Science.gov

Sample records for energy technologies revision

  1. Future Energy Technology. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Recommended for grades 7-12 language arts, science, and social studies classes, this 5-7 day unit encourages students to investigate alternative energy sources through research. Focusing on geothermal energy, tide and ocean, fusion, wind, biomass, and solar energy as possible areas of consideration, the unit attempts to create an awareness of the…

  2. Future Energy Technology. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Recommended for grades 7-12 language arts, science, and social studies classes, this 5-7 day unit encourages students to investigate alternative energy sources through research. Focusing on geothermal energy, tide and ocean, fusion, wind, biomass, and solar energy as possible areas of consideration, the unit attempts to create an awareness of the…

  3. Industrial Technology. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of a series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides learning activities for teachers to use with students in industrial arts/technology education. Each of the 17…

  4. Industrial Technology. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of the series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides activities for teaching industrial arts/technology education. The activities are intended to present energy…

  5. Electric energy savings from new technologies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

    1986-09-01

    Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for 10 technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all 10 technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference projection, only 25% of the savings estimated here should be subtracted from the reference projection for analysis purposes.

  6. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies. Revision 5/94

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which man is routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies. This report is not a risk assessment; nor does it contain instructions on how to do a risk assessment. Rather, it provides background information on how most of us think about risks and why it is difficult to do it rationally, it provides a philosophy and data with which to do a better job of judging risks more rationally, and it provides an overview of where risks of energy technologies fit within the spectrum of all risks. Much of the quantitative information provided here is on relative risk of dying of various causes. This is not because risk of dying is seen as the most important kind of risk, but because the statistics on mortality rates by cause are the highest quality data available on health risks in the general population.

  7. Energy Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Reviewed are technological problems faced in energy production including locating, recovering, developing, storing, and distributing energy in clean, convenient, economical, and environmentally satisfactory manners. The energy resources of coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric power, nuclear energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, winds, tides,…

  8. Energy Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Reviewed are technological problems faced in energy production including locating, recovering, developing, storing, and distributing energy in clean, convenient, economical, and environmentally satisfactory manners. The energy resources of coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric power, nuclear energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, winds, tides,…

  9. Energy 83. Revised and Expanded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, John, Ed.

    Energy 80 is an energy education program for middle/junior high school students. This document is a booklet of energy topics designed for student use in the program. Topics considered in this booklet include: forms of energy; energy rules; solar energy; food energy; fossil fuels; coal; oil and gas production and consumption; nuclear fission;…

  10. Energy 83. Revised and Expanded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, John, Ed.

    Energy 80 is an energy education program for middle/junior high school students. This document is a booklet of energy topics designed for student use in the program. Topics considered in this booklet include: forms of energy; energy rules; solar energy; food energy; fossil fuels; coal; oil and gas production and consumption; nuclear fission;…

  11. Kodak: MotorMaster+ Is the Foundation for Energy Efficiency at a Chemical and Imaging Technologies Plant (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-02-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Kodak is saving 5.8 million kWh and $664,000 annually after upgrading or replacing inefficient motors in its Rochester, New York, plant.

  12. Get Smart about Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

    This publication offers information on energy efficiency in schools. It discusses the high costs of energy in schools, the benefits of smart energy use, options for schools to be smarter in their energy use, energy's impact on student performance, how schools can participate in the EnergySmart Schools campaign operated by Rebuild America, why the…

  13. SCIENCE CURRICULUM REVISION AND THE TECHNOLOGICAL CLASSROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHERBURNE, E.G., JR.

    THE REVOLUTION IN THE ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURE OF THE SUBJECT MATTER OF SCIENCE AS TAUGHT IN THE SCHOOLS MUST NOW BE MATCHED TO ANOTHER REVOLUTION IN EDUCATION--THE TECHNOLOGICAL CLASSROOM. CURRICULUM REVISION MUST BE MADE WITH A VISION OF WHERE THE CLASSROOM MAY BE HEADED IN THE FUTURE. THE TRADITIONAL, THE TRANSITIONAL, AND THE TECHNOLOGICAL…

  14. China Energy Databook. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, J. E.; Fridley, D. G.; Levine, M. D.; Yang, F.; Zhenping, J.; Xing, Z.; Kejun, J.; Xiaofeng, L.

    1996-09-01

    The Energy Analysis Program at LBL first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and energy demand held in Nanjing Nov. 1988. EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute of China`s State Planning Commission. It was decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. Primary interest was to use the data to help understand the historical evolution and likely future of the Chinese energy system; thus the primary criterion was to relate the data to the structure of energy supply and demand in the past and to indicate probable developments (eg, as indicated by patterns of investment). Caveats are included in forewords to both the 1992 and 1996 editions. A chapter on energy prices is included in the 1996 edition. 1993 energy consumption data are not included since there was a major disruption in energy statistical collection in China that year.

  15. Fundamentals of Energy Technology. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in fundamentals of energy technology is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  16. Energy and Economics. [Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walstad, William; Gleason, Joyce

    This unit is designed to provide high school students with an introduction to topics of energy and economics. A basic premise of the unit is that energy issues and economics are interrelated. It is believed that the application of basic economic concepts to energy issues can provide students with the tools to improve their analysis of problems and…

  17. Energy and Economics. [Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walstad, William; Gleason, Joyce

    This unit is designed to provide high school students with an introduction to topics of energy and economics. A basic premise of the unit is that energy issues and economics are interrelated. It is believed that the application of basic economic concepts to energy issues can provide students with the tools to improve their analysis of problems and…

  18. Coal within a revised energy perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Darmstadter, J.

    2006-07-15

    The author considers the use of coal within a revised energy perspective, focusing on the factors that will drive which fuels are used to generate electricity going forward. He looks at the world markets for fossil fuels and the difficulties of predicting oil and natural gas supply and prices, as demonstrated by the variability in projections from one year to another in the EIA's Annual Energy Outlook. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Electricity: Today's Technologies, Tomorrow's Alternatives. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA.

    This book traces the relatively new role of electricity in our energy history, discusses old and new ways of producing it (and related environmental issues), and closes with an agenda of technology-related issues that await decisions. Topics are presented in nine chapters. Chapters focus on (1) energy use; (2) energy demand; (3) energy supply; (4)…

  20. Electricity: Today's Technologies, Tomorrow's Alternatives. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA.

    This book traces the relatively new role of electricity in our energy history, discusses old and new ways of producing it (and related environmental issues), and closes with an agenda of technology-related issues that await decisions. Topics are presented in nine chapters. Chapters focus on (1) energy use; (2) energy demand; (3) energy supply; (4)…

  1. Energy Audits. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in energy audits is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored training…

  2. Energy Economics. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in energy economics is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored…

  3. Synchronous Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The synchronous technology requirements for large space power systems are summarized. A variety of technology areas including photovoltaics, thermal management, and energy storage, and power management are addressed.

  4. Solar Energy in the Home. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeder, Allen A.; Woodland, James A.

    Recommended for grades 10-12 physical, earth, or general science classes, this 5-7 day unit is designed to give students a general understanding of solar energy and its use as a viable alternative to present energy sources. Along with this technology, students examine several factors of solar energy which influence the choice of solar home site…

  5. Solar Energy in the Home. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeder, Allen A.; Woodland, James A.

    Recommended for grades 10-12 physical, earth, or general science classes, this 5-7 day unit is designed to give students a general understanding of solar energy and its use as a viable alternative to present energy sources. Along with this technology, students examine several factors of solar energy which influence the choice of solar home site…

  6. International Energy: Subject Thesaurus. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The International Energy Agency: Subject Thesaurus contains the standard vocabulary of indexing terms (descriptors) developed and structured to build and maintain energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency`s International Nuclear Information System (INIS) staff representing the more than 100 countries and organizations that record and index information for the international nuclear information community. ETDE member countries are also members of INIS. Nuclear information prepared for INIS by ETDE member countries is included in the ETDE Energy Database, which contains the online equivalent of the printed INIS Atomindex. Indexing terminology is therefore cooperatively standardized for use in both information systems. This structured vocabulary reflects thscope of international energy research, development, and technological programs. The terminology of this thesaurus aids in subject searching on commercial systems, such as ``Energy Science & Technology`` by DIALOG Information Services, ``Energy`` by STN International and the ``ETDE Energy Database`` by SilverPlatter. It is also the thesaurus for the Integrated Technical Information System (ITIS) online databases of the US Department of Energy.

  7. Industrial Energy Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Traylor, T.D.; Pitsenbarger, J.

    1995-10-01

    Industrial Energy Technology (IET) is published bimonthly. Each issue of IET presents an article of interest to these in the field; contains abstracts of the most current world literature pertaining to industrial energy efficiency; and announces upcoming meetings, conferences, and symposia in the field of industrial energy conservation. This publication contains the abstracts of Department of Energy (DOE) reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements.

  8. Science. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of a series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides activities for teaching science. The activities are intended to present energy principles in an interesting manner…

  9. Mathematics. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of the series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides activities for teaching mathematics. The activities are intended to present energy principles in an interesting…

  10. Science. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of a series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides activities for teaching science. The activities are intended to present energy principles in an interesting manner…

  11. Science. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of the series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides activities for teaching science. The activities are intended to present energy principles in an interesting manner…

  12. Social Studies. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document provides activities for teachers to use with students in teaching social studies. The activities are intended to demonstrate the impact of energy technology on today's society.…

  13. German energy technology prospects.

    PubMed

    Popp, M

    1982-12-24

    After more than 25 years of development of nuclear power and almost 10 years of research and development in numerous areas of nonnuclear energy, there is now a good basis for judging the future prospects of energy technologies in the Federal Republic of Germany. The development of nuclear power has provided an important and economically advantageous new source of energy. Further efforts are needed to establish the nuclear fuel cycle in all stages and to exploit the potential of advanced reactors. In all other areas of energy technology, including energy conservation, new energy sources, and coal, economics has turned out to be the key problem, even at today's energy prices. Opportunities to overcome these economic problems through additional R & D are limited. There is some potential for special applications, and there are many technologies that could contribute to the energy supply of developing countries. In general, however, progress in energy conservation and the use of renewable energy sources will depend on the degree to which energy policy measures can improve their economic basis. For some technologies, such as solar thermal power stations and coal liquefaction, large-scale economic deployment cannot be foreseen today. Instead of establishing costly demonstration projects, emphasis will be put on improving key components of these technologies with the aim of having the most advanced technology available when the economic parameters are more favorable.

  14. Citizens' Energy Directory. Second Edition. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Jan; Bossong, Ken

    This directory offers an annotated listing of over 600 of the most active individuals and groups in the United States working on alternative energy technologies. It details their activities, publications, and services with a contact name, address, and telephone number for each. The entries are listed by state and cross-indexed by areas of…

  15. Following Industry's Lead: Revising the Automotive Technology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, William H.; Anglin, Donald L.

    1976-01-01

    Today's automotive technology curriculum is changing; curriculum revisions are being made in response to both the changing automobile and to the latest social trends and laws affecting students and teachers alike. (Author)

  16. Renewable Energy Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Michael K.; Carter, Vinson R.

    2010-01-01

    In many ways the field of renewable energy technology is being introduced to a society that has little knowledge or background with anything beyond traditional exhaustible forms of energy and power. Dotson (2009) noted that the real challenge is to inform and educate the citizenry of the renewable energy potential through the development of…

  17. Renewable Energy Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Michael K.; Carter, Vinson R.

    2010-01-01

    In many ways the field of renewable energy technology is being introduced to a society that has little knowledge or background with anything beyond traditional exhaustible forms of energy and power. Dotson (2009) noted that the real challenge is to inform and educate the citizenry of the renewable energy potential through the development of…

  18. Buildings Energy Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, D.L.; Emmanuel, L.

    1996-11-01

    BET announces on a monthly basis current worldwide information available on the technology required for economic energy conservation in buildings and communities. It contains abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers,patents,theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through IEA`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government- to-government agreements. The citations are available for online searching and retrieval; current information, added daily, is available to DOE and its contractors.

  19. Revising China's energy consumption and carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    China is the world's largest carbon emitter and takes the lion's share of new increased emission since 2000, China's carbon emissions and mitigation efforts have received global attentions (Liu et al., Nature 500, 143-145)1. Yet China's emission estimates have been approved to be greatly uncertain (Guan et al., Nature Climate Change 2, 672-675)2. Accurate estimation becomes even crucial as China has recently pledged to reach a carbon emission peak by 2030, but no quantitative target has been given, nor is it even possible to assess without a reasonable baseline. Here we produced new estimates of Chinese carbon emissions for 1950-2012 based on a new investigation in energy consumption activities and emission factors using extensively surveyed and experimental data from 4243 mines and 602 coal samples. We reported that the total energy consumption is 10% higher than the nationally published value. The investigated emission factors used in China are significantly (40%) different from the IPCC default values which were used in drawing up several previous emission inventories. The final calculated total carbon emissions from China are 10% different than the amount reported by international data sets. The new estimate provides a revision of 4% of global emissions, which could have important implications for global carbon budgets and burden-sharing of climate change mitigation. 1 Liu, Z. et al. A low-carbon road map for China. Nature 500, 143-145 (2013). 2 Guan, D., Liu, Z., Geng, Y., Lindner, S. & Hubacek, K. The gigatonne gap in China's carbon dioxide inventories. Nature Climate Change, 672-675 (2012).

  20. Alternative energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresselhaus, M. S.; Thomas, I. L.

    2001-11-01

    Fossil fuels currently supply most of the world's energy needs, and however unacceptable their long-term consequences, the supplies are likely to remain adequate for the next few generations. Scientists and policy makers must make use of this period of grace to assess alternative sources of energy and determine what is scientifically possible, environmentally acceptable and technologically promising.

  1. Stirling Technology Development at NASA GRC. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Mason, Lee S.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA Glenn) are developing a free-piston Stirling convertor for a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) for NASA Space Science missions. The SRG is being developed for multimission use, including providing electric power for unmanned Mars rovers and deep space missions. NASA Glenn is conducting an in-house technology project to assist in developing the convertor for space qualification and mission implementation. Recent testing, of 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDC's) built by STC includes mapping, of a second pair of TDC's, single TDC testing, and TDC electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility characterization on a nonmagnetic test stand. Launch environment tests of a single TDC without its pressure vessel to better understand the convertor internal structural dynamics and of dual-opposed TDC's with several engineering mounting structures with different natural frequencies have recently been completed. A preliminary life assessment has been completed for the TDC heater head, and creep testing of the IN718 material to be used for the flight convertors is underway. Long-term magnet aging tests are continuing to characterize any potential aging in the strength or demagnetization resistance of the magnets used in the linear alternator (LA). Evaluations are now beginning on key organic materials used in the LA and piston/rod surface coatings. NASA Glenn is also conducting finite element analyses for the LA, in part to look at the demagnetization margin on the permanent magnets. The world's first known integrated test of a dynamic power system with electric propulsion was achieved at NASA Glenn when a Hall-effect thruster was successfully operated with a free-piston Stirling power source. Cleveland State University is developing a multidimensional Stirling computational fluid dynamics code to significantly improve Stirling loss

  2. Transformational Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: In 2009, ARPA-E issued an open call for the most revolutionary energy technologies to form the agency’s inaugural program. The first open solicitation was open to ideas from all energy areas and focused on funding projects already equipped with strong research and development plans for their potentially high-impact technologies. The 37 projects chosen received a level of financial support that could accelerate technical progress and catalyze additional investment from the private sector. After only 2 months, ARPA-E’s investment in these projects catalyzed an additional $33 million in investments.

  3. EDITORIAL: Renewing energy technology Renewing energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Renewable energy is now a mainstream concern among businesses and governments across the world, and could be considered a characteristic preoccupation of our time. It is interesting to note that many of the energy technologies currently being developed date back to very different eras, and even predate the industrial revolution. The fuel cell was first invented as long ago as 1838 by the Swiss--German chemist Christian Friedrich Schönbein [1], and the idea of harnessing solar power dates back to ancient Greece [2]. The enduring fascination with new means of harnessing energy is no doubt linked to man's innate delight in expending it, whether it be to satisfy the drive of curiosity, or from a hunger for entertainment, or to power automated labour-saving devices. But this must be galvanized by the sustained ability to improve device performance, unearthing original science, and asking new questions, for example regarding the durability of photovoltaic devices [3]. As in so many fields, advances in hydrogen storage technology for fuel cells have benefited significantly from nanotechnology. The idea is that the kinetics of hydrogen uptake and release may be reduced by decreasing the particle size. An understanding of how effective this may be has been hampered by limited knowledge of the way the thermodynamics are affected by atom or molecule cluster size. Detailed calculations of individual atoms in clusters are limited by computational resources as to the number of atoms that can studied, and other innovative approaches that deal with force fields derived by extrapolating the difference between the properties of clusters and bulk matter require labour-intensive modifications when extending such studies to new materials. In [4], researchers in the US use an alternative approach, considering the nanoparticle as having the same crystal structure as the bulk but relaxing the few layers of atoms near the surface. The favourable features of nanostructures for catalysis

  4. Mathematics. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document contains teaching activities which are intended to strengthen students' mathematics skills and concepts, while broadening their understanding of energy concepts. Each of the 24…

  5. Nuclear energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  6. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory publishes the Energy and Technology Review Monthly. This periodical reviews progress mode is selected programs at the laboratory. This issue includes articles on in-situ coal gasification, on chromosomal aberrations in human sperm, on high speed cell sorting and on supercomputers.

  7. Advances in energy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, H.J. Jr.; Hegler, B.E.

    1982-01-01

    Papers on various topics of energy conservation, new passive solar heating and storage devices, governmental particiaption in developing energy technologies, and the development of diverse energy sources and safety features are presented. Attention is given to recent shifts in the federal and state government roles in energy research, development and economic incentives. The applications of passive solar walls, flat plate collectors and trombe walls as retorfits for houses, institutions, and industries were examined. Attention was given to the implementation of wind power by a zoo and the use of spoilers as speed control devices in a Darrieus wind turbine. Aspects of gasohol, coal, synfuel, and laser-pyrolyzed coal products use are investigated. Finally, the economic, social, and political factors influencing energy system selection are explored, together with conservation practices in housing, government, and industry, and new simulators for enhancing nuclear power plant safety.

  8. Energy Activities for the Primary Classroom. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Blue, Comp.

    An energy education program at the primary level should help students to understand the nature and importance of energy, consider different energy sources, learn about energy conservation, prepare for energy related careers, and become energy conscious in other career fields. The activities charts, readings, and experiments provided in this…

  9. Energy Activities for the Primary Classroom. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Blue, Comp.

    An energy education program at the primary level should help students to understand the nature and importance of energy, consider different energy sources, learn about energy conservation, prepare for energy related careers, and become energy conscious in other career fields. The activities charts, readings, and experiments provided in this…

  10. Technology Education Curriculum Standards K-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover. Div. of Vocational Education.

    These standards have been developed to provide a rationale and educational model for establishing Technology Education programs and for modifying Industrial Arts programs to reflect characteristics of technological systems. National curriculum theories and practices and Delaware's Educational Goals have provided the foundation for the development…

  11. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Stowers, I.F.; Crawford, R.B.; Esser, M.A.; Lien, P.L.; O'Neal, E.; Van Dyke, P.

    1982-07-01

    The state of the laboratory address by LLNL Director Roger Batzel is summarized, and a breakdown of the laboratory funding is given. The Livermore defense-related committment is described, including the design and development of advanced nuclear weapons as well as research in inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnance, and particle beam technology. LLNL is also applying its scientific and engineering resources to the dual challenge of meeting future energy needs without degrading the quality of the biosphere. Some representative examples are given of the supporting groups vital for providing the specialized expertise and new technologies required by the laboratory's major research programs. (GHT)

  12. Energy conservation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Courtright, H.A.

    1993-12-31

    The conservation of energy through the efficiency improvement of existing end-uses and the development of new technologies to replace less efficient systems is an important component of the overall effort to reduce greenhouse gases which may contribute to global climate change. Even though uncertainties exist on the degree and causes of global warming, efficiency improvements in end-use applications remain in the best interest of utilities, their customers and society because efficiency improvements not only reduce environmental exposures but also contribute to industrial productivity, business cost reductions and consumer savings in energy costs.

  13. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.S.

    1983-06-01

    Research activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described in the Energy and Technology Review. This issue includes articles on measuring chromosome changes in people exposed to cigarette smoke, sloshing-ion experiments in the tandem mirror experiment, aluminum-air battery development, and a speech by Edward Teller on national defense. Abstracts of the first three have been prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  14. Ocean Energy Technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The Department of Energy Ocean Energy Technology (OET) program is assessed. A summary of OET program activities during the period FY 1980 through FY 1983 documents the most significant findings of DOE-sponsored research and development in each of six program elements: Advanced Power Systems Development, Closed-Cycle Power Systems Development, Alternative Energy Systems Development, Environmental Research, Ocean Engineering, and Engineering Development. The summary is based on extensive review of technical documentation and discussions with DOE and field organization personnel. The result is a concise, comprehensive description of all significant OET activities during the period. Assessment of the current state of ocean technologies is documented through the use of matrices which relate elements of the current ocean technology WBS to a nine-level scale which defines technology status ranging from preliminary feasibility through off-the-shelf availability. These Technical Progress Matrices (TPMs) were developed for each of four ocean system configurations by integrating inputs from seven OET participating field organizations. An evaluation of the critical technical unknowns which would form the basis for future ocean energy public and private research and development activities is presented. This evaluation was accomplished using an accepted technique for group interaction and consensus formation in a meeting of knowledgeable program participants. The results of this meeting are presented in the form of forty minimum essential unknowns (MEUs). An analysis of the correlation of this list of unknowns with DOE policy and selection criteria for acceptable federally-sponsored R and D revealed significant research needs in the areas defined as the primary federal role.

  15. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.C.

    1991-04-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review discusses the various educational programs in which Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) participates or sponsors. LLNL has a long history of fostering educational programs for students from kindergarten through graduate school. A goal is to enhance the teaching of science, mathematics, and technology and thereby assist educational institutions to increase the pool of scientists, engineers, and technicians. LLNL programs described include: (1) contributions to the improvement of US science education; (2) the LESSON program; (3) collaborations with Bay Area Science and Technology Education; (4) project HOPES; (5) lasers and fusion energy education; (6) a curriculum on global climate change; (7) computer and technology instruction at LLNL's Science Education Center; (8) the National Education Supercomputer Program; (9) project STAR; (10) the American Indian Program; (11) LLNL programs with historically Black colleges and Universities; (12) the Undergraduate Summer Institute on Contemporary Topics in Applied Science; (13) the National Physical Science Consortium: A Fellowship Program for Minorities and Women; (14) LLNL's participation with AWU; (15) the apprenticeship programs at LLNL; and, (16) the future of LLNL's educational programs. An appendix lists all of LLNL's educational programs and activities. Contacts and their respective telephone numbers are given for all these programs and activities. (BN)

  16. Information Technology Vision: 2000, 2002. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truckee Meadows Community Coll., Sparks, NV.

    This document represents a major component of Nevada's Truckee Meadows Community College (TMCC) strategic planning activities and elaborates on the technology functions found in the college strategic plan. Information resources at TMCC are grouped into five areas: (1) administrative computing, the area of information processing that supports the…

  17. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume II. Detailed technical plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    The four sections which comprise Part II describe in detail the technical basis for each of the four Program Elements (PE's) of the FWBS Engineering Technology Program (ETP). Each PE is planned to be executed in a number of phases. The purpose of the DTP's is to delineate detailed near-term research, development, and testing required to establish a FWBS engineering data base. Optimum testing strategies and construction of test facilities where needed are identified. The DTP's are based on guidelines given by Argonne National Laboratory which included the basic programmatic goals and the requirements for the types of tests and test conditions.

  18. Chemistry for Energy Technology II. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in chemistry for energy technology is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  19. Chemistry for Energy Technology I. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in chemistry for energy technology is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  20. Energy and Technology Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    Revised Hiroshima and Nagasaki dose estimates are presented. Other topics include: predicting integrated circuit performance; DYNA3D, computerized modeling of material deformation; and oil and gas resources, predicting the unpredictable.

  1. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    After a brief report on revised Hiroshima and Nagasaki dose estimates, the issue concentrates on three subjects: predicting integrated circuit performance; DYNA3D, computerized modeling of material deformation; and oil and gas resources, predicting the unpredictable. (GHT)

  2. Energy Production Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in energy production systems is one of 15 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  3. China energy databook. Revision 2, 1992 edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Liu, Feng; Davis, W.B.; Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi

    1993-06-01

    The Energy Analysis Program at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute of China`s State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industries more energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of energy supply and demand in the People`s Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues, we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. We are hopeful that this volume will not only help us in our work, but help build a broader community of Chinese energy policy studies within the US. In order to select appropriate data from what was available we established several criteria. Our primary interest was to use the data to help understand the historical evolution and likely future of the Chinese energy system. A primary criterion was thus that the data relate to the structure of energy supply and demand in the past and indicate probable developments (e.g., as indicated by patterns of investment). Other standards were accuracy, consistency with other information, and completeness of coverage. This is not to say that all the data presented herein are accurate, consistent, and complete, but where discrepancies and omissions do occur we have tried to note them.

  4. Energy and Technology Review

    SciTech Connect

    Sefcik, J.A.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Highstone, H.; Kroopnick, H.; Sanford, N.M.

    1992-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we have added other major programs, including laser fusion and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense, and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering, and physics. The Laboratory also carries out a variety of projects for other Federal agencies, Energy and Technology Review is published monthly to report on unclassified work in all our program. Three projects are described in this issue. Numerical simulations of electromagnetic waves and plasmas in realistic geometries. Our numerical methods for simulating electromagnetic waves and plasmas in realistic geometries allow the use of unstructured meshes. Simulations can now address the spatial scales and boundary shapes of real devices, making them more useful for engineering applications that range from accelerators and fusion reactor components, to plasma torches, electronic devices, antenna design, and radar cross sections. Kestrel: A high-altitude balloon platform. We have design and tested a ship-board, balloon-launch method for flying a scientific payload at altitudes above 25 km for a period of several hours to obtain missile-launch plume data at infrared, visible, and ultraviolet wavelengths. Increasing laser power with beamlet architecture. We are developing a new laser architecture to increase the power output of lasers used for inertial confinement fusion experiments. This architecture is an assembly of optically independent units or modules called ``beamlets.`` Each beamlet will have an aperture of about 30 cm{sup 2} and will deliver to the target an output of 3.5 to 7.0 kJ at a 351-nm wavelength.

  5. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume I. Summary, objectives and management. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This document defines a plan for conducting selected aspects of the engineering testing required for magnetic fusion reactor FWBS components and systems. The ultimate product of this program is an established data base that contributes to a functional, reliable, maintainable, economically attractive, and environmentally acceptable commercial fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield system. This program plan updates the initial plan issued in November of 1980 by the DOE/Office of Fusion Energy (unnumbered report). The plan consists of two parts. Part I is a summary of activities, responsibilities and program management including reporting and interfaces with other programs. Part II is a compilation of the Detailed Technical Plans for Phase I (1982 to 1984) developed by the participants during Phase 0 of the program (July to December 1981).

  6. Technology Education Tackles Energy Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Sandy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the solar-hydrogen technologies at the East Valley Institute of Technology, the only technology center in the nations that offers this class. Describes its focus on solving the energy crisis. (JOW)

  7. Technology Education Tackles Energy Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Sandy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the solar-hydrogen technologies at the East Valley Institute of Technology, the only technology center in the nations that offers this class. Describes its focus on solving the energy crisis. (JOW)

  8. Energy and Technology Review

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.J.

    1993-08-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we other major programs have been added including laser fusion, and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering and physics. In this issue, Herald Brown, the Laboratory`s third director and now counselor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, reminisces about his years at Livermore and comments about the Laboratory`s role in the future. Also an article on visualizing dynamic systems in three dimensions is presented. Researchers can use our interactive algorithms to translate massive quantities of numerical data into visual form and can assign the visual markers of their choice to represent three- dimensional phenomena in a two-dimensional setting, such as a monitor screen. Major work has been done in the visualization of climate modeling, but the algorithms can be used for visualizing virtually any phenomena.

  9. Energy and Technology Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, W. J.

    1993-08-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, other major programs have been added including laser fusion, and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering and physics. In this issue, Herald Brown, the Laboratory's third director and now counselor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, reminisces about his years at Livermore and comments about the Laboratory's role in the future. Also an article on visualizing dynamic systems in three dimensions is presented. Researchers can use our interactive algorithms to translate massive quantities of numerical data into visual form and can assign the visual markers of their choice to represent three-dimensional phenomena in a two-dimensional setting, such as a monitor screen. Major work has been done in the visualization of climate modeling, but the algorithms can be used for visualizing virtually any phenomena.

  10. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  11. Energy and Technology Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, Andrew J.

    1988-10-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review contains: Neutron Penumbral Imaging of Laser-Fusion Targets--using our new penumbral-imaging diagnostic, we have obtained the first images that can be used to measure directly the deuterium-tritium burn region in laser-driven fusion targets; Computed Tomography for Nondestructive Evaluation--various computed tomography systems and computational techniques are used in nondestructive evaluation; Three-Dimensional Image Analysis for Studying Nuclear Chromatin Structure--we have developed an optic-electronic system for acquiring cross-sectional views of cell nuclei, and computer codes to analyze these images and reconstruct the three-dimensional structures they represent; Imaging in the Nuclear Test Program--advanced techniques produce images of unprecedented detail and resolution from Nevada Test Site data; and Computational X-Ray Holography--visible-light experiments and numerically simulated holograms test our ideas about an X-ray microscope for biological research.

  12. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.

    1988-10-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review contains: Neutron Penumbral Imaging of Laser-Fusion Targets--using our new penumbral-imaging diagnostic, we have obtained the first images that can be used to measure directly the deuterium-tritium burn region in laser-driven fusion targets; Computed Tomography for Nondestructive Evaluation--various computed tomography systems and computational techniques are used in nondestructive evaluation; Three-Dimensional Image Analysis for Studying Nuclear Chromatin Structure--we have developed an optic-electronic system for acquiring cross-sectional views of cell nuclei, and computer codes to analyze these images and reconstruct the three-dimensional structures they represent; Imaging in the Nuclear Test Program--advanced techniques produce images of unprecedented detail and resolution from Nevada Test Site data; and Computational X-Ray Holography--visible-light experiments and numerically simulated holograms test our ideas about an x-ray microscope for biological research.

  13. Benefits from energy storage technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R J; Kannberg, L D; O'Connell, L G; Eisenhaure, D; Hoppie, L O; Barlow, T M; Steele, R S; Strauch, S; Lawson, L J; Sapowith, A P

    1983-11-01

    The United States is continuing to rely upon nondomestic and nonsecure sources of energy. Large quantities of energy are lost as a result of time mismatches between the supply and the demand for power. Substantial improvements in energy efficiency are possible through the use of improved energy storage; advanced energy storage can also improve the utilization of domestic energy resources (coal, geothermal, solar, wind, and nuclear) by providing energy in accordance with a user's time-varying needs. Advanced storage technologies offer potentially substantial cost and performance advantages but also have significant technical risk. If even a fraction of the proposed technologies reach fruition, they will make an important contribution to better use of our domestic energy resources. The Energy Storage and Transport Technologies Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers encourages research, development, and application of energy storage technologies to reduce imports and energy costs.

  14. Energy and Technology Review

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.; Mayall, B.H.

    1989-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is an acknowledged world center for analytical cytology. This leadership was recognized by the Regents of the University of California (UC), who in 1982 established and funded the Program for Analytical Cytology to facilitate the transfer of this technology from scientists at LLNL to their University colleagues, primarily through innovative collaborative research. This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes three of the forty projects that have been funded in this way; chosen to illustrate the potential medical application of the research. Analytical cytology is a relatively new field of biomedical research that is increasingly being applied in clinical medicine. It has been particularly important in unraveling the complexities of the human immune system and in quantifying the pathobiology of malignancy. Defined as the characterization and measurement of cells and cellular constituents for biological and medical purposes, analytical cytology bridges the gap between the quantitative discipline of molecular biology and the more qualitative disciplines of anatomy and pathology. It is itself multidisciplinary in nature. Two major approaches to analytical cytology are flow cytometry and image cytometry. In each of these research techniques, cells are measured one at a time in an automated device. In flow instruments, the cells are dispersed in fluid suspension and pass in single file through a beam of laser light to generate optical signals that are measured. In image cytometry, cells are dispersed on a slide and are imaged through a microscope onto an electronic imaging and analysis system that processes the cell image to extract measurements of interest.

  15. Energy and Technology Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, Andrew J.; Mayall, Brian H.

    1989-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is an acknowledged world center for analytical cytology. This leadership was recognized by the Regents of the University of California (UC), who in 1982 established and funded the Program for Analytical Cytology to facilitate the transfer of this technology from scientists at LLNL to their University colleagues, primarily through innovative collaborative research. This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes three of the forty projects that have been funded in this way, chosen to illustrate the potential medical application of the research. Analytical cytology is a relatively new field of biomedical research that is increasingly being applied in clinical medicine. It has been particularly important in unraveling the complexities of the human immune system and in quantifying the pathobiology of malignancy. Defined as the characterization and measurement of cells and cellular constituents for biological and medical purposes, analytical cytology bridges the gap between the quantitative discipline of molecular biology and the more qualitative disciplines of anatomy and pathology. It is itself multidisciplinary in nature. Two major approaches to analytical cytology are flow cytometry and image cytometry. In each of these research techniques, cells are measured one at a time in an automated device. In flow instruments, the cells are dispersed in fluid suspension and pass in single file through a beam of laser light to generate optical signals that are measured. In image cytometry, cells are dispersed on a slide and are imaged through a microscope onto an electronic imaging and analysis system that processes the cell image to extract measurements of interest.

