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Sample records for energy transfer-based genetically

  1. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, X.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  2. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  3. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Eakin, Ann E; Walkup, Grant K; Rivin, Olga

    2011-06-01

    DNA ligase is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the backbone phosphodiester bond between the 5'-PO(4) and 3'-OH of adjacent DNA nucleotides at single-stranded nicks. These nicks occur between Okazaki fragments during replication of the lagging strand of the DNA as well as during DNA repair and recombination. As essential enzymes for DNA replication, the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases of pathogenic bacteria are potential targets for the development of antibacterial drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, a high-throughput assay for DNA ligase activity is invaluable. This article describes a straightforward, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA ligase assay that is well suited for high-throughput screening for DNA ligase inhibitors as well as for use in enzyme kinetics studies. Its use is demonstrated for measurement of the steady-state kinetic constants of Haemophilus influenzae NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and for measurement of the potency of an inhibitor of this enzyme.

  4. Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based reporter reveals differential calcineurin activation in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Bazzazi, Hojjat; Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yang, Wanjun; Yue, David T

    2015-09-01

    Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based genetically encoded reporters of calcineurin are constructed by fusing the two subunits of calcineurin with P2A-based linkers retaining the expected native conformation of calcineurin. Calcineurin reporters display robust responses to calcium transients in HEK293 cells. The sensor responses are correlated with NFATc1 translocation dynamics in HEK293 cells. The sensors are uniformly distributed in neonatal myocytes and respond efficiently to single electrically evoked calcium transients and show cumulative activation at frequencies of 0.5 and 1 Hz. In adult myocytes, the calcineurin sensors appear to be localized to the cardiac z-lines, and respond to cumulative calcium transients at frequencies of 0.5 and 1 Hz. The phosphatase calcineurin is a central component of many calcium signalling pathways, relaying calcium signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. It has critical functions in a multitude of systems, including immune, cardiac and neuronal. Given the widespread importance of calcineurin in both normal and pathological conditions, new tools that elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcineurin activity would be invaluable. Here we develop two separate genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors of calcineurin activation, DuoCaN and UniCaN. Both sensors showcase a large dynamic range and rapid response kinetics, differing primarily in the linker structure between the FRET pairs. Both sensors were calibrated in HEK293 cells and their responses correlated well with NFAT translocation to the nucleus, validating the biological relevance of the sensor readout. The sensors were subsequently expressed in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and acutely isolated adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Both sensors demonstrated robust responses in myocytes and revealed kinetic differences in calcineurin activation during changes in pacing rate for neonatal versus adult myocytes

  5. Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based reporter reveals differential calcineurin activation in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bazzazi, Hojjat; Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yang, Wanjun; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The phosphatase calcineurin is a central component of many calcium signalling pathways, relaying calcium signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. It has critical functions in a multitude of systems, including immune, cardiac and neuronal. Given the widespread importance of calcineurin in both normal and pathological conditions, new tools that elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcineurin activity would be invaluable. Here we develop two separate genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors of calcineurin activation, DuoCaN and UniCaN. Both sensors showcase a large dynamic range and rapid response kinetics, differing primarily in the linker structure between the FRET pairs. Both sensors were calibrated in HEK293 cells and their responses correlated well with NFAT translocation to the nucleus, validating the biological relevance of the sensor readout. The sensors were subsequently expressed in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and acutely isolated adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Both sensors demonstrated robust responses in myocytes and revealed kinetic differences in calcineurin activation during changes in pacing rate for neonatal versus adult myocytes. Finally, mathematical modelling combined with quantitative FRET measurements provided novel insights into the kinetics and integration of calcineurin activation in response to myocyte Ca transients. In all, DuoCaN and UniCaN stand as valuable new tools for understanding the role of calcineurin in normal and pathological signalling. Key points Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based genetically encoded reporters of calcineurin are constructed by fusing the two subunits of calcineurin with P2A-based linkers retaining the expected native conformation of calcineurin. Calcineurin reporters display robust responses to calcium transients in HEK293 cells. The sensor responses are correlated with NFATc1 translocation dynamics in HEK293 cells. The

  6. Förster resonance energy transfer-based sensor targeting endoplasmic reticulum reveals highly oxidative environment

    PubMed Central

    Kolossov, Vladimir L; Leslie, Matthew T; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Sheehan, Bridget M; Kenis, Paul J A; Gaskins, H Rex

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione thiol/disulfide couple is the major redox buffer in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, mechanisms by which it contributes to the tightly regulated redox environment of this intracellular organelle are poorly understood. The recent development of genetically encoded, ratiometric, single green fluorescent protein-based redox-sensitive (roGFP) sensors adjusted for more oxidative environments enables non-invasive measurement of the ER redox environment in living cells. In turn, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors based on two fluorophore probes represent an alternative strategy for ratiometric signal acquisition. In previous work, we described the FRET-based redox sensor CY-RL7 with a relatively high midpoint redox potential of −143 mV, which is required for monitoring glutathione potentials in the comparatively high oxidative environment of the ER. Here, the efficacy of the CY-RL7 probe was ascertained in the cytosol and ER of live cells with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The sensor was found to be fully reduced at steady state in the cytosol and became fully oxidized in response to treatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a depletor of reduced glutathione (GSH). In contrast, the probe was strongly oxidized (88%) upon expression in the ER of cultured cells. We also examined the responsiveness of the ER sensor to perturbations in cellular glutathione homeostasis. We observed that the reductive level of the FRET sensor was increased two-fold to about 28% in cells pretreated with N-acetylcysteine, a substrate for GSH synthesis. Finally, we evaluated the responsiveness of CY-RL7 and roGFP1-iL to various perturbations of cellular glutathione homeostasis to address the divergence in the specificity of these two probes. Together, the present data generated with genetically encoded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based glutathione probes highlight the complexity of the ER redox environment and indicate that the ER

  7. DNA sequence functionalized with heterogeneous core-satellite nanoassembly for novel energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-05-15

    This work reports the use of compositionally heterogeneous asymmetric Ag@Au core-satellite nanoassembly functionalized with DNA sequence as unique signaling nanoprobes for the realization of new energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay of prostate- specific antigen (PSA). Specifically, the Ag@Au asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies (Ag@Au ACS) were fabricated on a two-dimensional glass substrate by a modified controlled assembly technique, and then functionalized with DNA sequences containing PSA aptamers as signaling nanoprobes. Then, the sandwich complexing between the PSA, its antibodies, and the signaling nanoprobes was performed on a CdS QDs modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The single stranded DNA can server as a facile mediator that place the Ag@Au ACS in proximity of CdS QDs, stimulating the interparticle exciton-plasmon interactions between Ag@Au ACS and CdS QDs and thus quenching the excitonic states in the latter. Since the damping effect is closely related to the target concentration, a novel energy-transfer-based PEC bioanalysis could be achieved for the sensitive and specific PSA assay. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0×10(-11)gmL(-1) to 1.0×10(-7)gmL(-1) and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3×10(-13)gmL(-1). This strategy used the Ag@Au ACS-DNA signaling nanoprobes and overcame the deficiency of short operating distance of the energy transfer process for feasible PEC immunoassay. More significantly, it provided a way to couple the plasmonic properties of the Ag NPs and Au NPs in a single PEC bioanalytical system. We expected this work could inspire more interests and further investigations on the advanced engineering of the core-satellite or other judiciously designed nanostructures for new PEC bioanalytical uses with novel properties.

  8. Energy-transfer-based wavelength-shifting DNA probes with "clickable" cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, Carolin; Rubner, Moritz M; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2013-05-01

    The insertion of cyanine dye azides as energy donor dyes via postsynthetic "click"-type cycloaddition chemistry with e.g. a new thiazole orange azide combined with thiazole red yields dual emitting DNA probes with good fluorescence readout properties.

  9. On the construction of low-energy cislunar and translunar transfers based on the libration points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Wei, Yan; Xu, Shijie

    2013-11-01

    There exist cislunar and translunar libration points near the Moon, which are referred to as the LL 1 and LL 2 points, respectively. They can generate the different types of low-energy trajectories transferring from Earth to Moon. The time-dependent analytic model including the gravitational forces from the Sun, Earth, and Moon is employed to investigate the energy-minimal and practical transfer trajectories. However, different from the circular restricted three-body problem, the equivalent gravitational equilibria are defined according to the geometry of the instantaneous Hill boundary due to the gravitational perturbation from the Sun. The relationship between the altitudes of periapsis and eccentricities is achieved from the Poincaré mapping for all the captured lunar trajectories, which presents the statistical feature of the fuel cost and captured orbital elements rather than generating a specified Moon-captured segment. The minimum energy required by the captured trajectory on a lunar circular orbit is deduced in the spatial bi-circular model. The idea is presented that the asymptotical behaviors of invariant manifolds approaching to/traveling from the libration points or halo orbits are destroyed by the solar perturbation. In fact, the energy-minimal cislunar transfer trajectory is acquired by transiting the LL 1 point, while the energy-minimal translunar transfer trajectory is obtained by transiting the LL 2 point. Finally, the transfer opportunities for the practical trajectories that have escaped from the Earth and have been captured by the Moon are yielded by the transiting halo orbits near the LL 1 and LL 2 points, which can be used to generate the whole of the trajectories.

  10. Resonant-energy-transfer-based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivalent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance- dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant fluorescence energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GMI has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction.

  11. Development of Time Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-based Assay for FXR Antagonist Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Donna D.; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng; Forman, Barry M.

    2013-01-01

    FXR (farnesoid X receptor, NRIH4), a nuclear receptor, plays a major role in the control of cholesterol metabolism. FXR ligands have been investigated in preclinical studies for targeted therapy against metabolic diseases, but have shown limitations. Therefore, there is a need for new agonist or antagonist ligands of FXR, both for potential clinical applications, as well as to further elucidate its biological functions. Here we describe the use of the X-ray crystal structure of FXR complexed with the potent small molecule agonist GW4064 to design and synthesize a novel fluorescent, high-affinity probe (DY246) for time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. We then used the TR-FRET assay for high throughput screening of a library of over 5,000 bioactive compounds. From this library, we identified 13 compounds that act as putative FXR transcriptional antagonists. PMID:23688559

  12. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Junager, Nina P. L.; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  13. Development of time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for FXR antagonist discovery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Donna D; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng; Forman, Barry M

    2013-07-15

    FXR (farnesoid X receptor, NRIH4), a nuclear receptor, plays a major role in the control of cholesterol metabolism. FXR ligands have been investigated in preclinical studies for targeted therapy against metabolic diseases, but have shown limitations. Therefore, there is a need for new agonist or antagonist ligands of FXR, both for potential clinical applications, as well as to further elucidate its biological functions. Here we describe the use of the X-ray crystal structure of FXR complexed with the potent small molecule agonist GW4064 to design and synthesize a novel fluorescent, high-affinity probe (DY246) for time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. We then used the TR-FRET assay for high throughput screening of a library of over 5000 bioactive compounds. From this library, we identified 13 compounds that act as putative FXR transcriptional antagonists.

  14. Detection of Citrus tristeza virus by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, Taha Roodbar; Salleh, Mohamad Amran Mohd; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mohsenifar, Afshin; Safarnejad, Reza; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low titer or uneven distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in field samples, detection of CTV by using conventional detection techniques may be difficult. Therefore, in the present work, the cadmium-telluride quantum dots (QDs) was conjugated with a specific antibody against coat protein (CP) of CTV, and the CP were immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to develop a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanobiosensor for detecting CTV. The maximum FRET efficiency for the developed nano-biosensor was observed at 60% in AuNPs-CP/QDs-Ab ratio of 1:8.5. The designed system showed higher sensitivity and specificity over enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a limit of detection of 0.13 μg mL- 1 and 93% and 94% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. As designed sensor is rapid, sensitive, specific and efficient in detecting CTV, this could be envisioned for diagnostic applications, surveillance and plant certification program.

  15. Exciton energy transfer-based quantum dot fluorescence sensing array: "chemical noses" for discrimination of different nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Li, Gui; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Li, Li; Liu, Wei; Shi, Xing; Guo, Yali

    2015-01-20

    A novel exciton energy transfer-based fluorescence sensing array for the discrimination of different nucleobases was developed through target nucleobase-triggered self-assembly of quantum dots (QDs). Four QD nanoprobes with different ligand receptors, including mercaptoethylamine, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, 2-dimethyl-aminethanethiol, and thioglycolic acid, were created to detect and identify nucleobase targets. These QDs served as both selective recognition scaffolds and signal transduction elements for a biomolecule target. The extent of particle assembly, induced by the analyte-triggered self-assembly of QDs, led to an exciton energy transfer effect between interparticles that gave a readily detectable fluorescence quenching and distinct fluorescence response patterns. These patterns are characteristic for each nucleobase and can be quantitatively differentiated by linear discriminate analysis. Furthermore, a fingerprint-based barcode was established to conveniently discriminate the nucleobases. This pattern sensing was successfully used to identify nucleobase samples at unknown concentrations and five rare bases. In this "chemical noses" strategy, the robust characteristics of QD nanoprobes, coupled with the diversity of surface functionality that can be readily obtained using nanoparticles, provides a simple and label-free biosensing approach that shows great promise for biomedical applications.

  16. A novel alignment-free method for detection of lateral genetic transfer based on TF-IDF

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yingnan; Chan, Yao-ban; Ragan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral genetic transfer (LGT) plays an important role in the evolution of microbes. Existing computational methods for detecting genomic regions of putative lateral origin scale poorly to large data. Here, we propose a novel method based on TF-IDF (Term Frequency-Inverse Document Frequency) statistics to detect not only regions of lateral origin, but also their origin and direction of transfer, in sets of hierarchically structured nucleotide or protein sequences. This approach is based on the frequency distributions of k-mers in the sequences. If a set of contiguous k-mers appears sufficiently more frequently in another phyletic group than in its own, we infer that they have been transferred from the first group to the second. We performed rigorous tests of TF-IDF using simulated and empirical datasets. With the simulated data, we tested our method under different parameter settings for sequence length, substitution rate between and within groups and post-LGT, deletion rate, length of transferred region and k size, and found that we can detect LGT events with high precision and recall. Our method performs better than an established method, ALFY, which has high recall but low precision. Our method is efficient, with runtime increasing approximately linearly with sequence length. PMID:27453035

  17. Energy transfer based emission analysis of (Tb³⁺, Sm³⁺): lithium zinc phosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C Parthasaradhi; Naresh, V; Ramaraghavulu, R; Rudramadevi, B H; Reddy, K T Ramakrishna; Buddhudu, S

    2015-06-05

    The present paper reports on the results pertaining to photoluminescence properties of Tb(3+), Sm(3+) and energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Sm(3+) ions in lithium zinc phosphate (LZP) glass matrix prepared by melt quenching method. Besides photoluminescence studies thermal stability for the LZP glass is also evaluated from TG-DTA measurement. Tb(3+) doped glasses have exhibited a prominent green emission at 547 nm assigned to (5)D4→(7)F5 transitions on exciting at λ(exci)=377 nm. The quenching phenomenon in Tb(3+) emission on varying its concentration has been discussed from cross-relaxations. Sm(3+) incorporated glasses have shown strong orange emission at 603 nm assigned to (4)G5/2→(6)H7/2 transition upon exciting with λ(exci)=404 nm. The possibility of energy transfer process taking place between these two ions is understood from the significant spectral overlap of Sm(3+) absorption and Tb(3+) emission. Migration of excitation energy from Tb(3+) ions to Sm(3+) ions at λ(exci)=375 nm is evaluated from the emission spectra of (0.5 mol.% Tb(3+)+(0.5-2.0 mol.%) Sm(3+)) co-doped glasses. The emission intensity of Sm(3+) has enhanced while Tb(3+) emission intensity decreased with an increase in Sm(3+) concentration suggesting the occurrence of energy transfer through cross-relaxations from Tb(3+) ((5)D4) to Sm(3+) ((4)G5/2). The mechanism behind energy transfer process has been further explained from energy level diagram, decay profiles and confirmed by calculating energy transfer parameters (energy transfer efficiency (η) and energy transfer probability (P)) of co-doped glasses. The dipole-dipole interaction is found to be more responsible for energy transfer Tb(3+) ((5)D4) to Sm(3+) ((4)G5/2) ions in LZP glass matrix.

  18. Graphene quantum dot antennas for high efficiency Förster resonance energy transfer based dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Alagesan; Pan, Zhenghui; Rong, Genlan; Li, Hongfei; Zhou, Lisha; Li, Wanfei; Qiu, Yongcai; Xu, Yijun; Hou, Yuan; Zheng, Zhaozhao; Zhang, Yuegang

    2017-03-01

    The light harvesting efficiency of an acceptor dye can be enhanced by judicious choice and/or design of donor materials in the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In this work, we explore graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as energy relay antennas for the high power conversion efficiency Ru-based N719 acceptor dyes. The absorption, emission, and time decay spectral results evidence the existence of the FRET, the radiative energy transfer (RET), and a synergistic interaction between GQDs and N719 dye. The FRET efficiency is measured to be 27%. The GQDs co-sensitized DSSC achieves an efficiency (ƞ) of 7.96% with a Jsc of 16.54 mAcm-2, which is 30% higher than that of a N719-based DSSC. GQDs also reduce the charge recombination, which results in an increased open-circuit voltage up to 770 mV. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency and UV-Vis absorption measurement reveal that the enhanced absorption of the GQDs antennas is responsible for the improved Jsc in the whole UV-Visible region, while the RET/FRET and the synergistic effect contribute to the significant increase of Jsc in the UV region.

  19. Charge-controlled assembling of bacteriorhodopsin and semiconductor quantum dots for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Sukhanova, Alyona; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Troyon, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and photochromic protein bacteriorhodopsin within its natural purple membrane (PM) is explored to monitor their assembling. It is shown that the efficiency of FRET may be controlled by variation of the surface charge and thickness of QD organic coating. Atomic force microscopy imaging revealed correlation between the surface charge of QDs and degree of their ordering on the surface of PM. The most FRET-efficient QD-PM complexes have the highest level of QDs ordering, and their assembling design may be further optimized to engineer hybrid materials with advanced biophotonic and photovoltaic properties.

  20. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based approach for investigating late endosome-lysosome retrograde fusion events.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A M; Goldman, S D B; Krise, J P

    2009-03-01

    Traditionally, lysosomes have been considered to be a terminal endocytic compartment. Recent studies suggest that lysosomes are quite dynamic, being able to fuse with other late endocytic compartments as well as with the plasma membrane. Here we describe a quantitative fluorescence energy transfer (FRET)-based method for assessing rates of retrograde fusion between terminal lysosomes and late endosomes in living cells. Late endosomes were specifically labeled with 800-nm latex beads that were conjugated with streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 555 (FRET donor). Terminal lysosomes were specifically labeled with 10,000-MW dextran polymers conjugated with biotin and Alexa Fluor 647 (FRET acceptor). Following late endosome-lysosome fusion, the strong binding affinity between streptavidin and biotin brought the donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules into close proximity, thereby facilitating the appearance of a FRET emission signal. Because apparent size restrictions in the endocytic pathway do not permit endocytosed latex beads from reaching terminal lysosomes in an anterograde fashion, the appearance of the FRET signal is consistent with retrograde transport of lysosomal cargo back to late endosomes. We assessed the efficiency of this transport step in fibroblasts affected by different lysosome storage disorders-Niemann-Pick type C, mucolipidosis type IV, and Sandhoff's disease, all of which have a similar lysosomal lipid accumulation phenotype. We report here, for the first time, that these disorders can be distinguished by their rate of transfer of lysosome cargos to late endosomes, and we discuss the implications of these findings for developing new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Determination of biological activity of gonadotropins hCG and FSH by Förster resonance energy transfer based biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Mazina, Olga; Allikalt, Anni; Tapanainen, Juha S.; Salumets, Andres; Rinken, Ago

    2017-01-01

    Determination of biological activity of gonadotropin hormones is essential in reproductive medicine and pharmaceutical manufacturing of the hormonal preparations. The aim of the study was to adopt a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signal transduction pathway based assay for quantification of biological activity of gonadotropins. We focussed on studying human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), as these hormones are widely used in clinical practice. Receptor-specific changes in cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, second messenger in GPCR signalling) were monitored by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor protein TEpacVV in living cells upon activation of the relevant gonadotropin receptor. The BacMam gene delivery system was used for biosensor protein expression in target cells. In the developed assay only biologically active hormones initiated GPCR-mediated cellular signalling. High assay sensitivities were achieved for detection of hCG (limit of detection, LOD: 5 pM) and FSH (LOD: 100 pM). Even the small-scale conformational changes caused by thermal inactivation and reducing the biological activity of the hormones were registered. In conclusion, the proposed assay is suitable for quantification of biological activity of gonadotropins and is a good alternative to antibody- and animal-testing-based assays used in pharmaceutical industry and clinical research. PMID:28181555

  2. Determination of biological activity of gonadotropins hCG and FSH by Förster resonance energy transfer based biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mazina, Olga; Allikalt, Anni; Tapanainen, Juha S; Salumets, Andres; Rinken, Ago

    2017-02-09

    Determination of biological activity of gonadotropin hormones is essential in reproductive medicine and pharmaceutical manufacturing of the hormonal preparations. The aim of the study was to adopt a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signal transduction pathway based assay for quantification of biological activity of gonadotropins. We focussed on studying human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), as these hormones are widely used in clinical practice. Receptor-specific changes in cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, second messenger in GPCR signalling) were monitored by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor protein (T)Epac(VV) in living cells upon activation of the relevant gonadotropin receptor. The BacMam gene delivery system was used for biosensor protein expression in target cells. In the developed assay only biologically active hormones initiated GPCR-mediated cellular signalling. High assay sensitivities were achieved for detection of hCG (limit of detection, LOD: 5 pM) and FSH (LOD: 100 pM). Even the small-scale conformational changes caused by thermal inactivation and reducing the biological activity of the hormones were registered. In conclusion, the proposed assay is suitable for quantification of biological activity of gonadotropins and is a good alternative to antibody- and animal-testing-based assays used in pharmaceutical industry and clinical research.

  3. Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays on Paper-Based Platforms Using Emissive Nanoparticles as Donors.

    PubMed

    Doughan, Samer; Noor, M Omair; Han, Yi; Krull, Ulrich J

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) are luminescent nanoparticles (NPs) commonly used in bioassays and biosensors as resonance energy transfer (RET) donors. The narrow and tunable emissions of both QDs and UCNPs make them versatile RET donors that can be paired with a wide range of acceptors. Ratiometric signal processing that compares donor and acceptor emission in RET-based transduction offers improved precision, as it accounts for fluctuations in the absolute photoluminescence (PL) intensities of the donor and acceptor that can result from experimental and instrumental variations. Immobilizing NPs on a solid support avoids problems such as those that can arise with their aggregation in solution, and allows for facile layer-by-layer assembly of the interfacial chemistry. Paper is an attractive solid support for the development of point-of-care diagnostic assays given its ubiquity, low-cost, and intrinsic fluid transport by capillary action. Integration of nanomaterials with paper-based analytical devices (PADs) provides avenues to augment the analytical performance of PADs, given the unique optoelectronic properties of nanomaterials. Herein, we describe methodology for the development of PADs using QDs and UCNPs as RET donors for optical transduction of nucleic acid hybridization. Immobilization of green-emitting QDs (gQDs) on imidazole functionalized cellulose paper is described for use as RET donors with Cy3 molecular dye as acceptors for the detection of SMN1 gene fragment. We also describe the covalent immobilization of blue-emitting UCNPs on aldehyde modified cellulose paper for use as RET donors with orange-emitting QDs (oQDs) as acceptors for the detection of HPRT1 gene fragment. The data described herein is acquired using an epifluorescence microscope, and can also be collected using technology such as a typical electronic camera.

  4. Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric protease assays with fusion proteins of firefly luciferase and red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Ablamsky, Danielle M; Taylor, Kelsey P; Southworth, Tara L; Linder, Samantha J

    2011-07-15

    We report here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyze yellow-green (560nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41nM for caspase 3, 1.0nM for thrombin, and 58nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. Our results demonstrate for the first time that an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence can be employed to assay physiologically important protease activities.

  5. Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Molecular Switch Designed Using a Systematic Design Process Based on Monte Carlo Methods and Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallapalli, Arjun

    A RET network consists of a network of photo-active molecules called chromophores that can participate in inter-molecular energy transfer called resonance energy transfer (RET). RET networks are used in a variety of applications including cryptographic devices, storage systems, light harvesting complexes, biological sensors, and molecular rulers. In this dissertation, we focus on creating a RET device called closed-diffusive exciton valve (C-DEV) in which the input to output transfer function is controlled by an external energy source, similar to a semiconductor transistor like the MOSFET. Due to their biocompatibility, molecular devices like the C-DEVs can be used to introduce computing power in biological, organic, and aqueous environments such as living cells. Furthermore, the underlying physics in RET devices are stochastic in nature, making them suitable for stochastic computing in which true random distribution generation is critical. In order to determine a valid configuration of chromophores for the C-DEV, we developed a systematic process based on user-guided design space pruning techniques and built-in simulation tools. We show that our C-DEV is 15x better than C-DEVs designed using ad hoc methods that rely on limited data from prior experiments. We also show ways in which the C-DEV can be improved further and how different varieties of C-DEVs can be combined to form more complex logic circuits. Moreover, the systematic design process can be used to search for valid chromophore network configurations for a variety of RET applications. We also describe a feasibility study for a technique used to control the orientation of chromophores attached to DNA. Being able to control the orientation can expand the design space for RET networks because it provides another parameter to tune their collective behavior. While results showed limited control over orientation, the analysis required the development of a mathematical model that can be used to determine the

  6. Ag nanoclusters could efficiently quench the photoresponse of CdS quantum dots for novel energy transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yue; Liang, Yan-Yu; He, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-11-15

    Herein the influence of ultrasmall Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) against CdS quantum dots (QDs) in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) nanosystem was exploited for the first time, based on which a novel PEC bioanalysis was successfully developed via the efficient quenching effect of Ag NCs against the CdS QDs. In a model system, DNA assay was achieved by using molecular beacon (MB) probes anchored on a CdS QDs modified electrode, and the MB probes contain two segments that can hybridize with both target DNA sequence and the label of DNA encapsulated Ag NCs. After the MB probe was unfolded by the target DNA sequence, the labels of oligonucleotide encapsulated Ag NCs would be brought in close proximity to the CdS QDs electrode surface, and efficient photocurrent quenching of QDs could be resulted from an energy transfer process that originated from NCs. Thus, by monitoring the attenuation in the photocurrent signal, an elegant and sensitive PEC DNA bioanalysis could be accomplished. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0pM to 10nM and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3pM. This work presents a feasible signaling principle that could act as a common basis for general PEC bioanalysis development.

  7. Selective ligand activity at Nur/retinoid X receptor complexes revealed by dimer-specific bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based sensors

    PubMed Central

    Giner, Xavier C; Cotnoir-White, David; Mader, Sylvie; Lévesque, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXR) play a role as master regulators due to their capacity to form heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Accordingly, retinoid signaling is involved in multiple biological processes, including development, cell differentiation, metabolism and cell death. However, the role and functions of RXR in different heterodimer complexes remain unsolved, mainly because most RXR drugs (called rexinoids) are not selective to specific heterodimer complexes. This also strongly limits the use of rexinoids for specific therapeutic approaches. In order to better characterize rexinoids at specific nuclear receptor complexes, we have developed and optimized luciferase protein complementation-based Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assays, which can directly measure recruitment of a co-activator motif fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by specific nuclear receptor dimers. To validate the assays, we compared rexinoid modulation of co-activator recruitment by RXR homodimer, and heterodimers Nur77/RXR and Nurr1/RXR. Results reveal that some rexinoids display selective co-activator recruitment activities with homo- or hetero-dimer complexes. In particular, SR11237 (BMS649) has increased potency for recruitment of co-activator motif and transcriptional activity with the Nur77/RXR heterodimer compared to other complexes. This technology should prove useful to identify new compounds with specificity for individual dimeric species formed by nuclear receptors. PMID:26148973

  8. Real-time target-specific detection of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for white spot syndrome virus using fluorescence energy transfer-based probes.

    PubMed

    Chou, Pin-Hsing; Lin, Yu-Chan; Teng, Ping-Hua; Chen, Chu-Liang; Lee, Pei-Yu

    2011-04-01

    Aiming to establish a target amplicon-specific detection system for loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), the fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe technology was applied to develop the FRET LAMP platform. This report describes the development of the first FRET LAMP assay targeting white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) of penaeid shrimp. A successful accelerated WSSV LAMP was assembled first in a conventional oven and confirmed by gel electrophoresis and dot-blot hybridization. Subsequently, two additional FRET probes designed to target one loop region within WSSV LAMP amplicons were added to the same LAMP reaction. The reactions were carried out in a LightCycler (Roche) and significant FRET signals were detected in real time. Optimization of the reaction using plasmid DNA shortened the time for the detection of 10(2) copies of the target DNA to less than 70min. Cross reactivity was absent with WSSV-free or infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus-infected Penaeus vannamei samples. The performance of this system was comparable with that of a nested PCR assay from 21 WSSV-infected shrimp. Specifically detecting target amplicons and requiring no post-amplification manipulation, the novel FRET LAMP assay should allow indisputable detection of pathogens with minimized risks of amplicon contamination.

  9. Compact and versatile nickel-nitrilotriacetate-modified quantum dots for protein imaging and Förster resonance energy transfer based assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Young; Kim, Keumhyun; Hong, Sukmin; Kim, Heeyeon; Choi, Youngseon; Ryu, Jiyoung; Kwon, Doyoon; Grailhe, Regis; Song, Rita

    2010-05-18

    The generation of compact quantum dots (QDs) probes is of critical importance for visualizing molecular interaction occurring in biological context, particularly when using the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach. This Article reports novel water-soluble compact CdSe/ZnS QDs prepared by ligand exchange reaction using thiolated nitrilotriacetate (NTA). The resulting NTA-QDs revealed higher stability and remarkable conjugation efficiency compared to the other QDs prepared with different ligands by using the ligand exchange method. The Ni-NTA group is a well-known binding moiety for the detection and purification of oligohistidine-tagged recombinant proteins. We demonstrated that NiNTA-QDs prepared by Ni(2+) complexation exhibited highly specific binding ability toward 6-histidine (His)-tagged peptides present in various experimental conditions (buffer solution, agarose beads, and HEK cells). Importantly, the compact NiNTA-QDs serve as an efficient FRET donor. These results suggest that the stable and highly selective multifunctional NTA-QDs can be useful for labeling and tracking molecular interactions within biological context.

  10. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Tetrahedron Nanotweezer for Highly Reliable Detection of Tumor-Related mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Lu, Dan-Qing; Liang, Hao; Xie, Sitao; Luo, Can; Hu, Miaomiao; Xu, Liujun; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-30

    Accurate detection and imaging of tumor-related mRNA in living cells hold great promise for early cancer detection. However, currently, most probes designed to image intracellular mRNA confront intrinsic interferences arising from complex biological matrices and resulting in inevitable false-positive signals. To circumvent this problem, an intracellular DNA nanoprobe, termed DNA tetrahedron nanotweezer (DTNT), was developed to reliably image tumor-related mRNA in living cells based on the FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) "off" to "on" signal readout mode. DTNT was self-assembled from four single-stranded DNAs. In the absence of target mRNA, the respectively labeled donor and acceptor fluorophores are separated, thus inducing low FRET efficiency. However, in the presence of target mRNA, DTNT alters its structure from the open to closed state, thus bringing the dual fluorophores into close proximity for high FRET efficiency. The DTNT exhibited high cellular permeability, fast response and excellent biocompatibility. Moreover, intracellular imaging experiments showed that DTNT could effectively distinguish cancer cells from normal cells and, moreover, distinguish among changes of mRNA expression levels in living cells. The DTNT nanoprobe also exhibits minimal effect of probe concentration, distribution and laser power as other ratiometric probe. More importantly, as a result of the FRET "off" to "on" signal readout mode, the DTNT nanoprobe almost entirely avoids false-positive signals due to intrinsic interferences, such as nuclease digestion, protein binding and thermodynamic fluctuations in complex biological matrices. This design blueprint can be applied to the development of powerful DNA nanomachines for biomedical research and clinical early diagnosis.

  11. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C.; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F.; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime.

  12. Genetic algorithm reveals energy-efficient waveforms for neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M

    2009-01-01

    Energy consumption is an important consideration for battery-powered implantable stimulators. We used a genetic algorithm (GA) that mimics biological evolution to determine the energy-optimal waveform shape for neural stimulation. The GA was coupled to NEURON using a model of extracellular stimulation of a mammalian myelinated axon. Stimulation waveforms represented the organisms of a population, and each waveform's shape was encoded into genes. The fitness of each waveform was based on its energy efficiency and ability to elicit an action potential. After each generation of the GA, waveforms mated to produce offspring waveforms, and a new population was formed consisting of the offspring and the fittest waveforms of the previous generation. Over the course of the GA, waveforms became increasingly energy-efficient and converged upon a highly energy-efficient shape. The resulting waveforms resembled truncated normal curves or sinusoids and were 3-74% more energy-efficient than several waveform shapes commonly used in neural stimulation. If implemented in implantable neural stimulators, the GA optimized waveforms could prolong battery life, thereby reducing the costs and risks of battery-replacement surgery.

  13. Genetic Algorithm Reveals Energy-Efficient Waveforms for Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    Energy consumption is an important consideration for battery-powered implantable stimulators. We used a genetic algorithm (GA) that mimics biological evolution to determine the energy-optimal waveform shape for neural stimulation. The GA was coupled to NEURON using a model of extracellular stimulation of a mammalian myelinated axon. Stimulation waveforms represented the organisms of a population, and each waveform’s shape was encoded into genes. The fitness of each waveform was based on its energy efficiency and ability to elicit an action potential. After each generation of the GA, waveforms mated to produce offspring waveforms, and a new population was formed consisting of the offspring and the fittest waveforms of the previous generation. Over the course of the GA, waveforms became increasingly energy-efficient and converged upon a highly energy-efficient shape. The resulting waveforms resembled truncated normal curves or sinusoids and were 3–74% more energy-efficient than several waveform shapes commonly used in neural stimulation. If implemented in implantable neural stimulators, the GA optimized waveforms could prolong battery life, thereby reducing the costs and risks of battery-replacement surgery. PMID:19964233

  14. Sensitisation of Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-based luminescence by Ir(III) units in Ir/lanthanide dyads: evidence for parallel energy-transfer and electron-transfer based mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Daniel; Cankut, Ahmet J; Ali, Noorshida Mohd; Stephenson, Andrew; Spall, Steven J P; Parker, Simon C; Weinstein, Julia A; Ward, Michael D

    2014-05-07

    A series of blue-luminescent Ir(III) complexes with a pendant binding site for lanthanide(III) ions has been synthesized and used to prepare Ir(III)/Ln(III) dyads (Ln = Eu, Tb, Gd). Photophysical studies were used to establish mechanisms of Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer. In the Ir/Gd dyads, where direct Ir→Gd energy-transfer is not possible, significant quenching of Ir-based luminescence nonetheless occurred; this can be ascribed to photoinduced electron-transfer from the photo-excited Ir unit (*Ir, (3)MLCT/(3)LC excited state) to the pendant pyrazolyl-pyridine site which becomes a good electron-acceptor when coordinated to an electropositive Gd(III) centre. This electron transfer quenches the Ir-based luminescence, leading to formation of a charge-separated {Ir(4+)}˙-(pyrazolyl-pyridine)˙(-) state, which is short-lived possibly due to fast back electron-transfer (<20 ns). In the Ir/Tb and Ir/Eu dyads this electron-transfer pathway is again operative and leads to sensitisation of Eu-based and Tb-based emission using the energy liberated from the back electron-transfer process. In addition direct Dexter-type Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer occurs on a similar timescale, meaning that there are two parallel mechanisms by which excitation energy can be transferred from *Ir to the Eu/Tb centre. Time-resolved luminescence measurements on the sensitised Eu-based emission showed both fast and slow rise-time components, associated with the PET-based and Dexter-based energy-transfer mechanisms respectively. In the Ir/Tb dyads, the Ir→Tb energy-transfer is only just thermodynamically favourable, leading to rapid Tb→Ir thermally-activated back energy-transfer and non-radiative deactivation to an extent that depends on the precise energy gap between the *Ir and Tb-based (5)D4 states. Thus, the sensitised Tb(iii)-based emission is weak and unusually short-lived due to back energy transfer, but nonetheless represents rare examples of Tb(III) sensitisation by

  15. A new perspective on dark energy modeling via genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesseris, Savvas; García-Bellido, Juan

    2012-11-01

    We use Genetic Algorithms to extract information from several cosmological probes, such as the type Ia supernovae (SnIa), the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and the growth rate of matter perturbations. This is done by implementing a model independent and bias-free reconstruction of the various scales and distances that characterize the data, like the luminosity dL(z) and the angular diameter distance dA(z) in the SnIa and BAO data, respectively, or the dependence with redshift of the matter density Ωm(a) in the growth rate data, fσ8(z). These quantities can then be used to reconstruct the expansion history of the Universe, and the resulting Dark Energy (DE) equation of state w(z) in the context of FRW models, or the mass radial function ΩM(r) in LTB models. In this way, the reconstruction is completely independent of our prior bias. Furthermore, we use this method to test the Etherington relation, ie the well-known relation between the luminosity and the angular diameter distance, η≡dL(z)/(1+z)2dA(z), which is equal to 1 in metric theories of gravity. We find that the present data seem to suggest a 3-σ deviation from one at redshifts z ~ 0.5. Finally, we present a novel way, within the Genetic Algorithm paradigm, to analytically estimate the errors on the reconstructed quantities by calculating a Path Integral over all possible functions that may contribute to the likelihood. We show that this can be done regardless of the data being correlated or uncorrelated with each other and we also explicitly demonstrate that our approach is in good agreement with other error estimation techniques like the Fisher Matrix approach and the Bootstrap Monte Carlo.

