challis, P. J.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Metcalfe, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-07-01

    The Pan-STARRS (PS1) Medium Deep Survey discovered over 5000 likely supernovae (SNe) but obtained spectral classifications for just 10% of its SN candidates. We measured spectroscopic host galaxy redshifts for 3147 of these likely SNe and estimate that ˜1000 are Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) with light-curve quality sufficient for a cosmological analysis. We use these data with simulations to determine the impact of core-collapse SN (CC SN) contamination on measurements of the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. Using the method of Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS), distances to SNe Ia and the contaminating CC SN distribution are simultaneously determined. We test light-curve-based SN classification priors for BEAMS as well as a new classification method that relies upon host galaxy spectra and the association of SN type with host type. By testing several SN classification methods and CC SN parameterizations on large SN simulations, we estimate that CC SN contamination gives a systematic error on w ({σ }w{CC}) of 0.014, 29% of the statistical uncertainty. Our best method gives {σ }w{CC}=0.004, just 8% of the statistical uncertainty, but could be affected by incomplete knowledge of the CC SN distribution. This method determines the SALT2 color and shape coefficients, α and β, with ˜3% bias. However, we find that some variants require α and β to be fixed to known values for BEAMS to yield accurate measurements of w. Finally, the inferred abundance of bright CC SNe in our sample is greater than expected based on measured CC SN rates and luminosity functions.

  19. Dynamical Evolution and High-Energy Radiation of Mixed-Morphology Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Takafumi

    2014-03-01

    Evolution of a supernova remnant (SNR) without an active neutron star is basically described by probation of shock waves. The shock waves accelerate charged particles. The particles accelerated to GeV radiate synchrotron radio emission, which appears to be shelllike morphology. The shock waves heat matter up to keV, and heated-electrons ionize ions. Compared with a time-scale of shock-heating of electrons by the shock, a time-scale of ionization of ions by electron collisions in the shock down stream region is longer. Hence an ionization state of SNR plasma is thought to be under-ionized state in which the ionization temperature is lower than the electron temperature, or collisional ionization equilibrium state at late time. In fact, X-ray spectra of many SNRs are explained by such plasma state model. SNRs that exhibit shell-like morphology in thermal X-ray as well as radio are categorized into shell-like SNRs. In contrast to shell-like SNRs, some SNRs exhibit shell-like radio but center-filled thermal X-ray morphology. Such SNRs are categorized into mixed-morphology SNRs (MM SNRs). Many MM SNRs interact with molecular clouds, suggested by OH maser and near infrared observations, and hence are thought to be remnants of core-collapse supernova of massive stars. Interestingly, recombination radiation X-rays, which are evidence that X-ray emitting plasmas are over-ionized states in which the ionization temperature is higher than the electron temperature, are detected from six MM SNRs. The center-filled X-rays with recombination radiation can not be explained by a picture of shock-wave propagation that explains the X-rays of shell-like SNRs. As well as X-rays, MM SNRs are characteristic in γ-ray emission. Several MM SNRs and shell-like SNRs are detected in the GeV γ-ray band by Fermi. The 1 - 100 GeV γ-ray luminosities of MM SNRs are ˜ 1034-1036 erg s-1, which are systematically higher than those of shell-like SNRs of ˜ 1033-1035 erg s-1. Such high luminosities

  20. Supernova VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, N.

    2009-08-01

    We review VLBI observations of supernovae over the last quarter century and discuss the prospect of imaging future supernovae with space VLBI in the context of VSOP-2. From thousands of discovered supernovae, most of them at cosmological distances, ˜50 have been detected at radio wavelengths, most of them in relatively nearby galaxies. All of the radio supernovae are Type II or Ib/c, which originate from the explosion of massive progenitor stars. Of these, 12 were observed with VLBI and four of them, SN 1979C, SN 1986J, SN 1993J, and SN 1987A, could be imaged in detail, the former three with VLBI. In addition, supernovae or young supernova remnants were discovered at radio wavelengths in highly dust-obscured galaxies, such as M82, Arp 299, and Arp 220, and some of them could also be imaged in detail. Four of the supernovae so far observed were sufficiently bright to be detectable with VSOP-2. With VSOP-2 the expansion of supernovae can be monitored and investigated with unsurpassed angular resolution, starting as early as the time of the supernova's transition from its opaque to transparent stage. Such studies can reveal, in a movie, the aftermath of a supernova explosion shortly after shock break out.

  1. Stellar Evolution/Supernova Research Data Archives from the SciDAC Computational Astrophysics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer

    Woosley, Stan [University of California, Santa Cruz

    Theoretical high-energy astrophysics studies the most violent explosions in the universe - supernovae (the massive explosions of dying stars) and gamma ray bursts (mysterious blasts of intense radiation). The evolution of massive stars and their explosion as supernovae and/or gamma ray bursts describes how the "heavy" elements needed for life, such as oxygen and iron, are forged (nucleosynthesis) and ejected to later form new stars and planets. The Computational Astrophysics Consortium's project includes a Science Application Partnership on Adaptive Algorithms that develops software involved. The principal science topics are - in order of priority - 1) models for Type Ia supernovae, 2) radiation transport, spectrum formation, and nucleosynthesis in model supernovae of all types; 3) the observational implications of these results for experiments in which DOE has an interest, especially the Joint Dark Energy Mission, Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite observatory, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and ground based supernova searches; 4) core collapse supernovae; 5) gamma-ray bursts; 6) hypernovae from Population III stars; and 7) x-ray bursts. Models of these phenomena share a common need for nuclear reactions and radiation transport coupled to multi-dimensional fluid flow. The team has developed and used supernovae simulation codes to study Type 1A and core-collapse supernovae. (Taken from http://www.scidac.gov/physics/grb.html) The Stellar Evolution Data Archives contains more than 225 Pre-SN models that can be freely accessed.

  2. Observations of supernova remnants and molecular clouds: bridging low and high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montmerle, T.

    2017-07-01

    New evidence that galactic cosmic rays (GCR: here protons and nuclei) are accelerated by supernova remnant (SNR) shocks has come from recent works combining γ-ray observations in the sub-GeV to TeV domain, and in the submm-mm domain. The results show an enhanced CR flux in regions of massive star formation in which SNRs interact with molecular cloud complexes. Such regions are thus ideal laboratories to study in situ CR acceleration by SNR shocks, and diffusion processes in their vicinity.

  3. The dark energy survey Y1 supernova search: Survey strategy compared to forecasts and the photometric type Is SN volumetric rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, John Arthur

    For 70 years, the physics community operated under the assumption that the expansion of the Universe must be slowing due to gravitational attraction. Then, in 1998, two teams of scientists used Type Ia supernovae to discover that cosmic expansion was actually acceler- ating due to a mysterious "dark energy." As a result, Type Ia supernovae have become the most cosmologically important transient events in the last 20 years, with a large amount of effort going into their discovery as well as understanding their progenitor systems. One such probe for understanding Type Ia supernovae is to use rate measurements to de- termine the time delay between star formation and supernova explosion. For the last 30 years, the discovery of individual Type Ia supernova events has been accelerating. How- ever, those discoveries were happening in time-domain surveys that probed only a portion of the redshift range where expansion was impacted by dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is the first project in the "next generation" of time-domain surveys that will discovery thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to a redshift of 1.2 (where dark energy be- comes subdominant) and DES will have better systematic uncertainties over that redshift range than any survey to date. In order to gauge the discovery effectiveness of this survey, we will use the first season's 469 photometrically typed supernovee and compare it with simulations in order to update the full survey Type Ia projections from 3500 to 2250. We will then use 165 of the 469 supernovae out to a redshift of 0.6 to measure the supernovae rate both as a function of comoving volume and of the star formation rate as it evolves with redshift. We find the most statistically significant prompt fraction of any survey to date (with a 3.9? prompt fraction detection). We will also reinforce the already existing tension in the measurement of the delayed fraction between high (z > 1.2) and low red- shift rate measurements, where we find no

  4. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-01-01

    MSH 1556 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium.Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  5. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 15-56

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Castro, Daniel; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-05-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the {gamma}-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  6. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-05-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the γ-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  7. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; ...

    2015-03-15

    training and calibration of photometric redshifts – will require two separate solutions. For ongoing and future projects to reach their full potential, new spectroscopic samples of faint objects will be needed for training; those new samples may be suitable for calibration, but the latter possibility is uncertain. In contrast, wide-area samples of bright objects are poorly suited for training, but can provide high-precision calibrations via cross-correlation techniques. Additional training/calibration redshifts and/or host galaxy spectroscopy would enhance the use of supernovae and galaxy clusters for cosmology. We also summarize additional work on photometric redshift techniques that will be needed to prepare for data from ongoing and future dark energy experiments.« less

  8. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Comparat, Johan; Coupon, Jean; Cheu, Elliott; Cunha, Carlos E.; de la Macorra, Alex; Dell’Antonio, Ian P.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Menard, Brice; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Park, Changbom; Rhodes, Jason; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-03-15

    training and calibration of photometric redshifts – will require two separate solutions. For ongoing and future projects to reach their full potential, new spectroscopic samples of faint objects will be needed for training; those new samples may be suitable for calibration, but the latter possibility is uncertain. In contrast, wide-area samples of bright objects are poorly suited for training, but can provide high-precision calibrations via cross-correlation techniques. Additional training/calibration redshifts and/or host galaxy spectroscopy would enhance the use of supernovae and galaxy clusters for cosmology. We also summarize additional work on photometric redshift techniques that will be needed to prepare for data from ongoing and future dark energy experiments.

  9. Aspherical supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-01-01

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3) And

  10. Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Beacom, John

    2009-11-14

    Supernovae in our Galaxy probably occur about 3 times per century, though 90% of them are invisible optically because of obscuration by dust. However, present solar neutrino detectors are sensitive to core-collapse supernovae anywhere in our Galaxy, and would detect of order 10,000 events from a supernova at a distance of 10 kpc (roughly the distance to the Galactic center). I will describe how this data can be used to understand the supernova itself, as well as to test the properties of neutrinos.

  11. Probing the structure of jet-driven core-collapse supernova and long gamma-ray burst progenitors with high-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, Imre; Dasgupta, Basudeb; Márka, Szabolcs

    2012-10-01

    Times of arrival of high-energy neutrinos encode information about their sources. We demonstrate that the energy-dependence of the onset time of neutrino emission in advancing relativistic jets can be used to extract important information about the supernova/gamma-ray burst progenitor structure. We examine this energy and time dependence for different supernova and gamma-ray burst progenitors, including red and blue supergiants, helium cores, Wolf-Rayet stars, and chemically homogeneous stars, with a variety of masses and metallicities. For choked jets, we calculate the cutoff of observable neutrino energies depending on the radius at which the jet is stalled. Further, we exhibit how such energy and time dependence may be used to identify and differentiate between progenitors, with as few as one or two observed events, under favorable conditions.

  12. SPECTRUM OF THE SUPERNOVA RELIC NEUTRINO BACKGROUND AND METALLICITY EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazato, Ken’ichiro; Mochida, Eri; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Niino, Yuu

    2015-05-01

    The spectrum of the supernova relic neutrino (SRN) background from past stellar collapses including black hole formation (failed supernovae) is calculated. The redshift dependence of the black hole formation rate is considered on the basis of the metallicity evolution of galaxies. Assuming the mass and metallicity ranges of failed supernova progenitors, their contribution to SRNs is quantitatively estimated for the first time. Using this model, the dependences of SRNs on the cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD), shock revival time, and equation of state (EOS) are investigated. The shock revival time is introduced as a parameter that should depend on the still unknown explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae. The dependence on EOS is considered for failed supernovae, whose collapse dynamics and neutrino emission are certainly affected. It is found that the low-energy spectrum of SRNs is mainly determined by the CSFRD. These low-energy events will be observed in the Super-Kamiokande experiment with gadolinium-loaded water.

  13. Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. EnergyEvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale,Mike

    2006-03-28

    The convective period leading up to a Type Ia supernova (SNIa) explosion is characterized by very low Mach number flows, requiringhydrodynamical methods well-suited to long-time integration. We continuethe development of the low Mach number equation set for stellar scaleflows by incorporating the effects of heat release due to externalsources. Low Mach number hydrodynamics equations with a time-dependentbackground state are derived, and a numerical method based on theapproximate projection formalism is presented. We demonstrate throughvalidation with a fully compressible hydrodynamics code that this lowMach number model accurately captures the expansion of the stellaratmosphere as well as the local dynamics due to external heat sources.This algorithm provides the basis for an efficient simulation tool forstudying the ignition of SNe Ia.

  14. Experiences in mainstreaming alternative energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cabraal, A.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses efforts by the Asia Alternative Energy Unit (ASTAE) of the World Bank in supporting alternative energy source projects in Asia. Energy growth rates have been as high as 18% per year, with power capacity doubling each decade in the 1960`s, 70`s and 80`s. Much of this has come from fossil fuel projects coupled with major hydroelectric projects. One consequence is developing air pollution loads originating in Asia. ASTAE has been supporting pilot programs in applying alternative energy sources. The goal has been to mainstream renewable energy sources in World Bank operations, by working with managers from different countries to: include renewable energy in country assistance strategies and sectorial development plans; provide assistance to renewable energy initiatives; expand initiatives to new countries, sectors and technologies.

  15. Neutrinos from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, A. S.

    First, the author presents a short history of supernova neutrino theory. Then, the theory of core collapse supernovae is reviewed. Because of the profound opacity to light of the dense core that experiences collapse, we "see" this core directly only through its neutrino signature. Every bump and wiggle echoes the internal convulsions of the event and can provide clues about both the supernova mechanism and the neutron star that remains. The author discusses the only neutrino observations of a supernova so far, SN 1987A. While the agreement with calculations has been gratifying, there remain, of course, plenty of outstanding issues in supernova theory to be tested. These are high-lighted throughout the text. Since neutrinos give us the only real access to the physics inside the collapse, it is important that observation of these particles continue. In an appendix the author describes some of the available or contemplated neutrino detectors capable of good time resolution and therefore of shedding light on supernova mechanisms.

  16. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  17. Charm decay in slow-jet supernovae as the origin of the IceCube ultra-high energy neutrino events

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Atri; Sarcevic, Ina; Enberg, Rikard; Reno, Mary Hall E-mail: rikard.enberg@physics.uu.se E-mail: ina@physics.arizona.edu

    2015-06-01

    We investigate whether the recent ultra-high energy neutrino events detected at the IceCube neutrino observatory could come from the decay of charmed mesons produced within the mildly relativistic jets of supernova-like astrophysical sources. We demonstrate that the allowed region in the astrophysical and QCD parameter spaces permit an explanation of the 5.7σ excess of neutrinos observed by IceCube in the energy range 30 TeV–2 PeV as a diffuse flux of neutrinos produced in such slow-jet supernovae. We discuss the theoretical uncertainties inherent in the evaluation of charm production in high energy hadronic collisions, as well as some of the astrophysical uncertainties associated with slow-jet supernova sources. These sources result in a diffuse neutrino spectrum that exhibits a sharp drop at energies above a few PeV. We incorporate the effect of energy dependence in the spectrum-weighted charm production and decay cross sections and show that this has a very significant effect on the shape, magnitude and cutoff energies for the diffuse neutrino flux.

  18. The diffuse supernova neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2011-12-01

    I review the status and perspectives of the research on the diffuse flux of (core collapse) supernova neutrinos (DSNνF). Several upper bounds exist on this flux in different detection channels. The strongest is the limit from SuperKamiokande (SK) of 1.2 electron antineutrinos cm-2s-1 at 90% confidence level above 19.3 MeV of neutrino energy. The predictions of the DSNνF depend on the supernova rate and on the neutrino emission in a individual supernova. Above the SK threshold, they range between 0.05 electron antineutrinos cm-2s-1 up to touching the SK limit. The SK bound constrains part of the parameter space of the supernova rate - and indirectly of the star formation rate - only in models with relatively hard neutrino spectra. Experimentally, a feasible and very important goal for the future is the improvement of background discrimination and the resulting lowering of the detection threshold. Theory instead will benefit from reducing the uncertainties on the supernova neutrino emission (either with more precise numerical modeling or with data from a galactic supernova) and on the supernova rate. The latter will be provided precisely by next generation supernova surveys up to a normalization factor. Therefore, the detection of the DSNνF is likely to be precious chiefly to constrain such normalization and to study the physics of neutrino emission in supernovae.

  19. supernovae: Photometric classification of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Tom; Moss, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Supernovae classifies supernovae using their light curves directly as inputs to a deep recurrent neural network, which learns information from the sequence of observations. Observational time and filter fluxes are used as inputs; since the inputs are agnostic, additional data such as host galaxy information can also be included.

  20. Observational constraints on general relativistic energy conditions, cosmic matter density and dark energy from X-ray clusters of galaxies and type-Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuecker, P.; Caldwell, R. R.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C. A.; Guzzo, L.; Weinberg, N. N.

    2003-04-01

    New observational constraints on the cosmic matter density Omegam and an effectively redshift-independent equation of state parameter wx of the dark energy are obtained while simultaneously testing the strong and null energy conditions of general relativity on macroscopic scales. The combination of REFLEX X-ray cluster and type-Ia supernova data shows that for a flat Universe the strong energy condition might presently be violated whereas the null energy condition seems to be fulfilled. This provides another observational argument for the present accelerated cosmic expansion and the absence of exotic physical phenomena related to a broken null energy condition. The marginalization of the likelihood distributions is performed in a manner to include a large fraction of the recently discussed possible systematic errors involved in the application of X-ray clusters as cosmological probes. This yields for a flat Universe, Omegam =0.29+0.08-0.12 and wx=-0.95+0.30-0.35 (1sigma errors without cosmic variance). The scatter in the different analyses indicates a quite robust result around wx=-1, leaving little room for the introduction of new energy components described by quintessence-like models or phantom energy. The most natural interpretation of the data is a positive cosmological constant with wx=-1 or something like it.

  1. Supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the /sup 56/Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed.

  2. Thermal Energy Storage Flight Experiment in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, David

    1992-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Storage Flight Experiment was designed to characterize void shape and location in LiF-based phase change materials in different energy storage configurations representative of advanced solar dynamic systems. Experiment goals and payload design are described in outline and graphic form.

  3. Neutrino energy loss rates and positron capture rates on {sup 55}Co for presupernova and supernova physics

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Sajjad, Muhammad

    2008-05-15

    Proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently been used for the calculation of stellar weak interaction rates of the fp-shell nuclide with success. Neutrino losses from protoneutron stars play a pivotal role in deciding if these stars would be crushed into black holes or explode as supernovas. The product of abundance and positron capture rates on {sup 55}Co is substantial and as such can play a role in the fine tuning of input parameters of simulation codes especially in the presupernova evolution. Recently we introduced our calculation of capture rates on {sup 55}Co, in a luxurious model space of 7({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) {omega}, employing the pn-QRPA theory with a separable interaction. Simulators, however, may require these rates on a fine scale. Here we present for the first time an expanded calculation of the neutrino energy loss rates and positron capture rates on {sup 55}Co on an extensive temperature-density scale. This type of scale is appropriate for interpolation purposes and of greater utility for simulation codes. The pn-QRPA calculated neutrino energy loss rates are enhanced roughly up to two orders of magnitude compared with the large-scale shell model calculations and favor a lower entropy for the core of massive stars.

  4. Quark-novae Occurring in Massive Binaries : A Universal Energy Source in Superluminous Supernovae with Double-peaked Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-01

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 1052 erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  5. QUARK-NOVAE OCCURRING IN MASSIVE BINARIES: A UNIVERSAL ENERGY SOURCE IN SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE WITH DOUBLE-PEAKED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-10

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 10{sup 52} erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  6. SNLS3: CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY COMBINING THE SUPERNOVA LEGACY SURVEY THREE-YEAR DATA WITH OTHER PROBES

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.; Hook, I. M.; Guy, J.; Regnault, N.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Conley, A.; Carlberg, R. G.; Perrett, K. M.; Basa, S.; Fouchez, D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Baumont, S.

    2011-08-20

    We present observational constraints on the nature of dark energy using the Supernova Legacy Survey three-year sample (SNLS3) of Guy et al. and Conley et al. We use the 472 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in this sample, accounting for recently discovered correlations between SN Ia luminosity and host galaxy properties, and include the effects of all identified systematic uncertainties directly in the cosmological fits. Combining the SNLS3 data with the full WMAP7 power spectrum, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxy power spectrum, and a prior on the Hubble constant H{sub 0} from SHOES, in a flat universe we find {Omega}{sub m} = 0.269 {+-} 0.015 and w = -1.061{sup +0.069}{sub -} 0{sub .068} (where the uncertainties include all statistical and SN Ia systematic errors)-a 6.5% measure of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w. The statistical and systematic uncertainties are approximately equal, with the systematic uncertainties dominated by the photometric calibration of the SN Ia fluxes-without these calibration effects, systematics contribute only a {approx}2% error in w. When relaxing the assumption of flatness, we find {Omega}{sub m} = 0.271 {+-} 0.015, {Omega}{sub k} = -0.002 {+-} 0.006, and w = -1.069{sup +0.091}{sub -0.092}. Parameterizing the time evolution of w as w(a) = w{sub 0} + w{sub a} (1 - a) gives w{sub 0} = -0.905 {+-} 0.196, w{sub a} = -0.984{sup +1.094}{sub -1.097} in a flat universe. All of our results are consistent with a flat, w = -1 universe. The size of the SNLS3 sample allows various tests to be performed with the SNe segregated according to their light curve and host galaxy properties. We find that the cosmological constraints derived from these different subsamples are consistent. There is evidence that the coefficient, {beta}, relating SN Ia luminosity and color, varies with host parameters at >4{sigma} significance (in addition to the known SN luminosity-host relation); however, this has only a small effect on the

  7. SNLS3: Constraints on Dark Energy Combining the Supernova Legacy Survey Three-year Data with Other Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M.; Guy, J.; Conley, A.; Regnault, N.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fouchez, D.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K. M.; Pritchet, C. J.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Balam, D.; Baumont, S.; Ellis, R. S.; Fabbro, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fourmanoit, N.; González-Gaitán, S.; Graham, M. L.; Hudson, M. J.; Hsiao, E.; Kronborg, T.; Lidman, C.; Mourao, A. M.; Neill, J. D.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Suzuki, N.; Walker, E. S.

    2011-08-01

    We present observational constraints on the nature of dark energy using the Supernova Legacy Survey three-year sample (SNLS3) of Guy et al. and Conley et al. We use the 472 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in this sample, accounting for recently discovered correlations between SN Ia luminosity and host galaxy properties, and include the effects of all identified systematic uncertainties directly in the cosmological fits. Combining the SNLS3 data with the full WMAP7 power spectrum, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxy power spectrum, and a prior on the Hubble constant H 0 from SHOES, in a flat universe we find Ω m = 0.269 ± 0.015 and w = -1.061+0.069 - 0.068 (where the uncertainties include all statistical and SN Ia systematic errors)—a 6.5% measure of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w. The statistical and systematic uncertainties are approximately equal, with the systematic uncertainties dominated by the photometric calibration of the SN Ia fluxes—without these calibration effects, systematics contribute only a ~2% error in w. When relaxing the assumption of flatness, we find Ω m = 0.271 ± 0.015, Ω k = -0.002 ± 0.006, and w = -1.069+0.091 - 0.092. Parameterizing the time evolution of w as w(a) = w 0 + wa (1 - a) gives w 0 = -0.905 ± 0.196, wa = -0.984+1.094 - 1.097 in a flat universe. All of our results are consistent with a flat, w = -1 universe. The size of the SNLS3 sample allows various tests to be performed with the SNe segregated according to their light curve and host galaxy properties. We find that the cosmological constraints derived from these different subsamples are consistent. There is evidence that the coefficient, β, relating SN Ia luminosity and color, varies with host parameters at >4σ significance (in addition to the known SN luminosity-host relation); however, this has only a small effect on the cosmological results and is currently a subdominant systematic.

  8. Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism and supernova nucleosynthesis, and as a potential probe of the supernova environment and of some of the neutrino mixing parameters that remain unknown; hence, a variety of approximate transport schemes have been used to obtain results with reduced dimensionality. However, none of these approximate schemes have addressed a recent challenge to the conventional wisdom that neutrino flavor mixing cannot impact the explosion mechanism or r-process nucleosynthesis.

  9. Supernova and cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A general overview of supernova astronomy is presented, followed by a discussion of the relationship between SN and galactic cosmic rays. Pre-supernova evolution is traced to core collapse, explosion, and mass ejection. The two types of SN light curves are discussed in terms of their causes, and the different nucleosynthetic processes inside SNs are reviewed. Physical events in SN remnants are discussed. The three main connections between cosmic rays and SNs, the energy requirement, the acceleration mechanism, and the detailed composition of CR, are detailed.

  10. A Study of Quasar Selection in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tie, S.S.; et al.

    2016-11-16

    We present a study of quasar selection using the DES supernova fields. We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. We only considered objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. We examine color selection methods based on the WISE mid-IR W1-W2 color, a mixture of WISE and DES colors (g-i and i-W1) and a mixture of VHS and DES colors (g-i and i-K). For probabilistic quasar selection, we used XDQSOz, an algorithm that employs an empirical multi-wavelength flux model of quasars to assign quasar probabilities. Our variability selection uses the multi-band chi2-probability that sources are constant in the DES Year 1 griz-band light curves. The completeness and efficiency are calculated relative to an underlying sample of point sources that are detected in the required selection bands and pass our data quality and photometric error cuts. We conduct our analyses at two magnitude limits, i<19.8 mag and i<22 mag. For sources with W1 and W2 detections, the W1-W2 color or XDQSOz method combined with variability gives the highest completenesses of >85% for both i-band magnitude limits and efficiencies of >80% to the bright limit and >60% to the faint limit; however, the giW1 and giW1+variability methods give the highest quasar surface densities. The XDQSOz method and combinations of W1W2/giW1/XDQSOz with variability are among the better selection methods when both high completeness and high efficiency are desired. We also present the OzDES Quasar Catalog of 1,263 spectroscopically-confirmed quasars taken by the OzDES survey. The catalog includes quasars with redshifts up to z~4 and brighter than i=22 mag, although the catalog is not complete up this magnitude limit.

  11. A Study of Quasar Selection in the Supernova Fields of the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Tie, S. S.; Martini, P.; Mudd, D.; ...

    2017-02-14

    We present a study of quasar selection using the DES supernova fields. We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. We only considered objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. We examine color selection methods based on the WISE mid-IR W1-W2 color, a mixture of WISE and DES colors (g-i and i-W1) and a mixture of VHS and DES colors (g-i and i-K). For probabilistic quasar selection, we usedmore » XDQSOz, an algorithm that employs an empirical multi-wavelength flux model of quasars to assign quasar probabilities. Our variability selection uses the multi-band chi2-probability that sources are constant in the DES Year 1 griz-band light curves. The completeness and efficiency are calculated relative to an underlying sample of point sources that are detected in the required selection bands and pass our data quality and photometric error cuts. We conduct our analyses at two magnitude limits, i<19.8 mag and i<22 mag. For sources with W1 and W2 detections, the W1-W2 color or XDQSOz method combined with variability gives the highest completenesses of >85% for both i-band magnitude limits and efficiencies of >80% to the bright limit and >60% to the faint limit; however, the giW1 and giW1+variability methods give the highest quasar surface densities. The XDQSOz method and combinations of W1W2/giW1/XDQSOz with variability are among the better selection methods when both high completeness and high efficiency are desired. We also present the OzDES Quasar Catalog of 1,263 spectroscopically-confirmed quasars taken by the OzDES survey. The catalog includes quasars with redshifts up to z~4 and brighter than i=22 mag, although the catalog is not complete up this magnitude limit.« less

  12. Supernova remnants in the very-high-energy gamma-ray domain: the role of the Cherenkov telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofari, P.; Gabici, S.; Humensky, T. B.; Santander, M.; Terrier, R.; Parizot, E.; Casanova, S.

    2017-10-01

    Supernova remnants are often presented as the most probable sources of Galactic cosmic rays. This idea is supported by the accumulation of evidence that particle acceleration is happening at supernova remnant shocks. Observations in the TeV range have especially contributed to increase the understanding of the mechanisms, but many aspects of the particle acceleration at supernova remnant shocks are still debated. The Cherenkov telescope array is expected to lead to the detection of many new supernova remnants in the TeV and multi-TeV range. In addition to the individual study of each, the study of these objects as a population can help constrain the parameters describing the acceleration of particles and increase our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  13. Measuring supernova neutrino temperatures using lead perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S. R.

    2000-12-01

    Neutrino interactions with lead produce neutrons in numbers that depend on neutrino energy and type. A detector based on lead perchlorate, for example, would be able to measure the energy deposited by electrons and gammas in coincidence with the number of neutrons produced. Sorting the electron energy spectra by the number of coincident neutrons permits the identification of the neutrino type that induced the reaction. This separation allows an analysis which can determine the temperatures of {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} from a supernova in one experiment. The neutrino reaction signatures of lead perchlorate, and the fundamentals of using this material as a neutrino detector, are described.

  14. Measuring supernova neutrino temperatures using lead perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. R.

    2000-12-01

    Neutrino interactions with lead produce neutrons in numbers that depend on neutrino energy and type. A detector based on lead perchlorate, for example, would be able to measure the energy deposited by electrons and gammas in coincidence with the number of neutrons produced. Sorting the electron energy spectra by the number of coincident neutrons permits the identification of the neutrino type that induced the reaction. This separation allows an analysis which can determine the temperatures of νe and ν¯e from a supernova in one experiment. The neutrino reaction signatures of lead perchlorate, and the fundamentals of using this material as a neutrino detector, are described.

  15. OBSERVATIONS OF THE SHELL-TYPE SUPERNOVA REMNANT CASSIOPEIA A AT TeV ENERGIES WITH VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Chow, Y. C.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Cogan, P.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Butt, Y.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.

    2010-05-01

    We report on observations of very high energy {gamma} rays from the shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) Cassiopeia A with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System stereoscopic array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in Arizona. The total exposure time for these observations is 22 hr, accumulated between September and November of 2007. The {gamma}-ray source associated with the SNR Cassiopeia A was detected above 200 GeV with a statistical significance of 8.3{sigma}. The estimated integral flux for this {gamma}-ray source is about 3% of the Crab-Nebula flux. The photon spectrum is compatible with a power law dN/dE {proportional_to} E {sup -{Gamma}} with an index {Gamma} = 2.61 {+-} 0.24{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub sys}. The data are consistent with a point-like source. We provide a detailed description of the analysis results and discuss physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed {gamma}-ray emission.

