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Sample records for engine regenerator matrices

  1. Engineered matrices for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Shelley R.; Hu, Yunhua; Pugh, Amy; Brown, Leanna; Nguyen, Jesse T.; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.

    2000-06-01

    Traditional therapies of autografts and allogeneic banked bone can promote reasonable clinical outcome to repair damaged bone. However, under certain conditions the success of these traditional approaches plummets, providing the incentive for researchers to develop clinical alternatives. The evolving field of tissue engineering in the musculoskeletal system attempts to mimic many of the components from the intact, healthy subject. Those components consist of a biologic scaffold, cells, extracellular matrix, and signaling molecules. The bone biomimetic, i.e., an engineered matrix, provides a porous structural architecture for the regeneration and ingrowth of osseous tissue at the site of injury. To further enhance the regenerative cascade, our strategy has involved porous biodegradable scaffolds containing and releasing signaling molecules and providing a suitable environment for cell attachment, growth and differentiation. In addition, the inclusion of genetically modified osteogenic precursor cells has brought the technology closer to developing a tissue-engineered equivalent. The presentation will describe various formulations and the methods utilized to evaluate the clinical utility of these biomimetics.

  2. Biocompatible nanofiber matrices for the engineering of a dermal substitute for skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, J; Ramakrishna, S

    2005-01-01

    Natural and synthetic biodegradable nanofibers are extensively used for biomedical applications and tissue engineering. Biocompatibility and a well-established safety profile for polycaprolactone (PCL) and collagen represent a favorable matrix for preparing a dermal substitute for engineering skin. Collagen synthesized by fibroblasts is a good surface active agent and demonstrates its ability to penetrate a lipid-free interface. During granulation tissue formation, fibronectin provides a temporary substratum for migration and proliferation of cells and provides a template for collagen deposition, which increases stiffness and tensile strength of this healing tissues. The objective of this study was to fabricate nanofiber matrices from novel biodegradable PCL and collagen to mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) and to examine the cell behavior, cell attachment, and interaction between cells and nanofiber matrices. Collagen nanofiber matrices show a significant (p < 0.001) level of fibroblast proliferation and increase up to 54% compared with control tissue culture plate (TCP) after 72 h. The present investigation shows that PCL-coated collagen matrices are suitable for fibroblast growth, proliferation, and migration inside the matrices. This novel biodegradable PCL and collagen nanofiber matrices support the attachment and proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and might have potential in tissue engineering as a dermal substitute for skin regeneration.

  3. Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration: From Cell-Based Therapies to Decellularised Engineered Extracellular Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James N.; Peretti, Giuseppe M.; Scotti, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Currently, autologous bone grafting represents the clinical gold standard in orthopaedic surgery. In certain cases, however, alternative techniques are required. The clinical utility of stem and stromal cells has been demonstrated for the repair and regeneration of craniomaxillofacial and long bone defects although clinical adoption of bone tissue engineering protocols has been very limited. Initial tissue engineering studies focused on the bone marrow as a source of cells for bone regeneration, and while a number of promising results continue to emerge, limitations to this technique have prompted the exploration of alternative cell sources, including adipose and muscle tissue. In this review paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cell sources with a focus on adipose tissue and the bone marrow. Additionally, we highlight the relatively recent paradigm of developmental engineering, which promotes the recapitulation of naturally occurring developmental processes to allow the implant to optimally respond to endogenous cues. Finally we examine efforts to apply lessons from studies into different cell sources and developmental approaches to stimulate bone growth by use of decellularised hypertrophic cartilage templates. PMID:26997959

  4. Bone Regeneration Using Gene-Activated Matrices.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Sheetal; Atluri, Keerthi; Geary, Sean M; Hong, Liu; Elangovan, Satheesh; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-01-01

    Gene delivery to bone is a potential therapeutic strategy for directed, sustained, and regulated protein expression. Tissue engineering strategies for bone regeneration include delivery of proteins, genes (viral and non-viral-mediated delivery), and/or cells to the bone defect site. In addition, biomimetic scaffolds and scaffolds incorporating bone anabolic agents greatly enhance the bone repair process. Regional gene therapy has the potential of enhancing bone defect healing and bone regeneration by delivering osteogenic genes locally to the osseous lesions, thereby reducing systemic toxicity and the need for using supraphysiological dosages of therapeutic proteins. By implanting gene-activated matrices (GAMs), sustained gene expression and continuous osteogenic protein production in situ can be achieved in a way that stimulates osteogenesis and bone repair within osseous defects. Critical parameters substantially affecting the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy include the choice of osteogenic transgene(s), selection of non-viral or viral vectors, the wound environment, and the selection of ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery strategies, such as GAMs. It is critical for gene therapy applications that clinically beneficial amounts of proteins are synthesized endogenously within and around the lesion in a sustained manner. It is therefore necessary that reliable and reproducible methods of gene delivery be developed and tested for their efficacy and safety before translating into clinical practice. Practical considerations such as the age, gender, and systemic health of patients and the nature of the disease process also need to be taken into account in order to personalize the treatments and progress towards developing a clinically applicable gene therapy for healing bone defects. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies to regenerate bone with specific focus on non-viral gene delivery systems.

  5. Electrospun human keratin matrices as templates for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sow, Wan Ting; Lui, Yuan Siang; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of fabricating human hair keratin matrices through electrospinning and to evaluate the potential of these matrices for tissue regeneration. Keratin was extracted from human hair using Na2S and blended with poly(ethylene oxide) in the weight ratio of 60:1 for electrospinning. Physical morphology and chemical properties of the matrices were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Cell viability and morphology of murine and human fibroblasts cultured on the matrices were evaluated through the Live/Dead(®) assay and scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun keratin matrices were successfully produced without affecting the chemical conformation of keratin. Fibroblasts cultured on keratin matrices showed healthy morphology and penetration into matrices at day 7. Electrospun human hair keratin matrices provide a bioinductive and structural environment for cell growth and are thus attractive as alternative templates for tissue regeneration.

  6. Tissue engineering in urothelium regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vaegler, Martin; Maurer, Sabine; Toomey, Patricia; Amend, Bastian; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich

    2015-03-01

    The development of therapeutic treatments to regenerate urothelium, manufacture tissue equivalents or neourethras for in-vivo application is a significant challenge in the field of tissue engineering. Many studies have focused on urethral defects that, in most cases, inadequately address current therapies. This article reviews the primary tissue engineering strategies aimed at the clinical requirements for urothelium regeneration while concentrating on promising investigations in the use of grafts, cellular preparations, as well as seeded or unseeded natural and synthetic materials. Despite significant progress being made in the development of scaffolds and matrices, buccal mucosa transplants have not been replaced. Recently, graft tissues appear to have an advantage over the use of matrices. These therapies depend on cell isolation and propagation in vitro that require, not only substantial laboratory resources, but also subsequent surgical implant procedures. The choice of the correct cell source is crucial when determining an in-vivo application because of the risks of tissue changes and abnormalities that may result in donor site morbidity. Addressing an appropriately-designed animal model and relevant regulatory issues is of fundamental importance for the principal investigators when a therapy using cellular components has been developed for clinical use.

  7. Tissue engineered cartilage on collagen and PHBV matrices.

    PubMed

    Köse, Gamze Torun; Korkusuz, Feza; Ozkul, Aykut; Soysal, Yasemin; Ozdemir, Taner; Yildiz, Cemil; Hasirci, Vasif

    2005-09-01

    Cartilage engineering is a very novel approach to tissue repair through use of implants. Matrices of collagen containing calcium phosphate (CaP-Gelfix), and matrices of poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) (PHBV) were produced to create a cartilage via tissue engineering. The matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron diffraction spectroscopy (EDS). Porosity and void volume analysis were carried out to characterize the matrices. Chondrocytes were isolated from the proximal humerus of 22 week-old male, adult, local albino rabbits. For cell type characterization, Type II collagen was measured by Western Blot analysis. The foams were seeded with 1x10(6) chondrocytes and histological examinations were carried out to assess cell-matrix interaction. Macroscopic examination showed that PHBV (with or without chondrocytes) maintained its integrity for 21 days, while CaP-Gelfix was deformed and degraded within 15 days. Cell-containing and cell-free matrices were implanted into full thickness cartilage defects (4.5 mm in diameter and 4 mm in depth) at the patellar groove on the right and left knees of eight rabbits, respectively. In vivo results at 8 and 20 weeks with chondrocyte seeded PHBV matrices presented early cartilage formation resembling normal articular cartilage and revealed minimal foreign body reaction. In CaP-Gelfix matrices, fibrocartilage formation and bone invasion was noted in 20 weeks. Cells maintained their phenotype in both matrices. PHBV had better healing response than CaP-Gelfix. Both matrices were effective in cartilage regeneration. These matrices have great potential for use in the repair of joint cartilage defects.

  8. Tissue engineering for periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T; Conte, Greg; Nishimine, Dee; Dault, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As a result of periodontal regeneration research, a series of clinical techniques have emerged that permit tissue engineering to be performed for more efficient regeneration and repair of periodontal defects and improved implant site development. Historically, periodontal regeneration research has focused on a quest for "magic filler" material. This search has led to the development of techniques utilizing autologous bone and bone marrow, allografts, xenografts, and various man-made bone substitutes. Though these techniques have had limited success, the desire for a more effective regenerative approach has resulted in the development of tissue engineering techniques. Tissue engineering is a relatively new field of reconstructive biology which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biologic mediators to facilitate reconstruction/regeneration of a particular tissue. In periodontology, the concept of tissue engineering had its beginnings with guided tissue regeneration, a mechanical approach utilizing nonresorbable membranes to obtain regeneration in defects. In dental implantology, guided bone regeneration membranes +/- mechanical support are used for bone augmentation of proposed implant placement sites. With the availability of partially purified protein mixture from developing teeth and growth factors from recombinant technology, a new era of tissue engineering whereby biologic mediators can be used for periodontal regeneration. The advantage of recombinant growth factors is this tissue engineering device is consistent in its regenerative capacity, and variations in regenerative response are due to individual healing response and/or poor surgical techniques. In this article, the authors review how tissue engineering has advanced and discuss its impact on the clinical management of both periodontal and osseous defects in preparation for implant placement. An understanding of these new tissue engineering techniques is essential for comprehending today's ever

  9. Chemically modified RNA activated matrices enhance bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Khorsand, Behnoush; Do, Anh-Vu; Hong, Liu; Dewerth, Alexander; Kormann, Michael; Ross, Ryan D; Sumner, D Rick; Allamargot, Chantal; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-11-28

    There exists a dire need for improved therapeutics to achieve predictable bone regeneration. Gene therapy using non-viral vectors that are safe and efficient at transfecting target cells is a promising approach to overcoming the drawbacks of protein delivery of growth factors. Here, we investigated the transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, osteogenic potential and in vivo bone regenerative capacity of chemically modified ribonucleic acid (cmRNA) (encoding BMP-2) complexed with polyethylenimine (PEI) and made comparisons with PEI complexed with conventional plasmid DNA (encoding BMP-2). The polyplexes were fabricated at an amine (N) to phosphate (P) ratio of 10 and characterized for transfection efficiency using human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The osteogenic potential of BMSCs treated with these polyplexes was validated by determining the expression of bone-specific genes, osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase as well as through the detection of bone matrix deposition. Using a calvarial bone defect model in rats, it was shown that PEI-cmRNA (encoding BMP-2)-activated matrices promoted significantly enhanced bone regeneration compared to PEI-plasmid DNA (BMP-2)-activated matrices. Our proof of concept study suggests that scaffolds loaded with non-viral vectors harboring cmRNA encoding osteogenic proteins may be a powerful tool for stimulating bone regeneration with significant potential for clinical translation.

  10. Chitosan-Based Matrices Prepared by Gamma Irradiation for Tissue Regeneration: Structural Properties vs. Preparation Method.

    PubMed

    Casimiro, Maria Helena; Lancastre, Joana J H; Rodrigues, Alexandra P; Gomes, Susana R; Rodrigues, Gabriela; Ferreira, Luís M

    2017-02-01

    In the last decade, new generations of biopolymer-based materials have attracted attention, aiming its application as scaffolds for tissue engineering. These engineered three-dimensional scaffolds are designed to improve or replace damaged, missing, or otherwise compromised tissues or organs. Despite the number of promising methods that can be used to generate 3D cell-instructive matrices, the innovative nature of the present work relies on the application of ionizing radiation technology to form and modify surfaces and matrices with advantage over more conventional technologies (room temperature reaction, absence of harmful initiators or solvents, high penetration through the bulk materials, etc.), and the possibility of preparation and sterilization in one single step. The current chapter summarizes the work done by the authors in the gamma radiation processing of biocompatible and biodegradable chitosan-based matrices for skin regeneration. Particular attention is given to the correlation between the different preparation conditions and the final polymeric matrices' properties. We therefore expect to demonstrate that instructive matrices produced and improved by radiation technology bring to the field of skin regenerative medicine a supplemental advantage over more conservative techniques.

  11. Evaluation of ceramic packed-rod regenerator matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, W. N.; Arenz, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    An extensive evaluation of a modified cryocooler with various regenerator matrices is reported. The matrices examined are 0.015 in. diam. Pb spheres and 0.008, 0.015, and 0.030 in. diam. rods of a 0.2% SnCl2 doped ceramic labelled LS-8A. Specific heat and thermal conductivity data on these rod materials are also reported. The chronic pulverization/dusting problem common to Pb spheres was investigated. During a 1000 hr life test with 0.0008 in. diam. rods there was no degradation of the refrigerator performance, and a subsequent examination of the rods themselves revealed no evidence of breakage or pulverization. The load temperature characteristics for the rod packed regenerators were inferior to that for the Pb spheres, the effect being to shift the Pb spheres load curve up in temperature. This temperature shift was 5.0, 7.4, and 11.6K for the 0.0008, 0.015, and 0.030 in. diam. rods, respectively.

  12. Decision Matrices: Tools to Enhance Middle School Engineering Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonczi, Amanda L.; Bergman, Brenda G.; Huntoon, Jackie; Allen, Robin; McIntyre, Barb; Turner, Sheri; Davis, Jen; Handler, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Decision matrices are valuable engineering tools. They allow engineers to objectively examine solution options. Decision matrices can be incorporated in K-12 classrooms to support authentic engineering instruction. In this article we provide examples of how decision matrices have been incorporated into 6th and 7th grade classrooms as part of an…

  13. Decision Matrices: Tools to Enhance Middle School Engineering Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonczi, Amanda L.; Bergman, Brenda G.; Huntoon, Jackie; Allen, Robin; McIntyre, Barb; Turner, Sheri; Davis, Jen; Handler, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Decision matrices are valuable engineering tools. They allow engineers to objectively examine solution options. Decision matrices can be incorporated in K-12 classrooms to support authentic engineering instruction. In this article we provide examples of how decision matrices have been incorporated into 6th and 7th grade classrooms as part of an…

  14. Decellularized matrices for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Francesco; Mirabella, Teodelinda

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of death in the Western world. The replacement of damaged vessels and valves has been practiced since the 1950’s. Synthetic grafts, usually made of bio-inert materials, are long-lasting and mechanically relevant, but fail when it comes to “biointegration”. Decellularized matrices, instead, can be considered biological grafts capable of stimulating in vivo migration and proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs), recruitment and differentiation of mural cells, finally, culminating in the formation of a biointegrated tissue. Decellularization protocols employ osmotic shock, ionic and non-ionic detergents, proteolitic digestions and DNase/RNase treatments; most of them effectively eliminate the cellular component, but show limitations in preserving the native structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this review, we examine the current state of the art relative to decellularization techniques and biological performance of decellularized heart, valves and big vessels. Furthermore, we focus on the relevance of ECM components, native and resulting from decellularization, in mediating in vivo host response and determining repair and regeneration, as opposed to graft corruption. PMID:24660110

  15. Regenerator elements for internal combustion Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Shinji; Isshiki, Naotsugu; Kikuchi, Susumu

    The temperature efficiency, flow resistance of materials, and their durability against corrosion and erosion of heat regenerator elements for the Stirling internal combusion engine are examined. The heat regenerator materials, stainless-steel wire mesh, compressed foam metals, silicon carbide, stuffed wire mesh, and their combined materials are tested, and their temperature efficiencies are measured by another two-cycle experimental engine model.

  16. Regenerator for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lewakowski, John J.

    1979-01-01

    A rotary disc-type counterflow regenerator for a gas turbine engine includes a disc-shaped ceramic core surrounded by a metal rim which carries a coaxial annular ring gear. Bonding of the metal rim to the ceramic core is accomplished by constructing the metal rim in three integral portions: a driving portion disposed adjacent the ceramic core which carries the ring gear, a bonding portion disposed further away from the ceramic core and which is bonded thereto by elastomeric pads, and a connecting portion connecting the bonding portion to the driving portion. The elastomeric pads are bonded to radially flexible mounts formed as part of the metal rim by circumferential slots in the transition portion and lateral slots extending from one end of the circumferential slots across the bonding portion of the rim.

  17. Matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in dental, oral and craniofacial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moioli, Eduardo K; Clark, Paul A; Xin, Xuejun; Lal, Shan; Mao, Jeremy J

    2007-05-30

    Current treatments for diseases and trauma of dental, oral and craniofacial (DOC) structures rely on durable materials such as amalgam and synthetic materials, or autologous tissue grafts. A paradigm shift has taken place to utilize tissue engineering and drug delivery approaches towards the regeneration of these structures. Several prototypes of DOC structures have been regenerated such as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle, cranial sutures, tooth structures and periodontium components. However, many challenges remain when taking in consideration the high demand for esthetics of DOC structures, the complex environment and yet minimal scar formation in the oral cavity, and the need for accommodating multiple tissue phenotypes. This review highlights recent advances in the regeneration of DOC structures, including the tooth, periodontium, TMJ, cranial sutures and implant dentistry, with specific emphasis on controlled release of signaling cues for stem cells, biomaterial matrices and scaffolds, and integrated tissue engineering approaches.