  16. Energy transfer based photoluminescence spectra of co-doped (Dy3+ + Sm3+): Li2O-LiF-B2O3-ZnO glasses for orange emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, L.; Naveen Kumar, K.; Vijayalakshmi, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The present paper brings out the results concerning the preparation and optical properties of Sm3+ and Dy3+ each ion separately in different concentrations (0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol.%) and also together doped (x mol.% Dy3+ + 1.5 mol.% Sm3+): Li2O-LiF-B2O3-ZnO (where x = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol.%) glasses by a melt quenching method. Structural and thermal properties have been extensively studied for those glasses by XRD and TG/DTA. The compositional analysis has been carried out from FTIR spectral profile. Optical absorption spectral studies were also carried out. Sm3+: LBZ glasses have displayed an intense orange emission at 603 nm (4G5/2 → 6H7/2) with an excitation wavelength at 403 nm and Dy3+: LBZ glasses have shown two emissions located at 485 nm (4F9/2 → 6H15/2; blue) and 574 nm (4F9/2 → 6H13/2; yellow) with an excitation wavelength at 385 nm. Remarkably, it has been identified that the significant increase in the reddish orange emission of Sm3+ ions and diminished yellow emission pertaining to Dy3+ ions in the co-doped LBZ glass system under the excitation of 385 nm which relates to Dy3+ ions. This could be due energy transfer from Dy3+ to Sm3+. The non-radiative energy transfer from Dy3+ to Sm3+ is explained in terms of their emission spectra, donor lifetime, energy level diagram and energy transfer characteristic factors. These significantly enhanced orange emission exhibited glasses could be suggested as potential optical glasses for orange luminescence photonic devices.

  17. Dual-Recognition Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Based Platform for One-Step Sensitive Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria Using Fluorescent Vancomycin-Gold Nanoclusters and Aptamer-Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengqun; Wang, Hong; Fu, Fei; Li, Linyao; Li, Jing; Li, Gan; Song, Yang; Swihart, Mark T; Song, Erqun

    2017-04-04

    The effective monitoring, identification, and quantification of pathogenic bacteria is essential for addressing serious public health issues. In this study, we present a universal and facile one-step strategy for sensitive and selective detection of pathogenic bacteria using a dual-molecular affinity-based Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) platform based on the recognition of bacterial cell walls by antibiotic and aptamer molecules, respectively. As a proof of concept, Vancomycin (Van) and a nucleic acid aptamer were employed in a model dual-recognition scheme for detecting Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. aureus). Within 30 min, by using Van-functionalized gold nanoclusters and aptamer-modified gold nanoparticles as the energy donor and acceptor, respectively, the FRET signal shows a linear variation with the concentration of Staph. aureus in the range from 20 to 10(8) cfu/mL with a detection limit of 10 cfu/mL. Other nontarget bacteria showed negative results, demonstrating the good specificity of the approach. When employed to assay Staph. aureus in real samples, the dual-recognition FRET strategy showed recoveries from 99.00% to the 109.75% with relative standard derivations (RSDs) less than 4%. This establishes a universal detection platform for sensitive, specific, and simple pathogenic bacteria detection, which could have great impact in the fields of food/public safety monitoring and infectious disease diagnosis.

  18. Empirical valence bond models for reactive potential energy surfaces: a parallel multilevel genetic program approach.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Michael A; Coker, David F

    2011-07-28

    We describe a new method for constructing empirical valence bond potential energy surfaces using a parallel multilevel genetic program (PMLGP). Genetic programs can be used to perform an efficient search through function space and parameter space to find the best functions and sets of parameters that fit energies obtained by ab initio electronic structure calculations. Building on the traditional genetic program approach, the PMLGP utilizes a hierarchy of genetic programming on two different levels. The lower level genetic programs are used to optimize coevolving populations in parallel while the higher level genetic program (HLGP) is used to optimize the genetic operator probabilities of the lower level genetic programs. The HLGP allows the algorithm to dynamically learn the mutation or combination of mutations that most effectively increase the fitness of the populations, causing a significant increase in the algorithm's accuracy and efficiency. The algorithm's accuracy and efficiency is tested against a standard parallel genetic program with a variety of one-dimensional test cases. Subsequently, the PMLGP is utilized to obtain an accurate empirical valence bond model for proton transfer in 3-hydroxy-gamma-pyrone in gas phase and protic solvent.

  19. Energy sorghum--a genetic model for the design of C4 grass bioenergy crops.

    PubMed

    Mullet, John; Morishige, Daryl; McCormick, Ryan; Truong, Sandra; Hilley, Josie; McKinley, Brian; Anderson, Robert; Olson, Sara N; Rooney, William

    2014-07-01

    Sorghum is emerging as an excellent genetic model for the design of C4 grass bioenergy crops. Annual energy Sorghum hybrids also serve as a source of biomass for bioenergy production. Elucidation of Sorghum's flowering time gene regulatory network, and identification of complementary alleles for photoperiod sensitivity, enabled large-scale generation of energy Sorghum hybrids for testing and commercial use. Energy Sorghum hybrids with long vegetative growth phases were found to accumulate more than twice as much biomass as grain Sorghum, owing to extended growing seasons, greater light interception, and higher radiation use efficiency. High biomass yield, efficient nitrogen recycling, and preferential accumulation of stem biomass with low nitrogen content contributed to energy Sorghum's elevated nitrogen use efficiency. Sorghum's integrated genetics-genomics-breeding platform, diverse germplasm, and the opportunity for annual testing of new genetic designs in controlled environments and in multiple field locations is aiding fundamental discovery, and accelerating the improvement of biomass yield and optimization of composition for biofuels production. Recent advances in wide hybridization between Sorghum and other C4 grasses could allow the deployment of improved genetic designs of annual energy Sorghums in the form of wide-hybrid perennial crops. The current trajectory of energy Sorghum genetic improvement indicates that it will be possible to sustainably produce biofuels from C4 grass bioenergy crops that are cost competitive with petroleum-based transportation fuels.

  20. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  1. Heavy ion mutagenesis: linear energy transfer effects and genetic linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S.; Criddle, K.; Vannais, D.; Ueno, A.; Kraemer, S.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a series of 69 independent mutants at the endogenous hprt locus of human TK6 lymphoblasts and over 200 independent S1-deficient mutants of the human x hamster hybrid cell line AL arising spontaneously or following low-fluence exposures to densely ionizing Fe ions (600 MeV/amu, linear energy transfer = 190 keV/microns). We find that large deletions are common. The entire hprt gene (> 44 kb) was missing in 19/39 Fe-induced mutants, while only 2/30 spontaneous mutants lost the entire hprt coding sequence. When the gene of interest (S1 locus = M1C1 gene) is located on a nonessential human chromosome 11, multilocus deletions of several million base pairs are observed frequently. The S1 mutation frequency is more than 50-fold greater than the frequency of hprt mutants in the same cells. Taken together, these results suggest that low-fluence exposures to Fe ions are often cytotoxic due to their ability to create multilocus deletions that may often include the loss of essential genes. In addition, the tumorigenic potential of these HZE heavy ions may be due to the high potential for loss of tumor suppressor genes. The relative insensitivity of the hprt locus to mutation is likely due to tight linkage to a gene that is required for viability.

  2. English to Sanskrit Machine Translation Using Transfer Based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ganesh R.; Godse, Sachin P.

    2010-11-01

    Translation is one of the needs of global society for communicating thoughts and ideas of one country with other country. Translation is the process of interpretation of text meaning and subsequent production of equivalent text, also called as communicating same meaning (message) in another language. In this paper we gave detail information on how to convert source language text in to target language text using Transfer Based Approach for machine translation. Here we implemented English to Sanskrit machine translator using transfer based approach. English is global language used for business and communication but large amount of population in India is not using and understand the English. Sanskrit is ancient language of India most of the languages in India are derived from Sanskrit. Sanskrit can be act as an intermediate language for multilingual translation.

  3. Energy Consumption Forecasting Using Semantic-Based Genetic Programming with Local Search Optimizer.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Mauro; Trujillo, Leonardo; Vanneschi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Energy consumption forecasting (ECF) is an important policy issue in today's economies. An accurate ECF has great benefits for electric utilities and both negative and positive errors lead to increased operating costs. The paper proposes a semantic based genetic programming framework to address the ECF problem. In particular, we propose a system that finds (quasi-)perfect solutions with high probability and that generates models able to produce near optimal predictions also on unseen data. The framework blends a recently developed version of genetic programming that integrates semantic genetic operators with a local search method. The main idea in combining semantic genetic programming and a local searcher is to couple the exploration ability of the former with the exploitation ability of the latter. Experimental results confirm the suitability of the proposed method in predicting the energy consumption. In particular, the system produces a lower error with respect to the existing state-of-the art techniques used on the same dataset. More importantly, this case study has shown that including a local searcher in the geometric semantic genetic programming system can speed up the search process and can result in fitter models that are able to produce an accurate forecasting also on unseen data.

  4. Energy efficiency and energy homeostasis as genetic and epigenetic components of plant performance and crop productivity.

    PubMed

    De Block, Marc; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2011-06-01

    The importance of energy metabolism in plant performance and plant productivity is conceptually well recognized. In the eighties, several independent studies in Lolium perenne (ryegrass), Zea mays (maize), and Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) correlated low respiration rates with high yields. Similar reports in the nineties largely confirmed this correlation in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). However, selection for reduced respiration does not always result in high-yielding cultivars. Indeed, the ratio between energy content and respiration, defined here as energy efficiency, rather than respiration on its own, has a major impact on the yield potential of a crop. Besides energy efficiency, energy homeostasis, representing the balance between energy production and consumption in a changing environment, also contributes to an enhanced plant performance and this happens mainly through an increased stress tolerance. Although a few single gene approaches look promising, probably whole interacting networks have to be modulated, as is done by classical breeding, to improve the energy status of plants. Recent developments show that both energy efficiency and energy homeostasis have an epigenetic component that can be directed and stabilized by artificial selection (i.e. selective breeding). This novel approach offers new opportunities to improve yield potential and stress tolerance in a wide variety of crops.

  5. Mixing energy models in genetic algorithms for on-lattice protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahmood A; Newton, M A Hakim; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is computationally a very challenging problem. The challenge largely comes from the fact that the energy function that needs to be minimised in order to obtain the native structure of a given protein is not clearly known. A high resolution 20 × 20 energy model could better capture the behaviour of the actual energy function than a low resolution energy model such as hydrophobic polar. However, the fine grained details of the high resolution interaction energy matrix are often not very informative for guiding the search. In contrast, a low resolution energy model could effectively bias the search towards certain promising directions. In this paper, we develop a genetic algorithm that mainly uses a high resolution energy model for protein structure evaluation but uses a low resolution HP energy model in focussing the search towards exploring structures that have hydrophobic cores. We experimentally show that this mixing of energy models leads to significant lower energy structures compared to the state-of-the-art results.

  6. Mixing Energy Models in Genetic Algorithms for On-Lattice Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mahmood A.; Newton, M. A. Hakim; Hoque, Md. Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is computationally a very challenging problem. The challenge largely comes from the fact that the energy function that needs to be minimised in order to obtain the native structure of a given protein is not clearly known. A high resolution 20 × 20 energy model could better capture the behaviour of the actual energy function than a low resolution energy model such as hydrophobic polar. However, the fine grained details of the high resolution interaction energy matrix are often not very informative for guiding the search. In contrast, a low resolution energy model could effectively bias the search towards certain promising directions. In this paper, we develop a genetic algorithm that mainly uses a high resolution energy model for protein structure evaluation but uses a low resolution HP energy model in focussing the search towards exploring structures that have hydrophobic cores. We experimentally show that this mixing of energy models leads to significant lower energy structures compared to the state-of-the-art results. PMID:24224180

  7. Energy crops for biofuel feedstocks: facts and recent patents on genetic manipulation to improve biofuel crops.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh

    2013-12-01

    Burning fossil-fuels to meet the global energy requirements by human being has intensified the concerns of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Therefore, serious efforts are required to develop nonfossil-based renewable energy sources. Plants are more efficient in utilizing solar energy to convert it into biomass which can be used as feedstocks for biofuel production. Hence with the increasing demands of energy and the needs of cost-effective, sustainable production of fuels, it has become necessary to switch over to plant biomass as a renewable source of energy. Biofuels derived from more sustainable biological materials such as lignocellulosic plant residues, considered as second generation biofuels, are more dependable. However, there are technical challenges such as pretreatment and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to convert it into fermentable sugars. Plant genetic engineering has already proven its potential in modifying cell wall composition of plants for enhancing the efficiency of biofuel production. Interest and potential in the area are very much evident from the growing number of patents in the recent years on the subject. In this review, recent trends in genetic engineering of energy crops for biofuel production have been introduced, and strategies for the future developments have been discussed.

  8. Genetics of grass dry matter intake, energy balance, and digestibility in grazing irish dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Berry, D P; Horan, B; O'Donovan, M; Buckley, F; Kennedy, E; McEvoy, M; Dillon, P

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for grass dry matter intake (DMI), energy balance (EB), and cow internal digestibility (IDG) in grazing Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. Grass DMI was estimated up to 4 times per lactation on 1,588 lactations from 755 cows on 2 research farms in southern Ireland. Simultaneously measured milk production and BW records were used to calculate EB. Cow IDG, measured as the ratio of feed and fecal concentrations of the natural odd carbon-chain n-alkane pentatriacontane, was available on 583 lactations from 238 cows. Random regression and multitrait animal models were used to estimate residual, additive genetic and permanent environmental (co)variances across lactations. Results were similar for both models. Heritability for DMI, EB, and IDG across lactation varied from 0.10 [8 days in milk (DIM)] to 0.30 (169 DIM), from 0.06 (29 DIM) to 0.29 (305 DIM), and from 0.08 (50 DIM) to 0.45 (305 DIM), respectively, when estimated using the random regression model. Genetic correlations within each trait tended to decrease as the interval between periods compared increased for DMI and EB, whereas the correlations with IDG in early lactation were weakest when measured midlactation. The lowest correlation between any 2 periods was 0.10, -0.36, and -0.04 for DMI, EB, and IDG, respectively, suggesting the effect of different genes at different stages of lactations. Eigenvalues and associated eigenfunctions of the additive genetic covariance matrix revealed considerable genetic variation among animals in the shape of the lactation profiles for DMI, EB, and IDG. Genetic parameters presented are the first estimates from dairy cows fed predominantly grazed grass and imply that genetic improvement in DMI, EB, and IDG in Holstein-Friesian cows fed predominantly grazed grass is possible.

  9. Genetic parameters of dairy cow energy intake and body energy status predicted using mid-infrared spectrometry of milk.

    PubMed

    McParland, S; Kennedy, E; Lewis, E; Moore, S G; McCarthy, B; O'Donovan, M; Berry, D P

    2015-02-01

    Energy balance (EB) and energy intake (EI) are heritable traits of economic importance. Despite this, neither trait is explicitly included in national dairy cow breeding goals due to a lack of routinely available data from which to compute reliable breeding values. Mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry, which is performed during routine milk recording, is an accurate predictor of both EB and EI. The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters of EB and EI predicted using MIR spectrometry. Measured EI and EB were available for 1,102 Irish Holstein-Friesian cows based on actual feed intake and energy sink data. A subset of these data (1,270 test-day records) was used to develop equations to predict EI, EB, and daily change in body condition score (ΔBCS) and body weight (ΔBW) using the MIR spectrum with or without milk yield also as a predictor variable. Accuracy of cross-validation of the prediction equations was 0.75, 0.73, 0.77, and 0.70 for EI, EB, ΔBCS, and ΔBW, respectively. Prediction equations were applied to additional spectral data, yielding up to 94,653 records of MIR-predicted EI, EB, ΔBCS, and ΔBW available for variance component estimation. Variance components were estimated using repeatability animal linear mixed models. Heritabilities of MIR-predicted EI, EB, ΔBCS, and ΔBW were 0.20, 0.10, 0.07, and 0.06, respectively; heritability estimates of the respective measured traits were 0.35, 0.16, 0.07, and 0.08, respectively. The genetic correlation between measured and MIR-predicted EI was 0.84 and between measured and MIR-predicted EB was 0.54, indicating that selection based on MIR-predicted EI or EB would improve true EI or EB. Genetic and phenotypic associations between EI and both the milk production and body-change traits were generally in agreement, regardless of whether measured EI or MIR-predicted EI was considered. Higher-yielding animals of higher body weight had greater EI. Predicted EB was negatively genetically correlated

  10. Application of Genetic Algorithm to the Design Optimization of Complex Energy Saving Glass Coating Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johar, F. M.; Azmin, F. A.; Shibghatullah, A. S.; Suaidi, M. K.; Ahmad, B. H.; Abd Aziz, M. Z. A.; Salleh, S. N.; Shukor, M. Md

    2014-04-01

    Attenuation of GSM, GPS and personal communication signal leads to poor communication inside the building using regular shapes of energy saving glass coating. Thus, the transmission is very low. A brand new type of band pass frequency selective surface (FSS) for energy saving glass application is presented in this paper for one unit cell. Numerical Periodic Method of Moment approach according to a previous study has been applied to determine the new optimum design of one unit cell energy saving glass coating structure. Optimization technique based on the Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used to obtain an improved in return loss and transmission signal. The unit cell of FSS is designed and simulated using the CST Microwave Studio software at based on industrial, scientific and medical bands (ISM). A unique and irregular shape of an energy saving glass coating structure is obtained with lower return loss and improved transmission coefficient.

  11. Applying genetic algorithms to space optimization decision of farmland bio-energy intensive utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Li, Xia; Zhuo, Li; Tao, Haiyan; Xia, Lihua

    2008-10-01

    The development of bio-energy intensive utilization of farmland is to solve China's emerging issues related to energy and environment in an important way. Given the spatial distribution of bio-energy is scattered, not continuous, the intensive utilization of farmland bio-energy is different from that of the traditional energy, i.e. coal, oil, natural gas, etc.. The estimation of biomass, the spatial distribution and the space optimization study are the key for practical applications to develop bio-energy intensive utilization. Based on a case study conducted in Guangdong province, China, this paper provides a framework that estimates available biomass and analyzes its distribution pattern in the established NPP model quickly; it also builds the primary collection ranges by Thiessen polygon in different scales. The application of Genetic Algorithms (GA) to the optimization and space decision of bio-energy intensive utilization is one of the key deliveries. The result shows that GA and GIS integration model for resolving domain-point supply and field demand has obvious advantages. A key finding presents that the model simulation results have enormous impact by the MUAP. When Thiessen polygon scale with 10 KM proximal threshold is established as the primary collecting scope of bioenergy, the fitness value can be maximized in the optimized process. In short, the optimized model can provide an effective solution to farmland bio-energy spatial optimization.

  12. Geographic origins and population genetics of bats killed at wind-energy facilities.

    PubMed

    Pylant, Cortney L; Nelson, David M; Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Gates, J Edward; Keller, Stephen R

    2016-07-01

    An unanticipated impact of wind-energy development has been large-scale mortality of insectivorous bats. In eastern North America, where mortality rates are among the highest in the world, the hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) and the eastern red bat (L. borealis) comprise the majority of turbine-associated bat mortality. Both species are migratory tree bats with widespread distributions; however, little is known regarding the geographic origins of bats killed at wind-energy facilities or the diversity and population structure of affected species. We addressed these unknowns by measuring stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δ(2) H) and conducting population genetic analyses of bats killed at wind-energy facilities in the central Appalachian Mountains (USA) to determine the summering origins, effective size, structure, and temporal stability of populations. Our results indicate that ~1% of hoary bat mortalities and ~57% of red bat mortalities derive from non-local sources, with no relationship between the proportion of non-local bats and sex, location of mortality, or month of mortality. Additionally, our data indicate that hoary bats in our sample consist of an unstructured population with a small effective size (Ne ) and either a stable or declining history. Red bats also showed no evidence of population genetic structure, but in contrast to hoary bats, the diversity contained in our red bat samples is consistent with a much larger Ne that reflects a demographic expansion after a bottleneck. These results suggest that the impacts of mortality associated with intensive wind-energy development may affect bat species dissimilarly, with red bats potentially better able to absorb sustained mortality than hoary bats because of their larger Ne . Our results provide important baseline data and also illustrate the utility of stable isotopes and population genetics for monitoring bat populations affected by wind-energy development.

  13. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  14. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  15. Energy-efficient waveform shapes for neural stimulation revealed with a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2010-08-01

    The energy efficiency of stimulation is an important consideration for battery-powered implantable stimulators. We used a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the energy-optimal waveform shape for neural stimulation. The GA was coupled to a computational model of extracellular stimulation of a mammalian myelinated axon. As the GA progressed, waveforms became increasingly energy efficient and converged upon an energy-optimal shape. The results of the GA were consistent across several trials, and resulting waveforms resembled truncated Gaussian curves. When constrained to monophasic cathodic waveforms, the GA produced waveforms that were symmetric about the peak, which occurred approximately during the middle of the pulse. However, when the cathodic waveforms were coupled to rectangular charge-balancing anodic pulses, the location and sharpness of the peak varied with the duration and timing (i.e., before or after the cathodic phase) of the anodic phase. In a model of a population of mammalian axons and in vivo experiments on a cat sciatic nerve, the GA-optimized waveforms were more energy efficient and charge efficient than several conventional waveform shapes used in neural stimulation. If used in implantable neural stimulators, GA-optimized waveforms could prolong battery life, thereby reducing the frequency of recharge intervals, the volume of implanted pulse generators, and the costs and risks of battery-replacement surgeries.

  16. Energy-efficient waveform shapes for neural stimulation revealed with genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    The energy efficiency of stimulation is an important consideration for battery-powered implantable stimulators. We used a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the energy-optimal waveform shape for neural stimulation. The GA was coupled to a computational model of extracellular stimulation of a mammalian myelinated axon. As the GA progressed, waveforms became increasingly energy-efficient and converged upon an energy-optimal shape. The results of the GA were consistent across several trials, and resulting waveforms resembled truncated Gaussian curves. When constrained to monophasic cathodic waveforms, the GA produced waveforms that were symmetric about the peak, which occurred approximately during the middle of the pulse. However, when the cathodic waveforms were coupled to rectangular charge-balancing anodic pulses, the location and sharpness of the peak varied with the duration and timing (i.e., before or after cathodic phase) of the anodic phase. In a model of a population of mammalian axons and in vivo experiments on cat sciatic nerve, the GA-optimized waveforms were more energy-efficient and charge-efficient than several conventional waveform shapes used in neural stimulation. If used in implantable neural stimulators, GA-optimized waveforms could prolong battery life, thereby reducing the frequency of recharge intervals, the volume of implanted pulse generators, and the costs and risks of battery-replacement surgeries. PMID:20571186

  17. An integrated, structure- and energy-based view of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Henri; Westhof, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The principles of mRNA decoding are conserved among all extant life forms. We present an integrative view of all the interaction networks between mRNA, tRNA and rRNA: the intrinsic stability of codon–anticodon duplex, the conformation of the anticodon hairpin, the presence of modified nucleotides, the occurrence of non-Watson–Crick pairs in the codon–anticodon helix and the interactions with bases of rRNA at the A-site decoding site. We derive a more information-rich, alternative representation of the genetic code, that is circular with an unsymmetrical distribution of codons leading to a clear segregation between GC-rich 4-codon boxes and AU-rich 2:2-codon and 3:1-codon boxes. All tRNA sequence variations can be visualized, within an internal structural and energy framework, for each organism, and each anticodon of the sense codons. The multiplicity and complexity of nucleotide modifications at positions 34 and 37 of the anticodon loop segregate meaningfully, and correlate well with the necessity to stabilize AU-rich codon–anticodon pairs and to avoid miscoding in split codon boxes. The evolution and expansion of the genetic code is viewed as being originally based on GC content with progressive introduction of A/U together with tRNA modifications. The representation we present should help the engineering of the genetic code to include non-natural amino acids. PMID:27448410

  18. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Hosseini, S. A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  19. Guided macro-mutation in a graded energy based genetic algorithm for protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahmood A; Iqbal, Sumaiya; Khatib, Firas; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    Protein structure prediction is considered as one of the most challenging and computationally intractable combinatorial problem. Thus, the efficient modeling of convoluted search space, the clever use of energy functions, and more importantly, the use of effective sampling algorithms become crucial to address this problem. For protein structure modeling, an off-lattice model provides limited scopes to exercise and evaluate the algorithmic developments due to its astronomically large set of data-points. In contrast, an on-lattice model widens the scopes and permits studying the relatively larger proteins because of its finite set of data-points. In this work, we took the full advantage of an on-lattice model by using a face-centered-cube lattice that has the highest packing density with the maximum degree of freedom. We proposed a graded energy-strategically mixes the Miyazawa-Jernigan (MJ) energy with the hydrophobic-polar (HP) energy-based genetic algorithm (GA) for conformational search. In our application, we introduced a 2 × 2 HP energy guided macro-mutation operator within the GA to explore the best possible local changes exhaustively. Conversely, the 20 × 20 MJ energy model-the ultimate objective function of our GA that needs to be minimized-considers the impacts amongst the 20 different amino acids and allow searching the globally acceptable conformations. On a set of benchmark proteins, our proposed approach outperformed state-of-the-art approaches in terms of the free energy levels and the root-mean-square deviations.

  20. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  1. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; ...

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly,more » during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.« less

  2. Constructing the Energy Landscape for Genetic Switching System Driven by Intrinsic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fangting; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Genetic switching driven by noise is a fundamental cellular process in genetic regulatory networks. Quantitatively characterizing this switching and its fluctuation properties is a key problem in computational biology. With an autoregulatory dimer model as a specific example, we design a general methodology to quantitatively understand the metastability of gene regulatory system perturbed by intrinsic noise. Based on the large deviation theory, we develop new analytical techniques to describe and calculate the optimal transition paths between the on and off states. We also construct the global quasi-potential energy landscape for the dimer model. From the obtained quasi-potential, we can extract quantitative results such as the stationary distributions of mRNA, protein and dimer, the noise strength of the expression state, and the mean switching time starting from either stable state. In the final stage, we apply this procedure to a transcriptional cascades model. Our results suggest that the quasi-potential energy landscape and the proposed methodology are general to understand the metastability in other biological systems with intrinsic noise. PMID:24551081

  3. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy. PMID:25400629

  4. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan N; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  5. Short communication: genetic parameters for feed intake, production, and extent of negative energy balance in Nordic Red dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Liinamo, A-E; Mäntysaari, P; Mäntysaari, E A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the genetic parameters for feed intake, milk production, and energy balance in Nordic Red dairy cattle from an experimental data set. The data were collected at the MTT Agrifood Research Finland Rehtijärvi experimental farm in 4 feeding trials between 1998 and 2008, and included lactation wk 2 to 30 for 291 Nordic Red nucleus heifers descending from 72 different sires. The studied traits included weekly averages for energy-corrected milk yield (ECM, kg/d), dry matter intake (kg/d), body weight (BW, kg), body condition score (BCS, score 1 to 5), and energy balance (EB, MJ of metabolizable energy/d). The data were analyzed with both fixed and random regression models. The heritabilities of ECM and BCS were moderate to high and remained fairly constant over the entire lactation period, whereas the heritabilities of BW and EB were the highest in early lactation (0.47 and 0.37, respectively) and declined later on. The heritabilities of DMI were highest (0.33) around lactation wk 5 and again at lactation wk 30, and were somewhat lower at the beginning of the lactation and in the middle period. The genetic correlations between the traits differed considerably between early and later lactation periods, especially for the trait pairs ECM-dry matter intake, ECM-EB, BW-EB, and BCS-EB, being negative or close to zero in lactation wk 2 to 5 but turning moderate to strong and positive by lactation wk 10. The results suggest that the lactating cows express their genetic potential for feed intake and energy utilization most clearly between lactation wk 2 to 10. The best candidate trait for selection might be EB in lactation wk 2 to 5 because it has a moderate heritability and is not genetically correlated with BW or BCS in that period.

  6. Optimizing energy yields in black locust through genetic selection: final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bongarten, B.C.; Merkle, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the magnitude of improvement in biomass yield of black locust possible through breeding, and to determine methods for efficiently capturing the yield improvement achievable from selective breeding. To meet this overall objective, six tasks were undertaken to determine: (1) the amount and geographic pattern of natural genetic variation, (2) the mating system of the species, (3) quantitative genetic parameters of relevant traits, (4) the relationship between nitrogen fixation and growth in black locust, (5) the viability of mass vegetative propagation, and (6) the feasibility of improvement through genetic transformation.

  7. Multi-step excitation energy transfer engineered in genetic fusions of natural and synthetic light-harvesting proteins.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Joshua A; Kodali, Goutham; Jiang, Jianbing; Reddy, Kanumuri Ramesh; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Bryant, Donald A; Dutton, P Leslie; Moser, Christopher C

    2017-02-01

    Synthetic proteins designed and constructed from first principles with minimal reference to the sequence of any natural protein have proven robust and extraordinarily adaptable for engineering a range of functions. Here for the first time we describe the expression and genetic fusion of a natural photosynthetic light-harvesting subunit with a synthetic protein designed for light energy capture and multi-step transfer. We demonstrate excitation energy transfer from the bilin of the CpcA subunit (phycocyanin α subunit) of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic light-harvesting phycobilisome to synthetic four-helix-bundle proteins accommodating sites that specifically bind a variety of selected photoactive tetrapyrroles positioned to enhance energy transfer by relay. The examination of combinations of different bilin, chlorin and bacteriochlorin cofactors has led to identification of the preconditions for directing energy from the bilin light-harvesting antenna into synthetic protein-cofactor constructs that can be customized for light-activated chemistry in the cell.

  8. The relationship between protein turnover and energy balance in lean and genetically obese (ob/ob) mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, B G; Otto, W R; Grimble, R F; York, D A; Taylor, T G

    1979-09-01

    1. Groups of lean and genetically obese (ob/ob) mice were adapted to varying energy intakes and the rates of total protein turnover in liver, gut and kidney were measured. 2. Lean mice gained less weight when fed above maintenance and lost less weight when fed below maintance than obese mice. 3. Hepatic protein turnover (mg/d) was sigmoidally related to digestible energy intake in lean mice but showed no significant changes with dietary intake in obese mice. 4. The changes in protein turnover resulted from changes in both the half-lives of protein synthesis and catabolism and in tissue protein content. 5. In the lean mice, protein turnover in kidney and gut was not significantly changed with increasing energy intake until the highest level was reached. 6. The findings suggest that protein turnover may be an important cycle for the regulation of energy balance in mice and that this cycle is impaired in the genetically obese (ob/ob) mice.

  9. Energy optimization of the fin/rudder roll stabilization system based on the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lijun; Liu, Shaoying; Liu, Fanming; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Energy optimization is one of the key problems for ship roll reduction systems in the last decade. According to the nonlinear characteristics of ship motion, the four degrees of freedom nonlinear model of Fin/Rudder roll stabilization can be established. This paper analyzes energy consumption caused by overcoming the resistance and the yaw, which is added to the fin/rudder roll stabilization system as new performance index. In order to achieve the purpose of the roll reduction, ship course keeping and energy optimization, the self-tuning PID controller based on the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) method is used to optimize performance index. In addition, random weight coefficient is adopted to build a multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization model. The objective function is improved so that the objective function can be normalized to a constant level. Simulation results showed that the control method based on MOGA, compared with the traditional control method, not only improves the efficiency of roll stabilization and yaw control precision, but also optimizes the energy of the system. The proposed methodology can get a better performance at different sea states.

  10. Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Sam

    2013-03-01

    Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  11. Genetic Resources of Energy Crops: Biological Systems to Combat Climate Change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological systems are expected to contribute to renewable energy production, help stabilize rising levels of green house gases (GHG), and mitigate the risk of global climate change (GCC). Bioenergy crop plants that function as solar energy collectors and thermo-chemical energy storage systems are t...

  12. EFFECT OF DIETARY LYSINE AND GENETICS ON INDICES OF ENERGY AND PROTEIN METABOLISM IN RAINBOW TROUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since feed cost represents about 70% of production cost, inexpensive protein alternatives are desirable replacements for fish meal. One drawback to the replacement of fish meal with soybean meal is that the latter protein source is first limiting in lysine. To investigate if different genetic line...

  13. Electromagnetic energy as a bridge between atomic and cellular levels in the genetics approach to cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Tofani, Santi

    2015-01-01

    Literature on magnetic fields (MF) and gene expression, as well as on DNA damage, supports the hypothesis that electromagnetic energy may act at atomic level influencing genetic stability. According to quantum physics, MF act on the interconversion of singlet and triplet spin states, and therefore on genetic instability, activating oxidative processes connected to biological free radicals formation, particularly ROS. In the above frame, the results of in vitro and in vivo laboratory trials have been analyzed. The use of a static MF amplitude modulated by 50 Hz MF, with a time average total intensity of 5.5 mT, has been shown to influence tumor cell functions such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, p53 expression, inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in animals, evidence that MF can be more effective than chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide) in inhibiting metastatic spread and growth, having synergistic activity with chemotherapy (Cis-platin), and no observable side effects or toxicity in animals or in humans. The beneficial biological/clinical effects observed, without any adverse effects, have been confirmed by various authors and augur well for the potentiality of this new approach to treat genetically based diseases like cancer. Further studies are needed to develop a quantum physics approach to biology, allowing a stable bridge to be built between atomic and cellular levels, therefore developing quantum biology.

  14. Genetic variants in human CLOCK associate with total energy intake and cytokine sleep factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the importance of total energy intake in circadian system regulation, no study has related human CLOCK gene polymorphisms and food intake measures. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of five CLOCK single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) with food-intake and to explore the p...

  15. Genetic approaches to understanding the population-level impact of wind energy development on migratory bats

    SciTech Connect

    Vonhof, Maarten J.; Russell, Amy L.

    2013-09-30

    Documented fatalities of bats at wind turbines have raised serious concerns about the future impacts of increased wind power development on populations of migratory bat species. Yet there is little data on bat population sizes and trends to provide context for understanding the consequences of mortality due to wind power development. Using a large dataset of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation for eastern red bats, we demonstrated that: 1) this species forms a single, panmictic population across their range with no evidence for the historical use of divergent migratory pathways by any portion of the population; 2) the effective size of this population is in the hundreds of thousands to millions; and 3) for large populations, genetic diversity measures and at least one coalescent method are insensitive to even very high rates of population decline over long time scales and until population size has become very small. Our data provide important context for understanding the population-level impacts of wind power development on affected bat species.

  16. Improving the accuracy of low level quantum chemical calculation for absorption energies: the genetic algorithm and neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Shi, Li-Li; Li, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Shan-Shan; Li, Hui; Sun, Shi-Ling; Su, Zhong-Min; Lu, Ying-Hua

    2009-07-07

    The combination of genetic algorithm and back-propagation neural network correction approaches (GABP) has successfully improved the calculation accuracy of absorption energies. In this paper, the absorption energies of 160 organic molecules are corrected to test this method. Firstly, the GABP1 is introduced to determine the quantitative relationship between the experimental results and calculations obtained by using quantum chemical methods. After GABP1 correction, the root-mean-square (RMS) deviations of the calculated absorption energies reduce from 0.32, 0.95 and 0.46 eV to 0.14, 0.19 and 0.18 eV for B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/STO-3G and ZINDO methods, respectively. The corrected results of B3LYP/6-31G(d)-GABP1 are in good agreement with experimental results. Then, the GABP2 is introduced to determine the quantitative relationship between the results of B3LYP/6-31G(d)-GABP1 method and calculations of the low accuracy methods (B3LYP/STO-3G and ZINDO). After GABP2 correction, the RMS deviations of the calculated absorption energies reduce to 0.20 and 0.19 eV for B3LYP/STO-3G and ZINDO methods, respectively. The results show that the RMS deviations after GABP1 and GABP2 correction are similar for B3LYP/STO-3G and ZINDO methods. Thus, the B3LYP/6-31G(d)-GABP1 is a better method to predict absorption energies and can be used as the approximation of experimental results where the experimental results are unknown or uncertain by experimental method. This method may be used for predicting absorption energies of larger organic molecules that are unavailable by experimental methods and by high-accuracy theoretical methods with larger basis sets. The performance of this method was demonstrated by application to the absorption energy of the aldehyde carbazole precursor.

  17. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and…

  18. Toward a new radiative-transfer-based model for remote sensing of terrestrial surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shengcheng; Zhen, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Shizhi; Zhu, WenYue; Li, Xuebin; Huang, Honghua; Wei, Heli

    2015-08-15

    This Letter formulates a simple yet accurate radiative-transfer-based theoretical model to characterize the fraction of radiation reflected by terrestrial surfaces. Emphasis is placed on the concept of inhomogeneous distribution of the diffuse sky radiation function (DSRF) and multiple interaction effects (MIE). Neglecting DSRF and MIE produces a -1.55% mean relative bias in albedo estimates. The presented model can elucidate the impact of DSRF on the surface volume scattering and geometry-optical scattering components, respectively, especially for slant illuminations with solar zenith angles (SZA) larger than 50°. Particularly striking in the comparisons between our model and ground-based observations is the achievement of the agreement level, indicating that our model can effectively resolve the longstanding issue in accurately estimating albedo at extremely large SZAs and is promising for land-atmosphere interactions studies.

  19. Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...procurement or storage of standard, common use fuels. NATURAL GAS Natural gas, abundant globally and domestically, offers energy versatility among

  20. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human ...

  1. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Before or between pregnancies > Genetic counseling Genetic counseling E-mail to a friend Please fill ... a genetic counselor in your area. What is genetic counseling? Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes , ...