  16. Energy, Technology, and Our Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Richard L.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the strength in research and development and the technological leadership as factors dominating "postindustrial" country economy. Indicates that the United States future welfare will depend heavily upon technology, rather than an energy glut. (CC)

  17. Buildings energy technology advancement plan

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The Buildings Energy Technology Advancement (BETA) Plan is an integrated set of programs dedicated to the advancement and commercialization of energy-efficient and passive solar technologies for residential and commercial buildings in Canada. This bulletin begins with an overview of the BETA plan and barriers to more energy-efficient buildings. It then outlines the BETA technology advancement strategy and some BETA programs including the Passive Solar Program and Advanced Houses Program. Highlights of some BETA program achievements are also included.

  18. Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

  19. Appendix A: Energy storage technologies

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The project financial evaluation section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes structures and models to support the technical and economic status of emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  20. High-level waste tank remediation technology integration summary. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    DeLannoy, C.R.; Susiene, C.; Fowler, K.M.; Robson, W.M.; Cruse, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management and Technology Development Programs are engaged in a number of projects to develop, demonstrate, test, and evaluate new technologies to support the cleanup and site remediation of more than 300 underground storage tanks containing over 381,000 m{sup 3} (100 million gal) of liquid radioactive mixed waste at the Hanford Reservation. Significant development is needed within primary functions and in determining an overall bounding strategy. This document is an update of continuing work to summarize the overall strategy and to provide data regarding technology development activities within the strategy. It is intended to serve as an information resource to support understanding, decision making, and integration of multiple program technology development activities. Recipients are encouraged to provide comments and input to the authors for incorporation in future revisions.

  1. Electromechanical Devices. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in electromechanical devices is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored training…

  2. Microcomputer Hardware. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in microcomputer hardware is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored…

  3. Microcomputer Operations. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in microcomputer operations is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored…

  4. Industrial Energy Conservation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 55 papers presented in this volume, all of which will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA); 18 were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

  5. Industrial energy conservation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, P.S.; Williams, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 60 papers included in this volume, all of which will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA); 21 were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

  6. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  7. Energy Conservation. CORD Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in energy conservation is one of 16 courses in the Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored training programs. Comprised of seven modules,…

  8. Energy technologies and the environment: Environmental information handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This revision of Energy Technologies and the Environment reflects the changes in energy supply and demand, focus of environmental concern, and emphasis of energy research and development that have occurred since publication of the earlier edition in 1980. The increase in availability of oil and natural gas, at least for the near term, is responsible in part for a reduced emphasis on development of replacement fuels and technologies. Trends in energy development also have been influenced by an increased reliance on private industry initiatives, and a correspondingly reduced government involvement, in demonstrating more developed technologies. Environmental concerns related to acid rain and waste management continue to increase the demand for development of innovative energy systems. The basic criteria for including a technology in this report are that (1) the technology is a major current or potential future energy supply and (2) significant changes in employing or understanding the technology have occurred since publication of the 1980 edition. Coal is seen to be a continuing major source of energy supply, and thus chapters pertaining to the principal coal technologies have been revised from the 1980 edition (those on coal mining and preparation, conventional coal-fired power plants, fluidized-bed combustion, coal gasification, and coal liquefaction) or added as necessary to include emerging technologies (those on oil shale, combined-cycle power plants, coal-liquid mixtures, and fuel cells).

  9. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Research is described in three areas, high-technology design of unconventional, nonnuclear weapons, a model for analyzing special nuclear materials safeguards decisions, and a nuclear weapons accident exercise (NUWAX-81). (GHT)

  10. Directed Energy Technology Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    with an AR coating, The primary mirror is zerodur on a 9 point mount incorporating a tuned mass damper.. The secondary, tertiary, and coude optics are...beam conditioning back end section: • A beam expander enlarges the beam and shapes it to fill the active area of a deformable mirror • Because of the...enabling technologies that would make a 100-kW SS laser possible (high power optical coatings, high power gain modules, deformable mirror technology

  11. Geothermal energy survey and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is an FY-1990 Annual Report on 'geothermal energy survey and technology' by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). First, concerning geothermal resources exploration project in which surveys have been executed throughout Japan since 1980, outlines of surveys in 1990 and objectives for FY-1992 are summarized. As for surveys for promoting development of geothermal energy, surveys in 8 areas conducted for three years from 1988 to 1990 as well as future plans are also described. Then, the verification investigation for geothermal survey technologies, which has been executed since 1980 for the purpose of establishing geothermal survey technologies to promote the development of geothermal resources in Japan, is introduced with outlines of surveys in 1990 and objectives for FY-1992. Furthermore, development conditions of power generation technologies utilizing geothermal energy such as binary-cycle power generation and hot dry rock power generation are described.

  12. Expedited technology demonstration project (Revised mixed waste management facility project) Project baseline revision 4.0 and FY98 plan

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M. G.

    1997-10-01

    The re-baseline of the Expedited Technology Demonstration Project (Revised Mixed Waste Facility Project) is designated as Project Baseline Revision 4.0. The last approved baseline was identified as Project Baseline Revision 3.0 and was issued in October 1996. Project Baseline Revision 4.0 does not depart from the formal DOE guidance followed by, and contained in, Revision 3.0. This revised baseline document describes the MSO and Final Forms testing activities that will occur during FY98, the final year of the ETD Project. The cost estimate for work during FY98 continues to be $2.OM as published in Revision 3.0. However, the funds will be all CENRTC rather than the OPEX/CENTRC split previously anticipated. LLNL has waived overhead charges on ETD Project CENRTC funds since the beginning of project activities. By requesting the $2.OM as all CENTRC a more aggressive approach to staffing and testing can be taken. Due to a cost under- run condition during FY97 procurements were made and work was accomplished, with the knowledge of DOE, in the Feed Preparation and Final Forms areas that were not in the scope of Revision 3.0. Feed preparation activities for FY98 have been expanded to include the drum opening station/enclosure previously deleted.

  13. Annual renewable energy technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Renewable Energy Institute has seen a growing need to provide a central source of information on the full range of renewable energy technologies. Inquiries from federal and state governments, colleges and universities, renewable energy companies, foreign companies and governments, journalists, and the general public have revealed that such an information source was sorely lacking. National energy statistics generally identify only the ''tip of the iceberg'' by surveying traditional supply sources (e.g. electric utilities) and group the renewable energy contribution into the ''other'' category. Because of their decentralized application, the direct contribution of these technologies and their displacement of conventional energy sources are often overlooked. The Annual Renewable Energy Technology Review: Progress Through 1984 marks the second effort by the Renewable Energy Institute to quantify the contribution of renewable energy. The publication has been greatly expanded from the previous edition. Information on total resources availability, international activities, and state government incentives has been added. Also, sections which appeared in the previous edition on technology status, industry status, and market status have been enhanced to provide readers with vital information for evaluating the status and prospects of each technology.

  14. Energy and Technology Review

    SciTech Connect

    Bookless, W.A.; Quirk, W.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report discusses: The Clementine satellite, the first US satellite to the Moon in more than two decades, sent back more than 1.5 million images of the lunar surface using cameras designed and calibrated by LLNL. An LLNL-developed laser ranger provided information that will be used to construct a relief map of the Moon`s surface; and Uncertainty and the Federal Role in Science and Technology, Ralph E. Gomory was a recent participate in the Director`s Distinguished Lecturer Series at LLNL. In his lecture, he addressed some of the tensions, conflicts, and possible goals related to federal support for science and technology.

  15. Energy Storage Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    Daniel, Claus; Li, Jianlin

    2016-10-19

    At the DOE Battery Manufacturing R&D Facility, researchers are partnering with industry to increase energy density, reduce costs and hazardous materials, and improve the manufacturing process for batteries used in electric vehicles and other applications.

  16. Energy Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Li, Jianlin

    2016-04-22

    At the DOE Battery Manufacturing R&D Facility, researchers are partnering with industry to increase energy density, reduce costs and hazardous materials, and improve the manufacturing process for batteries used in electric vehicles and other applications.

  17. Energy and Technology Review

    SciTech Connect

    Bookless, W.A.; McElroy, L.; Wheatcraft, D.; Middleton, C.; Shang, S.

    1994-10-01

    Two articles are included: the industrial computing initiative, and artificial hip joints (applying weapons expertise to medical technology). Three research highlights (briefs) are included: KEN project (face recognition), modeling groundwater flow and chemical migration, and gas and oil national information infrastructure.

  18. 77 FR 23244 - Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division; Notice of Revised Baseline Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division; Notice of Revised Baseline Filing Take notice that on April 10, 2012, Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division (Atmos) filed a revised...

  19. Energy and Technology Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookless, W. A.; Wheatcraft, D.

    1995-03-01

    This journal contains two feature articles. The first article reports on the background, design, and capabilities of the Portable Tritium Processing System currently being used to clean up and decontaminate the Laboratory's Tritium Facility. The second article discusses the development of a x-ray lasers as a probe to obtain high-resolution images of high-density plasmas produced at the Nova laser facility. Finally, two research programs are highlighted. They are silicon microcomponents and modern technology for advanced military training.

  20. NASA's space energy technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. P.; Byers, D. C.; Ambrus, J. H.; Loria, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    NASA's Space Energy Systems program is concerned with the development of technology for space missions requiring high performance, such as geostationary orbit communication satellites and planetary spacecraft, and high capacity, such as the planned Space Station and lunar bases; these two requirements often lead to great differences in system design. The program accordingly addresses a wide range of candidate technologies, which encompasses photovoltaics, chemical energy conversion and storage, thermoelectric conversion, power management and distribution, and thermal management.

  1. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Research programs at LLNL are reviewed. This issue discusses validation of the pulsed-power design for FXR, the NOVA plasma shutter, thermal control of the MFTF superconducting magnet, a low-energy x-ray spectrometer for pulsed-source diagnostics, micromachining, the electronics engineer's design station, and brazing with a laser microtorch. (GHT)

  2. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L.

    1994-04-01

    This issue highlights the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s 1993 accomplishments in our mission areas and core programs: economic competitiveness, national security, energy, the environment, lasers, biology and biotechnology, engineering, physics, chemistry, materials science, computers and computing, and science and math education. Secondary topics include: nonproliferation, arms control, international security, environmental remediation, and waste management.

  3. Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-11

    Learn how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology and its potential to supply our homes, offices, industries, and vehicles with sustainable, reliable energy.

  4. Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Learn how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology and its potential to supply our homes, offices, industries, and vehicles with sustainable, reliable energy.

  5. Validity and Appropriate Uses of the Revised Technology Uses and Perceptions Survey (TUPS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Huggins-Manley, A. Corinne; Dawson, Kara; Agaçli-Dogan, Nihan; Dogan, Selcuk

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore validity evidence and appropriate uses of the revised Technology Uses and Perceptions Survey (TUPS) designed to measure in-service teacher perspectives about technology integration in K-12 schools and classrooms. The revised TUPS measures 10 domains, including Access and Support; Preparation of Technology…

  6. Revising Basic Mathematics in a Network Environment: An Empirical Study with Finnish Technology University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketamo, Harri; Alajaaski, Jarkko

    2008-01-01

    A revising/replenishment study course in basic mathematics is experienced as being almost a necessity at the beginning of technology studies at the Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland. This is to avoid early dropouts in actual engineering mathematics courses. Experimental research on factors explaining successful revision of…

  7. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    Three review articles are presented. The first describes the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory role in the research and development of oil-shale retorting technology through its studies of the relevant chemical and physical processes, mathematical models, and new retorting concepts. Second is a discussion of investigation of properties of dense molecular fluids at high pressures and temperatures to improve understanding of high-explosive behavior, giant-planet structure, and hydrodynamic shock interactions. Third, by totally computerizing the triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer system, the laboratory has produced a general-purpose instrument of unrivaled speed, selectivity, and adaptability for the analysis and identification of trace organic constituents in complex chemical mixtures. (GHT)

  8. Energy Efficiency for Electrical Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Intended primarily but not solely for use at the postsecondary level, this curriculum guide contains five units on energy efficiency that were designed to be incorporated into an existing program in electrical technology. The following topics are examined: where to look for energy waste; conservation methods for electrical consumers, for…

  9. Energy Efficiency for Electrical Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Intended primarily but not solely for use at the postsecondary level, this curriculum guide contains five units on energy efficiency that were designed to be incorporated into an existing program in electrical technology. The following topics are examined: where to look for energy waste; conservation methods for electrical consumers, for…

  10. Energy and Technology Review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    A specialized laser amplifier for use with velocity-measuring systems is described which makes possible detailed measurements of explosion-driven targets extending over long times. The experimental and diagnostic facilities of the Bunker 801 project enables sensitive and thorough hydrodynamics tests on the high-explosive components of nuclear devices. An improved spectrometry system has been developed covering the energy range from 0.025 eV to 20 MeV for use in radiation monitoring, and a new material is being tested for the neutron dosimeter worn with identification badges.

  11. Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the objectives of a hydrogen energy systems technology study directed toward determining future demand for hydrogen based on current trends and anticipated new uses and identifying the critical research and technology advancements required to meet this need with allowance for raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects. Attention is focused on historic production and use of hydrogen, scenarios used as a basis for projections, projections of energy sources and uses, supply options, and technology requirements and needs. The study found more than a billion dollar annual usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs, supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks. Evaluation of the progress in developing nuclear fusion and solar energy sources relative to hydrogen production will be necessary to direct the pace and character of research and technology work in the advanced water-splitting areas.

  12. Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the objectives of a hydrogen energy systems technology study directed toward determining future demand for hydrogen based on current trends and anticipated new uses and identifying the critical research and technology advancements required to meet this need with allowance for raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects. Attention is focused on historic production and use of hydrogen, scenarios used as a basis for projections, projections of energy sources and uses, supply options, and technology requirements and needs. The study found more than a billion dollar annual usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs, supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks. Evaluation of the progress in developing nuclear fusion and solar energy sources relative to hydrogen production will be necessary to direct the pace and character of research and technology work in the advanced water-splitting areas.

  13. 15 CFR 9.8 - Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications. 9.8 Section 9.8 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of... ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.8 Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications....

  14. 15 CFR 9.8 - Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications. 9.8 Section 9.8 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of... ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.8 Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications....

  15. 15 CFR 9.8 - Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications. 9.8 Section 9.8 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of... ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.8 Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications....

  16. 15 CFR 9.8 - Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications. 9.8 Section 9.8 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of... ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.8 Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications....

  17. 78 FR 72874 - Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block... information and reporting guidance concerning the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG...: ``Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program Status Report''; (3) Type of...

  18. Energy conservation through sealing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stair, W. K.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements in fluid film sealing resulting from a proposed research program could lead to an annual energy saving, on a national basis, equivalent to about 37 million bbl of oil or 0.3% of the total U.S. energy consumption. Further, the application of known sealing technology can result in an annual saving of an additional 10 million bbl of oil. The energy saving would be accomplished by reduction in process heat energy loss, reduction of frictional energy generated, and minimization of energy required to operate ancillary equipment associated with the seal system. In addition to energy saving, cost effectiveness is further enhanced by reduction in maintenance and in minimization of equipment for collecting leakage and for meeting environmental pollution standards.

  19. Energy conservation through sealing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stair, W. K.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements in fluid film sealing resulting from a proposed research program could lead to an annual energy saving, on a national basis, equivalent to about 37 million bbl of oil or 0.3% of the total U.S. energy consumption. Further, the application of known sealing technology can result in an annual saving of an additional 10 million bbl of oil. The energy saving would be accomplished by reduction in process heat energy loss, reduction of frictional energy generated, and minimization of energy required to operate ancillary equipment associated with the seal system. In addition to energy saving, cost effectiveness is further enhanced by reduction in maintenance and in minimization of equipment for collecting leakage and for meeting environmental pollution standards.

  20. Energy & Technology Review, April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D; McElroy, L.; Kroopnick, H.

    1994-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, other major programs have been added, including technology transfer, laser science, biology and biotechnology, environmental research and remediation, arms control and nonproliferation, advanced defense technology, and applied energy technology. These programs in turn require research in basic scientific disciplines including chemistry, and materials science, computing science and technology, engineering and physics. This review highlights two R&D 100 award winning research topics: (1) The world`s fastest digitizer which captures 30 ps transient electrical events, and (2) the MACHO camera system which fully exploits the power of large format digital imagers and integrates into one package the taking and analysis of images at a prodigious rate and the storage and archiving of extensive amounts of data. (GHH)

  1. International energy: Research organizations, 1988--1992. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, P.; Jordan, S.

    1993-06-01

    This publication contains the standardized names of energy research organizations used in energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the US DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). ETDE member countries are also members of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). Nuclear organization names recorded for INIS by these ETDE member countries are also included in the ETDE Energy Database. Therefore, these organization names are cooperatively standardized for use in both information systems. This publication identifies current organizations doing research in all energy fields, standardizes the format for recording these organization names in bibliographic citations, assigns a numeric code to facilitate data entry, and identifies report number prefixes assigned by these organizations. These research organization names may be used in searching the databases ``Energy Science & Technology`` on DIALOG and ``Energy`` on STN International. These organization names are also used in USDOE databases on the Integrated Technical Information System. Research organizations active in the past five years, as indicated by database records, were identified to form this publication. This directory includes approximately 31,000 organizations that reported energy-related literature from 1988 to 1992 and updates the DOE Energy Data Base: Corporate Author Entries.

  2. Wind energy technology program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of the Federal Wind Energy Technology Program is to perform research that will enable the private sector to develop and utilize safe, reliable, and efficient wind energy systems. Generic research will provide the technology base and scientific understanding necessary to allow industry to develop wind energy systems competitive with conventional energy sources. The goal of the DOE wind program is to improve the basic understanding of aerodynamics and structural dynamics in order to more accurately predict wind turbine aerodynamic performance, natural resonance frequencies, and structural loads. Areas included in the research plan being developed for the next five years include: advanced fluid dynamics, aerodynamics research, structural dynamics research, and advanced components and systems research, including multimegawatt (MOD-5) development.

  3. US Department of Energy radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE`s positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements.

  4. Flywheel Energy Storage technology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    O`Kain, D.; Howell, D.

    1993-12-31

    Advances in recent years of high strength/lightweight materials, high performance magnetic bearings, and power electronics technology has spurred a renewed interest by the transportation, utility, and manufacturing industries in Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) technologies. FES offers several advantages over conventional electro-chemical energy storage, such as high specific energy and specific power, fast charging time, long service life, high turnaround efficiency (energy out/energy in), and no hazardous/toxic materials or chemicals are involved. Potential applications of FES units include power supplies for hybrid and electric vehicles, electric vehicle charging stations, space systems, and pulsed power devices. Also, FES units can be used for utility load leveling, uninterruptable power supplies to protect electronic equipment and electrical machinery, and for intermittent wind or photovoltaic energy sources. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a forum to highlight technologies that offer a high potential to increase the performance of FES systems and to discuss potential solutions to overcome present FES application barriers. This document consists of viewgraphs from 27 presentations.

  5. Flywheel Energy Storage Technology Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okain, D.; Howell, D.

    Advances in recent years of high strength/lightweight materials, high performance magnetic bearings, and power electronics technology has spurred a renewed interest by the transportation, utility, and manufacturing industries in flywheel energy storage (FES) technologies. FES offers several advantages over conventional electrochemical energy storage, such as high specific energy and specific power, fast charging time, long service life, high turnaround efficiency (energy out/energy in), and no hazardous/toxic materials or chemicals are involved. Potential applications of FES units include power supplies for hybrid and electric vehicles, electric vehicle charging stations, space systems, and pulsed power devices. Also, FES units can be used for utility load leveling, uninterruptable power supplies to protect electronic equipment and electrical machinery, and for intermittent wind or photovoltaic energy sources. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a forum to highlight technologies that offer a high potential to increase the performance of FES systems and to discuss potential solutions to overcome present FES application barriers. This document consists of viewgraphs from 27 presentations.

  6. Space Systems Technology Working Group. Executive Report. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    and make the needed adjustments. Today, some noncritical technologies, such as all "space-qualified" cryocoolers , are controlled. Under the new export...energy, focused into a heat receiver, heats a working fluid. The working fluid drives a heat engine, using either a Brayton, Rankine, or Stirling ...and includes the development of microchannel heat exchangers, cryogenic refrigerators ( cryocoole . ) and heat pipes that have an effective thermal

  7. Revised congressional budget request, FY 1982. Conservation and renewable energy program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Programs dealing with conservation and renewable energy are reprinted from the Revised Congressional Budget Request FY 1982. From Volume 7, Energy Conservation, information is presented on: buildings and community systems; industrial programs; transportation programs; state and local programs; inventor's program energy conversion technology; energy impact assistance; and residential/commercial retrofit. From Volume 2, Energy Supply Research and Development, information and data are presented on: solar building applications; solar industrial applications; solar power applications; solar information systems; SERI facility; solar international activities; alcohol fuels; geothermal; and hydropower. From Volume 6, Energy Production, Demonstration, and Distribution, information and data on solar energy production, demonstration, and distribution are presented. From Volume 3, Energy Supply and R and D Appropriation, information and data on electric energy systems and energy storage systems are included. From Volume 4, information and data are included on geothermal resources development fund. In Volume 5, Power Marketing Administrations, information and data are presented on estimates by appropriations, positions and staff years by appropriation, staffing distribution, and power marketing administrations. Recissions and deferrals for FY 1981 are given. (MCW)

  8. Careers in Atomic Energy, Understanding the Atom Series, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlhenny, Loyce J.

    This booklet identifies careers in nuclear energy and suggests preparation for such careers. Suggested are the types of courses in high school and college necessary for work in physical, biological, and veterinary sciences, engineering, medicine, scientific writing, and supporting fields such as nursing and laboratory technology. Brief…

  9. Revised CTUIR Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Cox; Thomas Bailor; Theodore Repasky; Lisa Breckenridge

    2005-10-31

    This preliminary assessment of renewable energy resources on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (UIR) has been performed by CTUIR Department of Science and Engineering (DOSE). This analysis focused primarily identifying renewable resources that may be applied on or near the Umatilla Indian Reservation. In addition preliminary technical and economic feasibility of developing renewable energy resources have been prepared and initial land use planning issues identified. Renewable energies examined in the course of the investigation included solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, bioethanol, bio-diesel and bio-pellet fuel. All renewable energy options studied were found to have some potential for the CTUIR. These renewable energy options are environmentally friendly, sustainable, and compliment many of the policy goals of the CTUIR. This report seeks to provide an overall review of renewable energy technologies and applications. It tries to identify existing projects near to the CTUIR and the efforts of the federal government, state government and the private sector in the renewable energy arena. It seeks to provide an understanding of the CTUIR as an energy entity. This report intends to provide general information to assist tribal leadership in making decisions related to energy, specifically renewable energy deve lopment.

  10. 78 FR 34089 - Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Status Report AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice and request for comments....

  11. Revising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Linda, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    In focusing on recursive writing, the nine articles in this journal issue suggest that student writing should be taken seriously. The first article states that revision should occur throughout the writing process while the second discusses how to invite writers to become active readers of their own texts. The third article presents methods of…

  12. Battery Technology Life Verification Test Manual Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this Technology Life Verification Test (TLVT) Manual is to help guide developers in their effort to successfully commercialize advanced energy storage devices such as battery and ultracapacitor technologies. The experimental design and data analysis discussed herein are focused on automotive applications based on the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) electric vehicle, hybrid electric vehicle, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (EV, HEV, and PHEV, respectively) performance targets. However, the methodology can be equally applied to other applications as well. This manual supersedes the February 2005 version of the TLVT Manual (Reference 1). It includes criteria for statistically-based life test matrix designs as well as requirements for test data analysis and reporting. Calendar life modeling and estimation techniques, including a user’s guide to the corresponding software tool is now provided in the Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual (Reference 2).

  13. Energy technologies: Systemic aspects, technological trajectories, and institutional frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.M.

    1996-09-01

    Technology policies to promote a transition `away from the carbon atom` must take into account the systemic nature of technological change in the energy sector. Technological interrelatedness, infrastructure requirements, and lumpiness of energy sector investments result in the need to consider technological change as systemic, i.e., beyond the introduction and diffusion of individual technologies. Consequences of technological advances are ambivalent. On the one hand, technological improvements in existing technologies can slow down the development of new alternatives and radical technological shifts. On the other hand, technological change generates variety within the system of energy supply and end-use technologies, leading to technological pluralism. Thus, technology dynamics are characterized by a complex interplay between irrversibility and diversity. It is on this basis that public technology policy oriented toward sustainable energy development has to be formulated. 35 refs.

  14. Technology for aircraft energy efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Six technology programs for reducing fuel use in U.S. commercial aviation are discussed. The six NASA programs are divided into three groups: Propulsion - engine component improvement, energy efficient engine, advanced turboprops; Aerodynamics - energy efficient transport, laminar flow control; and Structures - composite primary structures. Schedules, phases, and applications of these programs are considered, and it is suggested that program results will be applied to current transport derivatives in the early 1980s and to all-new aircraft of the late 1980s and early 1990s.

  15. Technology for aircraft energy efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Six technology programs for reducing fuel use in U.S. commercial aviation are discussed. The six NASA programs are divided into three groups: Propulsion - engine component improvement, energy efficient engine, advanced turboprops; Aerodynamics - energy efficient transport, laminar flow control; and Structures - composite primary structures. Schedules, phases, and applications of these programs are considered, and it is suggested that program results will be applied to current transport derivatives in the early 1980s and to all-new aircraft of the late 1980s and early 1990s.

  16. New energy technologies for buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoen, R.; Hirshberg, A.; Weingart, J.

    1975-01-01

    The principal objective of the present work is to identify a variety of strategic approaches which could significantly enhance the rate of commercial development and deployment of total energy systems, fuel cells, and solar conversion. Emphasis is on the need for integration of research, conference, legislation, federal program, and industrial program aspects, leading to a fruitful feedback and follow-through process involving new energy technologies. The discussions are on a general, lay level. Recommendations made feature (1) action which improves the environment for innovation and change, (2) action which decreases risk and creates positive incentives, and (3) action which reflects the distance a particular technology is from commercialization and widespread use, as determined by its position on a development/diffusion scale.

  17. Technology and Soviet energy availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-11-01

    This study addresses in detail the significance of American petroleum equipment and technology to the U.S.S.R. and the resulting options for U.S. policy. It examines the problems and opportunities that confront the U.S.S.R. in its five primary energy industries: oil, gas, coal, nuclear, and electric power. It discusses plausible prospects for these industries in the next ten years; identifies the equipment and technology most important to the U.S.S.R.. In these areas; evaluates the extent to which the United States is the sole or preferred supplier of such items and analyzes the implications for both the entire Soviet bloc and the Western alliance of either providing or withholding Western equipment and technology.

  18. Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P.

    1995-02-28

    The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m{sup 3} (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program.

  19. Recent Trend of Energy Conservation Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Hiroyuki

    In order to cope with the global warming, importance of energy conservation technologies becomes large and large. This paper shows outline of the recent technology trends and future R&D strategies of national projects in Japan. The basic concept and some important R&D topics of the technology strategies, which will be determined by this September are summarized. They are Super combustion system technologies, Energy utilization technologies beyond time and distance restrictions, Future life environment technologies on energy conservation, Advanced traffic technologies, and New generation device technologies for energy conservation. Some relative R&D themes in industrial sector, civil sector, and transportation sector are also shown.

  20. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana. Technology summary (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This document has been prepared by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Western environmental Technology Office (WETO) in Butte, Montana. Technologies and processes described in this document have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information presented in this document has been assembled from recently produced OST documents that highlight technology development activities within each of the OST program elements and Focus Areas. This document presents one in a series for each of DOE`s Operations Office and Energy Technology Centers.

  1. Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Lapsa, Melissa Voss; Ward, Christina D; Smith, Barton; Grubb, Kimberly R; Lee, Russell

    2007-05-01

    The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

  2. Practical aspects of photovoltaic technology, applications and cost (revised)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to provide the reader with the background, understanding, and computational tools needed to master the practical aspects of photovoltaic (PV) technology, application, and cost. The focus is on stand-alone, silicon solar cell, flat-plate systems in the range of 1 to 25 kWh/day output. Technology topics covered include operation and performance of each of the major system components (e.g., modules, array, battery, regulators, controls, and instrumentation), safety, installation, operation and maintenance, and electrical loads. Application experience and trends are presented. Indices of electrical service performance - reliability, availability, and voltage control - are discussed, and the known service performance of central station electric grid, diesel-generator, and PV stand-alone systems are compared. PV system sizing methods are reviewed and compared, and a procedure for rapid sizing is described and illustrated by the use of several sample cases. The rapid sizing procedure yields an array and battery size that corresponds to a minimum cost system for a given load requirement, insulation condition, and desired level of service performance. PV system capital cost and levelized energy cost are derived as functions of service performance and insulation. Estimates of future trends in PV system costs are made.

  3. Practical aspects of photovoltaic technology, applications and cost (revised)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, L.

    1985-08-01

    The purpose of this text is to provide the reader with the background, understanding, and computational tools needed to master the practical aspects of photovoltaic (PV) technology, application, and cost. The focus is on stand-alone, silicon solar cell, flat-plate systems in the range of 1 to 25 kWh/day output. Technology topics covered include operation and performance of each of the major system components (e.g., modules, array, battery, regulators, controls, and instrumentation), safety, installation, operation and maintenance, and electrical loads. Application experience and trends are presented. Indices of electrical service performance - reliability, availability, and voltage control - are discussed, and the known service performance of central station electric grid, diesel-generator, and PV stand-alone systems are compared. PV system sizing methods are reviewed and compared, and a procedure for rapid sizing is described and illustrated by the use of several sample cases. The rapid sizing procedure yields an array and battery size that corresponds to a minimum cost system for a given load requirement, insulation condition, and desired level of service performance. PV system capital cost and levelized energy cost are derived as functions of service performance and insulation. Estimates of future trends in PV system costs are made.

  4. Conservation and renewable energy technologies for buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The Office of building Technologies (OBT) pursues advanced energy efficiency and renewable technologies and accelerates the rate of adoption of these technologies in the residential and commercial sectors through research, development, and demonstration.

  5. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  6. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This technology report describes Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examines the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management Department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  7. Second program on energy research and technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The second major energy research and development program is described. Renewable and nonrenewable energy resources are presented which include nuclear technology and future energy sources, like fusion. The current status and outlook for future progress are given.

  8. Interior LED Lighting Technology. Navy Energy Technology Validation (Techval) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Approved for public release: distribution unlimited TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1601 Sep 2015 Interior LED Lighting Technology Navy Energy...NAVFAC EXWC) to determine the potential energy savings for Interior LED lighting technology in office environments. NAVAFAC EXWC concluded that...Interior LED Lighting Technology can save money in comparison to the conventional incandescent, halogen, and where cost-effective, compact fluorescent

  9. Electricity for Millions: Developing Renewable Energy in China (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    This two page fact sheet describes NREL's work developing renewable energy in China. Renewable focus areas include rural energy development, wind energy development, geothermal energy development, renewable energy business development and policy and planning.

  10. Home Economics. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document was developed to provide home economics teachers with background information on energy, and activities that can be used/adapted with a minimum of preparation time. The…

  11. 78 FR 49736 - Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block... information and reporting guidance concerning the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG... information collection request contains: (1) 1910-5150; (2) ``Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

  12. 78 FR 59661 - Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the State Energy Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the State Energy Program AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: A 60-day notice and request...

  13. Alternative energy technologies for the Caribbean islands

    SciTech Connect

    Pytlinski, J.T. )

    1992-01-01

    All islands in the Caribbean except Puerto Rico can be classified as developing islands. Of these islands, all except Trinidad and Tobago are oil importers. Uncertainties concerning uninterrupted oil supply and increasing oil prices causes economic, social and political instability and jeopardizes further development of these islands. The paper discusses the energy situation of the Caribbean islands and presents alternative energy options. Several alternative energy projects financed by local, federal and international organizations are presented. Present and future uses of alternative energy technologies are described in different islands. Barrier which handicap developing and implementing alternative energy sources in the Caribbean are discussed. The potential and possible applications of alternative energy technologies such as: solar-thermal energy, photovoltaics, wind energy, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), ocean currents and tides energy, biomass, peat energy, municipal solid wastes, bioconversion, hydropower, geothermal energy, nuclear energy and energy conservation are discussed in detail as means to alleviate the energy situation in the Caribbean islands.

  14. Environmental aspects of solar energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, C.L.

    1980-09-01

    Solar energy technologies have environmental effects, and these may be positive or negative compared with current ways of producing energy. In this respect, solar energy technologies are no different from other energy systems. Where solar energy technologies differ is that no unresolvable technological problems (e.g., CO/sub 2/ emissions) or sociopolitical barriers (e.g., waste disposal, catastrophic accidents) have been identified. This report reviews some of the environmental aspects of solar energy technologies and ongoing research designed to identify and resolve potential environmental concerns. It is important to continue research and assessment of environmental aspects of solar energy to ensure that unanticipated problems do not arise. It is also important that the knowledge gained through such environmental research be incorporated into technology development programs and policy initiatives.