  18. Advanced Engineering Strategies for Periodontal Complex Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Lee, Yong-Moo; Seol, Yang-Jo

    2016-01-01

    The regeneration and integration of multiple tissue types is critical for efforts to restore the function of musculoskeletal complex. In particular, the neogenesis of periodontal constructs for systematic tooth-supporting functions is a current challenge due to micron-scaled tissue compartmentalization, oblique/perpendicular orientations of fibrous connective tissues to the tooth root surface and the orchestration of multiple regenerated tissues. Although there have been various biological and biochemical achievements, periodontal tissue regeneration remains limited and unpredictable. The purpose of this paper is to discuss current advanced engineering approaches for periodontal complex formations; computer-designed, customized scaffolding architectures; cell sheet technology-based multi-phasic approaches; and patient-specific constructs using bioresorbable polymeric material and 3-D printing technology for clinical application. The review covers various advanced technologies for periodontal complex regeneration and state-of-the-art therapeutic avenues in periodontal tissue engineering. PMID:28787856

  19. Heat engine regenerators: Research status and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    The rapidly oscillating, variable density flows of regenerative heat engines provide a class of poorly understood unsteady flow and heat transfer problems. These problems are not currently amenable to direct experimental resolution. Experiences in engine development and test programs and efforts to develop analysis tools point to the regenerator as a key area of insufficient understanding. Focusing on flow and heat transfer in regenerators, this report discusses similarity parameters for the flows and reviews the experimental data currently available for Stirling analysis. Then a number of experimental results are presented from recent fundamental fluid mechanical and thermal investigations that shed additional light on the functioning of heat engine regenerators. Suggestions are made for approaches for further measurement and analysis efforts.

  20. Imaging cardiac extracellular matrices: a blueprint for regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jangwook P.; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Lyons, Gary E.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    Once damaged, cardiac tissue does not readily repair and is therefore a primary target of regenerative therapies. One regenerative approach is the development of scaffolds that functionally mimic the cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) to deliver stem cells or cardiac precursor populations to the heart. Technological advances in micro/nanotechnology, stem cell biology, biomaterials and tissue decellularization have propelled this promising approach forward. Surprisingly, technological advances in optical imaging methods have not been fully utilized in the field of cardiac regeneration. Here, we describe and provide examples to demonstrate how advanced imaging techniques could revolutionize how ECM-mimicking cardiac tissues are informed and evaluated. PMID:22209562

  1. Composite Matrix Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Timothy R.

    1997-01-01

    This project concerns the design, fabrication and testing of carbon regenerators for use in Stirling power convertors. Radial fiber design with nonmetallic components offers a number of potential advantages over conventional steel regenerators: reduced conduction and pressure drop losses, and the capability for higher temperature, higher frequency operation. Diverse composite fabrication methods are explored and lessons learned are summarized. A pulsed single-blow test rig has been developed that has been used for generating thermal effectiveness data for different flow velocities. Carbon regenerators have been fabricated by carbon vapor infiltration of electroflocked preforms. Performance data in a small Stirling engine are obtained. Prototype regenerators designed for the BP-1000 power convertor were fabricated and delivered to NASA-Lewis.

  2. Effects of sudden expansion and contraction flow on pressure drops in the Stirling engine regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, K.; Yamashita, I.; Hirata, K.

    1998-07-01

    The flow losses in the regenerators greatly influence the performance of the Stirling engine. The losses mainly depend on fluid friction through the regenerator matrix, but are also generated in sudden expansion and contraction flow at the regenerator ends. The latter losses can't be neglected in the case of small area ratio (entrance area/cross-sectional area in regenerator). The pressure drops in regenerators are usually estimated assuming a uniform velocity distribution of working gas in the matrices. The estimation results, however, are generally smaller than practical data. The cross-sectional flow areas of the heater and cooler of typical Stirling engines are smaller than the cross- sectional area of the regenerator. The effects of the small flow passage on the velocity distribution of working fluid in the matrix, that is, a flow transition from tubes or channels to a regenerator matrix, can be often confirmed by the discolored matrix. Especially, the lack of a uniform distribution of velocity in the matrix causes increased flow loss and decreased thermal performance. So, it is necessary to understand the quantitative effects of the sudden change in flow area at the regenerator ends on the velocity distribution and pressure drop. In this paper, using matrices made of stacks of wire screens, the effects of the entrance and exit areas and the length of the regenerator on pressure drops are examined by an unidirectional steady flow apparatus. The experimental data are arranged in an empirical equation. The lack of a uniformity of velocity distribution is visualized using smoke-wire methods. The empirical equation presented is applied to the estimation of pressure loss in an actual engine regenerator. The applicability of the equation is examined by comparison of estimated value with engine data in pressure loss.

  3. Osteocalcin/fibronectin-functionalized collagen matrices for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, S G; Lee, D S; Lee, S; Jang, J-H

    2015-06-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein found in the extracellular matrix and is widely used to build scaffolds for biomedical applications which are the result of its biocompatibility and biodegradability. In the present study, we constructed a rhOCN/FNIII9-10 fusion protein and rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices and investigated the potential value for bone tissue engineering. In vitro studies carried out with preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed that rhOCN/FNIII9-10 fusion protein promoted cell adhesion and the mRNA levels of osteogenic markers including osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and collagen type I. In addition, rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices showed significant induction of the ALP activity more than rhFNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices or collagen matrices alone. These results suggested that rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices have potential for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Synthetic hydrogel matrices for guided bladder tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Adelöw, Catharina A M; Frey, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to provide a temporary scaffold for repair at the site of injury or disease that is able to support cell attachment and growth while synthesis of matrix proteins and reorganization take place. Although relatively successful, bladder tissue engineering suffers from the formation of scar tissue at the scaffold implant site partly due to the phenotypic switch of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from a quiescent contractile phenotype to a synthetic proliferative phenotype, known as myofibroblast. We hypothesize that culturing human SMCs in enzymatically degradable poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogels modified with integrin-binding peptides, and in co-culture with human urothelial cells (UCs), will offer some insight as to the required environment for their subsequent differentiation into quiescent SMCs. We have established protocols for isolation, culture, and characterization of human bladder UCs, SMCs, and fibroblasts and investigated co-culture conditions for SMCs and UCs. The optimal PEG hydrogel properties, promoting growth of these cells, have been investigated by varying the amounts of cell adhesion peptide, PEG, and crosslinker and examined using light and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the cell organization within and on top of gels 14 days post seeding has been examined by histology and immunohistochemistry. We have investigated a co-culture model for UCs and SMCs integrated into PEG hydrogels, mimicking a section of the bladder wall for reconstructive purposes that also could contribute to the understanding of the underlying basic mechanisms of SMC differentiation.

  5. Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Glenn; Buchanan, Fraser; Marsh, David; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Little, Uel; McCaigue, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal spontaneously. In the case of bone regeneration 3-D scaffolds are used as a framework to guide tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal cells obtained from the patient via biopsy are grown on biomaterials in vitro and then implanted at a desired site in the patient's body. Medical implants that encourage natural tissue regeneration are generally considered more desirable than metallic implants that may need to be removed by subsequent intervention. Numerous polymeric materials, from natural and artificial sources, are under investigation as substitutes for skeletal elements such as cartilage and bone. For bone regeneration, cells (obtained mainly from bone marrow aspirate or as primary cell outgrowths from bone biopsies) can be combined with biodegradable polymeric materials and/or ceramics and absorbed growth factors so that osteoinduction is facilitated together with osteoconduction; through the creation of bioactive rather than bioinert scaffold constructs. Relatively rapid biodegradation enables advantageous filling with natural tissue while loss of polymer strength before mass is disadvantageous. Innovative solutions are required to address this and other issues such as the biocompatibility of material surfaces and the use of appropriate scaffold topography and porosity to influence bone cell gene expression.

  6. Vascular regeneration: engineering the stem cell microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoming; Gerecht, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    Vascular diseases are a major threat to human health nowadays. While current treatments can cure some vascular diseases, their beneficial effects are only temporary; vascular regeneration holds the promise of permanent, effective treatments for many vascular diseases. Stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells can differentiate into vascular lineages and therefore have the potential to repair vascular systems. However, engineering appropriate microenvironments that will allow cell maturation and delivery remains the major challenge to the successful implementation of this treatment. This review introduces the cells that are being studied for vascular differentiation and regeneration; we then consider recent approaches to engineering microenvironments, including proper signaling cues and biodegradable scaffolds that will guide the development of these cells into vessels suitable for cell-based vascular therapy.

  7. Thermal Expansion Behavior of Hot-Pressed Engineered Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced engineered matrix composites (EMCs) require that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the engineered matrix (EM) matches those of the fiber reinforcements as closely as possible in order to reduce thermal compatibility strains during heating and cooling of the composites. The present paper proposes a general concept for designing suitable matrices for long fiber reinforced composites using a rule of mixtures (ROM) approach to minimize the global differences in the thermal expansion mismatches between the fibers and the engineered matrix. Proof-of-concept studies were conducted to demonstrate the validity of the concept.

  8. Adipose Tissue Engineering for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jennifer H.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Lee, Kyongbum; Marra, Kacey G.; Rubin, J. Peter; Yoo, James J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Current treatment modalities for soft tissue defects caused by various pathologies and trauma include autologous grafting and commercially available fillers. However, these treatment methods present a number of challenges and limitations, such as donor-site morbidity and volume loss over time. As such, improved therapeutic modalities need to be developed. Tissue engineering techniques offer novel solutions to these problems through development of bioactive tissue constructs that can regenerate adipose tissue in both structure and function. Recently, a number of studies have been designed to explore various methods to engineer human adipose tissue. This review will focus on these developments in the area of adipose tissue engineering for soft tissue replacement. The physiology of adipose tissue and current surgical therapies used to replace lost tissue volume, specifically in breast tissue, are introduced, and current biomaterials, cell sources, and tissue culture strategies are discussed. We discuss future areas of study in adipose tissue engineering. PMID:20166810

  9. Collagen functionalized bioactive nanofiber matrices for osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yixing; Ramos, Daisy; Lee, Paul; Liang, Danni; Yu, Xiaojun; Kumbar, Sangamesh G

    2014-02-01

    Scaffold architecture, surface topography, biochemical and mechanical cues have been shown to significantly improve cellular events and in vivo tissue regeneration. Specifically electrospun nanofiber matrices have gained tremendous interest due to their intrinsic structural resemblance to native tissue extracellular matrix (ECM). The present study reports on the electrospun nanofiber matrices of polycaprolactone (PCL)-chitosan (CS) blends and effect of type I collagen surface functionalization in regulating rat bone marrow derived stromal cells (rBMSCs) differentiation into osteogenic lineage. Collagen was covalently attached to blend nanofibers via carbodiimide (EDC) coupling. Bead-free smooth nanofibers (diameter-700-850 nm) obtained at the optimized conditions of polymer concentration and electrospinning parameters were used for the study. EDC collagen coupling resulted in 0.120+/-0.016 micro g of collagen immobilization onto a 1 cm2 area of the PCL/CS nanofibers, which was 2.6-folds higher than the amount of collagen that can be retained by physical adsorption. Significantly improved rBMSCs adhesion, spreading, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation was observed on the collagen functionalized COL-PCULCS nanofiber matrices as compared to control groups. Osteogenic phenotypic markers such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization were found to be significantly higher on COL-PCL/CS nanofiber matrices as compared to controls. Elevated gene expression profiles of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcin (0CN), osteopontin (OPN) and ALP further corroborate the osteoinductive nature of the collagen functionalized PCL/CS nanofiber matrices. These fiber matrices and modification techniques could be extended to other scaffold systems for tissue engineering applications.

  10. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yilgor, Caglar; Yilgor Huri, Pinar; Huri, Gazi

    2012-01-01

    Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration. PMID:22242032

  11. Novel nanostructured biodegradable polymer matrices fabricated by phase separation techniques for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S-H; Huang, S; Wang, Y-C; Kuo, Y-C

    2013-06-01

    Biomimetic nanostructures have a wide range of applications. In particular, biodegradable polymer nanostructures that mimic the subtleties of extracellular matrix may provide favorable cell interactions. In this study, a co-solvent system was developed to configure a thermodynamically metastable biodegradable polymer solution, from which novel nanostructured matrices subsequently formed via wet phase separation (quaternary) or a combination with thermally induced phase separation. Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured porous matrices were further fabricated by combination with particle-leaching (100-300μm glucose). The new co-solvent system may generate matrices with reproducible nanostructures from a variety of biodegradable polymers such as poly(d,l-lactide) (PLA), poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and PCL-based polyurethane. In vitro cell culture experiments were performed with mouse pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSC) to evaluate the osteoinductive potential of PLA nanostructures. The results showed that nanofibrous (<100nm) membranes promoted the bone-related marker gene expression and matrix mineralization of MC3T3-E1 at 14days. Nanofibrous 3D matrices seeded with hBM-MSC without osteogenic induction supplements demonstrated a 2.5-fold increase in bone matrix deposition vs. the conventional microporous matrices after 14 and 21days. Antimicrobial nanofibers were further obtained by plasma-assisted coating of chitosan on PLA nanofibers. This study reveals a platform for fabricating novel biodegradable nanofibrous architecture, with potential in tissue regeneration.

  12. Tissue Engineering Considerations in Dental Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nosrat, Ali; Kim, Jong Ryul; Verma, Prashant; S. Chand, Priya

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic procedure is introduced as a biologically based treatment for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. Successful clinical and radiographic outcomes following regenerative procedures have been reported in landmark case reports. Retrospective studies have shown that this conservative treatment allows for continued root development and increases success and survival rate of the treated teeth compared to other treatment options. Although the goal of treatment is regeneration of a functional pulp tissue, histological analyses show a different outcome. Developing predictable protocols would require the use of key elements for tissue engineering: stem cells, bioactive scaffolds, and growth factors. In this study we will review the evidence based steps and outcomes of regenerative endodontics. PMID:24396373

  13. Effects of regenerator size change on Stirling engine performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Hiratsuka, Y.; Miyabe, H.

    A systematic approach to the regenerator shape design is developed. The basic data reported with respect to the flow loss and heat transfer characteristics of the stacked wire gauzes, which have often been used as a regenerator matrix, are put in order by using the fixed dimensionless parameters. The effect of the regenerator shape on the engine performance is studied theoretically and experimentally. In the theoretical study, an equivalent indicated thermal efficiency is defined and the effects of size change are investigated by using a simple analysis. The effects of regenerator shape are experimentally evaluated by the engine performance.

  14. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer (sonoporation) in fibrin-based matrices: potential for use in tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Feichtinger, Georg A; Redl, Heinz; McHale, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that gene transfer into donor cells is an efficient and practical means of locally supplying requisite growth factors for applications in tissue regeneration. Here we describe, for the first time, an ultrasound-mediated system that can non-invasively facilitate gene transfer into cells entrapped within fibrin-based matrices. Since ultrasound-mediated gene transfer is enhanced using microbubbles, we compared the efficacy of neutral and cationic forms of these reagents on the ultrasound-stimulated gene transfer process in gel matrices. In doing so we demonstrated the beneficial effects associated with the use of cationic microbubble preparations that interact directly with cells and nucleic acid within matrices. In some cases, gene expression was increased two-fold in gel matrices when cationic microbubbles were compared with neutral microbubbles. In addition, incorporating collagen into fibrin gels yielded a 25-fold increase in gene expression after application of ultrasound to microbubble-containing matrices. We suggest that this novel system may facilitate non-invasive temporal and spatial control of gene transfer in gel-based matrices for the purposes of tissue regeneration.

  15. New strategies in kidney regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Uzarski, Joseph S; Xia, Yun; Belmonte, Juan C I; Wertheim, Jason A

    2014-07-01

    The severe shortage of suitable donor kidneys limits organ transplantation to a small fraction of patients suffering from end-stage renal failure. Engineering autologous kidney grafts on-demand would potentially alleviate this shortage, thereby reducing healthcare costs, improving quality of life, and increasing longevity for patients suffering from renal failure. Over the past 2 years, several studies have demonstrated that structurally intact extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds can be derived from human or animal kidneys through decellularization, a process in which detergent or enzyme solutions are perfused through the renal vasculature to remove the native cells. The future clinical paradigm would be to repopulate these decellularized kidney matrices with patient-derived renal stem cells to regenerate a functional kidney graft. Recent research aiming toward this goal has focused on the optimization of decellularization protocols, design of bioreactor systems to seed cells into appropriate compartments of the renal ECM to nurture their growth to restore kidney function, and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into renal progenitor lineages. New research efforts utilizing bio-mimetic perfusion bioreactor systems to repopulate decellularized kidney scaffolds, coupled with the differentiation of PSCs into renal progenitor cell populations, indicate substantial progress toward the ultimate goal of building a functional kidney graft on-demand.