  2. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanebrook, J. Richard

    This document describes a course designed to acquaint students with the many societal and technological problems facing the United States and the world due to the increasing demand for energy. The course begins with a writing assignment that involves readings on the environmental philosophy of Native Americans and the Chernobyl catastrophe.…

  3. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist influenced daily profile of energy expenditure in genetically obese diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuki; Ichikawa, Mineko; Ohta, Minoru; Kanai, Setsuko; Kobayash, Mikako; Ichimaru, Yuhei; Shimazoe, Takao; Watanabe, Shigenori; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Miyasak, Kyoko

    2002-03-01

    Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats were developed as a model of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with mild obesity. We reported that the daily profiles of energy expenditure associated with two peaks (one between 05:00 and 08:00 and the other between 20:00 and 22:00) were observed at 8 weeks of age (without NIDDM), while these two peaks disappeared at 24 weeks of age with NIDDM. As a new anti-diabetic drug, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor y agonist pioglitazone hydrochloride has been developed, we examined whether pioglitazone normalized daily profiles of energy expenditure at 24 weeks of age. A control diet and pioglitazone (0.1%)-containing diet were fed from 6 weeks of age. The two peaks of daily profiles of energy expenditure, which disappeared in OLETF rats with the control diet at 24 weeks of age, were reproduced by administration of pioglitazone. The respiratory quotient was lower and fat derived energy used for combustion was increased by pioglitazone at both ages. The body weight, daily food intake, plasma levels of fat, insulin, leptin and the wet weight of visceral fat were not influenced, but the levels of blood hemoglobin Alc and plasma tumor necrosis factor a were decreased by pioglitazone. Administration of pioglitazone improved daily profiles of energy expenditure via affecting glucose and fat metabolisms.

  4. Flight performance and teneral energy reserves of two genetically-modified and one wild-type strain of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Bargielowski, Irka; Kaufmann, Christian; Alphey, Luke; Reiter, Paul; Koella, Jacob

    2012-12-01

    The ability of sterile males to survive, disperse, find, and mate with wild females is key to the success of sterile insect technique (SIT). The Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal (RIDL) system is a genetics-based SIT strategy for Aedes aegypti. We examine two aspects of insect performance, flight potential (dispersal ability) and teneral energy reserves, by comparing wild-type (WT) males with genetically-modified lines carrying the tetracycline-repressible constructs OX513A and OX3604C. Our results show significant differences in the flight capacity of the modified lines. OX513A males bred with tetracycline covered 38% less distance, while OX3604C males reared without tetracycline spent 21% less time in flight than their WT counterparts. Such differences in flight performance should be considered when designing release programs (e.g., by placing release sites sufficiently close together to achieve adequate coverage). All mosquito lines had similar teneral carbohydrate contents, though males of the OX3604C line contained more lipids. The addition of tetracycline to the larval diet did not influence the flight potential of the males; however, it did change the teneral sugar reserves of the WT and the lipid reserves of both the WT and the OX3604C lines.

  5. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist.

  6. Development of a genetic algorithm optimisation tool for the early stage design of low and net-Zero Energy Solar Homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charron, Remi

    Homes that utilise solar thermal and solar photovoltaic (PV) technologies to generate as much energy as they consume in a year are referred to as net-Zero Energy Solar Homes (ZESH). This thesis presents the methodology used to develop a Genetic Algorithm (GA) Optimisation Tool that finds optimal configurations of low and net-zero energy solar homes taking into consideration effects from the use of different technologies, local climate, economics, and other factors. The tool links a low energy solar home model developed in TRNSYS with a GA optimisation program that automates the search for cost-effective building designs. The tool varies a predefined set of parameters including building width to length ratio, heating system type, solar thermal collector type and size, and more. The results from the TRNSYS model are compared with monitored data of an energy efficient house to verify that the model was correctly implemented. A total of 40 test cases were evaluated with the tool in order to verify the effects of climate, energy consumption target, control strategy, utility price structures, and other factors, to examine their impact on the resulting optimal design configurations. The GA program was capable of finding designs that were on average within 0.5% of the best known solution with the evaluation of only 0.00012% of the solution space. Results indicated that homes could be built with near equivalent monthly costs of conventional homes, while reducing the annual net-energy consumption by an order of magnitude. A reduction in PV system costs or the introduction of appropriate feed-in-tariffs had significant impacts on the overall cost-effectiveness of ZESH. The thesis clearly demonstrated the extent to which local climate, economic factors, and specific design constraints can have a major impact on the optimal design configuration, which limits the usefulness of generic design guidelines. The methodology developed was also a novel way of using TRNSYS for the

  7. New Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  8. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Genetic Disorders Home For Patients Search FAQs Genetic Disorders ... Spanish Genetic Disorders FAQ094, April 2014 PDF Format Genetic Disorders Pregnancy What are genes? What are chromosomes? ...

  9. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  10. The ability of genetically lean or fat slow-growing chickens to synthesize and store lipids is not altered by the dietary energy source.

    PubMed

    Baéza, E; Gondret, F; Chartrin, P; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Berri, C; Gabriel, I; Narcy, A; Lessire, M; Métayer-Coustard, S; Collin, A; Jégou, M; Lagarrigue, S; Duclos, M J

    2015-10-01

    The increasing use of unconventional feedstuffs in chicken's diets results in the substitution of starch by lipids as the main dietary energy source. To evaluate the responses of genetically fat or lean chickens to these diets, males of two experimental lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content were fed isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with either high lipid (80 g/kg), high fiber (64 g/kg) contents (HL), or low lipid (20 g/kg), low fiber (21 g/kg) contents (LL) from 22 to 63 days of age. The diet had no effect on growth performance and did not affect body composition evaluated at 63 days of age. Glycolytic and oxidative energy metabolisms in the liver and glycogen storage in liver and Sartorius muscle at 63 days of age were greater in chicken fed LL diet compared with chicken fed HL diet. In Pectoralis major (PM) muscle, energy metabolisms and glycogen content were not different between diets. There were no dietary-associated differences in lipid contents of the liver, muscles and abdominal fat. However, the percentages of saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in tissue lipids were generally higher, whereas percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were lower for diet LL than for diet HL. The fat line had a greater feed intake and average daily gain, but gain to feed ratio was lower in that line compared with the lean line. Fat chickens were heavier than lean chickens at 63 days of age. Their carcass fatness was higher and their muscle yield was lower than those of lean chickens. The oxidative enzyme activities in the liver were lower in the fat line than in the lean line, but line did not affect energy metabolism in muscles. The hepatic glycogen content was not different between lines, whereas glycogen content and glycolytic potential were higher in the PM muscle of fat chickens compared with lean chickens. Lipid contents in the liver, muscles and abdominal fat did not differ between lines, but fat chickens stored less MUFA and

  11. Deep Sequencing Reveals Novel Genetic Variants in Children with Acute Liver Failure and Tissue Evidence of Impaired Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, C. Alexander; Wang, Xinjian; Wang, Jin; Peters, Anna; Simmons, Julia R.; Moran, Molly C.; Mathur, Abhinav; Husami, Ammar; Qian, Yaping; Sheridan, Rachel; Bove, Kevin E.; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Miethke, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The etiology of acute liver failure (ALF) remains elusive in almost half of affected children. We hypothesized that inherited mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation disorders were occult etiological factors in patients with idiopathic ALF and impaired energy metabolism. Methods Twelve patients with elevated blood molar lactate/pyruvate ratio and indeterminate etiology were selected from a retrospective cohort of 74 subjects with ALF because their fixed and frozen liver samples were available for histological, ultrastructural, molecular and biochemical analysis. Results A customized next-generation sequencing panel for 26 genes associated with mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation defects revealed mutations and sequence variants in five subjects. Variants involved the genes ACAD9, POLG, POLG2, DGUOK, and RRM2B; the latter not previously reported in subjects with ALF. The explanted livers of the patients with heterozygous, truncating insertion mutations in RRM2B showed patchy micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content <30% of controls, and reduced respiratory chain complex activity; both patients had good post-transplant outcome. One infant with severe lactic acidosis was found to carry two heterozygous variants in ACAD9, which was associated with isolated complex I deficiency and diffuse hypergranular hepatocytes. The two subjects with heterozygous variants of unknown clinical significance in POLG and DGUOK developed ALF following drug exposure. Their hepatocytes displayed abnormal mitochondria by electron microscopy. Conclusion Targeted next generation sequencing and correlation with histological, ultrastructural and functional studies on liver tissue in children with elevated lactate/pyruvate ratio expand the spectrum of genes associated with pediatric ALF. PMID:27483465

  12. Mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). In addition, this review makes use of a growing number of publically available databases including MITOMAP, a human mitochondrial genome database (www.mitomap.org), the Human DNA polymerase Gamma Mutation Database (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/polg/) and PhyloTree.org (www.phylotree.org), a repository of global mtDNA variation. Areas of agreement The disruption in cellular energy, resulting from defects in mtDNA or defects in the nuclear-encoded genes responsible for mitochondrial maintenance, manifests in a growing number of human diseases. Areas of controversy The exact mechanisms which govern the inheritance of mtDNA are hotly debated. Growing points Although still in the early stages, the development of in vitro genetic manipulation could see an end to the inheritance of the most severe mtDNA disease. PMID:23704099

  13. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  14. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  15. Theory of chemical kinetics and charge transfer based on nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Martin Z

    2013-05-21

    Advances in the fields of catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion often involve nanoparticles, which can have kinetics surprisingly different from the bulk material. Classical theories of chemical kinetics assume independent reactions in dilute solutions, whose rates are determined by mean concentrations. In condensed matter, strong interactions alter chemical activities and create variations that can dramatically affect the reaction rate. The extreme case is that of a reaction coupled to a phase transformation, whose kinetics must depend not only on the order parameter but also on its gradients at phase boundaries. Reaction-driven phase transformations are common in electrochemistry, when charge transfer is accompanied by ion intercalation or deposition in a solid phase. Examples abound in Li-ion, metal-air, and lead-acid batteries, as well as metal electrodeposition-dissolution. Despite complex thermodynamics, however, the standard kinetic model is the Butler-Volmer equation, based on a dilute solution approximation. The Marcus theory of charge transfer likewise considers isolated reactants and neglects elastic stress, configurational entropy, and other nonidealities in condensed phases. The limitations of existing theories recently became apparent for the Li-ion battery material LixFePO4 (LFP). It has a strong tendency to separate into Li-rich and Li-poor solid phases, which scientists believe limits its performance. Chemists first modeled phase separation in LFP as an isotropic "shrinking core" within each particle, but experiments later revealed striped phase boundaries on the active crystal facet. This raised the question: What is the reaction rate at a surface undergoing a phase transformation? Meanwhile, dramatic rate enhancement was attained with LFP nanoparticles, and classical battery models could not predict the roles of phase separation and surface modification. In this Account, I present a general theory of chemical kinetics, developed over

  16. Geneletter: An Internet-based newsletter on the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics. Final report to the Department of Energy [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, Philip; Wertz, Dorothy C.

    2001-05-01

    The GeneLetter (http://www.geneletter.org) is an Internet newsletter on ethical, legal, and social issues in genetics, designed for a wide and varied audience, some of whom may not be familiar with genetic science. It appears every two months, with a variety of long and short feature articles on ethics and on genetic disorders, a section on new federal and state legislation, an international section, a student corner, book and video reviews, a summary of genetics in the news, and a list of upcoming conferences. Feature articles have ventured into an area of wide general concern, behavioral genetics. The newsletter also has an interactive chatbox and the opportunity of more private communications with the editors via email. The purpose of the GeneLetter is to help fill a communication and knowledge gap on ethical, legal and social issues surrounding genetics.

  17. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000510.htm Genetic counseling To use the sharing features on this ... cystic fibrosis or Down syndrome. Who May Want Genetic Counseling? It is up to you whether or ...

  18. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  19. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  20. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  1. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  2. Genetic barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  3. [Genetics of pediatric obesity].

    PubMed

    Peralta-Romero, José de Jesús; Gómez-Zamudio, Jaime Héctor; Estrada-Velasco, Bárbara; Karam-Araujo, Roberto; Cruz-López, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem around the globe. The statistics of overweight and obesity at early ages have reached alarming levels and placed our country in the first place in regard to childhood obesity. In the development of obesity two major factors take part, one genetic and the other one environmental. From the perspective of environmental changes both overweight and obesity result from the imbalance in the energy balance: people ingest more energy than they expend. Despite people live in the same obesogenic environment not all of them develop obesity; it requires genetic factors for this to happen. This review focuses on the description of the main methodologies to find genetic markers, as well as the main loci in candidate genes, whose single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with obesity and its comorbidities in children, highlighting the association of these genes in the Mexican population. Knowledge of the genetic markers associated with obesity will help to understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms, the genetic background and changes in body mass index in the Mexican population. This information is useful for the planning of new hypotheses in the search for new biomarkers that can be used in a predictive and preventive way, as well as for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  4. Genetic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  5. Genetic Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... all things Genetic Alliance, Expecting Health and more... Co-Creating A Healthy Future See all the photos, videos, slideshows and more that we co-created at our 30th Anniversary conference. BioTrust BioTrust ...

  6. Genetics (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chromosomes to their child, 22 autosomal and 1 sex chromosome. The inheritance of genetic diseases, abnormalities, or traits ... chromosome the abnormal gene resides on (autosomal or sex chromosome), and by whether the gene itself is dominant ...

  7. Genetic Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kathryn J.; Sakati, Nadia; Prichard, Lorraine L.; Schneiderman, Lawrence J.; Jones, Oliver W.; Dixson, Barbara K.

    1976-01-01

    The geographic distribution of County Health Department clinic facilities in the state of California has made it readily possible to establish a regionalized program for genetic counseling services, using public health nurses as a major source of case-finding. From both consumer and health professional standpoints, regionalized satellite genetic counseling clinics have been successful, and in particular, the effectiveness of public health nurses in identifying clinical genetic problems is readily apparent. Long-term follow-up reinforcement of genetic counseling appears to be an important conclusion from these studies. It is our suggestion that reinforcement of counseling would best be accomplished through the health team member (physician, nurse and so forth) following the patient or family rather than through the consulting geneticist. PMID:946335

  8. Genetically encoded ratiometric biosensors to measure intracellular exchangeable zinc in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Hurst, Tamiika K.; Thompson, Richard B.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2011-08-01

    Zinc is an essential element for numerous cellular processes, therefore zinc homeostasis is regulated in living organisms. Fluorescent sensors have been developed as important tools to monitor the concentrations of readily exchangeable zinc in live cells. One type of biosensor uses carbonic anhydrase (CA) as the recognition element based on its tunable affinity, superior metal selectivity, and fluorescence signal from aryl sulfonamide ligands coupled to zinc binding. Here, we fuse carbonic anhydrase with a red fluorescent protein to create a series of genetically-encoded Förster resonance energy transfer-based excitation ratiometric zinc sensors that exhibit large signal increases in response to alterations in physiological-free zinc concentrations. These sensors were applied to the prokaryotic model organism Escherichia coli to quantify the readily exchangeable zinc concentration. In minimal media, E. coli BL21(DE3) cells expressing the CA sensor, exhibit a median intracellular readily exchangeable zinc concentration of 20 pM, much less than the total cellular zinc concentration of ~0.2 mM. Furthermore, the intracellular readily exchangeable zinc concentration varies with the concentration of environmental zinc.

  9. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  10. A Novel Wireless Power Transfer-Based Weighed Clustering Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Method for Cognitive Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    In a cognitive sensor network (CSN), the wastage of sensing time and energy is a challenge to cooperative spectrum sensing, when the number of cooperative cognitive nodes (CNs) becomes very large. In this paper, a novel wireless power transfer (WPT)-based weighed clustering cooperative spectrum sensing model is proposed, which divides all the CNs into several clusters, and then selects the most favorable CNs as the cluster heads and allows the common CNs to transfer the received radio frequency (RF) energy of the primary node (PN) to the cluster heads, in order to supply the electrical energy needed for sensing and cooperation. A joint resource optimization is formulated to maximize the spectrum access probability of the CSN, through jointly allocating sensing time and clustering number. According to the resource optimization results, a clustering algorithm is proposed. The simulation results have shown that compared to the traditional model, the cluster heads of the proposed model can achieve more transmission power and there exists optimal sensing time and clustering number to maximize the spectrum access probability. PMID:26528987

  11. A Novel Wireless Power Transfer-Based Weighed Clustering Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Method for Cognitive Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin

    2015-10-30

    In a cognitive sensor network (CSN), the wastage of sensing time and energy is a challenge to cooperative spectrum sensing, when the number of cooperative cognitive nodes (CNs) becomes very large. In this paper, a novel wireless power transfer (WPT)-based weighed clustering cooperative spectrum sensing model is proposed, which divides all the CNs into several clusters, and then selects the most favorable CNs as the cluster heads and allows the common CNs to transfer the received radio frequency (RF) energy of the primary node (PN) to the cluster heads, in order to supply the electrical energy needed for sensing and cooperation. A joint resource optimization is formulated to maximize the spectrum access probability of the CSN, through jointly allocating sensing time and clustering number. According to the resource optimization results, a clustering algorithm is proposed. The simulation results have shown that compared to the traditional model, the cluster heads of the proposed model can achieve more transmission power and there exists optimal sensing time and clustering number to maximize the spectrum access probability.

  12. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to

  13. About Genetic Counselors

    MedlinePlus

    ... seeing a genetic counselor? Q. What is a genetic counselor? A. Genetic counselors are healthcare professionals with ... and serve as patient advocates. Q. What is genetic counseling? A. Genetic counseling is the process of ...

  14. Specific Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Genetic Terms Definitions for genetic terms Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  15. Energy metabolism of the untrained muscle of elite runners as observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy: evidence suggesting a genetic endowment for endurance exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Park, J H; Brown, R L; Park, C R; Cohn, M; Chance, B

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether genetically determined properties of muscle metabolism contribute to the exceptional physical endurance of world-class distance runners. ATP, phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and pH were quantitatively determined by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the wrist flexor muscles of elite long-distance runners and sedentary control subjects. These muscles had not been exposed to any specific program of exercise training in either group of subjects. The "untrained" muscles were examined at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. The flexor muscles of the athletes had higher concentrations of phosphocreatine and ATP than did those of the control subjects at rest and during exercise. The athletes' muscles possessed a higher capacity for generation of ATP by oxidative metabolism than did control subjects' muscles according to the following criteria: (i) high force output, 60% of maximum voluntary contraction, was more easily reached and better maintained in both exercise cycles; (ii) the ratio of inorganic phosphate to phosphocreatine rose less during exercise and recovered faster in the postexercise period; (iii) there was no loss of adenine nucleotides or total phosphate from the athletes' muscles but significant losses from the control subjects' muscles; and (iv) the pH decreased no more than 0.1 unit in the athletes' muscles during exercise, attesting to a relatively slow glycolysis and/or a rapid oxidation of lactate. In the muscles of the control subjects, on the other hand, the pH decreased nearly 0.4 unit early in the first exercise cycle, indicating a relatively fast glycolysis and/or slower oxidation of lactate. In the second exercise cycle, the pH returned to near normal in the control subjects' muscles, reflecting diminished lactate formation because of glycogen depletion and lactate washout by the high blood flow induced by exercise. By the end of the exercise

  16. Genetic Discrimination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congressman Charles Rangel (D-NY). House Committee on Energy and Commerce Report on GINA Submitted by Congressman John Dingell (D-MI). House Committee on Energy and Commerce Supplemental Report on GINA Submitted by Congressman John ...

  17. Evaluating Electronic Couplings for Excited State Charge Transfer Based on Maximum Occupation Method ΔSCF Quasi-Adiabatic States.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzi; Zhang, Yong; Bao, Peng; Yi, Yuanping

    2017-02-14

    Electronic couplings of charge-transfer states with the ground state and localized excited states at the donor/acceptor interface are crucial parameters for controlling the dynamics of exciton dissociation and charge recombination processes in organic solar cells. Here we propose a quasi-adiabatic state approach to evaluate electronic couplings through combining maximum occupation method (mom)-ΔSCF and state diabatization schemes. Compared with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using global hybrid functional, mom-ΔSCF is superior to estimate the excitation energies of charge-transfer states; moreover it can also provide good excited electronic state for property calculation. Our approach is hence reliable to evaluate electronic couplings for excited state electron transfer processes, which is demonstrated by calculations on a typical organic photovoltaic system, oligothiophene/perylenediimide complex.

  18. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  19. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: RNA-directed virus replication Volume 1. Topics covered include: Replication of the poliovirus genome; Influenza viral RNA transcription and replication; and Relication of the reoviridal: Information derived from gene cloning and expression.

  20. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  1. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  2. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Genetic Testing KidsHealth > For Parents > Genetic Testing Print A ... blood, skin, bone, or other tissue is needed. Genetic Testing During Pregnancy For genetic testing before birth, ...

  3. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  4. Use of genotype × environment interaction model to accommodate genetic heterogeneity for residual feed intake, dry matter intake, net energy in milk, and metabolic body weight in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Yao, C; de Los Campos, G; VandeHaar, M J; Spurlock, D M; Armentano, L E; Coffey, M; de Haas, Y; Veerkamp, R F; Staples, C R; Connor, E E; Wang, Z; Hanigan, M D; Tempelman, R J; Weigel, K A

    2017-03-01

    Feed efficiency in dairy cattle has gained much attention recently. Due to the cost-prohibitive measurement of individual feed intakes, combining data from multiple countries is often necessary to ensure an adequate reference population. It may then be essential to model genetic heterogeneity when making inferences about feed efficiency or selecting efficient cattle using genomic information. In this study, we constructed a marker × environment interaction model that decomposed marker effects into main effects and interaction components that were specific to each environment. We compared environment-specific variance component estimates and prediction accuracies from the interaction model analyses, an across-environment analyses ignoring population stratification, and a within-environment analyses using an international feed efficiency data set. Phenotypes included residual feed intake, dry matter intake, net energy in milk, and metabolic body weight from 3,656 cows measured in 3 broadly defined environments: North America (NAM), the Netherlands (NLD), and Scotland (SAC). Genotypic data included 57,574 single nucleotide polymorphisms per animal. The interaction model gave the highest prediction accuracy for metabolic body weight, which had the largest estimated heritabilities ranging from 0.37 to 0.55. The within-environment model performed the best when predicting residual feed intake, which had the lowest estimated heritabilities ranging from 0.13 to 0.41. For traits (dry matter intake and net energy in milk) with intermediate estimated heritabilities (0.21 to 0.50 and 0.17 to 0.53, respectively), performance of the 3 models was comparable. Genomic correlations between environments also were computed using variance component estimates from the interaction model. Averaged across all traits, genomic correlations were highest between NAM and NLD, and lowest between NAM and SAC. In conclusion, the interaction model provided a novel way to evaluate traits measured in

  5. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español: Regulación de pruebas genéticas Regulation of Genetic Tests Overview of Genetic Testing Introduction to Genetic ... Statements Congressional Activity Genetic Testing Resources Overview of Genetic Testing As the science of genomics advances, genetic ...

  6. Thermodynamics and evolutionary genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ingo

    2010-03-01

    Thermodynamics and evolutionary genetics have something in common. Thus, the randomness of mutation of cells may be likened to the random thermal fluctuations in a gas. And the probabilistic nature of entropy in statistical thermodynamics can be carried over to a population of haploid and diploid cells without any conceptual change. The energetic potential wells in which the atoms of a liquid are caught correspond to selective advantages for some phenotype over others. Thus, the eventual stable state in a population comes about as a compromise in the universal competition between entropy and energy.

  7. The electron-transfer based interaction between transition metal ions and photoluminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs): a platform for metal ion sensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongduan; Liao, Lei; Xu, Xiao; Zou, Mingjian; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2013-12-15

    The electron-transfer based quenching effect of commonly encountered transition metal ions on the photoluminescence of grapheme quantum dots (GQDs) was for the first time investigated, and was found to be associated with electron configuration of the individual metal ion. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the metal ion chelator, can competitively interact with metal ions to recover the quenched photoluminescence of GQDs. Basically, metal ions with empty or completely filled d orbits could not quench the photoluminescence of GQDs, but this quenching effect was observed for the metal ions with partly filled d orbits. Based on the quenching-recovering strategy, a simple optical metal sensing platform was established by taking Ni(2+) as an example. Using the nickel ion-specific chelating reagent, dimethylglyoxime (DMG), to replace EDTA, a detection limit of 4.1 μM was obtained in standard solution. This proposed strategy does not need further functionalization of GQDs, facilitating the application for simple, fast and cost-effective screening of metal ions.

  8. Genetic aspects of human obesity.

    PubMed

    Larder, Rachel; Lim, Chung Thong; Coll, Anthony P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and its related metabolic consequences represent a major public health problem. Huge changes within the environment have undoubtedly contributed to the increased prevalence of obesity but genetic factors are also critical in determining an individual's predisposition to gain weight. The last two decades have seen a huge increase in the understanding of the mechanisms controlling appetitive behavior, body composition, and energy expenditure. Many regions throughout the central nervous system play critical roles in these processes but the hypothalamus, in particular, receives and orchestrates a variety of signals to bring about coordinated changes in energy balance. Reviewing data from human genetic and model organism studies, we consider how disruptions of hypothalamic pathways evolved to maintain energy homeostasis and go on to cause obesity. We highlight ongoing technological developments which continue to lead to novel insights and discuss how this increased knowledge may lead to effective therapeutic interventions in the future.

  9. A genetic engineering approach to genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Gero, J S; Kazakov, V

    2001-01-01

    We present an extension to the standard genetic algorithm (GA), which is based on concepts of genetic engineering. The motivation is to discover useful and harmful genetic materials and then execute an evolutionary process in such a way that the population becomes increasingly composed of useful genetic material and increasingly free of the harmful genetic material. Compared to the standard GA, it provides some computational advantages as well as a tool for automatic generation of hierarchical genetic representations specifically tailored to suit certain classes of problems.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: monilethrix

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Diagnosis & Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Beaded hair General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: microphthalmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... including clouding of the lens of the eye ( cataract ) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed ... Genetic Testing Registry: Anophthalmia/Microphthalmia Genetic Testing Registry: Cataract, congenital, with microphthalmia Genetic Testing Registry: Cataract, microphthalmia ...

  12. Applying the New Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, James

    1976-01-01

    New developments in the prediction and treatment of genetic diseases are presented. Genetic counseling and the role of the counselor, and rights of individuals to reproduce versus societal impact of genetic disorders, are discussed. (RW)

  13. Genetics Home Reference

    MedlinePlus

    ... MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Genetics Home Reference provides consumer-friendly information about the effects of genetic variation ...

  14. Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Screening Tests FAQ165, September 2016 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  15. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  16. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  17. Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Pamphlets - Spanish FAQ164, September 2016 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  18. Genetic aspects and genetic epidemiology of parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Hublin, Christer; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2003-10-01

    Parasomnias are undesirable phenomena associated with sleep. Many of them run in families, and genetic factors have been long suggested to be involved in their occurrence. This article reviews the present knowledge of the genetics of the major classical behavioral parasomnias as well as present results from genetic epidemiological studies. The level and type of evidence for genetic effects varies much from parasomnia to parasomnia. The genetic factors are best established in enuresis, with several linkages to chromosomal loci, but their functions are not so far known. Environmental causes and gene-environment interactions are most probably also of great importance in the origin of complex traits or disorders such as parasomnias.

  19. Genetic Diversity and Genome Complexity of Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) as a C4 plant, is one of the most efficient crops in converting solar energy into chemical energy. Sugarcane cultivar improvement programs have not yet systematically utilized the most of the genetic sources of yield potential and resistance to stresses that may exist in t...

  20. The genetics of human obesity.

    PubMed

    Waalen, Jill

    2014-10-01

    The heritability of obesity has long been appreciated and the genetics of obesity has been the focus of intensive study for decades. Early studies elucidating genetic factors involved in rare monogenic and syndromic forms of extreme obesity focused attention on dysfunction of hypothalamic leptin-related pathways in the control of food intake as a major contributor. Subsequent genome-wide association studies of common genetic variants identified novel loci that are involved in more common forms of obesity across populations of diverse ethnicities and ages. The subsequent search for factors contributing to the heritability of obesity not explained by these 2 approaches ("missing heritability") has revealed additional rare variants, copy number variants, and epigenetic changes that contribute. Although clinical applications of these findings have been limited to date, the increasing understanding of the interplay of these genetic factors with environmental conditions, such as the increased availability of high calorie foods and decreased energy expenditure of sedentary lifestyles, promises to accelerate the translation of genetic findings into more successful preventive and therapeutic interventions.

  1. Interactive Genetics Tutorial Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The Interactive Genetics Tutorial (IGT) project and the Intelligent Tutoring System for the IGT project named MENDEL supplement genetics instruction in biology courses by providing students with experience in designing, conducting, and evaluating genetics experiments. The MENDEL software is designed to: (1) simulate genetics experiments that…

  2. The genetics of immunity.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Brian P; Schneider, David S

    2014-06-17

    In this commentary, Brian P. Lazzaro and David S. Schneider examine the topic of the Genetics of Immunity as explored in this month's issues of GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. These inaugural articles are part of a joint Genetics of Immunity collection (ongoing) in the GSA journals.

  3. Quantitative genetic divergence and standing genetic (co)variance in thermal reaction norms along latitude.

    PubMed

    Berger, David; Postma, Erik; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Walters, Richard J

    2013-08-01

    Although the potential to adapt to warmer climate is constrained by genetic trade-offs, our understanding of how selection and mutation shape genetic (co)variances in thermal reaction norms is poor. Using 71 isofemale lines of the fly Sepsis punctum, originating from northern, central, and southern European climates, we tested for divergence in juvenile development rate across latitude at five experimental temperatures. To investigate effects of evolutionary history in different climates on standing genetic variation in reaction norms, we further compared genetic (co)variances between regions. Flies were reared on either high or low food resources to explore the role of energy acquisition in determining genetic trade-offs between different temperatures. Although the latter had only weak effects on the strength and sign of genetic correlations, genetic architecture differed significantly between climatic regions, implying that evolution of reaction norms proceeds via different trajectories at high latitude versus low latitude in this system. Accordingly, regional genetic architecture was correlated to region-specific differentiation. Moreover, hot development temperatures were associated with low genetic variance and stronger genetic correlations compared to cooler temperatures. We discuss the evolutionary potential of thermal reaction norms in light of their underlying genetic architectures, evolutionary histories, and the materialization of trade-offs in natural environments.

  4. Genetics and genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Kali; Johnson, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Genetics is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of diseases, and the expansion of genetics into health care has generated the field of genomic medicine. Health care delivery is shifting away from general diagnostic evaluation toward a generation of therapeutics based on a patient's genetic makeup. Meanwhile, the scientific community debates how best to incorporate genetics and genomic medicine into practice. While obstacles remain, the ultimate goal is to use information generated from the study of human genetics to improve disease treatment, cure and prevention. As the use of genetics in medical diagnosis and treatment increases, health care workers will require an understanding of genetics and genomic medicine.

  5. What Is Genetic Ancestry Testing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing What is genetic ancestry testing? What is genetic ancestry testing? Genetic ancestry testing, or genetic genealogy, ... mixed with other groups. For more information about genetic ancestry testing: The University of Utah provides video ...

  6. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  7. Update: Biochemistry of Genetic Manipulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Various topics on the biochemistry of genetic manipulation are discussed. These include genetic transformation and DNA; genetic expression; DNA replication, repair, and mutation; technology of genetic manipulation; and applications of genetic manipulation. Other techniques employed are also considered. (JN)

  8. Genetic engineering compared to natural genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Arber, Werner

    2010-11-30

    By comparing strategies of genetic alterations introduced in genetic engineering with spontaneously occurring genetic variation, we have come to conclude that both processes depend on several distinct and specific molecular mechanisms. These mechanisms can be attributed, with regard to their evolutionary impact, to three different strategies of genetic variation. These are local nucleotide sequence changes, intragenomic rearrangement of DNA segments and the acquisition of a foreign DNA segment by horizontal gene transfer. Both the strategies followed in genetic engineering and the amounts of DNA sequences thereby involved are identical to, or at least very comparable with, those involved in natural genetic variation. Therefore, conjectural risks of genetic engineering must be of the same order as those for natural biological evolution and for conventional breeding methods. These risks are known to be quite low. There is no scientific reason to assume special long-term risks for GM crops. For future agricultural developments, a road map is designed that can be expected to lead, by a combination of genetic engineering and conventional plant breeding, to crops that can insure food security and eliminate malnutrition and hunger for the entire human population on our planet. Public-private partnerships should be formed with the mission to reach the set goals in the coming decades.

  9. Overview of symposium "Systems Genetics in Nutrition and Obesity Research".

    PubMed

    Kalupahana, Nishan S; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima

    2011-03-01

    Systems genetics is a novel approach for identifying the complex genetic architecture of quantitative traits and gene-environment interactions via detection of connections from genetic variation through intermediate phenotypes to overlying systems level phenotypes. This symposium, conducted at the Experimental Biology 2010 conference, aimed at educating nutrition researchers about the use of systems genetics as a tool for linking genetic variation to nutrient metabolism and energy balance and their overlying effects on health and disease. Basic concepts of systems genetics and the analytical framework used in these studies were presented. Further, the utility of genetic reference populations for gene-environment interaction studies along with specific studies addressing genetic variation in responsiveness to nutrients were discussed.

  10. Use of genotype x environment interaction model to accommodate genetic heterogeneity for residual feed intake, dry matter intake, net energy in milk, and metabolic body weight in dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feed efficiency in dairy cattle has gained much attention recently. Due to the cost-prohibitive measurement of individual feed intakes, combining data from multiple countries is often necessary to ensure an adequate reference population. It may then be essential to model genetic heterogeneity when m...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: congenital afibrinogenemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic conditions treated or managed? What is genetic testing? How can I find a genetics professional in my area? ... Manual Consumer Version: How Blood Clots Orphanet: Familial afibrinogenemia ...

  12. Software For Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steve E.

    1992-01-01

    SPLICER computer program is genetic-algorithm software tool used to solve search and optimization problems. Provides underlying framework and structure for building genetic-algorithm application program. Written in Think C.

  13. Genetic Brain Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: otulipenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions otulipenia otulipenia Enable Javascript to ...

  15. Genetics for Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jenny; Wood-Robinson, Colin

    1997-01-01

    Presents the results of investigations into young people's awareness of, and attitudes toward, genetics and DNA technology. Summarizes survey results and explores the process by which students form an opinion of new technology in the field of genetics. (DDR)

  16. Genetics Home Reference: SADDAN

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF Open All Close All Description SADDAN (severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans) is a ... Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans Other Diagnosis ...

  17. Latest Research: Genetic Links

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Latest Research: Genetic Links Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents ... laboratories is one way the NEI is expanding genetic testing of eye diseases. Photo courtesy of National ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Genetics Home Reference Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Genetics Home Reference (GHR) Web site — ghr.nlm.nih. ...

  19. Frontotemporal Dementia: Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calendar of Events Fundraising Events Conferences Press Releases Genetics of FTD After receiving a diagnosis of FTD ... that recent advances in science have brought the genetics of FTD into much better focus. In 2012, ...

  20. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  1. Genetics by the Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Genetics by the Numbers By Chelsea Toledo and Kirstie ... June 11, 2012 Scholars have been studying modern genetics since the mid-19th century, but even today ...

  2. Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart (Infographic) Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart (Infographic) PFSI010 ››› Weeks 1–4 Weeks ...

  3. Genetics and the Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find us on YouTube Follow us on Instagram Genetics and the Brain by Carl Sherman September 10, ... effects that may be responsible. How Much Is Genetic? [x] , [xi] , [xii] , [xiii] A basic question in ...

  4. Genetic Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newly Diagnosed Patients There are over 6,000 genetic disorders that can be passed down through the ... mission to help prevent, manage and treat inherited genetic diseases. View our latest News Brief here . You ...

  5. Introductory molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Moulds, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with an overview of the current principles of genetics and molecular genetics. Over this foundation, it adds detailed and specialized information: a description of the translation, transcription, expression and regulation of DNA and RNA; a description of the manipulation of genetic material via promoters, enhancers, and gene splicing; and a description of cloning techniques, especially those for blood group genes. The last chapter looks to the impact of molecular genetics on transfusion medicine.

  6. Genetics of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Mahil, Satveer K; Capon, Francesca; Barker, Jonathan N

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common and debilitating immune-mediated skin disease with a complex genetic basis. Genetic studies have provided critical insights into the pathogenesis of disease. This article focuses on the results of genetic association studies, which provide evidence that psoriasis susceptibility genes are involved in innate and adaptive immunity and skin barrier functions. The potential for disease stratification and the development of more effective treatments with fewer side effects using genetic data are highlighted.

  7. Behavioral genetics and taste

    PubMed Central

    Boughter, John D; Bachmanov, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on behavioral genetic studies of sweet, umami, bitter and salt taste responses in mammals. Studies involving mouse inbred strain comparisons and genetic analyses, and their impact on elucidation of taste receptors and transduction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the effect of genetic variation in taste responsiveness on complex traits such as drug intake is considered. Recent advances in development of genomic resources make behavioral genetics a powerful approach for understanding mechanisms of taste. PMID:17903279

  8. Massively Parallel Genetics.

    PubMed

    Shendure, Jay; Fields, Stanley

    2016-06-01

    Human genetics has historically depended on the identification of individuals whose natural genetic variation underlies an observable trait or disease risk. Here we argue that new technologies now augment this historical approach by allowing the use of massively parallel assays in model systems to measure the functional effects of genetic variation in many human genes. These studies will help establish the disease risk of both observed and potential genetic variants and to overcome the problem of "variants of uncertain significance."