  16. Preview of a Forthcoming Supernova

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Supernova Supernovae can occur one of two ways. The first occurs when a white dwarf—the vestigial ember of a dead star—passes so close to a living star that its matter leaks into the white dwarf. This causes a catastrophic explosion. However most people understand supernovae as the death of a massive star. When the star runs out of fuel toward the end of its life, the gravity at its heart sucks the surrounding mass into its center. At temperatures rocketing above 100 billion degrees Fahrenheit, all the layers of the star abruptly explode outward. The explosions produced by supernovae are so brilliant that astronomers use their luminosity to measure the distance between galaxies, the scale of the universe and the effects of dark energy. For a short period of time, one dying star can appear to shine as brightly as an entire galaxy. Supernovae are relatively common events, one occurring in our own galaxy once every 100 years. In 2014, a person could see the supernova M82 with a pair of binoculars. The cosmologist Tycho Brahe’s observation of a supernova in 1572 allowed him to disprove Aristotle’s theory that the heavens never changed. After a supernova, material expelled in the explosion can form a nebula—an interstellar pile of gas and dust. Over millions of years, gravity pulls the nebula’s materials into a dense orb called a protostar, which will become a new star. Within a few million years, this new star could go supernova as well. ------------------------------ Original Caption: NASA image release Feb. 24, 2012 At the turn of the 19th century, the binary star system Eta Carinae was faint and undistinguished. In the first decades of the century, it became brighter and brighter, until, by April 1843, it was the second brightest star in the sky, outshone only by Sirius (which is almost a thousand times closer to Earth). In the years that followed, it gradually dimmed again and by the 20th century was totally invisible to the naked eye. The star has

  17. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  18. Pyroelectric Energy Harvesting: Model and Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TR-7663 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Pyroelectric Energy Harvesting: Model and Experiments by Felisa Sze and...Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7663 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Pyroelectric Energy Harvesting: Model...2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 07/2015–02/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pyroelectric Energy Harvesting: Model and

  19. Solar Energy Experiment for Beginning Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Clyde E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment illustrating how such chemical concepts as light absorption, thermodynamics, and solid-state photovoltaics can be incorporated into solar energy education. Completed in a three-hour period, the experiment requires about two hours for data collections with the remaining hour devoted to calculations and comparison of results.…

  20. Solar Energy Experiment for Beginning Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Clyde E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment illustrating how such chemical concepts as light absorption, thermodynamics, and solid-state photovoltaics can be incorporated into solar energy education. Completed in a three-hour period, the experiment requires about two hours for data collections with the remaining hour devoted to calculations and comparison of results.…

  1. Luminous supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2012-08-24

    Supernovae, the luminous explosions of stars, have been observed since antiquity. However, various examples of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe; luminosities >7 × 10(43) ergs per second) have only recently been documented. From the accumulated evidence, SLSNe can be classified as radioactively powered (SLSN-R), hydrogen-rich (SLSN-II), and hydrogen-poor (SLSN-I, the most luminous class). The SLSN-II and SLSN-I classes are more common, whereas the SLSN-R class is better understood. The physical origins of the extreme luminosity emitted by SLSNe are a focus of current research.

  2. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  3. Observation of two new L4 Neptune Trojans in the Dark Energy Survey supernova fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, D. W.

    2016-01-28

    We report the discovery of the eighth and ninth known Trojans in stable orbits around Neptune's leading Lagrange point, L4. The objects 2014 QO441 and 2014 QP441 were detected in data obtained during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 observing seasons by the Dark Energy Survey, using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory. Both are in high-inclination orbits (18.8° and 19.4° respectively). Furthermore, with an eccentricity of 0.104, 2014 QO441 has the most eccentric orbit of the eleven known stable Neptune Trojans. We describe the search procedure and investigate the objects' long-term dynamical stability and physical properties.

  4. Observation of two new L4 Neptune Trojans in the Dark Energy Survey supernova fields

    DOE PAGES

    Gerdes, D. W.

    2016-01-28

    We report the discovery of the eighth and ninth known Trojans in stable orbits around Neptune's leading Lagrange point, L4. The objects 2014 QO441 and 2014 QP441 were detected in data obtained during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 observing seasons by the Dark Energy Survey, using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory. Both are in high-inclination orbits (18.8° and 19.4° respectively). Furthermore, with an eccentricity of 0.104, 2014 QO441 has the most eccentric orbit of the eleven known stable Neptune Trojans. We describe the search procedure and investigate the objects' long-termmore » dynamical stability and physical properties.« less

  5. Observation of Two New L4 Neptune Trojans in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, D. W.; Jennings, R. J.; Bernstein, G. M.; Sako, M.; Adams, F.; Goldstein, D.; Kessler, R.; Hamilton, S.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarlé, G.; Thaler, J.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of the eighth and ninth known Trojans in stable orbits around Neptune’s leading Lagrange point, L4. The objects 2014 QO441 and 2014 QP441 were detected in data obtained during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 observing seasons by the Dark Energy Survey, using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Both are in high-inclination orbits (18.°8 and 19.°4, respectively). With an eccentricity of 0.104, 2014 QO441 has the most eccentric orbit of the 11 known stable Neptune Trojans. Here we describe the search procedure and investigate the objects’ long-term dynamical stability and physical properties.

  6. Supernovae, neutrino rest mass, and the middle-energy neutrino background in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Seidov, Z. F.

    Neutrinos emitted during the formation of the neutron stars and black holes form, together with relict microwave radiation and relict neutrinos, a background for the present universe. The energy of the kind of neutrino emitted in neutron star formation, at 3-30 MeV, is much greater than that of relict neutrinos and much smaller than that of the cosmic ray neutrinos; they are accordingly designated 'middle energy neutrinos' (MENs). It is presently shown that the MEN background's density, at 2-10 x 10 to the -33rd gm/cu cm, is greater than the density of relict microwave radiation and less than the density of matter. The MEN spectra presently calculated yield 0.002 to 0.008 solar neutrino units in the solar chlorine-argon detector. Possible neutrino rest mass effects are discussed for the cases of expanding universe propagation and MEN background spatial structure.

  7. Probing Dark Energy via Weak Gravitational Lensing with the Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    SNAP is a candidate for the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) that seeks to place constraints on the dark energy using two distinct methods. The first, Type Ia SN, is discussed in a separate white paper. The second method is weak gravitational lensing, which relies on the coherent distortions in the shapes of background galaxies by foreground mass structures. The excellent spatial resolution and photometric accuracy afforded by a 2-meter space-based observatory are crucial for achieving the high surface density of resolved galaxies, the tight control of systematic errors in the telescope's Point Spread Function (PSF), and the exquisite redshift accuracy and depth required by this project. These are achieved by the elimination of atmospheric distortion and much of the thermal and gravity loads on the telescope. The SN and WL methods for probing dark energy are highly complementary and the error contours from the two methods are largely orthogonal. The nominal SNAP weak lensing survey covers 1000 square degrees per year of operation in six optical and three near infrared filters (NIR) spanning the range 350 nm to 1.7 {micro}m. This survey will reach a depth of 26.6 AB magnitude in each of the nine filters and allow for approximately 100 resolved galaxies per square arcminute, {approx} 3 times that available from the best ground-based surveys. Photometric redshifts will be measured with statistical accuracy that enables scientific applications for even the faint, high redshift end of the sample. Ongoing work aims to meet the requirements on systematics in galaxy shape measurement, photometric redshift biases, and theoretical predictions.

  8. Hard X-ray Vela supernova observation on rocket experiment WRX-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehlikova, V.; Urban, M.; Nentvich, O.; Daniel, V.; Sieger, L.; Tutt, J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a hard X-ray telescope for the Vela nebula observation during a sounding rocket flight. The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRX-R) experiment is organised by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU), USA with a primary payload of a soft X-ray spectroscope. The Czech team developed a hard X-ray Lobster-eye telescope as a secondary payload. The Czech experiment’s astrophysical object of study is the Vela pulsar in the centre of the Vela nebula.

  9. Supernova neutrino physics with xenon dark matter detectors: A timely perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Rafael F.; McCabe, Christopher; Reichard, Shayne; Selvi, Marco; Tamborra, Irene

    2016-11-01

    Dark matter detectors that utilize liquid xenon have now achieved tonne-scale targets, giving them sensitivity to all flavors of supernova neutrinos via coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering. Considering for the first time a realistic detector model, we simulate the expected supernova neutrino signal for different progenitor masses and nuclear equations of state in existing and upcoming dual-phase liquid xenon experiments. We show that the proportional scintillation signal (S2) of a dual-phase detector allows for a clear observation of the neutrino signal and guarantees a particularly low energy threshold, while the backgrounds are rendered negligible during the supernova burst. XENON1T (XENONnT and LZ; DARWIN) experiments will be sensitive to a supernova burst up to 25 (35; 65) kpc from Earth at a significance of more than 5 σ , observing approximately 35 (123; 704) events from a 27 M⊙ supernova progenitor at 10 kpc. Moreover, it will be possible to measure the average neutrino energy of all flavors, to constrain the total explosion energy, and to reconstruct the supernova neutrino light curve. Our results suggest that a large xenon detector such as DARWIN will be competitive with dedicated neutrino telescopes, while providing complementary information that is not otherwise accessible.

  10. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  11. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  12. Astronomical Resources: Supernovae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1987-01-01

    Contains a partially annotated, nontechnical bibliography of recent materials about supernovae, including some about the discovery of a supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Includes citations of general books and articles about supernovae, articles about Supernova 1987A, and a few science fiction stories using supernovae. (TW)

  13. High Energy Particle Acceleration and Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification in Shell Type Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keohane, Jonathan Wilmore

    1998-07-01

    Thesis submitted to the faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Part I discusses the spatial correlation between the x-ray and radio morphologies of Cas A, and in the process address: the effect of inhomogeneous absorption on the apparent x-ray morphology, the interaction between the SNR and a molecular cloud, and the rapid move toward equipartition between the magnetic and gas energy densities. Discussions of the x-ray./radio correlation continues in Chapter 5, where we present a new, deep, ROSAT HRI image of Cas A. Chapter 7 presents ASCA spectra, with non-thermal spectral fits for 13 of the youngest SNRs in the Galaxy.

  14. Low Energy Solar Neutrino Spectroscopy:. Results from the Borexino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, D.

    2011-03-01

    neutrino oscillations. A further confirmations of the LMA scenario is provided by the absence of a day-night asymmetry in the 7Be signal. These experimental results allow to improve the knowledge of the pp neutrino flux, to place an upper limit on the CNO flux and also to explore non standard neutrino properties, improving the upper limit on the neutrino effective magnetic moment. Calibration campaigns aiming to reduce the systematical errors on fiducial volume definition and detector energy response have been performed and data analysis is presently in progress. Borexino has also recently observed antineutrinos from the Earth, for the first time at more the 3σ C.L. and has measured a rate of 3.9{ - 1.3}{ + 1.6} <=ft( {{ - 3.2}{ + 5.8} } ; ) events/(100ton-yr) at 68.3%(99.73%) C.L. Borexino is also a powerful supernova neutrino detector. Future prospects of the experiment include reducing the systematic error on the 7Be flux to below 5% and direct measurement of additional solar neutrino emissions such as pep, CNO and possibly pp.

  15. Space Experiments to Advance Beamed Energy Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Donald G.

    2010-05-01

    High power microwave sources are now available and usable, with modification, or beamed energy propulsion experiments in space. As output windows and vacuum seals are not needed space is a natural environment for high power vacuum tubes. Application to space therefore improves reliability and performance but complicates testing and qualification. Low power communications satellite devices (TWT, etc) have already been through the adapt-to-space design cycle and this history is a useful pathway for high power devices such as gyrotrons. In this paper, space experiments are described for low earth orbit (LEO) and lunar environment. These experiments are precursors to space application for beamed energy propulsion using high power microwaves. Power generation and storage using cryogenic systems are important elements of BEP systems and also have an important role as part of BEP experiments in the space environment.

  16. Magnetares como fuentes para potenciar supernovas superluminosas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersten, M. C.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetars have been proposed as one of the possible sources to power the light curve of super-luminous supernovae. We have included the energy deposited by a hypothetical magnetar in our one-dimensional hydrodynamical code, and analyzed the dynamical effect on the supernova ejecta. In particular, we present a model for SN 2011kl, the first object associated with a ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst. Finally, we show its effect on the light curves of hydrogen rich supernovae.

  17. Supernova 2012aw - a high-energy clone of archetypal Type IIP SN 1999em

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subhash; Kumar, Brijesh; Sutaria, Firoza; Kumar, Brajesh; Roy, Rupak; Bhatt, V. K.; Pandey, S. B.; Chandola, H. C.; Sagar, Ram; Misra, Kuntal; Chakraborti, Sayan

    2013-08-01

    We present densely sampled UBVRI/griz photometric and low-resolution (6-10 Å) optical spectroscopic observations from 4 to 270 d after explosion of a newly discovered Type II SN 2012aw in a nearby (˜9.9 Mpc) galaxy M95. The light-curve characteristics of apparent magnitudes, colours, bolometric luminosity and the presence and evolution of prominent spectral features are found to have striking similarity with the archetypal IIP SNe 1999em, 1999gi and 2004et. The early time observations of SN 2012aw clearly detect minima in the light curve of V, R and I bands near 37 d after explosion and this we suggest to be an observational evidence for emergence of recombination phase. The mid-plateau MV magnitude (-16.67 ± 0.04) lies in between the bright (˜-18) and subluminous (˜-15) IIP SNe. The mass of nickel is 0.06 ± 0.01 M⊙. The SYNOW modelling of spectra indicate that the value and evolution of the photospheric velocity is similar to SN 2004et, but about ˜600 km s-1 higher than that of SNe 1999em and 1999gi at comparable epochs. This trend is more apparent in the line velocities of Hα and Hβ. A comparison of ejecta velocity properties with that of existing radiation-hydrodynamical simulations indicate that the energy of explosion lies in the range 1-2 × 1051 ergs; a further comparison of nebular phase [O I] doublet luminosity with SNe 2004et and 1987A indicate that the mass of progenitor star is about 14 to 15 M⊙. The presence of high-velocity absorption features in the mid-to-late plateau and possibly in early phase spectra show signs of interaction between ejecta and the circumstellar matter; being consistent with its early time detection at X-ray and radio wavebands.

  18. Color transparency experiments at higher energies

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, B.W.

    1994-04-01

    The phenomena of Color Transparency has recently attracted a significant amount of theoretical (and experimental) interest. With an increase in the CEBAF beam energy to 8 - 10 GeV, important new data on the process could become available. The present status of the experiments and future prospects at CEBAF are discussed.

  19. A Simple and Inexpensive Solar Energy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, J. H.; Pedersen, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    An experiment is presented which utilizes the current solid state technology to demonstrate electrochemical generation of hydrogen gas, direct generation of electricity for pumping water, and energy conversion efficiency. The experimental module costs about $100 and can be used repeatedly. (BB)

  20. Symmetron dark energy in laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Upadhye, Amol

    2013-01-18

    The symmetron scalar field is a matter-coupled dark energy candidate which effectively decouples from matter in high-density regions through a symmetry restoration. We consider a previously unexplored regime, in which the vacuum mass μ~2.4×10(-3) eV of the symmetron is near the dark energy scale, and the matter coupling parameter M~1 TeV is just beyond standard model energies. Such a field will give rise to a fifth force at submillimeter distances which can be probed by short-range gravity experiments. We show that a torsion pendulum experiment such as Eöt-Wash can exclude symmetrons in this regime for all self-couplings λ is < or approximately equal to 7.5.

  1. Supernova Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, the study of stellar explosions -- supernovae -- have focused almost exclusively on the strong optical emission that dominates the bolometric luminosity in the days following the ultimate demise of the star. Yet many of the leading breakthroughs in our understanding of stellar death have been enabled by obtaining data at other wavelengths. For example, I have shown that 1% of all supernovae give rise to powerful relativistic jets, representing the biggest bangs in the Universe since the Big Bang. My recent serendipitous X-ray discovery of a supernova in the act of exploding (“in flagrante delicto”) revealed a novel technique to discover new events and provide clues on the shock physics at the heart of the explosion. With the advent of sensitive new radio telescopes, my research group combines clues from across the electromagnetic spectrum (radio to gamma-ray), leading us to a holistic study of stellar death, the physics of the explosions, and their role in fertilizing the Universe with new elements, by providing the community with cosmic autopsy reports.

  2. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  3. Supernova 1987A at 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyromilio, J.; Leibundgut, B.; Fransson, C.; Larsson, J.; Migotto, K.; Girard, J.

    2017-03-01

    Thirty years on, SN 1987A continues to develop and, over the last decade in particular, has: revealed the presence of a large centrally concentrated reservoir of dust; shown the presence of molecular species within the ejecta; expanded such that the ejecta structure is angularly resolved; begun the destruction of the circumstellar ring and transitioned to being dominated by energy sources external to the ejecta. We are participating in a live experiment in the creation of a supernova remnant and here the recent progress is briefly overviewed. Exciting developments can be expected as the ejecta and the reverse shock continue their interaction, the X-rays penetrate into the cold molecular core and we observe the return of the material into the interstellar medium. We anticipate that the nature of the remnant of the leptonisation event in the centre will also be revealed.

  4. Improvements to type Ia supernova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Clare M.

    Type Ia Supernovae provided the first strong evidence of dark energy and are still an important tool for measuring the accelerated expansion of the universe. However, future improvements will be limited by systematic uncertainties in our use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles. Using Type Ia supernovae for cosmology relies on our ability to standardize their absolute magnitudes, but this relies on imperfect models of supernova spectra time series. This thesis is focused on using data from the Nearby Supernova Factory both to understand current sources of uncertainty in standardizing Type Ia supernovae and to develop techniques that can be used to limit uncertainty in future analyses. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  5. The Union3 Supernova Ia Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, David; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Bruce, Adam; Chappell, Greta; Currie, Miles; Dawson, Kyle S.; Deustua, Susana E.; Doi, Mamoru; Fakhouri, Hannah; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gibbons, Rachel A.; Goobar, Ariel; Hsiao, Eric; Huang, Xiaosheng; Ihara, Yutaka; Kim, Alex G.; Knop, Robert A.; Kowalski, Marek; Krechmer, Evan; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Meyers, Joshua; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nordin, Jakob; Perlmutter, Saul; Ripoche, Pascal; Rykoff, Eli S.; Saunders, Clare; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Suzuki, Nao; Takanashi, Naohiro; Yasuda, Naoki; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2015-01-01

    High-redshift supernovae observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are crucial for constraining any time variation in dark energy. In a forthcoming paper (Rubin+, in prep), we will present a cosmological analysis incorporating existing supernovae with improved calibrations, and new HST-observed supernovae. We combine these data with most of the world's current literature data, and fit using SALT2-4 to create the Union3 Supernova compilation. We present a new analysis framework that allows non-linear light-curve width and color corrections, direct modeling of color dispersion, and a redshift-dependent host-mass correction.

  6. Supernova 1987A: The Supernova of a Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Supernova 1987A, the brightest supernova since Kepler's in 1604, was detected 30 years ago at a distance of 160 000 light years in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. Visible with the naked eye and detected with the full range of technology constructed since Kepler's time, SN 1987A has continued to be a rich source of empirical information to help understand supernova explosions and their evolution into supernova remnants. While the light output has faded by a factor of 10 000 000 over those 30 years, instrumentation, like the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array has continued to improve so that this supernova continues to be visible in X-rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared light and in radio emission. In this review, I will sketch what has been learned from these observations about the pre-supernova star and its final stages of evolution, the explosion physics, the energy sources for emission, and the shock physics as the expanding debris encounters the circumstellar ring that was created about 20 000 years before the explosion. Today, SN 1987A is making the transition to a supernova remnant- the energetics are no longer dominated by the radioactive elements produced in the explosion, but by the interaction of the expanding debris with the surrounding gas. While we are confident that the supernova explosion had its origin in gravitational collapse, careful searches for a compact object at the center of the remnant place upper limits of a few solar luminosities on that relic. Support for HST GO programs 13401 and 13405 was provided by NASA through grants from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  7. Supernovae and neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Beacom

    2002-09-19

    A long-standing problem in supernova physics is how to measure the total energy and temperature of {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}, {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, and {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. While of the highest importance, this is very difficult because these flavors only have neutral-current detector interactions. We propose that neutrino-proton elastic scattering, {nu} + p {yields} {nu} + p, can be used for the detection of supernova neutrinos in scintillator detectors. It should be emphasized immediately that the dominant signal is on free protons. Though the proton recoil kinetic energy spectrum is soft, with T{sub p} {approx_equal} 2E{sub {nu}}{sup 2}/M{sub p}, and the scintillation light output from slow, heavily ionizing protons is quenched, the yield above a realistic threshold is nearly as large as that from {bar {nu}}{sub e} + p {yields} e{sup +} + n. In addition, the measured proton spectrum is related to the incident neutrino spectrum. The ability to detect this signal would give detectors like KamLAND and Borexino a crucial and unique role in the quest to detect supernova neutrinos.

  8. Methodology of the joint search for Gravitational Wave and Low Energy Neutrino signals from Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casentini, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) have a neutrino (v) signature confirmed by SN 1987A and are potential sources of Gravitational Waves (GWs). vs and GWs coming from these sources will reach the observer almost simultaneously and without significant interaction with interstellar matter. The expected GW signals are in the range of the upcoming advanced detectors for galactic neighborhood events. However, there are still significant uncertainties on the theoretical model of the emission. A joint search of coincident vs and GWs from these sources would bring valuable information from the inner core of the collapsing star and would enhance the detection of the so-called Silent Supernovae. Recently, a project for a joint search involving GW interferometers and v detectors has started. In this paper we discuss about the principal GW theoretical models of emission, and we present a methodological study of the joint search project between GW and v.

  9. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  10. Young Neutron Stars in Extragalactic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Nathan; Lorimer, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars are compact remnants of stellar cores left behind by supernova explosions. They spin rapidly and emit electromagnetic radiation from their magnetic poles, and gradually lose rotational energy. This project tests and expands upon a previous prediction by Perna et al. for the initial spin rates of neutron stars by attempting to model the x-ray emission from extragalactic supernovae. A computer simulation generated a set of pulsars of known initial rotational periods, magnetic field strengths, and ages, and will calculate the expected x-ray luminosities from the known relationship between magnetic field strengths, slow-down rates, and radio luminosities. This experiment expanded upon the original research by incorporating variability in the angle between the magnetic and rotational axes of each pulsar as well as the braking index value, which in the original publication were kept constant. This examines the effect of the angle on pulsars’ x-ray luminosities. The simulated x-ray luminosities were compared to the known x-ray luminosities of known supernova explosions, which served as an upper limit to determine the highest possible initial rotation speeds. Funding was provided through the WVU Summer Undergraduate Research Program.

  11. Finding Distances to Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are known as standard candles due to their consistency, allowing us to measure distances based on their brightness. But what if these explosions arent quite as consistent as we thought? Due scientific diligence requires careful checks, so a recent study investigates whether the metallicity of a supernovas environment affects the peak luminosity of the explosion.Metallicity Dependence?Type Ia supernovae are incredibly powerful tools for determining distances in our universe. Because these supernovae are formed by white dwarfs that explode when they reach a uniform accreted mass, the supernova peak luminosity is thought to be very consistent. This consistency allows these supernovae to be used as standard candles to measure distances to their host galaxies.But what if that peak luminosity is affected by a factor that we havent taken into account? Theorists have proposed that the luminosities of Type Ia supernovae might depend on the metallicity of their environments with high-metallicity environments suppressing supernova luminosities. If this is true, then we could be systematically mis-measuring cosmological distances using these supernovae.Testing AbundancesSupernova brightnesses vs. the metallicity of their environments. Low-metallicity supernovae (blue shading) and high-metallicity supernovae (red shading) have an average magnitude difference of ~0.14. [Adapted from Moreno-Raya et al. 2016]A team led by Manuel Moreno-Raya, of the Center for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain, has observed 28 Type Ia supernovae in an effort to test for such a metallicity dependence. These supernovae each have independent distance measurements (e.g., from Cepheids or the Tully-Fisher relation).Moreno-Raya and collaborators used spectra from the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope to estimate oxygen abundances in the region where each of these supernovae exploded. They then used these measurements to determine if metallicity of the local region

  12. High energy electron-positron experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Chul, Son

    We carried out e(+)e(-) experiments in two centers of mass energy regions: the AMY experiment in a 60 GeV region and the L 3 experiment in a 90 GeV region. The two experiments have both tested the Electroweak Standard model with high precision and measured the important coupling constants in QCD. The two-photon physics were also studied and new particles and related new physics were searched for. The results of AMY experiments includes those of measurements of hadronic production cross section, leptonic production cross sections, and their ratios, the forward-backward asymmetries of leptons and b-quarks and most of the data were consistent with the predictions of the Standard Model. The L 3 experiments, with the high resolution L 3 detector and many Z's recorded, have measured the mass and the widths of Z, the g(sub v) and g(sub A) of leptons, the forward-backward asymmetries of b-quarks, tau polarizations, and related the sin(sup 2)theta(sub W). They also tested the QCD and QED and searched for Higgs particles and other new particles in vain. But the L 3 observed a rather followed the L 3 searching for an unknown s-channel scalar boson but only obtained the limits on (2 J+1)(Gamma) x BR(gamma)(gamma).

  13. Observations of High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons by the ATIC Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.; Chang, J.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Christl, M.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sokolskaya N. V.; Watts, J. W.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    Recently the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon experiment reported observations of high energy cosmic ray electrons over the energy range 300 to 800 GeV, indicating a feature or "bump" in the otherwise smoothly decreasing energy spectrum. The severe energy losses that occur as these high energy particles traverse the galaxy render the cosmic ray electron spectrum sensitive to local (a few kiloparsecs) sources and hence very interesting. The ATIC results are the first time that such a cosmic ray spectrum anomaly has been observed at high energy. Potential sources of this electron excess include pulsars, microquasars, supernovae remnants as well as the annihilation of exotic dark matter candidate particles. ATIC has had three successful high altitude flights over the continent of Antarctica 2000-2001, 2002-2003 and 2007-2008. Only results from the first two flights have been reported so far. During this talk we will discuss the ATIC experiment, the electron observations (including preliminary results from the most recent ATIC flight), examine the merits of the various source models and compare the ATIC observations with other recent measurements.

  14. Observations of High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons by the ATIC Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.; Chang, J.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Christl, M.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Recently the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon experiment reported observations of high energy cosmic ray electrons over the energy range 300 to 800 GeV, indicating a feature or "bump" in the otherwise smoothly decreasing energy spectrum. The severe energy losses that occur as these high energy particles traverse the galaxy render the cosmic ray electron spectrum sensitive to local (a few kiloparsecs) sources and hence very interesting. The ATIC results are the first time that such a cosmic ray spectrum anomaly has been observed at high energy. Potential sources of this electron excess include pulsars, microquasars, supernovae remnants as well as the annihilation of exotic dark matter candidate particles. ATIC has had three successful high altitude flights over the continent of Antarctica 2000-2001, 2002-2003 and 2007-2008. Only results from the first two flights have been reported so far. During this talk we will discuss the ATIC experiment, the electron observations (including preliminary results from the most recent ATIC flight), examine the merits of the various source models and compare the ATIC observations with other recent measurements.

  15. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson /Inst. Astron., Honolulu /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Stockholm U.

    2007-01-08

    We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

  16. Earth to Orbit Beamed Energy Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Montgomery, Edward E.

    2017-01-01

    As a means of primary propulsion, beamed energy propulsion offers the benefit of offloading much of the propulsion system mass from the vehicle, increasing its potential performance and freeing it from the constraints of the rocket equation. For interstellar missions, beamed energy propulsion is arguably the most viable in the near- to mid-term. A near-term demonstration showing the feasibility of beamed energy propulsion is necessary and, fortunately, feasible using existing technologies. Key enabling technologies are large area, low mass spacecraft and efficient and safe high power laser systems capable of long distance propagation. NASA is currently developing the spacecraft technology through the Near Earth Asteroid Scout solar sail mission and has signed agreements with the Planetary Society to study the feasibility of precursor laser propulsion experiments using their LightSail-2 solar sail spacecraft. The capabilities of Space Situational Awareness assets and the advanced analytical tools available for fine resolution orbit determination now make it possible to investigate the practicalities of an Earth-to-orbit Beamed Energy eXperiment (EBEX) - a demonstration at delivered power levels that only illuminate a spacecraft without causing damage to it. The degree to which this can be expected to produce a measurable change in the orbit of a low ballistic coefficient spacecraft is investigated. Key system characteristics and estimated performance are derived for a near term mission opportunity involving the LightSail-2 spacecraft and laser power levels modest in comparison to those proposed previously. While the technology demonstrated by such an experiment is not sufficient to enable an interstellar precursor mission, if approved, then it would be the next step toward that goal.

  17. Prompt directional detection of galactic supernova by combining large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, V.; Chirac, T.; Lasserre, T.; Volpe, C.; Cribier, M.; Durero, M.; Gaffiot, J.; Houdy, T.; Letourneau, A.; Mention, G.; Pequignot, M.; Sibille, V.; Vivier, M.

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generation of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water Čerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each experiment. Finally, we discuss the possibility to constrain the neutrino energy spectrum as well as the mass of the newly born neutron star with the LLSD data.

  18. Prompt directional detection of galactic supernova by combining large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, V.; Chirac, T.; Lasserre, T. E-mail: tchirac@gmail.fr; and others

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generation of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water Čerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each experiment. Finally, we discuss the possibility to constrain the neutrino energy spectrum as well as the mass of the newly born neutron star with the LLSD data.

  19. Operational experience from solar thermal energy projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-03-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  20. Operational Experience from Solar Thermal Energy Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  1. First supernova companion star found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    discovery possible.” Supernovae occur when a star of more than about eight times the mass of the Sun reaches the end of its nuclear fuel reserves and can no longer produce enough energy to keep the star from collapsing under its own immense weight. The core of the star collapses, and the outer layers are ejected in a fast-moving shock wave. This huge energy release causes the visible supernova we see. While astronomers are convinced that observations will match this theoretical model, they are in the embarrassing position that they have confidently identified only two stars that later exploded as supernovae - the precursors of supernovae 1987A and 1993J. There have been more than 2000 supernovae discovered in galaxies beyond the Milky Way and there appear to be about eight distinct sub-classes. However identifying which stars produce which flavours has proved incredibly difficult. This team has now embarked on a parallel project with the Hubble Space Telescope to image a large number of galaxies and then wait patiently for a supernova to explode. Supernovae appear in spiral galaxies like M81 on average once every 100 years or so. The team, led by Stephen Smartt, hope to increase the numbers of supernova progenitors known from 2 to 20 over the next five years. Notes for editors The team is composed of Stephen J. Smartt and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge, UK), Rolf. P. Kudritzki (University of Hawaii, USA), Philipp Podsiadlowski (University of Oxford, UK) and Gerry F. Gilmore (University of Cambridge, UK). Animations of the discovery and general Hubble Space Telescope background footage are available from http://www.spacetelescope.org/video/heic0401_vnr.html

  2. Detecting supernovae neutrino with Earth matter effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei

    2016-12-01

    We study Earth matter effect in oscillations of supernovae neutrinos. We show that detecting Earth matter effect gives an independent measurement of spectra of supernovae neutrinos, i.e., the flavor difference of the spectra of supernovae neutrinos. We study the effect of energy resolution and angular resolution of a final electron or positron on detecting the signal of Earth matter effect. We show that varying the widths of energy bins in analysis can change the signal strength of Earth matter effect and the statistical fluctuation. A reasonable choice of energy bins can both suppress the statistical fluctuation and make a good signal strength relative to the statistical fluctuation. Neutrino detectors with good energy resolution and good angular resolution are therefore preferred so that there is more freedom to vary energy bins and to optimize the signal of Earth matter effect in analyzing events of supernovae neutrinos.