  16. Matrices and Scaffolds for DNA Delivery in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    De Laporte, Laura; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to create functional tissue replacements, typically through creating a controlled environment that promotes and directs the differentiation of stem or progenitor cells, either endogenous or transplanted. Scaffolds serve a central role in many strategies by providing the means to control the local environment. Gene delivery from the scaffold represents a versatile approach to manipulating the local environment for directing cell function. Research at the interface of biomaterials, gene therapy, and drug delivery has identified several design parameters for the vector and the biomaterial scaffold that must be satisfied. Progress has been made towards achieving gene delivery within a tissue engineering scaffold, though the design principles for the materials and vectors that produce efficient delivery require further development. Nevertheless, these advances in obtaining transgene expression with the scaffold have created opportunities to develop greater control of either delivery or expression and to identify the best practices for promoting tissue formation. Strategies to achieve controlled localized expression within the tissue engineering scaffold will have broad application to the regeneration of many tissues, with great promise for clinical therapies. PMID:17512630

  17. Engineered stem cell niche matrices for rotator cuff tendon regenerative engineering

    PubMed Central

    Peach, M. Sean; Ramos, Daisy M.; Morozowich, Nicole L.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Doty, Steven B.; Allcock, Harry R.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears represent a large proportion of musculoskeletal injuries attended to at the clinic and thereby make RC repair surgeries one of the most widely performed musculoskeletal procedures. Despite the high incidence rate of RC tears, operative treatments have provided minimal functional gains and suffer from high re-tear rates. The hypocellular nature of tendon tissue poses a limited capacity for regeneration. In recent years, great strides have been made in the area of tendonogenesis and differentiation towards tendon cells due to a greater understanding of the tendon stem cell niche, development of advanced materials, improved scaffold fabrication techniques, and delineation of the phenotype development process. Though in vitro models for tendonogenesis have shown promising results, in vivo models have been less successful. The present work investigates structured matrices mimicking the tendon microenvironment as cell delivery vehicles in a rat RC tear model. RC injuries augmented with a matrix delivering rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) showed enhanced regeneration over suture repair alone or repair with augmentation, at 6 and 12-weeks post-surgery. The local delivery of rMSCs led to increased mechanical properties and improved tissue morphology. We hypothesize that the mesenchymal stem cells function to modulate the local immune and bioactivity environment through autocrine/paracrine and/or cell homing mechanisms. This study provides evidence for improved tendon healing with biomimetic matrices and delivered MSCs with the potential for translation to larger, clinical animal models. The enhanced regenerative healing response with stem cell delivering biomimetic matrices may represent a new treatment paradigm for massive RC tendon tears. PMID:28369135

  18. Engineered stem cell niche matrices for rotator cuff tendon regenerative engineering.

    PubMed

    Peach, M Sean; Ramos, Daisy M; James, Roshan; Morozowich, Nicole L; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Doty, Steven B; Allcock, Harry R; Kumbar, Sangamesh G; Laurencin, Cato T

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears represent a large proportion of musculoskeletal injuries attended to at the clinic and thereby make RC repair surgeries one of the most widely performed musculoskeletal procedures. Despite the high incidence rate of RC tears, operative treatments have provided minimal functional gains and suffer from high re-tear rates. The hypocellular nature of tendon tissue poses a limited capacity for regeneration. In recent years, great strides have been made in the area of tendonogenesis and differentiation towards tendon cells due to a greater understanding of the tendon stem cell niche, development of advanced materials, improved scaffold fabrication techniques, and delineation of the phenotype development process. Though in vitro models for tendonogenesis have shown promising results, in vivo models have been less successful. The present work investigates structured matrices mimicking the tendon microenvironment as cell delivery vehicles in a rat RC tear model. RC injuries augmented with a matrix delivering rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) showed enhanced regeneration over suture repair alone or repair with augmentation, at 6 and 12-weeks post-surgery. The local delivery of rMSCs led to increased mechanical properties and improved tissue morphology. We hypothesize that the mesenchymal stem cells function to modulate the local immune and bioactivity environment through autocrine/paracrine and/or cell homing mechanisms. This study provides evidence for improved tendon healing with biomimetic matrices and delivered MSCs with the potential for translation to larger, clinical animal models. The enhanced regenerative healing response with stem cell delivering biomimetic matrices may represent a new treatment paradigm for massive RC tendon tears.

  19. Pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George TJ

    2009-01-01

    Dental pulp tissue is vulnerable to infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection – commonly known as root-canal therapy. Regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. However, with the advent of the concept of modern tissue engineering and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the early attempts to regenerate pulp tissue and the current endeavor of pulp and dentin tissue engineering, and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:19761395

  20. Stem cells, tissue engineering and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Menicanin, D; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the clinical utility of stem cells in periodontal regeneration by reviewing relevant literature that assesses the periodontal-regenerative potential of stem cells. We consider and describe the main stem cell populations that have been utilized with regard to periodontal regeneration, including bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and the main dental-derived mesenchymal stem cell populations: periodontal ligament stem cells, dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla and dental follicle precursor cells. Research into the use of stem cells for tissue regeneration has the potential to significantly influence periodontal treatment strategies in the future.

  1. Ceramic regenerator systems development program. [for automobile gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines. The results of 19,600 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate showed minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 6935 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 3510 hours at 982 C. Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  2. Micropatterned dermal-epidermal regeneration matrices create functional niches that enhance epidermal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Clement, Amanda L; Moutinho, Thomas J; Pins, George D

    2013-12-01

    Although tissue engineered skin substitutes have demonstrated some clinical success for the treatment of chronic wounds such as diabetic and venous ulcers, persistent graft take and stability remain concerns. Current bilayered skin substitutes lack the characteristic microtopography of the dermal-epidermal junction that gives skin enhanced mechanical stability and creates cellular microniches that differentially promote keratinocyte function to form skin appendages and enhance wound healing. We developed a novel micropatterned dermal-epidermal regeneration matrix (μDERM) which incorporates this complex topography and substantially enhances epidermal morphology. Here, we describe the use of this three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro culture model to systematically evaluate different topographical geometries and to determine their relationship to keratinocyte function. We identified three distinct keratinocyte functional niches: the proliferative niche (narrow geometries), the basement membrane protein synthesis niche (wide geometries) and the putative keratinocyte stem cell niche (narrow geometries and corners). Specifically, epidermal thickness and keratinocyte proliferation is significantly (p<0.05) increased in 50 and 100 μm channels while laminin-332 deposition is significantly (p<0.05) increased in 400 μm channels compared to flat controls. Additionally, β1(bri)p63(+) keratinocytes, putative keratinocyte stem cells, preferentially cluster in channel geometries (similar to clustering observed in native skin) compared to a random distribution on flats. This study identifies specific target geometries to enhance skin regeneration and graft performance. Furthermore, these results suggest the importance of μDERM microtopography in designing the next generation of skin substitutes. Finally, we anticipate that 3-D organotypic cultures on μDERMS will provide a novel tissue engineered skin substitute for in vitro investigations of skin morphogenesis, wound healing and

  3. Laminin active peptide/agarose matrices as multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuji; Hozumi, Kentaro; Aso, Akihiro; Hotta, Atsushi; Toma, Kazunori; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Cell adhesive peptides derived from extracellular matrix components are potential candidates to afford bio-adhesiveness to cell culture scaffolds for tissue engineering. Previously, we covalently conjugated bioactive laminin peptides to polysaccharides, such as chitosan and alginate, and demonstrated their advantages as biomaterials. Here, we prepared functional polysaccharide matrices by mixing laminin active peptides and agarose gel. Several laminin peptide/agarose matrices showed cell attachment activity. In particular, peptide AG73 (RKRLQVQLSIRT)/agarose matrices promoted strong cell attachment and the cell behavior depended on the stiffness of agarose matrices. Fibroblasts formed spheroid structures on the soft AG73/agarose matrices while the cells formed a monolayer with elongated morphologies on the stiff matrices. On the stiff AG73/agarose matrices, neuronal cells extended neuritic processes and endothelial cells formed capillary-like networks. In addition, salivary gland cells formed acini-like structures on the soft matrices. These results suggest that the peptide/agarose matrices are useful for both two- and three-dimensional cell culture systems as a multifunctional biomaterial for tissue engineering.

  4. Engineering Bi-Layer Nanofibrous Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yiqian; Wang, Aijun; Patel, Shyam; Kurpinski, Kyle; Diao, Edward; Bao, Xuan; Kwong, George; Young, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma injuries often cause peripheral nerve damage and disability. A goal in neural tissue engineering is to develop synthetic nerve conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration having therapeutic efficacy comparable to that of autografts. Nanofibrous conduits with aligned nanofibers have been shown to promote nerve regeneration, but current fabrication methods rely on rolling a fibrous sheet into the shape of a conduit, which results in a graft with inconsistent size and a discontinuous joint or seam. In addition, the long-term effects of nanofibrous nerve conduits, in comparison with autografts, are still unknown. Here we developed a novel one-step electrospinning process and, for the first time, fabricated a seamless bi-layer nanofibrous nerve conduit: the luminal layer having longitudinally aligned nanofibers to promote nerve regeneration, and the outer layer having randomly organized nanofibers for mechanical support. Long-term in vivo studies demonstrated that bi-layer aligned nanofibrous nerve conduits were superior to random nanofibrous conduits and had comparable therapeutic effects to autografts for nerve regeneration. In summary, we showed that the engineered nanostructure had a significant impact on neural tissue regeneration in situ. The results from this study will also lead to the scalable fabrication of engineered nanofibrous nerve conduits with designed nanostructure. This technology platform can be combined with drug delivery and cell therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:21501089

  5. The Quest toward limb regeneration: a regenerative engineering approach

    PubMed Central

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Nair, Lakshmi S.

    2016-01-01

    The Holy Grail to address the clinical grand challenge of human limb loss is to develop innovative strategies to regrow the amputated limb. The remarkable advances in the scientific understanding of regeneration, stem cell science, material science and engineering, physics and novel surgical approaches in the past few decades have provided a regenerative tool box to face this grand challenge and address the limitations of human wound healing. Here we discuss the convergence approach put forward by the field of Regenerative Engineering to use the regenerative tool box to design and develop novel translational strategies to limb regeneration. PMID:27047679

  6. Tissue Engineering Strategies for Promoting Vascularized Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Almubarak, Sarah; Nethercott, Hubert; Freeberg, Marie; Beaudon, Caroline; Jha, Amit; Jackson, Wesley; Marcucio, Ralph; Miclau, Theodore; Healy, Kevin; Bahney, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on current tissue engineering strategies for promoting vascularized bone regeneration. We review the role of angiogenic growth factors in promoting vascularized bone regeneration and discuss the different therapeutic strategies for controlled/sustained growth factor delivery. Next, we address the therapeutic uses of stem cells in vascularized bone regeneration. Specifically, this review addresses the concept of co-culture using osteogenic and vasculogenic stem cells, and how adipose derived stem cells compare to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in the promotion of angiogenesis. We conclude this review with a discussion of a novel approach to bone regeneration through a cartilage intermediate, and discuss why it has the potential to be more effective than traditional bone grafting methods. PMID:26608518

  7. Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    An involute-foil regenerator was designed, microfabricated, and tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. The concept consists of stacked involute-foil nickel disks (see figure) microfabricated via a lithographic process. Test results yielded a performance of about twice that of the 90-percent random-fiber currently used in small Stirling converters. The segmented nature of the involute- foil in both the axial and radial directions increases the strength of the structure relative to wrapped foils. In addition, relative to random-fiber regenerators, the involute-foil has a reduced pressure drop, and is expected to be less susceptible to the release of metal fragments into the working space, thus increasing reliability. The prototype nickel involute-foil regenerator was adequate for testing in an engine with a 650 C hot-end temperature. This is lower than that required by larger engines, and high-temperature alloys are not suited for the lithographic microfabrication approach.

  8. Tissue engineering strategies to study cartilage development, degeneration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Coburn, Jeannine; Centola, Matteo; Murab, Sumit; Barbero, Andrea; Kaplan, David L; Martin, Ivan; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on the generation of grafts to repair cartilage defects due to traumatic injury and disease. However engineered cartilage tissues have also a strong scientific value as advanced 3D culture models. Here we first describe key aspects of embryonic chondrogenesis and possible cell sources/culture systems for in vitro cartilage generation. We then review how a tissue engineering approach has been and could be further exploited to investigate different aspects of cartilage development and degeneration. The generated knowledge is expected to inform new cartilage regeneration strategies, beyond a classical tissue engineering paradigm.

  9. Heart Regeneration with Engineered Myocardial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Murry, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and regenerative therapies that replace damaged myocardium could benefit millions of patients annually. The many cell types in the heart, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and cardiac fibroblasts, communicate via intercellular signaling and modulate each other’s function. Although much progress has been made in generating cells of the cardiovascular lineage from human pluripotent stem cells, a major challenge now is creating the tissue architecture to integrate a microvascular circulation and afferent arterioles into such an engineered tissue. Recent advances in cardiac and vascular tissue engineering will move us closer to the goal of generating functionally mature tissue. Using the biology of the myocardium as the foundation for designing engineered tissue and addressing the challenges to implantation and integration, we can bridge the gap from bench to bedside for a clinically tractable engineered cardiac tissue. PMID:24819474

  10. Advances in Skin Regeneration Using Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Vig, Komal; Chaudhari, Atul; Tripathi, Shweta; Dixit, Saurabh; Sahu, Rajnish; Pillai, Shreekumar; Dennis, Vida A.; Singh, Shree R.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineered skin substitutes for wound healing have evolved tremendously over the last couple of years. New advances have been made toward developing skin substitutes made up of artificial and natural materials. Engineered skin substitutes are developed from acellular materials or can be synthesized from autologous, allograft, xenogenic, or synthetic sources. Each of these engineered skin substitutes has their advantages and disadvantages. However, to this date, a complete functional skin substitute is not available, and research is continuing to develop a competent full thickness skin substitute product that can vascularize rapidly. There is also a need to redesign the currently available substitutes to make them user friendly, commercially affordable, and viable with longer shelf life. The present review focuses on providing an overview of advances in the field of tissue engineered skin substitute development, the availability of various types, and their application. PMID:28387714

  11. Periodontal regeneration: a challenge for the tissue engineer?

    PubMed

    Hughes, F J; Ghuman, M; Talal, A

    2010-12-01

    Periodontitis affects around 15 per cent of human adult populations. While periodontal treatment aimed at removing the bacterial cause of the disease is generally very successful, the ability predictably to regenerate the damaged tissues remains a major unmet objective for new treatment strategies. Existing treatments include the use of space-maintaining barrier membranes (guided tissue regeneration), use of graft materials, and application of bioactive molecules to induce regeneration, but their overall effects are relatively modest and restricted in application. The periodontal ligament is rich in mesenchymal stem cells, and the understanding of the signalling molecules that may regulate their differentation has increased enormously in recent years. Applying these principles for the development of new tissue engineering strategies for periodontal regeneration will require further work to determine the efficacy of current experimental preclinical treatments, including pharmacological application of growth factors such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or Wnts, use of autologous stem cell reimplantation strategies, and development of improved biomaterial scaffolds. This article describes the background to this problem, addresses the current status of periodontal regeneration, including the background biology, and discusses the potential for some of these experimental therapies to achieve the goal of clinically predictable periodontal regeneration.

  12. Gelatin Nanofiber Matrices Derived from Schiff Base Derivative for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Devina; James, Roshan; Shelke, Namdev B; Harmon, Matthew D; Brown, Justin L; Hussain, Fazle; Kumbar, Sangamesh G

    2015-11-01

    Electrospinning of water-soluble polymers and retaining their mechanical strength and bioactivity remain challenging. Volatile organic solvent soluble polymers and their derivatives are preferred for fabricating electrospun nanofibers. We report the synthesis and characterization of 2-nitrobenzyl-gelatin (N-Gelatin)--a novel gelatin Schiff base derivative--and the resulting electrospun nanofiber matrices. The 2-nitrobenzyl group is a photoactivatable-caged compound and can be cleaved from the gelatin nanofiber matrices following UV exposure. Such hydrophobic modification allowed the fabrication of gelatin and blend nanofibers with poly(caprolactone) (PCL) having significantly improved tensile properties. Neat gelatin and their PCL blend nanofiber matrices showed a modulus of 9.08 ± 1.5 MPa and 27.61 ± 4.3 MPa, respectively while the modified gelatin and their blends showed 15.63 ± 2.8 MPa and 24.47 ± 8.7 MPa, respectively. The characteristic infrared spectroscopy band for gelatin Schiff base derivative at 1560 cm(-1) disappeared following exposure to UV light indicating the regeneration of free NH2 group and gelatin. These nanofiber matrices supported cell attachment and proliferation with a well spread morphology as evidenced through cell proliferation assay and microscopic techniques. Modified gelatin fiber matrices showed a 73% enhanced cell attachment and proliferation rate compared to pure gelatin. This polymer modification methodology may offer a promising way to fabricate electrospun nanofiber matrices using a variety of proteins and peptides without loss of bioactivity and mechanical strength.

  13. Harnessing developmental processes for vascular engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-07-01

    The formation of vasculature is essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration. During development, the vasculature forms via the dual processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, and is regulated at multiple levels: from transcriptional hierarchies and protein interactions to inputs from the extracellular environment. Understanding how vascular formation is coordinated in vivo can offer valuable insights into engineering approaches for therapeutic vascularization and angiogenesis, whether by creating new vasculature in vitro or by stimulating neovascularization in vivo. In this Review, we will discuss how the process of vascular development can be used to guide approaches to engineering vasculature. Specifically, we will focus on some of the recently reported approaches to stimulate therapeutic angiogenesis by recreating the embryonic vascular microenvironment using biomaterials for vascular engineering and regeneration.

  14. Harnessing developmental processes for vascular engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The formation of vasculature is essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration. During development, the vasculature forms via the dual processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, and is regulated at multiple levels: from transcriptional hierarchies and protein interactions to inputs from the extracellular environment. Understanding how vascular formation is coordinated in vivo can offer valuable insights into engineering approaches for therapeutic vascularization and angiogenesis, whether by creating new vasculature in vitro or by stimulating neovascularization in vivo. In this Review, we will discuss how the process of vascular development can be used to guide approaches to engineering vasculature. Specifically, we will focus on some of the recently reported approaches to stimulate therapeutic angiogenesis by recreating the embryonic vascular microenvironment using biomaterials for vascular engineering and regeneration. PMID:25005471

  15. Tissue engineering: A new vista in periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Nymphea; Malik, Rajvir; Philips, Deepa

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a highly promising field of reconstructive biology that draws on recent advances in medicine, surgery, molecular and cellular biology, polymer chemistry, and physiology. The objective of using tissue engineering as therapeutic application has been to harness its ability to exploit selected and primed cells together with an appropriate mix of regulatory factors, to allow growth and specialization of cells and matrix. The authors reviewed controlled clinical trials which also included histological studies that evaluated the potential of tissue engineering as a clinical tool in regeneration. PubMed/MEDLINE databases were searched for studies up to and including June 2010 to identify appropriate articles. A comprehensive search was designed, and the articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal regeneration were included. Studies demonstrated that the periodontal regeneration with the use of combination of tissue engineered products with an osteoconductive matrix improve the beneficial effect of these materials by accelerating cellular in growth and revascularization of the wound site. Studies have suggested the use of rh Platelet-derived growth factor + beta tricalcium phosphate for regeneration of the periodontal attachment apparatus in combination with collagen membranes as an acceptable alternative to connective tissue graft for covering gingival recession defects. The studies concluded that growth factors promote true regeneration of the periodontal attachment apparatus and the use of combination protein therapeutics which is commercially available can provide more predictable, faster, less invasive, less traumatic, and efficient outcome for the patient. PMID:22368355

  16. Clinically applied models of bone regeneration in tissue engineering research.

    PubMed

    Einhorn, T A

    1999-10-01

    The development of new strategies for the engineering of bone regeneration requires appropriate model systems. Selection of the best model for testing a new technology depends on a host of factors. In general, the best model system is the one which most closely mimics the clinical situation for which this technology is being developed, will not heal spontaneously unless the technology is used, and will not heal when another technology is used if that technology is less advanced than the one being tested. For the purposes of developing new strategies for bone regeneration, systems which can be considered include those which model normal fracture healing, the segmental loss of bone or critical size defects, and various forms of nonunions in which fracture healing is perturbed either by mechanical, metabolic, or neurologic means. Careful experimental design and selection of the appropriate model system will enhance scientific efforts in bone regeneration research.