  9. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing…

  10. Phenylketonuria Genetic Screening Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Patti

    2012-01-01

    After agreeing to host over 200 students on a daylong genetics field trip, the author needed an easy-to-prepare genetics experiment to accompany the DNA-necklace and gel-electrophoresis activities already planned. One of the student's mothers is a pediatric physician at the local hospital, and she suggested exploring genetic-disease screening…

  11. Feline Genetics: Clinical Applications and Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately thirty-three genes contain fifty mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat’s appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab using a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat’s internal genome. PMID:21147473

  12. Feline genetics: clinical applications and genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2010-11-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately 33 genes contain 50 mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab with a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's internal genome.

  13. Molecular genetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, D E; Kusano, T

    1994-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is a gram-negative, highly acidophilic (pH 1.5 to 2.0), autotrophic bacterium that obtains its energy through the oxidation of ferrous iron or reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. It is usually dominant in the mixed bacterial populations that are used industrially for the extraction of metals such as copper and uranium from their ores. More recently, these bacterial consortia have been used for the biooxidation of refractory gold-bearing arsenopyrite ores prior to the recovery of gold by cyanidation. The commercial use of T. ferrooxidans has led to an increasing interest in the genetics and molecular biology of the bacterium. Initial investigations were aimed at determining whether the unique physiology and specialized habitat of T. ferrooxidans had been accompanied by a high degree of genetic drift from other gram-negative bacteria. Early genetic studies were comparative in nature and concerned the isolation of genes such as nifHDK, glnA, and recA, which are widespread among bacteria. From a molecular biology viewpoint, T. ferrooxidans appears to be a typical member of the proteobacteria. In most instances, cloned gene promoters and protein products have been functional in Escherichia coli. Although T. ferrooxidans has proved difficult to transform with DNA, research on indigenous plasmids and the isolation of the T. ferrooxidans merA gene have resulted in the development of a low-efficiency electroporation system for one strain of T. ferrooxidans. The most recent studies have focused on the molecular genetics of the pathways associated with nitrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, and components of the energy-producing mechanisms. PMID:8177170

  14. Genetic technology: Promises and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    Issues concerning the use of genetic technology are discussed. Some areas discussed include treating genetic disease, prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion, screening for genetic disease, and genetic counseling. Policy issues stemming from these capabilities are considered.

  15. How Is Genetic Testing Done?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing How is genetic testing done? How is genetic testing done? Once a person decides to proceed ... is called informed consent . For more information about genetic testing procedures: The National Society of Genetic Counselors ...

  16. All about Genetics (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old All About Genetics KidsHealth > For Parents > All About Genetics Print A ... way they pick up special laboratory dyes. continue Genetic Problems Errors in the genetic code or "gene ...

  17. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth > For Parents > Prenatal Genetic Counseling Print ... how can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating ...

  18. Genetic interest assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughney, Erin

    Genetics is becoming increasingly integrated into peoples' lives. Different measures have been taken to try and better genetics education. This thesis examined undergraduate students at the University of North Texas not majoring in the life sciences interest in genetic concepts through the means of a Likert style survey. ANOVA analysis showed there was variation amongst the interest level in different genetic concepts. In addition age and lecture were also analyzed as contributing factors to students' interest. Both age and lecture were evaluated to see if they contributed to the interest of students in genetic concepts and neither showed statistical significance. The Genetic Interest Assessment (GIA) serves to help mediate the gap between genetic curriculum and students' interest.

  19. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-27

    See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity.

  20. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity.

  1. Genetics: advances in genetic testing for deafness

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, A. Eliot; Smith, Richard J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an update on recently discovered human deafness genes and to describe advances in comprehensive genetic testing platforms for deafness, both of which have been enabled by new massively parallel sequencing technologies. Recent findings Over the review period, three syndromic and six nonsyndromic deafness genes have been discovered, bringing the total number of nonsyndromic deafness genes to 64. Four studies have shown the utility of massively parallel sequencing for comprehensive genetic testing for deafness. Three of these platforms have been released on a clinical or commercial basis. Summary Deafness is the most common sensory deficit in humans. Genetic diagnosis has traditionally been difficult due to extreme genetic heterogeneity and a lack of phenotypic variability. For these reasons, comprehensive genetic screening platforms have been developed with the use of massively parallel sequencing. These technologies are also accelerating the pace of gene discovery for deafness. Because genetic diagnosis is the basis for molecular therapies, these advances lay the foundation for the clinical care of deaf and hard-of-hearing persons in the future. PMID:23042251

  2. Genetic selection and conservation of genetic diversity*.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, H D

    2012-08-01

    For 100s of years, livestock producers have employed various types of selection to alter livestock populations. Current selection strategies are little different, except our technologies for selection have become more powerful. Genetic resources at the breed level have been in and out of favour over time. These resources are the raw materials used to manipulate populations, and therefore, they are critical to the past and future success of the livestock sector. With increasing ability to rapidly change genetic composition of livestock populations, the conservation of these genetic resources becomes more critical. Globally, awareness of the need to steward genetic resources has increased. A growing number of countries have embarked on large scale conservation efforts by using in situ, ex situ (gene banking), or both approaches. Gene banking efforts have substantially increased and data suggest that gene banks are successfully capturing genetic diversity for research or industry use. It is also noteworthy that both industry and the research community are utilizing gene bank holdings. As pressures grow to meet consumer demands and potential changes in production systems, the linkage between selection goals and genetic conservation will increase as a mechanism to facilitate continued livestock sector development.

  3. [China genetic counseling network (CGCN): a website on genetic counseling and genetic education].

    PubMed

    He, Min; Li, Wei

    2007-03-01

    In April 2005, with the voluntary involvement of more than 50 worldwide genetic counselors or medical geneticists, we developed a website for online genetic counseling and genetic education on common genetic disease throughout China (URL: http://www.gcnet.org.cn). This website is offering professional online genetic counseling, as well as providing information about common genetic diseases which is a resource for genetic counselors and online genetic counselees. Online genetic counseling is an alternative method to the widely accepted face-to-face counseling. The data warehouse of China Genetic Counseling Network (CGCN) will be a unique supplement to current status of Clinical Genetics and healthcare system in China.

  4. Molecular Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. PMID:28270526

  5. Molecular Population Genetics.

    PubMed

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data.

  6. Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-01

    This factsheet describes a research project to replacing the more chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin with the less resistant hardwood guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) lignin genes. Achieving this genetic change would reduce the energy, chemical, and bleaching required in Kraft pulp production of softwoods.

  7. Genetic Pathways to Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Mackenzie J.; Gehrman, Philip R.

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current research on the genetics of insomnia, as genetic contributions are thought to be important for insomnia etiology. We begin by providing an overview of genetic methods (both quantitative and measured gene), followed by a discussion of the insomnia genetics literature with regard to each of the following common methodologies: twin and family studies, candidate gene studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Next, we summarize the most recent gene identification efforts (primarily GWAS results) and propose several potential mechanisms through which identified genes may contribute to the disorder. Finally, we discuss new genetic approaches and how these may prove useful for insomnia, proposing an agenda for future insomnia genetics research. PMID:27999387

  8. Genetic screening for deafness.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard J H; Hone, Stephen

    2003-04-01

    Genetic testing for deafness has become a reality. It has changed the paradigm for evaluating deaf and hard-of-hearing persons and will be used by physicians for diagnostic purposes and as a basis for treatment and management options. Although mutation screening is currently available for only a limited number of genes, in these specific instances, diagnosis, carrier detection, and reproductive risk counseling can be provided. In the coming years there will be an expansion of the role of genetic testing and counseling will not be limited to reproductive issues. Treatment and management decisions will be made based on specific genetic diagnoses. Although genetic testing may be a confusing service for the practicing otolaryngologist, it is an important part of medical care. New discoveries and technologies will expand and increase the complexity of genetic testing options and it will become the responsibility of otolaryngologists to familiarize themselves with current discoveries and accepted protocols for genetic testing.

  9. Landscape genetics of plants.

    PubMed

    Holderegger, Rolf; Buehler, Dominique; Gugerli, Felix; Manel, Stéphanie

    2010-12-01

    Landscape genetics is the amalgamation of landscape ecology and population genetics to help with understanding microevolutionary processes such as gene flow and adaptation. In this review, we examine why landscape genetics of plants lags behind that of animals, both in number of studies and consideration of landscape elements. The classical landscape distance/resistance approach to study gene flow is challenging in plants, whereas boundary detection and the assessment of contemporary gene flow are more feasible. By contrast, the new field of landscape genetics of adaptive genetic variation, establishing the relationship between adaptive genomic regions and environmental factors in natural populations, is prominent in plant studies. Landscape genetics is ideally suited to study processes such as migration and adaptation under global change.

  10. Energy: Conservation, Energy Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive energy conservation program at College of the Holy Cross has saved nearly one-third of the fuel oil and one-fifth of the electricity used at the college; briefs on boilers, lights, design. (Author/MLF)

  11. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also

  12. Genetics and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Morse, Stephen J

    2011-09-01

    Some believe that genetics threatens privacy and autonomy and will eviscerate the concept of human nature. Despite the astonishing research advances, however, none of these dire predictions and no radical transformation of the law have occurred. Advocates have tried to use genetic evidence to affect judgments of criminal responsibility. At present, however genetic research can provide little aid to assessments of criminal responsibility and it does not suggest a radical critique of responsibility.

  13. PCR in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Morling, Niels

    2009-04-01

    Since the introduction in the mid-1980s of analyses of minisatellites for DNA analyses, a revolution has taken place in forensic genetics. The subsequent invention of the PCR made it possible to develop forensic genetics tools that allow both very informative routine investigations and still more and more advanced, special investigations in cases concerning crime, paternity, relationship, disaster victim identification etc. The present review gives an update on the use of DNA investigations in forensic genetics.

  14. Genetic enhancements and expectations.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, K

    2009-07-01

    Some argue that genetic enhancements and environmental enhancements are not importantly different: environmental enhancements such as private schools and chess lessons are simply the old-school way to have a designer baby. I argue that there is an important distinction between the two practices--a distinction that makes state restrictions on genetic enhancements more justifiable than state restrictions on environmental enhancements. The difference is that parents have no settled expectations about genetic enhancements.

  15. The GS (genetic selection) Principle.

    PubMed

    Abel, David L

    2009-01-01

    The GS (Genetic Selection) Principle states that biological selection must occur at the nucleotide-sequencing molecular-genetic level of 3'5' phosphodiester bond formation. After-the-fact differential survival and reproduction of already-living phenotypic organisms (ordinary natural selection) does not explain polynucleotide prescription and coding. All life depends upon literal genetic algorithms. Even epigenetic and "genomic" factors such as regulation by DNA methylation, histone proteins and microRNAs are ultimately instructed by prior linear digital programming. Biological control requires selection of particular configurable switch-settings to achieve potential function. This occurs largely at the level of nucleotide selection, prior to the realization of any integrated biofunction. Each selection of a nucleotide corresponds to the setting of two formal binary logic gates. The setting of these switches only later determines folding and binding function through minimum-free-energy sinks. These sinks are determined by the primary structure of both the protein itself and the independently prescribed sequencing of chaperones. The GS Principle distinguishes selection of existing function (natural selection) from selection for potential function (formal selection at decision nodes, logic gates and configurable switch-settings).

  16. Genetics, society, and decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kowles, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides a conceptual understanding of the biology of genes and also gives current events and controversies in the field. Basic transmission genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics are covered, with additional discussions relating to such topics as agriculture, aging, forensic science, genetic counseling, gene splicing, and recombinant DNA. Low level radiation and its effects, drugs and heredity, IQ, heredity and racial variation, and creationism versus evolution are also described. ''Billboard'' style diagrams visually explain important concepts. Boldfaced key terms are defined within the text and in a comprehensive glossary. Selected readings, discussion questions and problems, and excellent chapter summaries further aid study.

  17. Going Forward with Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Li, Xiaohong; Beutler, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Forward genetic analysis is an unbiased approach for identifying genes essential to defined biological phenomena. When applied to mice, it is one of the most powerful methods to facilitate understanding of the genetic basis of human biology and disease. The speed at which disease-causing mutations can be identified in mutagenized mice has been markedly increased by recent advances in DNA sequencing technology. Creating and analyzing mutant phenotypes may therefore become rate-limiting in forward genetic experimentation. We review the forward genetic approach and its future in the context of recent technological advances, in particular massively parallel DNA sequencing, induced pluripotent stem cells, and haploid embryonic stem cells. PMID:23608223

  18. Genetics Home Reference: aniridia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Testing Registry: Congenital aniridia Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) GeneReview: Aniridia General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy ...

  19. The Genetics of Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Dorota M.; Gajecka, Marzena

    2011-01-01

    Keratoconus (KTCN) is non-inflammatory thinning and anterior protrusion of the cornea that results in steepening and distortion of the cornea, altered refractive error, and decreased vision. Keratoconus is a complex condition of multifactorial etiology. Both genetic and environmental factors are associated with KTCN. Evidence of genetic etiology includes familial inheritance, discordance between dizygotic twins, and association with other known genetic disorders. Several loci responsible for a familial form of KTCN have been mapped; however, no mutations in any genes have been identified for any of these loci. This article focuses on the genetic aspects. In addition, bioinformatics methods applied in KTCN gene identification process are discussed. PMID:21572727

  20. Genetic sperm defects.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Peter J

    2005-08-01

    Genetic sperm defects are specific sperm defects, which have been shown to have a genetic mode of transmission. Such genetic linkage, either direct or indirect, has been associated with a number of sperm defects in different species, with this number increasing with improved diagnostic capabilities. A number of sperm defects, which have proven or suspected genetic modes of transmission are discussed herein, with particular emphasis on cattle. These include: 1. Acrosome defects (knobbed, ruffled and incomplete); 2. Head defects (abnormal condensation, decapitated, round head, rolled head, nuclear crest); 3. Midpiece abnormalities ("Dag" defect, "corkscrew" defect, "pseudo-droplet" defect); 4. Tail defects ("tail stump" defect, primary ciliary dyskinesia).

  1. Is Genetic Evolution Predictable?

    PubMed Central

    Stern, David L.; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the integration of Mendelian genetics into evolutionary biology in the early 20th century, evolutionary geneticists have for the most part treated genes and mutations as generic entities. However, recent observations indicate that all genes are not equal in the eyes of evolution. Evolutionarily relevant mutations tend to accumulate in hotspot genes and at specific positions within genes. Genetic evolution is constrained by gene function, the structure of genetic networks, and population biology. The genetic basis of evolution may be predictable to some extent, and further understanding of this predictability requires incorporation of the specific functions and characteristics of genes into evolutionary theory. PMID:19197055

  2. Judaism, genetic screening and genetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Rosner, F

    1998-01-01

    Genetic screening, gene therapy and other applications of genetic engineering are permissible in Judaism when used for the treatment, cure, or prevention of disease. Such genetic manipulation is not considered to be a violation of God's natural law, but a legitimate implementation of the biblical mandate to heal. If Tay-Sachs disease, diabetes, hemophilia, cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease or other genetic diseases can be cured or prevented by "gene surgery," then it is certainly permitted in Jewish law. Genetic premarital screening is encouraged in Judaism for the purpose of discouraging at-risk marriages for a fatal illness such as Tay-Sachs disease. Neonatal screening for treatable conditions such as phenylketonuria is certainly desirable and perhaps required in Jewish law. Preimplantation screening and the implantation of only "healthy" zygotes into the mother's womb to prevent the birth of an affected child are probably sanctioned in Jewish law. Whether or not these assisted reproduction techniques may be used to choose the sex of one's offspring, to prevent the birth of a child with a sex-linked disease such as hemophilia, has not yet been ruled on by modern rabbinic decisions. Prenatal screening with the specific intent of aborting an affected fetus is not allowed according to most rabbinic authorities, although a minority view permits it "for great need." Not to have children if both parents are carriers of genetic diseases such as Tay-Sachs is not a Jewish option. Preimplantation screening is preferable. All screening test results must remain confidential. Judaism does not permit the alteration or manipulation of physical traits and characteristics such as height, eye and hair color, facial features and the like, when such change provides no useful benefit to mankind. On the other hand, it is permissible to clone organisms and microorganisms to facilitate the production of insulin, growth hormone, and other agents intended to benefit mankind and to

  3. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  4. Quo Vadis, Medical Genetics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeizel, Andrew E.

    The beginning of human genetics and its medical part: medical genetics was promising in the early decades of this century. Many genetic diseases and defects with Mendelian origin were identified and it helped families with significant genetic burden to limit their child number. Unfortunately this good start was shadowed by two tragic events. On the one hand, in the 1930s and early 1940s the German fascism brought about the dominance of an unscientific eugenics to mask vile political crimes. People with genetic diseases-defects were forced to sterilisation and several of them were killed. On the other hand, in the 1950s lysenkoism inhibitied the evolution of genetics in the Soviet Union and their satelite countries. Lysenko's doctrine declared genetics as a product of imperialism and a guilty science, therefore leading geneticists were ousted form their posts and some of them were executed or put in prison. Past decades genetics has resulted fantastic new results and achieved a leading position within the natural sciences. To my mind, however, the expected wider use of new eugenics indicates a new tragedy and this Cassandra's prediction is the topic of this presentation.

  5. Genetics in the courts

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, Heather; Drell, Dan

    2000-12-01

    Various: (1)TriState 2000 Genetics in the Courts (2) Growing impact of the new genetics on the courts (3)Human testing (4) Legal analysis - in re G.C. (5) Legal analysis - GM ''peanots'', and (6) Legal analysis for State vs Miller

  6. Systems Genetics of Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Chantel D.; Sayarath, Vicki; Moore, Jason H.

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholism is a common disease resulting from the complex interaction of genetic, social, and environmental factors. Interest in the high heritability of alcoholism has resulted in many studies of how single genes, as well as an individual’s entire genetic content (i.e., genome) and the proteins expressed by the genome, influence alcoholism risk. The use of large-scale methods to identify and characterize genetic material (i.e., high-throughput technologies) for data gathering and analysis recently has made it possible to investigate the complexity of the genetic architecture of susceptibility to common diseases such as alcoholism on a systems level. Systems genetics is the study of all genetic variations, their interactions with each other (i.e., epistasis), their interactions with the environment (i.e., plastic reaction norms), their relationship with interindividual variation in traits that are influenced by many genes and contribute to disease susceptibility (i.e., intermediate quantitative traits or endophenotypes1) defined at different levels of hierarchical biochemical and physiological systems, and their relationship with health and disease. The goal of systems genetics is to provide an understanding of the complex relationship between the genome and disease by investigating intermediate biological processes. After investigating main effects, the first step in a systems genetics approach, as described here, is to search for gene–gene (i.e., epistatic) reactions. PMID:23584748

  7. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  8. Energy Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Reviewed are technological problems faced in energy production including locating, recovering, developing, storing, and distributing energy in clean, convenient, economical, and environmentally satisfactory manners. The energy resources of coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric power, nuclear energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, winds, tides,…

  9. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics.

    PubMed

    Paaby, Annalise B; Gibson, Greg

    2016-06-13

    Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes-processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits.

  10. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Paaby, Annalise B.; Gibson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes—processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits. PMID:27304973

  11. Evolutionary behavioral genetics

    PubMed Central

    Zietsch, Brendan P.; de Candia, Teresa R; Keller, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the scientific enterprise at the intersection of evolutionary psychology and behavioral genetics—a field that could be termed Evolutionary Behavioral Genetics—and how modern genetic data is revolutionizing our ability to test questions in this field. We first explain how genetically informative data and designs can be used to investigate questions about the evolution of human behavior, and describe some of the findings arising from these approaches. Second, we explain how evolutionary theory can be applied to the investigation of behavioral genetic variation. We give examples of how new data and methods provide insight into the genetic architecture of behavioral variation and what this tells us about the evolutionary processes that acted on the underlying causal genetic variants. PMID:25587556

  12. Genetic Influences on Learning Disabilties I: Clinical Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shelley D.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion of basic genetic principles is followed by a review of selected genetic syndromes involving learning disabilites (such as Noonan Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis, Pheuylketonuria, and cleft lip and palate). Guidelines for securing a genetic evaluation are given. (CL)

  13. Multiobjective Topology Optimization of Energy Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    overlapping function. This data structure is tree-shaped and so genetic programming is used as the optimizer. The forward problem is solved with a...strain energy. Results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithm. 15. SUBJECT TERMS topology optimization; Pareto optimization; genetic ...combined using an overlapping function. This data structure is tree-shaped and so genetic programming is used as the optimizer. The forward problem

  14. The origin of life. [genetically important molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, N. H.; Hubbard, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Research in the areas of precambrian paleontology, chemical evolution of genetically important monomers, prebiotic dehydration-condensation reactions, organic compounds in meteorites and interstellar space, and biological exploration of the planets is summarized. Fossils in precambrian cherts and findings of eukaryotic cells are described, and recent investigations of prebiotic conditions, energy sources, and starting materials for genetic molecules are outlined. Studies of homogeneous and heterogeneous dehydrations and of nonaqueous thermal dehydrations are described. The detection of amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines in meteorites and of biologically significant molecules in interstellar clouds is discussed, as well as the possibilities of life on Jupiter, Mars, and Titan.

  15. Vertical heat transfer based on direct microstructure measurements in the ice-free Pacific-side Arctic Ocean: the role and impact of the Pacific water intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kikuchi, T.; Inoue, R.

    2014-12-01

    This study quantifies diapycnal mixing and vertical heat transfer in the Pacific side of the Arctic Ocean, where sea-ice cover has disappeared between July and September in the last few decades. We conducted microstructure measurements in the open water region around the Canada Basin from late summer to fall in 2009 and 2010 using RV Mirai. In the study domain, the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, ɛ, is typically as low level as O(10-10) W kg-1, resulting in vertical heat diffusivity of O(10-7) m2 s-1, which is close to the molecular diffusivity of heat, suggesting comparatively little predominance of mechanical turbulent mixing. An exception is the case at the Barrow Canyon, where the strong baroclinic throughflow generates substantial vertical mixing, producing ɛ >O(10-7) W kg-1, because of the shear flow instability. Meanwhile, in the confluence region, where the warm/salty Pacific water and the cold/fresh Arctic basin water encounter, the micro-temperature profiles revealed a localized enhancement in vertical diffusivity of heat, reaching O(10-5) m2 s-1 or greater. In this region, an intrusion of warm Pacific water creates a horizontally interleaved structure, where the double-diffusive mixing facilitates vertical heat transfer between the intruding Pacific water and the surrounding basin waters.

  16. Genetic variation and its maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.F.; De Stefano, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains several papers divided among three sections. The section titles are: Genetic Diversity--Its Dimensions; Genetic Diversity--Its Origin and Maintenance; and Genetic Diversity--Applications and Problems of Complex Characters.

  17. Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment Overview How can learning ... gov] Top of page How can knowing about genetics help treat disease? Every year, more than two ...

  18. Genetics & the Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the contribution made to the quality of human life by the study of genetics. Presents a description of the current status of genetics education. Suggests changes in genetics education necessary to keep up with new developments. (39 references) (CW)

  19. [Genetic risk and discrimination].

    PubMed

    Vidal Gallardo, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    The continuous advances in our society in the last decades have allowed us to get to know the personal genetic data. Although this discovery has important benefits, it also causes a great paradox, since the genetic information can be an element of social stigma, and its inappropriate use can damage the fundamental rights. It is obvious that there are cases in which the genetic risk, that is, the predisposition of a person to suffer some illnesses, can be a discriminatory element, especially in the contractual field.

  20. Genetically Engineered Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Ruanbao (Inventor); Gibbons, William (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The disclosed embodiments provide cyanobacteria spp. that have been genetically engineered to have increased production of carbon-based products of interest. These genetically engineered hosts efficiently convert carbon dioxide and light into carbon-based products of interest such as long chained hydrocarbons. Several constructs containing polynucleotides encoding enzymes active in the metabolic pathways of cyanobacteria are disclosed. In many instances, the cyanobacteria strains have been further genetically modified to optimize production of the carbon-based products of interest. The optimization includes both up-regulation and down-regulation of particular genes.

  1. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing statistically-based genetics problems. This issue is at the emerging edge of modern college-level genetics instruction, and this study attempts to identify key theoretical components for creating a specialized biological statistics curriculum. The goal of this curriculum will be to prepare biology students with the skills for assimilating quantitatively-based genetic processes, increasingly at the forefront of modern genetics. To fulfill this, two college level classes at two universities were surveyed. One university was located in the northeastern US and the other in the West Indies. There was a sample size of 42 students and a supplementary interview was administered to a select 9 students. Interviews were also administered to professors in the field in order to gain insight into the teaching of statistics in genetics. Key findings indicated that students had very little to no background in statistics (55%). Although students did perform well on exams with 60% of the population receiving an A or B grade, 77% of them did not offer good explanations on a probability question associated with the normal distribution provided in the survey. The scope and presentation of the applicable statistics/mathematics in some of the most used textbooks in genetics teaching, as well as genetics syllabi used by instructors do not help the issue. It was found that the text books, often times, either did not give effective explanations for students, or completely left out certain topics. The omission of certain statistical/mathematical oriented topics was seen to be also true with the genetics syllabi reviewed for this study. Nonetheless

  2. Genetics and antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jay

    2003-01-01

    This commentary article reviews a recent meta-analysis of genetic influences on antisocial behavior by Rhee and Waldman (2002). The authors combined the results of 51 twin and adoption studies and concluded that antisocial behavior has an important genetic component. However, twin and adoption studies contain several methodological flaws and are subject to the confounding influence of environmental factors. Therefore, Rhee and Waldman's conclusions in favor of genetic influences are not supported by the evidence. Two additional topics are Rhee and Waldman's incorrect description of the heritability concept and their failure to discuss several German criminal twin studies published during the Nazi era.

  3. Genetic engineering of rotaviruses by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2013-07-01

    The rotavirus genome is composed of 11 gene segments of dsRNA. A recent breakthrough in the field of rotaviruses is the development of a reverse genetics system for generating recombinant rotaviruses possessing a gene segment derived from cloned cDNA. Although this approach is a helper virus-driven system that is technically limited and gives low levels of recombinant viruses, it allows alteration of the rotavirus genome, thus contributing to our understanding of these medically important viruses. So far, this approach has successfully been applied to three of the 11 viral segments in our laboratory and others, and the efficiency of recovery of recombinant viruses has been improved. However, we are still waiting for the development of a helper virus-free reverse genetics system for generating an infectious rotavirus entirely from cDNAs, as has been achieved for other members of the Reoviridae family.

  4. Renewable energy.

    PubMed

    Destouni, Georgia; Frank, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Committee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has in a series of projects gathered information and knowledge on renewable energy from various sources, both within and outside the academic world. In this article, we synthesize and summarize some of the main points on renewable energy from the various Energy Committee projects and the Committee's Energy 2050 symposium, regarding energy from water and wind, bioenergy, and solar energy. We further summarize the Energy Committee's scenario estimates of future renewable energy contributions to the global energy system, and other presentations given at the Energy 2050 symposium. In general, international coordination and investment in energy research and development is crucial to enable future reliance on renewable energy sources with minimal fossil fuel use.

  5. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  6. Understanding Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Deepika; Shelby, Blake; Mattingly, Christine

    2016-01-01

    "Energy" is a term often used in everyday language. Even young children associate energy with the food they eat, feeling tired after playing soccer, or when asked to turn the lights off to save light energy. However, they may not have the scientific conceptual understanding of energy at this age. Teaching energy and matter could be…

  7. Energy Auditing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Energy Engineers, Atlanta, GA.

    Presented is a discussion of various aspects of policy and implementation of energy auditing at various levels of government. Included are 11 chapters dealing with: (1) a national energy plan, (2) state certification for energy auditors, (3) survey instrumentation, (4) energy management economics, (5) Maine school energy auditing, (6) energy…

  8. Genetic variants of ghrelin in metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ukkola, Olavi

    2011-11-01

    An increasing understanding of the role of genes in the development of obesity may reveal genetic variants that, in combination with conventional risk factors, may help to predict an individual's risk for developing metabolic disorders. Accumulating evidence indicates that ghrelin plays a role in regulating food intake and energy homeostasis and it is a reasonable candidate gene for obesity-related co-morbidities. In cross-sectional studies low total ghrelin concentrations and some genetic polymorphisms of ghrelin have been associated with obesity-associated diseases. The present review highlights many of the important problems in association studies of genetic variants and complex diseases. It is known that population-specific differences in reported associations exist. We therefore conclude that more studies on variants of ghrelin gene are needed to perform in different populations to get deeper understanding on the relationship of ghrelin gene and its variants to obesity.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: macrozoospermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Encyclopedia: Semen Analysis MedlinePlus Health Topic: Assisted Reproductive Technology General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: globozoospermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Encyclopedia: Semen Analysis MedlinePlus Health Topic: Assisted Reproductive Technology General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: neuroblastoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions neuroblastoma neuroblastoma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Neuroblastoma is a type of cancer that most often ...

  12. Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Perry G.; Ebbert, Mark T. W.; Kauwe, John S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that lacks disease-altering treatments. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of Alzheimer's disease, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease are largely understood with variants in three different genes leading to disease. In contrast, while several common alleles associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, including APOE, have been identified using association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23984328

  13. Genetics of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. This review focuses on the studies that have contributed to the discovery of genetic susceptibility factors in OA. The most relevant associations discovered until now are discussed in detail: GDF-5, 7q22 locus, MCF2L, DOT1L, NCOA3 and also some important findings from the arcOGEN study. Moreover, the different approaches that can be used to minimize the specific problems of the study of OA genetics are discussed. These include the study of microsatellites, phenotype standardization and other methods such as meta-analysis of GWAS and gene-based analysis. It is expected that these new approaches contribute to finding new susceptibility genetic factors for OA.

  14. Evolving genetic code

    PubMed Central

    OHAMA, Takeshi; INAGAKI, Yuji; BESSHO, Yoshitaka; OSAWA, Syozo

    2008-01-01

    In 1985, we reported that a bacterium, Mycoplasma capricolum, used a deviant genetic code, namely UGA, a “universal” stop codon, was read as tryptophan. This finding, together with the deviant nuclear genetic codes in not a few organisms and a number of mitochondria, shows that the genetic code is not universal, and is in a state of evolution. To account for the changes in codon meanings, we proposed the codon capture theory stating that all the code changes are non-disruptive without accompanied changes of amino acid sequences of proteins. Supporting evidence for the theory is presented in this review. A possible evolutionary process from the ancient to the present-day genetic code is also discussed. PMID:18941287

  15. Genetics for the ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Sadagopan, Karthikeyan A; Capasso, Jenina; Levin, Alex V

    2012-09-01

    The eye has played a major role in human genomics including gene therapy. It is the fourth most common organ system after integument (skin, hair and nails), nervous system, and musculoskeletal system to be involved in genetic disorders. The eye is involved in single gene disorders and those caused by multifactorial etiology. Retinoblastoma was the first human cancer gene to be cloned. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy was the first mitochondrial disorder described. X-Linked red-green color deficiency was the first X-linked disorder described. The eye, unlike any other body organ, allows directly visualization of genetic phenomena such as skewed X-inactivation in the fundus of a female carrier of ocular albinism. Basic concepts of genetics and their application to clinical ophthalmological practice are important not only in making a precise diagnosis and appropriate referral, but also in management and genetic counseling.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: osteopetrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal swelling caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema) and a condition called anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia that ... Registry: Ectodermal dysplasia, anhidrotic, with immunodeficiency, osteopetrosis, and lymphedema Genetic Testing Registry: Osteopetrosis and infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy ...

  17. Genetics and identity.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Anders

    2008-01-01

    For the last 20 years the concepts of identity and identification have been subject to much interest in the humanities and social sciences. However, the implications of genetics for identity and identification have been largely neglected. In this paper, I distinguish various conceptions of identity (as continuity over time, as basic kind of being, as unique set of properties, and as social role) and identification (as subjective experience of identity in various senses and as social ascription of identity in various senses), and investigate systematically genetic perspectives on each of these conceptions. I stress the importance of taking the genetic perspectives seriously but also their limitations. In particular, I pinpoint conceptual problems that arise when a genetic approach to identity is adopted.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: alkaptonuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... homogentisate oxidase. This enzyme helps break down the amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine, which are important building blocks ... Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Alkaptonuria Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center ( ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: histidinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition characterized by elevated blood levels of the amino acid histidine, a building block of most proteins. Histidinemia ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hyperlysinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition characterized by elevated blood levels of the amino acid lysine, a building block of most proteins. Hyperlysinemia ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: sialuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition French type sialuria Sialuria, French type Related Information How are genetic conditions and ... and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Sialuria, French type Educational Resources (5 links) Cincinnati Children's Hospital ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: phenylketonuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information & Resources MedlinePlus (4 links) Encyclopedia: Phenylketonuria Encyclopedia: Serum Phenylalanine Screening Health Topic: Newborn Screening Health Topic: Phenylketonuria Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Phenylketonuria Additional NIH Resources ( ...

  3. LSD and Genetic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  4. Genetic engineering of mammals.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Historically, genetic engineering for mammalian reproductive questions has been accomplished primarily in the mouse. However, all the genetic manipulations that can be done in the mouse can now be accomplished in most domesticated mammals. Random integration of transgenes, homologous recombination and gene editing are now routine for several mammalian species. For livestock, queries related to fertility can be asked directly for the species in question, without a need for a mouse model. For human clinical concerns, the most appropriate model should be selected based on physiology, anatomy, or even size. The mouse will continue to be a useful genetically engineered model. However, other species are now amenable to the full range of genetic manipulations and should be considered as possible models for human conditions when appropriate.

  5. Genetics of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  6. Genetics and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Steinlein, Ortrud K.

    2008-01-01

    The term “epilepsy” describes a heterogeneous group of disorders, most of them caused by interactions between several or even many genes and environmental factors. Much rarer are the genetic epilepsies that are due to single-gene mutations or defined structural chromosomal aberrations, such as microdeletions. The discovery of several of the genes underlying these rare genetic epilepsies has already considerably contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms epileptogenesis. The progress made in the last 15 years in the genetics of epilepsy is providing new possibilities for diagnosis and therapy. Here, different genetic epilepsies are reviewed as examples, to demonstrate the various pathways that can lead from genes to seizures. PMID:18472482

  7. Genetics Home Reference: acatalasemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the CAT gene can cause acatalasemia . This gene provides instructions ... DNA, proteins, and cell membranes. Mutations in the CAT gene greatly reduce the activity of catalase. A ...

  8. Primer on molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  9. Genetic diseases in adults.

    PubMed

    Kolettis, Peter N

    2003-02-01

    Genetic diseases that do not primarily affect the genitourinary tract may have urologic manifestations. These urologic manifestations range from benign and malignant renal disease to infertility. Thus, the practicing urologist may be involved in the care of these patients and should have knowledge of these diseases. Continued improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of these genetic diseases will likely result in improved survival and will increase the number of patients who may develop urologic manifestations of these diseases.

  10. Genetics and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Allen, Carolyn M; Founds, Sandra A

    2013-01-01

    Although the etiology of preterm birth is incompletely understood, phenotype classifications combined with recent technologies such as genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing could lead to discovering genotypes associated with preterm birth. Identifying genetic contributions will allow for genetic screening tests to predict or detect pregnancies with potential for preterm birth. In this article we discuss current knowledge regarding phenotype classifications, genotypes, and their associations with preterm birth.

  11. Genetic Testing in Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Ozlem; Pokharel, Yashashwi; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary dyslipidemias are often underdiagnosed and undertreated, yet with significant health implications, most importantly causing preventable premature cardiovascular diseases. The commonly used clinical criteria to diagnose hereditary lipid disorders are specific but are not very sensitive. Genetic testing may be of value in making accurate diagnosis and improving cascade screening of family members, and potentially, in risk assessment and choice of therapy. This review focuses on using genetic testing in the clinical setting for lipid disorders, particularly familial hypercholesterolemia.

  12. Genetic testing in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Ozlem; Pokharel, Yashashwi; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary dyslipidemias are often underdiagnosed and undertreated, yet with significant health implications, most importantly causing preventable premature cardiovascular diseases. The commonly used clinical criteria to diagnose hereditary lipid disorders are specific but are not very sensitive. Genetic testing may be of value in making accurate diagnosis and improving cascade screening of family members, and potentially, in risk assessment and choice of therapy. This review focuses on using genetic testing in the clinical setting for lipid disorders, particularly familial hypercholesterolemia.

  13. Genetics of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vadlamudi, Lata; Milne, Roger L.; Lawrence, Kate; Heron, Sarah E.; Eckhaus, Jazmin; Keay, Deborah; Connellan, Mary; Torn-Broers, Yvonne; Howell, R. Anne; Mulley, John C.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Hopper, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of twins with epilepsy to explore the genetic architecture of specific epilepsies, to evaluate the applicability of the 2010 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) organization of epilepsy syndromes, and to integrate molecular genetics with phenotypic analyses. Methods: A total of 558 twin pairs suspected to have epilepsy were ascertained from twin registries (69%) or referral (31%). Casewise concordance estimates were calculated for epilepsy syndromes. Epilepsies were then grouped according to the 2010 ILAE organizational scheme. Molecular genetic information was utilized where applicable. Results: Of 558 twin pairs, 418 had confirmed seizures. A total of 534 twin individuals were affected. There were higher twin concordance estimates for monozygotic (MZ) than for dizygotic (DZ) twins for idiopathic generalized epilepsies (MZ = 0.77; DZ = 0.35), genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (MZ = 0.85; DZ = 0.25), and focal epilepsies (MZ = 0.40; DZ = 0.03). Utilizing the 2010 ILAE scheme, the twin data clearly demonstrated genetic influences in the syndromes designated as genetic. Of the 384 tested twin individuals, 10.9% had mutations of large effect in known epilepsy genes or carried validated susceptibility alleles. Conclusions: Twin studies confirm clear genetic influences for specific epilepsies. Analysis of the twin sample using the 2010 ILAE scheme strongly supported the validity of grouping the “genetic” syndromes together and shows this organizational scheme to be a more flexible and biologically meaningful system than previous classifications. Successful selected molecular testing applied to this cohort is the prelude to future large-scale next-generation sequencing of epilepsy research cohorts. Insights into genetic architecture provided by twin studies provide essential data for optimizing such approaches. PMID:25107880

  14. [Genetics of congenital cardiopathies].