  3. Calibration Monitor for Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, M. E.

    2009-11-23

    The goal of this program was to design, build, test, and characterize a flight qualified calibration source and monitor for a Dark Energy related experiment: ACCESS - 'Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars'. This calibration source, the On-board Calibration Monitor (OCM), is a key component of our ACCESS spectrophotometric calibration program. The OCM will be flown as part of the ACCESS sub-orbital rocket payload in addition to monitoring instrument sensitivity on the ground. The objective of the OCM is to minimize systematic errors associated with any potential changes in the ACCESS instrument sensitivity. Importantly, the OCM will be used to monitor instrument sensitivity immediately after astronomical observations while the instrument payload is parachuting to the ground. Through monitoring, we can detect, track, characterize, and thus correct for any changes in instrument senstivity over the proposed 5-year duration of the assembled and calibrated instrument.

  4. High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    This grant supported our work on the High Energy Antimatter Telescope(HEAT) balloon experiment. The HEAT payload is designed to perform a series of experiments focusing on the cosmic ray positron, electron, and antiprotons. Thus far two flights of the HEAT -e+/- configuration have taken place. During the period of this grant major accomplishments included the following: (1) Publication of the first results of the 1994 HEAT-e+/- flight in Physical Review Letters; (2) Successful reflight of the HEAT-e+/- payload from Lynn Lake in August 1995; (3) Repair and refurbishment of the elements of the HEAT payload damaged during the landing following the 1995 flight; and (4) Upgrade of the ground support equipment for future flights of the HEAT payload.

  5. Summary talk: Experiments at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    In heavy-ion collisions at beam energies √sNN between 1 and 150A GeV highest baryonic densities are reached at rather moderate temperatures. By varying the beam energy and the system size a broad range of the QCD phase diagram is scanned where several interesting phenomena are predicted by theoretical models. Apart from possible phase transitions and existence of a critical point in this regime, the production of strangeness and the interaction of strange particles with the surrounding hot and dense nuclear medium constitutes a prominent probe not only to address the underlying reaction mechanisms and production processes but in particular to constrain densities and temperatures reached in the course of the collision. Recent results on heavy-ion collisions in this beam energy regime obtained by various experimental collaborations are summarized, with special emphasis on strangeness production, rare probes, and critical phenomena. The importance of data on elementary reactions (i.e., pp, p+nucleus, and π+nucleus) as a bench mark for theoretical models and their relevance for understanding the underlying mechanisms of heavy-ion collisions are being discussed. Several interesting observables have been presented in various contributions, which give further motivation for the construction of high-rate experiments at new accelerator facilities.

  6. Classification of 17 DES supernovae by SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, E.; Bassett, B.; Crawford, S.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.

    2016-02-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 17 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra (380-820nm) were obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  7. Supernova explosions in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Burrows, A

    2000-02-17

    During the lifetime of our Milky Way galaxy, there have been something like 100 million supernova explosions, which have enriched the Galaxy with the oxygen we breathe, the iron in our cars, the calcium in our bones and the silicon in the rocks beneath our feet. These exploding stars also influence the birth of new stars and are the source of the energetic cosmic rays that irradiate us on the Earth. The prodigious amount of energy (approximately 10(51), or approximately 2.5 x 10(28) megatonnes of TNT equivalent) and momentum associated with each supernova may even have helped to shape galaxies as they formed in the early Universe. Supernovae are now being used to measure the geometry of the Universe, and have recently been implicated in the decades-old mystery of the origin of the gamma-ray bursts. Together with major conceptual advances in our theoretical understanding of supernovae, these developments have made supernovae the centre of attention in astrophysics.

  8. Magnetar-Powered Supernovae in Two Dimensions. I. Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, S. E.; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the radiation emitted by a rapidly rotating magnetar embedded in a young supernova can greatly amplify its luminosity. These one-dimensional studies have also revealed the existence of an instability arising from the piling up of radiatively accelerated matter in a thin dense shell deep inside the supernova. Here, we examine the problem in two dimensions and find that, while instabilities cause mixing and fracture this shell into filamentary structures that reduce the density contrast, the concentration of matter in a hollow shell persists. The extent of the mixing depends upon the relative energy input by the magnetar and the kinetic energy of the inner ejecta. The light curve and spectrum of the resulting supernova will be appreciably altered, as will the appearance of the supernova remnant, which will be shellular and filamentary. A similar pile up and mixing might characterize other events where energy is input over an extended period by a centrally concentrated source, e.g., a pulsar, radioactive decay, a neutrino-powered wind, or colliding shells. The relevance of our models to the recent luminous transient ASASSN-15lh is briefly discussed.

  9. Uncertainties in Supernova Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Patrick A.; Fryer, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    Theoretical nucleosynthetic yields from supernovae are sensitive to both the details of the progenitor star and the explosion calculation. We attempt to comprehensively identify the sources of uncertainties in these yields. In this poster we concentrate on the variations in yields from a single progenitor arising from common 1-dimensional methods of approximating a supernova explosion. 3-dimensional effects in the explosion and the progenitor and improved physics in the progenitor evolution are also given preliminary consideration. For the 1-dimensional explosions we find that both elemental and isotopic yields for Si and heavier elements are a sensitive function of explosion energy. Also, piston-driven and thermal bomb type explosions have different yields for the same explosion energy. Yields derived from 1-dimensional explosions are non-unique. Bulk yields of common elements can vary by factors of several depending upon the assumptions of the calculation. This work was carried out in part under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy at Los Alamos National Laboratory and supported by Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396, by a DOE SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER41176, an NNSA ASC grant, and a subcontract to the ASCI FLASH Center at the University of Chicago.

  10. Detection of supernova neutrinos at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-07-01

    After considering supernova shock effects, Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, neutrino collective effects, and Earth matter effects, the detection of supernova neutrinos at the China Spallation Neutron Source is studied and the expected numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos observed through various reaction channels are calculated with the neutrino energy spectra described by the Fermi-Dirac distribution and the “beta fit” distribution respectively. Furthermore, the numerical calculation method of supernova neutrino detection on Earth is applied to some other spallation neutron sources, and the total expected numbers of supernova neutrinos observed through different reactions channels are given. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020, 11275025, 11575023)

  11. Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-08-23

    The physical relation between the properties of Type Ia supernovae and their host galaxies is investigated. Such supernovae are used to constrain the properties of dark energy, making it crucial to understand their physical properties and to check for systematic effects relating to the stellar populations of the progenitor stars from which these supernovae arose. This grant found strong evidence for two distinct populations of supernovae, and correlations between the progenitor stellar populations and the nature of the supernova light curves.

  12. GALAXY OUTFLOWS WITHOUT SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan; Ostriker, Eve C. E-mail: sharanya.sur@asu.edu

    2016-02-10

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have ≈50–100 km s{sup −1} line of sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds ≈35 km s{sup −1}, as occurs in the dense disks that have star-formation rate (SFR) densities above ≈0.1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the SFR density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.

  13. Starting Models in FLASH for Calculations of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Caceres, A.; Calder, A. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Fryxell, B.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Plewa, T.; Ricker, P.; Riley, K.; Rosner, R.; Siegel, A.; Timmes, F. X.; Truran, J. W.; Vladimirova, N.; Wiers, G.; Zingale, M.

    2003-05-01

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to be the result of a thermonuclear explosion in a white dwarf that is approaching the Chandrasekhar mass limit. The properties of the supernova explosion, including its energy, depends significantly on the way in which the thermonuclear runaway begins. Where in the white dwarf ignition takes place, and how many ignition points there are, are important unsolved questions. We discuss the challenges of modeling Type Ia supernova during the several hours before thermonuclear runaway using the FLASH code. In three-dimensional hydrodynamic codes, the pre-supernova white dwarf can exhibit ``ringing'' at the fundamental frequency of the star that is driven by numerical noise. These solutions manifest themselves as undamped velocity waves (the white dwarf "breathes in and out") that reach peak amplitudes of about 200 km s-1. We show the results of several methods aimed at reducing the amplitude of these undamped waves in FLASH. We also discuss some of our experiments in mapping spherically symmetric models, which suggest large scale convective motions of 50 km s-1 a few hours prior to ignition, onto a three-dimensional mesh. This work was supported in part by the DOE under the ASCI/Alliance program.

  14. Neutrino mass hierarchy and stepwise spectral swapping of supernova neutrino flavors.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huaiyu; Fuller, George M; Carlson, J; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2007-12-14

    We examine a phenomenon recently predicted by numerical simulations of supernova neutrino flavor evolution: the swapping of supernova nu(e) and nu(mu,tau) energy spectra below (above) energy E(C) for the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. We present the results of large-scale numerical calculations which show that in the normal neutrino mass hierarchy case, E(C) decreases as the assumed effective 2x2 vacuum nu(e)<==>nu(mu,tau) mixing angle (approximately theta13) is decreased. In contrast, these calculations indicate that E(C) is essentially independent of the vacuum mixing angle in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy case. With a good neutrino signal from a future galactic supernova, the above results could be used to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy even if theta13 is too small to be measured by terrestrial neutrino oscillation experiments.

  15. Revisiting the Contributions of Supernova and Hypernova Remnants to the Diffuse High-Energy Backgrounds: Constraints on Very High Redshift Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-08-01

    Star-forming and starburst galaxies are considered one of the viable candidate sources of the high-energy cosmic neutrino background detected in IceCube. We revisit contributions of supernova remnants (SNRs) and hypernova remnants (HNRs) in such galaxies to the diffuse high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray backgrounds, in light of the latest Fermi data above 50 GeV. We also take into account possible time-dependent effects of the cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration during the SNR evolution. CRs accelerated by the SNR shocks can produce high-energy neutrinos up to ˜100 TeV energies, but CRs from HNRs can extend the spectrum up to PeV energies. We show that, only if HNRs are dominant over SNRs, the diffuse neutrino background above 100 TeV can be explained without contradicting the gamma-ray data. However, the neutrino data around 30 TeV remain unexplained, which might suggest a different population of gamma-ray dark CR sources. We also consider possible contributions of Pop-III HNRs up to z ≲ 10 and show that they are not constrained by the gamma-ray data and thus could contribute to the diffuse high-energy backgrounds if their explosion energy reaches {{ E }}{POP - {III}}˜ \\text{a few}× {10}53 erg. More conservatively, our results suggest that the explosion energy of Pop-III HNRs is {{ E }}{POP - {III}}≲ 7× {10}53 erg.

  16. The Shape of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    emit an unpolarized spectrum. Otherwise, the polarization of an objects spectrum reveals information about its geometry.Modeling EjectaThe authors best model of the geometry of SN 2015bn 24 days before (top) and 28 days after (bottom) peak flux. The model consists of two ellipsoidal layers of ejecta material. [Inserra et al. 2016]Based on their observations, Inserra and collaborators find that SN 2015bn is not spherically symmetric but it does appear to be axisymmetric around a single dominant axis. They also find that the polarization level of the object changes both with wavelength and over time.To explain these dependencies, the authors produce a simple toy model of SN 2015bn. In the best-fitting model, the supernova has a two-layered ellipsoidal or bipolar geometry. The inner region becomes more and more aspherical as time passes.What does this model tell us about the physical cause of this superluminous supernova? Inserra and collaborators argue that the axisymmetric shape favors a core-collapse explosion. A central inner engine of a spinning magnetar (a highly magnetized neutron star) or black hole then remains at the center of this explosion, pumping energy into it and causing the increase of the inner asymmetry over time.The authors caution that their models are very preliminary but these observations should drive future, more detailed modeling, as well as further spectropolarimetric observations of future nearby superluminous supernovae. With luck, we will soon better understand what drives these unusual explosions.CitationC. Inserra et al 2016 ApJ 831 79. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/831/1/79

  17. Understanding the Ultraviolet Flux from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of observed magnitudes into flux densities for the creation of spectral energy distributions or integrating bolometric fluxes depends on the spectral shape of the source and the characteristics of the filters. Such details are often neglected, though the effects can be significant. We demonstrate the complexities of conversion as they relate to ultraviolet observations of supernovae, though the principles have broader application. These complexities include spectral model testing, the meaning of effective wavelengths, the endpoints of integration, and extinction corrections. Using data from the Swift Optical Ultraviolet Supernova Archive (SOUSA) we will present integrated luminosity curves from example supernovae of all types. We will also show the unprecedented ultraviolet luminosity of ASASSN-15lh/SN2015L. The creation of ultraviolet/optical spectral energy distributions is helpful in predicting the observed brightness and detectability of these supernovae at higher redshifts with optical telescopes such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  18. Supernova frequency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the frequency of type I and II supernovae occurring in galaxies of different types are derived from observational material acquired by the supernova patrol of the Shternberg Astronomical Institute.

  19. Supernova neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, K.

    2015-07-15

    In this presentation I summarize the main detection channels for neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae, and describe current status of and future prospects for supernova-neutrino-sensitive detectors worldwide.

  20. Alternative Energy Sources. Experiments You Can Do...from Edison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benrey, Ronald M.; Schultz, Robert F.

    Eight experiments dealing with alternative energy sources are presented. Each experiment includes an introductory section which provides background information and discusses the promises and problems of the particular energy source, a list of materials needed to complete the experiment, and the procedures to be used. The experiments involve:…

  1. Alternative Energy Sources. Experiments You Can Do...from Edison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benrey, Ronald M.; Schultz, Robert F.

    Eight experiments dealing with alternative energy sources are presented. Each experiment includes an introductory section which provides background information and discusses the promises and problems of the particular energy source, a list of materials needed to complete the experiment, and the procedures to be used. The experiments involve:…

  2. HELIX: The High Energy Light Isotope Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musser, Jim

    This is the lead proposal for a new suborbital program, HELIX (High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment), designed to make measurements of the isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei from ~200 MeV/nuc to ~10 GeV/nuc. Past measurements of this kind have provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information on acceleration and confinement time scales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. The most detailed information currently available comes from the ACE/CRIS mission, but is restricted to energies below a few 100 MeV/nuc. HELIX aims at extending this energy range by over an order of magnitude, where, in most cases, no measurements of any kind exist, and where relativistic time dilation affects the apparent lifetime of radioactive clock nuclei. The HELIX measurements will provide essential information for understanding the propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy. This is crucial for properly interpreting several intriguing anomalies reported in recent cosmic-ray measurements, pertaining to the energy spectra of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei, and to the anomalous rise in the positron fraction at higher energy. HELIX employs a high-precision magnet spectrometer to provide measurements which are not achievable by any current or planned instrument. The superconducting magnet originally used for the HEAT payload in five successful high-altitude flights will be combined with state-of-the-art detectors to measure the charge, time-of-flight, magnetic rigidity, and velocity of cosmic-ray particles with high precision. The instrumentation includes plastic scintillators, silicon-strip detectors repurposed from Fermilab's CDF detector, a high-performance gas drift chamber, and a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter employing aerogel radiators and silicon photomultipliers. To reduce cost and technical risk, the HELIX program will be structured in two stages. The first

  3. HELIX: The High Energy Light Isotope Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakely, Scott

    This is the lead proposal for a new suborbital program, HELIX (High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment), designed to make measurements of the isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei from ~200 MeV/nuc to ~10 GeV/nuc. Past measurements of this kind have provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information on acceleration and confinement time scales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. The most detailed information currently available comes from the ACE/CRIS mission, but is restricted to energies below a few 100 MeV/nuc. HELIX aims at extending this energy range by over an order of magnitude, where, in most cases, no measurements of any kind exist, and where relativistic time dilation affects the apparent lifetime of radioactive clock nuclei. The HELIX measurements will provide essential information for understanding the propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy. This is crucial for properly interpreting several intriguing anomalies reported in recent cosmic-ray measurements, pertaining to the energy spectra of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei, and to the anomalous rise in the positron fraction at higher energy. HELIX employs a high-precision magnet spectrometer to provide measurements which are not achievable by any current or planned instrument. The superconducting magnet originally used for the HEAT payload in five successful high-altitude flights will be combined with state-of-the-art detectors to measure the charge, time-of-flight, magnetic rigidity, and velocity of cosmic-ray particles with high precision. The instrumentation includes plastic scintillators, silicon-strip detectors repurposed from Fermilab's CDF detector, a high-performance gas drift chamber, and a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter employing aerogel radiators and silicon photomultipliers. To reduce cost and technical risk, the HELIX program will be structured in two stages. The first

  4. Core-collapse supernova neutrinos and neutrino properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gava, J.; Volpe, C.

    2008-08-29

    Core-collapse supernovae are powerful neutrino sources. The observation of a future (extra-)galactic supernova explosion or of the relic supernova neutrinos might provide important information on the supernova dynamics, on the supernova formation rate and on neutrino properties. One might learn more about unknown neutrino properties either from indirect effects in the supernova (e.g. on the explosion or on in the r-process) or from modifications of the neutrino time or energy distributions in a detector on Earth. Here we will discuss in particular possible effects of CP violation in the lepton sector. We will also mention the interest of future neutrino-nucleus interaction measurements for the precise knowledge of supernova neutrino detector response to electron neutrinos.

  5. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  6. The spectacular evolution of Supernova 1996al over 15 years: a low energy explosion of a stripped massive star in a highly structured environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    The final fate of massive stars is not well explored and depending on the stellar mass may have very much different outputs, ranging from very energetic explosions (e.g. GRB-SNe) to direct collapse on black-holes with very weak or not explosion at all (Heger, Woosley, & Baraffe, 2005). Here I present the case of SN 1996al. I describe the physical properties of this luminous supernova in the framework of a very weak explosion (kinetic energy of 1.6 x 10^(50 erg)), where the bolometric luminosity is sustained by the conversion of the kinetic energy into radiation thanks to the interaction between a low mass ( 1.15 M_{⊙}) , 87% of which is Helium, the remaining is Hydrogen) symmetric ejecta with an highly asymmetric circumstellar material. The detection of Hα emission in pre-explosion archive images suggests that the progenitor of SN 1996al was most likely a massive star ( 25 M_{⊙}) ZAMS) that had lost a large fraction of its hydrogen envelope before explosion, and was hence embedded in a H-rich cocoon. The low-mass ejecta and modest kinetic energy of the explosion are then explained with massive fallback of material into the compact remnant, a 7 - 8 M_{⊙}) black hole. Finally, I will try to place this particularly interesting SN in the framework of the SNIIn zoo.

  7. Radio emission from Supernovae and High Precision Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Torres, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    The present thesis work makes contributions in two scientific fronts: differential astrometry over the largest angular scales ever attempted (approx. 15 arcdegrees) and numerical simulations of radio emission from very young supernovae. In the first part, we describe the results of the use of very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) in one experiment designed to measure with very high precision the angular distance between the radio sources 1150+812 (QSO) and 1803+784 (BL Lac). We observed the radio sources on 19 November 1993 using an intercontinental array of radio telescopes, which simultaneously recorded at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz. VLBI differential astrometry is capable, Nature allowing, of yielding source positions with precisions well below the milliarcsecond level. To achieve this precision, we first had to accurately model the rotation of the interferometric fringes via the most precise models of Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP; precession, polar motion and UT1, nutation). With this model, we successfully connected our phase delay data at both frequencies and, using difference astrometric techniques, determined the coordinates of 1803+784 relative to those of 1150+812-within the IERS reference frame--with an standard error of about 0.6 mas in each coordinate. We then corrected for several effects including propagation medium (mainly the atmosphere and ionosphere), and opacity and source-structure effects within the radio sources. We stress that our dual-frequency measurements allowed us to accurately subtract the ionosphere contribution from our data. We also used GPS-based TEC measurements to independently find the ionosphere contribution, and showed that these contributions agree with our dual-frequency measurements within about 2 standard deviations in the less favorables cases (the longest baselines), but are usually well within one standard deviation. Our estimates of the relative positions, whether using dual-frequency-based or GPS-based ionosphere

  8. Instabilities and the Supernova Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Hayes, John

    1994-12-01

    Core collapse supernovae are thought to be powered not dynamically by the direct piston mechanism of core bounce, but by neutrino heating after the bounce shock has stalled into accretion. The theory we will describe provides a paradigm for understanding the neutrino heating mechanism. Both the critical condition for instability and the explosion energy are very steep functions of the driving neutrino luminosity. We will present recent 1D and 2D hydrodynamic calculations in which the basics of the supernova mechanism are elucidated. The shock wave that stalls within ten milliseconds of its creation during the collapse and bounce of the core of a massive star leaves behind it unstable lepton and entropy profiles that can drive a violent Rayleigh-Taylor overturn. Furthermore, the core neutrino luminosities can establish unstable entropy gradients near the shock 50 milliseconds after bounce. John Hayes, Bruce Fryxell and I have demonstrated the possible existence of a convective boost in the neutrino luminosities due to core lepton overturn that can ignite a supernova explosion and have verified the potential importance of nu -driven ``Bethe'' convection near the shock. Issues that surround the residual neutron star mass, the (56) Ni yields, the supernova energies, the progenitors, and the nucleosynthetic consequences will also be addressed.

  9. Pulsational Pair-instability Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    The final evolution of stars in the mass range 70-140 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ is explored. Depending upon their mass loss history and rotation rates, these stars will end their lives as pulsational pair-instability supernovae (PPISN) producing a great variety of observational transients with total durations ranging from weeks to millennia and luminosities from 1041 to over 1044 erg s-1. No nonrotating model radiates more than 5× {10}50 erg of light or has a kinetic energy exceeding 5× {10}51 erg, but greater energies are possible, in principle, in magnetar-powered explosions, which are explored. Many events resemble SNe Ibn, SNe Icn, and SNe IIn, and some potential observational counterparts are mentioned. Some PPISN can exist in a dormant state for extended periods, producing explosions millennia after their first violent pulse. These dormant supernovae contain bright Wolf-Rayet stars, possibly embedded in bright X-ray and radio sources. The relevance of PPISN to supernova impostors like Eta Carinae, to superluminous supernovae, and to sources of gravitational radiation is discussed. No black holes between 52 and 133 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ are expected from stellar evolution in close binaries.

  10. Diffuse neutrino flux from failed supernovae.

    PubMed

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2009-06-12

    I study the diffuse flux of electron antineutrinos from stellar collapses with direct black hole formation (failed supernovae). This flux is more energetic than that from successful supernovae, and therefore it might contribute substantially to the total diffuse flux above realistic detection thresholds. The total flux might be considerably higher than previously thought, and approach the sensitivity of Super-Kamiokande. For more conservative values of the parameters, the flux from failed supernovae dominates for antineutrino energies above 30-45 MeV, with potential to give an observable spectral distortion at megaton detectors.

  11. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-03-01

    The conventional neutrino transport theory for core-collapse supernovae misses one key property of neutrinos: the left-handedness. The chirality of neutrinos modifies the hydrodynamic behavior at the macroscopic scale and leads to topological transport phenomena. We argue that such transport phenomena should play important roles in the evolution of core-collapse supernovae, and, in particular, lead to a tendency toward the inverse energy cascade from small to larger scales, which may be relevant to the origin of the supernova explosion.

  12. The joint search for gravitational wave and low energy neutrino signals from core-collapse supernovae: methodology and status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, M. B.; Casentini, C.

    2017-09-01

    The detection of gravitational waves opens a new era in physics. Now it's possible to observe the Universe using a fundamentally new way. Gravitational waves potentially permit getting insight into the physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe). However, due to significant uncertainties on the theoretical models of gravitational wave emission associated with CCSNe, benefits may come from multi-messenger observations of CCSNe. Such benefits include increased confidence in detection, extending the astrophysical reach of the detectors and allowing deeper understanding of the nature of the phenomenon. Fortunately, CCSNe have a neutrino signature confirmed by the observation of SN1987A. The gravitational and neutrino signals propagate with the speed of light and without significant interaction with interstellar matter. So that they must reach an observer on the Earth almost simultaneously. These facts open a way to search for the correlation between the signals. However, this method is limited by the sensitivity of modern neutrino detectors that allow to observe CCSNe only in the Local Group of galaxies. The methodology and status of a proposed joint search for the correlation signals are presented here.

  13. The Global Supernova Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Global Supernova Project

    2017-06-01

    The Global Supernova Project is worldwide collaboration to study 600 supernovae of all types between May 2017 and July 2020. It is a Key Project at Las Cumbres Observatory, whose global robotic telescope network will provide lightcurves and spectra. Follow-up observations will be obtained on many other facilities, including Swift, VLA, K2, the NTT, IRTF, Keck, and Gemini. Observations are managed by the Supernova Exchange, a combination observatin database and telescope control system run by LCO. Here we report on results from the previous Supernova Key Project, and first results from the Global Supernova Project.

  14. BNL high energy heavy ion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Miake, Yasuo.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurement of particle spectra and correlations with good particle identification and with various triggers, such as selection of charged multiplicity, neutral energy and forward energy.

  15. Solar Energy Experiments for High School and College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Thomas W.; And Others

    This publication contains eighteen experiments and eight classroom activities. The experiments are of varying difficulty and cover the important aspects of solar energy utilization. Each experiment is self-contained, with its own introduction and background information. Energy measurements are emphasized and techniques for collector efficiency…

  16. Solar Energy Experiments for High School and College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Thomas W.; And Others

    This publication contains eighteen experiments and eight classroom activities. The experiments are of varying difficulty and cover the important aspects of solar energy utilization. Each experiment is self-contained, with its own introduction and background information. Energy measurements are emphasized and techniques for collector efficiency…

  17. Cosmology from High Redshift Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter

    The discovery of a correlation between the light curve shape and intrinsic b rightness has made Type Ia supernovae exceptionally accurate distance indicators out to cosmologically interesting redshifts. Ground-based searches and follow-up as well as Hubble S pace Telescope observations of Type Ia supernovae have produced a significant number of object s with redshifts between 0.3 and 1.0. The distant SNe, when combined with a local samp le analyzed in the same way, provide reliable constraints on the deceleration and age of th e Universe. Early this year, an analysis of a handful of Type Ia events indicated that the deceleration was too small for gravitating matter alone to make a flat Universe. A larger sa mple of supernovae gives the surprising result that the Universe is accelerating, implying the exi stence of a cosmological constant or some other exotic form of energy. The success of this research has depended on the development of algorithms and software to register, scale and subtract CCD images taken weeks apart and to search for var iable objects. A good fraction of the point-sources identified are asteroids, variable stars, or AGN, so spectra are needed to confirm the identification as a Type Ia supernova and obt ain a redshift. The best candidates are followed photometrically to construct light curves. The steps to transform the observed light curves into cosmologically interestin g results will also be described.

  18. Pulsar Wind Bubble Blowout from a Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, John M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2017-08-01

    For pulsars born in supernovae, the expansion of the shocked pulsar wind nebula is initially in the freely expanding ejecta of the supernova. While the nebula is in the inner flat part of the ejecta density profile, the swept-up, accelerating shell is subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We carried out two- and three-dimensional simulations showing that the instability gives rise to filamentary structure during this initial phase but does not greatly change the dynamics of the expanding shell. The flow is effectively self-similar. If the shell is powered into the outer steep part of the density profile, the shell is subject to a robust Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which the shell is fragmented and the shocked pulsar wind breaks out through the shell. The flow is not self-similar in this phase. For a wind nebula to reach this phase requires that the deposited pulsar energy be greater than the supernova energy, or that the initial pulsar period be in the ms range for a typical 1051 erg supernova. These conditions are satisfied by some magnetar models for Type I superluminous supernovae. We also consider the Crab Nebula, which may be associated with a low energy supernova for which this scenario applies.

  19. Simple Experiments on the Use of Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, G. J.; Goldsmid, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes 5 solar energy experiments that can be used in secondary school: flat-plate collector, solar thermoelectric generator, simple concentrators, solar cell, and natural storage of solar energy. (MLH)

  20. Simple Experiments on the Use of Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, G. J.; Goldsmid, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes 5 solar energy experiments that can be used in secondary school: flat-plate collector, solar thermoelectric generator, simple concentrators, solar cell, and natural storage of solar energy. (MLH)

  1. Nonstandard neutrino interactions in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleford, Charles J.; Väänänen, Daavid J.; Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.; Shapiro, Brandon T.

    2016-11-01

    Nonstandard interactions (NSI) of neutrinos with matter can significantly alter neutrino flavor evolution in supernovae with the potential to impact explosion dynamics, nucleosynthesis, and the neutrinos signal. In this paper, we explore, both numerically and analytically, the landscape of neutrino flavor transformation effects in supernovae due to NSI and find a new, heretofore unseen transformation processes can occur. These new transformations can take place with NSI strengths well below current experimental limits. Within a broad swath of NSI parameter space, we observe symmetric and standard matter-neutrino resonances for supernovae neutrinos, a transformation effect previously only seen in compact object merger scenarios; in another region of the parameter space we find the NSI can induce neutrino collective effects in scenarios where none would appear with only the standard case of neutrino oscillation physics; and in a third region the NSI can lead to the disappearance of the high density Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonance. Using a variety of analytical tools, we are able to describe quantitatively the numerical results allowing us to partition the NSI parameter according to the transformation processes observed. Our results indicate nonstandard interactions of supernova neutrinos provide a sensitive probe of beyond the Standard Model physics complementary to present and future terrestrial experiments.

  2. The Low-Redshift Carnegie Supernova Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, M. M.; Hamuy, M.; Freedman, W. L.; Persson, S. E.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Folatelli, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Krzeminski, W.; Morrell, N.; Murphy, D.; Roth, M.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A.; Carlberg, R.; Maza, J.; Pinto, P.

    2004-12-01

    The Carnegie Supernova Program (CSP) is a 5-year program designed to 1) provide a precise calibration of Type Ia supernova luminosity distances based on observations of nearby Type Ia and II supernovae, and 2) use this calibration to set constraints on the nature of the dark energy from restframe I-band photometry of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae. In this paper, we describe the low-redshift portion of the CSP, the major goal of which is to generate a fundamental dataset of precise u'BVg'r'i'YJHK light curves and optical spectrophotometry for 100 Type Ia supernovae (z < 0.07) and 100 Type II supernovae (z < 0.05). These data will be used to refine techniques for obtaining distances and reddenings to both types of supernovae, and to study possible evolutionary effects in Type Ia events. An important component of the low-z CSP is the near-IR photometry, which offers the promise of improving the precision of distance determinations due to the reduced effects of dust extinction and (for Type Ia supernovae) the smaller intrinsic variation in the peak luminosities at these wavelengths. The combination of optical and near-IR photometry should also yield much more reliable dust extinction corrections than can be obtained from optical data alone. The low-z CSP began taking data in Sept. 2004, and is projected to run through May 2009. Preliminary light curves and spectra for the first few supernovae observed are presented, as is a brief description of the various data reduction pipelines. This project is supported by NSF grant AST-0306969.

  3. Supernovae and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbergh, S.

    1994-01-01

    Shklovsky and others have suggested that some of the major extinctions in the geological record might have been triggered by explosions of nearby supernovae. The frequency of such extinction events will depend on the galactic supernova frequency and on the distance up to which a supernova explosion will produce lethal effects upon terrestrial life. In the present note it will be assumed that a killer supernova has to occur so close to Earth that it will be embedded in a young, active, supernova remnant. Such young remnants typically have radii approximately less than 3 pc (1 x 10(exp 19) cm). Larger (more pessimistic?) killer radii have been adopted by Ruderman, Romig, and by Ellis and Schramm. From observations of historical supernovae, van den Bergh finds that core-collapse (types Ib and II) supernovae occur within 4 kpc of the Sun at a rate of 0.2 plus or minus 0.1 per century. Adopting a layer thickness of 0.3 kpc for the galacitc disk, this corresponds to a rate of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). Including supernovae of type Ia will increase the total supernovae rate to approximately 1.5 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). For a lethal radius of R pc the rate of killer events will therefore be 1.7 (R/3)(exp 3) x 10(exp -2) supernovae per g.y. However, a frequency of a few extinctions per g.y. is required to account for the extinctions observed during the phanerozoic. With R (extinction) approximately 3 pc, the galactic supernova frequency is therefore too low by 2 orders of magnitude to account for the major extinctions in the geological record.