  17. Stem cells for tendon tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Jia-Lin; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2010-05-01

    Tendon injuries are common especially in sports activities, but tendon is a unique connective tissue with poor self-repair capability. With advances in stem cell biology, tissue engineering is becoming increasingly powerful for tissue regeneration. Stem cells with capacity of multipotency and self-renewal are an ideal cell source for tissue engineering. This review focus on discussing the potential strategies including inductive growth factors, bio-scaffolds, mechanical stimulation, genetic modification and co-culture techniques to direct tendon-lineage differentiation of stem cells for complete tendon regeneration. Attempting to use embryonic stem cells as seed cells for tendon tissue engineering have achieved encouraging results. The combination of chemical and physical signals in stem cell microenvironment could be regulated to induce differentiation of the embryonic stem cells into tendon. We summarize fundamental questions, as well as future directions in tendon biology and tissue engineering. Multifaceted technologies are increasingly required to control stem cell differentiation, to develop novel stem cell-based therapy, and, ultimately, to achieve more effective repair or regeneration of injured tendons.

  18. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM. During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90 percent random fiber currently used in small approx.100 W Stirling space-power convertors-in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50 to 100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6 to 9 percent; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to 1200 C

  19. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terry; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Wood, Gary; hide

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM (electric discharge machining). During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90% random fiber currently used in small 100 W Stirling space-power convertors in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50-100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6-9%; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to

  20. Mathematical modeling in wound healing, bone regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Geris, Liesbet; Gerisch, Alf; Schugart, Richard C

    2010-12-01

    The processes of wound healing and bone regeneration and problems in tissue engineering have been an active area for mathematical modeling in the last decade. Here we review a selection of recent models which aim at deriving strategies for improved healing. In wound healing, the models have particularly focused on the inflammatory response in order to improve the healing of chronic wound. For bone regeneration, the mathematical models have been applied to design optimal and new treatment strategies for normal and specific cases of impaired fracture healing. For the field of tissue engineering, we focus on mathematical models that analyze the interplay between cells and their biochemical cues within the scaffold to ensure optimal nutrient transport and maximal tissue production. Finally, we briefly comment on numerical issues arising from simulations of these mathematical models.

  1. Periodontal tissue engineering and regeneration: current approaches and expanding opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Jin, Yan

    2010-04-01

    The management of periodontal tissue defects that result from periodontitis represents a medical and socioeconomic challenge. Concerted efforts have been and still are being made to accelerate and augment periodontal tissue and bone regeneration, including a range of regenerative surgical procedures, the development of a variety of grafting materials, and the use of recombinant growth factors. More recently, tissue-engineering strategies, including new cell- and/or matrix-based dimensions, are also being developed, analyzed, and employed for periodontal regenerative therapies. Tissue engineering in periodontology applies the principles of engineering and life sciences toward the development of biological techniques that can restore lost alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum. It is based on an understanding of the role of periodontal formation and aims to grow new functional tissues rather than to build new replacements of periodontium. Although tissue engineering has merged to create more opportunities for predictable and optimal periodontal tissue regeneration, the technique and design for preclinical and clinical studies remain in their early stages. To date, the reconstruction of small- to moderate-sized periodontal bone defects using engineered cell-scaffold constructs is technically feasible, and some of the currently developed concepts may represent alternatives for certain ideal clinical scenarios. However, the predictable reconstruction of the normal structure and functionality of a tooth-supporting apparatus remains challenging. This review summarizes current regenerative procedures for periodontal healing and regeneration and explores their progress and difficulties in clinical practice, with particular emphasis placed upon current challenges and future possibilities associated with tissue-engineering strategies in periodontal regenerative medicine.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of CaO-loaded electrospun matrices for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Pankajakshan, Divya; Albuquerque, Maria T P; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Piva, Evandro; Gregory, Richard L; Bottino, Marco C

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to synthesize and characterize biodegradable polymer-based matrices loaded with CaO nanoparticles for osteomyelitis treatment and bone tissue engineering. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and PCL/gelatin (1:1, w/w) solutions containing CaO nanoparticles were electrospun into fibrous matrices. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), contact angle (CA), tensile testing, and antibacterial activity (agar diffusion assay) against Staphylococcus aureus were performed. Osteoprecursor cell (MC3T3-E1) response (i.e., viability and alkaline phosphatase expression/ALP) and infiltration into the matrices were evaluated. CaO nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into the fibers, with the median fiber diameter decreasing after CaO incorporation. The CA decreased with the addition of CaO, and the presence of gelatin made the matrix very hydrophilic (CA = 0°). Increasing CaO concentrations progressively reduced the mechanical properties (p ≤ 0.030). CaO-loaded matrices did not display consistent antibacterial activity. MC3T3-E1 cell viability demonstrated the highest levels for CaO-loaded matrices containing gelatin after 7 days in culture. An increased ALP expression was consistently seen for PCL/CaO matrices when compared to PCL and gelatin-containing counterparts. Despite inconsistent antibacterial activity, CaO nanoparticles can be effectively loaded into PCL or PCL/gelatin fibers without negatively affecting the overall performance of the matrices. More importantly, CaO incorporation enhanced cell viability as well as differentiation capacity, as demonstrated by an increased ALP expression. CaO-loaded electrospun matrices show potential for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  3. Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Partridge Jr, William P; Parks, II, James E; Norman, Kevin M; Huff, Shean P; Chambon, Paul H; Thomas, John F

    2010-01-01

    Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H2, CO, NH3, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.

  4. Optimizing seeding and culture methods to engineer smooth muscle tissue on biodegradable polymer matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, B S; Putnam, A J; Kulik, T J; Mooney, D J

    1998-01-05

    The engineering of functional smooth muscle (SM) tissue is critical if one hopes to successfully replace the large number of tissues containing an SM component with engineered equivalents. This study reports on the effects of SM cell (SMC) seeding and culture conditions on the cellularity and composition of SM tissues engineered using biodegradable matrices (5 x 5 mm, 2-mm thick) of polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers. Cells were seeded by injecting a cell suspension into polymer matrices in tissue culture dishes (static seeding), by stirring polymer matrices and a cell suspension in spinner flasks (stirred seeding), or by agitating polymer matrices and a cell suspension in tubes with an orbital shaker (agitated seeding). The density of SMCs adherent to these matrices was a function of cell concentration in the seeding solution, but under all conditions a larger number (approximately 1 order of magnitude) and more uniform distribution of SMCs adherent to the matrices were obtained with dynamic versus static seeding methods. The dynamic seeding methods, as compared to the static method, also ultimately resulted in new tissues that had a higher cellularity, more uniform cell distribution, and greater elastin deposition. The effects of culture conditions were next studied by culturing cell-polymer constructs in a stirred bioreactor versus static culture conditions. The stirred culture of SMC-seeded polymer matrices resulted in tissues with a cell density of 6.4 +/- 0.8 x 10(8) cells/cm3 after 5 weeks, compared to 2.0 +/- 1.1 x 10(8) cells/cm3 with static culture. The elastin and collagen synthesis rates and deposition within the engineered tissues were also increased by culture in the bioreactors. The elastin content after 5-week culture in the stirred bioreactor was 24 +/- 3%, and both the elastin content and the cellularity of these tissues are comparable to those of native SM tissue. New tissues were also created in vivo when dynamically seeded polymer matrices were

  5. Tissue engineering strategies for the regeneration of orthopedic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Helen H; Subramony, Siddarth D; Boushell, Margaret K; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-06-01

    A major focus in the field of orthopedic tissue engineering is the development of tissue engineered bone and soft tissue grafts with biomimetic functionality to allow for their translation to the clinical setting. One of the most significant challenges of this endeavor is promoting the biological fixation of these grafts with each other as well as the implant site. Such fixation requires strategic biomimicry to be incorporated into the scaffold design in order to re-establish the critical structure-function relationship of the native soft tissue-to-bone interface. The integration of distinct tissue types (e.g. bone and soft tissues such as cartilage, ligaments, or tendons), necessitates a multi-phased or stratified scaffold with distinct yet continuous tissue regions accompanied by a gradient of mechanical properties. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies for regenerating common tissue-to-tissue interfaces (ligament-to-bone, tendon-to-bone, or cartilage-to-bone), and the strategic biomimicry implemented in stratified scaffold design for multi-tissue regeneration. Potential challenges and future directions in this emerging field will also be presented. It is anticipated that interface tissue engineering will enable integrative soft tissue repair, and will be instrumental for the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems with biomimetic complexity and functionality.

  6. Tissue Engineering Strategies for the Regeneration of Orthopaedic Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Helen H.; Subramony, Siddarth D.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2013-01-01

    A major focus in the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is the development of tissue engineered bone and soft tissue grafts with biomimetic functionality to allow for their translation to the clinical setting. One of the most significant challenges of this endeavor is promoting the biological fixation of these grafts with each other as well as the implant site. Such fixation requires strategic biomimicry to be incorporated into the scaffold design in order to re-establish the critical structure-function relationship of the native soft tissue-to-bone interface. The integration of distinct tissue types (e.g. bone and soft tissues such as cartilage, ligaments, or tendons), requires a multi-phased or stratified scaffold with distinct yet continuous tissue regions accompanied by a gradient of mechanical properties that mimics that of the multi-tissue transition between bone and soft tissues. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies for regenerating common tissue-to-tissue interfaces (ligament-to-bone, tendon-to-bone or cartilage-to-bone), and the strategic biomimicry implemented in stratified scaffold design for multi-tissue regeneration. Potential challenges and future directions in this emerging field will also be presented. It is anticipated that interface tissue engineering will enable integrative soft tissue repair, and will be instrumental for the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems with biomimetic complexity and functionality. PMID:20422291

  7. Three Conceptions of Thermodynamics: Technical Matrices in Science and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Frederik V.; Rump, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    Introductory thermodynamics is a topic which is covered in a wide variety of science and engineering educations. However, very different teaching traditions have evolved within different scientific specialties. In this study we examine three courses in introductory thermodynamics within three different scientific specialties: physics, chemical…

  8. Three Conceptions of Thermodynamics: Technical Matrices in Science and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Frederik V.; Rump, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    Introductory thermodynamics is a topic which is covered in a wide variety of science and engineering educations. However, very different teaching traditions have evolved within different scientific specialties. In this study we examine three courses in introductory thermodynamics within three different scientific specialties: physics, chemical…

  9. Synthetic extracellular matrices for in situ tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Alison B; Weber, Franz E; Schmoekel, Hugo G; Müller, Ralph; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2004-04-05

    Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix play important roles in guiding tissue morphogenesis. The matrix stimulates cells to influence such things as differentiation and the cells actively remodel the matrix via local proteolytic activity. We have designed synthetic hydrogel networks that participate in this interplay: They signal cells via bound adhesion and growth factors, and they also respond to the remodeling influence of cell-associated proteases. Poly(ethylene glycol)-bis-vinylsulfone was crosslinked by a Michael-type addition reaction with a peptide containing three cysteine residues, the peptide sequence being cleavable between each cysteine residue by the cell-associated protease plasmin. Cells were able to invade gel networks that contained adhesion peptides and were crosslinked by plasmin-sensitive peptides, while materials lacking either of these two characteristics resisted cell infiltration. Incorporated bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) induced bone healing in a rat model in materials that were both adhesive and plasmin-sensitive, while materials lacking plasmin sensitivity resisted formation of bone within the material. Furthermore, when a heparin bridge was incorporated as a BMP-2 affinity site, mimicking yet another characteristic of the extracellular matrix, statistically improved bone regeneration was observed.

  10. Harnessing wound healing and regeneration for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, A D; Ferguson, M W J

    2005-04-01

    Biomedical science has made major advances in understanding how cells grow into functioning tissue and the signalling mechanisms used to achieve this are slowly being dissected. Tissue engineering is the application of that knowledge to the building or repairing of organs, including skin, the largest organ in the body. Generally, engineered tissue is a combination of living cells and a supporting matrix. Besides serving as burn coverings, engineered skin substitutes can help patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Today, most of these ulcers are treated with an approach that includes antibiotics, glucose control, special shoes and frequent cleaning and bandaging. The results of such treatments are often disappointing and ineffectual, and scarring remains a major problem, mechanically, cosmetically and psychologically. Within our group we are attempting to address this by investigating novel approaches to skin tissue engineering. We are identifying novel therapeutic manipulations to improve the degree of integration between a tissue engineered dermal construct and the host by both molecular manipulation of growth factors but also by understanding and harnessing mechanisms of regenerative biology. For the purpose of this summary, we will concentrate primarily on the latter of these two approaches in that we have identified a novel mouse mutant that completely and perfectly regenerates skin and cartilaginous components following ear injury. This experimental animal will allow us to characterize not only novel genes involved in the regeneration process but also to utilize cells from such animals in artificial skin equivalents to assess their behaviour compared with normal cells. This approach should allow us to create a tissue-engineered substitute, which more closely resembles the normal regional microanatomy and physiology of the skin, allowing better integration to the host with minimal or no scarring.

  11. Thermal compression and characterization of three-dimensional nonwoven PET matrices as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Ma, T; Yang, S T; Kniss, D A

    2001-03-01

    Nonwoven fibrous matrices have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering, and modification of microstructure of these matrices is needed to organize cells in three-dimensional space with spatially balanced proliferation and differentiation required for functional tissue development. The method of thermal compression of nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabrics was developed and key parameters of temperature, pressure, and compression duration were evaluated in this study. The permanent deformation was obtained at elevated temperature under pressure and the viscoelastic compressional behaviors were observed, characterized by a distinct apparent modulus change in glass transition temperature region. A liquid extrusion method was further employed to analyze both pore size and its distribution for matrices with porosity ranging from 84 to 93%. It is also found that a more uniformly distributed pore size was resulted from thermal compression and the isotropic nature of nonwoven fabrics was preserved because of the proportional reduction of the pore by compression. The thermally compressed fabric matrices with two different pore sizes (15 and 20 microm in pore radius) were used to culture human trophoblast ED27 and NIH 3T3 cells. It was found that cells cultured in the different pore-size PET matrices had different cell spatial organization and proliferation rates. The smaller pores in the matrix allowed cells to spread better and proliferate faster, while cells in the larger pores tended to form large aggregates and had lower proliferation rate. The thermal compression technique also can be applied to other synthetic fibrous matrices including biodegradable polymers used in tissue engineering to modify the microstructure according to their viscoelastic properties.

  12. Engineering Pre-vascularized Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Barabaschi, Giada D G; Manoharan, Vijayan; Li, Qing; Bertassoni, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Survival of functional tissue constructs of clinically relevant size depends on the formation of an organized and uniformly distributed network of blood vessels and capillaries. The lack of such vasculature leads to spatio-temporal gradients in oxygen, nutrients and accumulation of waste products inside engineered tissue constructs resulting in negative biological events at the core of the scaffold. Unavailability of a well-defined vasculature also results in ineffective integration of scaffolds to the host vasculature upon implantation. Arguably, one of the greatest challenges in engineering clinically relevant bone substitutes, therefore, has been the development of vascularized bone scaffolds. Various approaches ranging from peptide and growth factor functionalized biomaterials to hyper-porous scaffolds have been proposed to address this problem with reasonable success. An emerging alternative to address this challenge has been the fabrication of pre-vascularized scaffolds by taking advantage of biomanufacturing techniques, such as soft- and photo-lithography or 3D bioprinting, and cell-based approaches, where functional capillaries are engineered in cell-laden scaffolds prior to implantation. These strategies seek to engineer pre-vascularized tissues in vitro, allowing for improved anastomosis with the host vasculature upon implantation, while also improving cell viability and tissue development in vitro. This book chapter provides an overview of recent methods to engineer pre-vascularized scaffolds for bone regeneration. We first review the development of functional blood capillaries in bony structures and discuss controlled delivery of growth factors, co-culture systems, and on-chip studies to engineer vascularized cell-laden biomaterials. Lastly, we review recent studies using microfabrication techniques and 3D printing to engineer pre-vascularized scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  13. Endochondral Priming: A Developmental Engineering Strategy for Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Fiona E; McNamara, Laoise M

    2017-04-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have significant potential to treat bone pathologies by exploiting the capacity for bone progenitors to grow and produce tissue constituents under specific biochemical and physical conditions. However, conventional tissue engineering approaches, which combine stem cells with biomaterial scaffolds, are limited as the constructs often degrade, due to a lack of vascularization, and lack the mechanical integrity to fulfill load bearing functions, and as such are not yet widely used for clinical treatment of large bone defects. Recent studies have proposed that in vitro tissue engineering approaches should strive to simulate in vivo bone developmental processes and, thereby, imitate natural factors governing cell differentiation and matrix production, following the paradigm recently defined as "developmental engineering." Although developmental engineering strategies have been recently developed that mimic specific aspects of the endochondral ossification bone formation process, these findings are not widely understood. Moreover, a critical comparison of these approaches to standard biomaterial-based bone tissue engineering has not yet been undertaken. For that reason, this article presents noteworthy experimental findings from researchers focusing on developing an endochondral-based developmental engineering strategy for bone tissue regeneration. These studies have established that in vitro approaches, which mimic certain aspects of the endochondral ossification process, namely the formation of the cartilage template and the vascularization of the cartilage template, can promote mineralization and vascularization to a certain extent both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, this article outlines specific experimental challenges that must be overcome to further exploit the biology of endochondral ossification and provide a tissue engineering construct for clinical treatment of large bone/nonunion defects and obviate the need for