    PubMed

    Moreno García, M; Gómez Rodríguez, M J; Barreiro Miranda, E

    2000-07-01

    Congenital heart malformations are the most common of all birth defects, affecting 0.5-1% of all live births. Some of these malformations are due to genetic anomalies. Patterns of autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance have been described. Mitochondrial inheritance and chromosomal anomalies can also be responsible for congenital heart malformations. Several genes for congenital heart defects have been identified. We review current knowledge on the genetic etiology of congenital heart disease.

  15. Contemporary Genetics for Gender Researchers: Not Your Grandma's Genetics Anymore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salk, Rachel H.; Hyde, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past century, much of genetics was deterministic, and feminist researchers framed justified criticisms of genetics research. However, over the past two decades, genetics research has evolved remarkably and has moved far from earlier deterministic approaches. Our article provides a brief primer on modern genetics, emphasizing contemporary…

  16. Energy overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slone, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The experience, capabilities, and facilities being utilized at NASA Lewis in support of energy programs conducted by the Department of Energy and other agencies are discussed. Background information is given regarding NASA's involvement in solving energy problems.

  17. Energy Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy models characterize the energy system, its evolution, and its interactions with the broader economy. The energy system consists of primary resources, including both fossil fuels and renewables; power plants, refineries, and other technologies to process and convert these r...

  18. Genetics & sport: bioethical concerns.

    PubMed

    Miah, Andy

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of the ethical issues pertaining to the use of genetic insights and techniques in sport. Initially, it considers a range of scientific findings that have stimulated debate about the ethical issues associated with genetics applied to sport. It also outlines some of the early policy responses to these discoveries from world leading sports organizations, along with knowledge about actual use of gene technologies in sport. Subsequently, it considers the challenges with distinguishing between therapeutic use and human enhancement within genetic science, which is a particularly important issue for the world of sport. Next, particular attention is given to the use of genetic information, which raises questions about the legitimacy and reliability of genetic tests, along with the potential public value of having DNA databanks to economize in health care. Finally, the ethics of gene transfer are considered, inviting questions into the values of sport and humanity. It argues that, while gene modification may seem conceptually similar to other forms of doping, the requirements upon athletes are such that new forms of enhancement become increasingly necessary to discover. Insofar as genetic science is able to create safer, more effective techniques of human modification, then it may be an appealing route through which to modify athletes to safeguard the future of elite sports as enterprises of human excellence.

  19. Early Alzheimer's disease genetics.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2006-01-01

    The genetics community working on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias has made remarkable progress in the past 20 years. The cumulative efforts by multiple groups have lead to the identification of three autosomal dominant genes for early onset AD. These are the amyloid-beta protein precursor gene (APP), and the genes encoding presenilin1 and 2. The knowledge derived from this work has firmly established Abeta as a critical disease molecule and lead to candidate drugs currently in treatment trials. Work on a related disease, frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism - chromosome 17 type has also added to our understanding of pathogenesis by revealing that tau, the protein component of neurofibrillary tangles, is also a critical molecule in neurodegeneration. Lessons learned that still influence work on human genetics include the need to recognize and deal with genetic heterogeneity, a feature common to many genetic disorders. Genetic heterogeneity, if recognized, can be source of information. Another critical lesson is that clinical, molecular, and statistical scientists need to work closely on disease projects to succeed in solving the complex problems of common genetic disorders.

  20. Synchronization of genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianshou; Zhang, Jiajun; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Chen, Luonan

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization of genetic or cellular oscillators is a central topic in understanding the rhythmicity of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. Here, we show how a collective rhythm across a population of genetic oscillators through synchronization-induced intercellular communication is achieved, and how an ensemble of independent genetic oscillators is synchronized by a common noisy signaling molecule. Our main purpose is to elucidate various synchronization mechanisms from the viewpoint of dynamics, by investigating the effects of various biologically plausible couplings, several kinds of noise, and external stimuli. To have a comprehensive understanding on the synchronization of genetic oscillators, we consider three classes of genetic oscillators: smooth oscillators (exhibiting sine-like oscillations), relaxation oscillators (displaying jump dynamics), and stochastic oscillators (noise-induced oscillation). For every class, we further study two cases: with intercellular communication (including phase-attractive and repulsive coupling) and without communication between cells. We find that an ensemble of smooth oscillators has different synchronization phenomena from those in the case of relaxation oscillators, where noise plays a different but key role in synchronization. To show differences in synchronization between them, we make comparisons in many aspects. We also show that a population of genetic stochastic oscillators have their own synchronization mechanisms. In addition, we present interesting phenomena, e.g., for relaxation-type stochastic oscillators coupled to a quorum-sensing mechanism, different noise intensities can induce different periodic motions (i.e., inhomogeneous limit cycles).

  1. Genetics of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Schuckit, M A; Li, T K; Cloninger, C R; Deitrich, R A

    1985-12-01

    Great progress has been made by research on the contribution genetic factors make to a vulnerability toward alcoholism. Animal studies have demonstrated the importance of genetics in ethanol preference and levels of consumption, and human family, twin, and adoption research have revealed a 4-fold higher risk for offspring of alcoholics, even if they were adopted out at birth. The work presented in this symposium reviews the ongoing search for genetic trait markers of a vulnerability toward alcoholism. Dr. Li has used both animal and human research to demonstrate the possible importance of the genetic control of enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism and has worked to help develop an animal model of alcoholism. The possible importance of subgroups with different levels of predisposition toward alcoholism is emphasized by Dr. Cloninger. An overview of the studies of sons of alcoholics, given by Dr. Schuckit, reveals the potential importance of a decreased intensity of reaction to ethanol as part of a predisposition toward alcoholism and discusses the possible impact of some brain waves and ethanol metabolites to an alcoholism vulnerability. Dr. Deitrich reviews interrelationships between studies of animals and humans in the search for factors involved in a genetic vulnerability toward alcoholism. Taken together, these presentations underscore the importance of genetic factors in alcoholism, review animal and human research attempting to identify markers of a vulnerability, and reveal the high level of interaction between human and animal research.

  2. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  3. Energy Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. Bruce

    2007-10-01

    Without energy (E) there is nothing, m=E/c^2. Without energy the various global economies will collapse. In fact, these economies generally require more energy every year. Where will this energy come from? What are the expected impacts of the various energy sources & uses on the environment? Brief summary answers to these questions are presented, and a plea is made for more energy R&D at our national laboratories and within the industrial community.

  4. Energy Theater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daane, Abigail R.; Wells, Lindsay; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2014-05-01

    Energy Theater is a dynamic, full-body activity that engages all students in representing the flow of energy in various phenomena, such as a light bulb burning steadily or a refrigerator cooling food. In Energy Theater, each participant acts as a unit of energy that has one form at a time. Regions on the floor correspond to objects in a physical scenario, and participants move from one region to another to demonstrate the flow of energy among objects. (See Figs. 1, 3, and 4.) The goal of Energy Theater is for students to track energy transfers and transformations in real-world energy scenarios while employing the principle of energy conservation and disambiguating matter and energy. Unlike most representations of energy, which are static before-and-after accounting schemes for energy changes, Energy Theater is a dynamic representation that provides a natural stepping stone toward the more advanced ideas of energy density, energy current, and a continuity equation relating them. The fact that conservation of energy is embedded in the representation encourages students to "find the energy" in situations where it may be imperceptible. The rules of Energy Theater are listed in Fig. 2.

  5. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  6. High Points of Human Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Curt

    1975-01-01

    Discusses such high points of human genetics as the study of chromosomes, somatic cell hybrids, the population formula: the Hardy-Weinberg Law, biochemical genetics, the single-active X Theory, behavioral genetics and finally how genetics can serve humanity. (BR)

  7. The future of genetic epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Morton, N E

    1992-12-01

    Starting from a broad definition of genetic epidemiology, current developments in association, segregation, and linkage analysis of complex inheritance are considered together with integration of genetic and physical maps and resolution of genetic heterogeneity. Mitochondrial inheritance, imprinting, uniparental disomy, pregressive amplification, and gonadal mosaicism are some of the novel mechanisms discussed, with speculation about the future of genetic epidemiology.

  8. [Genetic aspects of genealogy].

    PubMed

    Tetushkin, E Iu

    2011-11-01

    The supplementary historical discipline genealogy is also a supplementary genetic discipline. In its formation, genetics borrowed from genealogy some methods of pedigree analysis. In the 21th century, it started receiving contribution from computer-aided genealogy and genetic (molecular) genealogy. The former provides novel tools for genetics, while the latter, which employing genetic methods, enriches genetics with new evidence. Genealogists formulated three main laws ofgenealogy: the law of three generations, the law of doubling the ancestry number, and the law of declining ancestry. The significance and meaning of these laws can be fully understood only in light of genetics. For instance, a controversy between the exponential growth of the number of ancestors of an individual, i.e., the law of doubling the ancestry number, and the limited number of the humankind is explained by the presence of weak inbreeding because of sibs' interference; the latter causes the pedigrees' collapse, i.e., explains also the law of diminishing ancestry number. Mathematic modeling of pedigrees' collapse presented in a number of studies showed that the number of ancestors of each individual attains maximum in a particular generation termed ancestry saturated generation. All representatives of this and preceding generation that left progeny are common ancestors of all current members of the population. In subdivided populations, these generations are more ancient than in panmictic ones, whereas in small isolates and social strata with limited numbers of partners, they are younger. The genealogical law of three generations, according to which each hundred years contain on average three generation intervals, holds for generation lengths for Y-chromosomal DNA, typically equal to 31-32 years; for autosomal and mtDNA, this time is somewhat shorter. Moving along ascending lineas, the number of genetically effective ancestors transmitting their DNA fragment to descendants increases far

  9. Nutritional and Genetic Determinants of Early Puberty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    5 weekly sessions of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and #14 h of weekly screen time (TV, video viewing, computer/ video game use) as...of genetic variants and nutrition in early maturation, obesity patterns and bone density. 7 REFERENCES 1. Henderson BE, Ross RK, Pike MC...physical activity, and energy intake. In a multivariate analysis focusing on the trunk:peripheral fat ratio, this measure of central obesity was

  10. Genetic transformation of obligately chemolithotrophic thiobacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Yankofsky, S A; Gurevich, R; Grimland, N; Stark, A A

    1983-01-01

    Genetic transformation of Thiobacaillus thioparus auxotrophs to prototrophy was obtained at frequencies of up to 10(-2) when proliferating cell populations were exposed to chromosomal DNA from a nutritionally independent strain of the same bacterium. The rate at which transformation occurred depended on recipient growth rate and could be drastically reduced by depriving otherwise competent cells of either nitrogen or exogenous energy substrate. Interspecies marker transfer was also shown among several obligately chemolithotrophic members of the genus. PMID:6571832

  11. Genetic response to bacteriophage infection in Lactococcus lactis reveals a four-strand approach involving induction of membrane stress proteins, D-alanylation of the cell wall, maintenance of proton motive force, and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Fallico, Vincenzo; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2011-11-01

    In this study, whole-genome microarrays were used to gain insights into the global molecular response of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 at an early stage of infection with the lytic phage c2. The bacterium differentially regulated the expression of 61 genes belonging to 14 functional categories, including cell envelope processes (12 genes), regulatory functions (11 genes), and carbohydrate metabolism (7 genes). The nature of these genes suggests a complex response involving four main mechanisms: (i) induction of membrane stress proteins, (ii) d-alanylation of cell wall lipoteichoic acids (LTAs), (iii) maintenance of the proton motive force (PMF), and (iv) energy conservation. The phage presence is sensed as a membrane stress in L. lactis subsp. lactis IL1403, which activated a cell wall-targeted response probably orchestrated by the concerted action of membrane phage shock protein C-like homologues, the global regulator SpxB, and the two-component system CesSR. The bacterium upregulated genes (ddl and dltABCD) responsible for incorporation of d-alanine esters into LTAs, an event associated with increased resistance to phage attack in Gram-positive bacteria. The expression of genes (yshC, citE, citF) affecting both PMF components was also regulated to restore the physiological PMF, which was disrupted following phage infection. While mobilizing the response to the phage-mediated stress, the bacterium activated an energy-saving program by repressing growth-related functions and switching to anaerobic respiration, probably to sustain the PMF and the overall cell response to phage. To our knowledge, this represents the first detailed description in L. lactis of the molecular mechanisms involved in the host response to the membrane perturbations mediated by phage infection.

  12. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Spurthi N; Song, Jian; Villa, Andrea; Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C; Kuhn, David N; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance.

  13. Promoting Utilization of Saccharum spp. Genetic Resources through Genetic Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C.; Kuhn, David N.; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A.; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  14. Pregnancy, cardiomyopathies, and genetics.

    PubMed

    Van Tintelen, J Peter; Pieper, Petronella G; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Van Den Berg, Maarten P

    2014-03-15

    Although familial forms of cardiomyopathy such as hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy have been recognized for decades, it is only recently that much of the genetic basis of these inherited cardiomyopathies has been elucidated. This has provided important insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease phenotype. This increased knowledge and the availability of genetic testing has resulted in increasing numbers of mutation carriers who are being monitored, including many who are now of child-bearing age. Pregnancy is generally well tolerated in asymptomatic patients or mutation carriers with inherited cardiomyopathies. However, since pregnancy leads to major physiological changes in the cardiovascular system, in women with genetic cardiomyopathies or who carry a mutation pre-disposing to a genetic cardiomyopathy, pregnancy entails a risk of developing heart failure and/or arrhythmias. This deterioration of cardiac function may occur despite optimal medical treatment. Advanced left ventricular dysfunction, poor functional class (NYHA class III or IV), or prior cardiac events appear to increase the risk of maternal cardiac complications. However, there are no large series of cardiomyopathy patients who are regularly evaluated for cardiac complications during pregnancy and for certain types of inherited cardiomyopathy, only case reports on individual pregnancies are available. Pre-conception cardiologic evaluation and genetic counselling are important for every woman with a cardiomyopathy or a cardiomyopathy-related mutation who is considering having a family. In this article, we give an overview of the basic clinical aspects, genetics, and pregnancy outcome in women with different types of inherited cardiomyopathies. We also discuss the genetic aspects of pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy.

  15. Genetic of uveitis.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Carrai, Paola; Srivastava, Sunil K; Lowder, Careen Y; Nucci, Paolo; Neri, Piergiorgio

    2016-06-01

    Immune-mediated uveitis may be associated with a systemic disease or may be localized to the eye. T-cell-dependent immunological events are increasingly being regarded as extremely important in the pathogenesis of uveitis. Several studies have also shown that macrophages are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis. Uveitis phenotypes can differ substantially, and most uveitis diseases are considered polygenic with complex inheritance patterns. This review attempts to present the current state of knowledge from in vitro and in vivo research on the role of genetics in the development and clinical course of uveitis. A review of the literature in the PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane databases was conducted to identify clinical trials, comparative studies, case series, and case reports describing host genetic factors as well as immune imbalance which contribute to the development of uveitis. The search was limited to primary reports published in English with human subjects from 1990 to the present, yielding 3590 manuscripts. In addition, referenced articles from the initial searches were hand searched to identify additional relevant reports. After title and abstract selection, duplicate elimination, and manual search, 55 papers were selected for analysis and reviewed by the authors for inclusion in this review. Studies have demonstrated associations between various genetic factors and the development and clinical course of intraocular inflammatory conditions. Genes involved included genes expressing interleukins, chemokines, chemokine receptors, and tumor necrosis factor and genes involved in complement system. When considering the genetics of uveitis, common threads can be identified. Genome-wide scans and other genetic methods are becoming increasingly successful in identifying genetic loci and candidate genes in many inflammatory disorders that have a uveitic component. It will be important to test these findings as uveitis-specific genetic factors. Therefore, the

  16. Moral issues arising from genetics.

    PubMed

    Zucker, A; Patriquin, D

    1987-01-01

    Gene therapy, pre-natal diagnosis, genetically altered bacteria, patenting new life forms: these are all outgrowths from the development of genetics. Our focus will be on the moral issues engendered by some of the genetic techniques which are now so well integrated into clinical medicine. The section on genetic counseling is meant to show the most frequent moral problems encountered as they might really occur. Genetic screening is presented as a mix of preventive medicine and aid for genetic counseling. Genetic engineering is discussed in the context of evolution and human needs and desires.

  17. Genetic epidemiology, genetic maps and positional cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Newton E

    2003-01-01

    Genetic epidemiology developed in the middle of the last century, focused on inherited causes of disease but with methods and results applicable to other traits and even forensics. Early success with linkage led to the localization of genes contributing to disease, and ultimately to the Human Genome Project. The discovery of millions of DNA markers has encouraged more efficient positional cloning by linkage disequilibrium (LD), using LD maps and haplotypes in ways that are rapidly evolving. This has led to large international programmes, some promising and others alarming, with laws about DNA patenting and ethical guidelines for responsible research still struggling to be born. PMID:14561327

  18. Genetic Counseling: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Handouts Genetic counseling (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Genetic Counseling updates ... GO GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Genetic counseling Related Health Topics Birth Defects Family History Genetic Disorders Genetic Testing ...

  19. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... sobre las pruebas genéticas Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Testing What is genetic testing? What can I ... find more information about genetic testing? What is genetic testing? Genetic testing uses laboratory methods to look ...

  20. What Are the Types of Genetic Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of genetic tests? What are the types of genetic tests? Genetic testing can provide information about a ... paternity). For more information about the uses of genetic testing: A Brief Primer on Genetic Testing , which ...

  1. Energy Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daane, Abigail R.; Wells, Lindsay; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Energy Theater is a dynamic, full-body activity that engages all students in representing the flow of energy in various phenomena, such as a light bulb burning steadily or a refrigerator cooling food. In Energy Theater, each participant acts as a unit of energy that has one form at a time. Regions on the floor correspond to objects in a physical…

  2. Energy Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of three energy experts on the issue of school facility energy management. The experts respond to the following questions: will energy deregulation occur in all 50 states and will it provide real savings; and will the majority of districts hire ESCOs to manage their energy needs? (GR)

  3. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    An introduction to geothermal energy is provided in this discussion of: (1) how a geothermal reservoir works; (2) how to find geothermal energy; (3) where it is located; (4) electric power generation using geothermal energy; (5) use of geothermal energy as a direct source of heat; (6) geopressured reservoirs; (7) environmental effects; (8)…

  4. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemzer, Marilyn; Page, Deborah

    This curriculum unit describes geothermal energy in the context of the world's energy needs. It addresses renewable and nonrenewable energy sources with an in-depth study of geothermal energy--its geology, its history, and its many uses. Included are integrated activities involving science, as well as math, social studies, and language arts.…

  5. Constraints in Genetic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic programming refers to a class of genetic algorithms utilizing generic representation in the form of program trees. For a particular application, one needs to provide the set of functions, whose compositions determine the space of program structures being evolved, and the set of terminals, which determine the space of specific instances of those programs. The algorithm searches the space for the best program for a given problem, applying evolutionary mechanisms borrowed from nature. Genetic algorithms have shown great capabilities in approximately solving optimization problems which could not be approximated or solved with other methods. Genetic programming extends their capabilities to deal with a broader variety of problems. However, it also extends the size of the search space, which often becomes too large to be effectively searched even by evolutionary methods. Therefore, our objective is to utilize problem constraints, if such can be identified, to restrict this space. In this publication, we propose a generic constraint specification language, powerful enough for a broad class of problem constraints. This language has two elements -- one reduces only the number of program instances, the other reduces both the space of program structures as well as their instances. With this language, we define the minimal set of complete constraints, and a set of operators guaranteeing offspring validity from valid parents. We also show that these operators are not less efficient than the standard genetic programming operators if one preprocesses the constraints - the necessary mechanisms are identified.

  6. Microtia: epidemiology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Luquetti, Daniela V; Heike, Carrie L; Hing, Anne V; Cunningham, Michael L; Cox, Timothy C

    2012-01-01

    Microtia is a congenital anomaly of the ear that ranges in severity from mild structural abnormalities to complete absence of the ear, and can occur as an isolated birth defect or as part of a spectrum of anomalies or a syndrome. Microtia is often associated with hearing loss and patients typically require treatment for hearing impairment and surgical ear reconstruction. The reported prevalence varies among regions, from 0.83 to 17.4 per 10,000 births, and the prevalence is considered to be higher in Hispanics, Asians, Native Americans, and Andeans. The etiology of microtia and the cause of this wide variability in prevalence are poorly understood. Strong evidence supports the role of environmental and genetic causes for microtia. Although some studies have identified candidate genetic variants for microtia, no causal genetic mutation has been confirmed. The application of novel strategies in developmental biology and genetics has facilitated elucidation of mechanisms controlling craniofacial development. In this paper we review current knowledge of the epidemiology and genetics of microtia, including potential candidate genes supported by evidence from human syndromes and animal models. We also discuss the possible etiopathogenesis in light of the hypotheses formulated to date: Neural crest cells disturbance, vascular disruption, and altitude.

  7. Genetics and smoking

    PubMed Central

    Loukola, Anu; Hällfors, Jenni; Korhonen, Tellervo; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Regular smoking is the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cancers, and thus is one of the most preventable causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Intake of nicotine, its central nervous system effects, and its metabolism are regulated by biological pathways; some of these are well known, but others are not. Genetic studies offer a method for developing insights into the genes contributing to those pathways. In recent years, large genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses have consistently revealed that the strongest genetic contribution to smoking-related traits comes from variation in the nicotinic receptor subunit genes. Many other genes, including those coding for enzymes involved in nicotine metabolism, also have been implicated. However, the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the identified genetic variants is very modest. This review intends to cover progress made in genetics and genetic epidemiology of smoking behavior in recent years, and focuses on studies revealing the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 15q25. Evidence supporting the involvement of a novel pathway in the shared pathophysiology of nicotine dependence and schizophrenia is also briefly reviewed. A summary of the current knowledge on gene–environment interactions involved in smoking behavior is included. PMID:24778978

  8. Genetics of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Ninoa, F.; Ilaria, M.; Noviello, C.; Santoro, L.; Rätsch, I.M.; Martino, A.; Cobellis, G.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the upper urinary tract. It is the most common congenital urological anomaly affecting 1-2% of children and 30-40% of patients with urinary tract infections. VUR is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and chronic renal failure in children. It is the result of a shortened intravesical ureter with an enlarged or malpositioned ureteric orifice. An ectopic embryonal ureteric budding development is implicated in the pathogenesis of VUR, which is a complex genetic developmental disorder. Many genes are involved in the ureteric budding formation and subsequently in the urinary tract and kidney development. Previous studies demonstrate an heterogeneous genetic pattern of VUR. In fact no single major locus or gene for primary VUR has been identified. It is likely that different forms of VUR with different genetic determinantes are present. Moreover genetic studies of syndromes with associated VUR have revealed several possible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of VUR and related urinary tract malformations. Mutations in genes essential for urinary tract morphogenesis are linked to numerous congenital syndromes, and in most of those VUR is a feature. The Authors provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the VUR. The different genes and signaling pathways controlling the embryonal urinary tract development are analyzed. A better understanding of VUR genetic bases could improve the management of this condition in children. PMID:27013925

  9. Genetics in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Rego, Ignacio; Carreira-Garcia, Vanessa; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative articular disease with complex pathogeny because diverse factors interact causing a process of deterioration of the cartilage. Despite the multifactorial nature of this pathology, from the 50’s it´s known that certain forms of osteoarthritis are related to a strong genetic component. The genetic bases of this disease do not follow the typical patterns of mendelian inheritance and probably they are related to alterations in multiple genes. The identification of a high number of candidate genes to confer susceptibility to the development of the osteoarthritis shows the complex nature of this disease. At the moment, the genetic mechanisms of this disease are not known, however, which seems clear is that expression levels of several genes are altered, and that the inheritance will become a substantial factor in future considerations of diagnosis and treatment of the osteoarthritis. PMID:19516961

  10. Genetics of Clubfoot

    PubMed Central

    DOBBS, Matthew B; GURNETT, Christina A

    2011-01-01

    Modern advances in genetics have allowed investigators to begin to identify the complex etiology of clubfoot. It has become increasingly apparent that clubfoot is a heterogeneous disorder with a polygenetic threshold model explaining its inheritance patterns. Several recent genetics studies have identified a key developmental pathway, the PITX1-TBX4 transriptional pathway, as being important in clubfoot etiology. Both PITX1 and TBX4 are uniquely expressed in the hindlimb which helps explain the foot phenotype seen with mutations in these transcription factors. Future studies are needed to develop animal models to determine the exact mechanisms by which these genetic abnormalities cause clubfoot and to test other hypotheses of clubfoot pathogenesis. PMID:21817922

  11. Whakapapa, genealogy and genetics.

    PubMed

    Evans, Donald

    2012-05-01

    This paper provides part of an analysis of the use of the Maori term whakapapa in a study designed to test the compatibility and commensurability of views of members of the indigenous culture of New Zealand with other views of genetic technologies extant in the country. It is concerned with the narrow sense of whakapapa as denoting biological ancestry, leaving the wider sense of whakapapa as denoting cultural identity for discussion elsewhere. The phenomenon of genetic curiosity is employed to facilitate this comparison. Four levels of curiosity are identified, in the Maori data, which penetrate more or less deeply into the psyche of individuals, affecting their health and wellbeing. These phenomena are compared with non-Maori experiences and considerable commonalities are discovered together with a point of marked difference. The results raise important questions for the ethical application of genetic technologies.

  12. Genetics of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Michael A; Zavala, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar disorder especially the most severe type (type I), has a strong genetic component. Family studies suggest that a small number of genes of modest effect are involved in this disorder. Family-based studies have identified a number of chromosomal regions linked to bipolar disorder, and progress is currently being made in identifying positional candidate genes within those regions. A number of candidate genes have also shown evidence of association with bipolar disorder, and genome-wide association studies are now under way, using dense genetic maps. Replication studies in larger or combined datasets are needed to definitively assign a role for specific genes in this disorder. This review covers our current knowledge of the genetics of bipolar disorder, and provides a commentary on current approaches used to identify the genes involved in this complex behavioral disorder.

  13. Genetics of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Buskila, Dan; Neumann, Lily

    2005-10-01

    The pathogenesis of fibromyalgia (FM) and related conditions is not entirely understood. Recent evidence suggests that these syndromes may share heritable pathophysiologic features. Familial studies suggest that genetic and familial factors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of these conditions. There is evidence that polymorphisms of genes in the serotoninergic and catecholaminergic systems are linked to the pathophysiology of FM and related conditions and are associated with personality traits. The precise role of genetic factors in the etiopathology of FM remains unknown, but it is likely that several genes are operating together to initiate this syndrome. Larger longitudinal studies are needed to better clarify the role of genetics in the development of FM.

  14. Workshop on molecular methods for genetic diagnosis. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M.

    1997-07-01

    The Sarah Lawrence College Human Genetics Program received Department of Energy funding to offer a continuing medical education workshop for genetic counselors in the New York metropolitan area. According to statistics from the National Society of Genetic Counselors, there are approximately 160 genetic counselors working in the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut), and many of them had been working in the field for more than 10 years. Thus, there was a real need to offer these counselors an in-depth opportunity to learn the specifics of the major advances in molecular genetics, and, in particular, the new approaches to diagnostic testing for genetic disease. As a result of the DOE Award DE-FG02-95ER62048 ($20,583), in July 1995 we offered the {open_quotes}Workshop on Molecular Methods for Genetic Diagnosis{close_quotes} for 24 genetic counselors in the New York metropolitan area. The workshop included an initial review session on the basics of molecular biology, lectures and discussions on past and current topics in molecular genetics and diagnostic procedures, and, importantly, daily laboratory exercises. Each counselor gained not only background, but also firsthand experience, in the major techniques of biochemical and molecular methods for diagnosing genetic diseases as well as in mathematical and computational techniques involved in human genetics analyses. Our goal in offering this workshop was not to make genetic counselors experts in these laboratory diagnostic techniques, but to acquaint them, by hands-on experience, about some of the techniques currently in use. We also wanted to provide them a technical foundation upon which they can understand and appreciate new technical developments arising in the near future.

  15. Energy Consumption vs. Energy Requirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, L. T.; Zhang, Tengyan; Schlup, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Energy is necessary for any phenomenon to occur or any process to proceed. Nevertheless, energy is never consumed; instead, it is conserved. What is consumed is available energy, or exergy, accompanied by an increase in entropy. Obviously, the terminology, "energy consumption" is indeed a misnomer although it is ubiquitous in the…

  16. Agricultural Energy Practices. Agriculture Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with agricultural energy practices. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss energy use and conservation of resources in the production of agricultural products. Some topics covered are basic uses of direct energy in…

  17. Genetic dissection of the functions of the melanocortin-3 receptor, a seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptor, suggests roles for central and peripheral receptors in energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Begriche, Karima; Levasseur, Peter R; Zhang, Jingying; Rossi, Jari; Skorupa, Danielle; Solt, Laura A; Young, Brandon; Burris, Thomas P; Marks, Daniel L; Mynatt, Randall L; Butler, Andrew A

    2011-11-25

    The melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) gene is pleiotropic, influencing body composition, natriuresis, immune function, and entrainment of circadian rhythms to nutrient intake. MC3Rs are expressed in hypothalamic and limbic regions of the brain and in peripheral tissues. To investigate the roles of central MC3Rs, we inserted a "lox-stop-lox" (LoxTB) 5' of the translation initiation codon of the mouse Mc3r gene and reactivated transcription using neuron-specific Cre transgenic mice. As predicted based on earlier observations of Mc3r knock-out mice, Mc3r(TB/TB) mice displayed reduced lean mass, increased fat mass, and accelerated diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, rescuing Mc3r expression in the nervous system using the Nestin-Cre transgene only partially rescued obesity in chow-fed conditions and had no impact on the accelerated diet-induced obesity phenotype. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), a critical node in the neural networks regulating feeding-related behaviors and metabolic homeostasis, exhibits dense Mc3r expression relative to other brain regions. To target VMH MC3R expression, we used the steroidogenic factor-1 Cre transgenic mouse. Although restoring VMH MC3R signaling also had a modest impact on obesity, marked improvements in metabolic homeostasis were observed. VMH MC3R signaling was not sufficient to rescue the lean mass phenotype or the regulation of behaviors anticipating food anticipation. These results suggest that actions of MC3Rs impacting on energy homeostasis involve both central and peripheral sites of action. The impact of central MC3Rs on behavior and metabolism involves divergent pathways; VMH MC3R signaling improves metabolic homeostasis but does not significantly impact on the expression of behaviors anticipating nutrient availability.

  18. Genetic Dissection of the Functions of the Melanocortin-3 Receptor, a Seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled Receptor, Suggests Roles for Central and Peripheral Receptors in Energy Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Begriche, Karima; Levasseur, Peter R.; Zhang, Jingying; Rossi, Jari; Skorupa, Danielle; Solt, Laura A.; Young, Brandon; Burris, Thomas P.; Marks, Daniel L.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Butler, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    The melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) gene is pleiotropic, influencing body composition, natriuresis, immune function, and entrainment of circadian rhythms to nutrient intake. MC3Rs are expressed in hypothalamic and limbic regions of the brain and in peripheral tissues. To investigate the roles of central MC3Rs, we inserted a “lox-stop-lox” (LoxTB) 5′ of the translation initiation codon of the mouse Mc3r gene and reactivated transcription using neuron-specific Cre transgenic mice. As predicted based on earlier observations of Mc3r knock-out mice, Mc3rTB/TB mice displayed reduced lean mass, increased fat mass, and accelerated diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, rescuing Mc3r expression in the nervous system using the Nestin-Cre transgene only partially rescued obesity in chow-fed conditions and had no impact on the accelerated diet-induced obesity phenotype. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), a critical node in the neural networks regulating feeding-related behaviors and metabolic homeostasis, exhibits dense Mc3r expression relative to other brain regions. To target VMH MC3R expression, we used the steroidogenic factor-1 Cre transgenic mouse. Although restoring VMH MC3R signaling also had a modest impact on obesity, marked improvements in metabolic homeostasis were observed. VMH MC3R signaling was not sufficient to rescue the lean mass phenotype or the regulation of behaviors anticipating food anticipation. These results suggest that actions of MC3Rs impacting on energy homeostasis involve both central and peripheral sites of action. The impact of central MC3Rs on behavior and metabolism involves divergent pathways; VMH MC3R signaling improves metabolic homeostasis but does not significantly impact on the expression of behaviors anticipating nutrient availability. PMID:21984834

  19. Secure information transfer based on computing reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmoski, R. M.; Ferrari, F. A. S.; de S. Pinto, S. E.; Baptista, M. S.; Viana, R. L.

    2013-04-01

    There is a broad area of research to ensure that information is transmitted securely. Within this scope, chaos-based cryptography takes a prominent role due to its nonlinear properties. Using these properties, we propose a secure mechanism for transmitting data that relies on chaotic networks. We use a nonlinear on-off device to cipher the message, and the transfer entropy to retrieve it. We analyze the system capability for sending messages, and we obtain expressions for the operating time. We demonstrate the system efficiency for a wide range of parameters. We find similarities between our method and the reservoir computing.

  20. Maize Genetic Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the resources held at the Maize Genetics Cooperation • Stock Center in detail and also provides some information about the North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station (NCRPIS) in Ames, IA, Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT) in Mexico, and the N...

  1. Teaching Genetics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, A.; Bird-Stewart, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the genetics content in secondary school curricula, suggesting possible revisions to current A- and 0-level syllabi. Present teaching methods, textbooks, and General Certificate of Education (GCE) examination questions are reviewed, problems identified, and suggestions made regarding possible improvements. (Author/JN)

  2. The new genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroff, L.

    1991-01-01

    Knowing the location and make-up of each of the 50,000 to 100,000 human genes will revolutionize the practice of medicine. This knowledge will lead to tailor-made therapies not only for treating disease but also for preventing it - in short, to a new concept of patient care. The Human Genome Project, a 15-year, $3 billion quest to determine the nucleotide sequence of the entire human genome, will make this possible. In The New Genetics, Leon Jaroff recounts the long path of discovery thatt has led to this huge new scientific venture - from the theory of heredity put forth by Aristotle more than 2,000 years ago to the current attempts to treat adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency and malignant melanoma via gene therapy. Against this background, the geneticists, molecular biologists, clinicians, and ethicists involved in the Human Genome Project describe their work and how it will provide physicians with ever more precise and effective tools to treat human disease. Jaroff also reveals the other, more problematic side of the story. Patients with an undesirable genetic profile may be subject to discrimination by private insurers. Physicians who fail to recommend genetic screening may find themselves victims of malpractice or wrongful-life suits. Indeed, these issues and others have already begun to affect physicians. The New Genetics makes it abundantly clear tha a revolution has arrived, and that physicians must be prepared to cope with the new order.

  3. Solving Problems in Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aznar, Mercedes Martinez; Orcajo, Teresa Ibanez

    2005-01-01

    A teaching unit on genetics and human inheritance using problem-solving methodology was undertaken with fourth-level Spanish Secondary Education students (15 year olds). The goal was to study certain aspects of the students' learning process (concepts, procedures and attitude) when using this methodology in the school environment. The change…

  4. Genetics of Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Mallipatna, Ashwin; Marino, Meghan; Singh, Arun D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a malignant retinal tumor that affects young children. Mutations in the RB1 gene cause retinoblastoma. Mutations in both RB1 alleles within the precursor retinal cell are essential, with one mutation that may be germline or somatic and the second one that is always somatic. Identification of the RB1 germline status of a patient allows differentiation between sporadic and heritable retinoblastoma variants. Application of this knowledge is crucial for assessing short-term (risk of additional tumors in the same eye and other eye) and long-term (risk of nonocular malignant tumors) prognosis and offering cost-effective surveillance strategies. Genetic testing and genetic counseling are therefore essential components of care for all children diagnosed with retinoblastoma. The American Joint Committee on Cancer has acknowledged the importance of detecting this heritable trait and has introduced the letter "H" to denote a heritable trait of all cancers, starting with retinoblastoma (in publication). In this article, we discuss the clinically relevant aspects of genetic testing and genetic counseling for a child with retinoblastoma.

  5. Genetics of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stančáková, Alena; Laakso, Markku

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic traits associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to play key roles in the pathogenesis of the MetS. The MetS has a significant genetic component, and therefore linkage analysis, candidate gene approach, and genome-wide association (GWA) studies have been applied in the search of gene variants for the MetS. A few variants have been identified, located mostly in or near genes regulating lipid metabolism. GWA studies for the individual components of the MetS have reported several loci having pleiotropic effects on multiple MetS-related traits. Genetic studies have provided so far only limited evidence for a common genetic background of the MetS. Epigenetic factors (DNA methylation and histone modification) are likely to play important roles in the pathogenesis of the MetS, and they might mediate the effects of environmental exposures on the risk of the MetS. Further research is needed to clarify the role of genetic variation and epigenetic mechanisms in the development of the MetS.

  6. Breeding and genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn breeding has been historically remarkably successful. Much research has investigated optimal breeding procedures, which are detailed here. A smaller effort has been put into identifying useful genetic resources for maize and how to best use them, but results from long-term base broadening effor...