  4. Observational constraints of stellar collapse: Diagnostic probes of nature's extreme matter experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L. Even, Wesley; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Wong, Tsing-Wai

    2014-04-15

    Supernovae are Nature's high-energy, high density laboratory experiments, reaching densities in excess of nuclear densities and temperatures above 10 MeV. Astronomers have built up a suite of diagnostics to study these supernovae. If we can utilize these diagnostics, and tie them together with a theoretical understanding of supernova physics, we can use these cosmic explosions to study the nature of matter at these extreme densities and temperatures. Capitalizing on these diagnostics will require understanding a wide range of additional physics. Here we review the diagnostics and the physics neeeded to use them to learn about the supernova engine, and ultimate nuclear physics.

  5. Distributed energy store railguns experiment and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic acceleration of projectiles holds the potential for achieving higher velocities than yet achieved by any other means. A railgun is the simplest form of electromagnetic macroparticle accelerator and can generate the highest sustained accelerating force. The practical length of conventional railguns is limited by the impedance of the rails because current must be carried along the entire length of the rails. A railgun and power supply system called the distributed energy store railgun was proposed as a solution to this limitation. The distributed energy store railgun used multiple current sources connected to the rails of a railgun at points distributed along the bore. These current sources (energy stores) are turned on in sequence as the projectile moves down the bore so that current is fed to the railgun from behind the armature. In this system the length of the rails that carry the full armature current is less than the total length of the railgun. If a sufficient number of energy stores is used, this removes the limitation on the length of a railgun. An additional feature of distributed energy store type railguns is that they can be designed to maintain a constant pressure on the projectile being accelerated. A distributed energy store railgun was constructed and successfully operated. In addition to this first demonstration of the distributed energy store railgun principle, a theoretical model of the system was also constructed.

  6. The Union3 Supernova Ia Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, David; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Bruce, Adam; Chappell, Greta; Currie, Miles; Dawson, Kyle S.; Deustua, Susana E.; Doi, Mamoru; Fakhouri, Hannah; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gibbons, Rachel A.; Goobar, Ariel; Hsiao, Eric; Huang, Xiaosheng; Ihara, Yutaka; Kim, Alex G.; Knop, Robert A.; Kowalski, Marek; Krechmer, Evan; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Meyers, Joshua; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nordin, Jakob; Perlmutter, Saul; Ripoche, Pascal; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Rykoff, Eli S.; Saunders, Clare; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Suzuki, Nao; Takanashi, Naohiro; Yasuda, Naoki; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift supernovae observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are crucial for constraining any time variation in dark energy. In a forthcoming paper (Rubin+, in prep), we will present a cosmological analysis incorporating existing supernovae with improved calibrations, and new HST-observed supernovae (six above z=1). We combine these data with current literature data, and fit them using SALT2-4 to create the Union3 Supernova compilation. We build on the Unified Inference for Type Ia cosmologY (UNITY) framework (Rubin+ 2015b), incorporating non-linear light-curve width and color relations, a model for unexplained dispersion, an outlier model, and a redshift-dependent host-mass correction.

  7. An LSST Deep Supernova Cosmology Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, P. A.; Smith, C. R.; Garnavich, P. M.

    2004-12-01

    Because of its rapid observing cadence and large aperture, the LSST presents an ideal tool for studying type Ia supernovae and exploiting them as cosmological tools to redshifts near unity. We present a series of simulations of an observing program which would use the LSST in a different mode from it usual cadence. It would use a small fraction of each night to do a deep supernova search in a ``staring mode," with 10-20 minutes total exposure per day on each of several ten-square-degree fields. Assuming no evolution in the type Ia supernova rate, a year-long campaign will yield close to 2000 supernovae in each field with a mean redshift near 0.75, with 60-100 photometric points per lightcurve in five photometric bands. We discuss the use of this dataset for constraining the dark energy equation of state and especially any variation it might have with direction on the sky.

  8. SN 1054: A pulsar-powered supernova?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Ze; Yu, Yun-Wei; Huang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The famous ancient supernova SN 1054 could have been too bright to be explained in the “standard” radioactive-powered supernova scenario. As an alternative attempt, we demonstrate that the spin-down of the newly born Crab pulsar could provide a sufficient energy supply to make SN 1054 visible at daytime for 23 days and at night for 653 days, where a one-zone semi-analytical model is employed. Our results indicate that SN 1054 could be a “normal” cousin of magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae. Therefore, SN 1054-like supernovae could be a probe to uncover the properties of newly born neutron stars, which provide initial conditions for studies on neutron star evolutions.

  9. Energy Aspects of Green Buildings - International Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauskale, L.; Geipele, I.; Zeltins, N.; Lecis, I.

    2016-12-01

    At present, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is one of the main environmental priorities globally, and implementation of sustainability aspects in the construction industry, including energy aspects, is of major importance for long-term environmental development, as buildings have a long life cycle and require many resources both for construction and operation periods. The aim of the research is to analyse energy aspects of green buildings. The results of research show that the construction of green buildings can significantly result in energy savings and has other benefits for different market participants. Future research directions have been identified as well.

  10. Core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae, the deaths of massive stars, are among the most spectacular phenomena in astrophysics: Not only can supernovae outshine their host galaxy for weeks; they are also laboratories for the behavior of matter at supranuclear densities, and one of the few environments where collective neutrino effects can become important. Moreover, supernovae play a central role in the cosmic matter cycle, e.g., as the dominant producers of oxygen in the Universe. Yet the mechanism by which massive stars explode has eluded us for decades, partly because classical astronomical observations across the electromagnetic spectrum cannot directly probe the supernovae ``engine''. Numerical simulations are thus our primary tool for understanding the explosion mechanism(s) of massive stars. Rigorous modeling needs to take a host of important physical ingredients into account, such as the emission and partial reabsorption of neutrinos from the young proto-neutron star, multi-dimensional fluid motions, general relativistic gravity, the equation of state of nuclear matter, and magnetic fields. This is a challenging multi-physics problem that has not been fully solved yet. Nonetheless, as I shall argue in this talk, recent first-principle 3D simulations have gone a long way towards demonstrating the viability of the most popular explosion scenario, the ``neutrino-driven mechanism''. Focusing on successful explosion models of the MPA-QUB-Monash collaboration, I will discuss possible requirements for robust explosions across a wide range of progenitors, such as accurate neutrino opacities, stellar rotation, and seed asymmetries from convective shell burning. With the advent of successful explosion models, supernova theory can also be confronted with astronomical observations. I will show that recent 3D models come closer to matching observed explosion parameters (explosion energies, neutron star kicks) than older 2D models, although there are still discrepancies. This work has

  11. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  12. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1999-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon Gamma Ray Observatory at Outback) experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  13. The Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory is a global network of robotic telescopes specializing in time domain astronomy. It currently has nine 1m telescopes, two 2m telescopes, and seven 0.4m telescopes. The Supernova Key Project is a 3 year program to obtain light curves and spectra of 500 supernovae with Las Cumbres Observatory. Here we show recent results, detail plans for the next Supernova Key Project, and explain how the US community can get involved.

  14. Interacting supernovae and supernova impostors: Evidence of incoming supernova explosions?

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, L.

    2015-02-24

    Violent eruptions, and consequently major mass loss, are a common feature of the so–called Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars. During major eruptive episodes LBVs mimic the behavior of real type IIn supernovae (SNe), showing comparable radiated energy and similar spectroscopic properties. For this reason these events are frequently labelled as SN impostors. Type IIn SN spectra are characterized by the presence of prominent narrow Balmer lines in emission. In most cases, SNe IIn arise from massive stars (M>8{sub ⊙}) exploding in a dense H–rich circumstellar medium (CSM), produced by progenitor’s mass loss prior to the SN explosion. Although the mechanisms triggering these eruptions are still unknown, recently we had direct proofs of the connection between very massive stars, their eruptions and ejecta-CSM interacting SNe. SNe 2006jc, 2010mc, 2011ht and the controversial SN 2009ip are famous cases in which we observed the explosion of the star months to years after major outbursts. In this context, the case of a recent transient event, LSQ13zm, is extremely interesting since we observed an outburst just ∼3 weeks before the terminal SN explosion. All of this may suggest that SN impostors occasionally herald true SN explosions. Nonetheless, there are several cases where major eruptions are followed by a quiescent phase in the LBV life. The impostor SN 2007sv is one of these cases, since it showed a single outburst event. Its photometric (a relatively faint absolute magnitude at the maximum) and spectroscopic properties (low velocity and temperature of the ejecta, and the absence of the typical elements produced in the explosive nucleosynthesis) strongly suggest that SN 2007sv was the giant eruption of an LBV, which has then returned in a quiescent stage.

  15. Interacting supernovae and supernova impostors: Evidence of incoming supernova explosions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, L.

    2015-02-01

    Violent eruptions, and consequently major mass loss, are a common feature of the so-called Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars. During major eruptive episodes LBVs mimic the behavior of real type IIn supernovae (SNe), showing comparable radiated energy and similar spectroscopic properties. For this reason these events are frequently labelled as SN impostors. Type IIn SN spectra are characterized by the presence of prominent narrow Balmer lines in emission. In most cases, SNe IIn arise from massive stars (M>8⊙) exploding in a dense H-rich circumstellar medium (CSM), produced by progenitor's mass loss prior to the SN explosion. Although the mechanisms triggering these eruptions are still unknown, recently we had direct proofs of the connection between very massive stars, their eruptions and ejecta-CSM interacting SNe. SNe 2006jc, 2010mc, 2011ht and the controversial SN 2009ip are famous cases in which we observed the explosion of the star months to years after major outbursts. In this context, the case of a recent transient event, LSQ13zm, is extremely interesting since we observed an outburst just ˜3 weeks before the terminal SN explosion. All of this may suggest that SN impostors occasionally herald true SN explosions. Nonetheless, there are several cases where major eruptions are followed by a quiescent phase in the LBV life. The impostor SN 2007sv is one of these cases, since it showed a single outburst event. Its photometric (a relatively faint absolute magnitude at the maximum) and spectroscopic properties (low velocity and temperature of the ejecta, and the absence of the typical elements produced in the explosive nucleosynthesis) strongly suggest that SN 2007sv was the giant eruption of an LBV, which has then returned in a quiescent stage.

  16. SOUSA Supernova Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    The Swift Optical/Ultraviolet Supernova Archive is an effort to make public the Swift UVOT images and final photometry of as many supernovae as possible. These include many of the nearest, brightest, and most exciting supernovae of the last decade. Hiding within the archive, however, are supernovae you have never heard of, which never the less show extremes in color or luminosity or interesting light curve behavior in the ultraviolet. I will highlight some of the extreme objects of different subtypes and puzzling objects which warrant further study.

  17. Surviving Companions of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzendorf, W.

    2016-06-01

    Most supernovae should occur in binaries. Massive stars, the progenitors of core collapse supernovae (SN II/Ib/c), have a very high binarity fraction of 80 percent (on average, they have 1.5 companions). Binary systems are also required to produce thermonuclear supernovae (SN Ia). Understanding the role that binarity plays in pre-supernova evolution is one of the great mysteries in supernova research. Finding and studying surviving companions of supernovae has the power to shed light on some of these mysteries. Searching Galactic and nearby supernova remnants for surviving companions is a particularly powerful technique. This might allow to study the surviving companion in great detail possibly enabling a relatively detailed reconstruction of the pre-supernova evolution. In this talk, I will summarize the multitude of theoretical studies that have simulated the impact of the shockwave on the companion star and the subsequent evolution of the survivor. I will then give an overview of the searches that used these theoretical findings to identify surviving companions in nearby supernova remnants as well as their results. Finally, I will give an outlook of new opportunities in the relatively young field.

  18. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  19. Supernova Relic Neutrinos and the Supernova Rate Problem: Analysis of Uncertainties and Detectability of ONeMg and Failed Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Grant J.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Jyutaro

    2014-08-01

    Direct measurements of the core collapse supernova rate (R SN) in the redshift range 0 <= z <= 1 appear to be about a factor of two smaller than the rate inferred from the measured cosmic massive star formation rate (SFR). This discrepancy would imply that about one-half of the massive stars that have been born in the local observed comoving volume did not explode as luminous supernovae. In this work, we explore the possibility that one could clarify the source of this "supernova rate problem" by detecting the energy spectrum of supernova relic neutrinos with a next generation 106 ton water Čerenkov detector like Hyper-Kamiokande. First, we re-examine the supernova rate problem. We make a conservative alternative compilation of the measured SFR data over the redshift range 0 <=z <= 7. We show that by only including published SFR data for which the dust obscuration has been directly determined, the ratio of the observed massive SFR to the observed supernova rate R SN has large uncertainties {\\sim }1.8^{+1.6}_{-0.6} and is statistically consistent with no supernova rate problem. If we further consider that a significant fraction of massive stars will end their lives as faint ONeMg SNe or as failed SNe leading to a black hole remnant, then the ratio reduces to {\\sim }1.1^{+1.0}_{-0.4} and the rate problem is essentially solved. We next examine the prospects for detecting this solution to the supernova rate problem. We first study the sources of uncertainty involved in the theoretical estimates of the neutrino detection rate and analyze whether the spectrum of relic neutrinos can be used to independently identify the existence of a supernova rate problem and its source. We consider an ensemble of published and unpublished core collapse supernova simulation models to estimate the uncertainties in the anticipated neutrino luminosities and temperatures. We illustrate how the spectrum of detector events might be used to establish the average neutrino temperature and

  20. Supernova relic neutrinos and the supernova rate problem: Analysis of uncertainties and detectability of ONeMg and failed supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Grant J.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Jyutaro

    2014-08-01

    Direct measurements of the core collapse supernova rate (R{sub SN}) in the redshift range 0 ≤ z ≤ 1 appear to be about a factor of two smaller than the rate inferred from the measured cosmic massive star formation rate (SFR). This discrepancy would imply that about one-half of the massive stars that have been born in the local observed comoving volume did not explode as luminous supernovae. In this work, we explore the possibility that one could clarify the source of this 'supernova rate problem' by detecting the energy spectrum of supernova relic neutrinos with a next generation 10{sup 6} ton water Čerenkov detector like Hyper-Kamiokande. First, we re-examine the supernova rate problem. We make a conservative alternative compilation of the measured SFR data over the redshift range 0 ≤z ≤ 7. We show that by only including published SFR data for which the dust obscuration has been directly determined, the ratio of the observed massive SFR to the observed supernova rate R{sub SN} has large uncertainties ∼1.8{sub −0.6}{sup +1.6} and is statistically consistent with no supernova rate problem. If we further consider that a significant fraction of massive stars will end their lives as faint ONeMg SNe or as failed SNe leading to a black hole remnant, then the ratio reduces to ∼1.1{sub −0.4}{sup +1.0} and the rate problem is essentially solved. We next examine the prospects for detecting this solution to the supernova rate problem. We first study the sources of uncertainty involved in the theoretical estimates of the neutrino detection rate and analyze whether the spectrum of relic neutrinos can be used to independently identify the existence of a supernova rate problem and its source. We consider an ensemble of published and unpublished core collapse supernova simulation models to estimate the uncertainties in the anticipated neutrino luminosities and temperatures. We illustrate how the spectrum of detector events might be used to establish the average

  1. Overview of the nearby supernova factory

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, Greg; Adam, Gilles; Antilogus, Pierre; Astier, Pierre; Bacon, Roland; Bongard, S.; Bonnaud, C.; Copin, Yannick; Hardin, D.; Howell, D. Andy; Lemmonnier, Jean-Pierre; Levy, J.-M.; Loken, S.; Nugent, Peter; Pain, Reynald; Pecontal, Arlette; Pecontal, Emmanuel; Perlmutter, Saul; Quimby, Robert; Schahmaneche, Kyan; Smadja, Gerard; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael

    2002-07-29

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international experiment designed to lay the foundation for the next generation of cosmology experiments (such as CFHTLS, wP, SNAP and LSST) which will measure the expansion history of the Universe using Type Ia supernovae. The SNfactory will discover and obtain frequent lightcurve spectrophotometry covering 3200-10000 {angstrom} for roughly 300 Type Ia supernovae at the low-redshift end of the smooth Hubble flow. The quantity, quality, breadth of galactic environments, and homogeneous nature of the SNfactory dataset will make it the premier source of calibration for the Type Ia supernova width-brightness relation and the intrinsic supernova colors used for K-correction and correction for extinction by host-galaxy dust. This dataset will also allow an extensive investigation of additional parameters which possibly influence the quality of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological probes. The SNfactory search capabilities and follow-up instrumentation include wide-field CCD imagers on two 1.2-m telescopes (via collaboration with the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking team at JPL and the QUEST team at Yale), and a two-channel integral-field-unit optical spectrograph/imager being fabricated for the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. In addition to ground-based follow-up, UV spectra for a subsample of these supernovae will be obtained with HST. The pipeline to obtain, transfer via wireless and standard internet, and automatically process the search images is in operation. Software and hardware development is now underway to enable the execution of follow-up spectroscopy of supernova candidates at the Hawaii 2.2-m telescope via automated remote control of the telescope and the IFU spectrograph/imager.

  2. Consequences of dark matter-dark energy interaction on cosmological parameters derived from type Ia supernova data

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, Luca; Campos, Gabriela Camargo; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2007-04-15

    Models where the dark matter component of the Universe interacts with the dark energy field have been proposed as a solution to the cosmic coincidence problem, since in the attractor regime both dark energy and dark matter scale in the same way. In these models the mass of the cold dark matter particles is a function of the dark energy field responsible for the present acceleration of the Universe, and different scenarios can be parametrized by how the mass of the cold dark matter particles evolves with time. In this article we study the impact of a constant coupling {delta} between dark energy and dark matter on the determination of a redshift dependent dark energy equation of state w{sub DE}(z) and on the dark matter density today from SNIa data. We derive an analytical expression for the luminosity distance in this case. In particular, we show that the presence of such a coupling increases the tension between the cosmic microwave background data from the analysis of the shift parameter in models with constant w{sub DE} and SNIa data for realistic values of the present dark matter density fraction. Thus, an independent measurement of the present dark matter density can place constraints on models with interacting dark energy.

  3. Constraining inverse-curvature gravity with supernovae.

    PubMed

    Mena, Olga; Santiago, José; Weller, Jochen

    2006-02-03

    We show that models of generalized modified gravity, with inverse powers of the curvature, can explain the current accelerated expansion of the Universe without resorting to dark energy and without conflicting with solar system experiments. We have solved the Friedmann equations for the full dynamical range of the evolution of the Universe and performed a detailed analysis of supernovae data in the context of such models that results in an excellent fit. If we further include constraints on the current expansion of the Universe and on its age, we obtain that the matter content of the Universe is 0.07

  4. Selection of promising sites for magma energy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Long Valley and Coso Hot Springs areas of California have been identified as the most promising sites for conducting a magma energy extraction experiment. These two locations were selected from among the potential sites on the basis of several factors that are critical to the success of the proposed long-term energy extraction experiment. These factors include the likelihood of the existence of shallow magma targets as well as several other drilling, energy extraction and programmatic considerations. As the magma energy extraction program continues, these sites will be analyzed in detail so that one can be selected as the site for the planned magma experiment.

  5. Detection of neutrinos from supernovae in nearby galaxies.

    PubMed

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Beacom, John F; Yüksel, Hasan

    2005-10-21

    While existing detectors would see a burst of many neutrinos from a Milky Way supernova, the supernova rate is only a few per century. As an alternative, we propose the detection of approximately 1 neutrino per supernova from galaxies within 10 Mpc, in which there were at least 9 core-collapse supernovae since 2002. With a future 1 Mton scale detector, this could be a faster method for measuring the supernova neutrino spectrum, which is essential for calibrating numerical models and predicting the redshifted diffuse spectrum from distant supernovae. It would also allow a > or approximately 10(4) times more precise trigger time than optical data alone for high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves.

  6. Degeneracy effects of neutrino mass ejection in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    A neutrino mechanism is discussed in order to explain supernovae in massive stars. An argument is presented for supernova mass ejection through leptonic neutrino transport characteristics suppressed by the arbitrary zero chemical potential condition. Results show that lepton conservation effects may be important in supernova neutrino transport. At low temperature and density the diffusion approximation becomes less precise because of the long mean free paths of low energy neutrinos. The amount of equilibrium neutrino spectrum affected here is small over most of the collapsing supernova structure.

  7. Teaching Mass and Energy Balances by Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orbey, Nese; De Jesús Vega, Marisel; Zalluhoglu, Fulya Sudur

    2017-01-01

    A general tank-draining problem was used as an experimental project in two undergraduate-level chemical engineering courses. The project aimed to illustrate the critical nature of experimentation in addition to use of mass and energy conservation principles in developing mathematical models that correctly describes a system. The students designed…

  8. Neutrino emission from nearby supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    Neutrinos have an important role for energy loss process during advanced evolution of massive stars. Although the luminosity and average energy of neutrinos during the Si burning are much smaller than those of supernova neutrinos, these neutrinos are expected to be detected by the liquid scintillation neutrino detector KamLAND if a supernova explosion occurs at the distance of ~100 parsec. We investigate the neutrino emission from massive stars during advanced evolution. We calculate the evolution of the energy spectra of neutrinos produced through electron-positron pair-annihilation in the supernova progenitors with the initial mass of 12, 15, and 20 M ⊙ during the Si burning and core-collapse stages. The neutrino emission rate increases from ~ 1050 s-1 to ~ 1052 s-1. The average energy of electron-antineutrinos is about 1.25 MeV during the Si burning and gradually increases until the core-collapse. For one week before the supernova explosion, the KamLAND detector is expected to observe 12-24 and 6-13 v¯e events in the normal and inverted mass hierarchies, respectively, if a supernova explosion of a 12-20 M ⊙ star occurs at the distance of 200 parsec, corresponding to the distance to Betelgeuse. Observations of neutrinos from SN progenitors have a possibility to constrain the core structure and the evolution just before the core collapse of massive stars.

  9. See Change: the Supernova Sample from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Brian; Perlmutter, Saul; Boone, Kyle; Nordin, Jakob; Rubin, David; Lidman, Chris; Deustua, Susana E.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Aldering, Greg Scott; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, James; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Santos, Joana; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Fassbender, Rene; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Wechsler, Risa H.; Muzzin, Adam; Willis, Jon; Boehringer, Hans; Gladders, Michael; Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Hook, Isobel; Huterer, Dragan; Huang, Xiaosheng; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric; Pain, Reynald; Saunders, Clare; Suzuki, Nao; Barbary, Kyle H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Meyers, Joshua; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Sofiatti, Caroline; Wilson, Gillian; Rozo, Eduardo; Hilton, Matt; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Luther, Kyle; Yen, Mike; Fagrelius, Parker; Dixon, Samantha; Williams, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. Our SN Ia sample closely matches our pre-survey predictions; this sample will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z~1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, See Change will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With the primary observing campaign completed, we present the preliminary supernova sample and our path forward to the supernova cosmology results. We also compare the number of SNe Ia discovered in each cluster with our pre-survey expectations based on cluster mass and SFR estimates. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters at z~1.2 expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.7, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.

  10. Saudi Arabia's experience in solar energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huraib, Fahad S.

    The progress in solar energy research in Saudi Arabia is discussed with emphasis on the efforts of a government research entity - King Adbulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). Three programs currently underway at KACST are considered: the continuation of activities initiated under the Solar Energy Research American/Saudi (SOLERAS) program, a Saudi/German program, and projects developed and conducted completely by KACST. The objectives, management structure, and program organization of SOLEARS are outlined, and attention is focused on urban, rural/agricultural, and industrial applications as well as resource development activities and accomplishments. Solar-hydrogen projects pursued together with Germany are reviewed, and their objectives, program management, and technical plans are covered. Domestic programs dealing with photovoltaic-powered lightning and hot-water systems are summarized.

  11. TeV neutrinos from core collapse supernovae and hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Razzaque, Soebur; Mészáros, Peter; Waxman, Eli

    2004-10-29

    A fraction of core-collapse supernovae of type Ib/c are associated with gamma-ray bursts, which are thought to produce highly relativistic jets. Recently, it has been hypothesized that a larger fraction of core-collapse supernovae produce slower jets, which may contribute to the disruption and ejection of the supernova envelope, and explain the unusually energetic hypernovae. We explore the TeV neutrino signatures expected from such slower jets, and calculate the expected detection rates with upcoming Gigaton Cherenkov experiments. We conclude that individual jetted supernovae may be detectable from nearby galaxies.

  12. Acquiring information about neutrino parameters by detecting supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2010-08-01

    We consider the supernova shock effects, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the collective effects, and the Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos on the Earth. It is found that the event number of supernova neutrinos depends on the neutrino mass hierarchy, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, and neutrino masses. Therefore, we propose possible methods to identify the mass hierarchy and acquire information about {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino masses by detecting supernova neutrinos. We apply these methods to some current neutrino experiments.

  13. The generation of gravitational radiation by escaping supernova neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, R.

    1978-01-01

    Formulae for the gravitational radiation due to the anisotropic axisymmetric emission of neutrinos from a small source are derived. We find that a burst of neutrinos released anisotropically from a supernova will generate a burst of gravitational radiation that may be comparable in amplitude and energy to the gravitational radiation generated by the fluid motion in the collapse of the supernova core.

  14. Pair production of helicity-flipped neutrinos in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Armando; Gandhi, Raj

    1989-01-01

    The emissivity was calculated for the pair production of helicity-flipped neutrinos, in a way that can be used in supernova calculations. Also presented are simple estimates which show that such process can act as an efficient energy-loss mechanism in the shocked supernova core, and this fact is used to extract neutrino mass limits from SN 1987A neutrino observations.

  15. The generation of gravitational radiation by escaping supernova neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, R.

    1978-01-01

    Formulae for the gravitational radiation due to the anisotropic axisymmetric emission of neutrinos from a small source are derived. We find that a burst of neutrinos released anisotropically from a supernova will generate a burst of gravitational radiation that may be comparable in amplitude and energy to the gravitational radiation generated by the fluid motion in the collapse of the supernova core.

  16. Implications of supernova remnant origin model of galactic cosmic rays on gamma rays from young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2017-06-01

    It is widely believed that Galactic cosmic rays are originated in supernova remnants (SNRs), where they are accelerated by a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in supernova blast waves driven by expanding SNRs. In recent theoretical developments of the DSA theory in SNRs, protons are expected to accelerate in SNRs at least up to the knee energy. If SNRs are the true generators of cosmic rays, they should accelerate not only protons but also heavier nuclei with the right proportions, and the maximum energy of the heavier nuclei should be the atomic number (Z ) times the mass of the proton. In this work, we investigate the implications of the acceleration of heavier nuclei in SNRs on energetic gamma rays produced in the hadronic interaction of cosmic rays with ambient matter. Our findings suggest that the energy conversion efficiency has to be nearly double for the mixed cosmic ray composition compared to that of pure protons to explain observations. In addition, the gamma-ray flux above a few tens of TeV would be significantly higher if cosmic ray particles could attain energies Z times the knee energy in lieu of 200 TeV, as suggested earlier for nonamplified magnetic fields. The two stated maximum energy paradigms will be discriminated in the future by upcoming gamma-ray experiments like the Cherenkov telescope array (CTA).

  17. Design for a High Energy Density Kelvin-Helmholtz Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A

    2007-10-29

    While many high energy density physics (HEDP) Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments have been fielded as part of basic HEDP and astrophysics studies, not one HEDP Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) experiment has been successfully performed. Herein, a design for a novel HEDP x-ray driven KH experiment is presented along with supporting radiation-hydrodynamic simulation and theory.

  18. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, Felix

    2016-09-01

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  19. SUPERNOVA FALLBACK ONTO MAGNETARS AND PROPELLER-POWERED SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu

    2011-08-01

    We explore fallback accretion onto newly born magnetars during the supernova of massive stars. Strong magnetic fields ({approx}10{sup 15} G) and short spin periods ({approx}1-10 ms) have an important influence on how the magnetar interacts with the infalling material. At long spin periods, weak magnetic fields, and high accretion rates, sufficient material is accreted to form a black hole, as is commonly found for massive progenitor stars. When B {approx}< 5 x 10{sup 14} G, accretion causes the magnetar to spin sufficiently rapidly to deform triaxially and produces gravitational waves, but only for {approx}50-200 s until it collapses to a black hole. Conversely, at short spin periods, strong magnetic fields, and low accretion rates, the magnetar is in the 'propeller regime' and avoids becoming a black hole by expelling incoming material. This process spins down the magnetar, so that gravitational waves are only expected if the initial protoneutron star is spinning rapidly. Even when the magnetar survives, it accretes at least {approx}0.3 M{sub sun}, so we expect magnetars born within these types of environments to be more massive than the 1.4 M{sub sun} typically associated with neutron stars. The propeller mechanism converts the {approx}10{sup 52} erg of spin energy in the magnetar into the kinetic energy of an outflow, which shock heats the outgoing supernova ejecta during the first {approx}10-30 s. For a small {approx}5 M{sub sun} hydrogen-poor envelope, this energy creates a brighter, faster evolving supernova with high ejecta velocities {approx}(1-3) x 10{sup 4} km s{sup -1} and may appear as a broad-lined Type Ib/c supernova. For a large {approx}> 10 M{sub sun} hydrogen-rich envelope, the result is a bright Type IIP supernova with a plateau luminosity of {approx}> 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} lasting for a timescale of {approx}60-80 days.

  20. Near-infrared spectroscopy of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Eric; Phillips, Mark; Burns, Christopher R.; Contreras, Carlos; Gall, Christa; Hoeflich, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Marion, Howie H.; Morrell, Nidia; Sand, David J.; Stritzinger, Maximillian; Carnegie Supernova Project

    2016-01-01

    Improving the cosmological experiments with Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is now not simply a question of observing more supernovae, since any survey, no matter how large, will ultimately be limited by the systematic errors. It has been clearly demonstrated in a number of studies that SNe Ia are better distance indicators in the near-infrared compared to the optical. As exciting as these new results are, SNe Ia in the NIR are expected to be even better than these studies indicate. A key ingredient for improving SN Ia in the NIR as distance indicators is to obtain NIR spectroscopy to determine precise k-corrections, which account for the effect of cosmological expansion upon the measured magnitudes. Better knowledge of the NIR spectroscopic behaviors, akin to that in the optical, is necessary to reach the distance precision required to identify viable models for dark energy. Carnegie Supernova Project II has built a definitive data set, much improved from previous samples, both in size and quality. With this previously unavailable window, we are also beginning to gain new insight on the physics of these events.