  14. Stem Cell Sources for Vascular Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the stem cell sources with the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering and to promote vascular regeneration. The first clinical studies using tissue-engineered vascular grafts are already under way, supporting the potential of this technology in the treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases. Despite progress in engineering biomaterials with the appropriate mechanical properties and biological cues as well as bioreactors for generating the correct tissue microenvironment, the source of cells that make up the vascular tissues remains a major challenge for tissue engineers and physicians. Mature cells from the tissue of origin may be difficult to obtain and suffer from limited proliferative capacity, which may further decline as a function of donor age. On the other hand, multipotent and pluripotent stem cells have great potential to provide large numbers of autologous cells with a great differentiation capacity. Here, we discuss the adult multipotent as well as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, their differentiation potential toward vascular lineages, and their use in engineering functional and implantable vascular tissues. We also discuss the associated challenges that need to be addressed in order to facilitate the transition of this technology from the bench to the bedside. PMID:22571595

  15. Neural tissue engineering options for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Williams, David F

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs) have emerged as a potential alternative to autologous nerve grafts, the gold standard for peripheral nerve repair. Typically, TENGs are composed of a biomaterial-based template that incorporates biochemical cues. A number of TENGs have been used experimentally to bridge long peripheral nerve gaps in various animal models, where the desired outcome is nerve tissue regeneration and functional recovery. So far, the translation of TENGs to the clinic for use in humans has met with a certain degree of success. In order to optimize the TENG design and further approach the matching of TENGs with autologous nerve grafts, many new cues, beyond the traditional ones, will have to be integrated into TENGs. Furthermore, there is a strong requirement for monitoring the real-time dynamic information related to the construction of TENGs. The aim of this opinion paper is to specifically and critically describe the latest advances in the field of neural tissue engineering for peripheral nerve regeneration. Here we delineate new attempts in the design of template (or scaffold) materials, especially in the context of biocompatibility, the choice and handling of support cells, and growth factor release systems. We further discuss the significance of RNAi for peripheral nerve regeneration, anticipate the potential application of RNAi reagents for TENGs, and speculate on the possible contributions of additional elements, including angiogenesis, electrical stimulation, molecular inflammatory mediators, bioactive peptides, antioxidant reagents, and cultured biological constructs, to TENGs. Finally, we consider that a diverse array of physicochemical and biological cues must be orchestrated within a TENG to create a self-consistent coordinated system with a close proximity to the regenerative microenvironment of the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Material-based engineering strategies for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Marion, Mieke H van; Bax, Noortje A M; Spreeuwel, Ariane C C van; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is composed of muscle and non-muscle cells, surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) and spatially organized into a complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture to allow for coordinated contraction and electrical pulse propagation. Despite emerging evidence for cardiomyocyte turnover in mammalian hearts, the regenerative capacity of human cardiac tissue is insufficient to recover from damage, e.g. resulting from myocardial infarction (MI). Instead, the heart 'repairs' lost or injured tissue by ongoing synthesis and remodeling of scar tissue. Conventional therapies and timely (stem) cell delivery to the injured tissue markedly improve short-term function and remodeling, but do not attenuate later stage adverse remodeling, leading to functional deterioration and eventually failure of the heart. Material-based therapies have been successfully used to mechanically support and constrain the post-MI failing heart, preventing it from further remodeling and dilation. When designed to deliver the right microenvironment for endogenous or exogenous cells, as well as the mechanical and topological cues to guide neo-tissue formation, material-based therapies may even reverse remodeling and boost cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the up-to-date status of material-based cardiac regeneration with special emphasis on 1) the use of bare biomaterials to deliver passive constraints that unload the heart, 2) the use of materials and cells to create engineered cardiac constructs for replacement, support, or regeneration of damaged myocardium, and 3) the development of bio-inspired and bioactive materials that aim to enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart. As the therapies should function in the infarcted heart, the damaged host environment and engineered in vitro test systems that mimic this environment, are reviewed as well.

  17. Nerve regeneration with aid of nanotechnology and cellular engineering.

    PubMed

    Sedaghati, Tina; Yang, Shi Yu; Mosahebi, Afshin; Alavijeh, Mohammad S; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    Repairing nerve defects with large gaps remains one of the most operative challenges for surgeons. Incomplete recovery from peripheral nerve injuries can produce a diversity of negative outcomes, including numbness, impairment of sensory or motor function, possibility of developing chronic pain, and devastating permanent disability. In the last few years, numerous microsurgical techniques, such as coaptation, nerve autograft, and different biological or polymeric nerve conduits, have been developed to reconstruct a long segment of damaged peripheral nerve. A few of these techniques are promising and have become popular among surgeons. Advancements in the field of tissue engineering have led to development of synthetic nerve conduits as an alternative for the nerve autograft technique, which is the current practice to bridge nerve defects with gaps larger than 30 mm. However, to date, despite significant progress in this field, no material has been found to be an ideal alternative to the nerve autograft. This article briefly reviews major up-to-date published studies using different materials as an alternative to the nerve autograft to bridge peripheral nerve gaps in an attempt to assess their ability to support and enhance nerve regeneration and their prospective drawbacks, and also highlights the promising hope for nerve regeneration with the next generation of nerve conduits, which has been significantly enhanced with the tissue engineering approach, especially with the aid of nanotechnology in development of the three-dimensional scaffold. The goal is to determine potential alternatives for nerve regeneration and repair that are simply and directly applicable in clinical conditions. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Bone tissue engineering and regeneration: from discovery to the clinic--an overview.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Regis J; Mao, Jeremy

    2011-12-01

    A National Institutes of Health sponsored workshop "Bone Tissue Engineering and Regeneration: From Discovery to the Clinic" gathered thought leaders from medicine, science, and industry to determine the state of art in the field and to define the barriers to translating new technologies to novel therapies to treat bone defects. Tissue engineering holds enormous promise to improve human health through prevention of disease and the restoration of healthy tissue functions. Bone tissue engineering, similar to that for other tissues and organs, requires integration of multiple disciplines such as cell biology, stem cells, developmental and molecular biology, biomechanics, biomaterials science, and immunology and transplantation science. Although each of the research areas has undergone enormous advances in last decade, the translation to clinical care and the development of tissue engineering composites to replace human tissues has been limited. Bone, similar to other tissue and organs, has complex structure and functions and requires exquisite interactions between cells, matrices, biomechanical forces, and gene and protein regulatory factors for sustained function. The process of engineering bone, thus, requires a comprehensive approach with broad expertise. Although in vitro and preclinical animal studies have been pursued with a large and diverse collection of scaffolds, cells, and biomolecules, the field of bone tissue engineering remains fragmented up to the point that a clear translational roadmap has yet to emerge. Translation is particularly important for unmet clinical needs such as large segmental defects and medically compromised conditions such as tumor removal and infection sites. Collectively, manuscripts in this volume provide luminary examples toward identification of barriers and strategies for translation of fundamental discoveries into clinical therapeutics. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  19. Extracellular matrices as advanced scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Piterina, A V; Callanan, A; Davis, L; Meaney, C; Walsh, M; McGloughlin, T M

    2009-01-01

    An alternative non-vascular extracellular material was obtained by decellularisation of porcine urinary bladder and examined for its potential as scaffold for vascular tissue engineering. Analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSCM) showed a porous interconnective microarchitecture, an abundance of well preserved fibers on the abluminal side and a micropatterned flat luminal surface. Uniaxial tensile testing revealed a strength of 1.9+/-0.3 MPa for the rehydrated material in a phosphate buffered saline medium for the ECM-UBM sheet and these results comparable to those of native artery of a middle aged human. Multilamination of the UBM increases the tensile properties in general (9+/-0.45 MPa for 2 layer, 30+/-0.6 MPa for 4 layers construct), with no effect on elongation capacities (38-40%) of the material. Contact-angle measurements indicated that the ECM-UBM surface exhibited a hydrophylic characteristic and better wettability than any vascular synthetic materials. Comparison of the initial adhesion in the multiplayer ECM constructs was evaluated and was found not to be altered by the preparation. The HAECs and HSMC shown an excellent adherence, spread and proliferation on the ECM-UBM material with the preservation of the cell phenotype. The level of MMP-1 and MMP-9 produced by endothelial cells was evaluated in this study and provides some data on the remodelling capacity of the scaffold. Vascular cell seeded-UBM constructs may also provide a suitable and affordable in vitro model for cell-physiology and drug development studies, which may elucidate to the mechanisms of vascular disease formation, and its prevention and treatment.

  20. The rheological properties of silated hydroxypropylmethylcellulose tissue engineering matrices.

    PubMed

    Fatimi, Ahmed; Tassin, Jean François; Quillard, Sophie; Axelos, Monique A V; Weiss, Pierre

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the rheological properties of silated hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC-Si) used in biomaterials domain as a three-dimensional synthetic matrix for tissue engineering. The HPMC-Si is an HPMC grafted with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). HPMC and HPMC-Si were studied. It is shown that although silanization reduces the hydrodynamic volume in dilute solution, it does not affect significantly the rheological behavior of the concentrated solutions. The HPMC-Si viscous solution (pH 12.8) cross-links by decreasing the pH using an acid buffer, since HPMC-Si solution transforms into an elastic state. The kinetics of cross-linking and final elastic properties is influenced by several parameters such as polymer concentration, pH and temperature. pH and temperature play an important role in the silanol condensation, mainly responsible for network formation. The study of the gelation process revealed the dependence of the final concentration of HPMC-Si hydrogel on cross-linking kinetics and viscoelastic properties. The percolation theory was applied to determine gel point and to discuss the dependence of storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli on frequency. Results showed that both G' and G'' exhibit a power-law behavior with an exponent (0.68) which extends over the entire frequency range. This method is the only one to characterize the time where a liquid viscous phase shifts to hydrogel with elastic properties. In this case it was about 23 min for a final pH of 7.4.

  1. Cell-derived matrices for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications1

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Lindsay E.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    The development and application of decellularized extracellular matrices (ECM) has grown rapidly in the fields of cell biology, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in recent years. Similar to decellularized tissues and whole organs, cell-derived matrices (CDMs) represent bioactive, biocompatible materials consisting of a complex assembly of fibrillar proteins, matrix macromolecules and associated growth factors that often recapitulate, at least to some extent, the composition and organization of native ECM microenvironments. The unique ability to engineer CDMs de novo based on cell source and culture methods makes them an attractive alternative to conventional allogeneic and xenogeneic tissue-derived matrices that are currently harvested from cadaveric sources, suffer from inherent heterogeneity, and have limited ability for customization. Although CDMs have been investigated for a number of biomedical applications, including adhesive cell culture substrates, synthetic scaffold coatings, and tissue engineered products, such as heart valves and vascular grafts, the state of the field is still at a relatively nascent stage of development. In this review, we provide an overview of the various applications of CDM and discuss successes to date, current limitations and future directions. PMID:25530850

  2. Role of morphogenetic proteins in skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reddi, A H

    1998-03-01

    Morphogenesis is the developmental cascade of pattern formation and body plan establishment, culminating in the adult form. It has formed the basis for the emerging discipline of tissue engineering, which uses principles of molecular developmental biology and morphogenesis gleaned through studies on inductive signals, responding stem cells, and the extracellular matrix to design and construct spare parts that restore function to the human body. Among the many organs in the body, bone has considerable powers for regeneration and is a prototype model for tissue engineering. Implantation of demineralized bone matrix into subcutaneous sites results in local bone induction. This model mimics sequential limb morphogenesis and has permitted the isolation of bone morphogens, such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), from demineralized adult bone matrix. BMPs initiate, promote, and maintain chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, but are also involved in the morphogenesis of organs other than bone. The symbiosis of the mechanisms underlying bone induction and differentiation is critical for tissue engineering and is governed by both biomechanics (physical forces) and context (microenvironment/extracellular matrix), which can be duplicated by biomimetic biomaterials such as collagens, hydroxyapatite, proteoglycans, and cell adhesion glycoproteins, including fibronectins and laminin. Rules of tissue architecture elucidated in bone morphogenesis may provide insights into tissue engineering and be universally applicable for all organs/tissues, including bones and joints.

  3. Measurements with an optimized regenerator for a liquid-working-substance heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, G. W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.

    1983-12-01

    A regenerator for use with a liquid in a Stirling cycle heat engine is described. Because of the thermophysical characteristics of liquids, such a regenerator can be nearly ideally effective and has thermal properties that can be calculated directly without resort to empirical information. The regenerator described here is designed to minimize loss arising from three sources: thermal conductivity along the generator, viscous heating in the working fluid, and imperfect thermal contact between the working fluid and the second thermodynamic medium in the regenerator. Measurements using liquid propylene as a test fluid in the regenerator confirm the design calculations.

  4. Statistical model for the mechanical behavior of the tissue engineering non-woven fibrous matrices under large deformation.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Mohd Suhail; Pal, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The fibrous matrices are widely used as scaffolds for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues due to their structural and mechanical similarities with the fibrous components of the extracellular matrix. These scaffolds not only provide the appropriate microenvironment for the residing cells but also act as medium for the transmission of the mechanical stimuli, essential for the tissue regeneration, from macroscopic scale of the scaffolds to the microscopic scale of cells. The requirement of the mechanical loading for the tissue regeneration requires the fibrous scaffolds to be able to sustain the complex three-dimensional mechanical loading conditions. In order to gain insight into the mechanical behavior of the fibrous matrices under large amount of elongation as well as shear, a statistical model has been formulated to study the macroscopic mechanical behavior of the electrospun fibrous matrix and the transmission of the mechanical stimuli from scaffolds to the cells via the constituting fibers. The study establishes the load-deformation relationships for the fibrous matrices for different structural parameters. It also quantifies the changes in the fiber arrangement and tension generated in the fibers with the deformation of the matrix. The model reveals that the tension generated in the fibers on matrix deformation is not homogeneous and hence the cells located in different regions of the fibrous scaffold might experience different mechanical stimuli. The mechanical response of fibrous matrices was also found to be dependent on the aspect ratio of the matrix. Therefore, the model establishes a structure-mechanics interdependence of the fibrous matrices under large deformation, which can be utilized in identifying the appropriate structure and external mechanical loading conditions for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthetic matrix metalloproteinase-sensitive hydrogels for the conduction of tissue regeneration: Engineering cell-invasion characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutolf, M. P.; Lauer-Fields, J. L.; Schmoekel, H. G.; Metters, A. T.; Weber, F. E.; Fields, G. B.; Hubbell, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    Synthetic hydrogels have been molecularly engineered to mimic the invasive characteristics of native provisional extracellular matrices: a combination of integrin-binding sites and substrates for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) was required to render the networks degradable and invasive by cells via cell-secreted MMPs. Degradation of gels was engineered starting from a characterization of the degradation kinetics (kcat and Km) of synthetic MMP substrates in the soluble form and after crosslinking into a 3D hydrogel network. Primary human fibroblasts were demonstrated to proteolytically invade these networks, a process that depended on MMP substrate activity, adhesion ligand concentration, and network crosslinking density. Gels used to deliver recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 to the site of critical defects in rat cranium were completely infiltrated by cells and remodeled into bony tissue within 4 wk at a dose of 5 μg per defect. Bone regeneration was also shown to depend on the proteolytic sensitivity of the matrices. These hydrogels may be useful in tissue engineering and cell biology as alternatives for naturally occurring extracellular matrix-derived materials such as fibrin or collagen.

  6. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Investigation of the surface layer of 3D-matrices for tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Chernonosova, V S; Kvon, R I; Kiseleva, E V; Stepanova, A O; Laktionov, P P

    2017-01-01

    Electrospinning is a convenient and promising manufacturing method a variety of materials for tissue engineering. 3D matrices fabricated by electrospinning from solutions of polycaprolactone with human serum albumin or gelatin in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol were studied. The microstructure of the 3D matrices and surface of the fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Protein distribution in the surface layer was studied by modification of protein amino groups with N-(2-hydroxyethyl)phenazine and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was shown, that concentration of the proteins in the surface layer of fibers exceeded their concentration in the initial electrospun solution up to 12 times and the surface layer was enriched in the protein inversely to the concentration of the protein in solution. The minor part of the proteins was released from fibers during first 30-60 min after swelling in water. Treatment of matrices with proteinase K hydrolyzed about 1/3 of the surface exposed human serum albumin. Thus, both methods can be used to study the surface content of the materials produced by electrospinning from blends of synthetic and natural polymers, however X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy appears to be more convenient and informative.

  8. Heart Regeneration with Embryonic Cardiac Progenitor Cells and Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shuo; Liu, Qihai; Gnatovskiy, Leonid; Ma, Peter X; Wang, Zhong

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent advances in stem cell research hold great potential for heart tissue regeneration through stem cell-based therapy. While multiple cell types have been transplanted into MI heart in preclinical studies or clinical trials, reduction of scar tissue and restoration of cardiac function have been modest. Several challenges hamper the development and application of stem cell-based therapy for heart regeneration. Application of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and cardiac tissue engineering for cell therapy has shown great promise to repair damaged heart tissue. This review presents an overview of the current applications of embryonic CPCs and the development of cardiac tissue engineering in regeneration of functional cardiac tissue and reduction of side effects for heart regeneration. We aim to highlight the benefits of the cell therapy by application of CPCs and cardiac tissue engineering during heart regeneration.

  9. Regeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Current strategies in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Thomas; Teuschl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of musculoskeletal tissue engineering have raised an increasing interest in the regeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). It is the aim of this article to review the current research efforts and highlight promising tissue engineering strategies. The four main components of tissue engineering also apply in several ACL regeneration research efforts. Scaffolds from biological materials, biodegradable polymers and composite materials are used. The main cell sources are mesenchymal stem cells and ACL fibroblasts. In addition, growth factors and mechanical stimuli are applied. So far, the regenerated ACL constructs have been tested in a few animal studies and the results are encouraging. The different strategies, from in vitro ACL regeneration in bioreactor systems to bio-enhanced repair and regeneration, are under constant development. We expect considerable progress in the near future that will result in a realistic option for ACL surgery soon. PMID:25621217

  10. Perspectives on tissue-engineered nerve regeneration for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Suk; Lee, Hai Bang

    2014-07-01

    Over the past few decades, substantial progress has been made to safely improve nerve function in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients through the regeneration of injured nerve tissue. This perspective focuses on an extensive overview of SCI research as well as tissue-engineered nerve regeneration for the treatment of SCI.