  7. Genetics and immunology: reinvigorated

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Hellmann, Matthew; Rizvi, Naiyer; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D; Chan, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy is changing oncology by improving the outcome of patients with advanced malignancies. Our research has revealed the genetic features of tumors present in patients who initiate a successful antitumor immune response and derive clinical benefit from immune checkpoint blockade therapy versus non-responders. PMID:26451299

  8. Genetic Building Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberg, Ezra

    2004-01-01

    The "Central Dogma" of genetics states that one gene, located in a DNA molecule, is ultimately translated into one protein. As important as this idea is, many teachers shy away from teaching the actual mechanism of gene translation, and many students find the concepts abstract and inaccessible. This article describes a unit, called Genetics…

  9. Prenatal Genetic Counselling

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, Barbara C.

    1986-01-01

    Genetic concerns and indications for prenatal diagnosis are first recognized by the family physician. Review of personal, pregnancy and family history may indicate concerns beyond that of advanced maternal age. Amniocentesis is still the most frequently used modality for prenatal diagnosis, but detailed ultrasound is valuable for structural abnormalities, and chorionic villus sampling is now being tested as an alternative to amniocentesis. PMID:21267316

  10. Safe genetically engineered plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosellini, D.; Veronesi, F.

    2007-10-01

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

  11. The genetics of Tamarix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic studies have helped us gain basic knowledge of the Tamarix invasion. We now have a better understanding of the species identities involved in the invasion, their evolutionary relationships, and the contribution of hybridization to the invasion. This information can be used to enhance the eff...

  12. Genetics and Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Good progress is being made on genetics and genomics of sugar beet, however it is in process and the tools are now being generated and some results are being analyzed. The GABI BeetSeq project released a first draft of the sugar beet genome of KWS2320, a dihaploid (see http://bvseq.molgen.mpg.de/Gen...

  13. Demonstration: Genetic Jewelry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Thomas; Roderick, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    In order for students to understand genetics and evolution, they must first understand the structure of the DNA molecule. The function of DNA proceeds from its unique structure, a structure beautifully adapted for information storage, transcription, translation into amino acid sequences, replication, and time travel. The activity described in this…

  14. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  15. New sunflower genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic research of the sunflower research unit, USDA-ARS, in Fargo, ND, was discussed in a presentation to a group of Canadian producers, industry representatives, and scientists. Because this was an international audience, I introduced the audience to ARS and the structure of the sunflower unit, a...

  16. Paper Genetic Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacClintic, Scott D.; Nelson, Genevieve M.

    Bacterial transformation is a commonly used technique in genetic engineering that involves transferring a gene of interest into a bacterial host so that the bacteria can be used to produce large quantities of the gene product. Although several kits are available for performing bacterial transformation in the classroom, students do not always…

  17. Genetic variability in Macadamia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic variability analysis involving 45 accessions of Macadamia including four species, M. integrifolia, M. tetraphylla, M. ternifolia, and M. hildebrandii and a wild relative, Hicksbeachia pinnatifolia was performed usingeight enzyme systems encoded by 16 loci (Gpi-1 and 2, Idh-1 and 2, Lap, Md...

  18. Genetics of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence strongly indicate that genetic factors contribute to the risk for alcohol use disorders (AUD). There is substantial heterogeneity in AUD, which complicates studies seeking to identify specific genetic factors. To identify these genetic effects, several different alcohol-related phenotypes have been analyzed, including diagnosis and quantitative measures related to AUDs. Study designs have used candidate gene analyses, genetic linkage studies, genomewide association studies (GWAS), and analyses of rare variants. Two genes that encode enzymes of alcohol metabolism have the strongest effect on AUD: aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B each has strongly protective variants that reduce risk, with odds ratios approximately 0.2-0.4. A number of other genes important in AUD have been identified and replicated, including GABRA2 and alcohol dehydrogenases 1B and 4. GWAS have identified additional candidates. Rare variants are likely also to play a role; studies of these are just beginning. A multifaceted approach to gene identification, targeting both rare and common variations and assembling much larger datasets for meta-analyses, is critical for identifying the key genes and pathways important in AUD.

  19. The genetics of deafness.

    PubMed

    Nance, Walter E

    2003-01-01

    Deafness is an etiologically heterogeneous trait with many known genetic and environmental causes. Genetic factors account for at least half of all cases of profound congenital deafness, and can be classified by the mode of inheritance and the presence or absence of characteristic clinical features that may permit the diagnosis of a specific form of syndromic deafness. The identification of more than 120 independent genes for deafness has provided profound new insights into the pathophysiology of hearing, as well as many unexpected surprises. Although a large number of genes can clearly cause deafness, recessive mutations at a single locus, GJB2 or Connexin 26, account for more than half of all genetic cases in some, but not all populations. The high frequency may well be related to the greatly improved social, educational, and economic circumstances of the deaf that began with the introduction of sign language 300-400 years ago, along with a high frequency of marriages among the deaf in many countries. Similar mechanisms may account for the rapid fixation of genes for speech after the first mutations appeared 50,000-100,000 years ago. Molecular studies have shown that mutations involving several different loci may be the cause for the same form of syndromic deafness. Even within a single locus, different mutations can have profoundly different effects, leading to a different pattern of inheritance in some cases, or isolated hearing loss without the characteristic syndromic features in others. Most cases of genetic deafness result from mutations at a single locus, but an increasing number of examples are being recognized in which recessive mutations at two loci are involved. For example, digenic interactions are now known to be an important cause of deafness in individuals who carry a single mutation at the Connexin 26 locus along with a deletion involving the functionally related Connexin 30 locus. This mechanism complicates genetic evaluation and counseling, but

  20. Energy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    1981-01-01

    The Aquatic Center at Corvallis (Oregon) is analyzed for energy use. Energy conservation in the building would be accomplished best through heavy insulation of exterior surfaces and the maximization of passive solar gain. (Author/MLF)

  1. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Marshall J.

    1979-01-01

    During 1978, exploration for geothermal energy continued at the same moderately low level of the past few years in most countries. The U.S. is the only country where the development of geothermal energy depends on private industry. (BB)

  2. Save Energy $.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Thomas E., III; Shapiro, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    Large institutional energy users can reduce energy costs by constructing and operating steam and electricity cogeneration facilities and purchasing their own gas at lower prices rather than relying on local distributors. (MSE)

  3. Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J.

    1996-02-01

    Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

  4. Genetic topography of brain morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi-Hua; Fiecas, Mark; Gutiérrez, E. D.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Eyler, Lisa T.; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Thompson, Wesley K.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Hagler, Donald J.; Jernigan, Terry L.; Neale, Michael C.; Franz, Carol E.; Lyons, Michael J.; Fischl, Bruce; Tsuang, Ming T.; Dale, Anders M.; Kremen, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Animal data show that cortical development is initially patterned by genetic gradients largely along three orthogonal axes. We previously reported differences in genetic influences on cortical surface area along an anterior-posterior axis using neuroimaging data of adult human twins. Here, we demonstrate differences in genetic influences on cortical thickness along a dorsal-ventral axis in the same cohort. The phenomenon of orthogonal gradations in cortical organization evident in different structural and functional properties may originate from genetic gradients. Another emerging theme of cortical patterning is that patterns of genetic influences recapitulate the spatial topography of the cortex within hemispheres. The genetic patterning of both cortical thickness and surface area corresponds to cortical functional specializations. Intriguingly, in contrast to broad similarities in genetic patterning, two sets of analyses distinguish cortical thickness and surface area genetically. First, genetic contributions to cortical thickness and surface area are largely distinct; there is very little genetic correlation (i.e., shared genetic influences) between them. Second, organizing principles among genetically defined regions differ between thickness and surface area. Examining the structure of the genetic similarity matrix among clusters revealed that, whereas surface area clusters showed great genetic proximity with clusters from the same lobe, thickness clusters appear to have close genetic relatedness with clusters that have similar maturational timing. The discrepancies are in line with evidence that the two traits follow different mechanisms in neurodevelopment. Our findings highlight the complexity of genetic influences on cortical morphology and provide a glimpse into emerging principles of genetic organization of the cortex. PMID:24082094

  5. Energy Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  6. Energy Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaddy, Carol T., Ed.; Wells, Kathy, Ed.

    This collection of reprints offers practical solutions, not readily available elsewhere, to everyday energy problems, such as high utility bills, insulating windows, getting more gas mileage, or buying a more efficient washer or refrigerator. The Arkansas Energy Office provides a weekly column of energy news and conservation tips to newspapers,…

  7. Energy Builders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Due to increasing energy demands and decreasing supplies, it is important for teachers to provide students with a solid foundation for energy decision making. Activities are presented which offer hands-on experiences with four sources of energy: wind, water, sun, and fossil fuels. (JN)

  8. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are the origin and nature of geothermal energy. Included is the history of its development as an energy source, technological considerations affecting its development as an energy source, its environmental effects, economic considerations, and future prospects of development in this field. Basic system diagrams of the operation of a…

  9. Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

  10. Genetic Engineering and the Amelioration of Genetic Defect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederberg, Joshua

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the claims for a brave new world of genetic manipulation" and concludes that if we could agree upon applying genetic (or any other effective) remedies to global problems we probably would need no rescourse to them. Suggests that effective methods of preventing genetic disease are prevention of mutations and detection and…

  11. A stable genetic polymorphism underpinning microbial syntrophy

    PubMed Central

    Großkopf, Tobias; Zenobi, Simone; Alston, Mark; Folkes, Leighton; Swarbreck, David; Soyer, Orkun S

    2016-01-01

    Syntrophies are metabolic cooperations, whereby two organisms co-metabolize a substrate in an interdependent manner. Many of the observed natural syntrophic interactions are mandatory in the absence of strong electron acceptors, such that one species in the syntrophy has to assume the role of electron sink for the other. While this presents an ecological setting for syntrophy to be beneficial, the potential genetic drivers of syntrophy remain unknown to date. Here, we show that the syntrophic sulfate-reducing species Desulfovibrio vulgaris displays a stable genetic polymorphism, where only a specific genotype is able to engage in syntrophy with the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis. This 'syntrophic' genotype is characterized by two genetic alterations, one of which is an in-frame deletion in the gene encoding for the ion-translocating subunit cooK of the membrane-bound COO hydrogenase. We show that this genotype presents a specific physiology, in which reshaping of energy conservation in the lactate oxidation pathway enables it to produce sufficient intermediate hydrogen for sustained M. maripaludis growth and thus, syntrophy. To our knowledge, these findings provide for the first time a genetic basis for syntrophy in nature and bring us closer to the rational engineering of syntrophy in synthetic microbial communities. PMID:27258948

  12. The genetics and pathology of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Rocha, Mariana C; Lax, Nichola Z; Turnbull, Doug M; Taylor, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are double-membrane-bound organelles that are present in all nucleated eukaryotic cells and are responsible for the production of cellular energy in the form of ATP. Mitochondrial function is under dual genetic control - the 16.6-kb mitochondrial genome, with only 37 genes, and the nuclear genome, which encodes the remaining ∼1300 proteins of the mitoproteome. Mitochondrial dysfunction can arise because of defects in either mitochondrial DNA or nuclear mitochondrial genes, and can present in childhood or adulthood in association with vast clinical heterogeneity, with symptoms affecting a single organ or tissue, or multisystem involvement. There is no cure for mitochondrial disease for the vast majority of mitochondrial disease patients, and a genetic diagnosis is therefore crucial for genetic counselling and recurrence risk calculation, and can impact on the clinical management of affected patients. Next-generation sequencing strategies are proving pivotal in the discovery of new disease genes and the diagnosis of clinically affected patients; mutations in >250 genes have now been shown to cause mitochondrial disease, and the biochemical, histochemical, immunocytochemical and neuropathological characterization of these patients has led to improved diagnostic testing strategies and novel diagnostic techniques. This review focuses on the current genetic landscape associated with mitochondrial disease, before focusing on advances in studying associated mitochondrial pathology in two, clinically relevant organs - skeletal muscle and brain. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Genetic & epigenetic approach to human obesity.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Rajender; Lal, Nirupama; Giridharan, N V

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is an important clinical and public health challenge, epitomized by excess adipose tissue accumulation resulting from an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure. It is a forerunner for a variety of other diseases such as type-2-diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, stroke, hyperlipidaemia and can be fatal leading to premature death. Obesity is highly heritable and arises from the interplay of multiple genes and environmental factors. Recent advancements in Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown important steps towards identifying genetic risks and identification of genetic markers for lifestyle diseases, especially for a metabolic disorder like obesity. According to the 12th Update of Human Obesity Gene Map there are 253 quantity trait loci (QTL) for obesity related phenotypes from 61 genome wide scan studies. Contribution of genetic propensity of individual ethnic and racial variations in obesity is an active area of research. Further, understanding its complexity as to how these variations could influence ones susceptibility to become or remain obese will lead us to a greater understanding of how obesity occurs and hopefully, how to prevent and treat this condition. In this review, various strategies adapted for such an analysis based on the recent advances in genome wide and functional variations in human obesity are discussed.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: thanatophoric dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions thanatophoric dysplasia thanatophoric dysplasia Enable ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary spherocytosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions hereditary spherocytosis hereditary spherocytosis Enable ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Sotos syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Sotos syndrome Sotos syndrome Enable ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... a combination of genetic variations and environmental factors influence the development of this complex condition. Asperger syndrome ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health ... with a rearrangement (translocation) of genetic material between chromosomes 17 and 22. This translocation, written as t( ...

  19. [Public health, genetics and ethics].

    PubMed

    Kottow, Miguel H

    2002-10-01

    Genetics research has shown enormous developments in recent decades, although as yet with only limited clinical application. Bioethical analysis has been unable to deal with the vast problems of genetics because emphasis has been put on the principlism applied to both clinical and research bioethics. Genetics nevertheless poses its most complex moral dilemmas at the public level, where a social brand of ethics ought to supersede the essentially interpersonal perspective of principlism. A more social understanding of ethics in genetics is required to unravel issues such as research and clinical explorations, ownership and patents, genetic manipulation, and allocation of resources. All these issues require reflection based on the requirements of citizenry, consideration of common assets, and definition of public policies in regulating genetic endeavors and protecting the society as a whole Bioethics has privileged the approach to individual ethical issues derived from genetic intervention, thereby neglecting the more salient aspects of genetics and social ethics.

  20. [Genetic information and future medicine].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akihiro

    2012-11-01

    Rapid technological advances in genetic analysis have revealed the genetic background of various diseases. Elucidation of the genes responsible for a disease enables better clinical management of the disease and helps to develop targeted drugs. Also, early diagnosis and management of at-risk family members can be made by identification of a genetic disease in the proband. On the other hand, genetic issues often cause psychological distress to the family. To perform genetic testing appropriately and to protect patients and family members from any harm, guidelines for genetic testing were released from the alliance of Japanese genetics-related academic societies in 2003. As genetic testing is becoming incorporated into clinical practice more broadly, the guideline was revised and released by the Japanese Society of Medical Sciences in 2011. All medical professionals in Japan are expected to follow this guideline.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: incontinentia pigmenti

    MedlinePlus

    ... more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the IKBKG gene cause incontinentia pigmenti . The ... About 80 percent of affected individuals have a mutation that deletes some genetic material from the IKBKG ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Feingold syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brunner HG. Feingold syndrome: clinical review and genetic mapping. Am J Med Genet A. 2003 Nov 1; ... Brunner HG. MYCN haploinsufficiency is associated with reduced brain size and intestinal atresias in Feingold syndrome. Nat ...

  3. Evolutionary Genetics: Reuse, Recycle, Converge.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charles J J; Matute, Daniel R

    2016-09-26

    Our understanding of how genetic changes underlie the evolution of traits is growing fast. Two new studies now show that changes in the same genetic loci can drive the evolution of the same trait in multiple Drosophila species.

  4. Genetic discrimination in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Miller, P S

    1998-01-01

    Author argues that the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against workers based on their genetic makeup. He also examines state legislation and recently proposed federal legislation prohibiting genetic discrimination.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Meckel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... MKS Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (3 links) Health Topic: Brain Malformations Health Topic: Kidney Cysts Health Topic: Neural Tube Defects Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  6. Selected Readings in Genetic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Thomas R.; Robinson, Sandra K.

    1973-01-01

    Describes different sources of readings for understanding issues and concepts of genetic engineering. Broad categories of reading materials are: concerns about genetic engineering; its background; procedures; and social, ethical and legal issues. References are listed. (PS)

  7. Education of nurses in genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, I

    1988-01-01

    The need for education of nurses in genetics was articulated more than 25 years ago. This article reviews the knowledge of practicing nurses about genetics as well as the content of genetics in nursing curricula. Implementation of federal legislation that mandated increased availability of genetic services and genetics education provided support for the examination of genetics content in curricula for health professionals, including nurses, and for the development of model programs to expand this content. Recent efforts to begin to develop a pool of nurse faculty who are well prepared in genetics will be described, as well as programs to provide the necessary content through continuing-education efforts. These efforts are expected to substantially improve the capability of nurses to contribute more effectively in the delivery of genetic services. PMID:3177390

  8. Synthetic biology and genetic causation.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Gry; Parkkinen, Veli-Pekka

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic biology research is often described in terms of programming cells through the introduction of synthetic genes. Genetic material is seemingly attributed with a high level of causal responsibility. We discuss genetic causation in synthetic biology and distinguish three gene concepts differing in their assumptions of genetic control. We argue that synthetic biology generally employs a difference-making approach to establishing genetic causes, and that this approach does not commit to a specific notion of genetic program or genetic control. Still, we suggest that a strong program concept of genetic material can be used as a successful heuristic in certain areas of synthetic biology. Its application requires control of causal context, and may stand in need of a modular decomposition of the target system. We relate different modularity concepts to the discussion of genetic causation and point to possible advantages of and important limitations to seeking modularity in synthetic biology systems.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly

    MedlinePlus

    ... other types of holoprosencephaly caused by genetic syndromes, chromosome abnormalities, or substances that cause birth defects (teratogens). The ... Some people do not have apparent structural brain abnormalities but have some of the facial features ... deletion syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: Holoprosencephaly ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Cowden syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Cowden syndrome Cowden syndrome Enable ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Lynch syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Lynch syndrome Lynch syndrome Enable ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis Enable ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: renal hypouricemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal hypouricemia renal hypouricemia Enable ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Parkinson disease Parkinson disease Enable ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: lipoid proteinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lipoid proteinosis lipoid proteinosis Enable ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Blau syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Blau syndrome Blau syndrome Enable ...

  17. Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y Z Test Your Knowledge Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms Designed to help learners at any level ... in a reference paper. The Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms The Human Genome Defined by Professionals at ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Friedreich ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Friedreich ataxia Friedreich ataxia Enable ...

  19. Genetic Testing and Eye Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a History of Eye Disease, Do You Need Genetic Testing? Mar. 23, 2012 Thanks to news coverage, ... of breast or ovarian cancer. Physicians now use genetic tests to decide on treatment for some types ...

  20. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of Alcoholism Why can some people have a ... to an increased risk of alcoholism. Cutting-Edge Genetic Research in Alcoholism Although researchers already have made ...

  1. NCI Dictionary of Genetics Terms

    Cancer.gov

    A dictionary of more than 150 genetics-related terms written for healthcare professionals, developed to support the comprehensive, evidence-based, peer-reviewed PDQ cancer genetics information summaries.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: bipolar disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions bipolar disorder bipolar disorder Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... bipolar affective psychosis bipolar spectrum disorder depression, bipolar manic depressive illness Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ...

  3. Biomass energy

    SciTech Connect

    Smil, V.

    1983-01-01

    This book offers a broad, interdisciplinary approach to assessing the factors that are key determinants to the use of biomass energies, stressing their limitations, complexities, uncertainties, links, and consequences. Considers photosynthesis, energy costs of nutrients, problems with monoculture, and the energy analysis of intensive tree plantations. Subjects are examined in terms of environmental and economic impact. Emphasizes the use and abuse of biomass energies in China, India, and Brazil. Topics include forests, trees for energy, crop residues, fuel crops, aquatic plants, and animal and human wastes. Recommended for environmental engineers and planners, and those involved in ecology, systematics, and forestry.

  4. Marine energy.

    PubMed

    Kerr, David

    2007-04-15

    Marine energy is renewable and carbon free and has the potential to make a significant contribution to energy supplies in the future. In the UK, tidal power barrages and wave energy could make the largest contribution, and tidal stream energy could make a smaller but still a useful contribution. This paper provides an overview of the current status and prospects for electrical generation from marine energy. It concludes that a realistic potential contribution to UK electricity supplies is approximately 80 TWh per year but that many years of development and investment will be required if this potential is to be realized.

  5. Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money - and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician - often called an energy auditor - can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

  6. Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money - and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician - often called an energy auditor - can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

  7. Genetic Counseling in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Peter

    The task of the genetic counselor who identifies genetic causes of mental retardation and assists families to understand risk of recurrence is described. Considered are chromosomal genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome, inherited disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease, identification by testing the amniotic fluid cells (amniocentresis) in time…

  8. Advances in genetics. Volume 23

    SciTech Connect

    Caspari, E.W.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents articles on genetics and the advances made in this field. Topics covered include the following: recovery, repair, and mutagenesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe; gene transfer in fungi; Y chromosome function and spermatogenesis in Drosophila hydei; recent developments in population genetics; and genetics, cytology and evolution of Gossypium.

  9. Genetics of Sesame Street Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raye, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Teaches genetics and inheritance using the characters from Sesame Street. Asks students to create a gene map of their favorite character and determine those genes passing to the next generation. Includes a genetics activity sheet and genetic information on the characters. (YDS)

  10. [Brazilian criminal law and genetics].

    PubMed

    de Souza, P V

    1999-01-01

    This article analyses the Brasilia criminal regulation on genetic. Act No. 8.974/95 is examined because it regulates some criminal typologies on genetic engineering and assisted reproduction. Moreover, it presents information about the Act Project No. 149/97, on genetic discrimination.

  11. Genetics in Relation to Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, J. Bird

    1987-01-01

    Claims that most instruction dealing with genetics is limited to sex education and personal hygiene. Suggests that the biology curriculum should begin to deal with other issues related to genetics, including genetic normality, prenatal diagnoses, race, and intelligence. Predicts these topics will begin to appear in British examination programs.…

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23(3):157-65. Review. Citation on PubMed Bird TD. Genetic aspects of Alzheimer disease. Genet Med. ... on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Bird TD. Genetic factors in Alzheimer's disease. N Engl ...

  13. Moral Fantasy in Genetic Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, C. Keith

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the main ethical issues generated by the new genetics and suggests ways to think about them. Concerns include "playing God," violation of the natural order of the universe, and abuse of genetic technology. Critical distinctions for making difficult decisions about genetic engineering issues are noted. (DH)

  14. Energy Economics. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in energy economics is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored…

  15. Energy Audits. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in energy audits is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored training…

  16. Genetics of impulsive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery.

  17. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  18. "Genetically Engineered" Nanoelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Salazar-Lazaro, Carlos H.; Stoica, Adrian; Cwik, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The quantum mechanical functionality of nanoelectronic devices such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs), quantum well infrared-photodetectors (QWIPs), quantum well lasers, and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) is enabled by material variations on an atomic scale. The design and optimization of such devices requires a fundamental understanding of electron transport in such dimensions. The Nanoelectronic Modeling Tool (NEMO) is a general-purpose quantum device design and analysis tool based on a fundamental non-equilibrium electron transport theory. NEW was combined with a parallelized genetic algorithm package (PGAPACK) to evolve structural and material parameters to match a desired set of experimental data. A numerical experiment that evolves structural variations such as layer widths and doping concentrations is performed to analyze an experimental current voltage characteristic. The genetic algorithm is found to drive the NEMO simulation parameters close to the experimentally prescribed layer thicknesses and doping profiles. With such a quantitative agreement between theory and experiment design synthesis can be performed.

  19. Genetics of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huilin; Ralston, Stuart H

    2005-03-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in regulating bone mineral density and other phenotypes relevant to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis such as ultrasound properties of bone, skeletal geometry, and bone turnover. Progress has been made in identifying quantitative traits for regulation of bone mineral density by linkage studies in man and mouse, but relatively few causal genes have been identified. Dramatic progress has been made in identifying the genes responsible for monogenic bone diseases and it appears that polymorphisms in many of these genes also play a role in regulating bone mineral density in the general population. Advances in knowledge about the genetic basis of osteoporosis and other bone diseases offer the prospect of developing new markers for assessment of fracture risk and the identification of novel molecular targets for the design of new drug treatments for osteoporosis.

  20. The expanded genetic alphabet.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, Denis A; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2015-10-05

    All biological information, since the last common ancestor of all life on Earth, has been encoded by a genetic alphabet consisting of only four nucleotides that form two base pairs. Long-standing efforts to develop two synthetic nucleotides that form a third, unnatural base pair (UBP) have recently yielded three promising candidates, one based on alternative hydrogen bonding, and two based on hydrophobic and packing forces. All three of these UBPs are replicated and transcribed with remarkable efficiency and fidelity, and the latter two thus demonstrate that hydrogen bonding is not unique in its ability to underlie the storage and retrieval of genetic information. This Review highlights these recent developments as well as the applications enabled by the UBPs, including the expansion of the evolution process to include new functionality and the creation of semi-synthetic life that stores increased information.

  1. On genetic map functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hongyu; Speed, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various genetic map functions have been proposed to infer the unobservable genetic distance between two loci from the observable recombination fraction between them. Some map functions were found to fit data better than others. When there are more than three markers, multilocus recombination probabilities cannot be uniquely determined by the defining property of map functions, and different methods have been proposed to permit the use of map functions to analyze multilocus data. If for a given map function, there is a probability model for recombination that can give rise to it, then joint recombination probabilities can be deduced from this model. This provides another way to use map functions in multilocus analysis. In this paper we show that stationary renewal processes give rise to most of the map functions in the literature. Furthermore, we show that the interevent distributions of these renewal processes can all be approximated quite well by gamma distributions. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Genetics of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Gliomas make up approximately 30% of all brain and central nervous system tumors and 80% of all malignant brain tumors. Despite the frequency of gliomas, the etiology of these tumors remains largely unknown. Diffuse gliomas, including astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, belong to a single pathologic class but have very different histologies and molecular etiologies. Recent genomic studies have identified separate molecular subtypes within the glioma classification that appear to correlate with biological etiology, prognosis, and response to therapy. The discovery of these subtypes suggests that molecular genetic tests are and will be useful, beyond classical histology, for the clinical classification of gliomas. While a familial susceptibility to glioma has been identified, only a small percentage of gliomas are thought to be due to single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes. Through the use of linkage studies and genome-wide association studies, multiple germline variants have been identified that are beginning to define the genetic susceptibility to glioma.

  3. Genetic secrets: Protecting privacy and confidentiality in the genetic era

    SciTech Connect

    Rothstein, M.A.

    1998-07-01

    Few developments are likely to affect human beings more profoundly in the long run than the discoveries resulting from advances in modern genetics. Although the developments in genetic technology promise to provide many additional benefits, their application to genetic screening poses ethical, social, and legal questions, many of which are rooted in issues of privacy and confidentiality. The ethical, practical, and legal ramifications of these and related questions are explored in depth. The broad range of topics includes: the privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; the challenges to privacy and confidentiality that may be projected to result from the emerging genetic technologies; the role of informed consent in protecting the confidentiality of genetic information in the clinical setting; the potential uses of genetic information by third parties; the implications of changes in the health care delivery system for privacy and confidentiality; relevant national and international developments in public policies, professional standards, and laws; recommendations; and the identification of research needs.

  4. Genetics of pancreatitis: an update for clinicians and genetic counselors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Sheila; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-04-01

    With novel genetic technologies available, there is a paradigm shift in the way that risk assessments, diagnoses,and therapies for genetic susceptibility syndromes are addressed. Hereditary pancreatitis is among these conditions, for which genetic counseling and next generation sequencing, help families better understand, cope with and live healthier lives. Identifying a genetic etiology to a condition formally believed to be solely environmentally induced can alter the path for treatment for many patients. This finding introduces the concept of gene-environment interactions in human disease and the relationship between genetic predisposition and exposure risk in disease development. The genetic counseling process is complex with medical explanations, psychosocial issues relating to coping with diagnosis, potential future health problems, recurrence risks and family planning. These sometimes difficult conversations can be facilitated by a genetic counselor as a member of the multidisciplinary team. This chapter addresses the intricate medical and psychosocial issues that can arise in the setting of treating patients with hereditary pancreatitis.

  5. Referring patients for a medical genetics consultation and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Reid

    2011-01-01

    Clinical geneticists and genetic counselors provide diagnosis and counseling for genetic disorders affecting every organ system and every age group. Genetic counselors are more focused on informing patients and families about the inheritance of a genetic disorder and providing recurrence risk counseling, support and information about a diagnosis and reproductive options. Medical geneticists may also share some of these roles in addition to establishing a diagnosis and providing medical management. Medical Geneticists receive training in ACGME-accredited residency programs and are certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics. Genetic counseling is a masters degree program and certification is granted by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. When a patient/family is referred to a Clinical Geneticist, they may expect a thorough evaluation in an effort to establish a diagnosis that may provide information about etiology, prognosis, therapy and recurrence risk.

  6. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    staining for major basic protein in esophageal tissue (arrowheads) in WT than IL21R-/- mice (A) is quantified morphometrically in (B). Quantitative PCR... morphometric analysis was used to measure IL21 receptor expression in patient esophageal biopsies. RESULTS: A number of genetic variants on chromosome 4q26-27...variants in the locus. Immunofluorescent microscopy and morphometric analysis demonstrate a marked increase in IL21 receptor- expressing cells within

  7. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    in esophageal tissue (arrowheads) in WT than IL21R-/- mice (A) is quantified morphometrically in (B). Quantitative PCR (C) for esophageal...microscopy and morphometric analysis was used to measure IL21 receptor expression in patient esophageal biopsies. RESULTS: A number of genetic variants...most highly associated variants in the locus. Immunofluorescent microscopy and morphometric analysis demonstrate a marked increase in IL21 receptor

  8. [Hereditary deafness: molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Denoyelle, Françoise; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Petit, Christine

    2004-03-01

    This article outlines recent advances in explaining hereditary deafness in molecular terms, focusing on isolated (i.e. nonsyndromic) hearing loss. The number of genes identified (36 to date) is growing rapidly. However, difficulties inherent in genetic linkage analysis, coupled with the possible involvement of environmental causes, have so far prevented the characterization of the main genes causative or predisposing to the late-onset forms of deafness.

  9. Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicators in Circulation Research

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Lars; Tian, Qinghai; Kaiser, Elisabeth; Xian, Wenying; Müller, Andreas; Oberhofer, Martin; Ruppenthal, Sandra; Sinnecker, Daniel; Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Moretti, Alessandra; Lipp, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Membrane potentials display the cellular status of non-excitable cells and mediate communication between excitable cells via action potentials. The use of genetically encoded biosensors employing fluorescent proteins allows a non-invasive biocompatible way to read out the membrane potential in cardiac myocytes and other cells of the circulation system. Although the approaches to design such biosensors date back to the time when the first fluorescent-protein based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors were constructed, it took 15 years before reliable sensors became readily available. Here, we review different developments of genetically encoded membrane potential sensors. Furthermore, it is shown how such sensors can be used in pharmacological screening applications as well as in circulation related basic biomedical research. Potentials and limitations will be discussed and perspectives of possible future developments will be provided. PMID:26370981

  10. Mitochondrial disorders: clinical and genetic features.

    PubMed

    Simon, D K; Johns, D R

    1999-01-01

    Virtually all cells in humans depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to generate energy, accounting for the remarkable diversity of clinical disorders associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations. However, certain tissues are particularly susceptible to mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in recognizable clinical syndromes. Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been linked to seizures, strokes, optic atrophy, neuropathy, myopathy, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, and other clinical features. Mitochondrial DNA mutations also may play an important role in aging, as well as in common age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly important for clinicians to recognize the clinical syndromes suggestive of a mitochondrial disorder, and to understand the unique features of mitochondrial genetics that complicate diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  11. Energy Drinks

    PubMed Central

    Ugochukwu, Chio; Bagot, Kara; Khalili, David; Zaky, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The market and degree of consumption of energy drinks have exponentially expanded while studies that assess their psychological effects and impact on quality of life remain in the early stages, albeit on the rise. This review aims to examine the literature for evidence of the psychological effects of energy drinks and their impact on the sense of well-being and quality of life. Methods: Studies were identified through Pubmed, Medline, and PsycINFO searches from the dates of 1990 to 2011, published in English, using the keywords energy or tonic drinks, psychological effects, caffeine and cognitive functions, mood, sleep, quality of life, well-being, and mental illness. Three authors agreed independently on including 41 studies that met specific selection criteria. Results: The literature reveals that people most commonly consume energy drinks to promote wakefulness, to increase energy, and to enhance the experience of alcohol intoxication. A number of studies reveal that individuals who consume energy drinks with alcohol were more inclined to be involved in risk-taking behaviors. There was also excessive daytime sleepiness the day following energy drink consumption. Contrary to expectations, the impact of energy drinks on quality of life and well-being was equivocal. Conclusions: Energy drinks have mixed psychological and well-being effects. There is a need to investigate the different contexts in which energy drinks are consumed and the impact on mental health, especially in the psychiatrically ill. PMID:22347688

  12. Darwin and genetics.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Brian; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2009-11-01

    Darwin's theory of natural selection lacked an adequate account of inheritance, making it logically incomplete. We review the interaction between evolution and genetics, showing how, unlike Mendel, Darwin's lack of a model of the mechanism of inheritance left him unable to interpret his own data that showed Mendelian ratios, even though he shared with Mendel a more mathematical and probabilistic outlook than most biologists of his time. Darwin's own "pangenesis" model provided a mechanism for generating ample variability on which selection could act. It involved, however, the inheritance of characters acquired during an organism's life, which Darwin himself knew could not explain some evolutionary situations. Once the particulate basis of genetics was understood, it was seen to allow variation to be passed intact to new generations, and evolution could then be understood as a process of changes in the frequencies of stable variants. Evolutionary genetics subsequently developed as a central part of biology. Darwinian principles now play a greater role in biology than ever before, which we illustrate with some examples of studies of natural selection that use DNA sequence data and with some recent advances in answering questions first asked by Darwin.

  13. [Genetics of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Solal, M; de Vernejoul, M C

    2004-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a multifactorial disease involving genetic component and several environmental factors. Some rare diseases that are associated with osteoporosis such as Lobstein disease or the "pseudoglial osteoporosis" syndrom are monogenetic. Nevertheless common osteoporosis is a polygenic affection resulting from the interaction between the polymorphism of different genes and the environmental factors. The genetic component of osteoporosis encompasses roughly 60 to 70% of bone mineral density, whereas the effect on fracture risk seems lower because of the importance of other environmental factors as falls. Many polymorphisms of candidate genes involved in the regulation of bone mass have been correlated to bone density. It is likely that many genes participate to the regulation of bone density although the existence of a major gene is highly suspected. Moreover linkage analysis after genome-wide search in populations with severe osteoporosis has focused on some regions of interest (QTL) on the chromosomes. This will allow to localize one or more specific genes. The current genetic studies on different populations affected by osteoporosis or not will be useful in order to better predict the fracture risk in association with bone density and biochemical markers of bone turnover. Moreover, this will lead to the development of new treatments of osfeoporosis and will help to adapt the therapy for individual patients.

  14. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract.

  15. Genetic immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribas, A; Butterfield, L H; Economou, J S

    2000-01-01

    Genetic immunization refers to treatment strategies where gene transfer methods are used to generate immune responses against cancer. Our growing knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the initiation and maintenance of cytotoxic immune responses has provided the rationale for the design of several genetic immunization strategies. Tumor cells have been gene-modified to express immune stimulatory genes and are then administered as tumor vaccines, in an attempt to overcome tumor cell ignorance by the immune system. With the description of well-characterized tumor antigens, multiple strategies have been proposed mainly aimed at optimal tumor antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APC). Among APC, the dendritic cells have been recognized as the most powerful cells in this class, and have become the target for introducing tumor antigen genes to initiate antitumor immune responses. The detailed knowledge of how the immune system can be activated to specifically recognize tumor antigens, and the mechanisms involved in the control of this immune response, provide the basis for modern genetic immunization strategies for cancer treatment.

  16. Advances in osteoarthritis genetics.

    PubMed

    Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2013-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a highly debilitating disease of the joints and can lead to severe pain and disability. There is no cure for OA. Current treatments often fail to alleviate its symptoms leading to an increased demand for joint replacement surgery. Previous epidemiological and genetic research has established that OA is a multifactorial disease with both environmental and genetic components. Over the past 6 years, a candidate gene study and several genome-wide association scans (GWAS) in populations of Asian and European descent have collectively established 15 loci associated with knee or hip OA that have been replicated with genome-wide significance, shedding some light on the aetiogenesis of the disease. All OA associated variants to date are common in frequency and appear to confer moderate to small effect sizes. Some of the associated variants are found within or near genes with clear roles in OA pathogenesis, whereas others point to unsuspected, less characterised pathways. These studies have also provided further evidence in support of the existence of ethnic, sex, and joint specific effects in OA and have highlighted the importance of expanded and more homogeneous phenotype definitions in genetic studies of OA.