  1. THE LANDSCAPE OF THE NEUTRINO MECHANISM OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: NEUTRON STAR AND BLACK HOLE MASS FUNCTIONS, EXPLOSION ENERGIES, AND NICKEL YIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Thompson, Todd A. E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2015-03-10

    If the neutrino luminosity from the proto-neutron star formed during a massive star core collapse exceeds a critical threshold, a supernova (SN) results. Using spherical quasi-static evolutionary sequences for hundreds of progenitors over a range of metallicities, we study how the explosion threshold maps onto observables, including the fraction of successful explosions, the neutron star (NS) and black hole (BH) mass functions, the explosion energies (E {sub SN}) and nickel yields (M {sub Ni}), and their mutual correlations. Successful explosions are intertwined with failures in a complex pattern that is not simply related to initial progenitor mass or compactness. We predict that progenitors with initial masses of 15 ± 1, 19 ± 1, and ∼21-26 M {sub ☉} are most likely to form BHs, that the BH formation probability is non-zero at solar-metallicity and increases significantly at low metallicity, and that low luminosity, low Ni-yield SNe come from progenitors close to success/failure interfaces. We qualitatively reproduce the observed E {sub SN}-M {sub Ni} correlation, we predict a correlation between the mean and width of the NS mass and E {sub SN} distributions, and that the means of the NS and BH mass distributions are correlated. We show that the observed mean NS mass of ≅ 1.33 M {sub ☉} implies that the successful explosion fraction is higher than 0.35. Overall, we show that the neutrino mechanism can in principle explain the observed properties of SNe and their compact objects. We argue that the rugged landscape of progenitors and outcomes mandates that SN theory should focus on reproducing the wide ranging distributions of observed SN properties.

  2. The search for gamma radiation from supernova 1987A in an experiment aboard the Salut-7/Cosmos-1686 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachilova, R. N.; Bloch, G. M.; Pankov, V. M.; Prohin, V. L.; Rutkovsky, A. I.; Rumin, S. P.

    1988-07-01

    Gamma-quanta flux measurements were carried out during February-October 1987 in a search for radiation from SN 1987A. The time dependence of the mean monthly gamma-quanta flux measured with the Nega telescope at an altitude of 500 km in the equatorial region is analyzed. The upper limit of the gamma-quanta flux is determined to be 1.5 x 10 to the -6th/sq cm s keV on the 3-sigma level for the 1.5-4.4 MeV energy interval.

  3. Nuclear Physics in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Fischer, T.; Froelich, C.; Hix, William Raphael; Langanke, Karlheinz; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Scheidegger, Simon; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl W.; Whitehouse, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Core-collapse and the launch of a supernova explosion form a very short episode of few seconds in the evolution of a massive star, during which an enormous gravitational energy of several times 1053 erg is transformed into observable neutrino-, kinetic-, and electromagnetic radiation energy. We emphasize the wide range of matter conditions that prevail in a supernova event and sort the conditions into distinct regimes in the density and entropy phase diagram to briefly discuss their different impact on the neutrino signal, gravitational wave emission, and ejecta.

  4. Flight experiment of thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, David

    1989-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) enables a solar dynamic system to deliver constant electric power through periods of sun and shade. Brayton and Stirling power systems under current considerations for missions in the near future require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1300+ K range. TES materials that meet these requirements fall into the fluoride family of salts. These salts store energy as a heat of fusion, thereby transferring heat to the fluid at constant temperature during shade. The principal feature of fluorides that must be taken into account is the change in volume that occurs with melting and freezing. Salts shrink as they solidify, a change reaching 30 percent for some salts. The location of voids that form as result of the shrinkage is critical when the solar dynamic system reemerges into the sun. Hot spots can develop in the TES container or the container can become distorted if the melting salt cannot expand elsewhere. Analysis of the transient, two-phase phenomenon is being incorporated into a three-dimensional computer code. The code is capable of analysis under microgravity as well as 1 g. The objective of the flight program is to verify the predictions of the code, particularly of the void location and its effect on containment temperature. The four experimental packages comprising the program will be the first tests of melting and freezing conducted under microgravity. Each test package will be installed in a Getaway Special container to be carried by the shuttle. The package will be self-contained and independent of shuttle operations other than the initial opening of the container lid and the final closing of the lid. Upon the return of the test package from flight, the TES container will be radiographed and finally partitioned to examine the exact location and shape of the void. Visual inspection of the void and the temperature data during flight will constitute the bases for code verification.

  5. Synoptic sky surveys and the diffuse supernova neutrino background: Removing astrophysical uncertainties and revealing invisible supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, Amy; Fields, Brian D.; Beacom, John F.

    2010-04-15

    The cumulative (anti)neutrino production from all core-collapse supernovae within our cosmic horizon gives rise to the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB), which is on the verge of detectability. The observed flux depends on supernova physics, but also on the cosmic history of supernova explosions; currently, the cosmic supernova rate introduces a substantial ({+-}40%) uncertainty, largely through its absolute normalization. However, a new class of wide-field, repeated-scan (synoptic) optical sky surveys is coming online, and will map the sky in the time domain with unprecedented depth, completeness, and dynamic range. We show that these surveys will obtain the cosmic supernova rate by direct counting, in an unbiased way and with high statistics, and thus will allow for precise predictions of the DSNB. Upcoming sky surveys will substantially reduce the uncertainties in the DSNB source history to an anticipated {+-}5% that is dominated by systematics, so that the observed high-energy flux thus will test supernova neutrino physics. The portion of the universe (z < or approx. 1) accessible to upcoming sky surveys includes the progenitors of a large fraction ({approx_equal}87%) of the expected 10-26 MeV DSNB event rate. We show that precision determination of the (optically detected) cosmic supernova history will also make the DSNB into a strong probe of an extra flux of neutrinos from optically invisible supernovae, which may be unseen either due to unexpected large dust obscuration in host galaxies, or because some core-collapse events proceed directly to black hole formation and fail to give an optical outburst.

  6. The physics of core collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swesty, Frank Douglas

    1993-01-01

    I have developed an equation of state (EOS) for hot, dense matter that is intended specifically for use in radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supernovae, proto-neutron star cooling, and neutron stars. This EOS makes use of an adjustable nucleon-nucleon interaction that allows for the input of various nuclear force parameters that are not well determined by laboratory measurements. Properties of the EOS as a function of these input parameters were studied and comparisons were made to another EOS that is currently used in stellar collapse simulations. Using this EOS I have conducted simulations of core collapse supernovae with several ideas in mind. First, I have attempted to delineate role of the incompressibility of dense matter in supernovae. I have conducted a parameter study in which the compression modulous of bulk nuclear matter was varied and have found some new and surprising results. When the EOS is constrained by the observed mass of 1.44M(solar mass) for one of the components of the binary pulsar system PSR1913+16, the 'stiffness' of the EOS no longer plays a role in the shock dynamics of the supernova. Secondly, I varied the symmetry energy coefficients in the EOS to determine the role of these coefficients in supernovae. I have found that the symmetry energy behavior of the EOS has potentially observable effects and may play an important role in determining the efficacy of the late-time heating mechanism for the explosion and the stability of the post-bounce core against convection. Finally, I have developed an implicit, general relativistic, radiation hydrodynamics algorithm for the numerical simulation of supernovae. By allowing simulation timesteps to exceed the Courant timescale, this algorithm makes practical high resolution simulations of supernovae to late times. I discuss this algorithm and the associated computer code along with code verification tests and an example of a late-time calculation.

  7. HUBBLE PINPOINTS DISTANT SUPERNOVAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Hubble Space Telescope images pinpoint three distant supernovae, which exploded and died billions of years ago. Scientists are using these faraway light sources to estimate if the universe was expanding at a faster rate long ago and is now slowing down. Images of SN 1997cj are in the left hand column; SN 1997ce, in the middle; and SN 1997ck, on the right. All images were taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The top row of images are wider views of the supernovae. The supernovae were discovered in April 1997 in a ground-based survey at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Once the supernovae were discovered, the Hubble telescope was used to distinguish the supernovae from the light of their host galaxies. A series of Hubble telescope images were taken in May and June 1997 as the supernovae faded. Six Hubble telescope observations spanning five weeks were taken for each supernova. This time series enabled scientists to measure the brightness and create a light curve. Scientists then used the light curve to make an accurate estimate of the distances to the supernovae. Scientists combined the estimated distance with the measured velocity of the supernova's host galaxy to determine the expansion rate of the universe in the past (5 to 7 billion years ago) and compare it with the current rate. These supernovae belong to a class called Type Ia, which are considered reliable distance indicators. Looking at great distances also means looking back in time because of the finite velocity of light. SN 1997ck exploded when the universe was half its present age. It is the most distant supernova ever discovered (at a redshift of 0.97), erupting 7.7 billion years ago. The two other supernovae exploded about 5 billion years ago. SN 1997ce has a redshift of 0.44; SN 1997cj, 0.50. SN 1997ck is in the constellation Hercules, SN 1997ce is in Lynx, just north of Gemini; and SN 1997cj is in Ursa Major, near the Hubble Deep Field

  8. HUBBLE PINPOINTS DISTANT SUPERNOVAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Hubble Space Telescope images pinpoint three distant supernovae, which exploded and died billions of years ago. Scientists are using these faraway light sources to estimate if the universe was expanding at a faster rate long ago and is now slowing down. Images of SN 1997cj are in the left hand column; SN 1997ce, in the middle; and SN 1997ck, on the right. All images were taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The top row of images are wider views of the supernovae. The supernovae were discovered in April 1997 in a ground-based survey at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Once the supernovae were discovered, the Hubble telescope was used to distinguish the supernovae from the light of their host galaxies. A series of Hubble telescope images were taken in May and June 1997 as the supernovae faded. Six Hubble telescope observations spanning five weeks were taken for each supernova. This time series enabled scientists to measure the brightness and create a light curve. Scientists then used the light curve to make an accurate estimate of the distances to the supernovae. Scientists combined the estimated distance with the measured velocity of the supernova's host galaxy to determine the expansion rate of the universe in the past (5 to 7 billion years ago) and compare it with the current rate. These supernovae belong to a class called Type Ia, which are considered reliable distance indicators. Looking at great distances also means looking back in time because of the finite velocity of light. SN 1997ck exploded when the universe was half its present age. It is the most distant supernova ever discovered (at a redshift of 0.97), erupting 7.7 billion years ago. The two other supernovae exploded about 5 billion years ago. SN 1997ce has a redshift of 0.44; SN 1997cj, 0.50. SN 1997ck is in the constellation Hercules, SN 1997ce is in Lynx, just north of Gemini; and SN 1997cj is in Ursa Major, near the Hubble Deep Field

  9. Supernovae - Still a challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, F.

    1983-12-01

    Historical data on supernovae (SN) occurrences are surveyed, together with present models for the physical processes occurring during the events. Type I SN feature low intensity hydrogen lines, while the hydrogen lines are prominant in Type II phenomena. Only Type I events seem to occur in elliptical galaxies, implying that the Type I events involve relatively old, low-mass objects. Both types occur in spatial galaxies, although the Type II objects are usually located in gas-rich stellar nurseries of the spiral arms, suggesting the Type II SN progenitor stars are only a few million years old. The light curves of Type I SN maintain a peak brightness significantly longer than do Type II SN, whose brightness declines irregularly. The incineration of a white dwarf that could account for observations of nickel abundances in a Type I burst, which may be confined to binary systems, is outlined. Processes that occur in a core bounce in a Type II SN, when a massive star collapses and gravitational energy abruptly changes into expansive energy, are discussed.

  10. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  11. High Energy Particle Acceleration and Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification in Shell Type Supernova Remnants. Degree awarded by Minnesota Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keohane, Jonathan Wilmore

    1998-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Part I discusses the spatial correlation between the x-ray and radio morphologies of Cas A, and in the process address: the effect of inhomogeneous absorption on the apparent x-ray morphology, the interaction between the SNR and a molecular cloud, and the rapid move toward equipartition between the magnetic and gas energy densities. Discussions of the x-ray./radio correlation continues in Chapter 5, where we present a new, deep, ROSAT HRI image of Cas A. Chapter 7 presents ASCA spectra, with non-thermal spectral fits for 13 of the youngest SNRs in the Galaxy.

  12. Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1986-01-01

    Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

  13. Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1986-01-01

    Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

  14. Energy deposition via magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration: I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilland, James; Mikellides, Pavlos; Marriott, Darin

    2009-02-01

    The expansion of a high-temperature fusion plasma through an expanding magnetic field is a process common to most fusion propulsion concepts. The propulsive efficiency of this process has a strong bearing on the overall performance of fusion propulsion. In order to simulate the expansion of a fusion plasma, a concept has been developed in which a high velocity plasma is first stagnated in a converging magnetic field to high (100s of eV) temperatures, then expanded though a converging/diverging magnetic nozzle. As a first step in constructing this experiment, a gigawatt magnetoplasmadynamic plasma accelerator was constructed to generate the initial high velocity plasma and has been characterized. The source is powered by a 1.6 MJ, 1.6 ms pulse forming network. The device has been operated with currents up to 300 kA and power levels up to 200 MWe. These values are among the highest levels reached in an magnetoplasmadynamic thruster. The device operation has been characterized by quasi-steady voltage and current measurements for helium mass flow rates from 0.5 to 27 g s-1. Probe results for downstream plasma density and electron temperature are also presented. The source behavior is examined in terms of current theories for magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters.

  15. Star Formation in High Pressure, High Energy Density Environments: Laboratory Experiments of ISM Dust Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Bringa, E; Dai, Z; Felter, T; Graham, G; Kucheyev, S; Torres, D; Tielens, A; Baragiola, R; Dukes, C; Loeffler, M

    2005-01-05

    Dust grains control the chemistry and cooling, and thus the gravitational collapse of interstellar clouds. Energetic particles, shocks and ionizing radiation can have a profound influence on the structure, lifetime and chemical reactivity of the dust, and therefore on the star formation efficiency. This would be especially important in forming galaxies, which exhibit powerful starburst (supernovae) and AGN (active galactic nucleus) activity. How dust properties are affected in such environments may be crucial for a proper understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The authors present the results of experiments at LLNL which show that irradiation of the interstellar medium (ISM) dust analog forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) with swift heavy ions (10 MeV Xe) and a large electronic energy deposition amorphizes its crystalline structure, without changing its chemical composition. From the data they predict that silicate grains in the ISM, even in dense and cold giant molecular clouds, can be amorphized by heavy cosmic rays (CR's). This might provide an explanation for the observed absence of crystalline dust in the ISM clouds of the Milky Way galaxy. This processing of dust by CR's would be even more important in forming galaxies and galaxies with active black holes.

  16. Spectroscopic classification of AT 2017byx as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Sarneczky, K.; Szakats, R.; Szalai, T.; Szekely, P.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    During the commissioning phase of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) survey we observed AT 2017byx (ATLAS17bla, PS17bve) at R.A.=14:17:48.36 Dec.=+52:41:54.6 with the Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) at McDonald Observatory on 2017-04-28.2 UT. The spectrum (range between 3500 and 5500 Angstroms) indicates that AT 2017byx is a Type Ia supernova.

  17. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Connaughton, V.; Henze, W.; Paciesas, W. S.; Finger, M. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Sahi, M.; Peterson, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (approx. 20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1 yr). BATSE monitored the high-energy sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT) for point sources whose emission extended for times on the order of the CGRO orbital period (approx. 92 min) or greater. Using the EOT to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE Large Area Detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the all-sky monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic, with intrinsic variability on timescales of hours to years. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the World Wide Web. We then performed a deep sampling of these 58 objects, plus a selection of 121 more objects, combining data from the entire 9.1 yr BATSE data set. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The sample represents a compilation of sources monitored and/or discovered with BATSE and other high-energy instruments between 1991 and 2000, known sources taken from the HEAO 1 A-4 and Macomb & Gehrels catalogs. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects and possible detections of 36 additional objects. The definite detections spanned three classes of sources: accreting black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and Supernova remnants. The average fluxes measured for the fourth class, the X-ray emitting stars, were below the confidence limit for definite detection.

  18. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Connaughton, V.; Henze, W.; Paciesas, W. S.; Finger, M. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Sahi, M.; Peterson, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (approx. 20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1 yr). BATSE monitored the high-energy sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT) for point sources whose emission extended for times on the order of the CGRO orbital period (approx. 92 min) or greater. Using the EOT to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE Large Area Detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the all-sky monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic, with intrinsic variability on timescales of hours to years. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the World Wide Web. We then performed a deep sampling of these 58 objects, plus a selection of 121 more objects, combining data from the entire 9.1 yr BATSE data set. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The sample represents a compilation of sources monitored and/or discovered with BATSE and other high-energy instruments between 1991 and 2000, known sources taken from the HEAO 1 A-4 and Macomb & Gehrels catalogs. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects and possible detections of 36 additional objects. The definite detections spanned three classes of sources: accreting black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and Supernova remnants. The average fluxes measured for the fourth class, the X-ray emitting stars, were below the confidence limit for definite detection.

  19. Galaxy Zoo Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Lynn, S.; Sullivan, M.; Lintott, C. J.; Nugent, P. E.; Botyanszki, J.; Kasliwal, M.; Quimby, R.; Bamford, S. P.; Fortson, L. F.; Schawinski, K.; Hook, I.; Blake, S.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Jönsson, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Law, N. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Walters, R.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the first results from a new citizen science project: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae. This proof-of-concept project uses members of the public to identify supernova candidates from the latest generation of wide-field imaging transient surveys. We describe the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae operations and scoring model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel method using imaging data and transients from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We examine the results collected over the period 2010 April-July, during which nearly 14 000 supernova candidates from the PTF were classified by more than 2500 individuals within a few hours of data collection. We compare the transients selected by the citizen scientists to those identified by experienced PTF scanners and find the agreement to be remarkable - Galaxy Zoo Supernovae performs comparably to the PTF scanners and identified as transients 93 per cent of the ˜130 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae (SNe) that the PTF located during the trial period (with no false positive identifications). Further analysis shows that only a small fraction of the lowest signal-to-noise ratio detections (r > 19.5) are given low scores: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae correctly identifies all SNe with ≥8σ detections in the PTF imaging data. The Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project has direct applicability to future transient searches, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, by both rapidly identifying candidate transient events and via the training and improvement of existing machine classifier algorithms. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 10 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project ().

  20. Heat Loss Experiments: Teach Energy Savings with Cardboard "House"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Using two cardboard boxes, a light bulb socket, light bulbs of varying wattage, a thermometer, and some insulation, students can learn some interesting lessons about how heat loss occurs in homes. This article describes practical experiments that work well on units related to energy, sustainable energy, renewables, engineering, and construction.…

  1. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm--within a few percent--that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have…

  2. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm--within a few percent--that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have…

  3. Heat Loss Experiments: Teach Energy Savings with Cardboard "House"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Using two cardboard boxes, a light bulb socket, light bulbs of varying wattage, a thermometer, and some insulation, students can learn some interesting lessons about how heat loss occurs in homes. This article describes practical experiments that work well on units related to energy, sustainable energy, renewables, engineering, and construction.…

  4. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  5. Neutrino Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshio; Chiba, Satoshi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yokomakura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Keiichi; Takamura, Akira; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    2009-05-04

    Neutrino nucleosynthesis is an important synthesis process for light elements in supernovae. One important physics input of neutrino nucleosynthesis is cross sections of neutrino-nucleus reactions. The cross sections of neutrino-{sup 12}C and {sup 4}He reactions are derived using new shell model Hamiltonians. With the new cross sections, light element synthesis of a supernova is investigated. The appropriate range of the neutrino temperature for supernovae is constrained to be between 4.3 MeV and 6.5 MeV from the {sup 11}B abundance in Galactic chemical evolution. Effects by neutrino oscillations are also discussed.

  6. Neutrinos and Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bradley S.

    2008-05-12

    Core-collapse supernovae are one of the few astrophysical environments in which neutrinos play a dominant role. Neutrinos emission is the means by which a newly-born neutron star formed in a core-collapse event cools. Neutrinos may play a significant role in causing the supernova explosion. Finally neutrinos may significantly affect the nucleosynthesis occurring in the layers of the exploding star that are eventually ejected into interstellar space. This paper reviews some interesting neutrino-nucleus processes that may occur in the cores of exploding massive stars and then discusses some effects neutrinos may have on explosive nucleosynthesis in supernovae.

  7. HUBBLE SPIES MOST DISTANT SUPERNOVA EVER SEEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers pinpointed a blaze of light from the farthest supernova ever seen, a dying star that exploded 10 billion years ago. The detection and analysis of this supernova, called 1997ff, is greatly bolstering the case for the existence of a mysterious form of dark energy pervading the cosmos, making galaxies hurl ever faster away from each other. The supernova also offers the first glimpse of the universe slowing down soon after the Big Bang, before it began speeding up. This panel of images, taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, shows the supernova's cosmic neighborhood; its home galaxy; and the dying star itself. Astronomers found this supernova in 1997 during a second look at the northern Hubble Deep Field [top panel], a tiny region of sky first explored by the Hubble telescope in 1995. The image shows the myriad of galaxies Hubble spied when it peered across more than 10 billion years of time and space. The white box marks the area where the supernova dwells. The photo at bottom left is a close-up view of that region. The white arrow points to the exploding star's home galaxy, a faint elliptical. Its redness is due to the billions of old stars residing there. The picture at bottom right shows the supernova itself, distinguished by the white dot in the center. Although this stellar explosion is among the brightest beacons in the universe, it could not be seen directly in the Hubble images. The stellar blast is so distant from Earth that its light is buried in the glow of its host galaxy. To find the supernova, astronomers compared two pictures of the 'deep field' taken two years apart. One image was of the original Hubble Deep Field; the other, the follow-up deep-field picture taken in 1997. Using special computer software, astronomers then measured the light from the galaxies in both images. Noting any changes in light output between the two pictures, the computer identified a blob of light in the 1997 picture

  8. HUBBLE SPIES MOST DISTANT SUPERNOVA EVER SEEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers pinpointed a blaze of light from the farthest supernova ever seen, a dying star that exploded 10 billion years ago. The detection and analysis of this supernova, called 1997ff, is greatly bolstering the case for the existence of a mysterious form of dark energy pervading the cosmos, making galaxies hurl ever faster away from each other. The supernova also offers the first glimpse of the universe slowing down soon after the Big Bang, before it began speeding up. This panel of images, taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, shows the supernova's cosmic neighborhood; its home galaxy; and the dying star itself. Astronomers found this supernova in 1997 during a second look at the northern Hubble Deep Field [top panel], a tiny region of sky first explored by the Hubble telescope in 1995. The image shows the myriad of galaxies Hubble spied when it peered across more than 10 billion years of time and space. The white box marks the area where the supernova dwells. The photo at bottom left is a close-up view of that region. The white arrow points to the exploding star's home galaxy, a faint elliptical. Its redness is due to the billions of old stars residing there. The picture at bottom right shows the supernova itself, distinguished by the white dot in the center. Although this stellar explosion is among the brightest beacons in the universe, it could not be seen directly in the Hubble images. The stellar blast is so distant from Earth that its light is buried in the glow of its host galaxy. To find the supernova, astronomers compared two pictures of the 'deep field' taken two years apart. One image was of the original Hubble Deep Field; the other, the follow-up deep-field picture taken in 1997. Using special computer software, astronomers then measured the light from the galaxies in both images. Noting any changes in light output between the two pictures, the computer identified a blob of light in the 1997 picture

  9. Energy Conservation Experiments You Can Do...from Edison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas Alva Edison Foundation, Southfield, MI.

    Background information, lists of materials needed, and procedures are provided for 11 energy conservation experiments. They include: (1) five experiments on heating and cooling (investigating how insulation works, investigating how weatherstripping works, investigating how storm windows work, building a draftometer, and letting sun heat a house);…

  10. Energy Conservation Experiments You Can Do...from Edison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas Alva Edison Foundation, Southfield, MI.

    Background information, lists of materials needed, and procedures are provided for 11 energy conservation experiments. They include: (1) five experiments on heating and cooling (investigating how insulation works, investigating how weatherstripping works, investigating how storm windows work, building a draftometer, and letting sun heat a house);…

  11. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Remington, B A; Arnett, D; Fryxell, B A; Drake, R P

    1998-11-10

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, they are attempting to rigorously scale the physics of the laboratory in supernova. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to hydrodynamics on the SN-size scales is presented and requirements established. Initial results were reported in [1]. Next the appropriate conditions are generated on the NOVA laser. 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates is generated. This scales the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D vs. 3D difference in growth at the He-H interface of Sn 1987A.

  12. X-ray emission from MSH 14-63 - Probable remnant of the A.D. 185 supernova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Observations during 1972 from an experiment on OSO 7 detected a 2-10-keV X-ray flux of 1.7 by 10 to the -10th power erg/sq cm per sec from a source coincident with MSH 14-63, the most probable candidate for association with the A.D. 185 supernova. Both the present data and those of Naranan et al. (1977) at lower energy can be fitted by a dual-temperature thermal spectrum similar to that observed in other young supernova remnants. Model calculations indicate that a mass in excess of 5 solar masses must have been ejected in the A.D. 185 supernova event.

  13. Energy response model of the Daya Bay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaux, Nicolás; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has made the most precise measurement of neutrino oscillation parameter sin2 2θ 13 as well as the first direct measurement of effective mass-squared difference |Δ {m}ee2| through the analyses of reactor antineutrino rate and spectral shape. Precise measurements of reactor antineutrino spectrum require an accurate understanding of the detector energy response. We developed an energy response model of the antineutrino detector using various in-situ calibrations and external measurements. The poster will present details of the energy response model that is used in the latest results from the Daya Bay experiment.

  14. Compilation of current high-energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of the compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. Only approved experiments are included.

  15. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-02-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm—within a few percent—that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have little trouble identifying discrepancies such as the loss of a few percent of the gravitational potential energy due to air friction encountered by a falling ball. Two-dimensional (2-D) systems can require more sophisticated analysis for higher level laboratories, but such systems often incorporate complicating components that can make the exercise academically incomplete and experimentally less accurate. The following describes a simple 2-D energy conservation experiment based on the popular "Newton's Cradle" toy that allows students to account for nearly all of the mechanical energy in the system in an academically complete analysis.

  16. Automated search for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  17. Evolution of a Supernova

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-19

    A massive star left, which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion middle, scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant right.

  18. Supernovae, neutrinos, and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Carla

    2014-04-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are the violent explosions at the end of the life of massive stars (≳ 8 - 10 M⊙). In these explosions a wide range of elements are synthesized and ejected: low-mass elements (O and Mg) from the hydrostatic evolution, intermediate-mass elements and Fe-group elements from explosive nucleosynthesis, and elements heavier than iron from the νp-process and potentially an r-process. However, supernova nucleosynthesis predictions are hampered by the not yet fully understood supernova explosion mechanism. In addition, recent progress in observational astronomy paints a fascinating picture for the origin of heavy elements, which is more complicated than the traditional s-, r-, and γ-processes. In this paper, we summarize the status of core-collapse supernova nucleosynthesis.

  19. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Claudia, Travaglio; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  20. Infrared supernovae in starbursts

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, D.; Norman, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of uniquely confirming that the luminosity source of starburst galaxies is a young population of massive stars is considered. Unambiguous detection of the supernova explosion associated with a massive stellar population would provide proof of the starburst hypothesis. High spatial resolution narrow-band infrared imaging of starburst galaxies directly detects the cobalt synthesized in Type II supernova explosions. Coupled with observations of other infrared lines and continuum, progenitor masses can be at least roughly estimated. A statistically large sample of starburst supernovae will lead to an average starburst initial mass function. Standard candles can also be constructed, based on both individual and populations of supernovae. With current and planned instruments, K-band can be found out to cosmological distances. 27 references.

  1. Berkeley automated supernova search

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  2. Wind and solar energy curtailment: A review of international experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, Lori; Lew, Debra; Milligan, Michael; Carlini, E. Maria; Estanqueiro, Ana; Flynn, Damian; Gomez-Lazaro, Emilio; Holttinen, Hannele; Menemenlis, Nickie; Orths, Antje; Eriksen, Peter Børre; Smith, J. Charles; Soder, Lennart; Sorensen, Poul; Altiparmakis, Argyrios; Yasuda, Yoh; Miller, John

    2016-11-01

    Greater penetrations of variable renewable generation on some electric grids have resulted in increased levels of curtailment in recent years. Studies of renewable energy grid integration have found that curtailment levels may grow as the penetration of wind and solar energy generation increases. This paper reviews international experience with curtailment of wind and solar energy on bulk power systems in recent years, with a focus on eleven countries in Europe, North America, and Asia. It examines levels of curtailment, the causes of curtailment, curtailment methods and use of market-based dispatch, as well as operational, institutional, and other changes that are being made to reduce renewable energy curtailment.

  3. Low voltage TEM: influences on electron energy loss spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Stöger-Pollach, M

    2010-08-01

    We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) a transmission electron microscope (TEM) at different high tensions. Instrumental effects such as energy resolution, spatial resolution, and point spread function of the detecting system, as well as physical effects like inelastic (Coloumb) delocalization and Cerenkov losses are dealt with. It is found that the actually available equipment is suitable for performing low voltage experiments. The energy resolution of a thermo-ionic emitter can be tremendously improved at lower energies, and the detector also has advantageous behaviour. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Supernova's Shockwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe's most massive stars. In death, these volatile creatures blast tons of energetic waves into the cosmos, destroying much of the dust surrounding them.

    This false-color composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of one such explosion. The remnant, called N132D, is the wispy pink shell of gas at the center of this image. The pinkish color reveals a clash between the explosion's high-energy shockwaves and surrounding dust grains.

    In the background, small organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are shown as tints of green. The blue spots represent stars in our galaxy along this line of sight.

    N132D is located 163,000 light-years away in a neighboring galaxy called, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    In this image, infrared light at 4.5 microns is mapped to blue, 8.0 microns to green and 24 microns to red. Broadband X-ray light is mapped purple. The infrared data were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer, while the X-ray data were captured by Chandra.

  5. A Supernova's Shockwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe's most massive stars. In death, these volatile creatures blast tons of energetic waves into the cosmos, destroying much of the dust surrounding them.

    This false-color composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of one such explosion. The remnant, called N132D, is the wispy pink shell of gas at the center of this image. The pinkish color reveals a clash between the explosion's high-energy shockwaves and surrounding dust grains.

    In the background, small organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are shown as tints of green. The blue spots represent stars in our galaxy along this line of sight.

    N132D is located 163,000 light-years away in a neighboring galaxy called, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    In this image, infrared light at 4.5 microns is mapped to blue, 8.0 microns to green and 24 microns to red. Broadband X-ray light is mapped purple. The infrared data were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer, while the X-ray data were captured by Chandra.

  6. Superluminous Extragalactic Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. R.; Chu, Y.-H.

    1998-12-01

    Extragalactic supernova remnants (SNRs) are conventionally surveyed by optical emission-line images, using the [S II]/Hα line ratio to diagnose SNRs. The majority of the optically identified extragalactic SNRs are too faint to be confirmed at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Conversely, extragalactic SNRs that are initially identified by X-ray or radio observations are all superluminous, e.g., the X-ray SNR in NGC 6946 (Blair & Fesen 1994, ApJ, 424, L103) and the radio SNR in NGC 5471 (Skillman 1985, ApJ, 290, 449). NGC 5471 is a giant H II region in M101. Optical echelle observations of the SNR in NGC 5471 have detected high-velocity gas with a FWZI of at least 350 km/s. Decomposing the narrow H II component and the broad SNR component in the Hα velocity profile, Chu & Kennicutt (1986) derived a total mass of 6500+/-3000 M_sun and a kinetic energy of a few *E(50) ergs. Using archival ROSAT X-ray observations, Williams & Chu (1995) measured an X-ray luminosity of ~ 1 x 10(38) ergs/s for NGC 5471. Apparently, the SNR in NGC 5471 is superluminous at all wavelengths. To determine the physical conditions and nature of the superluminous SNR in NGC 5471, we have obtained HST WFPC2 images of NGC 5471 in the Hα and [S II] lines and two continuum bands. These high-resolution images reveal a [S II]-enhanced shell with a diameter of ~ 60 pc. A recent 180-ks ROSAT High Resolution Imager image of M101 shows that the X-ray emission from NGC 5471 peaks at this SNR shell. We are thus confident in the identification of the superluminous SNR in NGC 5471. Are superluminous SNRs produced by particularly powerful supernova explosions? Are they associated with gamma-ray bursters? Are their luminosities caused by dense interstellar environment? We will report the detailed physical properties of the SNR in NGC 5471, compare it to the other superluminous SNRs, and address these questions.