  11. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Barrett, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  12. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gadeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    An actual-size microfabricated regenerator comprised of a stack of 42 disks, 19 mm diameter and 0.25 mm thick, with layers of microscopic, segmented, involute-shaped flow channels was fabricated and tested. The geometry resembles layers of uniformly-spaced segmented-parallel-plates, except the plates are curved. Each disk was made from electro-plated nickel using the LiGA process. This regenerator had feature sizes close to those required for an actual Stirling engine but the overall regenerator dimensions were sized for the NASA/Sunpower oscillating-flow regenerator test rig. Testing in the oscillating-flow test rig showed the regenerator performed extremely well, significantly better than currently used random-fiber material, producing the highest figures of merit ever recorded for any regenerator tested in that rig over its approximately 20 years of use.

  13. Regeneration

    Treesearch

    George A. Schier; Wayne D. Shepperd; John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    There are basically two approaches to regenerating aspen stands-sexual reproduction using seed, or vegetative regeneration by root suckering. In the West, root suckering is the most practical method. The advantage of having an existing, well established root system capable of producing numerous root suckers easily outweighs natural or artificial reforestation in the...

  14. Decellularized Tissue and Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrices as Scaffolds for Orthopaedic Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Christina W.; Solorio, Loran D.; Alsberg, Eben

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of musculoskeletal defects is a constant challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, chondral lesions, infections and tumor debulking can often lead to large tissue voids requiring reconstruction with tissue grafts. Autografts are currently the gold standard in orthopaedic tissue reconstruction; however, there is a limit to the amount of tissue that can be harvested before compromising the donor site. Tissue engineering strategies using allogeneic or xenogeneic decellularized bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament have emerged as promising potential alternative treatment. The extracellular matrix provides a natural scaffold for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Decellularization of in vitro cell-derived matrices can also enable the generation of autologous constructs from tissue specific cells or progenitor cells. Although decellularized bone tissue is widely used clinically in orthopaedic applications, the exciting potential of decellularized cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament cell-derived matrices has only recently begun to be explored for ultimate translation to the orthopaedic clinic. PMID:24417915

  15. Design of experiments approach to engineer cell-secreted matrices for directing osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Decaris, Martin L; Leach, J Kent

    2011-04-01

    The presentation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins provides an opportunity to instruct the phenotype and behavior of responsive cells. Decellularized cell-secreted matrix coatings (DM) represent a biomimetic culture surface that retains the complexity of the natural ECM. Microenvironmental culture conditions alter the composition of these matrices and ultimately the ability of DMs to direct cell fate. We employed a design of experiments (DOE) multivariable analysis approach to determine the effects and interactions of four variables (culture duration, cell seeding density, oxygen tension, and media supplementation) on the capacity of DMs to direct the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). DOE analysis revealed that matrices created with extended culture duration, ascorbate-2-phosphate supplementation, and in ambient oxygen tension exhibited significant correlations with enhanced hMSC differentiation. We validated the DOE model results using DMs predicted to have superior (DM1) or lesser (DM2) osteogenic potential for naïve hMSCs. Compared to cells on DM2, hMSCs cultured on DM1 expressed 2-fold higher osterix levels and deposited 3-fold more calcium over 3 weeks. Cells on DM1 coatings also exhibited greater proliferation and viability compared to DM2-coated substrates. This study demonstrates that DOE-based analysis is a powerful tool for optimizing engineered systems by identifying significant variables that have the greatest contribution to the target output.

  16. Clinical applications of decellularized extracellular matrices for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Parmaksiz, Mahmut; Dogan, Arin; Odabas, Sedat; Elçin, A Eser; Elçin, Y Murat

    2016-03-17

    Decellularization is the process of removing the cellular components from tissues or organs. It is a promising technology for obtaining a biomaterial with a highly preserved extracellular matrix (ECM), which may also act as a biological scaffold for tissue engineering and regenerative therapies. Decellularized products are gaining clinical importance and market space due to their ease of standardized production, constant availability for grafting and mechanical or biochemical superiority against competing clinical options, yielding clinical results ahead of the ones with autografts in some applications. Current drawbacks and limitations of traditional treatments and clinical applications can be overcome by using decellularized or acellular matrices. Several companies are leading the market with versatile acellular products designed for diverse use in the reconstruction of tissues and organs. This review describes ECM-based decellularized and acellular products that are currently in use for different branches of clinic.

  17. Skin equivalent tissue-engineered construct: co-cultured fibroblasts/ keratinocytes on 3D matrices of sericin hope cocoons.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sunita; Dey, Sancharika; Kundu, Subhas C

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective and alternative tissue-engineered skin replacements to autografts, allografts and xenografts has became a clinical requirement due to the problems related to source of donor tissue and the perceived risk of disease transmission. In the present study 3D tissue engineered construct of sericin is developed using co-culture of keratinocytes on the upper surface of the fabricated matrices and with fibroblasts on lower surface. Sericin is obtained from "Sericin Hope" silkworm of Bombyx mori mutant and is extracted from cocoons by autoclave. Porous sericin matrices are prepared by freeze dried method using genipin as crosslinker. The matrices are characterized biochemically and biophysically. The cell proliferation and viability of co-cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes on matrices for at least 28 days are observed by live/dead assay, Alamar blue assay, and by dual fluorescent staining. The growth of the fibroblasts and keratinocytes in co-culture is correlated with the expression level of TGF-β, b-FGF and IL-8 in the cultured supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histological analysis further demonstrates a multi-layered stratified epidermal layer of uninhibited keratinocytes in co-cultured constructs. Presence of involucrin, collagen IV and the fibroblast surface protein in immuno-histochemical stained sections of co-cultured matrices indicates the significance of paracrine signaling between keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the expression of extracellular matrix protein for dermal repair. No significant amount of pro inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide) production are evidenced when macrophages grown on the sericin matrices. The results all together depict the potentiality of sericin 3D matrices as skin equivalent tissue engineered construct in wound repair.

  18. Skin Equivalent Tissue-Engineered Construct: Co-Cultured Fibroblasts/ Keratinocytes on 3D Matrices of Sericin Hope Cocoons

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Sunita; Dey, Sancharika; Kundu, Subhas C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective and alternative tissue-engineered skin replacements to autografts, allografts and xenografts has became a clinical requirement due to the problems related to source of donor tissue and the perceived risk of disease transmission. In the present study 3D tissue engineered construct of sericin is developed using co-culture of keratinocytes on the upper surface of the fabricated matrices and with fibroblasts on lower surface. Sericin is obtained from “Sericin Hope” silkworm of Bombyx mori mutant and is extracted from cocoons by autoclave. Porous sericin matrices are prepared by freeze dried method using genipin as crosslinker. The matrices are characterized biochemically and biophysically. The cell proliferation and viability of co-cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes on matrices for at least 28 days are observed by live/dead assay, Alamar blue assay, and by dual fluorescent staining. The growth of the fibroblasts and keratinocytes in co-culture is correlated with the expression level of TGF-β, b-FGF and IL-8 in the cultured supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histological analysis further demonstrates a multi-layered stratified epidermal layer of uninhibited keratinocytes in co-cultured constructs. Presence of involucrin, collagen IV and the fibroblast surface protein in immuno-histochemical stained sections of co-cultured matrices indicates the significance of paracrine signaling between keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the expression of extracellular matrix protein for dermal repair. No significant amount of pro inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide) production are evidenced when macrophages grown on the sericin matrices. The results all together depict the potentiality of sericin 3D matrices as skin equivalent tissue engineered construct in wound repair. PMID:24058626

  19. Failure Analysis and Regeneration Performances Evaluation on Engine Lubricating Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Zhang, G. N.; Zhang, J. Y.; Yin, Y. L.; Xu, Y.

    To investigate the behavior of failure and recycling of lubricating oils, three sorts of typical 10w-40 lubricating oils used in heavy-load vehicle including the new oil, waste oil and regeneration oil regenerated by self-researched green regeneration technology were selected. The tribology properties were tested by four-ball friction wear tester as well. The results indicated that the performance of anti-extreme pressure of regeneration oil increase by 34.1% compared with the waste one and its load- carrying ability is close to the new oil; the feature of wear spot are better than those of the waste oil and frictional coefficient almost reach the level of the new oil's. As a result, the performance of anti-wear and friction reducing are getting better obviously.

  20. Ceramic composites as matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Habraken, W J E M; Wolke, J G C; Jansen, J A

    2007-05-30

    Ceramic composites and scaffolds are popular implant materials in the field of dentistry, orthopedics and plastic surgery. For bone tissue engineering especially CaP-ceramics or cements and bioactive glass are suitable implant materials due to their osteoconductive properties. In this review the applicability of these ceramics but also of ceramic/polymer composites for bone tissue engineering is discussed, and in particular their use as drug delivery systems. Overall, the high density and slow biodegradability of ceramics is not beneficial for tissue engineering purposes. To address these issues, macroporosity can be introduced often in combination with osteoinductive growth factors and cells. Ceramics are good carriers for drugs, in which release patterns are strongly dependent on the chemical consistency of the ceramic, type of drug and drug loading. Biodegradable polymers like polylactic acid, gelatin or chitosan are used as matrices for ceramic particles or as adjuvant to calcium phosphate cements. The use of these polymers can introduce a tailored biodegradation/drug release to the ceramic material.

  1. The Role of Tissue Engineering in Articular Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair and regeneration continue to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased articular cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving articular cartilage therapy. This review provides an overall description of the current state and progress in articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Traditional therapies and related problems are introduced. More importantly, a variety of promising cell sources, biocompatible tissue engineered scaffolds, scaffoldless techniques, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli used in current articular cartilage tissue engineering are reviewed. Finally, the technical and regulatory challenges of articular cartilage tissue engineering and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:20201770

  2. DYGABCD: A program for calculating linear A, B, C, and D matrices from a nonlinear dynamic engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A digital computer program, DYGABCD, was developed that generates linearized, dynamic models of simulated turbofan and turbojet engines. DYGABCD is based on an earlier computer program, DYNGEN, that is capable of calculating simulated nonlinear steady-state and transient performance of one- and two-spool turbojet engines or two- and three-spool turbofan engines. Most control design techniques require linear system descriptions. For multiple-input/multiple-output systems such as turbine engines, state space matrix descriptions of the system are often desirable. DYGABCD computes the state space matrices commonly referred to as the A, B, C, and D matrices required for a linear system description. The report discusses the analytical approach and provides a users manual, FORTRAN listings, and a sample case.

  3. Use of Mesothelial Cells and Biological Matrices for Tissue Engineering of Simple Epithelium Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Lachaud, Christian Claude; Rodriguez-Campins, Berta; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Soria, Bernat

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineering technologies have progressed rapidly through last decades resulting in the manufacture of quite complex bioartificial tissues with potential use for human organ and tissue regeneration. The manufacture of avascular monolayered tissues such as simple squamous epithelia was initiated a few decades ago and is attracting increasing interest. Their relative morphostructural simplicity makes of their biomimetization a goal, which is currently accessible. The mesothelium is a simple squamous epithelium in nature and is the monolayered tissue lining the walls of large celomic cavities (peritoneal, pericardial, and pleural) and internal organs housed inside. Interestingly, mesothelial cells can be harvested in clinically relevant numbers from several anatomical sources and not less important, they also display high transdifferentiation capacities and are low immunogenic characteristics, which endow these cells with therapeutic interest. Their combination with a suitable scaffold (biocompatible, degradable, and non-immunogenic) may allow the manufacture of tailored serosal membranes biomimetics with potential spanning a wide range of therapeutic applications, principally for the regeneration of simple squamous-like epithelia such as the visceral and parietal mesothelium vascular endothelium and corneal endothelium among others. Herein, we review recent research progresses in mesothelial cells biology and their clinical sources. We make a particular emphasis on reviewing the different types of biological scaffolds suitable for the manufacture of serosal mesothelial membranes biomimetics. Finally, we also review progresses made in mesothelial cells-based therapeutic applications and propose some possible future directions. PMID:26347862

  4. Use of Mesothelial Cells and Biological Matrices for Tissue Engineering of Simple Epithelium Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Christian Claude; Rodriguez-Campins, Berta; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Soria, Bernat

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineering technologies have progressed rapidly through last decades resulting in the manufacture of quite complex bioartificial tissues with potential use for human organ and tissue regeneration. The manufacture of avascular monolayered tissues such as simple squamous epithelia was initiated a few decades ago and is attracting increasing interest. Their relative morphostructural simplicity makes of their biomimetization a goal, which is currently accessible. The mesothelium is a simple squamous epithelium in nature and is the monolayered tissue lining the walls of large celomic cavities (peritoneal, pericardial, and pleural) and internal organs housed inside. Interestingly, mesothelial cells can be harvested in clinically relevant numbers from several anatomical sources and not less important, they also display high transdifferentiation capacities and are low immunogenic characteristics, which endow these cells with therapeutic interest. Their combination with a suitable scaffold (biocompatible, degradable, and non-immunogenic) may allow the manufacture of tailored serosal membranes biomimetics with potential spanning a wide range of therapeutic applications, principally for the regeneration of simple squamous-like epithelia such as the visceral and parietal mesothelium vascular endothelium and corneal endothelium among others. Herein, we review recent research progresses in mesothelial cells biology and their clinical sources. We make a particular emphasis on reviewing the different types of biological scaffolds suitable for the manufacture of serosal mesothelial membranes biomimetics. Finally, we also review progresses made in mesothelial cells-based therapeutic applications and propose some possible future directions.

  5. Polyphosphazene functionalized polyester fiber matrices for tendon tissue engineering: in vitro evaluation with human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peach, M Sean; James, Roshan; Toti, Udaya S; Deng, Meng; Morozowich, Nicole L; Allcock, Harry R; Laurencin, Cato T; Kumbar, Sangamesh G

    2012-08-01

    Poly[(ethyl alanato)(1)(p-methyl phenoxy)(1)] phosphazene (PNEA-mPh) was used to modify the surface of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofiber matrices having an average fiber diameter of 3000 ± 1700 nm for the purpose of tendon tissue engineering and augmentation. This study reports the effect of polyphosphazene surface functionalization on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, cell-construct infiltration, proliferation and tendon differentiation, as well as long term cellular construct mechanical properties. PCL fiber matrices functionalized with PNEA-mPh acquired a rougher surface morphology and led to enhanced cell adhesion as well as superior cell-construct infiltration when compared to smooth PCL fiber matrices. Long-term in vitro hMSC cultures on both fiber matrices were able to produce clinically relevant moduli. Both fibrous constructs expressed scleraxis, an early tendon differentiation marker, and a bimodal peak in expression of the late tendon differentiation marker tenomodulin, a pattern that was not observed in PCL thin film controls. Functionalized matrices achieved a more prominent tenogenic differentiation, possessing greater tenomodulin expression and superior phenotypic maturity according to the ratio of collagen I to collagen III expression. These findings indicate that PNEA-mPh functionalization is an efficient method for improving cell interactions with electrospun PCL matrices for the purpose of tendon repair.

  6. Innovative approaches to regenerate teeth by tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Steindorff, Marina M; Lehl, Helena; Winkel, Andreas; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, scientists in almost every medical sector moved the focus to tissue transplantation and stem cell-based therapies for organ and tissue regeneration. In dentistry, it is of great interest in this regard to restore natural teeth with the help of stem cell-based regeneration of soft tissues and hard tooth structures. Many studies have been published in which structures resembling teeth were constructed using stem cells. In most of these studies, carrier materials (scaffolds) were used, which were colonized with cells and then implanted into an animal. Apart from this, scaffold-free approaches based on cell aggregation have also been published. Although animal studies on tooth regeneration have been very promising, much more research is needed until this can be applied in human.

  7. Looking Ahead to Engineering Epimorphic Regeneration of a Human Digit or Limb

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, Lina M.; Lynch, Kristen M.; Allan, Christopher H.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 2 million people have had limb amputations in the United States due to disease or injury, with more than 185,000 new amputations every year. The ability to promote epimorphic regeneration, or the regrowth of a biologically based digit or limb, would radically change the prognosis for amputees. This ambitious goal includes the regrowth of a large number of tissues that need to be properly assembled and patterned to create a fully functional structure. We have yet to even identify, let alone address, all the obstacles along the extended progression that limit epimorphic regeneration in humans. This review aims to present introductory fundamentals in epimorphic regeneration to facilitate design and conduct of research from a tissue engineering and regenerative medicine perspective. We describe the clinical scenario of human digit healing, featuring published reports of regenerative potential. We then broadly delineate the processes of epimorphic regeneration in nonmammalian systems and describe a few mammalian regeneration models. We give particular focus to the murine digit tip, which allows for comparative studies of regeneration-competent and regeneration-incompetent outcomes in the same animal. Finally, we describe a few forward-thinking opportunities for promoting epimorphic regeneration in humans. PMID:26603349

  8. Looking Ahead to Engineering Epimorphic Regeneration of a Human Digit or Limb.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Lina M; Lynch, Kristen M; Allan, Christopher H; Badylak, Stephen F; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 2 million people have had limb amputations in the United States due to disease or injury, with more than 185,000 new amputations every year. The ability to promote epimorphic regeneration, or the regrowth of a biologically based digit or limb, would radically change the prognosis for amputees. This ambitious goal includes the regrowth of a large number of tissues that need to be properly assembled and patterned to create a fully functional structure. We have yet to even identify, let alone address, all the obstacles along the extended progression that limit epimorphic regeneration in humans. This review aims to present introductory fundamentals in epimorphic regeneration to facilitate design and conduct of research from a tissue engineering and regenerative medicine perspective. We describe the clinical scenario of human digit healing, featuring published reports of regenerative potential. We then broadly delineate the processes of epimorphic regeneration in nonmammalian systems and describe a few mammalian regeneration models. We give particular focus to the murine digit tip, which allows for comparative studies of regeneration-competent and regeneration-incompetent outcomes in the same animal. Finally, we describe a few forward-thinking opportunities for promoting epimorphic regeneration in humans.