  15. Technology, energy and the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Glenn Terry

    This dissertation consists of three distinct papers concerned with technology, energy and the environment. The first paper is an empirical analysis of production under uncertainty, using agricultural production data from the central United States. Unlike previous work, this analysis identifies the effect of actual realizations of weather as well as farmers' expectations about weather. The results indicate that both of these are significant factors explaining short run profits in agriculture. Expectations about weather, called climate, affect production choices, and actual weather affects realized output. These results provide better understanding of the effect of climate change in agriculture. The second paper examines how emissions taxes induce innovation that reduces pollution. A polluting firm chooses technical improvement to minimize cost over an infinite horizon, given an emission tax set by a planner. This leads to a solution path for technical change. Changes in the tax rate affect the path for innovation. Setting the tax at equal to the marginal damage (which is optimal in a static setting with no technical change) is not optimal in the presence of technical change. When abatement is also available as an alternative to technical change, changes in the tax can have mixed effects, due to substitution effects. The third paper extends the theoretical framework for exploring the diffusion of new technologies. Information about new technologies spreads through the economy by means of a network. The pattern of diffusion will depend on the structure of this network. Observed networks are the result of an evolutionary process. This paper identifies how these evolutionary outcomes compare with optimal solutions. The conditions guaranteeing convergence to an optimal outcome are quite stringent. It is useful to determine the set of initial population states that do converge to an optimal outcome. The distribution of costs and benefits among the agents within an

  16. Acceptance of health information technology in health professionals: an application of the revised technology acceptance model.

    PubMed

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis; Dimitrovski, Tomislav; Lazuras, Lambros; Bath, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    The response of health professionals to the use of health information technology (HIT) is an important research topic that can partly explain the success or failure of any HIT application. The present study applied a modified version of the revised technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the relevant beliefs and acceptance of HIT systems in a sample of health professionals (n = 133). Structured anonymous questionnaires were used and a cross-sectional design was employed. The main outcome measure was the intention to use HIT systems. ANOVA was employed to examine differences in TAM-related variables between nurses and medical doctors, and no significant differences were found. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the predictors of HIT usage intentions. The findings showed that perceived ease of use, but not usefulness, relevance and subjective norms directly predicted HIT usage intentions. The present findings suggest that a modification of the original TAM approach is needed to better understand health professionals' support and endorsement of HIT. Perceived ease of use, relevance of HIT to the medical and nursing professions, as well as social influences, should be tapped by information campaigns aiming to enhance support for HIT in healthcare settings.

  17. Addressing Energy Poverty through Smarter Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldfield, Eddie

    2011-01-01

    Energy poverty is a key detriment to labor productivity, economic growth, and social well-being. This article presents a qualitative review of literature on the potential role of intelligent communication technology, web-based standards, and smart grid technology to alleviate energy costs and improve access to clean distributed energy in developed…

  18. Addressing Energy Poverty through Smarter Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldfield, Eddie

    2011-01-01

    Energy poverty is a key detriment to labor productivity, economic growth, and social well-being. This article presents a qualitative review of literature on the potential role of intelligent communication technology, web-based standards, and smart grid technology to alleviate energy costs and improve access to clean distributed energy in developed…

  19. 77 FR 21763 - ReEnergy Stratton LLC; Supplemental Notice That Revised Market-Based Rate Tariff Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ReEnergy Stratton LLC; Supplemental Notice That Revised Market- Based Rate... above-referenced proceeding of ReEnergy Stratton LLC's tariff revision filing, noting that such...

  20. 77 FR 21763 - ReEnergy Ashland LLC; Supplemental Notice That Revised Market-Based Rate Tariff Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ReEnergy Ashland LLC; Supplemental Notice That Revised Market- Based Rate... above-referenced proceeding of ReEnergy Ashland LLC's tariff revision filing, noting that such...

  1. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorne, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges. We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologies are characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics and environmental performance. This paper provides an overview of the results, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, and neither will we in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costs compared to current technologies.

  2. Energy Storage (II): Developing Advanced Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L

    1974-01-01

    Energy storage, considered by some scientists to be the best technological and economic advancement after advanced nuclear power, still rates only modest funding for research concerning the development of advanced technologies. (PEB)

  3. Emerging clean energy technology investment trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumpus, A.; Comello, S.

    2017-06-01

    Early-stage capital providers and clean energy technology incubators are supporting a new wave of innovations focused on end-use efficiency and demand control. This wave complements expanding investments in supply technologies required for electricity sector decarbonization.

  4. Energy Storage (II): Developing Advanced Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L

    1974-01-01

    Energy storage, considered by some scientists to be the best technological and economic advancement after advanced nuclear power, still rates only modest funding for research concerning the development of advanced technologies. (PEB)

  5. Energy technologies and their impact on demand

    SciTech Connect

    Drucker, H.

    1995-06-01

    Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

  6. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorn, Jennifer

    2001-03-20

    For this study, we identified about 175 emerging energy-efficient technologies in industry, of which we characterized 54 in detail. While many profiles of individual emerging technologies are available, few reports have attempted to impose a standardized approach to the evaluation of the technologies. This study provides a way to review technologies in an independent manner, based on information on energy savings, economic, non-energy benefits, major market barriers, likelihood of success, and suggested next steps to accelerate deployment of each of the analyzed technologies. There are many interesting lessons to be learned from further investigation of technologies identified in our preliminary screening analysis. The detailed assessments of the 54 technologies are useful to evaluate claims made by developers, as well as to evaluate market potentials for the United States or specific regions. In this report we show that many new technologies are ready to enter the market place, or are currently under development, demonstrating that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity. Several technologies have reduced capital costs compared to the current technology used by those industries. Non-energy benefits such as these are frequently a motivating factor in bringing technologies such as these to market. Further evaluation of the profiled technologies is still needed. In particular, further quantifying the non-energy benefits based on the experience from technology users in the field is important. Interactive effects and inter-technology competition have not been accounted for and ideally should be included in any type of integrated technology scenario, for it may help to better evaluate market

  7. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing

  8. Resources in Support of Technology Transfer: Revised and Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanne, Daniel; Zeller, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Presents a list of agencies, databases, services, electronic mailing lists, and World Wide Web and Internet sites that provide information on technology transfer to help librarians and information professionals research this concept. (JMV)

  9. Toward a Revised Assessment Model: Rationales and Strategies for Assessing Students' Technological Authorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Hertogh, Lori Beth

    2014-01-01

    I argue in this article that digital composing practices require composition teachers to rethink the way we articulate learning outcomes and conduct classroom assessment. To accomplish this, we must revise the language we use to talk about outcomes and assessment in the context of new media. We also need to better understand how technologies are…

  10. Wind Powering America: Clean Energy for the 21st Century (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-09-01

    Wind Powering America: Clean Energy for the 21st Century continues to be one of the most popular publications produced by the Wind Powering America team. This latest revision incorporates new wind facts from the American Wind Energy Association, as well as wind FAQs for consumers, updated wind resource maps, and a list of WPA publications.

  11. 15 CFR 9.8 - Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amendment or revision of voluntary energy conservation specifications. 9.8 Section 9.8 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROCEDURES FOR A VOLUNTARY LABELING PROGRAM FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT TO EFFECT ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.8 Amendment...

  12. Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

  13. Emerging nuclear energy systems: Economic challenge: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Future nuclear energy systems may achieve substantially lower energy costs than those of existing fossil energy systems and comparable capital costs. Such low cost nuclear energy would provide a strong economic incentive to minimize the use of fossil fuels. If these low cost nuclear energy systems emerge in the next few decades, 21st century civilization may be able to avert potentially disastrous CO/sub 2/ induced global climate changes. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  15. Electronic Devices and Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in electronic devices and systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  16. Mechanical Devices and Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in mechanical devices and systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  17. Instrumentation and Control. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in instrumentation and controls is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  18. Green Energy Technologies Create Green Jobs

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing advanced energy technologies that can help address climate change and reduce U.S. dependence on oil. As these new technologies are launched into commercial use, they create new jobs for American workers.

  19. Fluid Power Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in fluid power systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored…

  20. 16th Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology Conference. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the SPRAT conference is to bring members of the space solar cell community together in a relatively informal conference setting to discuss the recent developments in solar cell technology and to discuss the future directions of the field. The conference is sponsored by the Photovoltaic and Space Environmental Effects Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  1. NEMO: Advanced energy systems and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, P.

    In this report, the contents and major results of the national research program on advanced energy system and technologies (NEMO) are presented. The NEMO-program was one of the energy research programs of the Ministry of Trade and Industry during 1988-1992. Helsinki University of Technology had the responsibility of the overall coordination of the program. NEMO has been the largest resource allocation into advanced energy systems in Finland so far. The total budget was 70 million FIM. The focus of the program has been in solar energy, wind power, and energy storage. Hydrogen and fuel cells have been included in smaller amount. On all major fields of the NEMO-program, useful and high quality results have been obtained. Results of international significance include among others arctic wind energy, new approaches for the energy storage problem in solar energy applications, and the development of a completely new storage battery. International collaboration has been given high priority. The NEMO-program has also been active in informing the industries of the various business and utilization possibilities that advanced energy technologies offer. For example, major demonstration plants of each technology group have been realized. It is recommended that the further R and D should be still more focused on commercial applications. Through research efforts at universities, a good technology base should be maintained, whereas the industries should take a stronger position in commercializing new technology. Parallel to technology R and D, more public resources should be allocated for market introduction.

  2. Energy: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. An Interdisciplinary Approach. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Geri J.; And Others

    This three-part unit is designed to give grades 7-9 students practice in interpreting and analyzing information concerning use of energy in Nebraska. The first section is a general (generic) overview of the different kinds of energy resources and serves as an introduction to the problems of supplying ever-increasing energy needs. Activities in…

  3. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book. Revised [and Expanded] Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    A variety of energy activities are provided, including instructions for and questions related to energy films. The activities are organized into five sections. Section 1 (work) includes an activity focusing on movement and change. Section 2 (forms of energy) includes activities related to mechanical (movement), radiant (light), chemical (burning),…

  4. Energy: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. An Interdisciplinary Approach. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Geri J.; And Others

    This three-part unit is designed to give grades 7-9 students practice in interpreting and analyzing information concerning use of energy in Nebraska. The first section is a general (generic) overview of the different kinds of energy resources and serves as an introduction to the problems of supplying ever-increasing energy needs. Activities in…

  5. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book. Revised [and Expanded] Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    A variety of energy activities are provided, including instructions for and questions related to energy films. The activities are organized into five sections. Section 1 (work) includes an activity focusing on movement and change. Section 2 (forms of energy) includes activities related to mechanical (movement), radiant (light), chemical (burning),…

  6. Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Aabakken, J.

    2006-08-01

    This report, prepared by NREL's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, and conversion factors.

  7. Solar energy: Technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that in 1970 the total energy consumed in the U.S. was equal to the energy of sunlight received by only 0.15% of the land area of the continental U.S. The utilization of solar energy might, therefore, provide an approach for solving the energy crisis produced by the consumption of irreplaceable fossil fuels at a steadily increasing rate. Questions regarding the availability of solar energy are discussed along with the design of solar energy collectors and various approaches for heating houses and buildings by utilizing solar radiation. Other subjects considered are related to the heating of water partly or entirely with solar energy, the design of air conditioning systems based on the use of solar energy, electric power generation by a solar thermal and a photovoltaic approach, solar total energy systems, industrial and agricultural applications of solar energy, solar stills, the utilization of ocean thermal power, power systems based on the use of wind, and solar-energy power systems making use of geosynchronous power plants.

  8. Solar energy: Technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that in 1970 the total energy consumed in the U.S. was equal to the energy of sunlight received by only 0.15% of the land area of the continental U.S. The utilization of solar energy might, therefore, provide an approach for solving the energy crisis produced by the consumption of irreplaceable fossil fuels at a steadily increasing rate. Questions regarding the availability of solar energy are discussed along with the design of solar energy collectors and various approaches for heating houses and buildings by utilizing solar radiation. Other subjects considered are related to the heating of water partly or entirely with solar energy, the design of air conditioning systems based on the use of solar energy, electric power generation by a solar thermal and a photovoltaic approach, solar total energy systems, industrial and agricultural applications of solar energy, solar stills, the utilization of ocean thermal power, power systems based on the use of wind, and solar-energy power systems making use of geosynchronous power plants.

  9. Vacuum technology /2nd revised and enlarged edition/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, A.

    Principles and phenomena germane to the field of vacuum technology are dealt with in the book. Natural and artificial vacuums are discussed, together with the history of vacuum technology development. Various factors and laws defining the content of rarefied gas theory are reviewed. Typical flows encountered in gas at low pressures are examined, as are calculations appropriate to vacuum situations. Attention is given to the physical and chemical phenomena observed in vacuum techniques, and methods and equipment for producing low pressure conditions are explored, noting the various types of pumps employed to approximate a vacuum. Calibration of instruments and the measurement of vacuums and partial pressures are considered. Finally, the techniques, vessels, cleaning procedures, and sealing methods for producing a clean vacuum are described.

  10. Solar Energy: Its Technologies and Applications

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Auh, P. C.

    1978-06-01

    Solar heat, as a potential source of clean energy, is available to all of us. Extensive R and D efforts are being made to effectively utilize this renewable energy source. A variety of different technologies for utilizing solar energy have been proven to be technically feasible. Here, some of the most promising technologies and their applications are briefly described. These are: Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings (SHACOB), Solar Thermal Energy Conversion (STC), Wind Energy Conversion (WECS), Bioconversion to Fuels (BCF), Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), and Photovoltaic Electric Power Systems (PEPS). Special emphasis is placed on the discussion of the SHACOB technologies, since the technologies are being expeditiously developed for the near commercialization.

  11. Energy technology review, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    This issue of Energy Technology Review'' gives the annual review of the programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This State of the Laboratory issue includes discussions of all major programs: Defense Systems; Laser Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Energy and Earth Sciences; Environmental Technology Program; Biomedical and Environmental Science; Engineering; Physics; Chemistry and Materials Science; Computations; and Administrative and Institutional Services. An index is also given of the 1991 achievements with contact names and telephone number.

  12. Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1993-02-01

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub o}-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for ``group R`` residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

  13. Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1993-02-01

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials' (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U[sub o]-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for group R'' residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

  14. Effective transfer of industrial energy conservation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, M.; Vallario, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    Voluntary participation in industrial energy conservation programs resulted in savings of approximately 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day in the US during 1981. These energy savings accrued largely from the development, introduction, and acceptance by industry of new energy conserving technologies. These new technologies were developed through cost sharing programs between the Department of Energy and private industry. These joint efforts reduced risk to industry, thus making them willing to accept and use these new technologies at an accelerated rate. Examples of several technologies that were used by industry at an accelerated rate are described. These technologies are: textile foam finishing and dyeing, forging furnace modifications, and high-efficiency metallic recuperators.

  15. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 3. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This notebook for grade 3 is one of a series developed in response to the concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade three. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  16. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 5. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 5 is one of a series developed in response to energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade five. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and objectives, and…

  17. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 6. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 6 is one of a series developed in response to the concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade six. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  18. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 3. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This notebook for grade 3 is one of a series developed in response to the concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade three. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  19. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 4. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 4 is one in a series developed in response to the concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade four. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  20. Small Town Energy Program (STEP) Final Report revised

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Charles T.

    2014-01-02

    University Park, Maryland (“UP”) is a small town of 2,540 residents, 919 homes, 2 churches, 1 school, 1 town hall, and 1 breakthrough community energy efficiency initiative: the Small Town Energy Program (“STEP”). STEP was developed with a mission to “create a model community energy transformation program that serves as a roadmap for other small towns across the U.S.” STEP first launched in January 2011 in UP and expanded in July 2012 to the neighboring communities of Hyattsville, Riverdale Park, and College Heights Estates, MD. STEP, which concluded in July 2013, was generously supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The STEP model was designed for replication in other resource-constrained small towns similar to University Park - a sector largely neglected to date in federal and state energy efficiency programs. STEP provided a full suite of activities for replication, including: energy audits and retrofits for residential buildings, financial incentives, a community-based social marketing backbone and local community delivery partners. STEP also included the highly innovative use of an “Energy Coach” who worked one-on-one with clients throughout the program. Please see www.smalltownenergy.org for more information. In less than three years, STEP achieved the following results in University Park: • 30% of community households participated voluntarily in STEP; • 25% of homes received a Home Performance with ENERGY STAR assessment; • 16% of households made energy efficiency improvements to their home; • 64% of households proceeded with an upgrade after their assessment; • 9 Full Time Equivalent jobs were created or retained, and 39 contractors worked on STEP over the course of the project. Estimated Energy Savings - Program Totals kWh Electricity 204,407 Therms Natural Gas 24,800 Gallons of Oil 2,581 Total Estimated MMBTU Saved (Source Energy) 5,474 Total Estimated Annual Energy Cost Savings $61,343 STEP clients who

  1. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliot, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorn, Jennifer

    2005-05-05

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of thenation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly,society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, moresustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing globalcompetitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges.We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologiesfor industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologiesare characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics andenvironmental performance. This paper provides an overview of theresults, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies toimprove energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, andneither will we in the future. The study shows that many of thetechnologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reducedenvironmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costscompared to current technologies.

  2. On the revised concept of linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Kellerer, A M; Rossi, H H

    1995-03-01

    The quantities linear energy transfer or restricted linear energy transfer are utilized in calculations that link absorbed dose to the fluence distribution of a radiation field. The computations provide approximations to absorbed dose in terms of the intermediate quantity cema or reduced cema. With the definition of the restricted linear energy transfer, L delta, given in ICRU Report 33, the approximation remains imperfect. This study deals with the resulting need for a modified definition of L delta, as proposed in a draft report of ICRU. Essential differences between the old and the new definitions are demonstrated. The changed definition permits a rigorous formulation of the dependence between fluence and absorbed dose.

  3. Hawai‘i Distributed Energy Resource Technologies for Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-09-30

    HNEI has conducted research to address a number of issues important to move Hawai‘i to greater use of intermittent renewable and distributed energy resource (DER) technologies in order to facilitate greater use of Hawai‘i's indigenous renewable energy resources. Efforts have been concentrated on the Islands of Hawai‘i, Maui, and O‘ahu, focusing in three areas of endeavor: 1) Energy Modeling and Scenario Analysis (previously called Energy Road mapping); 2) Research, Development, and Validation of Renewable DER and Microgrid Technologies; and 3) Analysis and Policy. These efforts focused on analysis of the island energy systems and development of specific candidate technologies for future insertion into an integrated energy system, which would lead to a more robust transmission and distribution system in the state of Hawai‘i and eventually elsewhere in the nation.

  4. Case studies on forecasting for innovative technologies: frequent revisions improve accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Jeffrey C; Robertson, Diane C; Goldstein, Sara M

    2015-02-01

    Health technology forecasting is designed to provide reliable predictions about costs, utilization, diffusion, and other market realities before the technologies enter routine clinical use. In this article we address three questions central to forecasting's usefulness: Are early forecasts sufficiently accurate to help providers acquire the most promising technology and payers to set effective coverage policies? What variables contribute to inaccurate forecasts? How can forecasters manage the variables to improve accuracy? We analyzed forecasts published between 2007 and 2010 by the ECRI Institute on four technologies: single-room proton beam radiation therapy for various cancers; digital breast tomosynthesis imaging technology for breast cancer screening; transcatheter aortic valve replacement for serious heart valve disease; and minimally invasive robot-assisted surgery for various cancers. We then examined revised ECRI forecasts published in 2013 (digital breast tomosynthesis) and 2014 (the other three topics) to identify inaccuracies in the earlier forecasts and explore why they occurred. We found that five of twenty early predictions were inaccurate when compared with the updated forecasts. The inaccuracies pertained to two technologies that had more time-sensitive variables to consider. The case studies suggest that frequent revision of forecasts could improve accuracy, especially for complex technologies whose eventual use is governed by multiple interactive factors.

  5. Energy & technology review, April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bookless, W.A.; Stull, S.

    1995-04-01

    This publication presents research overviews on projects from the Lawrence Livermore laboratory. This issue provides information on microsphere targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments; laser fabrication of berllium components; and the kinetic energy interceptor.

  6. Renewable energy technology handbook for military engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    Renewable energy applications are introduced that are considered promising for military use in the 1980s. These are: solar hot water for buildings, active solar hot water and space heating for buildings, passive solar heating and cooling of buildings, solar industrial process heata, solar ponds, photovoltaic power for homes, photovoltaic power for remote applications, parabolic dish solar systems for remote applications, wind energy for buildings, wind energy for central power plants, wind energy for water pumping, biomass energy systems for buildings, biomass energy systems for central power plants, geothermal energy for process heat, and geothermal energy for central power plants. For each of these is given: a brief history of the technology and information on how the technology works; a detailed technical and economic profile of an operating system; and a summary listing of operating civilian and military systems that are open for public viewing.

  7. Battery Technology Stores Clean Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Headquartered in Fremont, California, Deeya Energy Inc. is now bringing its flow batteries to commercial customers around the world after working with former Marshall Space Flight Center scientist, Lawrence Thaller. Deeya's liquid-cell batteries have higher power capability than Thaller's original design, are less expensive than lead-acid batteries, are a clean energy alternative, and are 10 to 20 times less expensive than nickel-metal hydride batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cell options.

  8. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy: Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Heitmann, Katrin; Hirata, Chris; Honscheid, Klaus; Roodman, Aaron; Seljak, Uroš; Slosar, Anže; Trodden, Mark

    2016-04-26

    A strong instrumentation and detector R&D program has enabled the current generation of cosmic frontier surveys. A small investment in R&D will continue to pay dividends and enable new probes to investigate the accelerated expansion of the universe. Instrumentation and detector R&D provide critical training opportunities for future generations of experimentalists, skills that are important across the entire Department of Energy High Energy Physics program.

  9. Energy Conservation Activities for Elementary Grades (Or: How To Help Slim Down the Energy Monster). Iowa Developed Energy Activities Sampler, Intermediate 3-5. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This booklet provides activities for teachers in the intermediate elementary grades (3-5) and is designed to enable students to develop a comprehensive understanding of energy concepts. Each…

  10. 78 FR 45517 - Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the State Energy Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... Energy Program, OMB Control Number 1910-5126. The proposed collection will collect information on the... information being collected; and (d) ways to further minimize the burden regarding the collection of...; (3) Type of Review: Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection; (4) Purpose: To...

  11. Characterizing emerging industrial technologies in energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Laitner, John A.; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Hanson, Donald A.

    2003-07-29

    Conservation supply curves are a common tool in economic analysis. As such, they provide an important opportunity to include a non-linear representation of technology and technological change in economy-wide models. Because supply curves are closely related to production isoquants, we explore the possibility of using bottom-up technology assessments to inform top-down representations of energy models of the U.S. economy. Based on a recent report by LBNL and ACEEE on emerging industrial technologies within the United States, we have constructed a supply curve for 54 such technologies for the year 2015. Each of the selected technologies has been assessed with respect to energy efficiency characteristics, likely energy savings by 2015, economics, and environmental performance, as well as needs for further development or implementation of the technology. The technical potential for primary energy savings of the 54 identified technologies is equal to 3.54 Quads, or 8.4 percent of the assume d2015 industrial energy consumption. Based on the supply curve, assuming a discount rate of 15 percent and 2015 prices as forecasted in the Annual Energy Outlook2002, we estimate the economic potential to be 2.66 Quads - or 6.3 percent of the assumed forecast consumption for 2015. In addition, we further estimate how much these industrial technologies might contribute to standard reference case projections, and how much additional energy savings might be available assuming a different mix of policies and incentives. Finally, we review the prospects for integrating the findings of this and similar studies into standard economic models. Although further work needs to be completed to provide the necessary link between supply curves and production isoquants, it is hoped that this link will be a useful starting point for discussion with developers of energy-economic models.

  12. Emerging electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies

    PubMed Central

    Badwal, Sukhvinder P. S.; Giddey, Sarbjit S.; Munnings, Christopher; Bhatt, Anand I.; Hollenkamp, Anthony F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical cells and systems play a key role in a wide range of industry sectors. These devices are critical enabling technologies for renewable energy; energy management, conservation, and storage; pollution control/monitoring; and greenhouse gas reduction. A large number of electrochemical energy technologies have been developed in the past. These systems continue to be optimized in terms of cost, life time, and performance, leading to their continued expansion into existing and emerging market sectors. The more established technologies such as deep-cycle batteries and sensors are being joined by emerging technologies such as fuel cells, large format lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical reactors; ion transport membranes and supercapacitors. This growing demand (multi billion dollars) for electrochemical energy systems along with the increasing maturity of a number of technologies is having a significant effect on the global research and development effort which is increasing in both in size and depth. A number of new technologies, which will have substantial impact on the environment and the way we produce and utilize energy, are under development. This paper presents an overview of several emerging electrochemical energy technologies along with a discussion some of the key technical challenges. PMID:25309898

  13. Emerging electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badwal, Sukhvinder; Giddey, Sarbjit; Munnings, Christopher; Bhatt, Anand; Hollenkamp, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Electrochemical cells and systems play a key role in a wide range of industry sectors. These devices are critical enabling technologies for renewable energy; energy management, conservation and storage; pollution control / monitoring; and greenhouse gas reduction. A large number of electrochemical energy technologies have been developed in the past. These systems continue to be optimized in terms of cost, life time and performance, leading to their continued expansion into existing and emerging market sectors. The more established technologies such as deep-cycle batteries and sensors are being joined by emerging technologies such as fuel cells, large format lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical reactors; ion transport membranes and supercapacitors. This growing demand (multi billion dollars) for electrochemical energy systems along with the increasing maturity of a number of technologies is having a significant effect on the global research and development effort which is increasing in both in size and depth. A number of new technologies, which will have substantial impact on the environment and the way we produce and utilize energy, are under development. This paper presents an overview of several emerging electrochemical energy technologies along with a discussion some of the key technical challenges.

  14. Emerging electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies.

    PubMed

    Badwal, Sukhvinder P S; Giddey, Sarbjit S; Munnings, Christopher; Bhatt, Anand I; Hollenkamp, Anthony F

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical cells and systems play a key role in a wide range of industry sectors. These devices are critical enabling technologies for renewable energy; energy management, conservation, and storage; pollution control/monitoring; and greenhouse gas reduction. A large number of electrochemical energy technologies have been developed in the past. These systems continue to be optimized in terms of cost, life time, and performance, leading to their continued expansion into existing and emerging market sectors. The more established technologies such as deep-cycle batteries and sensors are being joined by emerging technologies such as fuel cells, large format lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical reactors; ion transport membranes and supercapacitors. This growing demand (multi billion dollars) for electrochemical energy systems along with the increasing maturity of a number of technologies is having a significant effect on the global research and development effort which is increasing in both in size and depth. A number of new technologies, which will have substantial impact on the environment and the way we produce and utilize energy, are under development. This paper presents an overview of several emerging electrochemical energy technologies along with a discussion some of the key technical challenges.

  15. Projects from Federal Region IX: Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology Program. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Case, C.W.; Clark, H.R.; Kay, J.; Lucarelli, F.B.; Rizer, S.

    1980-01-01

    Details and progress of appropriate energy technology programs in Region IX are presented. In Arizona, the projects are Solar Hot Water for the Prescott Adult Center and Solar Prototype House for a Residential Community. In California, the projects are Solar AquaDome Demonstration Project; Solar Powered Liquid Circulating Pump; Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center; Digester for Wastewater Grown Aquatic Plants; Performance Characteristics of an Anaerobic Wastewater Lagoon Primary Treatment System; Appropriate Energy/Energy Conservation Demonstration Project; Solar Energy for Composting Toilets; Dry Creek Rancheria Solar Demonstration Projects; Demonstration for Energy Retrofit Analysis and Implementation; and Active Solar Space Heating System for the Integral Urban House. In Hawaii, the projects are: Java Plum Electric; Low-Cost Pond Digesters for Hawaiian Pig Farm Energy Needs; Solar Beeswax Melter; Methane Gas Plant for Operating Boilers and Generating Steam; and Solar Water Heating in Sugarcane Seed-Treatment Plants. A Wind-Powered Lighted Navigation Buoys Project for Guam is also described. A revised description of the Biogas Energy for Hawaiian Small Farms and Homesteads is given in an appendix.

  16. Energy technology and American democratic values

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Today, the benefits of liberal democracy have increasingly been cast into doubt. The debate over alternative energy policies illustrates the problems associated with liberal democracy. For many, it is the realization that energy choices and the selection of social and political values amount to much the same thing. Simply put, energy policy decisions, and the concomitant energy technologies, carry implications of an ethical, social and political nature. The argument of the social and political effects of energy technology flows from the more general thesis that all forms of technological practice condition social and political relations. That is, technological systems, beyond performing the specific functions for which they were designed, act upon and influence social and political arrangements. Seen in this light, energy technologies are as important to the promotion and preservation of this country's political values as are its institutions and laws. Further, there is evidence to suggest that this country's cherished democratic value of freedom is slowly being eclipsed by the values attendant to corporate capitalism and its singular pursuit of growth. It is this dominance of economic values over political values which provides the environment within which the technological debate is waged. Ultimately, tracing the historic linkage between property and liberty, it is concluded that the preservation of our freedom require new thinking regarding the present configuration of ownership patterns. The questions surrounding energy policy serve to illuminate these concerns.

  17. Waste-to-Energy Technology Brief

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETV's Greenhouse Gas Technology (GHG) Center, operated by Southern Research Institute under a cooperative agreement with US EPA, verified two biogas processing systems and four distributed generation (DG) energy systems in collaboration with the Colorado Governors Office or the N...

  18. Waste-to-Energy Technology Brief

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETV's Greenhouse Gas Technology (GHG) Center, operated by Southern Research Institute under a cooperative agreement with US EPA, verified two biogas processing systems and four distributed generation (DG) energy systems in collaboration with the Colorado Governors Office or the N...

  19. Energy modelling: Clean grids with current technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2016-05-01

    The need for new energy storage is often seen as an obstacle to integrating renewable electricity into national power systems. Modelling shows that existing technologies could provide significant emissions reductions in the US without the need for storage, however.

  20. Advanced Membrane Separation Technologies for Energy Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop novel materials for use in membrane separation technologies for the recovery of waste energy and water from industrial process streams.

  1. Waste-to-energy compendium: Revised 1982 edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-08-01

    This report surveys 49 waste-to-energy recovery projects throughout the United States. Included are ten refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production facilities, eight RDF user facilities, five combined RDF production-user facilities, and 26 mass burning facilities ith energy recovery. Only those facilities that are fully operational or those in advanced stages of startup and shakedown are surveyed. Information is provided on processing capacities, operation and maintenance problems, equipment specifications, capital and operating costs, and the current status of each facility. In addition, process flow schematics are provided for each of the ten RDF production plants and the five RDF production-user plants.

  2. Solar Energy Education Packet for Elementary & Secondary Students. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Renewable Resources, Washington, DC.

    The arrangement of this packet is essentially evolutionary, with a conscious effort to alternate reading assignments, activities and experiments. It begins with solar energy facts and terminology as background to introduce the reader to basic concepts. It progresses into a discussion of passive solar systems. This is followed by several projects…

  3. 75 FR 25121 - Revisions to Energy Efficiency Enforcement Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... products), 6316 (commercial and industrial equipment). To ensure that all covered products distributed in... this RFI, DOE requests comments, information, and recommendations on the following concepts for the.... This system creates a disconnect between the information certified to DOE and the energy consumption or...

  4. Solar Energy Education Packet for Elementary & Secondary Students. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Renewable Resources, Washington, DC.

    The arrangement of this packet is essentially evolutionary, with a conscious effort to alternate reading assignments, activities and experiments. It begins with solar energy facts and terminology as background to introduce the reader to basic concepts. It progresses into a discussion of passive solar systems. This is followed by several projects…

  5. Advanced nuclear energy analysis technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Murata, Kenneth K.; Romero, Vicente JosÔe; Young, Michael Francis; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2004-05-01

    A two-year effort focused on applying ASCI technology developed for the analysis of weapons systems to the state-of-the-art accident analysis of a nuclear reactor system was proposed. The Sandia SIERRA parallel computing platform for ASCI codes includes high-fidelity thermal, fluids, and structural codes whose coupling through SIERRA can be specifically tailored to the particular problem at hand to analyze complex multiphysics problems. Presently, however, the suite lacks several physics modules unique to the analysis of nuclear reactors. The NRC MELCOR code, not presently part of SIERRA, was developed to analyze severe accidents in present-technology reactor systems. We attempted to: (1) evaluate the SIERRA code suite for its current applicability to the analysis of next generation nuclear reactors, and the feasibility of implementing MELCOR models into the SIERRA suite, (2) examine the possibility of augmenting ASCI codes or alternatives by coupling to the MELCOR code, or portions thereof, to address physics particular to nuclear reactor issues, especially those facing next generation reactor designs, and (3) apply the coupled code set to a demonstration problem involving a nuclear reactor system. We were successful in completing the first two in sufficient detail to determine that an extensive demonstration problem was not feasible at this time. In the future, completion of this research would demonstrate the feasibility of performing high fidelity and rapid analyses of safety and design issues needed to support the development of next generation power reactor systems.