  17. Reprogenetics: Preimplantational genetics diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Coco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantational Genetics Diagnosis (PGD) is requested by geneticists and reproductive specialists. Usually geneticists ask for PGD because one or both members of the couple have an increased genetic risk for having an affected offspring. On the other hand, reproductive specialists ask for embryo aneuploidy screening (PGS) to assures an euploid embryo transfer, with the purpose to achieve an ongoing pregnancy, although the couple have normal karyotypes. As embryonic aneuploidies are responsible for pre and post implantation abortions, it is logical to considerer that the screening of the embryonic aneuploidies prior to embryo transfer could improve the efficiency of the in vitro fertilization procedures. Nevertheless, it is still premature to affirm this until well-designed clinical trials were done, especially in women of advanced age where the rate of embryos with aneuploidies is much greater. Although the indications of PGD are similar to conventional prenatal diagnosis (PND), PGD has less ethical objections than the PND. As with the PGD/PGS results only unaffected embryos are transferred, both methods can avoid the decision to interrupt the pregnancy due to a genetic problem; this makes an important difference when compared to conventional prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24764761

  18. Reprogenetics: Preimplantational genetics diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Coco, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Preimplantational Genetics Diagnosis (PGD) is requested by geneticists and reproductive specialists. Usually geneticists ask for PGD because one or both members of the couple have an increased genetic risk for having an affected offspring. On the other hand, reproductive specialists ask for embryo aneuploidy screening (PGS) to assures an euploid embryo transfer, with the purpose to achieve an ongoing pregnancy, although the couple have normal karyotypes. As embryonic aneuploidies are responsible for pre and post implantation abortions, it is logical to considerer that the screening of the embryonic aneuploidies prior to embryo transfer could improve the efficiency of the in vitro fertilization procedures. Nevertheless, it is still premature to affirm this until well-designed clinical trials were done, especially in women of advanced age where the rate of embryos with aneuploidies is much greater. Although the indications of PGD are similar to conventional prenatal diagnosis (PND), PGD has less ethical objections than the PND. As with the PGD/PGS results only unaffected embryos are transferred, both methods can avoid the decision to interrupt the pregnancy due to a genetic problem; this makes an important difference when compared to conventional prenatal diagnosis.

  19. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J

    2012-02-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype-phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young.

  20. Genetics and violence.

    PubMed

    Alsobrook, J P; Pauls, D L

    2000-10-01

    As is evident from this brief review, the genetic study of violence is maturing at an ever-increasing rate; much more work is needed to examine specific molecular genetic markers and their associated phenotypes, particularly in subjects with juvenile onset. It is also becoming clear that more work is needed to help delineate the specific phenotypes that are being transmitted within families. It is unlikely that we will find a gene or genes that are both necessary and sufficient for the manifestation of aggression and violence. It is more likely that specific genes will be associated with discrete factors that either increase the risk for the expression of violence or that are components of the violent phenotype. Thus, in addition to continuing research that examines the role of specific genetic factors in the manifestation of violence, more work is needed that will help further develop the nosology of violence and related behaviors. As noted previously, an understanding of the inherited phenotype is critical in the study of any disorder. It is especially important in the study of complex behaviors such as violence in which there may be several behavioral components that comprise the complete diagnostic category.

  1. Genetic influences on sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, M; Ohno, S

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the genetic influences underlying the development of sarcoidosis, HLA class II genotyping was performed in Japanese patients with sarcoidosis and healthy controls using the PCR-RFLP method. The frequencies of both DR52 group antigen-associated alleles (HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*12 and -DRB1*14) and DRB1*08 alleles were higher in the patient group, suggesting that the common, specific amino acid residue on the DRB1 molecule of these alleles may determine susceptibility to sarcoidosis. Alternatively, it is possible that another susceptibility gene, linked to these DRB1 alleles, exists within the MHC region. We screened the TNFA, TNFB, HSP70-1 and Hum70t genes around the class III region, as well as the HLA-DMA and -DMB genes in the class II region, for genetic polymorphism in sarcoidosis. None of these genes suggested a susceptibility to sarcoidosis. These studies support the thesis that one of the major genetic factors controlling the development of sarcoidosis is located within the DRB1 locus in the HLA class II region.

  2. Cellular genetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, F; Filareto, A; Spitalieri, P; Sangiuolo, F; Novelli, G

    2005-01-01

    Cellular genetic therapy is the ultimate frontier for those pathologies that are consequent to a specific nonfunctional cellular type. A viable cure for there kinds of diseases is the replacement of sick cells with healthy ones, which can be obtained from the same patient or a different donor. In fact, structures can be corrected and strengthened with the introduction of undifferentiated cells within specific target tissues, where they will specialize into the desired cellular types. Furthermore, consequent to the recent results obtained with the transdifferentiation experiments, a process that allows the in vitro differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells, it has also became clear that many advantages may be obtained from the use of stem cells to produce drugs, vaccines, and therapeutic molecules. Since stem cells can sustain lineage potentials, the capacity for differentiation, and better tolerance for the introduction of exogenous genes, they are also considered as feasible therapeutic vehicles for gene therapy. In fact, it is strongly believed that the combination of cellular genetic and gene therapy approaches will definitely allow the development of new therapeutic strategies as well as the production of totipotent cell lines to be used as experimental models for the cure of genetic disorders.

  3. Clinical mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P.; Howell, N.; Andrews, R.; Turnbull, D.

    1999-01-01

    The last decade has been an age of enlightenment as far as mitochondrial pathology is concerned. Well established nuclear genetic diseases, such as Friedreich's ataxia,12 Wilson disease,3 and autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia,4 have been shown to have a mitochondrial basis, and we are just starting to unravel the complex nuclear genetic disorders which directly cause mitochondrial dysfunction (table 1). However, in addition to the 3 billion base pair nuclear genome, each human cell typically contains thousands of copies of a small, 16.5 kb circular molecule of double stranded DNA (fig 1). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) accounts for only 1% of the total cellular nucleic acid content. It encodes for 13 polypeptides which are essential for aerobic metabolism and defects of the mitochondrial genome are an important cause of human disease.9293 Since the characterisation of the first pathogenic mtDNA defects in 1988,513 over 50 point mutations and well over 100 rearrangements of the mitochondrial genome have been associated with human disease9495 (http://www.gen.emory.edu/mitomap.html). These disorders form the focus of this article.


Keywords: mitochondrial DNA; mitochondrial disease; heteroplasmy; genetic counselling PMID:10874629

  4. Genetics of osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Tomohiko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-09-19

    Highlights: • Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with osteoporosis were identified. • SNPs mapped close to or within VDR and ESR1 are associated with bone mineral density. • WNT signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in regulating bone mineral density. • Genetic studies will be useful for identification of new therapeutic targets. - Abstract: Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, which increases susceptibility to fractures. BMD is a complex quantitative trait with normal distribution and seems to be genetically controlled (in 50–90% of the cases), according to studies on twins and families. Over the last 20 years, candidate gene approach and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with low BMD, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures. These SNPs have been mapped close to or within genes including those encoding nuclear receptors and WNT-β-catenin signaling proteins. Understanding the genetics of osteoporosis will help identify novel candidates for diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  5. Genetic Manipulations in Dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Alshahni, Mohamed Mahdi; Yamada, Tsuyoshi

    2017-02-01

    Dermatophytes are a group of closely related fungi that nourish on keratinized materials for their survival. They infect stratum corneum, nails, and hair of human and animals, accounting the largest portion of fungi causing superficial mycoses. Huge populations are suffering from dermatophytoses, though the biology of these fungi is largely unknown yet. Reasons are partially attributed to the poor amenability of dermatophytes to genetic manipulation. However, advancements in this field over the last decade made it possible to conduct genetic studies to satisfying extents. These included genetic transformation methods, indispensable molecular tools, i.e., dominant selectable markers, inducible promoter, and marker recycling system, along with improving homologous recombination frequency and gene silencing. Furthermore, annotated genome sequences of several dermatophytic species have recently been available, ensuring an optimal recruitment of the molecular tools to expand our knowledge on these fungi. In conclusion, the establishment of basic molecular tools and the availability of genomic data will open a new era that might change our understanding on the biology and pathogenicity of this fungal group.

  6. Genetically-encoded Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isacoff, Ehud

    2002-03-01

    One of the principle goals of neuroscience has been to understand the cellular basis of information processing and the plasticity that underlies learning and memory. Efforts in this area have mainly relied on electrical recording and optical imaging with chemical dyes. Over the last few years we and others have begun to develop genetically-encoded optical reporter "dyes" which should provide several important advantages over the classical methods for monitoring signal transmission in the nervous system. The advantages are that genetically-encoded reporters can be molecularly targeted a) to specific cell types via cell-specific promoters, and b) to specific subcellular compartments by peptides that are recognized by the protein sorting machinery of the cell. This makes it possible, in principle, to exclude signals from non-neuronal cells and to visualize selectively, in a brain region that contains many cell types with numerous kinds of synaptic connections, the activity of specific types of neurons (e.g. GABAergic interneurons) and specific synaptic elements (e.g. nerve terminals or dendrites), something that has hitherto not been possible. An additional advantage is that protein reporters may be rationally and irrationally "tuned" with mutations in functional domains known to control their dynamic range of operation. The general idea behind genetically-encoded reporters of cell signaling is to encode a protein that is either intrinsically fluorescent, or that can be labeled orthogonally with a fluorescent probe, and where the physiological signal changes fluorescence emission. I will describe recent progress employing both kinds of approaches.

  7. Genetic selection of boars.

    PubMed

    Safranski, T J

    2008-11-01

    Selection of boars by visual appraisal is the simplest and oldest method used by the swine industry. However, individual performance testing, and later use of computers to incorporate relatives' data and account for environmental variation, resulted in greater rate of improvement for economically important traits. Examples of molecular genetic tools that have increased improvement for some traits are also discussed. Accurate identification of genetic merit is increasingly important with widespread use of AI and resultant greater progeny number per sire. Historically, selection was to produce desirable progeny; however, with the majority of boars now housed in dedicated boar facilities, and the efficiency of sperm production being recorded, boar stud personnel are increasingly interested in selection of boars for fertility traits. Selecting boars that are lean and heavily muscled and have good semen parameters may be problematic, given the genetic relationships among the traits. Whereas conventional animal breeding methods will remain important, use of molecular tools will increase, and identification of a boar's fertility potential at birth will allow earlier and more efficient selection of high-fertility boars. Ability to achieve acceptable female reproduction with frozen semen would facilitate selection for longevity. However, this would lengthen the generation interval and could dilute selection intensity for other traits, as it requires indirect selection for semen freezability.

  8. Darwin and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Brian; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Darwin's theory of natural selection lacked an adequate account of inheritance, making it logically incomplete. We review the interaction between evolution and genetics, showing how, unlike Mendel, Darwin's lack of a model of the mechanism of inheritance left him unable to interpret his own data that showed Mendelian ratios, even though he shared with Mendel a more mathematical and probabilistic outlook than most biologists of his time. Darwin's own “pangenesis” model provided a mechanism for generating ample variability on which selection could act. It involved, however, the inheritance of characters acquired during an organism's life, which Darwin himself knew could not explain some evolutionary situations. Once the particulate basis of genetics was understood, it was seen to allow variation to be passed intact to new generations, and evolution could then be understood as a process of changes in the frequencies of stable variants. Evolutionary genetics subsequently developed as a central part of biology. Darwinian principles now play a greater role in biology than ever before, which we illustrate with some examples of studies of natural selection that use DNA sequence data and with some recent advances in answering questions first asked by Darwin. PMID:19933231

  9. Renewable energy: energy from agricultural products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This study discusses major issues concerning fuels derived from agricultural products. Agricultural products, particularly sugarcane and corn, are currently meeting major energy needs in Florida. Recent figures indicate that about 10% of the gasoline sold in Florida is ethanol enriched. This gasohol contains a 10% mix of ethanol, which is generally produced from corn or sugarcane molasses. Sugarcane residues (bagasse) also supply most of the fuel to power Florida's large sugar processing industry. These products have the potential to play an expanded role in Florida's energy future. Principle areas of interest are: Growing crops such as napier grass or harvesting water hyacinths to produce methane that can be substituted for natural gas; expanded use of sugar, starch, and industrial and agricultural wastes as raw materials for ethanol production; improved efficiency in conversion processes such as anaerobic digestion and fermentation. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida plays a leading national role in energy crops research, while Walt Disney World is using a demonstration project to convert water hyacinths into methane. Increased use of fuels produced from agricultural products depends largely on their costs compared to other fuels. Ethanol is currently attractive because of federal and state tax incentives. The growth potential of ethanol and methane is enhanced by the ease with which they can be blended with fossil fuels and thereby utilize the current energy distribution system. Neither ethanol nor methane appear able to compete in the free market for mass distribution at present, although studies indicate that genetic engineering and more efficient conversion processes may lower prices to cost effective levels. These fuels will be most cost effective in cases where waste products are utilized and the fuel is used close to the site of production.

  10. Renewable energy: energy from agricultural products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report discusses the major issues concerning fuels derived from agricultural products. Agricultural products, particularly sugarcane and corn, are currently meeting major energy needs in Florida. Recent figures indicate that about 10 percent of the gasoline sold in Florida is ethanol enriched. This gasohol contains a 10 percent mix of ethanol, which is generally produced from corn or sugarcane molasses. Sugarcane residues (bagasse) also supply most of the fuel to power Florida's large sugar processing industry. These products have the potential to play an expanded role in Florida's energy future. Principle areas of interest are: growing crops such as napier grass or harvesting water hyacinths to produce methane that can be substituted for natural gas; expanded use of sugar, starch, and industrial and agricultural wastes as raw materials for ethanol production; and improved efficiency in conversion processes such as anaerobic digestion and fermentation. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida plays a leading national role in energy crops research, while Walt Disney World is using a demonstration project to convert water hyacinths into methane. Increased use of fuels produced from agricultural products depends largely on their costs compared to other fuels. Ethanol is currently attractive because of federal and state tax incentives. The growth potential of ethanol and methane is enhanced by the ease with which they can be blended with fossil fuels and thereby utilize the current energy distribution system. Neither ethanol nor methane appear able to compete in the free market for mass distribution at present, although studies indicate that genetic engineering and more efficient conversion processes may lower prices to cost effective levels. These fuels will be most cost effective in cases where waste products are utilized and the fuel is used close to the site of production.

  11. Genetic Algorithms and Local Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Darrell

    1996-01-01

    The first part of this presentation is a tutorial level introduction to the principles of genetic search and models of simple genetic algorithms. The second half covers the combination of genetic algorithms with local search methods to produce hybrid genetic algorithms. Hybrid algorithms can be modeled within the existing theoretical framework developed for simple genetic algorithms. An application of a hybrid to geometric model matching is given. The hybrid algorithm yields results that improve on the current state-of-the-art for this problem.

  12. The synthesis paradigm in genetics.

    PubMed

    Rice, William R

    2014-02-01

    Experimental genetics with model organisms and mathematically explicit genetic theory are generally considered to be the major paradigms by which progress in genetics is achieved. Here I argue that this view is incomplete and that pivotal advances in genetics--and other fields of biology--are also made by synthesizing disparate threads of extant information rather than generating new information from experiments or formal theory. Because of the explosive expansion of information in numerous "-omics" data banks, and the fragmentation of genetics into numerous subdisciplines, the importance of the synthesis paradigm will likely expand with time.

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... used on this page Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Counseling What are genetic professionals and what do ... see a geneticist or other specialist? What are genetic professionals and what do they do? Genetics professionals ...

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... used on this page Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Disorders What are genetic disorders? A genetic disorder is a disease caused ... significant risk of developing the disease. . Geneticists group genetic disorders into three categories: Monogenetic disorders are caused ...

  15. How Are Genetic Conditions Treated or Managed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are genetic conditions treated or managed? How are genetic conditions treated or managed? Many genetic disorders result ... out more about the treatment and management of genetic conditions: Links to information about the treatment of ...

  16. Transporation Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2012-06-30

    This Transportation Energy Project is comprised of four unique tasks which work within the railroad industry to provide solutions in various areas of energy conservation. These tasks addressed: energy reducing yard related decision issues; alternate fuels; energy education, and energy storage for railroad applications. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team examined these areas and provided current solutions which can be used to both provide important reduction in energy usage and system efficiency in the given industry. This project also sought a mode in which rural and long-distance education could be provided. The information developed in each of the project tasks can be applied to all of the rail companies to assist in developing efficiencies.

  17. Energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  18. Wind energy.

    PubMed

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented.

  19. Energy Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Biomass energy includes the burning of products such as wood, methanol, sludge, railroad ties, and agricultural waste, to produce heat, steam and... energy . Recent political will elevated the development of biomass fuels to the top of the President’s political agenda. In his 2007 State of the...Union Address, President Bush set an ambitious goal for the nation to draw 20% of its energy needs from the use of ethanol, a biomass derived fuel

  20. Molecular genetics of human obesity: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajan Kumar; Kumar, Permendra; Mahalingam, Kulandaivelu

    2017-02-01

    Obesity and its related health complications is a major problem worldwide. Hypothalamus and their signalling molecules play a critical role in the intervening and coordination with energy balance and homeostasis. Genetic factors play a crucial role in determining an individual's predisposition to the weight gain and being obese. In the past few years, several genetic variants were identified as monogenic forms of human obesity having success over common polygenic forms. In the context of molecular genetics, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) approach and their findings signified a number of genetic variants predisposing to obesity. However, the last couple of years, it has also been noticed that alterations in the environmental and epigenetic factors are one of the key causes of obesity. Hence, this review might be helpful in the current scenario of molecular genetics of human obesity, obesity-related health complications (ORHC), and energy homeostasis. Future work based on the clinical discoveries may play a role in the molecular dissection of genetic approaches to find more obesity-susceptible gene loci.

  1. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  2. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  3. Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ganley, Jason; Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2016-03-15

    Wind energy is a variable and uncertain renewable resource that has long been used to produce mechanical work, and has developed into a large producer of global electricity needs. As renewable sources of energy and feedstocks become more important globally to produce sustainable products, many different processes have started adopting wind power as an energy source. Many times this is through a conversion to hydrogen through electrolysis that allows for a more continuous process input. Other important pathways include methanol and ammonia. As the demand for sustainable products and production pathways increases, and wind power capital costs decrease, the role of wind power in chemical and energy production seems poised to increase significantly.

  4. Genetics of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Groop, L

    2000-03-01

    The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors such as abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance in the same persons has been called the metabolic or insulin-resistance syndrome. In 1998 WHO proposed a unifying definition for the syndrome and chose to call it the metabolic syndrome rather than the insulin-resistance syndrome. Although insulin resistance has been considered as a common denominator for the different components of the syndrome, there is still debate as to whether it is pathogenically involved in all of the different components of the syndrome. Clustering of the syndrome in families suggests a genetic component. It is plausible that so-called thrifty genes, which have ensured optimal storage of energy during periods of fasting, could contribute to the phenotype of the metabolic syndrome. Common variants in a number of candidate genes influencing fat and glucose metabolism can probably, together with environmental triggers, increase susceptibility to the syndrome. Among these, the genes for beta 3-adrenergic receptor, hormone-sensitive lipase, lipoprotein lipase, IRS-1, PC-1, skeletal muscle glycogen synthase, etc. appear to increase the risk of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, novel genes may be identified by genome-wide searches.

  5. Virtual Library on Genetics from Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    DOE Data Explorer

    The World Wide Web (WWW) Virtual Library is a collaborative effort to provide topic indices that break down into many subtopics guiding users to vast resources of information around the world. ORNL hosts the Virtual Library on Genetics as part of the WWWVL's Biosciences topic area. The VL on Genetics is also a collection of links to information resources that supported the DOE Human Genome Project. That project has now evolved into Genomics: GTL. GTL is DOE's next step in genomics--builds on data and resources from the Human Genome Project, the Microbial Genome Program, and systems biology. GTL will accelerate understanding of dynamic living systems for solutions to DOE mission challenges in energy and the environment. The section of the Virtual Library on Genetics that is titled Organisms guides users to genetic information resources and gene sequences for animals, insects, microbes, and plant life.

  6. Plant genetics, sustainable agriculture and global food security.

    PubMed

    Ronald, Pamela

    2011-05-01

    The United States and the world face serious societal challenges in the areas of food, environment, energy, and health. Historically, advances in plant genetics have provided new knowledge and technologies needed to address these challenges. Plant genetics remains a key component of global food security, peace, and prosperity for the foreseeable future. Millions of lives depend upon the extent to which crop genetic improvement can keep pace with the growing global population, changing climate, and shrinking environmental resources. While there is still much to be learned about the biology of plant-environment interactions, the fundamental technologies of plant genetic improvement, including crop genetic engineering, are in place, and are expected to play crucial roles in meeting the chronic demands of global food security. However, genetically improved seed is only part of the solution. Such seed must be integrated into ecologically based farming systems and evaluated in light of their environmental, economic, and social impacts-the three pillars of sustainable agriculture. In this review, I describe some lessons learned, over the last decade, of how genetically engineered crops have been integrated into agricultural practices around the world and discuss their current and future contribution to sustainable agricultural systems.

  7. Plant Genetics, Sustainable Agriculture and Global Food Security

    PubMed Central

    Ronald, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    The United States and the world face serious societal challenges in the areas of food, environment, energy, and health. Historically, advances in plant genetics have provided new knowledge and technologies needed to address these challenges. Plant genetics remains a key component of global food security, peace, and prosperity for the foreseeable future. Millions of lives depend upon the extent to which crop genetic improvement can keep pace with the growing global population, changing climate, and shrinking environmental resources. While there is still much to be learned about the biology of plant–environment interactions, the fundamental technologies of plant genetic improvement, including crop genetic engineering, are in place, and are expected to play crucial roles in meeting the chronic demands of global food security. However, genetically improved seed is only part of the solution. Such seed must be integrated into ecologically based farming systems and evaluated in light of their environmental, economic, and social impacts—the three pillars of sustainable agriculture. In this review, I describe some lessons learned, over the last decade, of how genetically engineered crops have been integrated into agricultural practices around the world and discuss their current and future contribution to sustainable agricultural systems. PMID:21546547

  8. Energy Demands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Ron

    2010-01-01

    When construction slows and campus operating expenses are under the microscope, it is more important than ever to save energy dollars with the equipment and staff on hand. For the facilities manager who thinks out of the box, significant savings can be found on most school and college campuses. This article provides energy-conservation tips that…

  9. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bufe, Charles Glenn

    1983-01-01

    Major activities, programs, and conferences in geothermal energy during 1982 are highlighted. These include first comprehensive national assessment of U.S. low-temperature geothermal resources (conducted by U.S. Geological Survey and Department of Energy), map production by U.S. Geological Survey, geothermal plant production, and others. (JN)

  10. Energy Underground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Catherina L.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a unit to study the cycling of matter and energy through speleology using cooperative learning groups. Integrates the topic with zoology, biogeochemistry, paleontology, and meteorology. Includes a sample rubric for a salt block cave presentation, unit outline, and processes for studying matter and energy processes in caves. (Author/KHR)

  11. Energy - 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Board of Regents, Topeka.

    A checklist of energy consumption reduction measures for universities is provided with the intent of achieving rapid and significant energy savings at minimal cost. Measures described should be within the scope of accomplishment by regular university operating and maintenance personnel. The measures involve non-technical actions such as adjusting…

  12. Energy Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed as an interdisciplinary, supplemental teaching guide, this document provides fundamental information about energy supply, use, and conservation and related learning activities for secondary students. Eight units address the following topics: energy history, petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, alternative sources, energy…

  13. Energy Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobieski, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Education facilities managers are faced with a daunting set of challenges: They must find new ways to reduce energy consumption and carry out greener energy policies. HVAC typically accounts for more than 30% of a building's electricity costs, so there is a clear incentive to eliminate unnecessary heating and cooling of unoccupied rooms. With more…

  14. Genetic Counselling for Schizophrenia in the Era of Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen A; Murphy, Jillian; O’Neill, Sheri; Brzustowicz, Linda; Bassett, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the role of genetic counselling for individuals with psychiatric illnesses. Method Using schizophrenia as an example and including updated information about a genetic subtype (22q deletion syndrome), we discuss the value of the genetic counselling process in psychiatry, with support from the literature and our clinical experience. Results Genetic counselling, the process through which knowledge about the genetics of illnesses is shared, provides information on the inheritance of illnesses and their recurrence risks; addresses the concerns of patients, their families, and their health care providers; and supports patients and their families dealing with these illnesses. For comprehensive medical management, this service should be available to all individuals with schizophrenia and their families. Conclusions New findings in the genetics of psychiatric illness may have important clinical implications for patients and their families. PMID:11280080

  15. A comprehensive review of genetics and genetic testing in azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Alaa J; Esteves, Sandro C; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Azoospermia due to obstructive and non-obstructive mechanisms is a common manifestation of male infertility accounting for 10-15% of such cases. Known genetic factors are responsible for approximately 1/3 of cases of azoospermia. Nonetheless, at least 40% of cases are currently categorized as idiopathic and may be linked to unknown genetic abnormalities. It is recommended that various genetic screening tests are performed in azoospermic men, given that their results may play vital role in not only identifying the etiology but also in preventing the iatrogenic transmission of genetic defects to offspring via advanced assisted conception techniques. In the present review, we examine the current genetic information associated with azoospermia based on results from search engines, such as PUBMED, OVID, SCIENCE DIRECT and SCOPUS. We also present a critical appraisal of use of genetic testing in this subset of infertile patients. PMID:23503954

  16. Genetic manipulation of lignocellulosic biomass for bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Dudareva, Natalia; Morgan, John A; Chapple, Clint

    2015-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass represents an abundant and sustainable raw material for biofuel production. The recalcitrance of biomass to degradation increases the estimated cost of biofuel production and limits its competitiveness in the market. Genetic engineering of lignin, a major recalcitrance factor, improves saccharification and thus the potential yield of biofuels. Recently, our understanding of lignification and its regulation has been advanced by new studies in various systems, all of which further enhances our ability to manipulate the biosynthesis and deposition of lignin in energy crops for producing cost-effective second generation biofuels.

  17. [Mitochondrial genetics and human essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Guan, Min-xin

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) exhibits matrilineal inherence. Familial mitochondrial diseases caused by mtDNA mutations are generally involved in organs featuring high energy consumption, which include heart, brain and skeletal muscle. Recently, it has been found that some essential hypertension patients featured classical maternal inheritance, which has confirmed and enriched mtDNA mutations as one of the molecular mechanisms underlying maternally inherited hypertension. Nevertheless, more general as well as radical questions are still to be answered. This article reviews recent advance in mitochondrial genome evolution, mtDNA genetics and the role of mtDNA mutations in maternally inherited hypertension.

  18. Ethics in reproductive genetics.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J C; Evans, M I

    1992-12-01

    Ethics in reproductive genetics comprise descriptive ethics and normative ethics. Ethical problems before prenatal diagnosis involve genetic counseling and informed consent for the choice patients must make. Prenatal diagnosis using amniocentesis is controversial. An international survey of geneticists showed that 25% would do prenatal diagnosis for sex selection, and 17% would refer the couple elsewhere. Hungary (60%), India (37%), the US (34%), Canada (30%), Greece (29%), and Sweden (28%) would do prenatal diagnosis. The statistical incidence of positive findings after prenatal diagnosis does not exceed 4% of all cases when most couples choose abortion. Respect for parental choice and for nondirective counseling was supported in responses to 3 cases in the international survey that also had disclosure dilemmas included with abortion choices. 84% of respondents would be nondirective for XYY and 88% for XO. In India, Hungary, Turkey, and Norway, 46%, 40%, 40%, and 33%, respectively, would advise aborting an XO (Turner) fetus. A survey of 737 genetics and obstetricians and ethicists and clergy showed acceptability of abortion in singleton pregnancies and in twins associated strongly with the trimester of pregnancy, indication for selective termination, and fetal number. Prior group review of risks and benefits of experimental fetal therapy, case selection for experimental fetal therapy, the optimal informed-consent process for fetal therapy, twin pregnancies, refusal of proven fetal therapy, the lack of federal support for research in fetal diagnosis (preimplantation embryo diagnosis) and therapy, and sources of a moral obligation are also addressed. The Belmont Report on the ethics of biomedical research in the US proposed ethical principles to guide research with human subjects including the fetus: respect for parsons, beneficence, and justice.

  19. Coalgebraic structure of genetic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Li, Bai-Lian

    2004-09-01

    Although in the broadly defined genetic algebra, multiplication suggests a forward direction of from parents to progeny, when looking from the reverse direction, it also suggests to us a new algebraic structure-coalge- braic structure, which we call genetic coalgebras. It is not the dual coalgebraic structure and can be used in the construction of phylogenetic trees. Math- ematically, to construct phylogenetic trees means we need to solve equations x([n]) = a, or x([n]) = b. It is generally impossible to solve these equations inalgebras. However, we can solve them in coalgebras in the sense of tracing back for their ancestors. A thorough exploration of coalgebraic structure in genetics is apparently necessary. Here, we develop a theoretical framework of the coalgebraic structure of genetics. From biological viewpoint, we defined various fundamental concepts and examined their elementary properties that contain genetic significance. Mathematically, by genetic coalgebra, we mean any coalgebra that occurs in genetics. They are generally noncoassociative and without counit; and in the case of non-sex-linked inheritance, they are cocommutative. Each coalgebra with genetic realization has a baric property. We have also discussed the methods to construct new genetic coalgebras, including cocommutative duplication, the tensor product, linear combinations and the skew linear map, which allow us to describe complex genetic traits. We also put forward certain theorems that state the relationship between gametic coalgebra and gametic algebra. By Brower's theorem in topology, we prove the existence of equilibrium state for the in-evolution operator.

  20. Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ulrike; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors. A small proportion (3–5%) of cases arises from hereditary syndromes predisposing to early onset CRC as a result of mutations in over a dozen well-defined genes. In contrast, CRC is predominantly a late-onset “sporadic” disease, developing in individuals with no obvious hereditary syndrome. In recent years genome-wide association studies have discovered over 40 genetic regions to be associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC and it has been estimated that increasingly large genome-wide scans will identify many additional novel genetic regions. Subsequent experimental validations have identified the causally related variant(s) in a limited number of these genetic regions. Further biological insight could be obtained through ethnically diverse study populations, larger genetic sequencing studies, and development of higher-throughput functional experiments. Along with inherited variation, integration of the tumour genome may shed light on the carcinogenic processes in CRC. In addition to summarizing the genetic architecture of CRC, this review discusses genetic factors that modify environmental predictors of CRC, as well as examples of how genetic insight has improved clinical surveillance, prevention, and treatment strategies. In summary, substantial progress has been made in uncovering the genetic architecture of CRC and continued research efforts are expected to identify additional genetic risk factors that further our biological understanding of this disease. PMID:26187503

  1. Genetics of ectopia lentis.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Mohammad Ali; Vanderveen, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary ectopia lentis or lens subluxation can occur with and without systemic associations. Significant overlap can be found in the genetic mutations and pathogenesis of subluxated lenses in their isolated forms as well as with associated syndromes. Gene mutations have been identified for lens subluxation associated with Marfan syndrome, Weill Marchesani syndrome, Ectopia Lentis simplex, Ectopia Lentis et pupillae, Ehlers Danlos syndrome, homocystinuria, and sulfite oxidase deficiency. Herein we describe the ocular and systemic characteristics found in patients with ectopia lentis, as well as the gene mutations identified thus far.

  2. Genetically Altered Plant Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Researchers in Robert Ferl's lab at the University of Florida in Gainesville, genetically altered this Arabdopsis Thaliana (a brassica species) plant to learn how extreme environments, such as the low atmospheric pressure on Mars, affect plant genes. They inserted green fluorescent protein (GFP) near the on/off switches for anoxia and drought genes. When those genes were turned on after exposure to reduced atmospheric pressure, GFP was turned on as well, causing cells expressing those genes to glow green under a blue light. The natural fluorescence of chlorophyll accounts for the red glow.

  3. Genetics of restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita; Syrris, Petros; McKenna, William J

    2010-04-01

    Restrictive physiology, a severe form of diastolic dysfunction, is characteristically observed in the setting of constrictive pericarditis and myocardial restriction. The latter is commonly due to systemic diseases, some of which are inherited as mendelian traits (eg, hereditary amyloidosis), while others are multifactorial (eg, sarcoidosis). When restrictive physiology occurs as an early and dominant feature of a primary myocardial disorder, it may be termed restrictive cardiomyopathy. In the past decade, clinical and genetic studies have demonstrated that restrictive cardiomyopathy as such is part of the spectrum of sarcomeric disease and frequently coexists with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in affected families.

  4. Genetics of pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hani, Abeer J; Mikati, Husam M; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2015-06-01

    As the genetic etiologies of an expanding number of epilepsy syndromes are revealed, the complexity of the phenotype genotype correlation increases. As our review will show, multiple gene mutations cause different epilepsy syndromes, making identification of the specific mutation increasingly more important for prognostication and often more directed treatment. Examples of that include the need to avoid specific drugs in Dravet syndrome and the ongoing investigations of the potential use of new directed therapies such as retigabine in KCNQ2-related epilepsies, quinidine in KCNT1-related epilepsies, and memantine in GRIN2A-related epilepsies.

  5. Digital genetics: unravelling the genetic basis of evolution.

    PubMed

    Adami, Christoph

    2006-02-01

    Digital genetics, or the genetics of digital organisms, is a new field of research that has become possible as a result of the remarkable power of evolution experiments that use computers. Self-replicating strands of computer code that inhabit specially prepared computers can mutate, evolve and adapt to their environment. Digital organisms make it easy to conduct repeatable, controlled experiments, which have a perfect genetic 'fossil record'. This allows researchers to address fundamental questions about the genetic basis of the evolution of complexity, genome organization, robustness and evolvability, and to test the consequences of mutations, including their interaction and recombination, on the fate of populations and lineages.

  6. The media and behavioral genetics: Alternatives coexisting with addiction genetics

    PubMed Central

    Dingel, Molly J.; Ostergren, Jenny; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Hammer, Rachel; Koenig, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    To understand public discourse in the U.S. on genetic causation of behavioral disorders, we analyzed media representations of genetic research on addiction published between 1990 and 2010. We conclude first that the media simplistically represent biological bases of addiction and willpower as being mutually exclusive: behaviors are either genetically determined, or they are a choice. Second, most articles provide only cursory or no treatment of the environmental contribution. A media focus on genetics directs attention away from environmental factors. Rhetorically, media neglect the complexity underlying of the etiology of addiction and direct focus back toward individual causation and responsibility. PMID:26392644

  7. The probability of parallel genetic evolution from standing genetic variation.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, A; Nuismer, S L

    2017-02-01

    Parallel evolution is often assumed to result from repeated adaptation to novel, yet ecologically similar, environments. Here, we develop and analyse a mathematical model that predicts the probability of parallel genetic evolution from standing genetic variation as a function of the strength of phenotypic selection and constraints imposed by genetic architecture. Our results show that the probability of parallel genetic evolution increases with the strength of natural selection and effective population size and is particularly likely to occur for genes with large phenotypic effects. Building on these results, we develop a Bayesian framework for estimating the strength of parallel phenotypic selection from genetic data. Using extensive individual-based simulations, we show that our estimator is robust across a wide range of genetic and evolutionary scenarios and provides a useful tool for rigorously testing the hypothesis that parallel genetic evolution is the result of adaptive evolution. An important result that emerges from our analyses is that existing studies of parallel genetic evolution frequently rely on data that is insufficient for distinguishing between adaptive evolution and neutral evolution driven by random genetic drift. Overcoming this challenge will require sampling more populations and the inclusion of larger numbers of loci.

  8. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thalian. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S. I.

    2000-06-01

    This is a final report describing the results of the research funded by the DOE Energy Biosciences Program grant entitled ''A Molecular-Genetic Approach to Studying Source-Sink Interactions in Arabidiopsis thaliana''.

  9. Genetics of rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Mfuna-Endam, Leandra; Zhang, Yuan; Desrosiers, Martin Y

    2011-06-01

    Suggestion for a potential genetic basis to chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is afforded by degree of inheritability suggested from family and twin studies, existence of CRS in simple mendelian diseases, and development of sinusitis as part of the phenotype of certain gene "knockout" murine models. Genetic association studies are expected to identify novel genes associated with CRS and suggest novel mechanisms implicated in disease development. Although these studies are subject to methodologic difficulties, associations of CRS and polymorphisms in more than 30 genes have been published, with single nucleotide polymorphisms in 3 (IL1A, TNFA, AOAH) replicated. While the individual risk conferred by these single nucleotide polymorphisms remains modest, taken as a group, they suggest an important implication of pathways of innate immune recognition and in regulation of downstream signaling in the development of CRS. In a demonstration of these techniques' potential to identify new targets for research, the authors present a functional investigation of LAMB1, the top-rated gene from a pooling-based genome-wide association study of CRS. Upregulation of gene expression in LAMB1 and associated laminin genes in primary epithelial cells from CRS patients implicates the extracellular matrix in development of CRS and offers a new avenue for further study.

  10. Genetic code for sine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Alyasa Gan; Wah, Yap Bee

    2015-02-01

    The computation of the approximate values of the trigonometric sines was discovered by Bhaskara I (c. 600-c.680), a seventh century Indian mathematician and is known as the Bjaskara's I's sine approximation formula. The formula is given in his treatise titled Mahabhaskariya. In the 14th century, Madhava of Sangamagrama, a Kerala mathematician astronomer constructed the table of trigonometric sines of various angles. Madhava's table gives the measure of angles in arcminutes, arcseconds and sixtieths of an arcsecond. The search for more accurate formulas led to the discovery of the power series expansion by Madhava of Sangamagrama (c.1350-c. 1425), the founder of the Kerala school of astronomy and mathematics. In 1715, the Taylor series was introduced by Brook Taylor an English mathematician. If the Taylor series is centered at zero, it is called a Maclaurin series, named after the Scottish mathematician Colin Maclaurin. Some of the important Maclaurin series expansions include trigonometric functions. This paper introduces the genetic code of the sine of an angle without using power series expansion. The genetic code using square root approach reveals the pattern in the signs (plus, minus) and sequence of numbers in the sine of an angle. The square root approach complements the Pythagoras method, provides a better understanding of calculating an angle and will be useful for teaching the concepts of angles in trigonometry.