  7. SNRPy: Supernova remnant evolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-03-01

    SNRPy (Super Nova Remnant Python) models supernova remnant (SNR) evolution and is useful for understanding SNR evolution and to model observations of SNR for obtaining good estimates of SNR properties. It includes all phases for the standard path of evolution for spherically symmetric SNRs and includes alternate evolutionary models, including evolution in a cloudy ISM, the fractional energy loss model, and evolution in a hot low-density ISM. The graphical interface takes in various parameters and produces outputs such as shock radius and velocity vs. time, SNR surface brightness profile and spectrum.

  8. Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-10-01

    Supernova 1987A (SN1987A) in the LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD (LMC) is the brightest supernova to be observed since SN1604 (Kepler), the first to be observed in every band of the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM and the first to be detected through its initial burst of NEUTRINOS. Although the bolometric luminosity of SN1987A today is ≈10-6 of its value at maximum light (Lmax≈2.5×108L⊙), it ...

  9. Handbook of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athem Alsabti, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of pulsars in 1967, few celestial phenomena have fascinated amateur and professional astronomers, and the public, more than supernovae - dying stars that explode spectacularly and, in so doing, may outshine a whole galaxy. Thousands of research papers, reviews, monographs and books have been published on this subject. These publications are often written either for a highly specific level of expertise or education, or with respect to a particular aspect of supernovae research. However, the study of supernovae is a very broad topic involving many integral yet connected aspects, including physics, mathematics, computation, history, theoretical studies and observation. More specifically, areas of study include historical supernovae, the different types and light curves, nucleosynthesis, explosion mechanisms, formation of black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Related questions include how supernovae remnants interact with interstellar matter nearby and how do these events affect the formation of new stars or planetary systems? Could they affect existing planetary systems? Closer to home, did any supernovae affect life on earth in the past or could they do so in the future? And on the larger scale, how did supernovae observations help measure the size and expansion of the universe? All these topics, and more, are to be covered in a new reference work, consisting of more than 100 articles and more than 1700 pages. It is intended to cover all the main facets of current supernovae research. It will be pitched at or above the level of a new postgraduate student, who will have successfully studied physics (or a similar scientific subject) to Bachelor degree level. It will be available in both print and electronic (updatable) formats, with the exception of the first section, which will consist of a review of all the topics of the handbook at a level that allows anyone with basic scientific knowledge to grasp the

  10. Physics of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-12-13

    Presupernova models of massive stars are presented and their explosion by ''delayed neutrino transport'' examined. A new form of long duration Type II supernova model is also explored based upon repeated encounter with the electron-positron pair instability in stars heavier than about 60 Msub solar. Carbon deflagration in white dwarfs is discussed as the probable explanation of Type I supernovae and special attention is paid to the physical processes whereby a nuclear flame propagates through degenerate carbon. 89 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Observing dark energy with SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; SNAP Collaboration

    2004-06-07

    The nature of dark energy is of such fundamental importance -- yet such a mystery -- that a dedicated dark energy experiment should be as comprehensive and powerfully incisive as possible. The Supernova/Acceleration Probe robustly controls for a wide variety of systematic uncertainties, employing the Type Ia supernova distance method, with high signal to noise light curves and spectra over the full redshift range from z=0.1-1.7, and the weak gravitational lensing method with an accurate and stable point spread function.

  12. Supernova SN 2014C X-ray

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-24

    This image from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows spiral galaxy NGC 7331, center, in a three-color X-ray image. Red, green and blue colors are used for low, medium and high-energy X-rays, respectively. An unusual supernova called SN 2014C has been spotted in this galaxy. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21089

  13. Classification of 9 DES supernova by Magellan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Mandel, K.; Avelino, A.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Prajs, S.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.

    2016-09-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 9 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra were obtained using LDSS-3C (covering 420-950nm) on the 6.5m Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory.

  14. Systematic Features and Progenitor Dependence of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    We present our latest results of two-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations for about 400 progenitors. Our self-consistent supernova models reveal the systematic features of core-collapse supernova properties such as neutrino luminosity and energy spectrum, explosion energy, remnant mass, and yield of radioactive 56Ni. We find that these explosion characteristics tend to show a monotonic increase as a function of mass accretion rate onto a shock. The accretion rate depends on the structure of the progenitor core and its envelope, which is well described by the compactness parameter.

  15. Deflagrations and detonations in thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S

    2004-05-28

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast with the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae.

  16. Seeing Core-Collapse Supernovae in the Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter

    Core-collapse supernovae are the catastrophic deaths of massive stars. Ultraviolet observations are needed to understand the energy of the explosion through the study of the bolometric light curves. Early-time ultraviolet observations constrain the size of the progenitor. Ultraviolet spectra can break the degeneracies between temperature/ionization, reddening, and metallicity which hinder our understanding of ultraviolet photometry. Optical observations of high-redshift supernovae probe rest-frame ultraviolet wavelengths, requiring space-based observations of nearby supernovae against which to compare. Ultraviolet observations of core-collapse supernovae can also help distinguish them from type Ia supernovae, enabling cleaner photometric type Ia supernova samples for cosmological measurements. The Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift satellite has observed over two hundred core-collapse supernovae in the ultraviolet, including sixty-nine ultraviolet grism spectra of twenty core-collapse SNe. Additional ultraviolet spectra have been obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer, Hubble Space Telescope, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer. We propose a project to reduce the Swift grism spectra and combine with the other ultraviolet and groundbased optical/NIR spectra to create time-series bolometric spectra. We will use these bolometric spectra to better understand temperature, reddening, and metallicity and create bolometric light curves of these core collapse SNe. We will also use early time ultraviolet photometry and spectroscopy to constrain the progenitors of core collapse SNe. The ultraviolet observations fill a critical niche in our understanding of core collapse supernovae, and this program will enhance the scientific use of this important dataset from multiple space missions. Beyond core-collapse supernovae, the templates will allow studies of the dust properties around the progenitor systems (including the wavelength dependence of the extinction

  17. Spectroscopic Classifications with Magellan of 7 Supernovae Discovered by DES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, P. K.; Challis, P.; Drout, M.; Kirshner, R.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; D'Andrea, C.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Scolnic, D.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Brout, D. J.; Fischer, J. A.; Gladney, L.; March, M.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of supernova candidates discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. The spectra (425-945 nm) were obtained using IMACS on the 6.5m Baade telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory on Dec 19, 2014.

  18. Dust in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, H.

    In this Review, I will discuss our changing view on supernovae as interstellar dust sources. In particular I will focus on infrared and submillimetre studies of the historical supernova remnants Cassiopeia A, the Crab Nebula, SN 1987A, Tycho and Kepler. In the last decade (and particularly in recent years), SCUBA, Herschel and ALMA have now demonstrated that core-collapse supernovae are prolific dust factories, with evidence of 0.1 - 0.7 M⊙ of dust formed in the ejecta, though there is little evidence (as yet) for significant dust production in Type Ia supernova ejecta. There is no longer any question that dust (and molecule) formation is efficient after some supernova events, though it is not clear how much of this will survive over longer timescales. Current and future instruments will allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of dust within corecollapse ejecta, and whether this component contributes a significant amount to the dust content of the Universe or if supernovae ultimately provide a net loss once dust destruction by shocks is taken into account.

  19. Dark matter balls help supernovae to explode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-10-01

    As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova, the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat — of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating due to the dark matter balls would at first stop the collapse of the supernova progenitor. This opens up the possibility of there being two collapses giving two neutrino outbursts, as apparently seen in the supernova SN1987A — one in Mont Blanc and one 4 h 43 min later in both IMB and Kamiokande.

  20. Superluminous supernovae: no threat from eta Carinae.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Melott, Adrian L; Fields, Brian D; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J

    2008-02-01

    Recently, Supernova 2006gy was noted as the most luminous ever recorded, with a total radiated energy of approximately 10(44) Joules. It was proposed that the progenitor may have been a massive evolved star similar to eta Carinae, which resides in our own Galaxy at a distance of about 2.3 kpc. eta Carinae appears ready to detonate. Although it is too distant to pose a serious threat as a normal supernova, and given that its rotation axis is unlikely to produce a gamma-ray burst oriented toward Earth, eta Carinae is about 30,000 times nearer than 2006gy, and we re-evaluate it as a potential superluminous supernova. We have found that, given the large ratio of emission in the optical to the X-ray, atmospheric effects are negligible. Ionization of the atmosphere and concomitant ozone depletion are unlikely to be important. Any cosmic ray effects should be spread out over approximately 10(4) y and similarly unlikely to produce any serious perturbation to the biosphere. We also discuss a new possible effect of supernovae-e-ndocrine disruption induced by blue light near the peak of the optical spectrum. This is a possibility for nearby supernovae at distances too large to be considered "dangerous" for other reasons. However, due to reddening and extinction by the interstellar medium, eta Carinae is unlikely to trigger such effects to any significant degree.

  1. Turbulence in Type Ia Supernovae Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are among the most energetic explosions in the known universe, releasing 10^51 ergs of kinetic energy in their ejecta, with 0.7 solar masses of radioactive Ni-56 synthesized during the explosion. The discovery of the Phillips relation enabled the use of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) as standardizable cosmological candles, and has ushered in a new era of astronomy leading to the discovery of the acceleration of the universe, leading to the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics. The nature of the Type Ia progenitors, as well as their precise explosion mechanism, remains a subject of active investigation, both observationally as well as theoretically. It is known that the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae are near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs in binary systems, though competing models suggest the companion is either a red giant or main sequence star (the so-called ``single-degenerate channel'') or another white dwarf (the ``double-degenerate channel''). In this talk, I will present recent results of three -dimensional models of the single-degenerate channel of Type Ia supernovae. I will also discuss prospects for modeling the double-degenerate channel of Type Ia supernovae, which have recently enjoyed increased favor from observers and theorists.

  2. Supernova Science from a "Standard" LSST Cadence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, P. M.; Smith, R. C.; Miknaitis, G.; Stubbs, C. W.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Preito, J. L.; Pinto, P.

    2004-12-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will likely have several cadences, but one of the most general will be a cadence which covers a large portion of the available sky repeatedly in a limited number of filters in a short period of time, for example every 3 to 5 nights. Such a cadence is useful not only for identifying and tracking moving sources such as Near Earth Objects (NEOs), but also for identifying and following moderately long-term (month timescale) transient events such as supernovae. Given a sample general cadence, we investigate the number of type Ia and core-collapse supernovae likely to be discovered per year with LSST. We also investigate the resulting light curve and multi-filter sampling and how these data might best be used for studying SN rates, dark energy models and other science programs based on obtaining a large sample of supernovae.

  3. Supernovas y Cosmología

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folatelli, G.

    Supernovae are very relevant astrophysical objects because they indicate the violent end of certain stars and because they alter the interstellar medium. But most importantly, they have become an extremely useful tool for measuring cosmological distances. Based on highly precise distances to type Ia supernovae it was possible to find out that the expansion of the universe is currently accelerated. This led to introducing the concept of ``dark energy'' as a dominant and yet unknown component of the cosmos. In this article we will describe the method of distance measurements that leads to the determination of cosmological parameters. We will briefly review the current status of the field with emphasis on the importance of improving our knowledge about the physical nature of supernovae. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  4. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J. O.

    1999-06-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al., Astrophys. J.478, L75 (1997) The Nova laser is used to shock two-layer targets, producing Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the interfaces between the layers, analogous to instabilities seen at the interfaces of SN 1987A. Because the hydrodynamics in the laser experiments at intermediate times (3-40 ns) and in SN 1987A at intermediate times (5 s-104 s) are well described by the Euler equations, the hydrodynamics scale between the two regimes. The experiments are modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS, thus serving as a benchmark for PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike and bubble velocities in the experiment using potential flow theory and a modified Ott thin shell theory is presented. A numerical study of 2D vs. 3D differences in instability growth at the O-He and He-H interface of SN 1987A, and the design for analogous laser experiments are presented. We discuss further work to incorporate more features of the SN in the experiments, including spherical geometry, multiple layers and density gradients. Past and ongoing work in laboratory and laser astrophysics is reviewed, including experimental work on supernova remnants (SNRs). A numerical study of RM instability in SNRs is presented.

  5. Supernova Neutrino Physics with Xenon Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Shayne; Lang, Rafael F.; McCabe, Christopher; Selvi, Marco; Tamborra, Irene

    2017-09-01

    The dark matter experiment XENON1T is operational and sensitive to all flavors of neutrinos emitted from a supernova. We show that the proportional scintillation signal (S2) allows for a clear observation of the neutrino signal and guarantees a particularly low energy threshold, while the backgrounds are rendered negligible during the SN burst. XENON1T (XENONnT and LZ; DARWIN) will be sensitive to a SN burst up to 25 (40; 70) kpc from Earth at a significance of more than 5σ, observing approximately 35 (123; 704) events from a 27 M ⊙ SN progenitor at 10 kpc. Moreover, it will be possible to measure the average neutrino energy of all flavors, to constrain the total explosion energy, and to reconstruct the SN neutrino light curve. Our results suggest that a large xenon detector such as DARWIN will be competitive with dedicated neutrino telescopes, while providing complementary information that is not otherwise accessible.

  6. COMMON ENVELOPE EVOLUTION LEADING TO SUPERNOVAE WITH DENSE INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.

    2012-06-10

    A variety of supernova events, including Type IIn supernovae and ultraluminous supernovae, appear to have lost up to solar masses of their envelopes in tens to hundreds of years leading up to the explosion. In order to explain the close timing of the mass loss and supernova events, we explore the possibility that the mass loss is driven by common envelope evolution of a compact object (neutron star or black hole) in the envelope of a massive star and the supernova is triggered by the inspiral of the compact object to the central core of the companion star. The expected rate of such events is smaller than the observed rate of Type IIn supernovae but the rates may agree within the uncertainties. The mass loss velocity is related to the escape velocity from the common envelope system and is comparable to the observed velocity of hundreds of kilometers per second in Type IIn events. The mass loss is expected to be denser near the equatorial plane of the binary system and there is good evidence that the circumstellar media in Type IIn supernovae are asymmetric. Some of these supernova types show evidence for energies in excess of the canonical 10{sup 51} erg, which might be the result of explosions from rapid accretion onto a compact object through a disk.

  7. Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae.

    PubMed

    Maund, Justyn R; Crowther, Paul A; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Langer, Norbert

    2017-10-28

    Almost since the beginning, massive stars and their resultant supernovae have played a crucial role in the Universe. These objects produce tremendous amounts of energy and new, heavy elements that enrich galaxies, encourage new stars to form and sculpt the shapes of galaxies that we see today. The end of millions of years of massive star evolution and the beginning of hundreds or thousands of years of supernova evolution are separated by a matter of a few seconds, in which some of the most extreme physics found in the Universe causes the explosive and terminal disruption of the star. Key questions remain unanswered in both the studies of how massive stars evolve and the behaviour of supernovae, and it appears the solutions may not lie on just one side of the explosion or the other or in just the domain of the stellar evolution or the supernova astrophysics communities. The need to view massive star evolution and supernovae as continuous phases in a single narrative motivated the Theo Murphy international scientific meeting 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae' at Chicheley Hall, UK, in June 2016, with the specific purpose of simultaneously addressing the scientific connections between theoretical and observational studies of massive stars and their supernovae, through engaging astronomers from both communities.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maund, Justyn R.; Crowther, Paul A.; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Langer, Norbert

    2017-09-01

    Almost since the beginning, massive stars and their resultant supernovae have played a crucial role in the Universe. These objects produce tremendous amounts of energy and new, heavy elements that enrich galaxies, encourage new stars to form and sculpt the shapes of galaxies that we see today. The end of millions of years of massive star evolution and the beginning of hundreds or thousands of years of supernova evolution are separated by a matter of a few seconds, in which some of the most extreme physics found in the Universe causes the explosive and terminal disruption of the star. Key questions remain unanswered in both the studies of how massive stars evolve and the behaviour of supernovae, and it appears the solutions may not lie on just one side of the explosion or the other or in just the domain of the stellar evolution or the supernova astrophysics communities. The need to view massive star evolution and supernovae as continuous phases in a single narrative motivated the Theo Murphy international scientific meeting `Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae' at Chicheley Hall, UK, in June 2016, with the specific purpose of simultaneously addressing the scientific connections between theoretical and observational studies of massive stars and their supernovae, through engaging astronomers from both communities. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  9. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  10. An outburst from a massive star 40 days before a supernova explosion.

    PubMed

    Ofek, E O; Sullivan, M; Cenko, S B; Kasliwal, M M; Gal-Yam, A; Kulkarni, S R; Arcavi, I; Bildsten, L; Bloom, J S; Horesh, A; Howell, D A; Filippenko, A V; Laher, R; Murray, D; Nakar, E; Nugent, P E; Silverman, J M; Shaviv, N J; Surace, J; Yaron, O

    2013-02-07

    Some observations suggest that very massive stars experience extreme mass-loss episodes shortly before they explode as supernovae, as do several models. Establishing a causal connection between these mass-loss episodes and the final explosion would provide a novel way to study pre-supernova massive-star evolution. Here we report observations of a mass-loss event detected 40 days before the explosion of the type IIn supernova SN 2010mc (also known as PTF 10tel). Our photometric and spectroscopic data suggest that this event is a result of an energetic outburst, radiating at least 6 × 10(47) erg of energy and releasing about 10(-2) solar masses of material at typical velocities of 2,000 km s(-1). The temporal proximity of the mass-loss outburst and the supernova explosion implies a causal connection between them. Moreover, we find that the outburst luminosity and velocity are consistent with the predictions of the wave-driven pulsation model, and disfavour alternative suggestions.

  11. Non-equilibrium x-ray emission from young supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, J.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A computer model (NIE model) has been developed to predict the x-ray spectra from the hot (10/sup 6 -8/K), shock-heated plasmas that are found in the remnants of supernovae. The model accounts for the lack of collisional ionization equilibrium and for the possible lack of thermal equilibrium between the electrons and ions behind the shock fronts. Both of these effects are potentially important in determining the emergent x-ray spectrum of young (supernova remnants (SNR). Both a spectral component arising from the supernova ejecta and a component arising from the shocked interstellar medium surrounding the supernova are calculated. The NIE model has been fit to the spectral data from two young SNR's, MSH 14-63 and RCW 103. The data from MSH 14-63 was collected with HEAO A-2 experiment and spans an energy range from 0.18 - 15 keV. Spectral resolution is varied over this range. For example, ..delta..E/E = 32% FWHM at 1.5 keV, and ..delta..E/E = 15% FWHM at 7 keV. The data for RCW 103 was obtained using the Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) on board the HEAO-2 spacecraft. This data set had a more limited spectral range than above (0.8 -2.5 keV) but enhanced spectral resolution (..delta..E/E approx. = 10%). In addition, the data had limited spatial resolution.

  12. Supernovae and high density nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) in producing prompt supernova explosions is examined. Results of calculations of Baron, Cooperstein, and Kahana incorporating general relativity and a new high density EOS are presented, and the relevance of these calculations to laboratory experiments with heavy ions considered. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  14. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976.

  15. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John E.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Kopia, Leonard P.

    1992-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment will play a major role in NASA's planned multi-instrument multi-satellite Earth Observing System (EOS) program to observe and study the total Earth System on a global scale. The CERES experiment will provide EOS with a consistent data base of accurately known fields of radiation and of clouds; and will investigate the important question of the impact of clouds upon the radiative energy flow through the earth-atmosphere system. The CERES instruments will be an improved version of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) broadband scanning radiometer instruments flown by NASA in the 1980s. This paper describes the CERES experiment approach and the current CERES instrument design status.

  16. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John E.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Kopia, Leonard P.

    1992-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment will play a major role in NASA's planned multi-instrument multi-satellite Earth Observing System (EOS) program to observe and study the total Earth System on a global scale. The CERES experiment will provide EOS with a consistent data base of accurately known fields of radiation and of clouds; and will investigate the important question of the impact of clouds upon the radiative energy flow through the earth-atmosphere system. The CERES instruments will be an improved version of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) broadband scanning radiometer instruments flown by NASA in the 1980s. This paper describes the CERES experiment approach and the current CERES instrument design status.

  17. ENERGY PARTITIONING, ENERGY COUPLING (EPEC) EXPERIMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Dunlop, W H; Compton, S M; Kane, J O; Mirkarimi, P B; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

    2012-01-05

    The energy-partitioning, energy-coupling (EPEC) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will simultaneously measure the coupling of energy into both ground shock and air-blast overpressure from a laser-driven target. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of seismic and air-blast phenomena caused by a nuclear weapon. In what follows, we discuss the motivation for our investigation and briefly describe NIF. Then, we introduce the EPEC experiments, including diagnostics, in more detail.

  18. Modular safety interlock system for high energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, J.; Golceff, B.V.

    1980-10-01

    A frequent problem in electronics systems for high energy physics experiments is to provide protection for personnel and equipment. Interlock systems are typically designed as an afterthought and as a result, the working environment around complex experiments with many independent high voltages or hazardous gas subsystems, and many different kinds of people involved, can be particularly dangerous. A set of modular hardware has been designed which makes possible a standardized, intergrated, hierarchical system's approach and which can be easily tailored to custom requirements.

  19. The Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1996-01-01

    The supernova remnants G327.1-1.1 and G327.4+0.4 (Kes 27) are located 1.5 deg apart in the constellation Norma. In 1980, Einstein IPC observations discovered that both were irregular filled-center X-ray sources with possible point sources superposed. This paper describes new ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations which both map the diffuse structure and clearly show several unresolved sources in each field. Both remnants have bright emitting regions inside the limb which might indicate the presence of high energy electrons accelerated by a pulsar. The interior region is more prominent in G327.1-1.1 than in Kes 27. The spectra are relatively strongly absorbed, as expected from distant remnants close to the galactic plane. Comparison of the X-ray and radio maps of each remnant allows us to attribute some emission to a shell and some to the interior. With this information, a blast-wave model is used to derive approximate ages and energy release. Indications are that the Kes 27 supernova deposited approximately 10(exp 51) ergs in the surrounding medium. The G327.1-1.1 event probably deposited a factor of 3-10 less.

  20. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  1. Experiments to Determine the Efficiency of Various Energy Conversions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, D.; Goodwin, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Described are experiments used in the "Physical Science and Man" course at Hartley CAE which enable determinations of efficiencies of two energy conversion processes, namely, electricity into heat and burning gas to produce heat. Activities for comparing the processes are suggested. (DS)

  2. Experiments to Determine the Efficiency of Various Energy Conversions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, D.; Goodwin, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Described are experiments used in the "Physical Science and Man" course at Hartley CAE which enable determinations of efficiencies of two energy conversion processes, namely, electricity into heat and burning gas to produce heat. Activities for comparing the processes are suggested. (DS)

  3. Deconvolution of the energy loss function of the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannen, V.; Heese, I.; Weinheimer, C.; Sejersen Riis, A.; Valerius, K.

    2017-03-01

    The KATRIN experiment aims at a direct and model independent determination of the neutrino mass with 0.2 eV/c2 sensitivity (at 90% C.L.) via a measurement of the endpoint region of the tritium beta-decay spectrum. The main components of the experiment are a windowless gaseous tritium source (WGTS), differential and cryogenic pumping sections and a tandem of a pre- and a main-spectrometer, applying the concept of magnetic adiabatic collimation with an electrostatic retardation potential to analyze the energy of beta decay electrons and to guide electrons passing the filter onto a segmented silicon PIN detector. One of the important systematic uncertainties of such an experiment are due to energy losses of β-decay electrons by elastic and inelastic scattering off tritium molecules within the source volume which alter the shape of the measured spectrum. To correct for these effects an independent measurement of the corresponding energy loss function is required. In this work we describe a deconvolution method to extract the energy loss function from measurements of the response function of the experiment at different column densities of the WGTS using a monoenergetic electron source.

  4. Realistic Earth matter effects and a method to acquire information about small θ13 in the detection of supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin-Heng; Huang, Ming-Yang; Young, Bing-Lin

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we first calculate the realistic Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos at the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment which is currently under construction. It is found that the Earth matter effects depend on the neutrino incident angle θ, the neutrino mass hierarchy Δm312, the crossing probability at the high resonance region inside the supernova, PH, the neutrino temperature, Tα, and the pinching parameter in the neutrino spectrum, ηα. We also take into account the collective effects due to neutrino-neutrino interactions inside the supernova. With the expression for the dependence of PH on the neutrino mixing-angle θ13, we obtain the relations between θ13 and the event numbers for various reaction channels of supernova neutrinos. Using these relations, we propose a possible method to acquire information about θ13 smaller than 1.5°. Such a sensitivity cannot be achieved by the reactor neutrino deta at the Daya Bay experiment which has a sensitivity of the order of θ13˜3°. Furthermore, we apply this method to other neutrino experiments, i.e. Super-K, SNO, KamLAND, LVD, MinBooNE, Borexino, and Double-Chooz. We also study the energy spectra of the differential event numbers, dN/dE.

  5. Possible Progenitor of Special Supernova Type Detected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, scientists have reported the possible detection of a binary star system that was later destroyed in a supernova explosion. The new method they used provides great future promise for finding the detailed origin of these important cosmic events. In an article appearing in the February 14th issue of the journal Nature, Rasmus Voss of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany and Gijs Nelemans of Radboud University in the Netherlands searched Chandra images for evidence of a much sought after, but as yet unobserved binary system - one that was about to go supernova. Near the position of a recently detected supernova, they discovered an object in Chandra images taken more than four years before the explosion. Optical image of SN 2007on Optical image of SN 2007on The supernova, known as SN 2007on, was identified as a Type Ia supernova. Astronomers generally agree that Type Ia supernovas are produced by the explosion of a white dwarf star in a binary star system. However, the exact configuration and trigger for the explosion is unclear. Is the explosion caused by a collision between two white dwarfs, or because a white dwarf became unstable by pulling too much material off a companion star? Answering such questions is a high priority because Type Ia supernovas are major sources of iron in the Universe. Also, because of their nearly uniform intrinsic brightness, Type Ia supernova are used as important tools by scientists to study the nature of dark energy and other cosmological issues. People Who Read This Also Read... Oldest Known Objects Are Surprisingly Immature Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits Discovery of Most Recent Supernova in Our Galaxy Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking "Right now these supernovas are used as black boxes to measure distances and derive the rate of expansion of the universe," said Nelemans. "What we're trying to do is look inside the box." If the supernova explosion is

  6. Supernovae by the Hundreds: the LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; LCOGT Key Project

    2016-01-01

    The LCOGT Supernova Key Project is a three year project to obtain lightcurves and spectra of 600 supernovae. To do this, it has been awarded 2900 hours per year on the 9 one meter and 2 two meter robotic telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network (LCOGT). At the midway point of the Key Project, it is on track to achieving its goals. I will discuss recent insights into supernova progenitors, exotic individual supernovae, and some of the large samples of supernovae studied by the project.

  7. Supernova tests of the timescape cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smale, Peter R.; Wiltshire, David L.

    2011-05-01

    The timescape cosmology has been proposed as a viable alternative to homogeneous cosmologies with dark energy. It realizes cosmic acceleration as an apparent effect that arises in calibrating average cosmological parameters in the presence of spatial curvature and gravitational energy gradients that grow large with the growth of inhomogeneities at late epochs. Recently Kwan, Francis and Lewis have claimed that the timescape model provides a relatively poor fit to the Union and Constitution supernovae compilations, as compared to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. We show this conclusion is a result of systematic issues in supernova light-curve fitting, and of failing to exclude data below the scale of statistical homogeneity, z≲ 0.033. Using all currently available supernova data sets (Gold07, Union, Constitution, MLCS17, MLCS31, SDSS-II, CSP, Union2), and making cuts at the statistical homogeneity scale, we show that data reduced by the SALT/SALT-II (Spectral Adaptive Light curve Template) fitters provide Bayesian evidence that favours the spatially flat ΛCDM model over the timescape model, whereas data reduced with MLCS2k2 fitters give Bayesian evidence which favours the timescape model over the ΛCDM model. We discuss the questions of extinction and reddening by dust, and of intrinsic colour variations in supernovae which do not correlate with the decay time, and the likely impact these systematics would have in a scenario consistent with the timescape model.

  8. Evolution of clustered supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Evgenii O.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.; Nath, Biman B.

    2017-07-01

    We study the merging and evolution of isolated supernova (SN) remnants in a stellar cluster into a collective superbubble, with the help of 3D hydrodynamic simulations. We particularly focus on the transition stage when the isolated SN remnants gradually combine to form a superbubble. We find that when the SN rate is high (νsn ˜ 10-9 pc-3 yr-1), the merging phase lasts for ˜104 yr, for n = 1-10 cm-3, and the merging phase lasts for a longer time (˜0.1 Myr or more) for lower SN rates (νsn ≤ 10-10 pc-3 yr-1). During this transition phase, the growing superbubble is filled with dense and cool fragments of shells, and most of the energy is radiated away during this merging process. After passing through the intermediate phase, the superbubble eventually settles on to a new power-law wind asymptote that is smaller than estimated in a continuous wind model. This results in a significant (more than several times) underestimation of the mechanical luminosity needed to feed the bubble. We determine the X-ray and H α surface brightnesses as functions of time for such merging SNe in a stellar cluster and find that clusters with high SN rate shine predominantly in soft X-rays and H α. In particular, a low value of the volume-averaged H α-to-H β ratio and its large spread can be a good indicator of the transition phase of merging SNe.

  9. Scintillation counters in modern high-energy physics experiments (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzheev, Yu. N.

    2015-07-01

    Scintillation counters (SCs) based on organic plastic scintillators (OPSs) are widely used in modern high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. A comprehensive review is given to technologies for production of OPS strips and tiles (extrusion, injection molding, etc.), optical and physical characteristics of OPSs, and methods of light collection based on the use of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers coupled to multipixel vacuum and silicon PMs. Examples are given of the use of SCs in modern experiments involved in the search for quarks and new particles, including the Higgs boson (D0, CDF, ATLAS, CMS), new states of matter (ALICE), CP violation (LHCb, KLOE), neutrino oscillations (MINOS, OPERA), and cosmic particles in a wide mass and energy interval (AMS-02). Scintillation counters hold great promise for future HEP experiments (at the ILC, NICA, FAIR) due to properties of a high segmentation, WLS fiber light collection, and multipixel silicon PMT readout.

  10. A high-resolution radio image of a young supernova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartel, N.; Rupen, M. P.; Shapiro, I. I.; Preston, R. A.; Rius, A.