  9. Experimental performance of the regenerator for the Chrysler upgraded automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J. M.; Nussle, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Automobile gas turbine engine regenerator performance was studied in a regenerator test facility that provided a satisfactory simulation of the actual engine operating environment but with independent control of airflow and gas flow. Velocity and temperature distributions were measured immediately downstream of both the core high-pressure-side outlet and the core low-pressure-side outlet. For the original engine housing, the regenerator temperature effectiveness was 1 to 2 percent higher than the design value, and the heat transfer effectiveness was 2 to 4 percent lower than the design value over the range of test conditions simulating 50 to 100 percent of gas generator speed. Recalculating the design values to account for seal leakage decreased the design heat transfer effectiveness to values consistent with those measured herein. A baffle installed in the engine housing high-pressure-side inlet provided more uniform velocities out of the regenerator but did not improve the effectiveness. A housing designed to provide more uniform axial flow to the regenerator was also tested. Although temperature uniformity was improved, the effectiveness values were not improved. Neither did 50-percent flow blockage (90 degree segment) applied to the high-pressure-side inlet change the effectiveness significantly.

  10. Tissue engineered extracellular matrices (ECMs) in urology: Evolution and future directions.

    PubMed

    Davis, N F; Cunnane, E M; O'Brien, F J; Mulvihill, J J; Walsh, M T

    2017-08-12

    Autologous gastrointestinal tissue has remained the gold-standard reconstructive biomaterial in urology for >100 years. Mucus-secreting epithelium is associated with lifelong metabolic and neuromechanical complications when implanted into the urinary tract. Therefore, the availability of biocompatible tissue-engineered biomaterials such as extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds may provide an attractive alternative for urologists. ECMs are decellularised, biodegradable membranes that have shown promise for repairing defective urinary tract segments in vitro and in vivo by inducing a host-derived tissue remodelling response after implantation. In urology, porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM) are commonly selected as ECMs for tissue regeneration. Both ECMs support ingrowth of native tissue and differentiation of multi-layered urothelial and smooth muscle cells layers while providing mechanical support in vivo. In their native acellular state, ECM scaffolds can repair small urinary tract defects. Larger urinary tract segments can be repaired when ECMs are manipulated by seeding them with various cell types prior to in vivo implantation. In the present review, we evaluate and summarise the clinical potential of tissue engineered ECMs in reconstructive urology with emphasis on their long-term outcomes in urological clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of engineered nanomaterials in complex matrices (environment and biota): general considerations and conceptual case studies.

    PubMed

    von der Kammer, Frank; Ferguson, P Lee; Holden, Patricia A; Masion, Armand; Rogers, Kim R; Klaine, Stephen J; Koelmans, Albert A; Horne, Nina; Unrine, Jason M

    2012-01-01

    Advances in the study of the environmental fate, transport, and ecotoxicological effects of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have been hampered by a lack of adequate techniques for the detection and quantification of ENMs at environmentally relevant concentrations in complex media. Analysis of ENMs differs from traditional chemical analysis because both chemical and physical forms must be considered. Because ENMs are present as colloidal systems, their physicochemical properties are dependent on their surroundings. Therefore, the simple act of trying to isolate, observe, and quantify ENMs may change their physicochemical properties, making analysis extremely susceptible to artifacts. Many analytical techniques applied in materials science and other chemical/biological/physical disciplines may be applied to ENM analysis as well; however, environmental and biological studies may require that methods be adapted to work at low concentrations in complex matrices. The most pressing research needs are the development of techniques for extraction, cleanup, separation, and sample storage that introduce minimal artifacts to increase the speed, sensitivity, and specificity of analytical techniques, as well as the development of techniques that can differentiate between abundant, naturally occurring particles, and manufactured nanoparticles.

  12. Engineering 3D cell instructive microenvironments by rational assembly of artificial extracellular matrices and cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Sala, Ana; Hänseler, Patrick; Ranga, Adrian; Lutolf, Matthias P; Vörös, Janos; Ehrbar, Martin; Weber, Franz E

    2011-11-01

    Engineered artificial microenvironments hold enormous potential as models to study developmental, physiological, pathological, and regenerative processes under highly defined conditions. Such platforms aim at bridging the gap between traditional in vitro 2D culture systems and animal models. By dissecting the biological complexity into an amenable number of parameters, systemic manipulation and study in controllable environments closely resembling the in vivo situation is possible. Novel strategies that address the evaluation of either ECM components, growth factors or cell-cell interactions on cellular behaviour are being developed. However, reliable methods that simultaneously recapitulate the natural instructive microenvironments in terms of cell and matrix composition, biological cues, heterogeneity and geometry are not yet available. Such spatially-defined microenvironments may be necessary to initiate and guide the formation of artificial tissues by morphogenetic processes. In this work, we introduce a flexible strategy that relies on the combination of artificial extracellular matrices with patterning techniques as well as a layer-by-layer approach to mimic rationally-designed instructive milieus. By a rational arrangement of cells and defined biochemical and biophysical extracellular cues, we report control of cell migration and generation of an artificial vascularized bone tissue-like construct.

  13. Recent Strategies in Tissue Engineering for Guided Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Kayla; Dinis, Tony M; Taourirt, Sami; Vidal, Guillaume; Kaplan, David L; Egles, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The repair of large crushed or sectioned segments of peripheral nerves remains a challenge in regenerative medicine due to the complexity of the biological environment and the lack of proper biomaterials and architecture to foster reconstruction. Traditionally such reconstruction is only achieved by using fresh human tissue as a surrogate for the absence of the nerve. However, recent focus in the field has been on new polymer structures and specific biofunctionalization to achieve the goal of peripheral nerve regeneration by developing artificial nerve prostheses. This review presents various tested approaches as well their effectiveness for nerve regrowth and functional recovery.

  14. Bone repair with a form of BMP-2 engineered for incorporation into fibrin cell ingrowth matrices.

    PubMed

    Schmoekel, Hugo G; Weber, Franz E; Schense, Jason C; Grätz, Klaus W; Schawalder, Peter; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2005-02-05

    Most growth factors naturally involved in development and regeneration demonstrate strong binding to the extracellular matrix and are retained there until being locally mobilized by cells. In spite of this feedback between cell activity and growth factor mobilization in the extracellular matrix, this approach has not been extensively explored in therapeutic situations. We present an engineered bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) fusion protein that mimics such function in a surgically relevant matrix, fibrin, incorporated into the matrix until it is locally liberated by cell surface-associated proteases. A tripartite fusion protein, denoted TG-pl-BMP-2, was designed and produced recombinantly. An N-terminal transglutaminase substrate (TG) domain provides covalent attachment to fibrin during coagulation under the influence of the blood transglutaminase factor XIIIa. A central plasmin substrate (pl) domain provides a cleavage site for local release of the attached growth factor from the fibrin matrix under the influence of cell-activated plasmin. A C-terminal human BMP-2 domain provides osteogenic activity. TG-pl-BMP-2 in fibrin was evaluated in vivo in critical-size craniotomy defects in rats, where it induced 76% more defect healing with bone at 3 weeks with a dose of 1 mug/defect than wildtype BMP-2 in fibrin. After a dosing study in rabbits, the engineered growth factor in fibrin was evaluated in a prospective clinical study for pancarpal fusion in dogs, where it induced statistically faster and more extensive bone bridging than equivalent treatment with cancellous bone autograft. The strong healing response shown by fibrin including a bound BMP-2 variant suggests that with the combination of bound growth factor and ingrowth matrix, it may be possible to improve upon the natural growth factor and even upon tissue autograft.

  15. Development of VEGF-loaded PLGA matrices in association with mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, A.R.; Steffens, D.; Santi, B.; Quintiliano, K.; Steffen, N.; Pilger, D.A.; Pranke, P.

    2017-01-01

    The association of bioactive molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), with nanofibers facilitates their controlled release, which could contribute to cellular migration and differentiation in tissue regeneration. In this research, the influence of their incorporation on a polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffold produced by electrospinning on cell adhesion and viability and cytotoxicity was carried out in three groups: 1) PLGA/BSA/VEGF; 2) PLGA/BSA, and 3) PLGA. Morphology, fiber diameter, contact angle, loading efficiency and controlled release of VEGF of the biomaterials, among others, were measured. The nanofibers showed smooth surfaces without beads and with interconnected pores. PLGA/BSA/VEGF showed the smallest water contact angle and VEGF released for up to 160 h. An improvement in cell adhesion was observed for the PLGA/BSA/VEGF scaffolds compared to the other groups and the scaffolds were non-toxic for the cells. Therefore, the scaffolds were shown to be a good strategy for sustained delivery of VEGF and may be a useful tool for tissue engineering. PMID:28793048

  16. Development of VEGF-loaded PLGA matrices in association with mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rosa, A R; Steffens, D; Santi, B; Quintiliano, K; Steffen, N; Pilger, D A; Pranke, P

    2017-08-07

    The association of bioactive molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), with nanofibers facilitates their controlled release, which could contribute to cellular migration and differentiation in tissue regeneration. In this research, the influence of their incorporation on a polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffold produced by electrospinning on cell adhesion and viability and cytotoxicity was carried out in three groups: 1) PLGA/BSA/VEGF; 2) PLGA/BSA, and 3) PLGA. Morphology, fiber diameter, contact angle, loading efficiency and controlled release of VEGF of the biomaterials, among others, were measured. The nanofibers showed smooth surfaces without beads and with interconnected pores. PLGA/BSA/VEGF showed the smallest water contact angle and VEGF released for up to 160 h. An improvement in cell adhesion was observed for the PLGA/BSA/VEGF scaffolds compared to the other groups and the scaffolds were non-toxic for the cells. Therefore, the scaffolds were shown to be a good strategy for sustained delivery of VEGF and may be a useful tool for tissue engineering.

  17. [Progress in application of 3D bioprinting in cartilage regeneration and reconstruction for tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Liao, Junlin; Wang, Shaohua; Chen, Jia; Xie, Hongju; Zhou, Jianda

    2017-02-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting provides an advanced technology for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine because of its ability to produce the models or organs with higher precision and more suitable for human body. It has been successfully used to produce a variety of cartilage scaffold materials. In addition, 3D bioprinter can directly to print tissue and organs with live chondrocytes. In conclusion, 3D bioprinting may have broad prospect for cartilage regeneration and reconstruction in tissue engineering.

  18. Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide adsorbents for diesel engine emission control

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

    2011-03-15

    Disclosed herein are sorbents and devices for controlling sulfur oxides emissions as well as systems including such sorbents and devices. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the disclosed sorbents, devices and systems. In one embodiment the disclosed sorbents can be conveniently regenerated, such as under normal exhaust stream from a combustion engine, particularly a diesel engine. Accordingly, also disclosed are combustion vehicles equipped with sulfur dioxide emission control devices.

  19. Long-term survival and integration of transplanted engineered nervous tissue constructs promotes peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jason H; Cullen, D Kacy; Browne, Kevin D; Groff, Robert; Zhang, Jun; Pfister, Bryan J; Zager, Eric L; Smith, Douglas H

    2009-07-01

    Although peripheral nerve injury is a common consequence of trauma or surgery, there are insufficient means for repair. In particular, there is a critical need for improved methods to facilitate regeneration of axons across major nerve lesions. Here, we engineered transplantable living nervous tissue constructs to provide a labeled pathway to guide host axonal regeneration. These constructs consisted of stretch-grown, longitudinally aligned living axonal tracts inserted into poly(glycolic acid) tubes. The constructs (allogenic) were transplanted to bridge an excised segment of sciatic nerve in the rat, and histological analyses were performed at 6 and 16 weeks posttransplantation to determine graft survival, integration, and host regeneration. At both time points, the transplanted constructs were found to have maintained their pretransplant geometry, with surviving clusters of graft neuronal somata at the extremities of the constructs spanned by tracts of axons. Throughout the transplanted region, there was an intertwining plexus of host and graft axons, suggesting that the transplanted axons mediated host axonal regeneration across the lesion. By 16 weeks posttransplant, extensive myelination of axons was observed throughout the transplant region. Further, graft neurons had extended axons beyond the margins of the transplanted region, penetrating into the host nerve. Notably, this survival and integration of the allogenic constructs occurred in the absence of immunosuppression therapy. These findings demonstrate the promise of living tissue-engineered axonal constructs to bridge major nerve lesions and promote host regeneration, potentially by providing axon-mediated axonal outgrowth and guidance.

  20. Physiological features of periodontal regeneration and approaches for periodontal tissue engineering utilizing periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Bruno Braga; Silvério, Karina Gonzales; Casati, Márcio Zaffalon; Sallum, Enílson Antônio; Nociti, Francisco Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the potential of periodontal regeneration seems to be limited by the regenerative capacity of the cells involved. The regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues is mediated by various periodontal cells and is regulated by a vast array of extracellular matrix informational molecules that induce both selective and nonselective responses in different cell lineages and their precursors. In this paper, we first review periodontal ligament tissue and its different cell subpopulations including fibroblasts and paravascular stem cells, and their functions during the development and homeostasis of periodontal tissues. Because conventional periodontal regeneration methods remain insufficient to obtain a complete and reliable periodontal regeneration, the concept of periodontal tissue engineering has been based on the generation of the conditions necessary to improve the healing of periodontal tissues. Additionally, the potential of periodontal ligament cells for use in periodontal tissue engineering to overcome the limitations of conventional periodontal regenerative therapies is discussed, followed by an update of the recent progress and future directions of research utilizing periodontal ligament cells for predictable periodontal regeneration.

  1. Dental Pulp and Dentin Tissue Engineering and Regeneration – Advancement and Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George T.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Hard tissue is difficult to repair especially dental structures. Tooth enamel is incapable of self-repairing whereas dentin and cememtum can regenerate with limited capacity. Enamel and dentin are commonly under the attack by caries. Extensive forms of caries destroy enamel and dentin and can lead to dental pulp infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by the pulp space disinfection and filled with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection --commonly known as root canal or endodontic therapy. Regeneration of dentin relies on having vital pulps; however, regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. With the advent of modern tissue engineering concept and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the recent endeavor on pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement and challenge in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:21196351

  2. Engineering Cell Fate for Tissue Regeneration by In Vivo Transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    de Lázaro, I; Kostarelos, K

    2016-02-01

    Changes in cell identity occur in adult mammalian organisms but are rare and often linked to disease. Research in the last few decades has thrown light on how to manipulate cell fate, but the conversion of a particular cell type into another within a living organism (also termed in vivo transdifferentiation) has only been recently achieved in a limited number of tissues. Although the therapeutic promise of this strategy for tissue regeneration and repair is exciting, important efficacy and safety concerns will need to be addressed before it becomes a reality in the clinical practice. Here, we review the most relevant in vivo transdifferentiation studies in adult mammalian animal models, offering a critical assessment of this potentially powerful strategy for regenerative medicine.

  3. Stimulated myoblast differentiation on graphene oxide-impregnated PLGA-collagen hybrid fibre matrices.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Yong-Joo; Hyun, Jung Keun; Jung, Tae-Gon; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-03-12

    Electrospinning is a simple and effective method for fabricating micro- and nanofiber matrices. Electrospun fibre matrices have numerous advantages for use as tissue engineering scaffolds, such as high surface area-to-volume ratio, mass production capability and structural similarity to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Therefore, electrospun matrices, which are composed of biocompatible polymers and various biomaterials, have been developed as biomimetic scaffolds for the tissue engineering applications. In particular, graphene oxide (GO) has recently been considered as a novel biomaterial for skeletal muscle regeneration because it can promote the growth and differentiation of myoblasts. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to fabricate the hybrid fibre matrices that stimulate myoblasts differentiation for skeletal muscle regeneration. Hybrid fibre matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and collagen (Col) impregnated with GO (GO-PLGA-Col) were successfully fabricated using an electrospinning process. Our results indicated that the GO-PLGA-Col hybrid matrices were comprised of randomly-oriented continuous fibres with a three-dimensional non-woven porous structure. Compositional analysis showed that GO was dispersed uniformly throughout the GO-PLGA-Col matrices. In addition, the hydrophilicity of the fabricated matrices was significantly increased by blending with a small amount of Col and GO. The attachment and proliferation of the C2C12 skeletal myoblasts were significantly enhanced on the GO-PLGA-Col hybrid matrices. Furthermore, the GO-PLGA-Col matrices stimulated the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 skeletal myoblasts, which was enhanced further under the culture conditions of the differentiation media. Taking our findings into consideration, it is suggested that the GO-PLGA-Col hybrid fibre matrices can be exploited as potential biomimetic scaffolds for skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration because these GO

  4. Stem cell and biomaterials research in dental tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Horst, Orapin V; Chavez, Miquella G; Jheon, Andrew H; Desai, Tejal; Klein, Ophir D

    2012-07-01

    This review summarizes approaches used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, with a focus on dental applications. Dental caries and periodontal disease are the most common diseases resulting in tissue loss. To replace or regenerate new tissues, various sources of stem cells have been identified such as somatic stem cells from teeth and peridontium. Advances in biomaterial sciences including microfabrication, self-assembled biomimetic peptides, and 3-dimensional printing hold great promise for whole-organ or partial tissue regeneration to replace teeth and periodontium.

  5. Bone Regeneration Based on Tissue Engineering Conceptions — A 21st Century Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Jan; Woodruff, Maria A.; Epari, Devakara R.; Steck, Roland; Glatt, Vaida; Dickinson, Ian C.; Choong, Peter F. M.; Schuetz, Michael A.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Bone Tissue Engineering in the field of Regenerative Medicine has been the topic of substantial research over the past two decades. Technological advances have improved orthopaedic implants and surgical techniques for bone reconstruction. However, improvements in surgical techniques to reconstruct bone have been limited by the paucity of autologous materials available and donor site morbidity. Recent advances in the development of biomaterials have provided attractive alternatives to bone grafting expanding the surgical options for restoring the form and function of injured bone. Specifically, novel bioactive (second generation) biomaterials have been developed that are characterised by controlled action and reaction to the host tissue environment, whilst exhibiting controlled chemical breakdown and resorption with an ultimate replacement by regenerating tissue. Future generations of biomaterials (third generation) are designed to be not only osteoconductive but also osteoinductive, i.e. to stimulate regeneration of host tissues by combining tissue engineering and in situ tissue regeneration methods with a focus on novel applications. These techniques will lead to novel possibilities for tissue regeneration and repair. At present, tissue engineered constructs that may find future use as bone grafts for complex skeletal defects, whether from post-traumatic, degenerative, neoplastic or congenital/developmental “origin” require osseous reconstruction to ensure structural and functional integrity. Engineering functional bone using combinations of cells, scaffolds and bioactive factors is a promising strategy and a particular feature for future development in the area of hybrid materials which are able to exhibit suitable biomimetic and mechanical properties. This review will discuss the state of the art in this field and what we can expect from future generations of bone regeneration concepts. PMID:26273505

  6. Review: tissue engineering for regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Temenoff, J S; Mikos, A G

    2000-03-01

    Joint pain due to cartilage degeneration is a serious problem, affecting people of all ages. Although many techniques, often surgical, are currently employed to treat this affliction, none have had complete success. Recent advances in biology and materials science have pushed tissue engineering to the forefront of new cartilage repair techniques. This review seeks to condense information for the biomaterialist interested in developing materials for this application. Articular cartilage anatomy, types of injury, and current repair methods are explained. The need for biomaterials, current commonly used materials for tissue-engineered cartilage, and considerations in scale-up of cell-biomaterial constructs are summarized.