  6. A Course on Energy Technology and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Thomas F.

    2007-01-01

    The emerging energy situation in the United States puts chemical engineering at the forefront of the large research and education effort that will need to be undertaken during the next 20 years. Chemical engineering undergraduates and graduate students will need to be literate on energy alternatives and the interconnection of technology,…

  7. Technology and Soviet energy availability: Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-11-01

    The course Soviet energy production will take if present policies in the West and the USSR remain unchanged is investigated. Opportunities and problems in the five primary Soviet energy industries: oil, gas, coal, nuclear, and electric power; equipment and technology requirements; and the implications of providing or withholding assistance are addressed.

  8. A Course on Energy Technology and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Thomas F.

    2007-01-01

    The emerging energy situation in the United States puts chemical engineering at the forefront of the large research and education effort that will need to be undertaken during the next 20 years. Chemical engineering undergraduates and graduate students will need to be literate on energy alternatives and the interconnection of technology,…

  9. Exploring Energy, Power, and Transportation Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Donovan; Kellum, Mary

    These teacher's materials for a seven-unit course were developed to help students develop technological literacy, career exploration, and problem-solving skills relative to the communication industries. The seven units include an overview of energy and power, principles of energy and power, power production and conversion, power transmission and…

  10. Energy & Technology Review, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L.; Van Dyke, P.

    1994-03-01

    This monthly report of research activities at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory highlights three different research programs. First, the Forensic Science Center supports a broad range of analytical techniques that focus on detecting and analyzing chemical, biological, and nuclear species. Analyses are useful in the areas of nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and law enforcement. Second, starting in 1977, the laboratory initiated a series of studies to understand a high incidence of melanoma among employees. Continued study shows that mortality from this disease has decreased from the levels seen in the 1980`s. Third, to help coordinate the laboratory`s diverse research projects that can provide better healthcare tools to the public, the lab is creating the new Center for Healthcare Technologies.

  11. Development of an energy-use estimation methodology for the revised Navy Manual MO-303

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Wood, A.G.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Navy commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to revise and/or update the Navy Utilities Targets Manual, NAVFAC MO-303 (U.S. Navy 1972b). The purpose of the project was to produce a current, applicable, and easy-to-use version of the manual for use by energy and facility engineers and staff at all Navy Public Works Centers (PWCs), Public Works Departments (PWDs), Engineering Field Divisions (EFDs), and other related organizations. The revision of the MO-303 manual involved developing a methodology for estimating energy consumption in buildings and ships. This methodology can account for, and equitably allocate, energy consumption within Navy installations. The analyses used to develop this methodology included developing end-use intensities (EUIs) from a vast collection of Navy base metering and billing data. A statistical analysis of the metering data, weather data, and building energy-use characteristics was used to develop appropriate EUI values for use at all Navy bases. A complete Navy base energy reconciliation process was also created for use in allocating all known energy consumption. Initial attempts to use total Navy base consumption values did not produce usable results. A parallel effort using individual building consumption data provided an estimating method that incorporated weather effects. This method produced a set of building EUI values and weather adjustments for use in estimating building energy use. A method of reconciling total site energy consumption was developed based on a {open_quotes}zero-sum{close_quotes} principle. This method provides a way to account for all energy use and apportion part or all of it to buildings and other energy uses when actual consumption is not known. The entire text of the manual was also revised to present a more easily read understood and usable document.

  12. Directed-energy process technology efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.

    1985-06-01

    A summary of directed-energy process technology for solar cells was presented. This technology is defined as directing energy or mass to specific areas on solar cells to produce a desired effect in contrast to exposing a cell to a thermal or mass flow environment. Some of these second generation processing techniques are: ion implantation; microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition; rapid thermal processing; and the use of lasers for cutting, assisting in metallization, assisting in deposition, and drive-in of liquid dopants. Advantages of directed energy techniques are: surface heating resulting in the bulk of the cell material being cooler and unchanged; better process control yields; better junction profiles, junction depths, and metal sintering; lower energy consumption during processing and smaller factory space requirements. These advantages should result in higher-efficiency cells at lower costs. The results of the numerous contracted efforts were presented as well as the application potentials of these new technologies.

  13. Directed-energy process technology efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of directed-energy process technology for solar cells was presented. This technology is defined as directing energy or mass to specific areas on solar cells to produce a desired effect in contrast to exposing a cell to a thermal or mass flow environment. Some of these second generation processing techniques are: ion implantation; microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition; rapid thermal processing; and the use of lasers for cutting, assisting in metallization, assisting in deposition, and drive-in of liquid dopants. Advantages of directed energy techniques are: surface heating resulting in the bulk of the cell material being cooler and unchanged; better process control yields; better junction profiles, junction depths, and metal sintering; lower energy consumption during processing and smaller factory space requirements. These advantages should result in higher-efficiency cells at lower costs. The results of the numerous contracted efforts were presented as well as the application potentials of these new technologies.

  14. The status of renewable energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, D. G.

    1992-03-01

    Renewable energy technologies convert naturally occurring phenomena into useful energy forms. These technologies use resources that generally are not depleted, such as the direct energy (heat and light) from the sun and the indirect results of its impact on the earth (wind, falling water, heating effects, plant growth), gravitational forces (the tides), and the heat of the Earth's core (geothermal), as the sources from which they produce useful energy. These very large stores of natural energy represent a resource potential that is incredibly massive, and dwarfs that of equivalent fossil energy resources. The magnitude of these resources is, therefore, not a key constraint on energy production. However, they are generally diffuse and not fully accessible, some are intermittent, and all have distinct regional and local variability. It is these aspects of their character that give rise to difficult, but generally solvable, technical, institutional, and economic challenges inherent in development and use of renewable energy resources. This report discusses the technologies and their associated energy source.

  15. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  16. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  17. Shelf mounted ocean thermal energy conversion platform, revised preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-03-01

    This report relates model tests of a generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) platform. The objective of these tests is to aid in the evaluation of new OTEC designs and to present a data base for design purposes. The test plant has been designed to provide a data base for comparison with current and projected analytical tools as well as comparisons of results from one model configuration to another. The new conceptual OTEC designs are different from the typical offshore (jacket type) structure which is quite transparent to waves. The major difference is the addition of large submerged power production modules to the frame. These proposed modules offer a large surface area to obstruct the flow and thereby increase the global wave forces acting on the structure.

  18. Energy Conservation Activities for Elementary Grades (Or: How To Help Slim Down the Energy Monster). Iowa Developed Energy Activities Sampler, Primary K-2. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This booklet provides activities for teachers to use in the primary elementary grades (K-2). The activities are organized into nine units, with units 1 through 8 containing three activities…

  19. Annual Technology Baseline (Including Supporting Data); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, Nate; Cory, Karlynn; Hand, Maureen; Parkhill, Linda; Speer, Bethany; Stehly, Tyler; Feldman, David; Lantz, Eric; Augusting, Chad; Turchi, Craig; O'Connor, Patrick

    2015-07-08

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), National Renewable Energy Laboratory provides an organized and centralized dataset that was reviewed by internal and external experts. It uses the best information from the Department of Energy laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information. The ATB includes both a presentation with notes (PDF) and an associated Excel Workbook. The ATB includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind; offshore wind; utility-scale solar PV; concentrating solar power; geothermal power; hydropower plants (upgrades to existing facilities, powering non-powered dams, and new stream-reach development); conventional coal; coal with carbon capture and sequestration; integrated gasification combined cycle coal; natural gas combustion turbines; natural gas combined cycle; conventional biopower. Nuclear laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information.

  20. Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Future Energy Systems.

    PubMed

    Preuster, Patrick; Alekseev, Alexander; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-06-07

    Future energy systems will be determined by the increasing relevance of solar and wind energy. Crude oil and gas prices are expected to increase in the long run, and penalties for CO2 emissions will become a relevant economic factor. Solar- and wind-powered electricity will become significantly cheaper, such that hydrogen produced from electrolysis will be competitively priced against hydrogen manufactured from natural gas. However, to handle the unsteadiness of system input from fluctuating energy sources, energy storage technologies that cover the full scale of power (in megawatts) and energy storage amounts (in megawatt hours) are required. Hydrogen, in particular, is a promising secondary energy vector for storing, transporting, and distributing large and very large amounts of energy at the gigawatt-hour and terawatt-hour scales. However, we also discuss energy storage at the 120-200-kWh scale, for example, for onboard hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles using compressed hydrogen storage. This article focuses on the characteristics and development potential of hydrogen storage technologies in light of such a changing energy system and its related challenges. Technological factors that influence the dynamics, flexibility, and operating costs of unsteady operation are therefore highlighted in particular. Moreover, the potential for using renewable hydrogen in the mobility sector, industrial production, and the heat market is discussed, as this potential may determine to a significant extent the future economic value of hydrogen storage technology as it applies to other industries. This evaluation elucidates known and well-established options for hydrogen storage and may guide the development and direction of newer, less developed technologies.

  1. Energy-related applications of helium: a revision of the ERDA-13 data base

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, E.F.; Krupka, M.C.

    1980-08-01

    A re-examination, revision, and re-evaluation of the data base contained within the 1975 document, ERDA-13, The Energy-Related Applications of Helium, were completed and results are presented in this report. New technical and resource data, current legislative proposals, updated supply-and-demand relationships, latest legal developments, programmatic changes affectng the future demand for helium, socio-economic aspects, and the effects of the latest energy-consumption projections were considered and are discussed. In contrast to ERDA-13, however, explicit recommendations with respect to the formulation of Federal helium policy, as it pertains to the energy-related applications of helium, are not given.

  2. Scientific challenges in sustainable energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nathan

    2006-04-01

    We describe and evaluate the technical, political, and economic challenges involved with widespread adoption of renewable energy technologies. First, we estimate fossil fuel resources and reserves and, together with the current and projected global primary power production rates, estimate the remaining years of oil, gas, and coal. We then compare the conventional price of fossil energy with that from renewable energy technologies (wind, solar thermal, solar electric, biomass, hydroelectric, and geothermal) to evaluate the potential for a transition to renewable energy in the next 20-50 years. Secondly, we evaluate - per the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - the greenhouse constraint on carbon-based power consumption as an unpriced externality to fossil-fuel use, considering global population growth, increased global gross domestic product, and increased energy efficiency per unit GDP. This constraint is projected to drive the demand for carbon-free power well beyond that produced by conventional supply/demand pricing tradeoffs, to levels far greater than current renewable energy demand. Thirdly, we evaluate the level and timescale of R&D investment needed to produce the required quantity of carbon-free power by the 2050 timeframe. Fourth, we evaluate the energy potential of various renewable energy resources to ascertain which resources are adequately available globally to support the projected demand. Fifth, we evaluate the challenges to the chemical sciences to enable the cost-effective production of carbon-free power required. Finally, we discuss the effects of a change in primary power technology on the energy supply infrastructure and discuss the impact of such a change on the modes of energy consumption by the energy consumer and additional demands on the chemical sciences to support such a transition in energy supply.

  3. Technology Innovation and Building Energy Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altwies, Joy E.

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to add insight on the following general question: Has public policy stimulated energy-related technological change in buildings? Greater understanding of how policy influences technological change in the building sector can translate into better-designed policy mechanisms, ultimately accelerating innovation and adoption of energy-saving technologies. These technologies can enable building users to reduce their energy consumption and associated environmental impacts. This research addresses this general question using a case study of building controls technology, and poses the following specific research question: Has the use of building energy codes stimulated adoption of building controls? Building controls can be used in any type of building, of any vintage, and in any location; the systems come in a variety of configurations with a common objective; and they affect major sources of building energy consumption. Since they are used in both residential and commercial sectors, both of these sectors are included in the analysis. To address this research question, data are assembled from diverse sources and analyzed in multiple ways. The chapters proceed in a sequence that adds insight on individual aspects of the process of innovation in building controls. Chapter 1 reviews the literature on technological change, the characteristics of the building industry, and related energy policy. Chapter 2 uses patent citation data to characterize invention. Chapter 3 measures trends in technology prices to assess innovation. Chapter 4 uses federal commercial and residential building surveys to measure diffusion. Chapter 5 examines building energy code policies, selected for their relatively long history, widespread use, and relevance to building controls. In Chapter 6, data from Chapters 2 through 5 are used as inputs to a regression model to identify the effect of policy on adoption of the technology. Findings are discussed in

  4. Scientific Challenges in Sustainable Energy Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nathan

    2006-03-01

    This presentation will describe and evaluate the challenges, both technical, political, and economic, involved with widespread adoption of renewable energy technologies. First, we estimate the available fossil fuel resources and reserves based on data from the World Energy Assessment and World Energy Council. In conjunction with the current and projected global primary power production rates, we then estimate the remaining years of supply of oil, gas, and coal for use in primary power production. We then compare the price per unit of energy of these sources to those of renewable energy technologies (wind, solar thermal, solar electric, biomass, hydroelectric, and geothermal) to evaluate the degree to which supply/demand forces stimulate a transition to renewable energy technologies in the next 20-50 years. Secondly, we evaluate the greenhouse gas buildup limitations on carbon-based power consumption as an unpriced externality to fossil-fuel consumption, considering global population growth, increased global gross domestic product, and increased energy efficiency per unit of globally averaged GDP, as produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). A greenhouse gas constraint on total carbon emissions, in conjunction with global population growth, is projected to drive the demand for carbon-free power well beyond that produced by conventional supply/demand pricing tradeoffs, at potentially daunting levels relative to current renewable energy demand levels. Thirdly, we evaluate the level and timescale of R&D investment that is needed to produce the required quantity of carbon-free power by the 2050 timeframe, to support the expected global energy demand for carbon-free power. Fourth, we evaluate the energy potential of various renewable energy resources to ascertain which resources are adequately available globally to support the projected global carbon-free energy demand requirements. Fifth, we evaluate the challenges to the chemical sciences to

  5. Energy-Saving Opportunities for Manufacturing Companies, (English/Russian Fact Sheet) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This English/Russian brochure describes the Industrial Technologies Program Save Energy Now model and provides information on tools and resources to help manufacturing facilities reduce industrial energy intensity.

  6. Energy optimization aspects by injection process technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, A.; Ciortea, M.; Hutanu, C.; Farcas, V.

    2016-08-01

    In the proposed paper, the authors examine the energy aspects related to the injection moulding process technology in the automotive industry. Theoretical considerations have been validated by experimental measurements on the manufacturing process, for two types of injections moulding machines, hydraulic and electric. Practical measurements have been taken with professional equipment separately on each technological operation: lamination, compression, injection and expansion. For results traceability, the following parameters were, whenever possible, maintained: cycle time, product weight and the relative time. The aim of the investigations was to carry out a professional energy audit with accurate losses identification. Base on technological diagram for each production cycle, at the end of this contribution, some measure to reduce the energy consumption were proposed.

  7. Energy and Technology Review, April 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, W. J.; Canada, J.; Devore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R. D.; McElroy, L.; Kroopnick, H.

    1994-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, other major programs have been added, including technology transfer, laser science, biology and biotechnology, environmental research and remediation, arms control and nonproliferation, advanced defense technology, and applied energy technology. These programs in turn require research in basic scientific disciplines including chemistry and materials science, computing science and technology, engineering, and physics. This review highlights two R&D 100 award winning research topics: (1) The world's fastest digitizer which captures 30 ps transient electrical events, and (2) the MACHO camera system which fully exploits the power of large format digital imagers and integrates into one package the taking and analysis of images at a prodigious rate and the storage and archiving of extensive amounts of data.

  8. Market penetration of new energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Packey, D.J.

    1993-02-01

    This report examines the characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, and, for some, the mathematical formulas of forecasting methods that can be used to forecast the market penetration of renewable energy technologies. Among the methods studied are subjective estimation, market surveys, historical analogy models, cost models, diffusion models, time-series models, and econometric models. Some of these forecasting methods are more effective than others at different developmental stages of new technologies.

  9. Market penetration of new energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Packey, D.J.

    1993-02-01

    This report examines the characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, and, for some, the mathematical formulas of forecasting methods that can be used to forecast the market penetration of renewable energy technologies. Among the methods studied are subjective estimation, market surveys, historical analogy models, cost models, diffusion models, time-series models, and econometric models. Some of these forecasting methods are more effective than others at different developmental stages of new technologies.

  10. Compressed air energy storage technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscutoff, W. V.

    1980-06-01

    Progress in the development of compressed air energy storage (CAES) technologies for central station electric utility applications is reported. It is reported that the concept improves the effectiveness of a gas turbine using petroleum fuels, could reduce petroleum fuel consumption of electric utility peaking plants, and is technically feasible and economically viable. Specific topics discussed include stability criteria for large underground reservoirs in salt domes, hard rock, and porous rock used for air storage in utility applications and second-generation technologies that have minimal or no dependence on petroleum fuels. The latter includes integration of thermal energy storage, fluidized bed combustion, or coal gasification with CAES.

  11. Data on development of new energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-03-01

    The paper compiles data on the trend of development of new energy technologies into a book. By category, renewable energy is solar energy, wind power generation, geothermal power generation, ocean energy, and biomass. As a category of fuel form conversion, cited are coal liquefaction/gasification, coal gasification combined cycle power generation, and natural gas liquefaction/decarbonization. The other categories are cogeneration by fuel cell and ceramic gas turbine, district heat supply system, power load leveling technology, transportation-use substitution-fuel vehicle, and others (Stirling engine, superconducting power generator, etc.). The data are systematically compiled on essential principles, transition of introduction, objectives of introduction, status of production, cost, development schedule, performance, etc. The paper also deals with the related legislation system, developmental organizations, and a menu for power companies' buying surplus power.

  12. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies in Buildings Technology Characterizations for Energy Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2004-10-11

    The energy use in America's commercial and residential building sectors is large and growing. Over 38 quadrillion Btus (Quads) of primary energy were consumed in 2002, representing 39% of total U.S. energy consumption. While the energy use in buildings is expected to grow to 52 Quads by 2025, a large number of energy-related technologies exist that could curtail this increase. In recent years, improvements in such items as high efficiency refrigerators, compact fluorescent lights, high-SEER air conditioners, and improved building shells have all contributed to reducing energy use. Hundreds of other technology improvements have and will continue to improve the energy use in buildings. While many technologies are well understood and are gradually penetrating the market, more advanced technologies will be introduced in the future. The pace and extent of these advances can be improved through state and federal R&D. This report focuses on the long-term potential for energy-efficiency improvement in buildings. Five promising technologies have been selected for description to give an idea of the wide range of possibilities. They address the major areas of energy use in buildings: space conditioning (33% of building use), water heating (9%), and lighting (16%). Besides describing energy-using technologies (solid-state lighting and geothermal heat pumps), the report also discusses energy-saving building shell improvements (smart roofs) and the integration of multiple energy service technologies (CHP packaged systems and triple function heat pumps) to create synergistic savings. Finally, information technologies that can improve the efficiency of building operations are discussed. The report demonstrates that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The five technology areas alone can potentially result in total primary energy savings of between 2 and 4

  13. Energy technology progress for sustainable development

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D.E.; Drennen, T.E.

    1997-03-01

    Energy security is a fundamental part of a country`s national security. Access to affordable, environmentally sustainable energy is a stabilizing force and is in the world community`s best interest. The current global energy situation however is not sustainable and has many complicating factors. The primary goal for government energy policy should be to provide stability and predictability to the market. This paper differentiates between short-term and long-term issues and argues that although the options for addressing the short-term issues are limited, there is an opportunity to alter the course of long-term energy stability and predictability through research and technology development. While reliance on foreign oil in the short term can be consistent with short-term energy security goals, there are sufficient long-term issues associated with fossil fuel use, in particular, as to require a long-term role for the federal government in funding research. The longer term issues fall into three categories. First, oil resources are finite and there is increasing world dependence on a limited number of suppliers. Second, the world demographics are changing dramatically and the emerging industrialized nations will have greater supply needs. Third, increasing attention to the environmental impacts of energy production and use will limit supply options. In addition to this global view, some of the changes occurring in the US domestic energy picture have implications that will encourage energy efficiency and new technology development. The paper concludes that technological innovation has provided a great benefit in the past and can continue to do so in the future if it is both channels toward a sustainable energy future and if it is committed to, and invested in, as a deliberate long-term policy option.

  14. Conservation and renewable energy technologies for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is charged with long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research and development of promising transportation technologies that are unlikely to be undertaken by the private sector alone. OTT activities are designed to develop an advanced technology base within the US transportation industry for future manufacture of more energy-efficient, fuel-flexible, and environmentally sound transportation systems. OTT operations are focused on three areas: advanced automotive propulsion systems including gas turbines, low heat rejection diesel, and electric vehicle technologies; advanced materials development and tribology research; and research, development, demonstration, test, and evaluation (including field testing in fleet operations) of alternative fuels. Five papers describing the transportation technologies program have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Conservation and renewable energy technologies for transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-11-01

    The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is charged with long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research and development of promising transportation technologies that are unlikely to be undertaken by the private sector alone. OTT activities are designed to develop an advanced technology base within the U.S. transportation industry for future manufacture of more energy-efficient, fuel-flexible, and environmentally sound transportation systems. OTT operations are focused on three areas: advanced automotive propulsion systems including gas turbines, low heat rejection diesel, and electric vehicle technologies; advanced materials development and tribology research; and research, development, demonstration, test, and evaluation (including field testing in fleet operations) of alternative fuels. Five papers describing the transportation technologies program have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Energy efficiency assessment methods and tools evaluation. Bolling Air Force Base. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dixon, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy-efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools, software, and procedures used to identify and evaluate energy-efficiency technologies and improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy use efficiency. To assist in procurement of energy-efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies devise and implement performance contracting and utility demand-side management strategies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) supports the FEMP mission of energy systems modernization. Under this charter, the Laboratory and its contractors work with federal facility energy managers to assess and implement energy-efficiency improvements at federal facilities nationwide.

  17. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  18. Environmental data, energy technology characterizations: petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Serrajian, N.M.

    1980-04-01

    Environmental Data Energy Technology Characterizations are publications which are intended to provide policy analysts and technical analysts with basic environmental data associated with key energy technologies. The first publication, Summary, provides information in tabular form on the eight technology areas examined; subsequent publications provide more detailed information on the technologies. This publication provides documentation of petroleum. The transformation of the energy in petroleum into a more useful form is described in this document in terms of major activity areas in the petroleum cycle, that is, in terms of activities which produce either an energy product or a fuel leading to the production of an energy product in a different form. These activities represent both well-documented and less well-documented activity areas. The former activities are characterized in terms of actual operating data with allowance for future modification where appropriate. Emissions are assumed to conform to environmental standards. The less well-documented activity areas examined are those like oil storage in salt domes and exploration for which engineering studies were performed. The organization of the chapters in this volume is designed to support the tabular presentation in the Summary. Each chapter begins with a brief description of the activity under consideration. The standard characteristics, size, availability, mode of functioning, and place in the fuel cycle are presented. Next, major legislative and/or technological factors influencing the commercial operation of the activity are offered. Discussions of resources consumed, residuals produced, and economics follow. To aid in comparing and linking the different activity areas, data for each area are normalized to 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output from the activity.

  19. Energy Technology Allocation for Distributed Energy Resources: A Technology-Policy Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallikarjun, Sreekanth

    Distributed energy resources (DER) are emerging rapidly. New engineering technologies, materials, and designs improve the performance and extend the range of locations for DER. In contrast, constructing new or modernizing existing high voltage transmission lines for centralized generation are expensive and challenging. In addition, customer demand for reliability has increased and concerns about climate change have created a pull for swift renewable energy penetration. In this context, DER policy makers, developers, and users are interested in determining which energy technologies to use to accommodate different end-use energy demands. We present a two-stage multi-objective strategic technology-policy framework for determining the optimal energy technology allocation for DER. The framework simultaneously considers economic, technical, and environmental objectives. The first stage utilizes a Data Envelopment Analysis model for each end-use to evaluate the performance of each energy technology based on the three objectives. The second stage incorporates factor efficiencies determined in the first stage, capacity limitations, dispatchability, and renewable penetration for each technology, and demand for each end-use into a bottleneck multi-criteria decision model which provides the Pareto-optimal energy resource allocation. We conduct several case studies to understand the roles of various distributed energy technologies in different scenarios. We construct some policy implications based on the model results of set of case studies.

  20. Biomass-energy-technology program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    An account is given of the ongoing research, development, and demonstration efforts of the Biomass Energy Technology program. Descriptions are given for each of the program projects funded and/or in existence during Fiscal Year 1981, reflecting their status as of September 30, 1981. The summaries are grouped as follows: feedstock production, conversion systems, market development, and general support and analysis.

  1. Biomass recycling heat technology and energy products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakaev, R. B.; Gergelizhiu, P. S.; Kazakov, A. V.; Zavorin, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    Relevance is determined by necessity of utilizing of local low-grade fuels by energy equpment. Most widespread Tomsk oblast (Russian Federation region) low-grade fuels are described and listed. Capability of utilizing is analysed. Mass balances of heat-technology conversion materials and derived products are described. As a result, recycling capability of low-grade fuels in briquette fuel is appraised.

  2. Essays on Energy Technology Innovation Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Gabriel Angelo Sherak

    Motivated by global climate change, enhancing innovation systems for energy technologies is seen as one of the largest public policy challenges of the near future. The role of policy in enhancing energy innovation systems takes several forms: public provision of research and develop funding, facilitating the private sector's capability to develop new technologies, and creating incentives for private actors to adopt innovative and appropriate technologies. This dissertation explores research questions that span this range of policies to develop insights in how energy technology innovation policy can be reformed in the face of climate change. The first chapter of this dissertation explores how decision making to allocate public research and development funding could be improved through the integration of expert technology forecasts. I present a framework to evaluate and optimize the U.S. Department of Energy's research and development portfolio of applied energy projects, accounting for spillovers from technical complimentary and competition for the same market share. This project integrates one of the largest and most comprehensive sets of expert elicitations on energy technologies (Anadon et al., 2014b) in a benefit evaluation framework. This work entailed developing a new method for probability distribution sampling that accommodates the information that can be provided by expert elicitations. The results of this project show that public research and development in energy storage and solar photovoltaic technologies has the greatest marginal returns to economic surplus, but the methodology developed in this chapter is broadly applicable to other public and private R&D-sponsoring organizations. The second chapter of this dissertation explores how policies to transfer technologies from federally funded research laboratories to commercialization partners, largely private firms, create knowledge spillovers that lead to further innovation. In this chapter, I study the U

  3. World Energy Resources and New Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.

    2016-01-01

    The development of civilisation is linked inextricably with growing demand for electricity. Thus, the still-rapid increase in the level of utilisation of natural resources, including fossil fuels, leaves it more and more urgent that conventional energy technologies and the potential of the renewable energy sources be made subject to re-evaluation. It is estimated that last 200 years have seen use made of more than 50% of the available natural resources. Equally, if economic forecasts prove accurate, for at least several more decades, oil, natural gas and coal will go on being the basic primary energy sources. The alternative solution represented by nuclear energy remains a cause of considerable public concern, while the potential for use to be made of renewable energy sources is seen to be very much dependent on local environmental conditions. For this reason, it is necessary to emphasise the impact of research that focuses on the further sharpening-up of energy efficiency, as well as actions aimed at increasing society's awareness of the relevant issues. The history of recent centuries has shown that rapid economic and social transformation followed on from the industrial and technological revolutions, which is to say revolutions made possible by the development of power-supply technologies. While the 19th century was "the age of steam" or of coal, and the 20th century the era of oil and gas, the question now concerns the name that will at some point come to be associated with the 21st century. In this paper, the subjects of discussion are primary energy consumption and energy resources, though three international projects on the global scale are also presented, i.e. ITER, Hydrates and DESERTEC. These projects demonstrate new scientific and technical possibilities, though it is unlikely that commercialisation would prove feasible before 2050. Research should thus be focused on raising energy efficiency. The development of high-efficiency technologies that

  4. Energy technology assessments for energy security -- Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, A.D.; Schock, R.N.

    1993-03-01

    In the first phase of the evaluation process the group identified technology areas that are clearly important for reducing US vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. The important technologies were then evaluated against the following specific criteria: Additions to world oil and gas reserves outside the Middle East; increase in efficiency in the oil consuming sectors; displacement of petroleum-based fuels; reduction in demand for oil-fueled transportation; increase in the ability to switch quickly away from petroleum based fuels; increases in domestic and international oil stocks; reduction in world oil demand; and additions to domestic, non-petroleum electrical generating capacity (important in the ultimate term). The technology areas deemed by the members of the working group to be most important are: (1) In the near term, technologies related to improved recovery of natural gas, the conversion of natural gas to liquids, advanced liquefaction of coal, the development of alternatively fueled vehicles, automobiles and light truck improvements to increase efficiency, and vehicles that operate on alternative fuels. (2) In the long term, these technologies, as well as those related to hydrogen production, storage and utilization, biomass derived fuels, electric and hybrid vehicles, building heating and cooling using solar energy, more efficient appliances, improved HVAC, and advanced building materials and envelopes were also judged to be most important. (3) In the ultimate term (>2030) other technologies have the possibility to join with these to increase energy security. These are improved oil and gas exploration and extraction, heavy oil and hydrocarbon conversion, gas recovery from unconventional sources, advanced fission reactors and fuel cycles, solar generation of electricity, and fusion energy. An increase in US electrical generating capacity is also thought to bear directly on energy security in this time-frame.

  5. Sensor Technology Assessment for Ordnance and Explosive Waste Detection and Location. Revision B.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Engineers 17 Section 2.1 - An Overview Of Ordnance Sensor Technologies provides its own source of energy . The system "illuminates" the terrain with...electromagnetic energy , detects the energy returning from the terrain (called radar return), and then records it as an image. (Passive remote sensing systems...such as photography and thermal infrared sensing detect the available energy reflected or radiated from the terrain, whereas radar systems operate

  6. Technology assessment of wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, B. W.; Merson, T. J.

    1980-09-01

    Environmental data for wind energy conversion systems (WECSs) have been generated in support of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy (TASE) program. Two candidates have been chosen to characterize the WECS that might be deployed if this technology makes a significant contribution to the national energy requirements. One WECS is a large machine of 1.5-MW-rated capacity that can be used by utilities. The other WECS is a small machine that is characteristic of units that might be used to meet residential or small business energy requirements. Energy storage systems are discussed for each machine to address the intermittent nature of wind power. Many types of WECSs are being studied and a brief review of the technology is included to give background for choosing horizontal axis designs for this study. Cost estimates have been made for both large and small systems as required for input to the Strategic Environmental Assessment Simulation (SEAS) computer program. Material requirements, based on current generation WECSs, are discussed and a general discussion of environmental impacts associated with WECS deployment is presented.

  7. Revision of the energy conservation requirements in the manufactured home construction and safety standards

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C C; Lee, A D; Lucas, R G; Taylor, Z T

    1992-02-01

    Thermal requirements were developed for manufactured (mobile) homes in response to legislation requiring the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to revise its thermal standards for manufactured homes. A life-cycle cost minimization from the home owner's perspecetive was used to establish an optimum in a large number of cities for several prototype homes. The development of the economic, financial, and energy conservation measure parameters input into the life-cycle cost analysis was documented. The optimization results were aggregated to zones which were expressed as a maximum overall home U-value (thermal transmittance) requirement. The revised standard's costs, benefits, and net value to the consumer were quantified. 50 refs.

  8. Energy and Technology Review, August--September

    SciTech Connect

    Sefcik, J A

    1992-01-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review focuses on cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs)-one of the Laboratory's most effective means of technology transfer. The first article chronicles the legislative evolution of these agreements. The second article examines the potential beneficial effects of CRADAs on the national economy and discusses their role in the development and marketing of Laboratory technologies. The third article provides information on how to initiate and develop CRADAs at LLNL, and the fourth and fifth articles describe the Laboratory's two most prominent technology transfer projects. One is a 30-month CRADA with General Motors to develop advanced lasers for cutting, welding, and heat-treating operations. The cover photograph shows this laser cutting through a piece of steel 1/16 of an inch thick. The other project is a three-year CRADA with Amoco, Chevron-Conoco, and Unocal to refine our oil shale retorting process.

  9. Solar America: A Solar Energy Tour of the United States (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-06-01

    This CDROM contains nearly 500 photos and captions of solar energy technologies at work throughout the United States. Every state of the union is represented, as well as Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the District of Columbia, and U.S. outposts in Antarctica. The technologies represented are photovoltaics, solar thermal, solar hot water, and concentrating solar power. The CD promotes solar energy as a wise energy choice for America's present and future.

  10. Mesoporous materials for clean energy technologies.

    PubMed

    Linares, Noemi; Silvestre-Albero, Ana M; Serrano, Elena; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; García-Martínez, Javier

    2014-11-21

    Alternative energy technologies are greatly hindered by significant limitations in materials science. From low activity to poor stability, and from mineral scarcity to high cost, the current materials are not able to cope with the significant challenges of clean energy technologies. However, recent advances in the preparation of nanomaterials, porous solids, and nanostructured solids are providing hope in the race for a better, cleaner energy production. The present contribution critically reviews the development and role of mesoporosity in a wide range of technologies, as this provides for critical improvements in accessibility, the dispersion of the active phase and a higher surface area. Relevant examples of the development of mesoporosity by a wide range of techniques are provided, including the preparation of hierarchical structures with pore systems in different scale ranges. Mesoporosity plays a significant role in catalysis, especially in the most challenging processes where bulky molecules, like those obtained from biomass or highly unreactive species, such as CO2 should be transformed into most valuable products. Furthermore, mesoporous materials also play a significant role as electrodes in fuel and solar cells and in thermoelectric devices, technologies which are benefiting from improved accessibility and a better dispersion of materials with controlled porosity.