  11. Genetics of Melanocytic Nevi

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Eliades, Philip; Gupta, Sameer; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-01-01

    Melanocytic nevi are a benign clonal proliferation of cells expressing the melanocytic phenotype, with heterogeneous clinical and molecular characteristics. In this review, we discuss the genetics of nevi by salient nevi subtypes: congenital melanocytic nevi, acquired melanocytic nevi, blue nevi, and Spitz nevi. While the molecular etiology of nevi has been less thoroughly studied than melanoma, it is clear that nevi and melanoma share common driver mutations. Acquired melanocytic nevi harbor oncogenic mutations in BRAF, which is the predominant oncogene associated with melanoma. Congenital melanocytic nevi and blue nevi frequently harbor NRAS mutations and GNAQ mutations, respectively, while Spitz and atypical Spitz tumors often exhibit HRAS and kinase rearrangements. These initial “driver” mutations are thought to trigger the establishment of benign nevi. After this initial phase of cell proliferation, a senescence program is executed, causing termination of nevi growth. Only upon the emergence of additional tumorigenic alterations, which may provide an escape from oncogene-induced senescence, can malignant progression occur. Here, we review the current literature on the pathobiology and genetics of nevi in the hope that additional studies of nevi promise to inform our understanding of the transition from benign neoplasm to malignancy. PMID:26300491

  12. Genetics of digital osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Michou, Laëtitia

    2011-07-01

    Genetic factors contribute to the development of digital osteoarthritis, whose heritability has been estimated at 48 to 65%. Among the manifestations of digital osteoarthritis, only Heberden's nodes are transmitted by Mendelian inheritance, as a dominant trait in women and a recessive trait in men. The other forms of digital osteoarthritis are multifactorial, with a major gene and a residual multifactorial component that probably interacts with environmental factors. Hindrances to molecular studies include the absence to date of a universally accepted definition of the phenotype and the late onset of the manifestations. Genetic association studies of selected class I and II HLA genes produced conflicting results. The T303M polymorphism of the MATN3 gene, which was initially described as associated with hand osteoarthritis, may be more closely linked to trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis than to digital osteoarthritis. Genome-wide scans have identified numerous loci linked to digital osteoarthritis. Replication has been achieved for some of these loci, most notably those located at 2p, 2q, 3p, 4q, and 7p. A recently published genome-wide association study showed that an A2BP1 gene polymorphism was significantly associated with hand osteoarthritis. Many candidate-gene studies found associations with AGC1, ASPN, ENPP1, HFE, KL, VDR, IL-1 cluster, and IL-6, although the results were not consistently reproducible. In one study, women with hand osteoarthritis had significant telomere shortening. Telomere shortening has also been reported in other age-related conditions.

  13. Genetics of SCID.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Fausto

    2010-11-15

    Human SCID (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency) is a prenatal disorder of T lymphocyte development, that depends on the expression of numerous genes. The knowledge of the genetic basis of SCID is essential for diagnosis (e.g., clinical phenotype, lymphocyte profile) and treatment (e.g., use and type of pre-hematopoietic stem cell transplant conditioning).Over the last years novel genetic defects causing SCID have been discovered, and the molecular and immunological mechanisms of SCID have been better characterized. Distinct forms of SCID show both common and peculiar (e.g., absence or presence of nonimmunological features) aspects, and they are currently classified into six groups according to prevalent pathophysiological mechanisms: impaired cytokine-mediated signaling; pre-T cell receptor defects; increased lymphocyte apoptosis; defects in thymus embryogenesis; impaired calcium flux; other mechanisms.This review is the updated, extended and largely modified translation of the article "Cossu F: Le basi genetiche delle SCID", originally published in Italian language in the journal "Prospettive in Pediatria" 2009, 156:228-238.

  14. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, S; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causing dyshormonogenesis. Genes associated with thyroid gland dysgenesis include the TSH receptor in non-syndromic congenital hypothyroidism, and Gsα and the thyroid transcription factors (TTF-1, TTF-2, and Pax-8), associated with different complex syndromes that include congenital hypothyroidism. Among those causing dyshormonogenesis, the thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin genes were initially described, and more recently PDS (Pendred syndrome), NIS (sodium iodide symporter), and THOX2 (thyroid oxidase 2) gene defects. There is also early evidence for a third group of congenital hypothyroid conditions associated with iodothyronine transporter defects associated with severe neurological sequelae. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of primary congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:15863666

  15. Genetically engineered plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Forestiere, Carlo; Pasquale, Alyssa J; Capretti, Antonio; Miano, Giovanni; Tamburrino, Antonello; Lee, Sylvanus Y; Reinhard, Björn M; Dal Negro, Luca

    2012-04-11

    In the present Letter, we demonstrate how the design of metallic nanoparticle arrays with large electric field enhancement can be performed using the basic paradigm of engineering, namely the optimization of a well-defined objective function. Such optimization is carried out by coupling a genetic algorithm with the analytical multiparticle Mie theory. General design criteria for best enhancement of electric fields are obtained, unveiling the fundamental interplay between the near-field plasmonic and radiative photonic coupling. Our optimization approach is experimentally validated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements, which demonstrate how genetically optimized arrays, fabricated using electron beam lithography, lead to order of ten improvement of Raman enhancement over nanoparticle dimer antennas, and order of one hundred improvement over optimal nanoparticle gratings. A rigorous design of nanoparticle arrays with optimal field enhancement is essential to the engineering of numerous nanoscale optical devices such as plasmon-enhanced biosensors, photodetectors, light sources and more efficient nonlinear optical elements for on chip integration.

  16. The Genetics of Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia has been defined as a syndrome of involuntary, sustained muscle contractions affecting one or more sites of the body, frequently causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Dystonia is also a clinical sign that can be the presenting or prominent manifestation of many neurodegenerative and neuro-metabolic disorders. Etiological categories include primary dystonia, secondary dystonia, heredodegenerative diseases with dystonia, and dystonia plus. Primary dystonia includes syndromes in which dystonia is the sole phenotypic manifestation with the exception that tremor can be present as well. Most primary dystonia begins in adults, and approximately 10% of probands report one or more affected family members. Many cases of childhood- and adolescent-onset dystonia are due to mutations in TOR1A and THAP1. Mutations in THAP1 and CIZ1 have been associated with sporadic and familial adult-onset dystonia. Although significant recent progress had been made in defining the genetic basis for most of the dystonia-plus and heredodegenerative diseases with dystonia, a major gap remains in understanding the genetic etiologies for most cases of adult-onset primary dystonia. Common themes in the cellular biology of dystonia include G1/S cell cycle control, monoaminergic neurotransmission, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the neuronal stress response. PMID:22989765

  17. [Arrhythmia and genetic background].

    PubMed

    Chinushi, Masaomi; Sato, Akinori

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that genetic abnormalities associated with the regulation of myocardial ionic channels, receptors, transporters, cell membranous proteins etc, can create an arrhythmogenic substrate in some patients with structurally normal hearts, and these are called hereditary arrhythmic diseases. Various arrhythmic diseases (such as congenital long or short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholamine-sensitive polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, early repolarization syndrome etc.) are categorized as hereditary arrhythmic diseases. Among them, we focused on long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome in this review. In congenital long QT syndrome, either attenuation of the net outward current or augmentation of the net inward current is responsible for prolonging the myocardial action potential duration and QT interval on ECG. Premature ventricular beats triggered due to early after-depolarization infringe on the large spatial dispersion of ventricular repolarization and initiate polymorphic ventricular tachycardia with a specific form (torsade de pointes). Currently, thirteen genotypes in Romano-Ward syndrome and two genotypes in Jervell-Lange Nielsen syndrome have been reported. In Brugada syndrome, large transient outward current (Ito) creates a deep phase 1 notch in the action potential, especially at the epicardial myocardium of the right ventricular outflow tract. In combination with the delayed completion of repolarization and loss of the phase 2 dome in some epicardial myocardium in this area, coved-type ECG abnormality and ventricular fibrillation due to phase 2 reentry are believed to be induced in Brugada syndrome. Eleven genetic abnormalities are presently listed as a possible cause of Brugada syndrome.

  18. Genetics and plant development.

    PubMed

    Prunet, Nathanaël; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-01-01

    There are only three grand theories in biology: the theory of the cell, the theory of the gene, and the theory of evolution. Two of these, the cell and gene theories, originated in the study of plants, with the third resulting in part from botanical considerations as well. Mendel's elucidation of the rules of inheritance was a result of his experiments on peas. The rediscovery of Mendel's work in 1900 was by the botanists de Vries, Correns, and Tschermak. It was only in subsequent years that animals were also shown to have segregation of genetic elements in the exact same manner as had been shown in plants. The story of developmental biology is different - while the development of plants has long been studied, the experimental and genetic approaches to developmental mechanism were developed via experiments on animals, and the importance of genes in development (e.g., Waddington, 1940) and their use for understanding developmental mechanisms came to botanical science much later - as late as the 1980s.

  19. Genetics of experimental hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, A F; Clark, J S; Jeffs, B; Anderson, N H; Negrin, C D; Lee, W K; Brosnan, M J

    1998-12-01

    Experimental models of genetic hypertension are used to develop paradigms to study human essential hypertension while removing some of the complexity inherent in the study of human subjects. Since 1991 several quantitative trait loci responsible for blood pressure regulation have been identified in various rat crosses. More recently, a series of interesting quantitative trait loci influencing cardiac hypertrophy, stroke, metabolic syndrome and renal damage has also been described. It is recognized that the identification of large chromosomal regions containing a quantitative trait locus is only a first step towards gene identification. The next step is the production of congenic strains and substrains to confirm the existence of the quantitative trait locus and to narrow down the chromosomal region of interest. Several congenic strains have already been produced, with further refinement of the methodology currently in progress. The ultimate goal is to achieve positional cloning of the causal gene, a task which has so far been elusive. There are several areas of cross-fertilization between experimental and human genetics of hypertension, with a successful transfer of two loci directly from rats to humans and with new pharmacogenetic approaches which may be utilized in both experimental and clinical settings.

  20. Biology, Genetics, and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Tamara L.; Luczak, Susan E.; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gene variants encoding several of the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are among the largest genetic associations with risk for alcohol dependence. Certain genetic variants (i.e., alleles)—particularly the ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3, ADH1C*1, and ALDH2*2 alleles—have been associated with lower rates of alcohol dependence. These alleles may lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde during alcohol metabolism, which can result in heightened subjective and objective effects. The prevalence of these alleles differs among ethnic groups; ADH1B*2 is found frequently in northeast Asians and occasionally Caucasians, ADH1B*3 is found predominantly in people of African ancestry, ADH1C*1 varies substantially across populations, and ALDH2*2 is found almost exclusively in northeast Asians. Differences in the prevalence of these alleles may account at least in part for ethnic differences in alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, these alleles do not act in isolation to influence the risk of AUD. For example, the gene effects of ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 seem to interact. Moreover, other factors have been found to influence the extent to which these alleles affect a person’s alcohol involvement, including developmental stage, individual characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, antisocial behavior, and behavioral undercontrol), and environmental factors (e.g., culture, religion, family environment, and childhood adversity). PMID:27163368

  1. [Genetics of congenital deafness].

    PubMed

    Faundes, Víctor; Pardo, Rosa Andrea; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    Congenital deafness is defined as the hearing loss which is present at birth and, consequently, before speech development. It is the most prevalent sensor neural disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is estimated between 1-3 children per 1,000 newborns, of which more than 50% are attributable to genetics causes. Deafness can be classified as syndromic or non-syndromic. In the first case, it is associated with outer ear malformations and/or systemic findings. More than 400 syndromes accompanied of deafness have been described, which represent about 30% of cases of congenital hearing loss. The remaining percentage corresponds to non-syndromic cases: 75-85% are autosomal recessive, 15-24% are autosomal dominant, and 1-2% are X-linked. The evaluation of a child with deafness requires a multidisciplinary collaboration among specialists, who must coordinate themselves and give information to the affected family. The aims of establishing a diagnosis are to predict other manifestations that may suggest some syndrome and to anticipate their management, as well as to perform genetic counseling to parents and affected individuals.

  2. Energy Control Systems: Energy Savings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The installation of proper control systems is estimated as saving up to 25 percent of the energy used in schools. Other potential energy-saving areas are transmission (heat loss or gain through walls, especially ceilings); internal load (heat from students, lights, and machinery); ventilation; and equipment maintenance. (Author/MLF)

  3. Genetic Dissection of Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liqun; Callaway, Edward M.; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the principles of information processing in neural circuits requires systematic characterization of the participating cell types and their connections, and the ability to measure and perturb their activity. Genetic approaches promise to bring experimental access to complex neural systems, including genetic stalwarts such as the fly and mouse, but also to nongenetic systems such as primates. Together with anatomical and physiological methods, cell-type-specific expression of protein markers and sensors and transducers will be critical to construct circuit diagrams and to measure the activity of genetically defined neurons. Inactivation and activation of genetically defined cell types will establish causal relationships between activity in specific groups of neurons, circuit function, and animal behavior. Genetic analysis thus promises to reveal the logic of the neural circuits in complex brains that guide behaviors. Here we review progress in the genetic analysis of neural circuits and discuss directions for future research and development. PMID:18341986

  4. Genetic specificity of face recognition.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Plomin, Robert

    2015-10-13

    Specific cognitive abilities in diverse domains are typically found to be highly heritable and substantially correlated with general cognitive ability (g), both phenotypically and genetically. Recent twin studies have found the ability to memorize and recognize faces to be an exception, being similarly heritable but phenotypically substantially uncorrelated both with g and with general object recognition. However, the genetic relationships between face recognition and other abilities (the extent to which they share a common genetic etiology) cannot be determined from phenotypic associations. In this, to our knowledge, first study of the genetic associations between face recognition and other domains, 2,000 18- and 19-year-old United Kingdom twins completed tests assessing their face recognition, object recognition, and general cognitive abilities. Results confirmed the substantial heritability of face recognition (61%), and multivariate genetic analyses found that most of this genetic influence is unique and not shared with other cognitive abilities.

  5. Energy Saver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Harris Semiconductor Company used technology which they found in Tech Briefs as the basis for an integrated circuit to reduce onto one chip most of the circuitry of the motors, for example working machines, drill presses, etc. Harris produced an induction motor energy saver (IMES) centered upon a silicon chip. The chip computes the precise voltage and the IMES monitors the motor and provides the energy. An IMES equipped drill press uses only 79 watts of energy as compared to the usual 160 watts.

  6. Energy generator

    SciTech Connect

    Krisko, P.

    1989-08-01

    The patent describes a power booster. It comprises: at least one pendulum means suspended at one end to oscillate about the point of suspension; power generating means; mass means connected to one end of the pendulum means; spring means disposed in operative cooperation with the mass means to impart energy into the pendulum means and assist the pendulum means in oscillating about the point of suspension; and energy transfer linkage means between the pendulum means and the power generating means for transferring energy between the pendulum means and the power generating means.

  7. Clinical Genetic Testing in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New technologies for mutation detection in the human genome have greatly increased our understanding of epilepsy genetics. Application of genomic technologies in the clinical setting allows for more efficient genetic diagnosis in some patients; therefore, it is important to understand the types of tests available and the types of mutations that can be detected. Making a genetic diagnosis improves overall patient care by enhancing prognosis and recurrence risk counseling and informing treatment decisions. PMID:26316867

  8. Genetic screening: marvel or menace?

    PubMed

    Rowley, P T

    1984-07-13

    Genetic screening is a systematic search in the population for persons of certain genotypes. The usual purpose is to detect persons who themselves or whose offspring are at risk for genetic diseases or genetically determined susceptibilities to environmental agents. Is genetic screening a marvel about to free us from the scourge of genetic disease or a menace about to invade our privacy and determine who may reproduce? There are three different types of genetic screening. Newborn screening identifies serious genetic disease at birth, permitting prompt treatment to prevent mental and physical retardation. Fetal screening and prenatal diagnosis identify genetic disease in the fetus permitting selective termination of pregnancy and the opportunity to have children free of defects detectable in utero. Carrier screening identifies individuals heterozygous for a gene for a serious recessive disease who may be at risk for affected offspring. The challenge to society is to provide (by way of cost-effective programs) expert services, including genetic counseling and follow-up, to all who may benefit, to ensure confidentiality and freedom of choice, and to avoid misunderstanding and stigmatization. It is recommended that the objective of screening programs should be to maximize the options available to families at risk rather than to reduce the incidence of genetic diseases. Whenever possible, the providers of these services should be the providers of primary health care. Urgently needed are a greater awareness of avoidable genetic diseases on the part of primary care providers and efforts to familiarize the public with the basic concepts of human genetics through the public school system.

  9. Genetic basis of metabolome variation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Jeffrey S; Hackett, Sean R; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-03-01

    Metabolism, the conversion of nutrients into usable energy and biochemical building blocks, is an essential feature of all cells. The genetic factors responsible for inter-individual metabolic variability remain poorly understood. To investigate genetic causes of metabolome variation, we measured the concentrations of 74 metabolites across ~ 100 segregants from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cross by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We found 52 quantitative trait loci for 34 metabolites. These included linkages due to overt changes in metabolic genes, e.g., linking pyrimidine intermediates to the deletion of ura3. They also included linkages not directly related to metabolic enzymes, such as those for five central carbon metabolites to ira2, a Ras/PKA pathway regulator, and for the metabolites, S-adenosyl-methionine and S-adenosyl-homocysteine to slt2, a MAP kinase involved in cell wall integrity. The variant of ira2 that elevates metabolite levels also increases glucose uptake and ethanol secretion. These results highlight specific examples of genetic variability, including in genes without prior known metabolic regulatory function, that impact yeast metabolism.

  10. Genetic Basis of Metabolome Variation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Jeffrey S.; Hackett, Sean R.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism, the conversion of nutrients into usable energy and biochemical building blocks, is an essential feature of all cells. The genetic factors responsible for inter-individual metabolic variability remain poorly understood. To investigate genetic causes of metabolome variation, we measured the concentrations of 74 metabolites across 100 segregants from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cross by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We found 52 quantitative trait loci for 34 metabolites. These included linkages due to overt changes in metabolic genes, e.g., linking pyrimidine intermediates to the deletion of ura3. They also included linkages not directly related to metabolic enzymes, such as those for five central carbon metabolites to ira2, a Ras/PKA pathway regulator, and for the metabolites, S-adenosyl-methionine and S-adenosyl-homocysteine to slt2, a MAP kinase involved in cell wall integrity. The variant of ira2 that elevates metabolite levels also increases glucose uptake and ethanol secretion. These results highlight specific examples of genetic variability, including in genes without prior known metabolic regulatory function, that impact yeast metabolism. PMID:24603560

  11. Role of genetic background in induced instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadhim, Munira A.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is effectively induced by ionizing radiation. Recently, evidence has accumulated supporting a relationship between genetic background and the radiation-induced genomic instability phenotype. This is possibly due to alterations in proteins responsible for maintenance of genomic integrity or altered oxidative metabolism. Studies in human cell lines, human primary cells, and mouse models have been performed predominantly using high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, or high doses of low LET radiation. The interplay between genetics, radiation response, and genomic instability has not been fully determined at low doses of low LET radiation. However, recent studies using low doses of low LET radiation suggest that the relationship between genetic background and radiation-induced genomic instability may be more complicated than these same relationships at high LET or high doses of low LET radiation. The complexity of this relationship at low doses of low LET radiation suggests that more of the population may be at risk than previously recognized and may have implications for radiation risk assessment.

  12. Quaternionic representation of the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Carlevaro, C Manuel; Irastorza, Ramiro M; Vericat, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    A heuristic diagram of the evolution of the standard genetic code is presented. It incorporates, in a way that resembles the energy levels of an atom, the physical notion of broken symmetry and it is consistent with original ideas by Crick on the origin and evolution of the code as well as with the chronological order of appearance of the amino acids along the evolution as inferred from work that mixtures known experimental results with theoretical speculations. Suggested by the diagram we propose a Hamilton quaternions based mathematical representation of the code as it stands now-a-days. The central object in the description is a codon function that assigns to each amino acid an integer quaternion in such a way that the observed code degeneration is preserved. We emphasize the advantages of a quaternionic representation of amino acids taking as an example the folding of proteins. With this aim we propose an algorithm to go from the quaternions sequence to the protein three dimensional structure which can be compared with the corresponding experimental one stored at the Protein Data Bank. In our criterion the mathematical representation of the genetic code in terms of quaternions merits to be taken into account because it describes not only most of the known properties of the genetic code but also opens new perspectives that are mainly derived from the close relationship between quaternions and rotations.

  13. Band-structure parameters by genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Starrost, F.; Bornholdt, S.; Solterbeck, C.; Schattke, W.

    1996-05-01

    A genetic algorithm has been used to solve a complex multidimensional parameter-fitting problem. We will focus on the parameters of an empirical tight-binding Hamiltonian. The method is used to approximate the electronic energy band structure if energy values are known for a few wave vectors of high symmetry. Compared to the usual manual procedure this method is more accurate and automatic. This approach, based on the extended H{umlt u}ckel theory (EHT), has provided a list of EHT parameters for IV-IV and III-V semiconductors with zinc-blende structure and helped us to find a symmetry in the EHT. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. The Synthesis Paradigm in Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental genetics with model organisms and mathematically explicit genetic theory are generally considered to be the major paradigms by which progress in genetics is achieved. Here I argue that this view is incomplete and that pivotal advances in genetics—and other fields of biology—are also made by synthesizing disparate threads of extant information rather than generating new information from experiments or formal theory. Because of the explosive expansion of information in numerous “-omics” data banks, and the fragmentation of genetics into numerous subdisciplines, the importance of the synthesis paradigm will likely expand with time. PMID:24496401

  15. Essay: early American genetics journals.

    PubMed

    Crow, James F

    2005-09-01

    Before the Second World War, there were only two North-American journals exclusively devoted to genetics - the Journal of Heredity and Genetics. In the late 1940s, Genetics spawned two progeny - the American Journal of Human Genetics and Evolution. This article recounts the early days of these journals, their influential and often colourful founding editors, and their contents. It emphasizes the contrast between those years, when a reader had a realistic chance of keeping up with the whole field, and the current plethora of journals that makes it impossible to keep up with even the tables of contents.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as substances called bile alcohols. Cholestanol and bile alcohols are increased in the blood, while blood cholesterol levels are typically ... Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  17. The genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dellefave, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review More than forty different individual genes have been implicated in the inheritance of dilated cardiomyopathy. For a subset of these genes, mutations can lead to a spectrum of cardiomyopathy that extends to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction. In nearly all cases, there is an increased risk of arrhythmias. With some genetic mutations, extracardiac manifestations are likely to be present. The precise genetic etiology can usually not be discerned from the cardiac and/or extracardiac manifestations and requires molecular genetic diagnosis for prognostic determination and cardiac care. Recent findings Newer technologies are influencing genetic testing, especially cardiomyopathy genetic testing, where an increased number of genes are now routinely being tested simultaneously. While this approach to testing multiple genes is increasing the diagnostic yield, the analysis of multiple genes in one test is also resulting in a large amount of genetic information of unclear significance. Summary Genetic testing is highly useful in the care of patients and families, since it guides diagnosis, influences care and aids in prognosis. However, the large amount of benign human genetic variation may complicate genetic results, and often requires a skilled team to accurately interpret the findings. PMID:20186049

  18. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J; Keller, Margaux F; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P; Traynor, Bryan J; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G; Cookson, Mark R; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain.

  19. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A.; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J.; Keller, Margaux F.; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Cookson, Mark R.; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain. PMID:24057672

  20. Salinity Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  1. Energy Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen

    Rules are provided for this bingo game focusing on terms related to solar, coal, nuclear, hydro, and wind energy. Playing cards and calling cards (to be cut out by the teacher) are also provided. (JN)

  2. Energy Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelson, Philip H.

    1972-01-01

    Comments on The Potential for Energy Conservation,'' a study by the Office of Emergency Preparedness, emphasizing the coming dependence on foreign oil, and presses for government influence to encourage development of more efficient cars. (AL)

  3. Tidal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Impact of Science on Society, 1987

    1987-01-01

    States that tidal power projects are feasible in a relatively limited number of locations around the world. Claims that together they could theoretically produce the energy equivalent to more than one million barrels of oil per year. (TW)

  4. Cassava as an energy source: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, C.

    1980-01-01

    This selected bibliography includes 250 articles on cassava as a potential energy source. Factors included are things which influence cassava growth; such as weeding, fertilizer, diseases and genetic selection, as well as the conversion of cassava to ethanol. (DP)

  5. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-09-30

    Energy storage technology is critical if the U.S. is to achieve more than 25% penetration of renewable electrical energy, given the intermittency of wind and solar. Energy density is a critical parameter in the economic viability of any energy storage system with liquid fuels being 10 to 100 times better than batteries. However, the economical conversion of electricity to fuel still presents significant technical challenges. This project addressed these challenges by focusing on a specific approach: efficient processes to convert electricity, water and nitrogen to ammonia. Ammonia has many attributes that make it the ideal energy storage compound. The feed stocks are plentiful, ammonia is easily liquefied and routinely stored in large volumes in cheap containers, and it has exceptional energy density for grid scale electrical energy storage. Ammonia can be oxidized efficiently in fuel cells or advanced Carnot cycle engines yielding water and nitrogen as end products. Because of the high energy density and low reactivity of ammonia, the capital cost for grid storage will be lower than any other storage application. This project developed the theoretical foundations of N2 catalysis on specific catalysts and provided for the first time experimental evidence for activation of Mo 2N based catalysts. Theory also revealed that the N atom adsorbed in the bridging position between two metal atoms is the critical step for catalysis. Simple electrochemical ammonia production reactors were designed and built in this project using two novel electrolyte systems. The first one demonstrated the use of ionic liquid electrolytes at room temperature and the second the use of pyrophosphate based electrolytes at intermediate temperatures (200 – 300 ºC). The mechanism of high proton conduction in the pyrophosphate materials was found to be associated with a polyphosphate second phase contrary to literature claims and ammonia production rates as high as 5X 10

  6. Surface plasmon-enhanced energy transfer in an organic light-emitting device structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ki Youl; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Ahn, Chi Won

    2009-07-06

    We present a surface plasmon-mediated energy transfer based on an organic light-emitting device structure. In order to localize surface plasmons, silver nano clusters were deposited thermally close to the cathode with a 1-nm-thick LiF spacer. It was shown that the surface plasmon formed on the silver nano cluster provides a strong donor decay channel and increases the donor-acceptor dipolar interaction. Thus, photoluminescence results displayed 3.5-fold enhanced acceptor emission intensity, compared with those of sample which has no Ag nano cluster.

  7. Genetics of obesity.

    PubMed

    Clement, Karine; Boutin, Philippe; Froguel, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a typical common multifactorial disease in which environmental and genetic factors interact. In rare cases of severe obesity with childhood onset, a single gene has a major effect in determining the occurrence of obesity, with the environment having only a permissive role in the severity of the phenotype. Exceptional mutations of the leptin gene and its receptor, pro-opiomelanocortine (POMC), prohormone convertase 1 (PC1) and more frequently, mutations in the melanocortin receptor 4 (1 to 4% of very obese cases) have been described. All these obesity genes encode proteins that are strongly connected as part of the same loop of the regulation of food intake. They all involve the leptin axis and one of its hypothalamic targets; the melanocortin pathway. Pathways of bodyweight regulation involved in monogenic forms of obesity might represent targets for future drug development. Successful leptin protein replacement in a leptin-deficient child has contributed to the validation of the usefulness of gene screening in humans. However, the individual variability in response to leptin treatment might be related to genetic variability. The efficiency of leptin itself or of small-molecule agonists of the leptin receptor should be studied in relation with genetic variations in the leptin gene promoter. The most common forms of obesity are polygenic. Two general approaches have been used to date in the search for genes underlying common polygenic obesity in humans. The first approach focuses on selected genes having some plausible role in obesity on the basis of their known or presumed biological role. This approach yielded putative susceptibility genes with only small or uncertain effects. The second approach attempts to map genes purely by position and requires no presumptions on the function of genes. Genome-wide scans identify chromosomal regions showing linkage with obesity in large collections of nuclear families. Genome-wide scans in different ethnic

  8. Does receiving genetic counseling impact genetic counselor practice?

    PubMed

    Peters, Elizabeth; McCarthy Veach, Patricia; Ward, Erin E; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2004-10-01

    This study was an investigation of whether genetic counselors have received genetic counseling and if so, how they believe it affects their practice. One thousand genetic counselors were mailed surveys about the nature of genetic counseling services received, impact on their clinical practice, frequency and reasons for disclosing about their receipt of counseling to their clients, and demographics. Ninety-three of the 510 respondents reported receiving genetic counseling. Of these, almost three-fourths were practicing genetic counselors while receiving services. Reasons for services include prenatal concerns, family history of cancer, and history/risk of other genetic conditions. Frequently endorsed effects on practice include increased empathy and understanding of client decisions, feeling more connected with clients, greater emphasis on psychosocial support, and sympathy. Forty-six respondents disclosed to clients about their receipt of genetic counseling. Prevalent reasons include client asked, help clients feel they are not alone, demonstrate counselor understanding, decrease client anxiety, build rapport, and normalize client feelings. Practice and research recommendations are given.

  9. On Gene Concepts and Teaching Genetics: Episodes from Classical Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burian, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the teaching of advanced high school courses or undergraduate courses for non-biology majors about genetics or history of genetics. It will probably be difficult to take the approach described here in a high school science course, although the general approach could help improve such courses. It would be ideal for a college…

  10. [The Human Genome Project, genetic viability and genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2005-12-18

    The goal of the Human Genome Project to elucidate the complete sequence of the human genome has been achieved. The aims of the "post-genome" era are explaining the genetic information, characterisation of functional elements encoded in the human genome and mapping the human genetic variability as well. Two unrelated human beings also share 99.9% of their genomic sequence. The difference of 0.1% is the result of genetic polymorphisms: single nucleotide polymorphisms, repetitive sequences and insertion/deletion. The genetic differences, coupled with environmental exposures will determine the phenotypic variation we observe in health or disease. The disease-causing genetic variants can be identified by linkage analysis or association studies. The knowledge of human genome and application of multiple biomarkers will improve our ability to identify individuals at risk, so that preventive interventions can be applied, earlier diagnosis can be made and treatment can be optimized.

  11. Genetics in the art and art in genetics.

    PubMed

    Bukvic, Nenad; Elling, John W

    2015-01-15

    "Healing is best accomplished when art and science are conjoined, when body and spirit are probed together", says Bernard Lown, in his book "The Lost Art of Healing". Art has long been a witness to disease either through diseases which affected artists or diseases afflicting objects of their art. In particular, artists have often portrayed genetic disorders and malformations in their work. Sometimes genetic disorders have mystical significance; other times simply have intrinsic interest. Recognizing genetic disorders is also an art form. From the very beginning of my work as a Medical Geneticist I have composed personal "algorithms" to piece together evidence of genetics syndromes and diseases from the observable signs and symptoms. In this paper we apply some 'gestalt' Genetic Syndrome Diagnostic algorithms to virtual patients found in some art masterpieces. In some the diagnosis is clear and in others the artists' depiction only supports a speculative differential diagnosis.

  12. Introduction to genetics and genomics in asthma: genetics of asthma.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Rasika Ann

    2014-01-01

    While asthma is a heterogeneous disease, a strong genetic basis has been firmly established. Rather than being a single disease entity, asthma consists of related, overlapping syndromes [Barnes (Proc Am Thor Soc 8:143-148, 2011)] including three general domains: variable airway obstruction, airway hyper-responsiveness, and airway inflammation with a considerable proportion, but not all, of asthma being IgE-mediated further adding to its heterogeneity. This chapter reviews the approaches to the elucidation of genetics of asthma from the early evidence of familial clustering to the current state of knowledge with genome-wide approaches. The conclusion is that research efforts have led to a tremendous repository of genetic determinants of asthma, most of which fall into the above phenotypic domains of the syndrome. We now look to future integrative approaches of genetics, genomics (Chap. 10), and epigenetics (Chap. 11) to better understand the causal mechanism through which, these genetic loci act in manifesting asthma.

  13. Xenomicrobiology: a roadmap for genetic code engineering.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Budisa, Nediljko

    2016-09-01

    Biology is an analytical and informational science that is becoming increasingly dependent on chemical synthesis. One example is the high-throughput and low-cost synthesis of DNA, which is a foundation for the research field of synthetic biology (SB). The aim of SB is to provide biotechnological solutions to health, energy and environmental issues as well as unsustainable manufacturing processes in the frame of naturally existing chemical building blocks. Xenobiology (XB) goes a step further by implementing non-natural building blocks in living cells. In this context, genetic code engineering respectively enables the re-design of genes/genomes and proteins/proteomes with non-canonical nucleic (XNAs) and amino (ncAAs) acids. Besides studying information flow and evolutionary innovation in living systems, XB allows the development of new-to-nature therapeutic proteins/peptides, new biocatalysts for potential applications in synthetic organic chemistry and biocontainment strategies for enhanced biosafety. In this perspective, we provide a brief history and evolution of the genetic code in the context of XB. We then discuss the latest efforts and challenges ahead for engineering the genetic code with focus on substitutions and additions of ncAAs as well as standard amino acid reductions. Finally, we present a roadmap for the directed evolution of artificial microbes for emancipating rare sense codons that could be used to introduce novel building blocks. The development of such xenomicroorganisms endowed with a 'genetic firewall' will also allow to study and understand the relation between code evolution and horizontal gene transfer.

  14. Entraining synthetic genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; de Luis, Oscar; Izquierdo, Adriana; Coloma, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new approach for synchronizing a population of synthetic genetic oscillators, which consists in the entrainment of a colony of repressilators by external modulation. We present a model where the repressilator dynamics is affected by periodic changes in temperature. We introduce an additional plasmid in the bacteria in order to correlate the temperature variations with the enhancement of the transcription rate of a certain gene. This can be done by introducing a promoter that is related to the heat shock response. This way, the expression of that gene results in a protein that enhances the overall oscillations. Numerical results show coherent oscillations of the population for a certain range of the external frequency, which is in turn related to the natural oscillation frequency of the modified repressilator. Finally we study the transient times related with the loss of synchronization and we discuss possible applications in biotechnology of large-scale production coupled to synchronization events induced by heat shock.

  15. Genetic research and biobanks.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Don

    2011-01-01

    Human biobanks, and genetic research databases, as referred to by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), are essential tools for modern biomedical research. Biobanks may consist in collections created in clinical diagnosis (such as pathology tissue samples in hospitals) or collections created for large-scale longitudinal research (such as the UK Biobank). Human tissue collections are regulated by a patchwork of national laws. However, there is an increasing international uniformity in national privacy laws based on 1980s OECD standards. There are similar uniform standards developing in national research ethics guidelines. As biobanks develop collaborations and linkages, international harmonisation of legislation and human research regulation will be required across jurisdictions. It is essential that international public trust is maintained in biobanking research.

  16. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry.

  17. Designing Genetic Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andreas W K; Dolan, James A; Kelly, Ciarán L; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-08-01

    By incorporating feedback around systems we wish to manipulate, it is possible to improve their performance and robustness properties to meet pre-specified design objectives. For decades control engineers have been successfully implementing feedback controllers for complex mechanical and electrical systems such as aircraft and sports cars. Natural biological systems use feedback extensively for regulation and adaptation but apart from the most basic designs, there is no systematic framework for designing feedback controllers in Synthetic Biology. In this paper we describe how classical approaches from linear control theory can be used to close the loop. This includes the design of genetic circuits using feedback control and the presentation of a biological phase lag controller.

  18. [Molecular genetics of hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Schwarzová, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The review focuses on the molecular background of an inborn error of lipid metabolism -familial hypercholesterolemia. FH describes a group of genetic defects resulting in severe elevations of blood cholesterol levels and increased risk of premature coronary heart disease. Most cases are due to the mutations decreasing and/or destroying the function of the LDL receptor (85-90 % of cases), smaller portion of cases is caused by defects in the gene encoding the ligand for LDL receptor - apolipoprotein B-100 (5-10 %). Less than 5 % of cases has gain-of-function station of the PCSK9 gene that increases the rate of degradation of the LDL receptor molecules. Autosomal recessive form of the disease, caused by the mutations in LDLR adaptor protein 1 gene, is extremely rare.Key words: APOB - familial hypercholesterolemia - LDLR - LDLRAP1 - PCSK9.

  19. Genetic susceptibility to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. J.; Brenner, D. J.; Worgul, B.; Smilenov, L.

    In the context of space radiation, it is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. One possibility is that haploinsufficiency for ATM confers radiosensitivity, and this defect involves 1-3% of the population. Using knock-out mice we chose to study cataractogenesis in the lens and oncogenic transformation in mouse embryo fibroblasts to assay for effects of ATM deficiency. Radiation induced cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals following exposure to either gamma rays or 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. In addition, it was found that embryo fibroblasts of Atm heterozygotes showed an increased incidence of oncogenic transformation compared with their normal litter-matched counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive subpopulation.

  20. Genetics and skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Bekou, Vassiliki; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex process and underlies multiple influences with the probable involvement of heritable and various environmental factors. Several theories have been conducted regarding the pathomechanisms of aged skin, however fundamental mechanisms still remain poorly understood. This article addresses the influence of genetics on skin aging and in particular deals with the differences observed in ethnic populations and between both genders. Recent studies indicate that male and female aged skin differs as far as the type, the consistency and the sensitivity to external factors is concerned. The same has been also documented between elderly people of different origin. Consequently, the aging process taking place in both genders and in diverse ethnic groups should be examined separately and products specialized to each population should be developed in order to satisfy the special needs. PMID:23467395