    1991-01-01

    A VLBI radio images of the bright supernova 1986J, which occurred in the galaxy NGC891 at a distance of about 12 Mpc, is presented. No detailed image of any supernova or remnant has been obtained before so soon after the explosion. The image shows a shell of emission with jetlike protrusions. Analysis of the images should advance understanding of the dynamics of the expanding debris, the dissipation of energy into the surrounding circumstellar medium, and the evolution of the supernova into the remnant.

  11. The role of supernova neutrinos on molecular homochirality.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo

    2007-06-01

    Electroweak parity violating interaction between supernova (SN) neutrinos and electrons of a simple chiral molecule is studied related to the origin of molecular homochirality. Appearance of supernova remnants inside molecular clouds favours the interaction of SN-neutrinos with interstellar molecules, leading to a energetic difference between the two enantiomers of the order of 10(-5) eV. This energetic difference is closer to the thermic energy of the interstellar medium, so molecular homochirality could be enhanced in molecular clouds containing supernova remnants inside it due to neutrino interaction.

  12. Type Ia supernovae as stellar endpoints and cosmological tools.

    PubMed

    Howell, D Andrew

    2011-06-14

    Empirically, Type Ia supernovae are the most useful, precise, and mature tools for determining astronomical distances. Acting as calibrated candles they revealed the presence of dark energy and are being used to measure its properties. However, the nature of the Type Ia explosion, and the progenitors involved, have remained elusive, even after seven decades of research. But now, new large surveys are bringing about a paradigm shift--we can finally compare samples of hundreds of supernovae to isolate critical variables. As a result of this, and advances in modelling, breakthroughs in understanding all aspects of these supernovae are finally starting to happen.

  13. Resonant neutrino spin-flavor precession and supernova shock revival

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E.K.; Lanza, A.; Petcov, S.T.; Sciama, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    A new mechanism of supernova shock revival is proposed which involves the resonant spin-flavor precession of neutrinos with a transition magnetic moment in the magnetic field of the supernova. The mechanism can be operative in supernovae for transition magnetic moments as small as 10{sup {minus}14}{mu}{sub B} provided the neutrino mass squared difference is in the range {Delta}m{sup 2}{approximately}(3 eV){sup 2}{minus}(600eV){sup 2}. It is shown that this mechanism can increase the neutrino-induced shock reheating energy by about 60{percent}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Probing the origins of neutrino mass with supernova data.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Huber, Patrick

    2005-11-04

    We study type II supernova signatures of neutrino mass generation via symmetry breaking at a scale in the range from keV to MeV. The scalar responsible for symmetry breaking is thermalized in the supernova core and restores the symmetry. The neutrinos from scalar decays have about half the average energy of thermal neutrinos. The Bose-Einstein distribution of the scalars can be established with a megaton water Cerenkov detector. The discovery of the bimodal neutrino flux is, however, well within the reach of the Super-Kamiokande detector, without a detailed knowledge of the supernova parameters.

  15. An effective Lagrangian description of supernova-core bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, H.; Deavila, V.; Duarte, S. J. B.; Kodama, T.

    1990-08-01

    The global dynamical aspects of a supernova event are studied in terms of an effective Lagrangian formulation. The equation of motion derived from this Lagrangian is solved numerically for different supernova core masses. An equation of state for cold matter is introduced by means of an adiabatic index parametrization which is a smooth function of the matter density. The energy transfer from the inner to the outer core is estimated in the context of the hydrodynamic bounce mechanism. It is found that only a very restricted mass distribution to pre-supernova core configuration generate a strong enough shock wave leading to a prompt bounce ejection.

  16. Supernova ejecta with a relativistic wind from a central compact object: a unified picture for extraordinary supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi

    2017-04-01

    The hydrodynamical interaction between freely expanding supernova ejecta and a relativistic wind injected from the central region is studied in analytic and numerical ways. As a result of the collision between the ejecta and the wind, a geometrically thin shell surrounding a hot bubble forms and expands in the ejecta. We use a self-similar solution to describe the early dynamical evolution of the shell and carry out a two-dimensional special relativistic hydrodynamic simulation to follow further evolution. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability inevitably develops at the contact surface separating the shocked wind and ejecta, leading to the complete destruction of the shell and the leakage of hot gas from the hot bubble. The leaking hot materials immediately catch up with the outermost layer of the supernova ejecta and thus different layers of the ejecta are mixed. We present the spatial profiles of hydrodynamical variables and the kinetic energy distributions of the ejecta. We stop the energy injection when a total energy of 1052 erg, which is 10 times larger than the initial kinetic energy of the supernova ejecta, is deposited into the ejecta and follow the subsequent evolution. From the results of our simulations, we consider expected emission from supernova ejecta powered by the energy injection at the centre and discuss the possibility that superluminous supernovae and broad-lined Ic supernovae could be produced by similar mechanisms.

  17. Supernovae: lights in the darkness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Every year, at the end of the summer, the Section of Physics and Technique of the "Institut Menorquí d'Estudis" and the "Societat Catalana de Física" organize the "Trobades Científiques de la Mediterrània" with the support of several academic institutions. The 2007 edition has been devoted to stellar explosions, the true evolutionary engines of galaxies. Whenever a star explodes, it injects into the interstellar medium a kinetic energy of 1051 erg and between one and several solar masses of newly synthesized elements as a result of the thermonuclear reactions that have taken place within the stellar interior. Two mechanisms are able to provide these enormous amounts of energy: one of them thermonuclear and the other, gravitational. Thermonuclear supernovae are the result of the incineration of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf that is the compact star of a binary stellar system. If the two stars are sufficiently close to each other, the white dwarf accretes matter from its companion, approaches the mass of Chandrasekhar, and ends up exploding. The processes previous to the explosion, the explosion itself, as well as the exact nature of the double stellar system that explodes, are still a matter of discussion. This point is particularly important because these explosions, known as Type Ia Supernovae, are very homogenous and can be used to measure cosmological distances. The most spectacular result obtained, is the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, but it still feels uncomfortable that such a fundamental result is based on a "measuring system" whose origin and behaviour in time is unknown. At the end of their lives, massive stars generate an iron nucleus that gets unstable when approaching the Chandrasekhar mass. Its collapse gives rise to the formation of a neutron star or a black hole, and the external manifestation of the energy that is released, about a 1053 erg, consists of a Type II or Ib/c supernova, of a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) or even of

  18. Energy reconstruction in the long-baseline neutrino experiment.

    PubMed

    Mosel, U; Lalakulich, O; Gallmeister, K

    2014-04-18

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment aims at measuring fundamental physical parameters to high precision and exploring physics beyond the standard model. Nuclear targets introduce complications towards that aim. We investigate the uncertainties in the energy reconstruction, based on quasielastic scattering relations, due to nuclear effects. The reconstructed event distributions as a function of energy tend to be smeared out and shifted by several 100 MeV in their oscillatory structure if standard event selection is used. We show that a more restrictive experimental event selection offers the possibility to reach the accuracy needed for a determination of the mass ordering and the CP-violating phase. Quasielastic-based energy reconstruction could thus be a viable alternative to the calorimetric reconstruction also at higher energies.

  19. Deconvolution of Energy Spectra in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batkov, K. E.; Panov, A. D.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazley, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasigha, R. M.; Guzik, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic- ray elemental spectra measurements from below 100 GeV up to tens TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. The instrument is composed of a silicon matrix detector followed by a carbon target, interleaved with scintillator tracking layers, and a segmented BGO calorimeter composed of 320 individual crystals totalling 18 radiation lengths, used to determine the particle energy. The technique for deconvolution of the energy spectra measured in the thin calorimeter is based on detailed simulations of the response of the ATIC instrument to different cosmic ray nuclei over a wide energy range. The method of deconvolution is described and energy spectrum of carbon obtained by this technique is presented.

  20. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  1. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  2. The WFIRST Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Hounsell, Rebekah; Scolnic, Daniel; WFIRST Supernova Science Investigation Team

    2017-01-01

    WFRIST is expected to launch in the mid 2020s. As part of its main mission, it will conduct a survey to measure the Universe's cosmic expansion history with supernovae. I will present the first simulations of this survey. The simulations take into account our current knowledge of the hardware, realistic properties of the supernovae, and our understanding of the relevant systematic uncertainties. I will compare the ultimate dark enegery figures of merit derived from the simulations and discuss future plans. These data will be extremely useful for other science; other transient science and studies of the resulting deep static images will particularly benefit.

  3. Supernova remnant morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1994-04-01

    The morphology of supernova remnants is principally determined by two components, a shell formed by interaction of the supernova ejecta with the surrounding medium, and a nebula which is powered directly by the associated pulsar. This nebula, often called a 'plerion', is usually located within the shell. These two components appear to evolve independently; in many cases there is no detectable plerion and in a few cases, the Crab Nebula being the most notable example, there is no detectable shell. A 'theoretician's supernova remnant' has spherical symmetry, but observers know that this is rarely the case. There are four main possible sources of non-sphericity, namely, the surrounding interstellar medium, the circumstellar medium, the surpernova explosion, and the associated pulsar. Supernovae often occured in active star formation regions and these regions often have complex networks of cavities blown by strong stellar winds. A supernova remnant expanding in this environment can consist of a several shell-like structure. IC443 is a good example (Braun and Strom, 1986, Astron. Astrophys., 1264, 193). The enhancement of Supernova remnant (SNR) shell brightness toward the Galactic plane (Caswell, 1977, Proc. Astron. Soc. Aust., 3, 130) is further evidence of the influence of the large-scale structure of the interstellar medium. One of the most common forms of non-sphericity is a bilateral symmetry attributed to a barrel-shaped enhancement of the shell (Kesteven and Caswell, 1987, Astron. Astrophys., 183, 118). There is good evidence that this and the associated bi-annular structure often obseved (Manchester, 1987, Astron. Astrophys., 171, 205) ar due to structure in the circumstellar material resulting from mass loss from the pre-supernova star (Storey et al., 1992, Astron. Astrophys., 265, 752). supernova remants (e.g., Tuohy, Clark and Burton, 1982, Astrophys. &J., 260, L65) are evidence that

  4. Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Richard; Li, Hong Wei

    1988-01-01

    Supernova 1987A (February 23, 1987) in the Large Magellanic Cloud is the brightest supernova to be observed since SN 1604 AD (Kepler). Detection of a burst of neutrinos indicates that a neutron star was formed. Radioactive decay of about 0.07 solar mass of Co-56 is responsible for the observed optical light as well as hard X-rays and gamma-ray lines. Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared 'light echoes' and soft X-rays provide information on the distribution of circumstellar matter and the evolution of the progenitor star.

  5. Supernova science with LCOGT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale A.; Valenti, S.; Sand, D. J.; Parrent, J. T.; Arcavi, I.; Graham, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT.net) is a collection of nine robotic one meter telescopes with imagers spaced around the world in longitude, operated as a single network. There are also two robotic FLOYDS spectrographs on the two meter Faulkes telescopes in Siding Spring, Australia, and Haleakala, Hawaii. Here we describe recent supernova lightcurves and spectra with taken with LCOGT after being triggered from Pan-STARRS1, the La Silla-QUEST survey, the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, and the IAU circulars. Since at least one telescope is always in the dark, and the facilities are robotic, LCOGT is uniquely suited to early-time supernova science.

  6. Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Richard; Li, Hong Wei

    1988-01-01

    Supernova 1987A (February 23, 1987) in the Large Magellanic Cloud is the brightest supernova to be observed since SN 1604 AD (Kepler). Detection of a burst of neutrinos indicates that a neutron star was formed. Radioactive decay of about 0.07 solar mass of Co-56 is responsible for the observed optical light as well as hard X-rays and gamma-ray lines. Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared 'light echoes' and soft X-rays provide information on the distribution of circumstellar matter and the evolution of the progenitor star.

  7. The first interdisciplinary experiments at the IMP high energy microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Guo, Na; Liu, Wenjing; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Lina; Li, Qiang; Li, Huiyun

    2015-04-01

    The high energy beam of tens to hundred MeV/u ions possesses mm-to-cm penetration depth in materials and can be easily extracted into air without significant energy loss and beam scattering. Combination of high energy ions and microbeam technology facilitates the microprobe application to many practical studies in large scale samples. The IMP heavy ion microbeam facility has recently been integrated with microscopic positioning and targeting irradiation system. This paper introduced the first interdisciplinary experiments performed at the IMP microbeam facility using the beam of 80.5 MeV/u carbon ions. Bystander effect induction via medium transferring was not found in the micro-irradiation study using HeLa cells. The mouse irradiation experiment demonstrated that carbon irradiation of 10 Gy dose to its tuberomammillary nucleus did not impair the sleep nerve system. The fault injection attack on RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman) decryption proved that the commercial field-programmable gate array chip is vulnerable in single event effect to low linear-energy-transfer carbon irradiation, and the attack can cause the leakage of RSA private key. This work demonstrates the potential of high energy microbeam in its application to biology, biomedical, radiation hardness, and information security studies.

  8. Neutrinos from failed supernovae at future water and liquid argon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keehn, James G.; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the diffuse flux of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos from cosmological failed supernovae, stars that collapse directly into a black hole with no explosion. This flux has a hotter energy spectrum compared to the flux from regular, neutron star-forming collapses and therefore it dominates the total diffuse flux from core collapses above 20-45 MeV of neutrino energy. Reflecting the features of the originally emitted neutrinos, the flux of νe and ν¯e at Earth is larger when the survival probability of these species is larger, and also when the equations of state of nuclear matter are stiffer. In the 19-29 MeV energy window, the flux from failed supernovae is substantial, ranging from ˜7% to a dominant fraction of the total flux from all core collapses. It can be as large as ϕe¯BH=0.38s-1cm-2 for ν¯e and as large as ϕeBH=0.28s-1cm-2 for νe, normalized to a local rate of core collapses of Rcc(0)=10-4yr-1Mpc-3. In 5 years, a 0.45 Mt water Cherenkov detector should see ˜5-65 events from failed supernovae, while up to ˜160 events are expected for the same mass with Gadolinium added. A 0.1 Mt liquid argon experiment should record ˜1-11 events. Signatures of neutrinos from failed supernovae are the enhancement of the total rates of events from core collapses (up to a factor of ˜2) and the appearance of high energy tails in the event spectra.

  9. Neutrinos from failed supernovae at future water and liquid argon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Keehn, James G.; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the diffuse flux of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos from cosmological failed supernovae, stars that collapse directly into a black hole with no explosion. This flux has a hotter energy spectrum compared to the flux from regular, neutron star-forming collapses and therefore it dominates the total diffuse flux from core collapses above 20–45 MeV of neutrino energy. Reflecting the features of the originally emitted neutrinos, the flux of νe and $\\bar{v}$e at Earth is larger when the survival probability of these species is larger, and also when the equations of state of nuclear matter are stiffer. In the 19–29 MeV energy window, the flux from failed supernovae is substantial, ranging from ~7% to a dominant fraction of the total flux from all core collapses. It can be as large as Φ$\\bar{e}$BH=0.38 s-1 cm-2 for $\\bar{v}$e and as large as Φ$\\bar{e}$BH=0.28 s-1 cm-2 for νe, normalized to a local rate of core collapses of Rcc(0)=10-4 yr-1 Mpc-3. In 5 years, a 0.45 Mt water Cherenkov detector should see ~5–65 events from failed supernovae, while up to ~160 events are expected for the same mass with Gadolinium added. A 0.1 Mt liquid argon experiment should record ~1–11 events. Signatures of neutrinos from failed supernovae are the enhancement of the total rates of events from core collapses (up to a factor of ~2) and the appearance of high energy tails in the event spectra.

  10. How supernovae launch galactic winds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Drummond; Quataert, Eliot; Martizzi, Davide; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2017-09-01

    We use idealized three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of global galactic discs to study the launching of galactic winds by supernovae (SNe). The simulations resolve the cooling radii of the majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) and thus self-consistently capture how SNe drive galactic winds. We find that SNe launch highly supersonic winds with properties that agree reasonably well with expectations from analytic models. The energy loading (η _E= \\dot{E}_wind/ \\dot{E}_SN) of the winds in our simulations are well converged with spatial resolution while the wind mass loading (η _M= \\dot{M}_wind/\\dot{M}_\\star) decreases with resolution at the resolutions we achieve. We present a simple analytic model based on the concept that SNRs with cooling radii greater than the local scaleheight break out of the disc and power the wind. This model successfully explains the dependence (or lack thereof) of ηE (and by extension ηM) on the gas surface density, star formation efficiency, disc radius and the clustering of SNe. The winds our simulations are weaker than expected in reality, likely due to the fact that we seed SNe preferentially at density peaks. Clustering SNe in time and space substantially increases the wind power.

  11. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R. P.; Fryxell, B. A.; Teyssier, R.; Moore, K.

    1999-05-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al. [Astrophys. J. 478, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few ×103 s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. 51, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, Numerical Astrophysics (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482-497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. 54, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  12. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R.P.; Fryxell, B.A.; Teyssier, R.

    1999-05-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane {ital et al.} [Astrophys. J. {bold 478}, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 4}, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer{endash}Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. {bold 51}, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, {ital Numerical Astrophysics} (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482{endash}497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. {bold 54}, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  13. Supernova SN 2014C Optical and X-Ray

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-24

    This visible-light image from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey shows spiral galaxy NGC 7331, center, where astronomers observed the unusual supernova SN 2014C . The inset images are from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, showing a small region of the galaxy before the supernova explosion (left) and after it (right). Red, green and blue colors are used for low, medium and high-energy X-rays, respectively. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21088

  14. Studies of Machine Learning Photometric Classification of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Joseph Nicholas; Cunningham, John; Kuhlmann, Stephen; Gupta, Ravi; Kovacs, Eve

    2017-01-01

    We studied the use of machine learning for the photometuric classification of Type Ia (SNIa) and core collapse (SNcc) supernovae. We used a combination of simulated data for the Dark Energy survey (DES) and real data from SDSS and chose our metrics to be the sample purity and the efficiency of identifying SNIa supernovae. Our focus was to quantify the effects of varying the training and parameters for random-forest decision-tree algorithms.

  15. Supernova bangs as a tool to study big bang

    SciTech Connect

    Blinnikov, S. I.

    2012-09-15

    Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in observed Universe. This educational review tells about supernovae and their applications in cosmology. It is explained how to understand the production of light in the most luminous events with minimum required energy of explosion. These most luminous phenomena can serve as primary cosmological distance indicators. Comparing the observed distance dependence on red shift with theoretical models one can extract information on evolution of the Universe from Big Bang until our epoch.

  16. Supernova feedback in molecular clouds: global evolution and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körtgen, Bastian; Seifried, Daniel; Banerjee, Robi; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We use magnetohydrodynamical simulations of converging warm neutral medium flows to analyse the formation and global evolution of magnetized and turbulent molecular clouds subject to supernova feedback from massive stars. We show that supernova feedback alone fails to disrupt entire, gravitationally bound, molecular clouds, but is able to disperse small-sized (˜10 pc) regions on time-scales of less than 1 Myr. Efficient radiative cooling of the supernova remnant as well as strong compression of the surrounding gas result in non-persistent energy and momentum input from the supernovae. However, if the time between subsequent supernovae is short and they are clustered, large hot bubbles form that disperse larger regions of the parental cloud. On longer time-scales, supernova feedback increases the amount of gas with moderate temperatures (T ≈ 300-3000 K). Despite its inability to disrupt molecular clouds, supernova feedback leaves a strong imprint on the star formation process. We find an overall reduction of the star formation efficiency by a factor of 2 and of the star formation rate by roughly factors of 2-4.

  17. Fourth Workshop on Science with the New Generation of High Energy Gamma-ray Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massai, Marco Maria; Omodei, Nicola; Spandre, Gloria

    I. Space-based telescope. Integral-4 years in orbit / P. Umbertini, P. Caraveo. The Suzaku mission / K. Yamaoka. The Swift mission: two years of operation / A. Moretti. Gamma-ray astrophysics with AGILE / F.Longo et al., The AGILE collaboration. The GLAST mission / J.E. McEnery -- II. Ground-based telescope. Recent results from CANGAROO / M. Mori for the CANGAROO team. The H.E.S.S. project / C. Masterson for the H.E.S.S. collaboration. The MAGIC experiment / N. Turini for the MAGIC collaboration. VERITAS: status and performance / J. Holder for the VERITAS collaboration -- III. Galactic variable sources. Galactic variable sky with EGRET and GLAST / S. Digel. Galactic variable sources observed with H.E.S.S. / N. Komin for the H.E.S.S collaboration. Gamma ray pulsars in the GLAST era / M. Razzano. Solving the riddle of unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources / P. Caraveo. Supernovae and gamma-ray burst / M. Della Valle. First cycle of MAGIC galactic observations / J. Cortina for the MAGIC collaboration. Gamma-rays and neutrinos from a SNR in the galactic center / V. Cavasinni, D. Grasso, L. Maccione. Solving GRBs and SGRs puzzles by precessing jets / D. Fargion, O. Lanciano, P. Oliva -- IV. Extragalactic sources. Multiwavelength observations and theories of blazers / G. Tosti. AGN observations with the MAGIC telescope / C. Bigongiari for the MAGIC collaboration. Gamma ray bursts/ L. Amati. X-rays and GeV flares in GRB light curves / A. Galli ... [et al.]. The highest energy emission from gamma ray bursts: MILAGRO's constraints and HAWC's potential / B. Dingus for the MILAGRO and HAWC collaborations. Observation of GRB with the MAGIC telescope / N. Galante, P. Piccioli for the MAGIC collaboration. GRB 060218 and the outliers with respect to the E-E correlation / G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghibellini -- V. Poster session. Study of the performance and calibration of the GLAST-LAT silicon tracker / M. Brigida, N. Giglietto, P. Spinelli. The online monitor for the GLAST

  18. Community energy auditing: experience with the comprehensive community energy management program

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.L.; Berger, D.A.; Rubin, C.B.; Hutchinson, P.A. Sr.; Griggs, H.M.

    1980-09-01

    The report provides local officials and staff with information on lessons from the audit, projection, and general planning experiences of the Comprehensive Community Energy Management Program (CCEMP) communities and provides ANL and US DOE with information useful to the further development of local energy management planning methods. In keeping with the objectives, the report is organized into the following sections: Section II presents the evaluation issues and key findings based on the communities' experiences from Spring of 1979 to approximately March of 1980; Section III gives an organized review of experience of communities in applying the detailed audit methodology for estimating current community energy consumption and projecting future consumption and supply; Section IV provides a preliminary assessment of how audit information is being used in other CCEMP tasks; Section V presents an organized review of preliminary lessons from development of the community planning processes; and Section VI provides preliminary conclusions on the audit and planning methodology. (MCW)

  19. Theoretical models for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-09-21

    The results of recent numerical simulations of supernova explosions are presented and a variety of topics discussed. Particular emphasis is given to (i) the nucleosynthesis expected from intermediate mass (10sub solar less than or equal to M less than or equal to 100 Msub solar) Type II supernovae and detonating white dwarf models for Type I supernovae, (ii) a realistic estimate of the ..gamma..-line fluxes expected from this nucleosynthesis, (iii) the continued evolution, in one and two dimensions, of intermediate mass stars wherein iron core collapse does not lead to a strong, mass-ejecting shock wave, and (iv) the evolution and explosion of vary massive stars (M greater than or equal to 100 Msub solar of both Population I and III. In one dimension, nuclear burning following a failed core bounce does not appear likely to lead to a supernova explosion although, in two dimensions, a combination of rotation and nuclear burning may do so. Near solar proportions of elements from neon to calcium and very brilliant optical displays may be created by hypernovae, the explosions of stars in the mass range 100 M/sub solar/ to 300 M/sub solar/. Above approx. 300 M/sub solar/ a black hole is created by stellar collapse following carbon ignition. Still more massive stars may be copious producers of /sup 4/He and /sup 14/N prior to their collapse on the pair instability.

  20. QCD and Supernovas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, T.

    2005-12-01

    In this contribution we briefly summarize aspects of the physics of QCD which are relevant to the supernova problem. The topic of greatest importance is the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear and strongly-interacting matter, which is required to describe the physics of the proto-neutron star (PNS) and the neutron star remnant (NSR) formed during a supernova event. Evaluation of the EOS in the regime of relevance for these systems, especially the NSR, requires detailed knowledge of the spectrum and strong interactions of hadrons of the accessible hadronic species, as well as other possible phases of strongly interacting matter, such as the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The forces between pairs of baryons (both nonstrange and strange) are especially important in determining the EOS at NSR densities. Predictions for these forces are unfortunately rather model dependent where not constrained by data, and there are several suggestions for the QCD mechanism underlying these short-range hadronic interactions. The models most often employed for determining these strong interactions are broadly of two types, 1) meson exchange models (usually assumed in the existing neutron star and supernova literature), and 2) quark-gluon models (mainly encountered in the hadron, nuclear and heavy-ion literature). Here we will discuss the assumptions made in these models, and discuss how they are applied to the determination of hadronic forces that are relevant to the supernova problem.

  1. Supernova Confetti in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2010-11-01

    Chromium has four isotopes, with atomic weights of 50, 52, 53, and 54. In terrestrial rocks the isotopes behave in predictable ways, with their variations in relative abundance governed by geochemical processes. In contrast, some meteorites have deviant abundances of the heaviest (hence the one with the most neutrons) Cr isotope, chromium-54. These anomalies in isotopic composition are almost certainly caused by nuclear reactions in stars that existed before our Sun was formed. However, the mineralogical carrier of the special chromium-54 was not known until Nicolas Dauphas (University of Chicago) and eight colleagues there and at the California Institute of Technology, the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Universite de Lille (France) made detailed analyses of chemical and physical separates from the Orgueil and Murchison carbonaceous chondrites. They found that the carrier of the isotopically-anomalous Cr is spinel, Cr-bearing oxide grains generally smaller than 100 nanometers. Only supernovae can produce the chromium-54 anomalies, although which specific type of supernova is not clear. An intriguing possibility is that the chromium-54-rich nano-oxide particles were produced in the same supernova that made two other short-lived isotopes, iron-60 and aluminum-26, which also existed in the Solar System when it formed. This suggests that formation of the Solar System was triggered by a supernova explosion.

  2. A Supernova Shockwaves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-13

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe most massive stars. This false-color composite from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of N132D, the wispy pink shell of gas at center.

  3. Monolithic electronics for nuclear and high-energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G.R.

    1994-12-31

    Electronic instrumentation for large fixed-target and collider experiments is rapidly moving to the use of highly integrated electronics wherever it is cost effective. This trend is aided by the development of circuit building blocks useful for nuclear and high-energy physics instrumentation and has accelerated recently with the development of monolithic silicon chips with multiple functions on one substrate. Examples of recent developments are given, together with remarks on the rationale for use of monolithic electronics and economic considerations.

  4. High energy imploding liner experiment HEL-1: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Anderson, B.G.; Ekdahl, C.A.

    1997-09-01

    Magnetically driven imploding liner systems can be used as a source of shock energy for materials equation of state studies, implosion driven magnetized plasma fusion experiments, and other similar applications. The imploding liner is a cylinder of conducting material through which a current is passed in the longitudinal direction. Interaction of the current with its own magnetic field causes the liner to implode. Sources of electrical energy for imploding liner systems are capacitor banks or explosive pulse power systems seeded by capacitor banks. In August, 1996, a high energy liner experiment (HEL-1) was conducted at the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia. A 5 tier 1 meter diameter explosive disk generator provided electrical energy to drive a 48 cm outside diameter, 4 mm thick, aluminum alloy liner having a mass of about 11kg onto an 11 cm diameter diagnostic package. The purpose of the experiment was to measure performance of the explosive pulse power generator and the heavy imploding liner. Electrical performance diagnostics included inductive (B-dot) probes, Faraday Rotation current measurement, Rogowski total current measurement, and voltage probes. Flux loss and conductor motion diagnostics included current-joint voltage measurements and motion sensing contact pins. Optical and electrical impact pins, inductive (B-dot) probes, manganin pressure probes, and continuously recording resistance probes in the Central Measuring Unit (CMU) and Piezo and manganin pressure probes, optical beam breakers, and inductive probes located in the glide planes were used as liner symmetry and velocity diagnostics. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that a peak current of more than 100 MA was attained and the liner velocity was between 6.7 km/sec and 7.5 km/sec. Liner kinetic energy was between 22 MJ and 35 MJ. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. A comparative modeling of supernova 1993J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinnikov, Sergei; Eastman, Ron; Bartunov, Oleg; Popolitov, Vlad; Woosley, Stan

    1997-01-01

    The light curve of Supernova 1993J is calculated using two computational radiation transport approaches. The two approaches are represented by the computer codes STELLA and EDDINGTON. The emphasis is on the shock breakout and the photometry in the U, B and V bands during the first 120 days of the supernova. The STELLA model includes implicit hydrodynamics and is able to model early supernova evolution before the expansion is homologous. The STELLA model employs multi-group photonics and is able to follow the radiation as it decouples from the matter. The EDDINGTON code uses an algorithm for integrating the transport equation which assumes homologous expansion and uses a finer frequency resolution. The agreement between the two codes is considered to be satisfactory only in the case where compatible physical assumptions are made concerning the opacity. The assumptions are justified. The continuum spectrum for SN 1993J is predicted near the shock breakout to be superior to that predicted by standard single energy group hydrocodes. The uncertainties involved in current time dependent models of supernova light curves are discussed.

  6. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  7. GRAVITATIONAL FIELD SHIELDING AND SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-12-20

    A new mechanism for supernova explosions called gravitational field shielding is proposed, in accord with a five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field that unifies the four-dimensional Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory. It is shown that a dense compact collapsing core of a star will suddenly turn off or completely shield its gravitational field when the core collapses to a critical density, which is inversely proportional to the square of mass of the core. As the core suddenly turns off its gravity, the extremely large pressure immediately stops the core collapse and pushes the mantle material of supernova moving outward. The work done by the pressure in the expansion can be the order of energy released in a supernova explosion. The gravity will resume and stop the core from a further expansion when the core density becomes less than the critical density. Therefore, the gravitational field shielding leads a supernova to impulsively explode and form a compact object such as a neutron star as a remnant. It works such that a compressed spring will shoot the oscillator out when the compressed force is suddenly removed.

  8. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; ...

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10more » $$^{44}$$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.« less

  9. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark L.; Chertkow, Merek A.; Harris, James A.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{44}$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  10. A comparative modeling of supernova 1993J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinnikov, Sergei; Eastman, Ron; Bartunov, Oleg; Popolitov, Vlad; Woosley, Stan

    1997-01-01

    The light curve of Supernova 1993J is calculated using two computational radiation transport approaches. The two approaches are represented by the computer codes STELLA and EDDINGTON. The emphasis is on the shock breakout and the photometry in the U, B and V bands during the first 120 days of the supernova. The STELLA model includes implicit hydrodynamics and is able to model early supernova evolution before the expansion is homologous. The STELLA model employs multi-group photonics and is able to follow the radiation as it decouples from the matter. The EDDINGTON code uses an algorithm for integrating the transport equation which assumes homologous expansion and uses a finer frequency resolution. The agreement between the two codes is considered to be satisfactory only in the case where compatible physical assumptions are made concerning the opacity. The assumptions are justified. The continuum spectrum for SN 1993J is predicted near the shock breakout to be superior to that predicted by standard single energy group hydrocodes. The uncertainties involved in current time dependent models of supernova light curves are discussed.

  11. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-01

    Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  12. Ideal bandpasses for type Ia supernova cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tamara M.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Kim, Alex G.