  11. The United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology`s Technology Benefits Recording System

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, K.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technology`s (OIT`s) Technology Benefits Recording System (TBRS) was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The TBRS is used to organize and maintain records of the benefits accrued from the use of technologies developed with the assistance of OIT. OIT has had a sustained emphasis on technology deployment. While individual program managers have specific technology deployment goals for each of their ongoing programs, the Office has also established a separate Technology Deployment Division whose mission is to assist program managers and research and development partners commercialize technologies. As part of this effort, the Technology Deployment Division developed an energy-tracking task which has been performed by PNL since 1977. The goal of the energy-tracking task is to accurately assess the energy savings impact of OIT-developed technologies. In previous years, information on OIT-sponsored technologies existed in a variety of forms--first as a hardcopy, then electronically in several spreadsheet formats that existed in multiple software programs. The TBRS was created in 1993 for OIT and was based on information collected in all previous years from numerous industrial contacts, vendors, and plants that have installed OIT-sponsored technologies. The TBRS contains information on technologies commercialized between 1977 and the present, as well as information on emerging technologies in the late development/early commercialization stage of the technology life cycle. For each technology, details on the number of units sold and the energy saved are available on a year-by-year basis. Information regarding environmental benefits, productivity and competitiveness benefits, or impact that the technology may have had on employment is also available.

  12. Energy metabolic state in hypothermically stored boar spermatozoa using a revised protocol for efficient ATP extraction

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh Thu; Wallner, Ulrike; Schmicke, Marion; Waberski, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian spermatozoa utilize ATP as the energy source for key functions on the route to fertilization. ATP and its precursor nucleotides ADP and AMP are regularly investigated in sperm physiology studies, mostly by bioluminescence assays. Assay results vary widely, mainly due to different efficiencies in nucleotide extraction and prevention of their enzymatic degradation. Here, we describe a revised, validated protocol for efficient phosphatase inhibition and adenine nucleotide extraction resulting in consistently high ATP concentrations exceeding previously reported values for boar spermatozoa up to 20-fold. The revised assay is applicable for determining ATP concentrations and adenylate energy charge in extracts from fresh and frozen samples, thereby allowing simultaneous assessment of semen samples from long-term storage experiments. After validation, the assay was applied to liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa stored at 17°C and 5°C for 24 and 72 h. Cooling to 5°C, but not storage duration, reduced ATP concentration in spermatozoa (P<0.05), which was accompanied by the appearance of AMP and ADP in the preservation medium. ATP and energy charge were highly correlated to the proportion of membrane-intact spermatozoa, supporting the idea of nucleotides leaking through disrupted membranes in cold-shocked cells. The present assay allows highly standardized studies of energy metabolism in spermatozoa. PMID:27612509

  13. Energy metabolic state in hypothermically stored boar spermatozoa using a revised protocol for efficient ATP extraction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quynh Thu; Wallner, Ulrike; Schmicke, Marion; Waberski, Dagmar; Henning, Heiko

    2016-11-15

    Mammalian spermatozoa utilize ATP as the energy source for key functions on the route to fertilization. ATP and its precursor nucleotides ADP and AMP are regularly investigated in sperm physiology studies, mostly by bioluminescence assays. Assay results vary widely, mainly due to different efficiencies in nucleotide extraction and prevention of their enzymatic degradation. Here, we describe a revised, validated protocol for efficient phosphatase inhibition and adenine nucleotide extraction resulting in consistently high ATP concentrations exceeding previously reported values for boar spermatozoa up to 20-fold. The revised assay is applicable for determining ATP concentrations and adenylate energy charge in extracts from fresh and frozen samples, thereby allowing simultaneous assessment of semen samples from long-term storage experiments. After validation, the assay was applied to liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa stored at 17°C and 5°C for 24 and 72 h. Cooling to 5°C, but not storage duration, reduced ATP concentration in spermatozoa (P<0.05), which was accompanied by the appearance of AMP and ADP in the preservation medium. ATP and energy charge were highly correlated to the proportion of membrane-intact spermatozoa, supporting the idea of nucleotides leaking through disrupted membranes in cold-shocked cells. The present assay allows highly standardized studies of energy metabolism in spermatozoa.

  14. Energy and technology lessons since Rio

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Wise, Marshall A.

    2012-11-01

    The 1992 Framework Convention on Climate Change created the basic international architecture for addressing climate change. That treaty was negotiated at a time when the research literature examining emissions mitigation and the role of energy technology was relatively limited. In the two subsequent decades a great deal has been learned. The problem of stabilizing the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has proved far more difficult than envisioned in 1992 and the role of technology appears even more important when emissions mitigation strategies are co-developed in the context of multiple competing ends.

  15. 78 FR 30296 - Revisions to Oil Pipeline Regulations Pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Notice of Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Revisions to Oil Pipeline Regulations Pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Notice of Annual Change in the Producer Price Index for Finished Goods The Commission's...

  16. 76 FR 28966 - Revisions to Oil Pipeline Regulations Pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Notice of Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Revisions to Oil Pipeline Regulations Pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Notice of Annual Change in the Producer Price Index for Finished Goods The Commission's...

  17. 77 FR 29997 - Revisions to Oil Pipeline Regulations Pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Notice of Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Revisions to Oil Pipeline Regulations Pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Notice of Annual Change in the Producer Price Index for Finished Goods The Commission's...

  18. 75 FR 29526 - Revisions to Oil Pipeline Regulations Pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Notice of Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... No: 2010-12622] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [131 FERC ] 61,161; Docket No. RM93-11-000] Revisions to Oil Pipeline Regulations Pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Notice of Annual Change in the Producer Price Index for Finished Goods May 19, 2010. The Commission's...

  19. Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, E.M.

    1995-03-01

    The Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC), is the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) centralized software management facility. It is operated under contract for the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The ESTSC is authorized by DOE and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to license and distribute DOE-and NRC-sponsored software developed by national laboratories and other facilities and by contractors of DOE and NRC. ESTSC also has selected software from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) through a software exchange agreement that DOE has with the agency.

  20. The PCAST Energy Technology Innovation System Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitz, M.; Fri, R.

    2010-12-01

    The President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) recently made recommendations for strengthening the nation's energy innovation system. The PCAST report builds in part on earlier work at the National Research Council (NRC) and elsewhere. For example, PCAST largely adopted the description of the energy innovation system that appeared in the NRC report on 'Limiting the Magnitude of Future Climate Change'. Similarly, the 'Limiting' report provided examples of the importance of social science research in crafting energy policy, a recommendation of the PCAST report. And both the 'Limiting' report and an earlier report on 'America's Energy Future' recommended an aggressive commercial demonstration program for carbon capture and storage and new nuclear power plants. The PCAST report discusses the need for new approaches for federal demonstration projects. This session traces these relationships and suggests how similar synergies might be encouraged in the future.

  1. Innovation, Diffusion, and Regulation in Energy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, Theodore Robert

    The innovation and diffusion of new technologies is one of the central concerns of economics. New inventions or technological combinations do not spring fully formed into the world; as firms encounter and learn about new technologies they experiment, refine, and learn about them, improving productivity (and sometimes earning economic rents). Understanding the processes by which firms learn, and how these processes interact with regulations, is fundamental to understanding the emergence of new technologies, their contribution to growth, and the interaction of innovation and regulation. This dissertation addresses how firms learn and respond to regulations in the context of emerging technologies. Within this framework, I address several questions. When production inputs are socially controversial, do firms respond to disclosure laws by voluntarily constraining their inputs? Do these public disclosure laws facilitate knowledge transmission across firms, and if so, what are the implications for public welfare - for instance, do the gains from trade outweigh any effects of reduced incentives for innovation? I study these questions in the context of hydraulic fracturing, though the results offer insight for more general settings. Panning out to a much broader view, I also explore how energy-related technologies - in both generation and consumption - diffuse across national boundaries over time, and whether innovation and diffusion of energy-efficient technologies has led to more or less energy-efficient economic growth. In my first paper, I contribute to improved understanding of the conditions in which information-based regulations, which are increasingly common in multiple policy domains, decrease externalities such as environmental pollution. Specifically, I test whether information disclosure regulations applied to hydraulic fracturing chemicals caused firms to decrease their use of toxic inputs. Prior to these mandatory disclosure laws, some operators voluntarily

  2. Environmental data energy technology characterizations: natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Environmental Data Energy Technology Characterizations are publications which are intended to provide policy analysts and technical analysts with basic environmental data associated with key energy technologies. This publication provides backup documentation on natural gas. The transformation of the energy in gas into a more useful form is described in this document in terms of major activity areas in the gas cycle; that is, in terms of activities which produce either an energy product or a fuel leading to the production of an energy product in a different form. The activities discussed in this document are exploration, extraction, purification, power-plants, storage and transportation of natural gas. These activities represent both well-documented and non-documented activity areas. The former activities are characterized in terms of actual operating data with allowance for future modification where appropriate. Emissions are assumed to conform to environmental standards. The other activity areas examined are those like exploration and extraction, where reliance on engineering studies provided the data. The organization of the chapters in this volume is designed to support the tabular presentation in the summary. Each chapter begins with a brief description of the activity under consideration. The standard characteristics, size, availability, mode of functioning, and place in the fuel cycle are presented. Next, major legislative and/or technological factors influencing the commercial operation of the activity are offered. Discussions of resources consumed, residuals produced, and economics follow. To aid in comparing and linking the different activity areas, data for each area are normalized to 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output from the activity.

  3. Environmental data energy technology characterizations: synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Environmental Data Energy Technology Characterizations are publications which are intended to provide policy analysts and technical analysts with basic environmental data associated with key energy technologies. This publication provides documentation on synthetic fuels (coal-derived and oil shale). The transformation of the energy in coal and oil shale into a more useful form is described in this publication in terms of major activity areas in the synthetic fuel cycles, that is, in terms of activities which produce either an energy product or a fuel leading to the production of an energy product in a different form. The activities discussed in this document are coal liquefaction, coal gasification, in-situ gasification, and oil shales. These activities represent both well-documented and advanced activity areas. The former activities are characterized in terms of actual operating data with allowance for future modification where appropriate. Emissions are assumed to conform to environmental standards. The advanced activity areas examined are those like coal liquefaction and in-situ retorting of oil shale. For these areas, data from pilot or demonstration plants were used where available; otherwise, engineering studies provided the data. The organization of the chapters in this volume is designed to support the tabular presentation in the summary volume. Each chapter begins with a brief description of the activity under consideration. The standard characteristics, size, availability, mode of functioning and place in the fuel cycle are presented. Next, major legislative and/or technological factors influencing the commercial operation of the activity are offered. Discussions of resources consumed, residuals produced, and economics follow. To aid in comparing and linking the different activity areas, data for each area are normalized to 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output from the activity.

  4. Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Gordon, E. M.; Kalu, A.; Hepp, Aloysius F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology (SORET) program is an education program involving three Historically Black Colleges and Universities and NASA's John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. These three universities; Central State University (CSU), Savannah State University (SSU) and Wilberforce University (WU) are working together with NASA Glenn to use the theme of renewable energy to improve the science, engineering and technology education of minority students and to attract minority students to these fields. In this vein, a renewable energy laboratory course is being offered at WU with the goal of giving the students of WU and CSU hands on experiences. As part of this course, the students are constructing solar light posts for a local high school with a high minority population. A Physics teacher from this school and some of his high school students are involved with this project. A lecture course on energy systems and sustainability is being developed by SSU to be delivered via distance reaming to the other institutions. Summer activities are being planned at all three institutions involving student projects in renewable energy. For example, WU students will work on a study of the synthesis and properties of photovoltaic materials. In addition, CSU will present a weeklong summer program to high school students with the assistance of WU. This presentation will focus on the student involvement and achievements in the educational area to date and plot the future course of this program.

  5. Separations Technology for Clean Water and Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, Gordon D

    2012-06-22

    Providing clean water and energy for about nine billion people on the earth by midcentury is a daunting challenge. Major investments in efficiency of energy and water use and deployment of all economical energy sources will be needed. Separations technology has an important role to play in producing both clean energy and water. Some examples are carbon dioxide capture and sequestration from fossil energy power plants and advanced nuclear fuel cycle scemes. Membrane separations systems are under development to improve the economics of carbon capture that would be required at a huge scale. For nuclear fuel cycles, only the PUREX liquid-liquid extraction process has been deployed on a large scale to recover uranium and plutonium from used fuel. Most current R and D on separations technology for used nuclear fuel focuses on ehhancements to a PUREX-type plant to recover the minor actinides (neptunium, americiu, and curium) and more efficiently disposition the fission products. Are there more efficient routes to recycle the actinides on the horizon? Some new approaches and barriers to development will be briefly reviewed.

  6. Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Gordon, E. M.; Kalu, A.; Hepp, Aloysius F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology (SORET) program is an education program involving three Historically Black Colleges and Universities and NASA's John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. These three universities; Central State University (CSU), Savannah State University (SSU) and Wilberforce University (WU) are working together with NASA Glenn to use the theme of renewable energy to improve the science, engineering and technology education of minority students and to attract minority students to these fields. In this vein, a renewable energy laboratory course is being offered at WU with the goal of giving the students of WU and CSU hands on experiences. As part of this course, the students are constructing solar light posts for a local high school with a high minority population. A Physics teacher from this school and some of his high school students are involved with this project. A lecture course on energy systems and sustainability is being developed by SSU to be delivered via distance reaming to the other institutions. Summer activities are being planned at all three institutions involving student projects in renewable energy. For example, WU students will work on a study of the synthesis and properties of photovoltaic materials. In addition, CSU will present a weeklong summer program to high school students with the assistance of WU. This presentation will focus on the student involvement and achievements in the educational area to date and plot the future course of this program.

  7. Thermionic energy conversion technology - Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.; Morris, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Aerospace and terrestrial applications of thermionic direct energy conversion and advances in direct energy conversion (DEC) technology are surveyed. Electrode materials, the cesium plasma drop (the difference between the barrier index and the collector work function), DEC voltage/current characteristics, conversion efficiency, and operating temperatures are discussed. Attention is centered on nuclear reactor system thermionic DEC devices, for in-core or out-of-core operation. Thermionic fuel elements, the radiation shield, power conditions, and a waste heat rejection system are considered among the thermionic DEC system components. Terrestrial applications include topping power systems in fossil fuel and solar power generation.

  8. Energy and environment. A Sandia technology bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Parrott, L.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

    1993-03-01

    This bulletin discusses the following: decontamination of polluted water by using a photocatalyst to convert ultraviolet energy into electrochemical energy capable of destroying organic waste and removing toxic metals; monitoring oil spills with SAR by collecting data in digital form, processing the data, and creating digital images that are recorded for post-mission viewing and processing; revitalization of a solar industrial process heat system which uses parabolic troughs to heat water for foil production of integrated circuits; and an electronic information system, EnviroTRADE (Environmental Technologies for Remedial Actions Data Exchange) for worldwide exchange of environmental restoration and waste management information.

  9. Summary of solar energy technology characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Dr., Gregory J.; Blaunstein, Dr., Robert R.

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes the design, operating, energy, environmental, and economic characteristics of 38 model solar systems used in the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems Project including solar heating and cooling of buildings, agricultural and industrial process heat, solar electric conversion, and industrial biomass systems. The generic systems designs utilized in this report were based on systems studies and mission analyses performed by the DOE National Laboratories and the MITRE Corporation. The purpose of those studies were to formulate materials and engineering cost data and performance data of solar equipment once mass produced.

  10. Thermionic energy conversion technology - Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.; Morris, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Aerospace and terrestrial applications of thermionic direct energy conversion and advances in direct energy conversion (DEC) technology are surveyed. Electrode materials, the cesium plasma drop (the difference between the barrier index and the collector work function), DEC voltage/current characteristics, conversion efficiency, and operating temperatures are discussed. Attention is centered on nuclear reactor system thermionic DEC devices, for in-core or out-of-core operation. Thermionic fuel elements, the radiation shield, power conditions, and a waste heat rejection system are considered among the thermionic DEC system components. Terrestrial applications include topping power systems in fossil fuel and solar power generation.

  11. Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of

  12. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-21

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear

  13. Future Technologies to Enhance Geothermal Energy Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J J; Kaahaaina, N; Aines, R; Zucca, J; Foxall, B; Atkins-Duffin, C

    2008-07-25

    Geothermal power is a renewable, low-carbon option for producing base-load (i.e., low-intermittency) electricity. Improved technologies have the potential to access untapped geothermal energy sources, which experts estimate to be greater than 100,000 MWe. However, many technical challenges in areas such as exploration, drilling, reservoir engineering, and energy conversion must be addressed if the United States is to unlock the full potential of Earth's geothermal energy and displace fossil fuels. (For example, see Tester et al., 2006; Green and Nix, 2006; and Western Governors Association, 2006.) Achieving next-generation geothermal power requires both basic science and applied technology to identify prospective resources and effective extraction strategies. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a long history of research and development work in support of geothermal power. Key technologies include advances in scaling and brine chemistry, economic and resource assessment, direct use, exploration, geophysics, and geochemistry. For example, a high temperature, multi-spacing, multi-frequency downhole EM induction logging tool (GeoBILT) was developed jointly by LLNL and EMI to enable the detection and orientation of fractures and conductive zones within the reservoir (Figure 1). Livermore researchers also conducted studies to determine how best to stave off increased salinity in the Salton Sea, an important aquatic ecosystem in California. Since 1995, funding for LLNL's geothermal research has decreased, but the program continues to make important contributions to sustain the nation's energy future. The current efforts, which are highlighted in this report, focus on developing an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) and on improving technologies for exploration, monitoring, characterization, and geochemistry. Future research will also focus on these areas.

  14. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Alvine, Kyle J.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  15. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  16. India’s Nuclear Energy Program and U.S. Policies Today. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    inspection and that principle is not affected by participation on the safeguards panel. ’ And it is also agreed,’ he said, ’that if this panel does not come...DN C I , FINAL REPORT INDIA’S NUCLEAR ENERGY PROGRAM AND U.S. POLICIES TODAY DTIC Roberta Wohlstetter MAR 1 6 1989 0 Revised February 1980 In partial...Morarji to Indira........ . ............ 1 On Desai’s ’Vain Gandhism" " ............... 10 Pakistan, India and the Afghanistan Crisis " ....... 21

  17. The threshold photoelectron spectrum of cyanovinylacetylene leads to an upward revision of the ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmeier, Fabian; Lang, Melanie; Fischer, Ingo; Hemberger, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Cyanovinylacetylene C5H3N was investigated by threshold photoelectron spectroscopy. The ionization energy (IE) was determined to be 10.04 eV. This value constitutes an upward revision of the earlier value of 9.33 eV. For both stereoisomers (trans and cis) computations predict very similar IEs and spectra. At 11.08 eV and 11.17 eV excited cationic states are observed. For the precursor 3-bromopyridine an IE of 9.34 eV was obtained. The appearance energy AE0K (3-bromopyridine, 3-pyridyl+) was determined to be 11.71 eV and a bond dissociation energy of the Csbnd Br bond in the 3-bromopyridine cation of 229 kJ mol-1 was derived.

  18. Studies on advanced overseas energy technologies, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straus, R. W.; Carsey, J. N.

    1981-03-01

    A final evaluation is presented covering investigations over the past 5 years to perceive energy conversion technology and covering over 100 advanced energy technologies which saw many new developments in energy conversion in the countries studied. Specifically, the state-of-the-art for specified technologies and the development of energy technologies overseas are discussed. The development of combustion technology in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Japan, Norway, and the Federal Republic of Germany is summarized.

  19. Project plan hydrogen energy systems technology. Phase 1: Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An overview of the potential need for hydrogen as a source of energy in the future was presented in order to identify and define the technology requirements for the most promising approaches to meet that need. The following study objectives were discussed: (1) determination of the future demand for hydrogen, based on current trends and anticipated new uses, (2) identification of the critical research and technology advances required to meet this need considering, to the extent possible, raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects, and (3) definition and recommendation of the scope and space of a National Hydrogen Energy Systems Technology Program and outline of a Program Development Plan.

  20. Student Outreach With Renewable Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Eric B. (Technical Monitor); Buffinger, D.; Fuller, C.; Kalu, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology (SORET) program is a joint grant that involves a collaboration between three HBCU's (Central State University, Savannah State University, and Wilberforce University) and NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The overall goal of the grant is to increase the interest of minority students in the technical disciplines, to encourage participating minority students to continue their undergraduate study in these disciplines, and to promote graduate school to these students. As a part of SORET, Central State University has developed an undergraduate research associates program over the past two years. As part of this program, students are required to take special laboratory courses offered at Wilberforce University that involve the application of renewable energy systems. The course requires the students to design, construct, and install a renewable energy project. In addition to the applied renewable energy course, Central State University provided four undergraduate research associates the opportunity to participate in summer internships at Texas Southern University (Renewable Energy Environmental Protection Program) and the Cleveland African-American Museum (Renewable Energy Summer Camp for High School Students) an activity co sponsored by NASA and the Cleveland African-American Museum. Savannah State University held a high school summer program with a theme of the Direct Impact of Science on Our Every Day Lives. The purpose of the institute was to whet the interest of students in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) by demonstrating the effectiveness of science to address real world problems. The 2001 institute involved the design and installation of a PV water pumping system at the Center for Advanced Water Technology and Energy Systems at Savannah State. Both high school students and undergraduates contributed to this project. Wilberforce University has used NASA support to provide

  1. Student Outreach With Renewable Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Eric B. (Technical Monitor); Buffinger, D.; Fuller, C.; Kalu, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology (SORET) program is a joint grant that involves a collaboration between three HBCU's (Central State University, Savannah State University, and Wilberforce University) and NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The overall goal of the grant is to increase the interest of minority students in the technical disciplines, to encourage participating minority students to continue their undergraduate study in these disciplines, and to promote graduate school to these students. As a part of SORET, Central State University has developed an undergraduate research associates program over the past two years. As part of this program, students are required to take special laboratory courses offered at Wilberforce University that involve the application of renewable energy systems. The course requires the students to design, construct, and install a renewable energy project. In addition to the applied renewable energy course, Central State University provided four undergraduate research associates the opportunity to participate in summer internships at Texas Southern University (Renewable Energy Environmental Protection Program) and the Cleveland African-American Museum (Renewable Energy Summer Camp for High School Students) an activity co sponsored by NASA and the Cleveland African-American Museum. Savannah State University held a high school summer program with a theme of the Direct Impact of Science on Our Every Day Lives. The purpose of the institute was to whet the interest of students in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) by demonstrating the effectiveness of science to address real world problems. The 2001 institute involved the design and installation of a PV water pumping system at the Center for Advanced Water Technology and Energy Systems at Savannah State. Both high school students and undergraduates contributed to this project. Wilberforce University has used NASA support to provide

  2. A new method to evaluate energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Y.; Clark, D.J.

    1985-04-01

    As the world's oil reserves are rapidly depleted and numerous alternative energy technologies are proposed, a perplexing and urgent question confronts us: how can we assess these technologies in order to choose those which will deliver the most desirable consequences. This task, the evaluation of technology, is a form of policy study where the intent is to examine the broadest societal implications (technological, economic, environmental, legal, social, emotional, etc.) related to the development and deployment of existing or emerging technology. In a strategic planning process, one of the principal tools contributing to effective leadership is a carefully designed framework for guiding the discussion. The five step approach and the discussion support system by computer described in this article are a starting point for such a framework. The leader can advance group thinking by offering interpretive summaries using the computer and lead the group from one step to the next by giving transitional statements based on the five step approach. The constant challenge for him is to maintain the balance between freedom and control which makes for progress and yet does not act to stifle creative thinking.

  3. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies less than or equal to400 MeV. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    Multigroup cross sections (66 neutron groups and 22 photon groups) are described for neutron energies from thermal to 400 MeV. The elements considered are hydrogen, /sup 10/B, /sup 11/B, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, sulfur, potassium, calcium, chromium, iron, nickel, tungsten, and lead. The cross section data presented are a revision of similar data presented previously. In the case of iron, transport calculations using the earlier and the revised cross sections are presented and compared, and significant differences are found. The revised cross sections are available from the Radiation Shielding information Center of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

    2007-06-01

    This document supports the other measurement procedures and all building energy-monitoring projects by providing methods to calculate the source energy and emissions from the energy measured at the building. Energy and emission factors typically account for the conversion inefficiencies at the power plant and the transmission and distribution losses from the power plant to the building. The energy and emission factors provided here also include the precombustion effects, which are the energy and emissions associated with extracting, processing, and delivering the primary fuels to the point of conversion in the electrical power plants or directly in the buildings.

  5. Advanced Technology Display House. Volume 2: Energy system design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maund, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary design concept for the energy systems in the Advanced Technology Display House is analyzed. Residential energy demand, energy conservation, and energy concepts are included. Photovoltaic arrays and REDOX (reduction oxidation) sizes are discussed.

  6. Essays in energy, environment and technological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yichen Christy

    This dissertation studies technological change in the context of energy and environmental economics. Technology plays a key role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Chapter 1 estimates a structural model of the car industry that allows for endogenous product characteristics to investigate how gasoline taxes, R&D subsidies and competition affect fuel efficiency and vehicle prices in the medium-run, both through car-makers' decisions to adopt technologies and through their investments in knowledge capital. I use technology adoption and automotive patents data for 1986-2006 to estimate this model. I show that 92% of fuel efficiency improvements between 1986 and 2006 were driven by technology adoption, while the role of knowledge capital is largely to reduce the marginal production costs of fuel-efficient cars. A counterfactual predicts that an additional 1/gallon gasoline tax in 2006 would have increased the technology adoption rate, and raised average fuel efficiency by 0.47 miles/gallon, twice the annual fuel efficiency improvement in 2003-2006. An R&D subsidy that would reduce the marginal cost of knowledge capital by 25% in 2006 would have raised investment in knowledge capital. This subsidy would have raised fuel efficiency only by 0.06 miles/gallon in 2006, but would have increased variable profits by 2.3 billion over all firms that year. Passenger vehicle fuel economy standards in the United States will require substantial improvements in new vehicle fuel economy over the next decade. Economic theory suggests that vehicle manufacturers adopt greater fuel-saving technologies for vehicles with larger market size. Chapter 2 documents a strong connection between market size, measured by sales, and technology adoption. Using variation consumer demographics and purchasing pattern to account for the endogeneity of market size, we find that a 10 percent increase in market size raises vehicle fuel efficiency by 0.3 percent, as compared

  7. Animated Bibliography. A Sample of Energy Education Curriculum Materials: K-6. Energy Action in Schools. [Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwall, Bonnie; Ortiz, Kim

    The California Extension Service works with schools to develop energy education programs which will reduce school energy usage and costs by involving staff and students in energy management. This bibliography contains selected materials which present an accurate reporting of the facts, assume little teacher background, emphasize active learning in…

  8. Revised Energy Spectra for Primary Elements, H - Si, above 50 GeV from the ATIC-2 Science Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunashingha, R. M.; Guzik, T. G.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) long duration balloon experiment had a successful science flight accumulating 18 days of data (12/02 - 1/03) during a single circumnavigation in Antarctica. ATIC measures the energy spectra of elements from H to Fe in primary cosmic rays using a fully active Bismuth Germanate calorimeter preceded by a carbon target, with embedded scintillator hodoscopes, and a silicon matrix charge detector at the top. Preliminary results from ATIC have been reported in previous conferences. The revised results reported here are derived from a new analysis of the data with improved charge resolution, lower background and revised energy calibration. The raw energy deposit spectra are de-convolved into primary energy spectra and extrapolated to the top of the atmosphere. We compare these revised results to previous data and comment upon the astrophysical interpretation of the results.

  9. Technical support document: Survey data used in revising the energy conservation requirements in the manufactured home construction and safety standards

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.D.; Conner, C.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report documents data used in the development of revised energy conservation standards for manufactured housing. The approach used in developing the proposed standard revision is a cost-benefit analysis in which the costs of energy conservation measures (ECM) are balanced against the benefits of energy savings. The analysis used to develop the recommendations for revision of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) energy conservation standards for manufactured housing requires information on specific ECMs. This technical support document contains the data from two of the three surveys that were used primarily to characterize the available ECMs and their associated costs. The analyses of these data are provided in separate reports. 5 refs.

  10. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  11. Demonstration of EnergyNest thermal energy storage (TES) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoivik, Nils; Greiner, Christopher; Tirado, Eva Bellido; Barragan, Juan; Bergan, Pâl; Skeie, Geir; Blanco, Pablo; Calvet, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the experimental results from the EnergyNest 2 × 500 kWhth thermal energy storage (TES) pilot system installed at Masdar Institute of Science & Technology Solar Platform. Measured data are shown and compared to simulations using a specially developed computer program to verify the stability and performance of the TES. The TES is based on a solid-state concrete storage medium (HEATCRETE®) with integrated steel tube heat exchangers cast into the concrete. The unique concrete recipe used in the TES has been developed in collaboration with Heidelberg Cement; this material has significantly higher thermal conductivity compared to regular concrete implying very effective heat transfer, at the same time being chemically stable up to 450 °C. The demonstrated and measured performance of the TES matches the predictions based on simulations, and proves the operational feasibility of the EnergyNest concrete-based TES. A further case study is analyzed where a large-scale TES system presented in this article is compared to two-tank indirect molten salt technology.

  12. Application of the polystyrene model made by 3-D printing rapid prototyping technology for operation planning in revision lumbar discectomy.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Yang, Mingyuan; Xie, Yang; Chen, Ziqiang; Wang, Chuanfeng; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of 3-D rapid prototyping technology in revision lumbar discectomy. 3-D rapid prototyping technology has not been reported in the treatment of revision lumbar discectomy. Patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation who were preparing to undergo revision lumbar discectomy from a single center between January 2011 and 2013 were included in this analysis. Patients were divided into two groups. In group A, 3-D printing technology was used to create subject-specific lumbar vertebral models in the preoperative planning process. Group B underwent lumbar revision as usual. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were compared between groups included operation time, perioperative blood loss, postoperative complications, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Japan Orthopaedics Association (JOA) scores, and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for back pain and leg pain. A total of 37 patients were included in this study (Group A = 15, Group B = 22). Group A had a significantly shorter operation time (106.53 ± 11.91 vs. 131.92 ± 10.81 min, P < 0.001) and significantly less blood loss (341.67 ± 49.45 vs. 466.77 ± 71.46 ml, P < 0.001). There was no difference between groups for complication rate. There were also no differences between groups for any clinical metric. Using the 3-D printing technology before revision lumbar discectomy may reduce the operation time and the perioperative blood loss. There does not appear to be a benefit to using the technology with respect to clinical outcomes. Future prospective studies are needed to further elucidate the efficacy of this emerging technology.

  13. Examining the Impact of Technology on Primary Students' Revision of Written Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisy, Jennifer Garrette

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the revision processes of second grade students and even fewer have explored the impact of digital writing on young students' revisions. This study utilized a within subject crossover trial using randomized block assignment (AB | BA) for counterbalancing. This study sought to determine (1) whether revising on paper versus…

  14. Modular, Reconfigurable, High-Energy Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrington, Connie; Howell, Joe

    2006-01-01

    The Modular, Reconfigurable High-Energy (MRHE) Technology Demonstrator project was to have been a series of ground-based demonstrations to mature critical technologies needed for in-space assembly of a highpower high-voltage modular spacecraft in low Earth orbit, enabling the development of future modular solar-powered exploration cargo-transport vehicles and infrastructure. MRHE was a project in the High Energy Space Systems (HESS) Program, within NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESR&T) Program. NASA participants included Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and Glenn Research Center (GRC). Contractor participants were the Boeing Phantom Works in Huntsville, AL, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, CA, ENTECH, Inc. in Keller, TX, and the University of AL Huntsville (UAH). MRHE's technical objectives were to mature: (a) lightweight, efficient, high-voltage, radiation-resistant solar power generation (SPG) technologies; (b) innovative, lightweight, efficient thermal management systems; (c) efficient, 100kW-class, high-voltage power delivery systems from an SPG to an electric thruster system; (d) autonomous rendezvous and docking technology for in-space assembly of modular, reconfigurable spacecraft; (e) robotic assembly of modular space systems; and (f) modular, reconfigurable distributed avionics technologies. Maturation of these technologies was to be implemented through a series of increasingly-inclusive laboratory demonstrations that would have integrated and demonstrated two systems-of-systems: (a) the autonomous rendezvous and docking of modular spacecraft with deployable structures, robotic assembly, reconfiguration both during assembly and (b) the development and integration of an advanced thermal heat pipe and a high-voltage power delivery system with a representative lightweight high-voltage SPG array. In addition, an integrated simulation testbed would have been developed

  15. Alignment of Assessment Objectives with Instructional Objectives Using Revised Bloom's Taxonomy--The Case for Food Science and Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jideani, V. A.; Jideani, I. A.

    2012-01-01

    Nine food science and technology (FST) subjects were assessed for alignment between the learning outcomes and assessment using revised Bloom's taxonomy (RBT) of cognitive knowledge. Conjoint analysis was used to estimate the utilities of the levels of cognitive, knowledge, and the attribute importance (cognitive process and knowledge dimension)…

  16. Alignment of Assessment Objectives with Instructional Objectives Using Revised Bloom's Taxonomy--The Case for Food Science and Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jideani, V. A.; Jideani, I. A.

    2012-01-01

    Nine food science and technology (FST) subjects were assessed for alignment between the learning outcomes and assessment using revised Bloom's taxonomy (RBT) of cognitive knowledge. Conjoint analysis was used to estimate the utilities of the levels of cognitive, knowledge, and the attribute importance (cognitive process and knowledge dimension)…

  17. Energy Efficient Engine Exhaust Mixer Model Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Larkin, M.

    1981-01-01

    An exhaust mixer test program was conducted to define the technology required for the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The model configurations of 1/10 scale were tested in two phases. A parametric study of mixer design options, the impact of residual low pressure turbine swirl, and integration of the mixer with the structural pylon of the nacelle were investigated. The improvement of the mixer itself was also studied. Nozzle performance characteristics were obtained along with exit profiles and oil smear photographs. The sensitivity of nozzle performance to tailpipe length, lobe number, mixer penetration, and mixer modifications like scalloping and cutbacks were established. Residual turbine swirl was found detrimental to exhaust system performance and the low pressure turbine system for Energy Efficient Engine was designed so that no swirl would enter the mixer. The impact of mixer/plug gap was also established, along with importance of scalloping, cutbacks, hoods, and plug angles on high penetration mixers.

  18. Energy and technology review, January 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.; Johnson, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Energy and Technology Review, January 1989, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, contains: An Expert System for Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry, a powerful software tool for tuning an instrument; An Expert System to Control a Fusion Energy Experiment, a rule-based expert system that automates the critical process of conditioning new or rebuilt neutral beam sources; An Expert System for Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators, a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle-beam accelerators; Qualitative Reasoning and Symbolic Analysis for Engineering Design, a workstation package that uses qualitative reasoning and symbolic analysis to give the engineer insight into the behavior of his design at an early stage; Using Expert Systems in Treaty Verification, rule-based expert systems to aid in the verification of such treaties by automating the task of data interpretation for various seismic monitoring systems; and Monitoring and Interpreting Security Alarms, an expert system to assess security incidents. (TC)

  19. Energy and technology review, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L.; Sanford, N.M.; Van Dyke, P.T.

    1993-06-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then other major programs have been added, including laser fusion and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense, and applied energy technology. These programs require basic research in chemistry, materials science, computer science, engineering and physics. This bulletin is published on a monthly basis to report on unclassified work in all of the programs. There are two articles in this issue. Herbert F. York reminisces about the early days in Livermore, emphasizing the legacy of E.O. Lawrence, and comments on the role of the Laboratory in the future. COG, a new,high-resolution code for modeling radiation transport is described. The code is a new Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code that solves complex radiation shielding and nuclear criticality problems. It is now available for high-speed desktop workstations as well as mainframes.

  20. Crystal growth technology CGT for energy: saving energy and renewable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Hans J.

    2005-02-01

    The fast-growing worldwide demand for energy, due to population growth and increasing standard of living, is in contrast with the limited fossil energy resources, with the political problems of nuclear fission energy, with the demand to reduce CO 2 production for climate control (Kyoto protocol), and with the slow advances of renewable energy sources. It will be shown how crystal growth technology (including epitaxy technology) can contribute to reduce the energy problem. CGT is the rate-determining factor for progress in energy-saving electrical technologies with high-temperature/high-power electrical technology and illumination from GaN-based devices as examples. Progress in CGT is also essential for the development of renewable energy sources like economic high-efficiency solar cells and in future laser-fusion energy where large laser and nonlinear-optic crystals of high radiation hardness are required. Education of CGT engineers and scientific development of CGT, using normally one optimum technology for industrial fabrication of specific crystals and one technology for specific epitaxial layers "epilayers", are needed.

  1. Commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hattrup, M.P.; Weijo, R.O.

    1989-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. The purpose of the study was to develop and screen a list of potential entry market applications for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Several initial screening criteria were used to identify promising ATES applications. These include the existence of an energy availability/usage mismatch, the existence of many similar applications or commercial sites, the ability to utilize proven technology, the type of location, market characteristics, the size of and access to capital investment, and the number of decision makers involved. The in-depth analysis identified several additional screening criteria to consider in the selection of an entry market application. This analysis revealed that the best initial applications for ATES are those where reliability is acceptable, and relatively high temperatures are allowable. Although chill storage was the primary focus of this study, applications that are good candidates for heat ATES were also of special interest. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Adaptive Seat Energy Absorbers for Enhanced Crash Safety: Technology Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    ARL-TR-7743 ● AUG 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Adaptive Seat Energy Absorbers for Enhanced Crash Safety: Technology...AUG 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Adaptive Seat Energy Absorbers for Enhanced Crash Safety: Technology Demonstration by Muthuvel...COVERED (From - To) 10 January 2012–29 February 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adaptive Seat Energy Absorbers for Enhanced Crash Safety: Technology

  3. Energy-limited escape revised. The transition from strong planetary winds to stable thermospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than log 10(-ΦG)< 13.11 erg g-1 because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with log 10(-ΦG) ≳ 13.6 erg g-1 exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Lyα and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating efficiency. Small planets undergo enhanced evaporation because they host expanded atmospheres that expose a larger surface to the stellar irradiation. We present scaling laws for the heating efficiency and the expansion radius that depend on the gravitational potential and irradiation level of the planet. The resulting revised energy-limited escape concept can be used to derive estimates for the mass-loss rates of super-Earth-sized planets as well as massive hot Jupiters with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres.

  4. Environmental data energy technology characterizations: coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This document describes the activities leading to the conversion of coal to electricity. Specifically, the activities consist of coal mining and beneficiation, coal transport, electric power generation, and power transmission. To enhance the usefulness of the material presented, resource requirements, energy products, and residuals for each activity area are normalized in terms of 10/sup 12/ Btus of energy produced. Thus, the total effect of producing electricity from coal can be determined by combining the residuals associated with the appropriate activity areas. Emissions from the coal cycle are highly dependent upon the type of coal consumed as well as the control technology assigned to the activity area. Each area is assumed to be equipped with currently available control technologies that meet environmental regulations. The conventional boiler, for example, has an electrostatic precipitator and a flue gas desulfurization scrubber. While this results in the removal of most of the particulate matter and sulfur dioxide in the flue gas stream, it creates other new environmental residuals -- solid waste, sludge, and ash. There are many different types of mined coal. For informational purposes, two types from two major producing regions, the East and the West, are characterized here. The eastern coal is typical of the Northern Appalachian coal district with a high sulfur and heat content. The western coal, from the Powder River Basin, has much less sulfur, but also has a substantially lower heating value.

  5. Energy and Technology Review, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sefcik, J.A.; Quirk, W.J.

    1993-06-01

    The Lawrence Liver National Laboratory was established in 1952 to research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we have added other major programs, including fusion and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense, and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering, and physics. This review is published monthly to report on unclassified work in all of our programs. This issue describes three endeavors. We have developed a multiple-frame, laser-illuminated, electro-optic camera system that produces sequential photographs of fast phenomena, such as the formation of shaped-charge jets, with unprecedented high resolution. Another project concerns a new rocket propulsion system for small spacecraft. This liquid rocket propulsion system won a 1992 R&D 100 award and features miniature pumps that can turn on and off and can change speed within a millisecond to meet a wide range of thrust requirements. The last project reported on pertains to computational integrated photonics: using numerical simulation to optimize photonic devices.

  6. Energy Assurance: Essential Energy Technologies for Climate Protection and Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L; Boudreaux, Philip R; Dean, David Jarvis; Fulkerson, William; Gaddis, Abigail; Graham, Robin Lambert; Graves, Ronald L; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Hughes, Patrick; Lapsa, Melissa Voss; Mason, Thom; Standaert, Robert F; Wilbanks, Thomas J; Zucker, Alexander

    2009-12-01

    We present and apply a new method for analyzing the significance of advanced technology for achieving two important national energy goals: climate protection and energy security. Quantitative metrics for U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2050 and oil independence in 2030 are specified, and the impacts of 11 sets of energy technologies are analyzed using a model that employs the Kaya identity and incorporates the uncertainty of technological breakthroughs. The goals examined are a 50% to 80% reduction in CO2 emissions from energy use by 2050 and increased domestic hydrocarbon fuels supply and decreased demand that sum to 11 mmbd by 2030. The latter is intended to insure that the economic costs of oil dependence are not more than 1% of U.S. GDP with 95% probability by 2030. Perhaps the most important implication of the analysis is that meeting both energy goals requires a high probability of success (much greater than even odds) for all 11 technologies. Two technologies appear to be indispensable for accomplishment of both goals: carbon capture and storage, and advanced fossil liquid fuels. For reducing CO2 by more than 50% by 2050, biomass energy and electric drive (fuel cell or battery powered) vehicles also appear to be necessary. Every one of the 11 technologies has a powerful influence on the probability of achieving national energy goals. From the perspective of technology policy, conflict between the CO2 mitigation and energy security is negligible. These general results appear to be robust to a wide range of technology impact estimates; they are substantially unchanged by a Monte Carlo simulation that allows the impacts of technologies to vary by 20%.

  7. Electric energy savings from new technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, R.J.; Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for ten technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all ten technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Thus, the savings projected here represent between 4% and 14% of total consumption projected for 2000. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference forecast, reducing projected electricity consumption from what it otherwise would have been, the savings estimated here should not be directly subtracted from the reference forecast.

  8. Energy Storage Technology Development for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Jankovsky, Amy L.; Reid, Concha M.; Miller, Thomas B.; Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing battery and fuel cell technology to meet the expected energy storage needs of human exploration systems. Improving battery performance and safety for human missions enhances a number of exploration systems, including un-tethered extravehicular activity suits and transportation systems including landers and rovers. Similarly, improved fuel cell and electrolyzer systems can reduce mass and increase the reliability of electrical power, oxygen, and water generation for crewed vehicles, depots and outposts. To achieve this, NASA is developing non-flow-through proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell stacks, and electrolyzers coupled with low permeability membranes for high pressure operation. The primary advantage of this technology set is the reduction of ancillary parts in the balance-of-plant fewer pumps, separators and related components should result in fewer failure modes and hence a higher probability of achieving very reliable operation, and reduced parasitic power losses enable smaller reactant tanks and therefore systems with lower mass and volume. Key accomplishments over the past year include the fabrication and testing of several robust, small-scale non-flow-through fuel cell stacks that have demonstrated proof-of-concept. NASA is also developing advanced lithium-ion battery cells, targeting cell-level safety and very high specific energy and energy density. Key accomplishments include the development of silicon composite anodes, lithiatedmixed- metal-oxide cathodes, low-flammability electrolytes, and cell-incorporated safety devices that promise to substantially improve battery performance while providing a high level of safety.

  9. Forthcoming revision to the department of energy - Tritium handling and safe storage guide

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, W.W.

    2015-03-15

    Once every five years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires that each of its Standards and Handbooks undergo a maintenance review (also known as 'sunset reviews'). There are 3 possible outcomes of a maintenance review: 1) reaffirmation as current, accurate, and of continuing value to the Department; 2) revision to be current, accurate, and of continuing value; or 3) cancellation. DOE-HDBK-1129-2008, Tritium Handling and Safe Storage, is following option 2) above; the required justification of continuing value was demonstrated by a lack of comparable technical breadth and depth available in other publications. This paper gives an overview of the updates that the Tritium Handling and Safe Storage Guide will undergo. It is expected that the update will be completed in early 2014. (authors)

  10. Technology assessment of portable energy RDT and P, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spraul, J. R. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    A technological assessment of portable energy research, development, technology, and production was undertaken to assess the technical, economic, environmental, and sociopolitical issues associated with portable energy options. Those courses of action are discussed which would impact aviation and air transportation research and technology. Technology assessment workshops were held to develop problem statements. The eighteen portable energy problem statements are discussed in detail along with each program's objective, approach, task description, and estimates of time and costs.

  11. Gasohol: An Energy Alternative. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    This 2-3 week high school chemistry unit is designed to provide students with an awareness of Gasohol as an energy alternative. Gasohol is a blend of 10 percent pure ethanol and 90 percent unleaded gasoline. The unit consists of nine activities (five laboratory experiments, three informational readings, and a sample problem activity). The five…

  12. Energy Conservation in the Home. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Recommended for grades 7-9 science and/or social studies classes, this 8-10 day unit provides students with experiences in conserving energy through small conservation activities and practices. The unit consists of 11 activities with rationale, objectives, and instructional strategies provided for each activity. Students are given information on…

  13. Economic Development Benefits from Wind Energy in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.

    2009-06-01

    This report focuses on the economic development impacts estimated from building and operating 7,800 MW of new wind power in Nebraska. This level of development is on the scale envisioned in the Department of Energy (DOE) report 20% Wind Energy by 2030. A practical first step to building 7,800 of wind is completing 1,000 MW. We also include the estimated economic impacts to Nebraska from building 1,000 MW of wind power. Our primary analysis indicates that the development and construction of approximately 7,800 MW of wind energy in Nebraska by 2030 will support 20,600 to 36,500 annual full-time equivalents (AFTE). In addition, operating the full 7,800 MW of wind energy could support roughly 2,000 to 4,000 full-time workers throughout the operating life of the wind facilities (LFTE). Nebraska's economy is estimated to see an average annual boost in economic activity ranging from $140 million to $260 million solely from construction and development related activities between 2011 and 2030. An additional boost of $250 - $442 million annually is estimated from operating 7,800 MW of wind capacity.

  14. Energy from the Atom. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Recommended for grades 9-12 social studies and/or physical science classes, this 4-8 day unit focuses on four topics: (1) the background and history of atomic development; (2) two common types of nuclear reactors (boiling water and pressurized water reactors); (3) disposal of radioactive waste; and (4) the future of nuclear energy. Each topic…

  15. History of United States Energy. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Intended as a supplement to the units "Oil: Fuel of the Past" and "Coal: Fuel of the Past, Hope of the Future," this 3-4 day unit contains three activities which briefly explain the chronological development of energy resources and the formation and development of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). The…

  16. Gasohol: An Energy Alternative. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    This 2-3 week high school chemistry unit is designed to provide students with an awareness of Gasohol as an energy alternative. Gasohol is a blend of 10 percent pure ethanol and 90 percent unleaded gasoline. The unit consists of nine activities (five laboratory experiments, three informational readings, and a sample problem activity). The five…

  17. Energy from the Atom. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Recommended for grades 9-12 social studies and/or physical science classes, this 4-8 day unit focuses on four topics: (1) the background and history of atomic development; (2) two common types of nuclear reactors (boiling water and pressurized water reactors); (3) disposal of radioactive waste; and (4) the future of nuclear energy. Each topic…

  18. History of United States Energy. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Intended as a supplement to the units "Oil: Fuel of the Past" and "Coal: Fuel of the Past, Hope of the Future," this 3-4 day unit contains three activities which briefly explain the chronological development of energy resources and the formation and development of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). The…

  19. Energy Technologies Research and Education Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Ghassemi, Abbas; Ranade, Satish

    2014-12-31

    For this project, the intended goal of the microgrid component was to investigate issues in policy and technology that would drive higher penetration of renewable energy, and to demonstrate implementation in a utility system. The work accomplished on modeling the dynamics of photovoltaic (PV) penetration can be expanded for practical application. Using such a tool those involved in public policy can examine what the effect of a particular policy initiative, e.g., renewable portfolio standards (RPS) requirements, might be in terms of the desired targets. The work in the area of microgrid design, protection, and operation is fundamental to the development of microgrids. In particular the “Energy Delivery” paradigm provides new opportunities and business models for utilities. Ultimately, Energy Delivery could accrue significant benefits in terms of costs and resiliency. The experimental microgrid will support continued research and allow the demonstration of technology for better integration of renewables. The algal biofuels component of the project was developed to enhance the test facility and to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a commercial-scale geothermal algal biofuels operation for replication elsewhere in the arid Southwest. The project was housed at New Mexico State University’s (NMSU’s) Geothermal Aquaculture Facility (GAF) and a design for the inoculation train and algae grow-out process was developed. The facility was upgraded with modifications to existing electrical, plumbing and structural components on the GAF and surrounding grounds. The research work was conducted on biomass-processing, harvesting, dewatering, and extraction. Additionally, research was conducted to determine viability of using low-cost, wastewater from municipal treatment plants in the cultivation units as make-up water and as a source of nutrients, including nitrogen and soluble phosphorus. Data was collected on inputs and outputs, growth evaluation and

  20. Energy Efficient Transport - Technology in hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, D. B.; Bartlett, D. W.; Hood, R. V.

    1984-01-01

    Technologies developed through NASA's Energy Efficient Transport Program are described. The program was charged with research in advanced aerodynamics and active controls, with the goal of increasing the fuel efficiency of transport aircraft by 15 to 20 percent. Research in aerodynamics was directed toward the development of high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings, winglets, computational design methodology, high-lift devices, propulsion airframe integration, and surface coatings. The active control portion of the program investigated Wing Load Alleviation (WLA) through the use of active controls, drag reduction, and the effect of active pitch controls on fuel consumption. It was found that applying active control functions at the beginning of the aircraft design cycle brings the best benefit, and that if active control and advanced aerodynamic airframe configurations are applied to transport aircraft design concurrently with new lightweight materials, fuel consumption can be reduced by as much as 40 percent.

  1. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two

  2. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for

  3. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion: Technology and market potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrowski, L.J.; Pernisz, U.C.; Fraas, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report contains material displayed on poster panels during the Conference. The purpose of the contribution was to present a summary of the business overview of thermophotovoltaic generation of electricity and its market potential. The market analysis has shown that the TPV market, while currently still in an early nucleation phase, is evolving into a range of small niche markets out of which larger-size opportunities can emerge. Early commercial applications on yachts and recreational vehicles which require a quiet and emission-free compact electrical generator fit the current TPV technology and economics. Follow-on residential applications are attractive since they can combine generation of electricity with space and hot water heating in a co-generation system. Development of future markets in transportation, both private and communal or industrial, will be driven by legislation requiring emission-free vehicles, and by a reduction in TPV systems cost. As a result of {open_quote}{open_quote}moving down the learning curve,{close_quote}{close_quote} growing power and consumer markets are predicted to come into reach of TPV systems, a development favored by high overall energy conversion efficiency due to high radiation energy density and to high electric conversion efficiency available with photovoltaic cells. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion: Technology and market potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Leon J.; Pernisz, Udo C.; Fraas, Lewis M.

    1996-02-01

    This report contains material displayed on poster panels during the Conference. The purpose of the contribution was to present a summary of the business overview of thermophotovoltaic generation of electricity and its market potential. The market analysis has shown that the TPV market, while currently still in an early nucleation phase, is evolving into a range of small niche markets out of which larger-size opportunities can emerge. Early commercial applications on yachts and recreational vehicles which require a quiet and emission-free compact electrical generator fit the current TPV technology and economics. Follow-on residential applications are attractive since they can combine generation of electricity with space and hot water heating in a co-generation system. Development of future markets in transportation, both private and communal or industrial, will be driven by legislation requiring emission-free vehicles, and by a reduction in TPV systems cost. As a result of ``moving down the learning curve,'' growing power and consumer markets are predicted to come into reach of TPV systems, a development favored by high overall energy conversion efficiency due to high radiation energy density and to high electric conversion efficiency available with photovoltaic cells.

  5. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  6. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  7. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  8. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  9. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  10. Metal oxide electrocatalysts for alternative energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacquette, Adele Lawren

    This dissertation focuses on the development of metal oxide electrocatalysts with varying applications for alternative energy technologies. Interest in utilizing clean, renewable and sustainable sources of energy for powering the planet in the future has received much attention. This will address the growing concern of the need to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. The facile synthesis of metal oxides from earth abundant metals was explored in this work. The electrocatalysts can be incorporated into photoelectrochemical devices, fuel cells, and other energy storage devices. The first section addresses the utilization of semiconductors that can harness solar energy for water splitting to generate hydrogen. An oxysulfide was studied in order to combine the advantageous properties of the stability of metal oxides and the visible light absorbance of metal chalcogenides. Bi 2O2S was synthesized under facile hydrothermal conditions. The band gap of Bi2O2S was smaller than that of its oxide counterpart, Bi2O3. Light absorption by Bi 2O2S was extended to the visible region (>600 nm) in comparison to Bi2O3. The formation of a composite with In 2O3 was formed in order to create a UV irradiation protective coating of the Bi2O2S. The Bi2O2S/In 2O3 composite coupled with a dye CrTPP(Cl) and cocatalysts Pt and Co3O4 was utilized for water splitting under light irradiation to generate hydrogen and oxygen. The second section focuses on improving the stability and light absorption of semiconductors by changing the shapes and morphologies. One of the limitations of semiconductor materials is that recombination of electron-hole pairs occur within the bulk of the materials instead of migration to the surface. Three-dimensional shapes, such as nanorods, can prevent this recombination in comparison to spherical particles. Hierarchical structures, such as dendrites, cubes, and multipods, were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions, in order to reduce recombination and improve

  11. Energy & technology review, November--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L.

    1993-11-01

    For the 40-plus years of the Cold War, both the United States and the Soviet Union built up nuclear stockpiles of tens of thousands of weapons. Now, as the Cold War has ended and tensions between the superpowers have subsided, the US faces the task of significantly reducing its nuclear arsenal. Many thousands of nuclear weapons are being removed from the stockpile as a result of recent treaties and unilateral decisions. This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes the Laboratory`s role in the nation`s effort to dismantle these weapons safely and rapidly. The dismantlement of the United States` nuclear weapons takes place at the Department of Energy`s Pantex facility near Amarillo, Texas. The first article in this issue summarizes the Laboratory`s involvement in dismantling Livermore-designed nuclear weapons. LLNL (like Los Alamos) has responsibility for the weapons it designed, from design concept to retirement. In the past, the responsibilities ended when the weapon was retired from the stockpile. Now however, the role has been extended to include dismantlement. The second article reports on an incident that occurred in November 1992, in which the pit of a W48 warhead cracked during dismantlement. The Laboratory was called upon to handle the pit safely and determine the causes of the cracking. The third article explores a variety of methods proposed for reusing the high explosives after they are removed from the weapon. In the past, Laboratory work on nuclear weapons focused primarily on design and development. However, as the size and composition of the US stockpile changes with evolving international conditions, they will be called upon with increasing frequency to provide the scientific and technical expertise needed to dismantle the nation`s retired nuclear weapons safely and efficiently.

  12. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, William R; Burchell, Timothy D; Halsey, William; Hayner, George; Katoh, Yutai; Klett, James William; McGreevy, Timothy E; Nanstad, Randy K; Ren, Weiju; Snead, Lance Lewis; Stoller, Roger E; Wilson, Dane F

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  13. Energy storage technology - Environmental implications of large scale utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupka, M. C.; Moore, J. E.; Keller, W. E.; Baca, G. A.; Brasier, R. I.; Bennett, W. S.

    Environmental effects are identified for several energy storage technologies including advanced lead-acid battery, compressed air, underground pumped hydroelectric, flywheel, superconducting magnet, and various thermal systems. A preliminary study on fuel cell technology is also reported. New applications for energy storage technologies and the additional costs of controls to be used for mitigation of specific impacts are briefly discussed.

  14. Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF): Facility Stewardship Plan, Revision 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Art; Hannegan, Bryan

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, has established the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on the campus of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and has designated it as a DOE user facility. This 182,500-sq. ft. research facility provides state-of-the-art laboratory and support infrastructure to optimize the design and performance of electrical, thermal, fuel, and information technologies and systems at scale. This Facility Stewardship Plan serves to provide DOE and other decision makers with information on the existing and expected capabilities of ESIF, and the expected performance metrics to be applied to ESIF operations. This Plan is a living document that will be updated and refined throughout the lifetime of the facility.

  15. Best Practices Guide for Energy-Efficient Data Center Design: Revised March 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-03-01

    This guide provides an overview of best practices for energy-efficient data center design which spans the categories of Information Technology (IT) systems and their environmental conditions, data center air management, cooling and electrical systems, on-site generation, and heat recovery. IT system energy efficiency and environmental conditions are presented first because measures taken in these areas have a cascading effect of secondary energy savings for the mechanical and electrical systems. This guide concludes with a section on metrics and benchmarking values by which a data center and its systems energy efficiency can be evaluated. No design guide can offer 'the most energy-efficient' data center design but the guidelines that follow offer suggestions that provide efficiency benefits for a wide variety of data center scenarios.

  16. Review of NASA programs in applying aerospace technology to energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenk, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    NASA's role in energy research and development, with the aid of aerospace technology, is reviewed. A brief history, which began in 1974 with studies of solar energy systems on earth, is presented, and the major energy programs, consisting of over 60 different projects, are described, and include solar terrestrial systems, conservation and fossil energy systems, and space utilization systems. Special attention is given to the Satellite Power System and the isolation of nuclear wastes in space. Emerging prospects for NASA programs in energy technology include bioenergy, and ocean thermal energy conversion, coal extraction and conversion technologies, and support to the nuclear industry in power plant systems safety.

  17. Review of NASA programs in applying aerospace technology to energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, F. C.

    NASA's role in energy research and development, with the aid of aerospace technology, is reviewed. A brief history, which began in 1974 with studies of solar energy systems on earth, is presented, and the major energy programs, consisting of over 60 different projects, are described, and include solar terrestrial systems, conservation and fossil energy systems, and space utilization systems. Special attention is given to the Satellite Power System and the isolation of nuclear wastes in space. Emerging prospects for NASA programs in energy technology include bioenergy, and ocean thermal energy conversion, coal extraction and conversion technologies, and support to the nuclear industry in power plant systems safety.

  18. Review of NASA programs in applying aerospace technology to energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenk, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    NASA's role in energy research and development, with the aid of aerospace technology, is reviewed. A brief history, which began in 1974 with studies of solar energy systems on earth, is presented, and the major energy programs, consisting of over 60 different projects, are described, and include solar terrestrial systems, conservation and fossil energy systems, and space utilization systems. Special attention is given to the Satellite Power System and the isolation of nuclear wastes in space. Emerging prospects for NASA programs in energy technology include bioenergy, and ocean thermal energy conversion, coal extraction and conversion technologies, and support to the nuclear industry in power plant systems safety.

  19. Technology as a driver of climate and energy politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias S.; Sewerin, Sebastian

    2017-06-01

    Technological innovation, often induced by national and subnational policies, can be a key driver of global climate and energy policy ambition and action. A better understanding of the technology-politics feedback link can help to further increase ambitions.

  20. Technology Co-evolution Analysis in the Energy Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungjoo; Yoon, Byungun

    This paper suggests the method that can describe the co-evolutionary patterns in the energy sectors. Technologies that have facilitated the growth of other technologies should get the priority in the R&D investment, if other conditions are almost the same. In the suggested method, LVC equations were applied to the patents relating to energy technologies. Then a network showing the interactions between technologies in their evolution process is visualised. Research findings will provide numerous implications for policy-making and strategic planning for energy technology development.

  1. Contributions of the National Ignition Facility to the development of inertial fusion energy. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, M.; Logan, G.; Diaz De La Rubia, T.; Schrock, V.; Schultz, K.; Tokheim, R.; Abdou, M.; Bangerter, R.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy is proposing to construct the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to embark on a program to achieve ignition and modest gain in the laboratory early in the next century. The NM will use a {ge}1.8-MJ, 0.35-mm laser with 192 independent beams, a fifty-fold increase over the energy of the Nova laser. System performance analyses suggest yields as great as 20 MJ may be achievable. NIF will conduct more than 600 shots per year. The benefits of a micro-fusion capability in the laboratory include: Essential contributions to defense programs, resolution of important Inertial Fusion Energy issues, and unparalleled conditions of energy density for basic science and technology research. We have begun to consider the role the National Ignition Facility will fill in the development of Inertial Fusion Energy. While the achievement of ignition and gain speaks for itself in terms of its impact on developing IFE, we believe there are areas of IFE development, such as fusion power technology, IFE target design and fabrication, and understanding chamber dynamics, that would significantly benefit from NIF experiments. In the area of IFE target physics, ion targets will be designed using the NIF laser, and feasibility of high gain targets will be confirmed. Target chamber dynamics experiments will benefit from x-ray and debris energies that mimic in-IFE-chamber conditions. Fusion power technology will benefit from using single-shot neutron yields to measure spatial distribution of neutron heating, activation, and tritium breeding in relevant materials. IFE target systems will benefit from evaluating low-cost target fabrication techniques by testing such targets on NIF.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

  3. 77 FR 74520 - Encore Clean Energy, Inc., Energy & Engine Technology Corp., Equity Media Holdings Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Encore Clean Energy, Inc., Energy & Engine Technology Corp., Equity Media Holdings Corporation, eTotalSource, Inc., Extensions, Inc., Firepond, Inc., and GNC Energy Corporation; Order...

  4. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-07-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2006 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  5. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-03-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program?s national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  6. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-07-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2007 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program from October 2006 to September 2007. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  7. Determinants of the Pace of Global Innovation in Energy Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Understanding the factors driving innovation in energy technologies is of critical importance to mitigating climate change and...addressing other energy-related global challenges. Low levels of innovation , measured in terms of energy patent filings, were noted in the 1980s and...release; distribution is unlimited. Determinants of the Pace of Global Innovation in Energy Technologies The views, opinions and/or findings contained in

  8. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program: FY 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-10-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2004 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2004. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  9. Efficient Portfolios of the Energy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonov, Oleg I.; Medvedeva, Marina A.

    2011-09-01

    The goal of the research is to apply the methods of Portfolio Theory to a set of technologies instead of to a set of securities on a stock market (as it is the case in the original model). Assets on the stock market are objects that have risk and return, parameters that depend on uncertain factors and thus are uncertain. The returns from the use of technologies also depend on uncertain factors and thus each technology has a certain amount of risk. The simultaneous use of technologies could diversify the risks that are associated with technologies just the same way as diversification works on the stock market.

  10. Exploring Technology Education: Exploring Energy, Power, and Transportation Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joerschke, John D.

    This guide is part of a series designed to help students learn about technology and teachers organize and improve instruction in technology. The instructional materials are based on the curriculum-alignment concept of first stating the objectives, developing instructional strategies for teaching those objectives, and assessing to those same…

  11. Exploring Technology Education: Exploring Energy, Power, and Transportation Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joerschke, John D.

    This guide is part of a series designed to help students learn about technology and teachers organize and improve instruction in technology. The instructional materials are based on the curriculum-alignment concept of first stating the objectives, developing instructional strategies for teaching those objectives, and assessing to those same…

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a

  13. Energy Crisis, Will Technology Save Us

    ScienceCinema

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2016-07-12

    Will we run out of certain forms of energy, such as oil, and what are the replacement options? How does hydrogen fit into the future U.S. energy picture? What is carbon sequestration and why does it matter? What about sustainable energy sources such as solar, wind and geothermal? John Ziagos, Atmospheric, Earth, and Energy Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and high school teacher Dean Reese present the latest information on the earth's total energy budget to see what forms of energy we will be harnessing in the future. Series: Science on Saturday [6/2008] [Science] [Show ID: 14494

  14. Energy Crisis, Will Technology Save Us

    SciTech Connect

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2008-05-16

    Will we run out of certain forms of energy, such as oil, and what are the replacement options? How does hydrogen fit into the future U.S. energy picture? What is carbon sequestration and why does it matter? What about sustainable energy sources such as solar, wind and geothermal? John Ziagos, Atmospheric, Earth, and Energy Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and high school teacher Dean Reese present the latest information on the earth's total energy budget to see what forms of energy we will be harnessing in the future. Series: Science on Saturday [6/2008] [Science] [Show ID: 14494

  15. Transferring building energy technologies by linking government and private-sector programs

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B.C.

    1990-07-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT) may wish to use existing networks and infrastructures wherever possible to transfer energy-efficiency technologies for buildings. The advantages of relying on already existing networks are numerous. These networks have in place mechanisms for reaching audiences interested in energy-efficiency technologies in buildings. Because staffs in trade and professional organizations and in state and local programs have responsibilities for brokering information for their members or client organizations, they are open to opportunities to improve their performance in information transfer. OBT, as an entity with primarily R D functions, is, by cooperating with other programs, spared the necessity of developing an extensive technology transfer program of its own, thus reinventing the wheel.'' Instead, OBT can minimize its investment in technology transfer by relying extensively on programs and networks already in place. OBT can work carefully with staff in other organizations to support and facilitate their efforts at information transfer and getting energy-efficiency tools and technologies into actual use. Consequently, representatives of some 22 programs and organizations were contacted, and face-to-face conversations held, to explore what the potential might be for transferring technology by linking with OBT. The briefs included in this document were derived from the discussions, the newly published Directory of Energy Efficiency Information Services for the Residential and Commercial Sectors, and other sources provided by respondents. Each brief has been sent to persons contacted for their review and comment one or more times, and each has been revised to reflect the review comments.

  16. Technical descriptions of ten irrigation technologies for conserving energy

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Technical description of ten technologies which were researched to save energy in irrigated agriculture are presented. These technologies are: well design and development ground water supply system optimization, column and pump redesign, variable-speed pumping, pipe network optimization, reduced-pressure center-pivot systems, low-energy precision application, automated gated-pipe system, computerized irrigation scheduling, and instrumented irrigation scheduling. (MHR)

  17. Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  18. E-SMARRT: Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    This factsheet describes the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) program developed by Advanced Technology Institute (ATI). E-SMARRT is a balanced portfolio of projects to address energy-saving opportunities in the metalcasting industry.

  19. Effect of aircraft technology improvements on intercity energy use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An examination of the growth or decline in energy consumption in short haul, high density intercity transportation is made in relation to changes in aeronautical technology. Improvements or changes in the technology of competitive modes are also included. Certain improvements in air traffic control procedures were included to determine their effectiveness in saving energy along with a fuel efficient turboprop short haul aircraft concept.