    2005-10-24

    To use type Ia supernovae as standard candles for cosmologywe need accurate broadband magnitudes. In practice the observed magnitudemay differ from the ideal magnitude-redshift relationship either throughintrinsic inhomogeneities in the type Ia supernova population or throughobservational error. Here we investigate how we can choose filterbandpasses to reduce the error caused by both these effects. We find thatbandpasses with large integral fluxes and sloping wings are best able tominimise several sources of observational error, and are also leastsensitive to intrinsic differences in type Ia supernovae. The mostimportant feature of a complete filter set for type Ia supernovacosmology is that each bandpass be a redshifted copy of the first. Wedesign practical sets of redshifted bandpasses that are matched totypical high resistivity CCD and HgCdTe infra-red detector sensitivities.These are designed to minimise systematic error in well observedsupernovae, final designs for specific missions should also considersignal-to-noise requirements and observing strategy. In addition wecalculate how accurately filters need to be calibrated in order toachieve the required photometric accuracy of future supernova cosmologyexperiments such as the SuperNova-Acceleration-Probe (SNAP), which is onepossible realisation of the Joint Dark-Energy mission (JDEM). We considerthe effect of possible periodic miscalibrations that may arise from theconstruction of an interference filter.

  13. Experiments to Increase the Used Energy With the PEGASUS Railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundertmark, Stephan; Schneider, Markus; Simicic, Dejan; Vincent, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    The French-German Research Institute (ISL) has several railguns installed, the largest of these is the PEGASUS accelerator. It is a 6m long, 4x4 cm2 caliber distributed energy supply (DES) railgun. It has a 10 MJ capacitor bank as energy supply attached to it. In the past, this installation was used to accelerate projectiles with a mass of about 300 g to velocities up to 2500 m/s. In the ongoing investigation, it is attempted to accelerate heavier projectiles to velocities above 2000m/s. For this a new type of projectile including a payload section was developed. In this paper the results of the experiments with payload projectiles using a primary energy between 3.8 MJ and 4.8 MJ are discussed.

  14. High-Energy-Density Shear Flow and Instability Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid-density, 20 μm thick Al plate, variations of the experiment to details of the initial conditions have been performed. These variations have included increasing the fluid densities (by modifying the plate material from Al to Ti and Cu), imposing sinusoidal seed perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. Radiography of the unseeded layer has revealed the presence of emergent Kelvin-Helmholtz structures which may be analyzed to infer fluid-mechanical properties including turbulent energy density. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  15. Community energy auditing: Experience with the comprehensive community energy management program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. L.; Berger, D. A.; Rubin, C. B.; Hutchinson, P. A., Sr.; Griggs, H. M.

    1980-09-01

    The evaluation issues and key findings based on the communities' experiences from Spring of 1979 to approximately March of 1980 are presented. An organized review of experience of communities in applying the detailed audit methodology for estimating current community energy consumption and projecting future consumption and supply is presented. A preliminary assessment of how audit information is being used in other CCEMP tasks is provided.

  16. A Supernova Feedback Implementation For The Astrophysical Simulation Software Arepo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubel, André-Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Please see the current version (v2) on arXiv (https://arxiv.org/abs/1604.06071) This version is as submitted to the university for my master's degree. I might have worded my critique of Arepo a bit too harshly, and a significant amount of issues were already addressed since the original submission. I removed section 3.4 and most of the discussion in 4.1, as these sections may need rework and further objective underpinning. Supernova (SN) explosions play an important role in the development of galactic structures. The energy and momentum imparted on the interstellar medium (ISM) in so called ”supernova feedback” drives turbulence, heats the gas, enriches it with heavy elements, can lead to the formation of new stars or even suppress star formation by disrupting stellar nurseries. In the numerical simulation at the sub-galactic level, not including the energy and momentum of supernovas in the physical description of the problem can also lead to several problems that might partially be resolved by including a description of supernovas. In this thesis such an implementation is attempted for the combined numerical hydrodynamics and N-body simulation software Arepo (Springel, 2010). In a stochastic process a large amount of thermal energy is imparted on a number of neighbouring cells, mimicking the effect of a supernova explosions. We test this approach by modelling the explosion of a single supernova in a uniform density medium and comparing the evolution of the resulting supernova remnant to the theoretically-predicted behaviour. We also run a simulation with our feedback code and a fixed supernova rate derived from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation (Kennicutt, 1998) for a duration of about 20 Myrs. We describe our method in detail in this text and discuss the properties of our implementation.

  17. EXTRAGALACTIC STAR-FORMING GALAXIES WITH HYPERNOVAE AND SUPERNOVAE AS HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO AND GAMMA-RAY SOURCES: THE CASE OF THE 10 TeV NEUTRINO DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Senno, Nicholas; Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Baerwald, Philipp; Rees, Martin J.

    2015-06-10

    In light of the latest IceCube data, we discuss the implications of the cosmic ray (CR) energy input from hypernovae (HNe) and supernovae (SNe) into the universe, and their propagation in the hosting galaxies and galaxy clusters or groups. The magnetic confinement of CRs in these environments may lead to efficient neutrino production via pp collisions, resulting in a diffuse neutrino spectrum extending from PeV down to 10 TeV energies, with a spectrum and flux level compatible with that recently reported by IceCube. If the diffuse 10 TeV neutrino background largely comes from such CR reservoirs, the corresponding diffuse γ-ray background should be compatible with the recent Fermi data. In this scenario, the CR energy input from HNe should be dominant over that of SNe, implying that the starburst scenario does not work if the SN energy budget is a factor of two larger than the HN energy budget. Thus, this strong case scenario can be supported or ruled out in the near future.

  18. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  19. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  20. See Change: First Results from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Brian; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Boehringer, Hans; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Deustua, Susana E.; Dixon, Samantha; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Fagrelius, Parker; Fassbender, Rene; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gladders, Michael; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Goobar, Ariel; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hilton, Matt; Hoekstra, Henk; Hook, Isobel; Huang, Xiaosheng; Huterer, Dragan; Jee, James; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Luther, Kyle; Meyers, Joshua; Muzzin, Adam; Nordin, Jakob; Pain, Reynald; Perlmutter, Saul; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Rozo, Eduardo; Rubin, David; Rykoff, Eli S.; Santos, Joana; Saunders, Clare; Sofiatti, Caroline; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Suzuki, Nao; Wechsler, Risa H.; Willis, Jon; Wilson, Gillian; Yen, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope, the Supernova Cosmology Project is performing a type Ia supernova search in the highest-redshift, most massive clusters known to date. This large HST program spans Cycles 22-23. It will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z ~ 1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, the SNe clusters observed also will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With Cycle 22 completed, we present preliminary supernova light curves above z=1.1 and discuss the number of supernovae discovered compared to our expectations from different SN rates models. Our HST imaging and extensive ground-based campaign are already producing unique results; we have spectroscopically confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members to-date, and confirmed one of the most massive clusters at z~1.2 expected over the entire sky.

  1. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  2. Cooling and evolution of a supernova remnant.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the structure, evolution, and cooling of an old supernova remnant, aimed at providing a theoretical framework for relating remnants with similar energies and environments but of different ages. Discussed evolution details include the Sedov-Taylor blast wave, the electron-ion equipartition and thermal conduction, the temperature sag and the dynamics in the process of transition to a dense shell, and the history of remnant luminosity.

  3. Progenitors of type Ia supernovae in elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfanov, M.; Bogdan, A.

    2011-09-21

    Although there is a nearly universal agreement that type Ia supernovae are associated with the thermonuclear disruption of a CO white dwarf, the exact nature of their progenitors is still unknown. The single degenerate scenario envisages a white dwarf accreting matter from a non-degenerate companion in a binary system. Nuclear energy of the accreted matter is released in the form of electromagnetic radiation or gives rise to numerous classical nova explosions prior to the supernova event. We show that combined X-ray output of supernova progenitors and statistics of classical novae predicted in the single degenerate scenario are inconsistent with X-ray and optical observations of nearby early type galaxies and galaxy bulges. White dwarfs accreting from a donor star in a binary system and detonating at the Chandrasekhar mass limit can account for no more than {approx}5% of type Ia supernovae observed in old stellar populations.

  4. Stability of Magnetically Implode Liners for High Energy Density Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Anderson, W.E.; Atchison, W.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Clark, D.A.; Ekdahl, C.E.; Faehl, R.J.; Goforth, J.H.; Keinigs, R.K.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Morgan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Tasker, D.G.; Trainor, R.J.; Shlachter, J.S.

    1998-10-18

    Magnetically imploded cylindrical metal shells (z-pinch liners) are attractive drivers for a wide variety of hydrodynamics and material properties experiments. The ultimate utility of liners depends on the acceleration of near-solid density shells to velocities exceeding 20 km/sec with good azimuthal symmetry and axial uniformity. Two pulse power systems (Ranchero and Atlas) currently operational or under development at Los Alamos provide electrical energy adequate to accelerate {approximately}50 gr. liners to 1-2 MJ/cm kinetic energy. As in all z-pinches, the outer surface of a magnetically imploded liner is unstable to magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) modes during acceleration. Large-scale distortion in the liners from RT modes growing from glide plane interactions or initial imperfections could make liners unusable for man experiments. On the other hand, material strength in the liner should, from first principles, reduce the growth rate of RT modes - and can render some combinations of wavelength and amplitude analytically stable. The growth of instabilities in both soft aluminum liners and in high strength aluminum alloy liners has been studied analytically, computationally and experimentally at liner kinetic energies up to 100 KJ/cm on the Pegasus capacitor bank using driving currents up to 12 MA.

  5. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiali; Tiedt, Douglas

    2013-05-23

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  6. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  7. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  8. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-11-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  9. Supernova 1987A: 18 Months later

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the significance for physics of the closest visual supernova in almost 400 years is presented. The supernova occurred in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), /approximately/50 kpc away. The supernova star was a massive star of /approximately/15--20M. Observations now show that it was once a red-giant but lost its outer envelope. The lower than standard luminosity and higher observed velocities are a natural consequence of the pre-supernova star being a blue rather than a red (supergiant). Of particular importance to physicists is the detection of neutrinos from the event by detectors in the United States and Japan. Not only did this establish extra-solar system neutrino astronomy, but it also constrained the properties of neutrino. It is shown that the well established Kamioka-IMB neutrino burst experimentally implies an event with about 2--4 /times/ 10/sup 53/ergs emitted in neutrinos and a temperature, T/sub /bar /nu/e//, of between 4 and 4.5 MeV. This event is in excellent agreement with what one would expect from the gravitational core collapse of a massive star. A neutrino detection, such as that reported earlier in Mt. Blanc, would require more than the rest mass energy of a neutron star to be converted to neutrinos, if it were to have its origin in the LMC. Thus it is probably unrelated to the supernova. The anticipated frequency of collapse events in our Galaxy, will also be discussed with a rate as high as 1/10 year shown to be not unreasonable. 61 refs.

  10. Infrared Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Andrew Samuel

    2012-05-01

    This thesis presents the CfAIR2 data set, which includes over 4000 near-Infrared (NIR) JHK8-band measurements of 104 Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) observed from 2005-2011 using PAIRITEL, the 1.3-m Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. While the discovery of dark energy and most subsequent supernova cosmology has been performed using optical and Ultraviolet wavelength observations of SN Ia, a growing body of evidence suggests that NIR SN Ia observations will be crucial for future cosmological studies. Whereas SN Ia observed at optical wavelengths have been shown to be excellent standardizeable candles, using empirical correlations between luminosity, light curve shape, and color, the CfAIR2 data set strengthens the evidence that SN Ia at NIR wavelengths are essentially standard candles, even without correction for light-curve shape or for reddening. CfAIR2 was obtained as part of the CfA Supernova Program, an ongoing multi-wavelength follow-up effort at FLWO designed to observe high-quality, densely sampled light curves and spectra of hundreds of low-redshift SN Ia. CfAIR2 is the largest homogeneously observed and processed NIR data set of its kind to date, nearly tripling the number of individual JHK8-band observations and nearly doubling the set of SN Ia with published NIR light curves in the literature. Matched only by the recently published Carnegie Supernova Project sample, CfAIR2 complements the large and growing set of low-redshift optical and NIR SN Ia observations obtained by the CfA and other programs, making this data set a unique and particularly valuable local universe anchor for future supernova cosmology.

  11. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  12. Electron antineutrino detection from simulated supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luoma, Steffon Jon

    Supernova 1987A demonstrated that neutrinos from a nearby supernova could be detected terrestrially. The partition of events between the neutrino flavours generated by stellar collapse can provide details about supernova dynamics and by using Monte Carlo simulations we can prepare for the analysis of data from the next such supernova. Through its sensitivity to the charged current, neutral current and elastic scattering interactions in both the heavy and light waters, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is able to measure this partition. The unique signal of the charged current [Special characters omitted.] interactions with deuterium nuclei ([Special characters omitted.] + d [arrow right] n + n + e + ) allows a direct count of the number of [Special characters omitted.] 's to be made. With the addition of NaCl to the heavy water the efficiency of detecting neutrons was increased, which in turn increased the sensitivity for the detection of [Special characters omitted.] 's. This work explores methods of identifying [Special characters omitted.] 's in the high flux environment of a modeled supernova source in SNO during the salt phase. The differences in energy spectrum and in PMT hit pattern of positrons and neutrons allow for distinction between the two, and thus permits classification. Association of these particles to the [Special characters omitted.] interaction is made possible by measuring the time and space between detection of the positron and each neutron generated from the same [Special characters omitted.] . A [Special characters omitted.] is considered to be identified when the correct final state particles generated from the interaction with a deuterium nucleus are associated with each other. Because the expected data rate may be very high and may have a large dynamic range, causing some improper particle association, a pivotal component of this analysis is understanding the rate dependencies. To accomplish this, datasets were generated at several

  13. Probing the core-collapse supernova mechanism with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian D.

    2009-10-01

    The mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions must draw on the energy provided by gravitational collapse and transfer the necessary fraction to the kinetic and internal energy of the ejecta. Despite many decades of concerted theoretical effort, the detailed mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions is still unknown, but indications are strong that multi-D processes lie at its heart. This opens up the possibility of probing the supernova mechanism with gravitational waves, carrying direct dynamical information from the supernova engine deep inside a dying massive star. I present a concise overview of the physics and primary multi-D dynamics in neutrino-driven, magnetorotational, and acoustically driven core-collapse supernova explosion scenarios. Discussing and contrasting estimates for the gravitational-wave emission characteristics of these mechanisms, I argue that their gravitational-wave signatures are clearly distinct and that the observation (or non-observation) of gravitational waves from a nearby core-collapse event could put strong constraints on the supernova mechanism.

  14. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z.; Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (≅ 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (≅ 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (∼3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub −2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub −0.8}{sup +1.4} per

  15. HST OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA IN M51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has returned the most detailed images ever of supernova 1994I which is in the 'Whirlpool Galaxy' (M51) located 20 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici. The view in this picture encompasses the inner region of the galaxy's grand spiral disk, which extends all the way to the bright nucleus. An arrow points to the location of the supernova, which lies approximately 2,000 light-years from the nucleus. The supernova appears to be superposed on a diffuse background of starlight. The Hubble Space Telescope was also used to measure the spectrum of the supernova in the ultraviolet light, which can be used to analyze the chemical composition and the motion of the gas ejected in the explosion. A supernova is a violent stellar explosion which destroys a star, while ejecting the products of nuclear burning into the gas between stars. The energy for some supernova explosions comes from the collapse of a massive star to a compact neutron star, with the mass of the Sun, but the size of a city. Elements out of which the Earth is formed had their origin in ancient supernova explosions in our own Milky Way Galaxy. This supernova was discovered on April 2, 1994 by amateur astronomers and has been the target of investigations by astronomers using ground-based optical and radio telescopes and NASA's International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. Because a supernova explosion is a billion times as bright as a star like the Sun, they can be seen to great distances and may prove useful in charting the size of the universe. These previous observations show that SN 1994I is a very unusual supernova, called 'Type Ic,' for which very few examples have been studied carefully. The ultraviolet observations made with HST will help astronomers understand what type of stellar explosion led to supernova 1994I. Further observations of SN 1994I with the Hubble Space Telescope will be able to see more deeply into the interior of the exploded star, as

  16. Infrared Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Andrew S.; Kirshner, R. P.; Wood-Vasey, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Mandel, K.; Challis, P.; Hicken, M.; Narayan, G.; Foley, R.; Rest, A.; Modjaz, M.; Starr, D.; Blondin, S.; Blake, C.; CfA Supernova Group; PAIRITEL Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    For my Astronomy Ph.D. thesis at Harvard University, I used the PAIRITEL 1.3m robotic telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona to observe Near-Infrared (NIR) JHKs band light curves of over 100 Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) in nearby galaxies, compiling a data set that will more than quintuple the number of NIR SN Ia light curves in the literature. With this data, we confirm and strengthen the claim that SN Ia are more standard in NIR luminosity, less sensitive to dust extinction, and crucial to reducing systematic distance errors due to the degeneracy between intrinsic color variation and reddening of light by dust, arguably the most dominant systematic error in SN Ia cosmology. Uncertainty in our knowledge of the distributions of host galaxy dust properties is a major obstacle to obtaining consistent dark energy constraints with different SN Ia cosmological analysis methods. As such, I develop a color curve model using optical and NIR data to estimate the most probable amount of dust extinction and the properties of the host galaxy dust for each SN Ia. Continuing a comprehensive ground based optical and NIR program to observe low redshift SN Ia is one of the best ways to improve the precision and accuracy of SN Ia as standardizeable candles and cosmological distance indicators moving forward. Such data will critically inform the design of the NASA/DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission, and indeed any future cosmology experiment designed to measure cosmic acceleration and dark energy with a sample of high redshift SN Ia. This work has been supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and a NASA GSRP Fellowship.

  17. The Supernova Early Warning System (SNEWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habig, A.; SNEWS Collaboration

    2005-05-01

    SNEWS is a cooperative effort between the world's neutrino detection experiments to spread the news that a star in our galaxy has just experienced a core-collapse event and is about to become a Type-II Supernova. This project exploits the ˜hours time difference between neutrinos promptly escaping the nascent supernova and photons which originate when the shock wave breaks through the stellar photosphere, to give the world a chance to get ready to observe such an exciting event at the earliest possible time. A coincidence trigger between experiments is used to eliminate potential local false alarms, allowing a rapid, automated alert. SNEWS is currently operational and ready, and this poster presents the procedures in use. SNEWS work is supported by NSF collaborative grant #0302166.

  18. Earth matter effects in detection of supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.-H.; Young Binglin

    2006-05-01

    We calculated the matter effect, including both the Earth and supernova, on the detection of neutrinos from type II supernovae at the proposed Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. It is found that apart from the dependence on the flip probability P{sub H} inside the supernova and the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, the amount of the Earth matter effect depends on the direction of the incoming supernova neutrinos, and reaches the biggest value when the incident angle of neutrinos is around 93 deg. In the reaction channel {nu}{sub e}+p{yields}e{sup +}+n the Earth matter effect can be as big as about 12%. For other detection processes the amount of the Earth matter effect is a few per cent.

  19. Earth matter effects in detection of supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.-H.; Young, Bing-Lin

    2006-05-01

    We calculated the matter effect, including both the Earth and supernova, on the detection of neutrinos from type II supernovae at the proposed Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. It is found that apart from the dependence on the flip probability PH inside the supernova and the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, the amount of the Earth matter effect depends on the direction of the incoming supernova neutrinos, and reaches the biggest value when the incident angle of neutrinos is around 93°. In the reaction channel ν¯e+p→e++n the Earth matter effect can be as big as about 12%. For other detection processes the amount of the Earth matter effect is a few per cent.

  20. Presupernova models and supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, D.; Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of theories of presupernova stellar evolution and the triggering mechanisms of supernova explosions are reviewed. The validity of the single-star approximation for stellar core evolution is considered, and the central density and temperature of the stellar core are discussed. Attention is then given to the results of numerical models of supernova explosions by carbon deflagration of an intermediate mass star, resulting in the total disruption of the star; the photodissociation of iron nuclei in a massive star, resulting in neutron star or black hole formation; and stellar core collapse triggered by electron capture in stars of mass ranging between those of the intermediate mass and massive stars, resulting in neutron star formation despite oxygen deflagration. Helium and carbon combustion and detonation in accreting white dwarfs and the gravitational collapse triggered by electron-pair creation in supermassive stars are also discussed, and problems requiring future investigation are indicated.

  1. Binary progenitors of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    1984-12-01

    Among the massive stars that are expected to produce Type II, hydrogen-rich supernovae, the presence of a close companion can increase the main sequence mass needed to yield a collapsing core. In addition, due to mass transfer from the primary to the secondary, the companion enhances the stripping of the stellar hydrogen envelope produced by single star winds and thereby makes it harder for the star to give rise to a typical SN II light curve. Among the less massive stars that may be the basis for Type I, hydrogen-free supernovae, a close companion could be an innocent bystander to carbon detonation/deflagration in the primary. It may alternatively be a vital participant which transfers material to a white dwarf primary and drives it to explosive conditions.

  2. Presupernova models and supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, D.; Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of theories of presupernova stellar evolution and the triggering mechanisms of supernova explosions are reviewed. The validity of the single-star approximation for stellar core evolution is considered, and the central density and temperature of the stellar core are discussed. Attention is then given to the results of numerical models of supernova explosions by carbon deflagration of an intermediate mass star, resulting in the total disruption of the star; the photodissociation of iron nuclei in a massive star, resulting in neutron star or black hole formation; and stellar core collapse triggered by electron capture in stars of mass ranging between those of the intermediate mass and massive stars, resulting in neutron star formation despite oxygen deflagration. Helium and carbon combustion and detonation in accreting white dwarfs and the gravitational collapse triggered by electron-pair creation in supermassive stars are also discussed, and problems requiring future investigation are indicated.

  3. Supernova Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  4. Supernova research with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, Norbert; Bietenholz, Michael F.

    2016-06-01

    Core-collapse supernovae have been monitored with VLBI from shortly after the explosion to many years thereafter. Radio emission is produced as the ejecta hit the stellar wind left over from the dyingstar. Images show the details of the interaction as the shock front expands into the circumstellar medium. Measurements of the velocity and deceleration of the expansion provide information on both the ejecta and the circumstellar medium. VLBI observations can also search for the stellar remnant of the explosion, a neutron star or a black hole. Combining the transverse expansion rate with the radial expansion rate from optical spectra allows a geometric determination of the distance to the host galaxy. We will present results from recent VLBI observations, focus on their interpretations, and show updated movies of supernovae from soon after their explosion to the present.

  5. Supernova 1987A!

    PubMed

    Woosley, S E; Phillips, M M

    1988-05-06

    Light from the brightest supernova in almost 400 years arrived at Earth on 23 February 1987. Although located 160,000 light years away in a satellite galaxy of our own known as the Large Magellanic Cloud, this supernova's relative proximity compared to all others that have been observed in modern times has allowed observations, which were never possible before, to be made from space, from detectors on the ground and carried by balloons and airplanes, and from neutrino detectors deep underground. What emerges is a greater understanding of one of the most violent events in the universe, the death of a massive star. For the most part, theoretical expectations have been borne out, but some major surprises have made the event all the more fascinating.

  6. Multimicroprocessor system for high-energy physics experiment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Píška, K.; Falkenberg, W.; Glasneck, C.-P.; Pflugbeil, W.

    1982-05-01

    An autonomous modular multicomputer system based on the INTEL 8080 for program development and for application to the high-energy physics experiment "RISK" is presented. The associated microcomputers (a three-processor configuration is realized) with uniform software systems can perform, in parallel, the interactively-controlled processing and monitoring of data accessible in the common memory block coupled to the processors via the direct shared bus. Data are acquired into the common memory buffer by the main processor, which is linked by the CAMAC interface with the experimental apparatus and optionally with a large-size computer. One microcomputer can be connected with the magnetic tape unit used for data recording.

  7. Measuring leptonic CP violation by low energy neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.

    2000-12-01

    We uncover an interesting phenomenon that neutrino flavor transformation in slowly varying matter density imitates almost exactly that of vacuum neutrino oscillation under suitably chosen experimental parameters. It allows us to have relatively large CP violating measure ΔP≡P(νμ-->νe)- P(ν¯μ-->ν¯e) which is essentially free from matter effect contamination. We utilize this phenomenon to design a low-energy long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment to measure the leptonic CP violating phase.

  8. Our clinical experience in low-energy laser medical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Bruckner, Ion I.; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Moldovan, Corneliu I.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Ionescu, Elena

    1996-05-01

    In clinical research the efficiency of low-energy laser (LEL) therapy remains controversial. We present here some of the most important results of our clinical experience in this field. We summarize our opinions about the LEL effects in rheumatic diseases, in chronic pelvic inflammatory disorders, in the treatment of some dermatological disorders, and in the recovery of the distal forearm nerve from traumatic lesion after surgical suture. We conclude that these results may be important evidence for the real clinical efficiency of the LEL.

  9. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  10. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  11. Constraining Dark Energy in Table-Top Quantum Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Holger

    If dark energy is a light scalar field, it might interact with normal matter. The interactions, however, are suppressed in the leading models, which are thus compatible with current cosmological observations as well as solar-system and laboratory studies. Such suppression typically relies on the scalar's interaction with macroscopic amounts of ordinary matter but can be bypassed by studying the interaction with individual particles. Using an atom interferometer, we have placed tight constraints on so-called chameleon models, ruling out interaction parameters smaller than 2 . 3 ×10-5 , while M ~ 1 or larger would lead to conflict with macroscopic experiments. In order to close this gap, we have already increased the sensitivity hundredfold and are expecting a new constraint soon. Purpose-built experiments in the lab or on the international space station will completely close the gap and rule out chameleons and other theories such as symmetrons or f (R) gravity.

  12. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-04

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K{sup +} beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  13. Wall shocks in high-energy-density shock tube experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, F. W.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Robey, H. F.

    2009-11-15

    The radiative precursor of a sufficiently fast shock has been observed to drive the vaporization of shock tube material ahead of the shock. The resulting expansion drives a converging blast wave into the gas volume of the tube. The effects of this wall shock may be observed and correlated with primary shock parameters. We demonstrate this process in experiments performed on the Omega Laser Facility, launching shocks propagating through xenon with speeds above 100 km/s driven by ablation pressures of approximately 50 Mbars. Wall shocks in laser experiments, in which the principal shock waves themselves should not be radiative, are also reported--in which the wall shocks have been launched by some other early energy source.

  14. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Are There Hidden Supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Harker, David; Dunham, E.; Rank, David; Temi, Pasquale

    1997-02-01

    Ames Research Center and UCSC have been working on the development of a Mid IR Camera for the KAO in order to search for extra galactic supernovae. The development of the camera and its associated data reduction software have been successfully completed. Spectral Imaging of the Orion Bar at 6.2 and 7.8 microns demonstrates the derotation and data reduction software which was developed.

  16. Are There Hidden Supernovae?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Harker, David; Dunham, E.; Rank, David; Temi, Pasquale

    1997-01-01

    Ames Research Center and UCSC have been working on the development of a Mid IR Camera for the KAO in order to search for extra galactic supernovae. The development of the camera and its associated data reduction software have been successfully completed. Spectral Imaging of the Orion Bar at 6.2 and 7.8 microns demonstrates the derotation and data reduction software which was developed.

  17. Supernova Dust Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Haley; Consortium, MESS; LCOGT

    2013-01-01

    The origin of interstellar dust in galaxies is poorly understood, particularly the relative contribution from supernovae. We present infrared and submillimeter photometry and spectroscopy from the Herschel Space Observatory of the Galactic remnants Tycho, Kepler and the Crab Nebula, taken as part of the Mass Loss from Evolved StarS program (MESS). Although we detect small amounts of dust surrounding Tycho and Kepler (the remnants of Type Ia supernovae), we show this is due to swept-up interstellar and circumstellar material respectively. The lack of dust grains in the ejecta suggests that Type Ia remnants do not produce substantial quantities of iron-rich dust grains and has important consequences for the ‘missing’ iron mass observed in ejecta. After carefully subtracting the synchrotron and line emission from the Crab, the remaining far-infrared continuum originates from 0.1-0.2 solar masses of dust. These observations suggest that the Crab Nebula has condensed most of the relevant refractory elements into dust and that these grains appear well set to survive their journey into the interstellar medium. In summary, our Herschel observations show that significantly less dust forms in the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae than in the remnants of core-collapse explosions, placing stringent constraints on the environments in which dust and molecules can form.

  18. Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig

    1992-01-01

    Spectral calculations show that a model based on the thermonuclear explosion of a degenerate carbon/oxygen white dwarf provides excellent agreement with observations of Type Ia supernovae. Identification of suitable evolutionary progenitors remains a severe problem. General problems with estimation of supernova rates are outlined and the origin of Type Ia supernovae from double degenerate systems are discussed in the context of new rates of explosion per H band luminosity, the lack of observed candidates, and the likely presence of H in the vicinity of some SN Ia events. Re-examination of the problems of triggering Type Ia by accretion of hydrogen from a companion shows that there may be an avenue involving cataclysmic variables, especially if extreme hibernation occurs. Novae may channel accreting white dwarfs to a unique locus in accretion rate/mass space. Systems that undergo secular evolution to higher mass transfer rates could lead to just the conditions necessary for a Type Ia explosion. Tests involving fluorescence or absorption in a surrounding circumstellar medium and the detection of hydrogen stripped from a companion, which should appear at low velocity inside the white dwarf ejecta, are suggested. Possible observational confirmation of the former is described.

  19. CALET on the ISS: a high energy astroparticle physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone; CALET Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    CALET is a space mission of the Japanese Aerospace Agency (JAXA) in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and NASA. The CALET instrument (CALorimetric Electron Telescope) is planned for a long exposure on the JEM-EF, an external platform of the Japanese Experiment Module KIBO, aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The main science objectives include high precision measurements of the inclusive electron (+positron) spectrum below 1 TeV and the exploration of the energy region above 1 TeV, where the shape of the high end of the spectrum might reveal the presence of nearby sources of acceleration. With an excellent energy resolution and low background contamination CALET will search for possible spectral signatures of dark matter with both electrons and gamma rays. It will also measure the high energy spectra and relative abundance of cosmic nuclei from proton to iron and detect trans-iron elements up to Z ~ 40. With a large exposure and high energy resolution, CALET will be able to verify and complement the observations of CREAM, PAMELA and AMS-02 on a possible deviation from a pure power-law of proton and He spectra in the region of a few hundred GeV and to extend the study to the multi-TeV region. CALET will also contribute to clarify the present experimental picture on the energy dependence of the boron/carbon ratio, below and above 1 TeV/n, thereby providing valuable information on cosmic-ray propagation in the galaxy. Gamma-ray transients will be studied with a dedicated Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM).

  20. How Well Do We Know The Supernova Equation of State?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Matthias; Oertel, Micaela; Typel, Stefan; Klähn, Thomas

    We give an overview about equations of state (EOS) which are currently available for simulations of core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers. A few selected important aspects of the EOS, such as the symmetry energy, the maximum mass of neutron stars, and cluster formation, are confronted with constraints from experiments and astrophysical observations. There are just very few models which are compatible even with this very restricted set of constraints. These remaining models illustrate the uncertainty of the uniform nuclear matter EOS at high densities. In addition, at finite temperatures the medium modifications of nuclear clusters represent a conceptual challenge. In conclusion, there has been significant development in the recent years, but there is still need for further improved general purpose EOS tables.