  20. Electrical Power and Illumination Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in electrical power and illumination systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  1. Thermal Energy for Space Cooling--Federal Technology Alert

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.

    2000-12-31

    Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy-intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off peak hours when electricity rates are lower. This Federal Technology Alert, which is sponsored by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. In addition, it defines the savings potential in the federal sector, presents application advice, and describes the performance experience of specific federal users. The results of a case study of a GSA building using cool storage technology are also provided.

  2. Technology diffusion of energy-related products in residential markets

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.J.; Bruneau, C.L.

    1987-05-01

    Acceptance of energy-related technologies by end residential consumers, manufacturers of energy-related products, and other influential intermediate markets such as builders will influence the potential for market penetration of innovative energy-related technologies developed by the Department of Energy, Office of Building and Community Systems (OBCS). In this report, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the available information on technology adoption, diffusion, and decision-making processes to provide OBCS with a background and understanding of the type of research that has previously been conducted on this topic. Insight was gained as to the potential decision-making criteria and motivating factors that influence the decision-maker(s) selection of new technologies, and some of the barriers to technology adoption faced by potential markets for OBCS technologies.

  3. Missouri Introduction to Energy and Power Technology Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide provides materials for the first high school specialization course beyond the broad-based foundation provided by the Introduction to Industrial Technology and Exploration of Technology courses. Section I is the Instructor's Guide, which contains suggestions about how the energy and power technology cluster might be taught as a course…

  4. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - July 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-01

    This quarterly newsletter is intended for participants and stakeholders in the DOE Solar Program. The content includes features on technology development, market transformation, and policy analysis for solar. Highlights include solar industry updates, DOE funding opportunity announcements and awards, and national laboratory technology developments.

  5. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - September 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    This quarterly newsletter is intended for participants and stakeholders in the DOE Solar Program. The content includes features on technology development, market transformation, and policy analysis for solar. Highlights include solar industry updates, DOE funding opportunity announcements and awards, and national laboratory technology developments.

  6. Residential Energy Efficiency Demonstration: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, L.; Sparn, B.; Rutter, A.; Briggs, D.

    2014-03-01

    In order to meet its energy goals, the Department of Defense (DOD) has partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy-efficiency technologies. The scope of this project was to demonstrate tools and technologies to reduce energy use in military housing, with particular emphasis on measuring and reducing loads related to consumer electronics (commonly referred to as 'plug loads'), hot water, and whole-house cooling.

  7. Energy and Technology Review, July-August 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. C.

    This issue of 'Energy and Technology Review' gives the annual review of the programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This State of the Laboratory issue includes discussions of all major programs: Defense Systems; Laser Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Energy and Earth Sciences; Environmental Technology Program; Biomedical and Environmental Science; Engineering; Physics; Chemistry and Materials Science; Computations; and Administrative and Institutional Services. An index is also given of the 1991 achievements with contact names and telephone number.

  8. Practical Integration Approach and Whole Building Energy Simulation of Three Energy Efficient Building Technologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. P.; Zhivov, A.; Heron, D.; Deru, M.; Benne, K.

    2010-08-01

    Three technologies that have potential to save energy and improve sustainability of buildings are dedicated outdoor air systems, radiant heating and cooling systems and tighter building envelopes. To investigate the energy savings potential of these three technologies, whole building energy simulations were performed for a barracks facility and an administration facility in 15 U.S. climate zones and 16 international locations.

  9. Revising the ECRIN standard requirements for information technology and data management in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The pilot phase of the ECRIN (European Clinical Research Infrastructure Network) certification programme for European data centres, in late 2011, led to a substantial revision of the original ECRIN standards, completed by June 2012. The pilot phase, the conclusions drawn from it and the revised set of standards are described. Issues concerning the further development of standards and related material are discussed, as are the methods available to best support that development. A strategy is outlined based on short-lived specific task groups, established as necessary by a steering group drawn from ECRIN-ERIC. A final section discusses possible future developments. PMID:23561034

  10. Revising the ECRIN standard requirements for information technology and data management in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Cornu, Catherine; Dreß, Jochen; Gueyffier, François; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Nicolis, Enrico B; Wittenberg, Michael

    2013-04-05

    The pilot phase of the ECRIN (European Clinical Research Infrastructure Network) certification programme for European data centres, in late 2011, led to a substantial revision of the original ECRIN standards, completed by June 2012. The pilot phase, the conclusions drawn from it and the revised set of standards are described. Issues concerning the further development of standards and related material are discussed, as are the methods available to best support that development. A strategy is outlined based on short-lived specific task groups, established as necessary by a steering group drawn from ECRIN-ERIC. A final section discusses possible future developments.

  11. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-08-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report summarizes some of the key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (the full report is published under SERI number TP-260-3729). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes in summary these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some example technology transfer activities; and summarizes the Advisory Group's recommendations.

  12. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-07-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report presents key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some 60 example technology transfer activities; and documents the Advisory Group's recommendations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Hill

    2007-07-01

    This plan describes the GNEP Technology Demonstration Program (GNEP-TDP). It has been prepared to guide the development of integrated plans and budgets for realizing the domestic portion of the GNEP vision as well as providing the basis for developing international cooperation. Beginning with the GNEP overall goals, it describes the basic technical objectives for each element of the program, summarizes the technology status and identifies the areas of greatest technical risk. On this basis a proposed technology demonstration program is described that can deliver the required information for a Secretarial decision in the summer of 2008 and support construction of facilities.

  14. Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.; Gelman, R.; Tomberlin, G.; Bain, R.

    2014-03-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

  15. Space power technology applied to the energy problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. L.; Morgan, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A solution to the energy problem is suggested through the technology of photovoltaic electrolysis of water to generate hydrogen. Efficient solar devices are discussed in relation to available solar energy, and photovoltaic energy cost. It is concluded that photovoltaic electrolytic generation of hydrogen will be economically feasible in 1985.

  16. Energy Efficiency for Building Construction Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Intended primarily but not solely for use at the postsecondary level, this curriculum guide contains five units of materials on energy efficiency that were designed to be incorporated into an existing program in building construction. The following topics are examined: conservation measures (residential energy use and methods for reducing…

  17. Integrating Geospatial Technologies in an Energy Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulo, Violet A.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a design-based research study of the implementation of an energy unit developed for middle school students. The unit utilized Google Earth and a geographic information system (GIS) to support student understanding of the world's energy resources and foster their spatial thinking skills. Findings from the prototype study…

  18. Integrating Geospatial Technologies in an Energy Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulo, Violet A.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a design-based research study of the implementation of an energy unit developed for middle school students. The unit utilized Google Earth and a geographic information system (GIS) to support student understanding of the world's energy resources and foster their spatial thinking skills. Findings from the prototype study…

  19. Developing a framework for energy technology portfolio selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoudpour, Hamid; Ashrafi, Maryam

    2012-11-01

    Today, the increased consumption of energy in world, in addition to the risk of quick exhaustion of fossil resources, has forced industrial firms and organizations to utilize energy technology portfolio management tools viewed both as a process of diversification of energy sources and optimal use of available energy sources. Furthermore, the rapid development of technologies, their increasing complexity and variety, and market dynamics have made the task of technology portfolio selection difficult. Considering high level of competitiveness, organizations need to strategically allocate their limited resources to the best subset of possible candidates. This paper presents the results of developing a mathematical model for energy technology portfolio selection at a R&D center maximizing support of the organization's strategy and values. The model balances the cost and benefit of the entire portfolio.

  20. 76 FR 45547 - Notice of Intent To Grant Partially Exclusive License Between the National Energy Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... of Intent To Grant Partially Exclusive License Between the National Energy Technology Laboratory and Envired Systems AGENCY: National Energy Technology Laboratory, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of intent to grant partially exclusive license. SUMMARY: The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL...

  1. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 1, Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    Technologies developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Storage (STOR) Program must be converted into products, processes, or services that benefit the private sector. The process of technology transfer is the primary means of accomplishing this. The purpose of this report is to examine the technology transfer activities of the STOR Program and suggest mechanisms that might make the transfer of technologies from national laboratories and universities to the private sector more effective. A brief summary of recommendations that would improve the effectiveness of the transfer of energy storage technologies from the national laboratories to the private sector is discussed. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Breakthrough Energy Savings with Waterjet Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee W. Saperstein; R. Larry Grayson; David A. Summers; Jorge Garcia-Joo; Greg Sutton; Mike Woodward; T.P. McNulty

    2007-05-15

    Experiments performed at the University of Missouri-Rolla's Waterjet Laboratory have demonstrated clearly the ability of waterjets to disaggregate, in a single step, four different mineral ores, including ores containing iron, lead and copper products. The study focused mainly on galena-bearing dolomite, a lead ore, and compared the new technology with that of traditional mining and milling to liberate the valuable constituent for the more voluminous host rock. The technical term for the disintegration of the ore to achieve this liberation is comminution. The potential for energy savings if this process can be improved, is immense. Further, if this separation can be made at the mining face, then the potential energy savings include avoidance of transportation (haulage and hoisting) costs to move, process and store this waste at the surface. The waste can, instead, be disposed into the available cavities within the mine. The savings also include the elimination of the comminution, crushing and grinding, stages in the processing plant. Future prototype developments are intended to determine if high-pressure waterjet mining and processing can be optimized to become cheaper than traditional fragmentation by drilling and blasting and to optimize the separation process. The basic new mining process was illustrated in tests on two local rock types, a low-strength sandstone with hematite inclusions, and a medium to high-strength dolomite commonly used for construction materials. Illustrative testing of liberation of minerals, utilized a lead-bearing dolomite, and included a parametric study of the optimal conditions needed to create a size distribution considered best for separation. The target goal was to have 50 percent of the mined material finer than 100 mesh (149 microns). Of the 21 tests that were run, five clearly achieved the target. The samples were obtained as run-of-mine lumps of ore, which exhibited a great deal of heterogeneity within the samples. This, in

  3. The Beamed Energy Technology Working Group, Programs and Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A brief description of the Beamed Energy Technology Program will be given. Its relationship to the overall Advanced Technology Program at Marshall Space Flight Center will be discussed. A summary description of the known potential benefits and technical issues remaining in the development of a viable system will be presented along with program plans for a NASA Research Announcement in FY03 to begin development of relevant technologies and systems concepts. The results of workshop activity by the Beamed Energy Technology Working Group will be provided.

  4. The Beamed Energy Technology Working Group, Programs and Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A brief description of the Beamed Energy Technology Program will be given. Its relationship to the overall Advanced Technology Program at Marshall Space Flight Center will be discussed. A summary description of the known potential benefits and technical issues remaining in the development of a viable system will be presented along with program plans for a NASA Research Announcement in FY03 to begin development of relevant technologies and systems concepts. The results of workshop activity by the Beamed Energy Technology Working Group will be provided.

  5. Climate Change Technology Scenarios: Energy, Emissions, and Economic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Placet, Marylynn; Humphreys, Kenneth K.; Mahasenan, N Maha

    2004-08-15

    This report describes three advanced technology scenarios and various illustrative cases developed by staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program. These scenarios and illustrative cases explore the energy, emissions and economic implications of using advanced energy technologies and other climate change related technologies to reduce future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The cases were modeled using the Mini Climate Assessment Model (MiniCAM) developed by PNNL. The report describes the scenarios, the specifications for the cases, and the results. The report also provides background information on current emissions of GHGs and issues associated with stabilizing GHG concentrations.

  6. Energy Technologies for the Markets of the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, R

    2001-10-01

    Energy is the fuel of economic development. Yet, this is lost on the over 2 billion people in the world without access to commercial energy, most in rural areas. Meeting their needs, along with the growing needs of the population already with access, provides very large markets for energy and energy services. Studies have repeatedly shown that technology is the single most important historical driver for productivity growth. Technology is also at the heart of the goals spelled out in the World Energy Council's Statement 2000 [l]: accessibility of reliable and affordable modern energy services for all the world's inhabitants; availability of high-quality reliable delivered energy; and acceptability of energy resources produced and used in harmony with the local, regional, and global environment. With this in mind, the World Energy Council (WEC) at the time of the 17th Congress in Houston decided to identify and examine some of the energy technologies that might sustain the world in the 21st century. This effort would examine steps that might be taken to ensure that these new technologies are available to the marketplace, and what role governments and industry might play to ensure this availability. The WEC launched a major study in 1999, Energy Technologies for the 21st Century, conducted by a study group composed of international energy experts [2]. The first part of the study examined trends in public and private research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) spending over the past 15 years to determine what has been happening with the resource base for future development. Improvements in energy technologies are attained through active RD&D performed now, in advance of their implementation. Energy RD&D also provides insurance against potential impacts such as climate change, oil price shocks, and disruptions in the energy distribution system [3]. This part of the study sought to answer the questions: What is the current situation with respect to energy RD&D and

  7. Energy conservation technologies based on thermodynamic principles

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Masaru

    1996-12-31

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission to prevent global warming, the most promising way for electric generation in the Northeast Asia is to introduce cogeneration and {open_quotes}repowering{close_quotes} technologies based on high temperature gas turbines fueled by natural gas. Especially the old type coal burning boiler-steam turbine plants should be retrofit by introducing gas turbines to become highly efficient combined cycle. Same technologies should be applied to the old garbage incineration plants and/or even to the nuclear power plants. The exhaust heat or steam should become much increased and it should be utilized as the process heat for industries or heat supply as the distinct heating or cooling for residential area. This paper introduces a brief survey of these new technologies.

  8. Assessment of some energy technologies associated with solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarbanel, H. D.; Case, K. M.; Flatte, S. M.; Nierenberg, W. A.; Watson, K. M.

    1981-10-01

    In this report we present our study of three alternative energy generation concepts which employ solar energy in some part of the system. We will discuss these subjects: Salinity Gradient Solar Ponds, Osmotic Membrane Power Generation, and Thermochemical Storage and Transport. The treatment of these items is not uniform. The report will emphasize the ponds, briefly dwell on Osmotic Membranes and only touch on the third topic. This, in fact, reflects the assessment of the potential of the three concepts.

  9. [Hemostasis and technology. Energy. Development of new technologies].

    PubMed

    Balagué, Carmen

    2009-06-01

    The hemostasis systems applied in surgery are based on endothermic heat production resulting from the interaction between energy and tissue. The most frequently used energy source is electrocoagulation, applied through two systems: monopolar and bipolar. More sophisticated electrocoagulation systems have progressively been developed such as the Argon beam, in which coagulation is superficial and does not injure the deep tissues, or LigaSure, based on the use of a bipolar system with an inbuilt feedback system allowing vessels to be sealed without excessive heat and a consequent reduction of collateral lesions. Another system that has been developed in the last few years is the ultrasonic scalpel, based on the ability of the cell membrane proteins to denature as a result of ultrasonic vibration. This system avoids some of the risks involved in the use of electrical energy such as accidental burns due to stray electrical current or faulty insulation of an instrument. Moreover, the harmonic scalpel reaches a temperature of no more than 100 degrees and the effect of lateral tissue destruction is much lower than with electrosurgery, although this reduction is negligible when compared with the electrosurgical methods developed in the last few years such as LigaSure. Another system that is also used is laser energy, consisting of a photon beam containing a specific wavelength; each photon moves in step with the others in both time and space. This system has not become widely used due to its high cost, the difficulty of controlling this type of energy, and the lack of objective advantages over conventional electrosurgery.

  10. Maximizing Residential Energy Savings: Net Zero Energy House (ZEH) Technology Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Roberts, D.

    2008-11-01

    To meet current U.S. Department of Energy zero-energy home performance goals, new technologies and solutions must increase whole-house efficiency savings by an additional 40% relative to those provided by best available components and systems.

  11. Innovation on Energy Power Technology (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Susumu; Kakishima, Masayoshi

    After the last war, the output of single Steam Turbine Generator produced by the own technology in Japan returned to a prewar level. Electric power companies imported the large-capacity high efficiency Steam Turbine Generator from the foreign manufacturers in order to support the sudden increase of electric power demand. On the other hand, they decided to produce those in our own country to improve industrial technology. The domestic production of large-capacity 125MW Steam Turbine Generator overcome much difficulty and did much contribution for the later domestic technical progress.

  12. Our prodigal sun. [solar energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Characteristics of the sun are reported indicating it as a source of energy. Data from several space missions are discussed, and the solar activity cycle is presented. The corona, flares, prominences, spots, and wind of the sun are also discussed.

  13. Energy and Technology Review, November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.; Crawford, R.; Gleason, K.; Hendry, D.P.; Sanford, N.M.; Taft, S.O.

    1988-01-01

    This review by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains papers related to: cratering phenomenology revealed through discrete-element modeling; high-intensity short-pulse lasers; localized transmission of wave energy; and evidence of localized wave transmission.

  14. Space assets, technology and services in support of energy policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, C. A.; Adriaensen, M.; Bretel, A.; Duvaux-Bechon, I.; Giannopapa, C. G.

    2017-09-01

    Space can be used as a tool by decision and policy makers in developing, implementing and monitoring various policy areas including resource management, environment, transport, security and energy. This paper focuses on the role of space for the energy policy. Firstly, the paper summarizes the European Union's (EU) main objectives in energy policy enclosed in the Energy Strategy 2020-2030-2050 and demonstrates how space assets can contribute to achieving those objectives. Secondly, the paper addresses how the European Space Agency (ESA) has established multiple initiatives and programs that directly finance the development of space assets, technology and applications that deliver services in support of the EU energy policy and sector. These efforts should be continued and strengthened in order to overcome identified technological challenges. The use of space assets, technology and applications, can help achieve the energy policy objectives for the next decades.

  15. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, China: Energy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    described. The hybrid breeder can provide sufficient fuel for a PWR or FBR. A system consisting of fusion-fission hybrid breeders and PWRs or FBRs is...deuterium, tritium ) as a clean energy source with an extremely abundant fuel supply. The development and application of fusion energy is a very difficult... tritium combustion, will be reached in the near future. However, the commercialization of fusion is still a long way off, probably by the middle of the

  16. JPRS Report, Science & Technology. China: Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-28

    have water resources that could be used for small hydropower stations during the Eighth 5-Year Plan period , was launched. The programme could...million tons of standard coal through energy conservation over a ten year period was one-third that of developing that amount of energy resources, a...which is responsible for issuing laws and regulations, and for planning, and also held periodic conferences with the two major systems to assure

  17. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, China: Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to exchange goods for energy on the international market . For this reason, both ends of this region’s production process -- import of raw materials...object saying that in a situation in which all the countries of the world are striving to reduce their dependence on the world’s energy market ...nanyao, perfume , and so on, and the Simao forest product base area. According to the information, the Manwan Hydropower Station which now has 18

  18. How might renewable energy technologies fit in the food-water-energy nexus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmark, R. L.; Macknick, J.; Heath, G.; Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Roberts, B.

    2011-12-01

    Feeding the growing population in the U.S. will require additional land for crop and livestock production. Similarly, a growing population will require additional sources of energy. Renewable energy is likely to play an increased role in meeting the new demands of electricity consumers. Renewable energy technologies can differ from conventional technologies in their operation and their siting locations. Many renewable energy technologies have a lower energy density than conventional technologies and can also have large land use requirements. Much of the prime area suitable for renewable energy development in the U.S. has historically been used for agricultural production, and there is some concern that renewable energy installations could displace land currently producing food crops. In addition to requiring vast expanses of land, both agriculture and renewable energy can require water. The agriculture and energy sectors are responsible for the majority of water withdrawals in the U.S. Increases in both agricultural and energy demand can lead to increases in water demands, depending on crop management and energy technologies employed. Water is utilized in the energy industry primarily for power plant cooling, but it is also required for steam cycle processes and cleaning. Recent characterizations of water use by different energy and cooling system technologies demonstrate the choice of fuel and cooling system technologies can greatly impact the withdrawals and the consumptive use of water in the energy industry. While some renewable and conventional technology configurations can utilize more water per unit of land than irrigation-grown crops, other renewable technology configurations utilize no water during operations and could lead to reduced stress on water resources. Additionally, co-locating agriculture and renewable energy production is also possible with many renewable technologies, avoiding many concerns about reductions in domestic food production. Various

  19. Energy/environment/technology two visions, two directions

    SciTech Connect

    Fox-Penner, P.

    1995-12-31

    This paper compares the energy policies proposed by the U.S. Congress and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Connections between energy, economy, environment, and technology are discussed in some detail. The National Energy Policy Plan of the DOE is summarized, and the impact of budget cuts proposed by Congress are projected. Aspects of the DOE plan which are emphasized include research and development, minimization of regulation, and eliminating redundant government and private industry efforts. 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Proceedings of the second international symposium on nonconventional energy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on emerging energy systems. Topics considered at the symposium included a quantum ramjet for interstellar flight, oil and gas exploration, advanced propulsion technology, motional field generators, electromagnetics, the fundamental properties of matter, magnetic monopoles, controlled fusion, ball lighting, homopolar faraday generator, free energy, fundamental ac energy and power measurement techniques in non-conventional energy, advanced alternators, ambient temperature superconducting filaments, and geometrical models of field wave forms.

  1. JPRS Report, Science and Technology, China: Energy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-06

    discussion and clarification. A nuclear power plant is a technologically intensive project and there are inherent risks in its operation. For this reason...Canadian Government agencies and private companies, began what Webb describes as their "independent and bankable " feasibil- ity studies on the project in

  2. Black Contributors to Science and Energy Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Public Affairs.

    Presents biographical and pictorial information about 12 black scientists and inventors who were selected to serve as models for children who have little opportunity to learn of black contributions to science and technology, and as motivation for students who are uncertain about continuing their studies or about selecting professions. Much of…

  3. Wind Energy Technology: Training a Sustainable Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krull, Kimberly W.; Graham, Bruce; Underbakke, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Through innovative teaching and technology, industry and educational institution partnerships, Cloud County Community College is preparing a qualified workforce for the emerging wind industry estimated to create 80,000 jobs by 2020. The curriculum blends on-campus, on-line and distance learning, land-lab, and field training opportunities for…

  4. Black Contributors to Science and Energy Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Public Affairs.

    Presents biographical and pictorial information about 12 black scientists and inventors who were selected to serve as models for children who have little opportunity to learn of black contributions to science and technology, and as motivation for students who are uncertain about continuing their studies or about selecting professions. Much of…

  5. Wind Energy Technology: Training a Sustainable Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krull, Kimberly W.; Graham, Bruce; Underbakke, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Through innovative teaching and technology, industry and educational institution partnerships, Cloud County Community College is preparing a qualified workforce for the emerging wind industry estimated to create 80,000 jobs by 2020. The curriculum blends on-campus, on-line and distance learning, land-lab, and field training opportunities for…

  6. Issues in transferring US energy technologies to developing nations

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Brown, M.A.; Samuels, G.

    1986-01-01

    To stimulate discussion of potentials for and mechanisms of technology transfer from the US to developing nations, this paper draws upon two bodies of experience at ORNL: (1) a wide variety of technical assistance activities supported by the US Agency for International Development (AID), helping AID-assisted developing nations improve their energy planning, policy formulation, and applications of fossil and renewable energy options; and (2) a wide variety of technology transfer related activities, ranging from (1) assistance to buildings energy conservation programs of the US Department of Energy in improving the transfer of new technologies from the nation's R and D system to commercial users to (2) research to improve the general understanding of the technology transfer process, especially from R and D institutions to commercial developers. Using three energy options of current interest to AID as examples (carbonized coal briquettes to meet residential and commercial sector energy needs, wood gasification to power stationary internal combustion engines, and rural electrification), the paper illustrates the importance of several dimensions often neglected in engineering-economic analysis, such as institutional requirements and a relatively detailed understanding of market segments. Unless such dimensions are incorporated effectively into technology transfer efforts by US developers, relatively little success should be expected either in expanding markets for US technology or in helping developing nations meet their energy needs.

  7. Energy Utilization Technology Curriculum Materials FY 91. Illinois Plan for Industrial Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Dennis; Welty, Kenneth

    This document contains technology-based learning activities for the Illinois energy utilization technology course at the orientation level (grades 9 and 10). This packet includes a course rationale, course mission statement, course description, course outline, suggested learning objectives for each of the energy utilization areas, and suggested…

  8. Energy Utilization Technology Curriculum Materials FY 91. Illinois Plan for Industrial Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Dennis; Welty, Kenneth

    This document contains technology-based learning activities for the Illinois energy utilization technology course at the orientation level (grades 9 and 10). This packet includes a course rationale, course mission statement, course description, course outline, suggested learning objectives for each of the energy utilization areas, and suggested…

  9. 78 FR 31997 - Greatmat Technology Corp., Kentucky USA Energy, Inc., Solar Energy Ltd., and Visiphor Corp...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... COMMISSION Greatmat Technology Corp., Kentucky USA Energy, Inc., Solar Energy Ltd., and Visiphor Corp., Order... lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Solar Energy Ltd. because it has... concerning the securities of Kentucky USA Energy, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since...

  10. ENERGY SMART SCHOOLS - APPLIED RESEARCH, FIELD TESTING, AND TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kate Burke

    2004-01-01

    This multi-state collaborative project will coordinate federal, state, and private sector resources and high-priority school-related energy research under a comprehensive initiative that includes tasks that increase adoption of advanced energy efficiency high-performance technologies in both renovation of existing schools and building new ones; educate and inform school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide as to the energy, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improve the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in schools.

  11. Energy intensity, electricity consumption, and advanced manufacturing-technology usage

    SciTech Connect

    Doms, M.E.; Dunne, T.

    1995-07-01

    This article reports on the relationship between the usage of advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs) and energy consumption patterns in manufacturing plants. Using data from the Survey of Manufacturing Technology and the 1987 Census of Manufactures, we model the energy intensity and the electricity intensity of plants as functions of AMT usage and plant age. The main findings are that plants that utilize AMTs are less-energy intensive than plants not using AMTs, but consume proportionately more electricity as a fuel source. Additionally, older plants are generally more energy intensive and rely on fossil fuels to a greater extent than younger plants. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Tillemann, Levi; Beck, Fredric; Brodrick, James; Brown, Austin; Feldman, David; Nguyen, Tien; Ward, Jacob

    2013-09-17

    For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. But even as costs fell and technology matured, a clean energy revolution always seemed just out of reach. Critics often said a clean energy future would "always be five years away." This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market, they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic modules, LED lighting, and electric vehicles.

  13. Flywheel Energy Storage Technology Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Frederick J.

    2001-01-01

    A flywheel energy storage system was spun to 60,000 rpm while levitated on magnetic bearings. This system is being developed as an energy-efficient replacement for chemical battery systems. Used in groups, the flywheels can have two functions providing attitude control for a spacecraft in orbit as well as providing energy storage. The first application for which the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing the flywheel is the International Space Station, where a two-flywheel system will replace one of the nickel-hydrogen battery strings in the space station's power system. The 60,000-rpm development rotor is about one-eighth the size that will be needed for the space station (0.395 versus 3.07 kWhr).

  14. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - First Quarter 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-22

    The first quarter 2010 edition of the Solar Energy Technologies Program newsletter summarizes the activities for the past three months, funding opportunities, highlights from the national labs, and upcoming events.

  15. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema

    INL

    2016-07-12

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  16. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - Fourth Quarter 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2009-12-31

    The Fourth Quarter 2009 edition of the Solar Energy Technologies Program newsletter summarizes the activities for the past three months, funding opportunities, highlights from the national labs, and upcoming events.

  17. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    INL

    2008-05-30

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  18. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, China: Energy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the region consumes 20 percent of the world’s energy. Based on "Asian Pacific Statistical Annuals" of the United Nations, in the 23-year period from...to 2.16 billion tons of coal equivalent. Over the same period , the production of energy rose from only 680 million tons of coal equivalent to 2.04...of the gross value of production in developed countries was 4.7 percent. In the same period , the growth in the Asian Pacific region, including

  19. Technology Teachers' Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy and Their Implications for Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Yang, Hsiu-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to explore high-school (grades 10-12) technology teachers' attitudes toward nuclear energy and their implications to technology education. A questionnaire was developed to solicit 323 high-school technology teachers' responses in June 2013 and 132 (or 41%) valid questionnaires returned. Consequently, the following…

  20. Progress in cryocooler technology and energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, D.N.; Sager, R.E.

    1983-06-01

    Although some superconducting devices are now used commercially, the major obstacle to the widespread use of superconducting technology is the requirement for expensive and inconvenient refrigeration systems. The authors have made significant progress toward the development of a small, low-power, Stirling-cycle cryocooler capable of cooling small devices to superconducting temperatures. The primary limitation on the low temperature performance of Stirling cycle cryocoolers is the lack of proper regeneration of the working fluid at low temperatures. The authors have experimented with several innovative techniques for improving the low-temperature regeneration of their cooler, and the results of those experiments are discussed. Unprecedented temperatures less than 6K in a magnetically clean system have been achieved, well within the required operating range for SQUID devices. The authors expect that the availability of convenient, low-cost cryocoolers will rapidly introduce superconducting technology into a wide range of scientific and commercial applications. Some of these potential applications are discussed.

  1. Energy Technology Maturation Act of 2017

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Lujan Grisham, Michelle [D-NM-1

    2017-09-12

    09/12/2017 Referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and in addition to the Committee on Armed Services, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee... (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Energy Technology Maturation Act of 2017

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Lujan Grisham, Michelle [D-NM-1

    2017-09-12

    House - 09/12/2017 Referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and in addition to the Committee on Armed Services, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the... (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Guide to Employing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficient Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    issued foam pad between the panels  Remove any debris from the cases before packaging  Make sure that the lids to all components are properly closed...Government- issued Technical Manuals nor is this knowledge intended to replace any existing tactical warfighting fundamentals. d. Our goal is to...Section 4 – Solar Energy Basics ................................................. 12 Photovoltaic (PV) Systems

  4. Building Design Guidelines for Solar Energy Technologies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Givoni, B.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main objectives to this publication. The first is to find out the communalities in the experience gained in previous studies and in actual applications of solar technologies in buildings, residential as well as nonresidential. The second objective is to review innovative concepts and products which may have an impact on future developments and applications of solar technologies in buildings. The available information and common lessons were collated and presented in a form which, hopefully, is useful for architects and solar engineers, as well as for teachers of "solar architecture" and students in Architectural Schools. The publication is based mainly on the collection and analysis of relevant information. The information included previous studies in which the performance of solar buildings was evaluated, as well as the personal experience of the Author and the research consultants. The state of the art, as indicated by these studies and personal experience, was summarized and has served as basis for the development of the Design Guidelines. In addition to the summary of the state of the art, as was already applied in solar buildings, an account was given of innovative concepts and products. Such innovations have occurred in the areas of thermal storage by Phase Change Materials (PCM) and in glazing with specialized or changeable properties. Interesting concepts were also developed for light transfer, which may enable to transfer sunlight to the core areas of large multi story nonresidential buildings. These innovations may have a significant impact on future developments of solar technologies and their applications in buildings.

  5. Public Policy, Technology Adoption, and Aggregate Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, W.; Kopp, R.J.; Morgenstern, R.D.; Pizer, W.A.; Shih, J.S.

    1999-04-01

    This research examines the factors that influence the adoption of new energy-saving technologies among U.S. manufacturing plants and explores their potential impact on aggregate energy efficiency. We conduct this analysis using two models: a conventional diffusion model and a stand-alone model of new technology adoption we develop in this paper. The latter model allows us to compute effects on aggregate efficiency based solely on adoption data.

  6. Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    The Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT) was established to advance the state of the art in knowledge and education on critical technologies that support a renewable energy future. Our research and education efforts have focused on alternative energy systems, energy storage systems, and research on battery and hybrid energy storage systems.This report details the Center's progress in the following specific areas: Development of a battery laboratory; Development of a demonstration system for compressed air energy storage; Development of electric propulsion test systems; Battery storage systems; Thermal management of battery packs; and Construction of a micro-grid to support real-world performance monitoring of a renewable energy system.

  7. 21st Century Energy Technology Deployment Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Bingaman, Jeff [D-NM

    2009-04-30

    04/30/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (text of measure as introduced: CR S4971-4976) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, China: Energy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    For example, the IIASA [International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis] energy model, which is based on economic development and population...Like the IIASA model, the model described here was based on scenarios, including human computations and decisions, computer calculations, and direct

  9. Technology, market and policy aspects of geothermal energy in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortall, Ruth; Uihlein, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET-Plan) is the technology pillar of the EU's energy and climate policy. The goal of the SET-Plan is to achieve EU worldwide leadership in the production of energy technological solutions capable of delivering EU 2020 and 2050 targets for a low carbon economy. The Joint Research Centre (JRC) runs and manages the SET-Plan Information System (SETIS) to support the SET-Plan. Under SETIS, the JRC publishes a number of regularly updated key references on the state of low carbon technology, research and innovation in Europe. Within the framework of the SET-Plan, the geothermal sector is placed into context with other power and heat generation technologies. The talk will give an introduction to some of JRC's geothermal research activities. Amongst others, the JRC Geothermal status report will be presented. This report aims to contribute to the general knowledge about the geothermal sector, its technology, economics and policies, with a focus on innovation, research, development and deployment activities as well as policy support schemes within the European Union. The speech will present the main findings of the report, providing an overview of the activities and progress made by the geothermal energy sector, the status of its sub-technologies and current developments. In addition, the speech will discuss the economic, market and policy aspects of geothermal energy for power production, direct use and ground source heat pumps in Europe and beyond.

  10. Methane mitigation timelines to inform energy technology evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mandira; Edwards, Morgan R.; Trancik, Jessika E.

    2015-11-01

    Energy technologies emitting differing proportions of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) vary significantly in their relative climate impacts over time, due to the distinct atmospheric lifetimes and radiative efficiencies of the two gases. Standard technology comparisons using the global warming potential (GWP) with a fixed time horizon do not account for the timing of emissions in relation to climate policy goals. Here we develop a portfolio optimization model that incorporates changes in technology impacts based on the temporal proximity of emissions to a radiative forcing (RF) stabilization target. An optimal portfolio, maximizing allowed energy consumption while meeting the RF target, is obtained by year-wise minimization of the marginal RF impact in an intended stabilization year. The optimal portfolio calls for using certain higher-CH4-emitting technologies prior to an optimal switching year, followed by CH4-light technologies as the stabilization year approaches. We apply the model to evaluate transportation technology pairs and find that accounting for dynamic emissions impacts, in place of using the static GWP, can result in CH4 mitigation timelines and technology transitions that allow for significantly greater energy consumption while meeting a climate policy target. The results can inform the forward-looking evaluation of energy technologies by engineers, private investors, and policy makers.

  11. Wind Energy at NREL's National Wind Technology Center

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    It is a pure, plentiful natural resource. Right now wind is in high demand and it holds the potential to transform the way we power our homes and businesses. NREL is at the forefront of wind energy research and development. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is a world-class facility dedicated to accelerating and deploying wind technology.

  12. Energy efficient industrial technology in Europe: A compendium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, A. G.; McGee, M. J.

    1982-05-01

    Energy efficient industrial technologies currently in use in Europe are described. Gas-fired equipment in West Germany, France, and the United Kingdom is emphasized. Some of these technologies are unique and some are currently available in the United States. Load management, cogeneration, heat recovery, and various industrial processes are discussed.

  13. Advanced component technologies for energy-efficient turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reviews NASA's Energy Efficient Engine Project which was initiated to provide the advanced technology base for a new generation of fuel-conservative engines for introduction into airline service by the late 1980s. Efforts in this project are directed at advancing engine component and systems technologies to a point of demonstrating technology-readiness by 1984. Early results indicate high promise in achieving most of the goals established in the project.

  14. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains the appendices to Technology Transfer Recommendations for the US Department of Energy's Storage Program (PNL-6484, Vol. 1). These appendices are a list of projects, publications, and presentations connected with the Energy Storage (STOR) program. In Volume 1, the technology transfer activities of the STOR program are examined and mechanisms for increasing the effectiveness of those activities are recommended.

  15. Energy Surety Microgrids (trademark) Supporting Renewable Technologies and Energy Assurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-30

    Small combustion and µ-turbines Fuel cells IC engines Small hydro and wind Solar electric and solar thermal Energy storage (batteries, flywheels...assurance (safety, security, reliability) • Facilitates integration of renewable resources and DG • Offers opportunities for CHP /Tri-power – greater...400 KW 600 KW B B B C NG ES 3xx CHP ES C Static switch and controls to isolate Microgrid from utility during outages Use breakers

  16. Municipal waste-to-energy technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R.E.; Krause, H.H., Jr.; Engdahl, R.B.; Levy, A.; Oxley, J.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Two major technologies are available to burn municipal solid waste (MSW) to generate steam for the production of electricity: mass-burn and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) systems. Mass-burn systems process as-received waste directly in a combustor, such as a reciprocating, rotary, or roller-grate furnace, with only limited removal of undesirable objects. Refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) systems first process the waste to produce refuse-derived fuel via shredding and other operations before combustion in spreader-stoker, fluidized-bed, and other suitable combustors. Although mass-burn systems with specially designed grates are now considered proven technology, there is much interest in RDF systems, because RDF can be used in a wide range of combustors, including some utility power plants of conventional design. However, a number of technical issues remain for both mass-burn and RDF-firing systems, and further research is warranted. Disposal of the ash residues from the combustor and/or the waste from the air-pollution control equipment is a major issue preventing more widespread use of this technology. Selection of materials of construction is also an important issue. Continuous-emission-monitoring requirements may be exceeding the technical capabilities for reliable, long-term operation. The occasional receipt of biologically active waste or waste containing heavy metals is still a troublesome issue. Dioxin emissions seem to be a problem only in plants of early design, although the issue of dioxin emissions continues to be a major one in permit applications and public relations. 58 refs., 28 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Building design guidelines for solar energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Givoni, B.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main objectives to this publication. The first is to find out the communalities in the experience gained in previous studies and in actual applications of solar technologies in buildings, residential as well as nonresidential. The second objective is to review innovative concepts and products which may have an impact on future developments and applications of solar technologies in buildings. The available information and common lessons were collated and presented in a form which, hopefully, is useful for architects and solar engineers, as well as for teachers of solar architecture'' and students in Architectural Schools. The publication is based mainly on the collection and analysis of relevant information. The information included previous studies in which the performance of solar buildings was evaluated, as well as the personal experience of the Author and the research consultants. The state of the art, as indicated by these studies and personal experience, was summarized and has served as basis for the development of the Design Guidelines. In addition to the summary of the state of the art, as was already applied in solar buildings, an account was given of innovative concepts and products. Such innovations have occurred in the areas of thermal storage by Phase Change Materials (PCM) and in glazing with specialized or changeable properties. Interesting concepts were also developed for light transfer, which may enable to transfer sunlight to the core areas of large multi story nonresidential buildings. These innovations may have a significant impact on future developments of solar technologies and their applications in buildings. 15 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Energy and technology review, March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bookless, W.A.; Wheatcraft, D.

    1995-03-01

    This journal contains two feature articles. The first article reports on the background, design, and capabilities of the Portable Tritium Processing System currently being used to clean up and decontaminate the Laboratory`s Tritium Facility. The second article discusses the development of a x-ray lasers as a probe to obtain high-resolution images of high-density plasmas produced at the Nova laser facility. Finally, two research programs are highlighted. They are silicon microcomponents and modern technology for advanced military training.

  19. Energy Efficient Engine acoustic supporting technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavin, S. P.; Ho, P. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The acoustic development of the Energy Efficient Engine combined testing and analysis using scale model rigs and an integrated Core/Low Spool demonstration engine. The scale model tests show that a cut-on blade/vane ratio fan with a large spacing (S/C = 2.3) is as quiet as a cut-off blade/vane ratio with a tighter spacing (S/C = 1.27). Scale model mixer tests show that separate flow nozzles are the noisiest, conic nozzles the quietest, with forced mixers in between. Based on projections of ICLS data the Energy Efficient Engine (E3) has FAR 36 margins of 3.7 EPNdB at approach, 4.5 EPNdB at full power takeoff, and 7.2 EPNdB at sideline conditions.

  20. JPRS Report. Science & Technology, China: Energy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-03

    thus accelerating their desertification , and the expansion of desert area and the shift in the rain belt caused by so rapid a change in air...level. The coal supply areas are primarily in Shanxi, western Inner Mongolia , Shaanxi, Ningxia, and western Henan, while the energy-poor areas of the...Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, covers 32,000 sq km. The field boasts reserves of 239 billion tons of high quality coal, which has a low ash and

  1. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, China: Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-18

    EC Database on Energy Policy Inaugurated [EC PRESS RELEASE, 16 Dec 87] 17 FACTORY AUTOMATION, ROBOTICS FRG’s Nixdorf, Volkswagen Share CIM...because research is still primarily conducted on a theo - retical level, although a few industrial companies have already brought out several...developed a prototype printer which uses ferrofluids instead of ink. Hitachi protects the hard disks of auxiliary memories by mag- netic-liquid

  2. JPRS Report, Science & Technology. China: Energy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    January-August Percentage increase in total for January-August compared to same period in 1991 Total Monthly Total production of energy resources...particular during periods of coal shortages, the quality of coal has continually JPRS-CEN-92-013 24 December 1992 NATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS declined...grids are large generators 125MW and larger. During the 5-year period , 45.000MW in new thermal power gener- ators will be placed into operation

  3. Understanding energy consumption: Beyond technology and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhite, H.; Shove, E.

    1998-07-01

    This paper summarizes two years of efforts among a cross-disciplinary group of senior researchers to bring social and cultural perspectives to modeling of household energy consumption. The work has been organized by the Center for Energy Studies of the University of Geneva. The researchers represent both the physical and social sciences, several institutions and a number of countries. The initiative was based on an acknowledgement of the failure of technical and economic models to explain consumption or more importantly, how consumption patterns change. Technical and economic models most often either ignore social and cultural issues or reduce them to parameters of other variables. An important objective for the Geneva Group has been to engage modelers and social scientists in a dialogue which brings social and cultural context to the fore. The process reveals interesting insights into the frictions of cross-disciplinary interaction and the emergence of new perspectives. Various classical modeling approaches have been discussed and rejected. Gradually, a framework has emerged which says something about the appropriate institutions and actors which contribute to consumption patterns; about how they are related; and finally about how the interinstitutional relationships and the consumption patterns themselves change. A key point of convergence is that a complete understanding of energy end-use will not be possible from an analysis directed at the point of end use alone. The analysis must incorporate what happens inside institutions like manufacturers, retailers, and public policy organizations as well as how those organizations interact with consumers, including media and advertising. Progress towards a better understanding of energy consumption requires a greater engagement of social scientists with these heretofore little explored actors an relationships.

  4. New technology for traveling with less energy

    SciTech Connect

    Oman, H.

    1997-12-31

    Better airplane performance came from jet engines with turbine blades that operate in a 1426 C (2600 F) inlet-gas temperature. An important by-product of this development is the aeroderivative gas turbine, which when installed in a combined-cycle power plant, converts natural-gas energy to electric power with 60% efficiency. Independent power producers are selling this power for 3 cents per kWh. Another new and pertinent development has been computer simulation which predicts the aerodynamic performance of a given design. The Raven, a human-powered airplane with a 100-mile nonstop range, illustrates the usefulness of modeling. It uses a carbon-fiber reinforced structure. The resulting airplane, with a 35-meter (115-foot) wingspan, weighs only 34 kg (75 pounds). Ten years ago the author had calculated the cost of traveling 1609 km (1000 miles) in 12 different vehicles. The cost energy for this travel ranged from $127.40 to $3.29. Now a battery-powered electric bicycle offers the lowest energy cost for the trip--$2.12.

  5. Energy technology X: a decade of progress. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.F.

    1983-06-01

    The characterization, development, and availability of various energy sources for large scale energy production are discussed. Attention is given to government, industry, and international policies on energy resource development and implementation. Techniques for energy analysis, planning, and regulation are examined, with consideration given to conservation practices, military energy programs, and financing schemes. Efficient energy use is examined, including energy and load management, building retrofits, and cogeneration installations, as well as waste heat recovery. The state of the art of nuclear, fossil, and geothermal power extraction is investigated, with note taken of synthetic fuels, fluidized bed combustion, and pollution control in coal-powered plants. Finally, progress in renewable energy technologies, including solar heating and cooling, biomass, and large and small wind energy conversion devices is described.

  6. Verification Testing of Air Pollution Control Technology Quality Management Plan Revision 2.3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center was established in 1995 as part of the EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program to accelerate the development and commercialization of improved environmental technologies’ performance.

  7. MHD--Developing New Technology to Meet the Energy Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Sandra S.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics is a technology that could utilize the nation's most abundant fossil fuel and produce electrical energy more efficiently and cleanly than present-day turbines. A national research and development program is ongoing in Butte, Montana at the Montana Energy and MHD Research and Development Institute (MERDI). (Author/RK)

  8. MHD--Developing New Technology to Meet the Energy Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Sandra S.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics is a technology that could utilize the nation's most abundant fossil fuel and produce electrical energy more efficiently and cleanly than present-day turbines. A national research and development program is ongoing in Butte, Montana at the Montana Energy and MHD Research and Development Institute (MERDI). (Author/RK)

  9. Technology Readiness Assessment of Department of Energy Waste Processing Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-11

    environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. Energy Security: Promoting America’s energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable...innovations in science and technology Nuclear Security: Ensuring America’s nuclear security Environmental Responsibility: Protecting the environment by...providing a responsible resolution to the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production 3 What Exactly Does EM Do? The Office of Environmental

  10. Energy demand analytics using coupled technological and economic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of a range of policy scenarios on end-use energy demand are examined using a coupling of MARKAL, an energy system model with extensive supply and end-use technological detail, with Inforum LIFT, a large-scale model of the us. economy with inter-industry, government, and c...

  11. Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided more than $36 billion to the Department of Energy (DOE) to accelerate work on existing projects, undertake new and transformative research, and deploy clean energy technologies across the nation. Of this funding, $1029 million is supporting innovative work to advance biomass research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

  12. Energy demand analytics using coupled technological and economic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of a range of policy scenarios on end-use energy demand are examined using a coupling of MARKAL, an energy system model with extensive supply and end-use technological detail, with Inforum LIFT, a large-scale model of the us. economy with inter-industry, government, and c...

  13. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  14. Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

  15. Battery technologies for large-scale stationary energy storage.

    PubMed

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, with the deployment of renewable energy sources, advances in electrified transportation, and development in smart grids, the markets for large-scale stationary energy storage have grown rapidly. Electrochemical energy storage methods are strong candidate solutions due to their high energy density, flexibility, and scalability. This review provides an overview of mature and emerging technologies for secondary and redox flow batteries. New developments in the chemistry of secondary and flow batteries as well as regenerative fuel cells are also considered. Advantages and disadvantages of current and prospective electrochemical energy storage options are discussed. The most promising technologies in the short term are high-temperature sodium batteries with β″-alumina electrolyte, lithium-ion batteries, and flow batteries. Regenerative fuel cells and lithium metal batteries with high energy density require further research to become practical.

  16. Energy End-Use Technologies for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, S; Haegermark, H; Larsen, H; Morishita, M; Nakicenovic, N; Schock, R N; Suntola, T

    2005-04-13

    The World Energy Council's recent study examined the potential of energy end-use technologies and of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) into these technologies on a global scale. Surprises are likely, but nevertheless, current research and development offer a picture of what might happen in the future as new technologies face the competition of the marketplace. Given the breadth of energy end-use technologies and the differences between regions and economic conditions, the study focused on technologies that appear most important from today's vantage point. Globally, robust research and development followed by demonstrations of new end-use technologies can potentially save at least 110 EJ/year by 2020 and over 300 EJ/year by 2050. If achieved, this translates to worldwide energy savings of as much as 25% by 2020 and over 40% by 2050, over what may be required without these technologies. It is almost certain that no single technology, or even a small set of technologies, will dominate in meeting the needs of the globe in any foreseeable timeframe. Absent a significant joint government-industry effort on end-use technology RD&D, the technologies needed will not be ready for the marketplace in the timeframes required with even the most pessimistic scenarios. Based on previous detailed analyses for the United States, an international expenditure of $4 billion per year seems more than justified. The success of new energy end-use technologies depends on new RD&D investments and policy decisions made today. Governments, in close cooperation with industry, must carefully consider RD&D incentives that can help get technologies from the laboratory or test-bed to market. Any short-term impact areas are likely to benefit from focused RD&D. These include electricity transmission and distribution, distributed electricity production, transportation, the production of paper and pulp, iron and steel, aluminum, cement and chemicals, and information and communication

  17. Potential environmental problems of photovoltaic energy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrey, G.R.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Patten, D.; Berry, W.; Conway, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the ten papers of this proceedings of a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1980. The purposes of this proceedings are to provide a preliminary identificaton and assessment of environmental hazards which might be realistically associated with growth of the photovoltaic industry, and to provide a reference for environmental considerations by obtaining a 1980 state-of-the-art assessment of growth anticipated for the industry. Currently the industry is considered to be in the early stages of development and several possible technological options are available for large-scale manufacturing as the industry grows. Estimates of the industrial emissions of materials considered to be potentially harmful in the environment were obtained by several different analytical methods. (KRM)

  18. Saving Energy, Water, and Money with Efficient Water Treatment Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-06-01

    Reverse Osmosis (RO) is a method of purifying water for industrial processes and human consumption; RO can remove mineral salts as well as contaminants such as bacteria and pesticides. Advances in water treatment technologies have enhanced and complemented the conventional RO process, reducing energy and water consumption, lowering capital and operating costs, and producing purer water. This publication of the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program introduces RO, describes the benefits of high-efficiency reverse osmosis (HERO), and compares HERO with RO/electrodeionization (EDI) technology.

  19. Comparing energy technology alternatives from an environmental perspective

    SciTech Connect

    House, P W; Coleman, J A; Shull, R D; Matheny, R W; Hock, J C

    1981-02-01

    A number of individuals and organizations advocate the use of comparative, formal analysis to determine which are the safest methods for producing and using energy. Some have suggested that the findings of such analyses should be the basis upon which final decisions are made about whether to actually deploy energy technologies. Some of those who support formal comparative analysis are in a position to shape the policy debate on energy and environment. An opposing viewpoint is presented, arguing that for technical reasons, analysis can provide no definitive or rationally credible answers to the question of overall safety. Analysis has not and cannot determine the sum total of damage to human welfare and ecological communities from energy technologies. Analysis has produced estimates of particular types of damage; however, it is impossible to make such estimates comparable and commensurate across different classes of technologies and environmental effects. As a result of the deficiencies, comparative analysis connot form the basis of a credible, viable energy policy. Yet, without formal comparative analysis, how can health, safety, and the natural environment be protected. This paper proposes a method for improving the Nation's approach to this problem. The proposal essentially is that health and the environment should be considered as constraints on the deployment of energy technologies, constraints that are embodied in Government regulations. Whichever technologies can function within these constraints should then compete among themselves. This competition should be based on market factors like cost and efficiency and on political factors like national security and the questions of equity.

  20. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division`s Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments.

  1. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies less than or equal to400 MeV. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    For a variety of applications, e.g., accelerator shielding design, neutrons in radiotherapy, radiation damage studies, etc., it is necessary to carry out transport calculations involving medium-energy (greater than or equal to20 MeV) neutrons. A previous paper described neutron-photon multigroup cross sections in the ANISN format for neutrons from thermal to 400 MeV. In the present paper the cross-section data presented previously have been revised to make them agree with available experimental data. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  2. The future of seawater desalination: energy, technology, and the environment.

    PubMed

    Elimelech, Menachem; Phillip, William A

    2011-08-05

    In recent years, numerous large-scale seawater desalination plants have been built in water-stressed countries to augment available water resources, and construction of new desalination plants is expected to increase in the near future. Despite major advancements in desalination technologies, seawater desalination is still more energy intensive compared to conventional technologies for the treatment of fresh water. There are also concerns about the potential environmental impacts of large-scale seawater desalination plants. Here, we review the possible reductions in energy demand by state-of-the-art seawater desalination technologies, the potential role of advanced materials and innovative technologies in improving performance, and the sustainability of desalination as a technological solution to global water shortages.

  3. Energy and Economic Trade Offs for Advanced Technology Subsonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Wagner, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in future aircraft technology which conserve energy are studied, along with the effect of these changes on economic performance. Among the new technologies considered are laminar-flow control, composite materials with and without laminar-flow control, and advanced airfoils. Aircraft design features studied include high-aspect-ratio wings, thickness ratio, and range. Engine technology is held constant at the JT9D level. It is concluded that wing aspect ratios of future aircraft are likely to significantly increase as a result of new technology and the push of higher fuel prices. Composite materials may raise aspect radio to about 11 to 12 and practical laminar flow-control systems may further increase aspect ratio to 14 or more. Advanced technology provides significant reductions in aircraft take-off gross weight, energy consumption, and direct operating cost.

  4. ECASTAR: Energy Conservation; an Assessment of Systems, Technologies and Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A methodology for a systems approach display and assessment of the potential for energy conservation actions and the impacts of those actions was presented. The U.S. economy is divided into four sectors: energy industry, industry, residential/commercial and transportation. Each sector is assessed with respect to energy conservation actions and impacts. The four sectors are combined and three strategies for energy conservation actions for the combined sectors are assessed. The three strategies (national energy conservation, electrification and diversification) represent energy conservation actions for the near term (now to 1985), the mid term (1985 to 2000) and the far term (2000 and beyond). The assessment procedure includes input/output analysis to bridge the flows between the sectors, and net economics and net energetics as performance criteria for the conservation actions. Targets of opportunity for large net energy net energy savings and the application of technology to achieve these savings are discussed.

  5. Current biomass energy technology in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, H.G.

    1985-06-01

    The potential for major biomass energy production in Brazil is very great because of the significant possibilities for expansion of the agricultural and forest production there. For example, production of 20 t/ha (metric) of dry wood in the Amazon basin is reported here by the senior author, who worked with the huge JARI operation there. In addition to the current large ethanol production (7.5 billion liters estimated 1983/84) based mainly on sugar cane, the potential for expanding this with sweet sorghum and cassava is promising. Research and development there and in the US resulted in a high-compression ethanol tractor showing slightly higher thermal efficiency than a standard diesel tractor under field operating conditions.

  6. Energy and technology review, July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.J.

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses the two-stage light-gas gun which was developed by the Super-High-Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a step toward realizing a launcher that can do this at a fraction of the cost of rockets. The SHARP gun is different from other two-stage designs because it is larger and its launch and pump tube are joined at right angles. This configuration allows the launch tube to point at any angle toward the sky while the pump tube remains horizontal. We have demonstrated that this gun can fire projectiles when the launch tube is in the horizontal position. Dr. Michael M. May who was the Laboratory`s fifth Director (1965--71) and is now a Director Emeritus. Under his directorship, the groundwork was laid for the Laboratory`s Energy Program, environmental science programs, and Laser Program. May remains active in research on arms control, nonproliferation, and cooperative security, and he is doing research and teaching at UC San Diego and at Stanford University. As part of the Laboratory`s 40th anniversary celebration, May was invited to lecture on his views of the changing world and the role of LLNL. In 1992, he participated in an influential National Academy of Sciences study on the reduction of nuclear weapons. This study recommended that the US cut strategic weapons to one-third the present number, withdraw most tactical weapons, and dismantle the retired nuclear weapons. May is convinced that the relative stability now present among the major nations is a precondition for keeping the demand for nuclear weapons low among the nuclear ``have-not`` nations. In the coming years, May believes that the Laboratory will remain most useful at major government-funded R&D projects in the areas of defense, energy, and the environment. May is now working on a new report on the disposition of surplus plutonium from nuclear weapons.

  7. Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Cheng; Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-03-30

    Energy consumed by buildings accounts for one third of the world?s total primary energy use. Associated with the conscious of energy savings in buildings, High Performance Buildings (HPBs) has surged across the world, with wide promotion and adoption of various performance rating and certification systems. It is valuable to look into the actual energy performance of HPBs and to understand their influencing factors. To shed some light on this topic, this paper conducted a series of portfolio analysis based on a database of 51 high performance office buildings across the world. Analyses showed that the actual site Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of the 51 buildings varied by a factor of up to 11, indicating a large scale of variation of the actual energy performance of the current HPBs. Further analysis of the correlation between EUI and climate elucidated ubiquitous phenomenon of EUI scatter throughout all climate zones, implying that the weather is not a decisive factor, although important, for the actual energy consumption of an individual building. On the building size via EUI, analysis disclosed that smaller buildings have a tendency to achieving lower energy use. Even so, the correlation is not absolute since some large buildings demonstrated low energy use while some small buildings performed opposite. Concerning the technologies, statistics indicated that the application of some technologies had correlations with some specific building size and climate characteristic. However, it was still hard to pinpoint a set of technologies which was directly correlative with a group of low EUI buildings. It is concluded that no a single factor essentially determines the actual energy performance of HPBs. To deliver energy-efficient buildings, an integrated design taking account of climate, technology, occupant behavior as well as operation and maintenance should be implemented.

  8. Macomb College Transportation and Energy Technology 126.09

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-31

    The objectives for this project were to create the laboratory facilities to deliver recently created and amended curriculum in the areas of energy creation, storage, and delivery in the transportation and stationary power sectors. The project scope was to define the modules, courses and programs in the emerging energy sectors of the stationary power and transportation industries, and then to determine the best equipment to support instruction, and procure it and install it in the laboratories where courses will be taught. Macomb Community College had a curriculum development grant through the Department of Education that ran parallel to this one where the energy curriculum at the school was revised to better permit students to gain comprehensive education in a targeted area of the renewable energy realm, as well as enhance the breadth of jobs addressed by curriculum in the transportation sector. The curriculum development and experiment and equipment definition ran in parallel, and resulted in what we believe to be a cogent and comprehensive curriculum supported with great hands-on experiments in modern labs. The project has been completed, and this report will show how the equipment purchases under the Department of Energy Grant support the courses and programs developed and amended under the Department of Education Grant. Also completed is the tagging documentation and audit tracking process required by the DOE. All materials are tagged, and the documentation is complete as required.

  9. Renewable energy technologies and its adaptation in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, K. Ravindranathan; Byrne, Owen; Surolia, Praveen K.

    2014-01-01

    This general article is based on the inaugural talk delivered at the opening of OMTAT 2013 conference. It notes that the integration of renewable energy sources into living and transport sectors presents a daunting task, still. In spite of the fact that the earth and its atmosphere continually receive 1.7 × 1017 watts of radiation from the sun, in the portfolio of sustainable and environment friendly energy options, which is about 16% of the world's energy consumption and mostly met by biomass, only a paltry 0.04% is accredited to solar. First and second generation solar cells offer mature technologies for applications. The most important difficulty with regards to integration with structures is not only the additional cost, but also the lack of sufficient knowledge in managing the available energy smartly and efficiently. The incorporation of PV as a part of building fabric greatly reduces the overall costs compared with retrofitting. BIPV (Building Integrated photovoltaic) is a critical technology for establishing aesthetically pleasing solar structures. Infusing PV and building elements is greatly simplified with some of the second generation thin film technologies now manufactured as flexible panels. The same holds true for 3rd generation technologies under development such as, and dye- and quantum dot- sensitized solar cells. Additionally, these technologies offer transparent or translucent solar cells for incorporation into windows and skylights. This review deals with the present state of solar cell technologies suitable for BIPV and the status of BIPV applications and its future prospects.

  10. Renewable energy technologies and its adaptation in an urban environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thampi, K. Ravindranathan Byrne, Owen Surolia, Praveen K.

    2014-01-28

    This general article is based on the inaugural talk delivered at the opening of OMTAT 2013 conference. It notes that the integration of renewable energy sources into living and transport sectors presents a daunting task, still. In spite of the fact that the earth and its atmosphere continually receive 1.7 × 10{sup 17} watts of radiation from the sun, in the portfolio of sustainable and environment friendly energy options, which is about 16% of the world’s energy consumption and mostly met by biomass, only a paltry 0.04% is accredited to solar. First and second generation solar cells offer mature technologies for applications. The most important difficulty with regards to integration with structures is not only the additional cost, but also the lack of sufficient knowledge in managing the available energy smartly and efficiently. The incorporation of PV as a part of building fabric greatly reduces the overall costs compared with retrofitting. BIPV (Building Integrated photovoltaic) is a critical technology for establishing aesthetically pleasing solar structures. Infusing PV and building elements is greatly simplified with some of the second generation thin film technologies now manufactured as flexible panels. The same holds true for 3{sup rd} generation technologies under development such as, and dye- and quantum dot- sensitized solar cells. Additionally, these technologies offer transparent or translucent solar cells for incorporation into windows and skylights. This review deals with the present state of solar cell technologies suitable for BIPV and the status of BIPV applications and its future prospects.

  11. An Overview of NASA's Contributions to Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Levine, Arlene S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is well known for its many contributions to advancing technology for the aviation and space industries. It may be surprising to some that it has also made a major impact in advancing energy technologies. This paper presents a historic overview of some of the energy programs that NASA was involved in, as well as presenting some current energy-related work that is relevant to both aerospace and non-aerospace needs. In the past, NASA developed prototype electric cars, low-emission gas turbines, wind turbines, and solar-powered villages, to name a few of the major energy projects. The fundamental expertise in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, thermodynamics, mechanical and electrical engineering, and other related fields, found in NASA s workforce, can easily be applied to develop creative solutions to energy problems in space, aviation, or terrestrial systems.

  12. Overview of Energy Storage Technologies for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao

    2006-01-01

    This presentations gives an overview of the energy storage technologies that are being used in space applications. Energy storage systems have been used in 99% of the robotic and human space missions launched since 1960. Energy storage is used in space missions to provide primary electrical power to launch vehicles, crew exploration vehicles, planetary probes, and astronaut equipment; store electrical energy in solar powered orbital and surface missions and provide electrical energy during eclipse periods; and, to meet peak power demands in nuclear powered rovers, landers, and planetary orbiters. The power source service life (discharge hours) dictates the choice of energy storage technology (capacitors, primary batteries, rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, regenerative fuel cells, flywheels). NASA is planning a number of robotic and human space exploration missions for the exploration of space. These missions will require energy storage devices with mass and volume efficiency, long life capability, an the ability to operate safely in extreme environments. Advanced energy storage technologies continue to be developed to meet future space mission needs.

  13. Overview of Energy Storage Technologies for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao

    2006-01-01

    This presentations gives an overview of the energy storage technologies that are being used in space applications. Energy storage systems have been used in 99% of the robotic and human space missions launched since 1960. Energy storage is used in space missions to provide primary electrical power to launch vehicles, crew exploration vehicles, planetary probes, and astronaut equipment; store electrical energy in solar powered orbital and surface missions and provide electrical energy during eclipse periods; and, to meet peak power demands in nuclear powered rovers, landers, and planetary orbiters. The power source service life (discharge hours) dictates the choice of energy storage technology (capacitors, primary batteries, rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, regenerative fuel cells, flywheels). NASA is planning a number of robotic and human space exploration missions for the exploration of space. These missions will require energy storage devices with mass and volume efficiency, long life capability, an the ability to operate safely in extreme environments. Advanced energy storage technologies continue to be developed to meet future space mission needs.

  14. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler: 6-12. Social Studies. Revised 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    Thirty-eight energy related classroom activities for sixth to twelfth grade are included in this document. The activities are based on the following conceptual themes: (1) energy is basic; (2) energy's usefulness is limited; (3) energy exchanges affect the environment; (4) energy conservation is essential; and (5) people can develop and share…

  15. Renewable energy technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: potentials, barriers and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable energy penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great potential for renewable energies from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of Energy initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable energy to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable energy resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable energy use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable energy policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable energy development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable energy technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable energy technology sector in Kazakhstan.

  16. Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, Richard; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2013-01-15

    The CREST research team conducted research that optimized catalysts used for the conversion of southwestern lignite into synthetic crude oil that can be shipped to nearby Texas refineries and power plants for development of transportation fuels and power generation. Research was also undertaken to convert any potential by-products of this process such as CO2 to useful chemicals and gases which could be recycled and used as feedstock to the synthetic fuel process. These CO2 conversion processes used light energy to drive the endogonic reduction reactions involved. The project was divided into two tasks: A CO2 Conversion Task, and a Catalyst Optimization Task. The CO2 Conversion task was aimed at developing molecular and solid state catalysts for the thermal, electro- and photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to reduced products such as simple feedstock compounds (e.g. CO, H2, CHOOH, CH2O, CH3OH and CH4). For example, the research team recycled CO that was developed from this Task and used it as a feedstock for the production of synthetic crude in the Catalyst Optimization Task. In the Catalyst Optimization Task, the research team conducted bench-scale experiments with the goal of reducing overall catalyst cost in support of several synthetic crude processes that had earlier been developed. This was accomplished by increasing the catalyst reactivity thus reducing required concentrations or by using less expensive metals. In this task the team performed parametric experiments in small scale batch reactors in an effort to improve catalyst reactivity and to lower cost. They also investigated catalyst robustness by testing lignite feedstocks that vary in moisture, h, and volatile content.

  17. Oil heat venting technology and NFPA standard 31 revision year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Krajewski, R.F.

    1997-09-01

    The revision of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 31 for the year 2000 offers an opportunity to update the Appendix which currently offers recommendations for basic metal relining of masonry chimneys up to and including 25 feet. The paper discusses the proposed update of the existing recommendations to include flexible (rough) metal liners. In addition, the discussion addresses the inclusion of additional information for unlined (non-conforming), lined (conforming to NFPA 211) masonary chimneys, insulated metal chimneys, chimney heights beyond what are now published, as well as power venting both forced and induced draft. Included in the paper is a discussion of the existing Oil Heat Vent Analysis Program (OHVAP Version 3.0) and issues that need resolution to make it a better vent system model.

  18. Santa Monica College Master Plan for Technology. Revision 1998-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Monica City Coll., CA.

    This document describes the goals, objectives and actions taken to update the Santa Monica College (CA) Master Plan for Technology as administered under the District Technology Committee. A number of principles were agreed upon as the basis for development between 1998 and 2000. Among those principles included were: technical training and…

  19. North American Technology and Industrial Base Organization (NATIBO) Operations & 3 Year Business Plan. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    The mission of NATIBO: in support of North American national security, the NATIBO facilities technology and industrial base efforts between the U.S...and Canadian Defense Departments. NATIBO coordinates technology and industrial base activities between Canada and the United States.

  20. Materials, Chemistry, and Simulation for Future Energy Technology.

    PubMed

    Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang-Sheng

    2015-09-07

    Special Issue: The Future of Energy. The science and engineering of clean energy now is becoming a multidisciplinary area, typically when new materials, chemistry, or mechanisms are met. "Trial and error" is the past. Exploration of new concepts for future clean energy can be accomplished through computer-aided materials design and reaction simulation, thanks to innovations in information technologies. This special issue, a fruit of the Energy Future Conference organized by UNSW Australia, has compiled some excellent examples of such approaches. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.