  7. Geomicrobiological Regeneration of Iron Sulfides in Engineered barrier Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannela, R.; Adriaens, P.; Hayes, K. F.

    2005-12-01

    The reactive capacity of iron sulfide-based permeable reactive barriers (PRB) to complex and co-precipitate heavy metal ions from groundwater will depend on the potential for regeneration of reactive FeS during the expected lifetime of the PRB. FeS reactivity may decrease in a PRB in time as the result of the following processes: (i) oxidation of FeS and the formation of ferric iron (Fe(III)) oxide solids in the presence of oxygenated groundwater at the entrance of the PRB, (ii) oxidation of FeS in the presence of redox active metals like As(V) with the formation of ferric solids, (iii) co-precipitation of heavy metals within the PRB with the reactive FeS leading to the formation of insoluble metal sulfides co-precipitates with the concomitant release of ferrous iron and formation of ferrous (Fe(II) oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate solids, (iv) clogging of the PRB structure due to formation of precipitate products from processes (i) - (iii).. We have demonstrated the formation of triolite in the presence of an oxidized form of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), various sulfate concentrations, and biomass densities for the sulfate reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio vulgaris. This result has allowed us to demonstrate the feasibility of regeneration of FeS from the ferric oxide and hydroxide solids that may be produced under scenarios (i) and (ii) above as well as to establish the electron donor and acceptor requirements for this SRB. Using Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, both HFO and soluble complexed forms of ferric iron gave rise to the formation of mackinawite. The latter have been shown to react with As (V) and Cd (II) to form ferric solids. Both organisms will be used to generate FeS solids in the presence of crystalline forms of ferric solids expected to form from scenarios (i) and (ii) (e.g., goethite and the mixed Fe(II)/(Fe(III) magnetite, and green rusts) and ferrous iron solids from scenarios (iii) and (iv) (Fe(II) oxides and siderite). Similar to the study

  8. A nanoparticulate injectable hydrogel as a tissue engineering scaffold for multiple growth factor delivery for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dyondi, Deepti; Webster, Thomas J; Banerjee, Rinti

    2013-01-01

    Gellan xanthan gels have been shown to be excellent carriers for growth factors and as matrices for several tissue engineering applications. Gellan xanthan gels along with chitosan nanoparticles of 297 ± 61 nm diameter, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) were employed in a dual growth factor delivery system to promote the differentiation of human fetal osteoblasts. An injectable system with ionic and temperature gelation was optimized and characterized. The nanoparticle loaded gels showed significantly improved cell proliferation and differentiation due to the sustained release of growth factors. A differentiation marker study was conducted, analyzed, and compared to understand the effect of single vs dual growth factors and free vs encapsulated growth factors. Dual growth factor loaded gels showed a higher alkaline phosphatase and calcium deposition compared to single growth factor loaded gels. The results suggest that encapsulation and stabilization of growth factors within nanoparticles and gels are promising for bone regeneration. Gellan xanthan gels also showed antibacterial effects against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, the common pathogens in implant failure. PMID:23293519

  9. Feasibility of silica-hybridized collagen hydrogels as three-dimensional cell matrices for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Sun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Seo, Seog-Jin; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-09-01

    Exploiting hydrogels for the cultivation of stem cells, aiming to provide them with physico-chemical cues suitable for osteogenesis, is a critical demand for bone engineering. Here, we developed hybrid compositions of collagen and silica into hydrogels via a simple sol-gel process. The physico-chemical and mechanical properties, degradation behavior, and bone-bioactivity were characterized in-depth; furthermore, the in vitro mesenchymal stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation behaviors within the 3D hybrid gel matrices were communicated for the first time. The hydrolyzed and condensed silica phase enabled chemical links with the collagen fibrils to form networked hybrid gels. The hybrid gels showed improved chemical stability and greater resistance to enzymatic degradation. The in vitro apatite-forming ability was enhanced by the hybrid composition. The viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hybrid gels were significantly improved in terms of the deformation resistance to an applied load and the modulus values under a dynamic oscillation. Mesenchymal stem cells adhered well to the hybrid networks and proliferated actively with substantial cytoskeletal extensions within the gel matrices. Of note, the hybrid gels substantially reduced the cell-mediated gel contraction behaviors, possibly due to the stiffer networks and higher resistance to cell-mediated degradation. Furthermore, the osteogenic differentiation of cells, including the expression of bone-associated genes and protein, was significantly upregulated within the hybrid gel matrices. Together with the physico-chemical and mechanical properties, the cellular behaviors observed within 3D gel matrices, being different from the previous approaches reported on 2D substrates, provide new information on the feasibility and usefulness of the silica-collagen system for stem cell culture and tissue engineering of hard tissues.

  10. Self-synthesized extracellular matrix contributes to mature adipose tissue regeneration in a tissue engineering chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Weiqing; Chang, Qiang; Xiao, Xiaolian; Dong, Ziqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The development of an engineered adipose tissue substitute capable of supporting reliable, predictable, and complete fat tissue regeneration would be of value in plastic and reconstructive surgery. For adipogenesis, a tissue engineering chamber provides an optimized microenvironment that is both efficacious and reproducible; however, for reasons that remain unclear, tissues regenerated in a tissue engineering chamber consist mostly of connective rather than adipose tissue. Here, we describe a chamber-based system for improving the yield of mature adipose tissue and discuss the potential mechanism of adipogenesis in tissue-chamber models. Adipose tissue flaps with independent vascular pedicles placed in chambers were implanted into rabbits. Adipose volume increased significantly during the observation period (week 1, 2, 3, 4, 16). Histomorphometry revealed mature adipose tissue with signs of adipose tissue remolding. The induced engineered constructs showed high-level expression of adipogenic (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ), chemotactic (stromal cell-derived factor 1a), and inflammatory (interleukin 1 and 6) genes. In our system, the extracellular matrix may have served as a scaffold for cell migration and proliferation, allowing mature adipose tissue to be obtained in a chamber microenvironment without the need for an exogenous scaffold. Our results provide new insights into key elements involved in the early development of adipose tissue regeneration.

  11. Tissue Engineering Whole Bones Through Endochondral Ossification: Regenerating the Distal Phalanx

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Eamon J.; Mesallati, Tariq; Kelly, Lara; Vinardell, Tatiana; Buckley, Conor T.; Kelly, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Novel strategies are urgently required to facilitate regeneration of entire bones lost due to trauma or disease. In this study, we present a novel framework for the regeneration of whole bones by tissue engineering anatomically shaped hypertrophic cartilaginous grafts in vitro that subsequently drive endochondral bone formation in vivo. To realize this, we first fabricated molds from digitized images to generate mesenchymal stem cell-laden alginate hydrogels in the shape of different bones (the temporomandibular joint [TMJ] condyle and the distal phalanx). These constructs could be stimulated in vitro to generate anatomically shaped hypertrophic cartilaginous tissues that had begun to calcify around their periphery. Constructs were then formed into the shape of the distal phalanx to create the hypertrophic precursor of the osseous component of an engineered long bone. A layer of cartilage engineered through self-assembly of chondrocytes served as the articular surface of these constructs. Following chondrogenic priming and subcutaneous implantation, the hypertrophic phase of the engineered phalanx underwent endochondral ossification, leading to the generation of a vascularized bone integrated with a covering layer of stable articular cartilage. Furthermore, spatial bone deposition within the construct could be modulated by altering the architecture of the osseous component before implantation. These findings open up new horizons to whole limb regeneration by recapitulating key aspects of normal bone development. PMID:26309799

  12. Advances in Determining Soil Matric Potential Using an Engineered Porous Ceramic and Dielectric Permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos, D. R.; Campbell, C. S.; Campbell, G. S.

    2007-12-01

    Soil water potential is a key parameter for determining water availability for plant growth, water flow, and soil stability. Although an in situ measurement of matric potential has been the focus of considerable research over the years, existing solutions still have many draw backs such as high maintenance, limited longevity, individual calibration requirements, high cost, and small measurement range. The objective of this research was to develop a sensor that could be used in the field to accurately measure soil matric potential without the limitations noted above. The sensor, which consisted of a dielectric sensor sandwiched between porous ceramic, was tested over a range soil types, electrical conductivties, and temperatures to calibrate and characterize its output. Data show consistent calibration curves between sensor output and actual soil matric potential over a variety of soil textures and electrical conductivities. Although temperature showed an effect on sensor output, it was low compared to overall sensor output. Likewise, salt effects were not visible in saturated matrices up to 10 dS/m. Data suggest the sensor will be an effective and robust tool to determine in situ matric potential.

  13. Stem Cell-based Tissue Engineering Approaches for Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patrick T.; Handorf, Andrew M.; Jeon, Won Bae; Li, Wan-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering is an ever evolving field that holds promise in treating numerous musculoskeletal diseases and injuries. An important impetus in the development of the field was the discovery and implementation of stem cells. The utilization of mesenchymal stem cells, and later embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, opens new arenas for tissue engineering and presents the potential of developing stem cell-based therapies for disease treatment. Multipotent and pluripotent stem cells can produce various lineage tissues, and allow for derivation of a tissue that may be comprised of multiple cell types. As the field grows, the combination of biomaterial scaffolds and bioreactors provides methods to create an environment for stem cells that better represent their microenvironment for new tissue formation. As technologies for the fabrication of biomaterial scaffolds advance, the ability of scaffolds to modulate stem cell behavior advances as well. The composition of scaffolds could be of natural or synthetic materials and could be tailored to enhance cell self-renewal and/or direct cell fates. In addition to biomaterial scaffolds, studies of tissue development and cellular microenvironments have determined other factors, such as growth factors and oxygen tension, that are crucial to the regulation of stem cell activity. The overarching goal of stem cell-based tissue engineering research is to precisely control differentiation of stem cells in culture. In this article, we review current developments in tissue engineering, focusing on several stem cell sources, induction factors including growth factors, oxygen tension, biomaterials, and mechanical stimulation, and the internal and external regulatory mechanisms that govern proliferation and differentiation. PMID:23432679

  14. Engineering Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration: A novel chassis strain for whole-cell catalysis.

    PubMed

    Geier, Martina; Brandner, Christoph; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Hall, Mélanie; Hartner, Franz S; Glieder, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Many synthetically useful reactions are catalyzed by cofactor-dependent enzymes. As cofactors represent a major cost factor, methods for efficient cofactor regeneration are required especially for large-scale synthetic applications. In order to generate a novel and efficient host chassis for bioreductions, we engineered the methanol utilization pathway of Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration. By deleting the genes coding for dihydroxyacetone synthase isoform 1 and 2 (DAS1 and DAS2), NADH regeneration via methanol oxidation (dissimilation) was increased significantly. The resulting Δdas1 Δdas2 strain performed better in butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH1) based whole-cell conversions. While the BDH1 catalyzed acetoin reduction stopped after 2 h reaching ~50% substrate conversion when performed in the wild type strain, full conversion after 6 h was obtained by employing the knock-out strain. These results suggest that the P. pastoris Δdas1 Δdas2 strain is capable of supplying the actual biocatalyst with the cofactor over a longer reaction period without the over-expression of an additional cofactor regeneration system. Thus, focusing the intrinsic carbon flux of this methylotrophic yeast on methanol oxidation to CO2 represents an efficient and easy-to-use strategy for NADH-dependent whole-cell conversions. At the same time methanol serves as co-solvent, inductor for catalyst and cofactor regeneration pathway expression and source of energy.

  15. Engineering Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration: A novel chassis strain for whole-cell catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Martina; Brandner, Christoph; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Hall, Mélanie; Hartner, Franz S

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many synthetically useful reactions are catalyzed by cofactor-dependent enzymes. As cofactors represent a major cost factor, methods for efficient cofactor regeneration are required especially for large-scale synthetic applications. In order to generate a novel and efficient host chassis for bioreductions, we engineered the methanol utilization pathway of Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration. By deleting the genes coding for dihydroxyacetone synthase isoform 1 and 2 (DAS1 and DAS2), NADH regeneration via methanol oxidation (dissimilation) was increased significantly. The resulting Δdas1 Δdas2 strain performed better in butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH1) based whole-cell conversions. While the BDH1 catalyzed acetoin reduction stopped after 2 h reaching ~50% substrate conversion when performed in the wild type strain, full conversion after 6 h was obtained by employing the knock-out strain. These results suggest that the P. pastoris Δdas1 Δdas2 strain is capable of supplying the actual biocatalyst with the cofactor over a longer reaction period without the over-expression of an additional cofactor regeneration system. Thus, focusing the intrinsic carbon flux of this methylotrophic yeast on methanol oxidation to CO2 represents an efficient and easy-to-use strategy for NADH-dependent whole-cell conversions. At the same time methanol serves as co-solvent, inductor for catalyst and cofactor regeneration pathway expression and source of energy. PMID:26664594

  16. Engineering scaffolds integrated with calcium sulfate and oyster shell for enhanced bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue; Yang, Shizhou; Liu, Jianli; Xu, Huazi; Shi, Zhongli; Lin, Zhongqing; Ying, Xiaozhou; Guo, Peng; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shigui; Huang, Qing; Peng, Lei

    2014-08-13

    Engineering scaffolds combinging natural biomineral and artificially synthesized material hold promising potential for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, novel bioactive calcium sulfate/oyster shell (CS/OS) composites were prepared. Comparing to CS scaffold, the CS/OS composites with a controllable degradation rate displayed enhanced mineral nodule formation, higher alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and increased proliferation rate while treated osteocytes. In CS/OS composites group, elevated mRNA levels of key osteogenic genes including bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix (Osx), and osteocalcin (OCN) were observed. Furthermore, The up-regulation of BMP-2 and type I collagen (COL-I) was observed for CS/OS composites relative to a CS group. Scaffolds were implanted into critical-sized femur cavity defects in rabbits to investigate the osteogenic capacity of the composites in vivo. The CS/OS scaffolds with proper suitable times and mechanical strength strongly promoted osteogenic tissue regeneration relative to the regeneration capacity of CS scaffolds, as indicated by the results of histological staining. These results suggest that the OS-modified CS engineering scaffolds with improved mechanical properties and bioactivity would facilitate the development of a new strategy for clinic bone defect regeneration.

  17. The use of bi-layer silk fibroin scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa matrices to support bladder tissue regeneration in a rat model of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeun Goo; Algarrahi, Khalid; Franck, Debra; Tu, Duong D.; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Kaplan, David L.; Estrada, Carlos R.; Mauney, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse side-effects associated with enterocystoplasty for neurogenic bladder reconstruction have spawned the need for the development of alternative graft substitutes. Bi-layer silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) matrices were investigated for their ability to support bladder tissue regeneration and function in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Bladder augmentation was performed with each scaffold configuration in SCI animals for 10 wk of implantation and compared to non-augmented control groups (normal and SCI alone). Animals subjected to SCI alone exhibited a 72% survival rate (13/18) while SCI rats receiving SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds displayed respective survival rates of 83% (10/12) and 75% (9/12) over the course of the study period. Histological (Masson’s trichrome analysis) and immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluations demonstrated both implant groups supported de novo formation of smooth muscle layers with contractile protein expression [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and SM22α] as well as maturation of multi-layer urothelia expressing cytokeratin (CK) and uroplakin 3A proteins. Histomorphometric analysis revealed bi-layer SF and SIS scaffolds respectively reconstituted 64% and 56% of the level of α-SMA+ smooth muscle bundles present in SCI-alone controls, while similar degrees of CK+ urothelium across all experimental groups were detected. Parallel evaluations showed similar degrees of vascular area and synaptophysin+ boutons in all regenerated tissues compared to SCI-alone controls. In addition, improvements in certain urodynamic parameters in SCI animals, such as decreased peak intravesical pressure, following implantation with both matrix configurations were also observed. The data presented in this study detail the ability of acellular SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds to support formation of innervated, vascularized smooth muscle and urothelial tissues in a neurogenic bladder model. PMID:24917031

  18. Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Seifu, Dawit G; Bono, Nina; Unsworth, Larry; Mequanint, Kibret; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-06-16

    Synthetic materials are known to initiate clinical complications such as inflammation, stenosis, and infections when implanted as vascular substitutes. Collagen has been extensively used for a wide range of biomedical applications and is considered a valid alternative to synthetic materials due to its inherent biocompatibility (i.e., low antigenicity, inflammation, and cytotoxic responses). However, the limited mechanical properties and the related low hand-ability of collagen gels have hampered their use as scaffold materials for vascular tissue engineering. Therefore, the rationale behind this work was first to engineer cellularized collagen gels into a tubular-shaped geometry and second to enhance smooth muscle cells driven reorganization of collagen matrix to obtain tissues stiff enough to be handled. The strategy described here is based on the direct assembling of collagen and smooth muscle cells (construct) in a 3D cylindrical geometry with the use of a molding technique. This process requires a maturation period, during which the constructs are cultured in a bioreactor under static conditions (without applied external dynamic mechanical constraints) for 1 or 2 weeks. The "static bioreactor" provides a monitored and controlled sterile environment (pH, temperature, gas exchange, nutrient supply and waste removal) to the constructs. During culture period, thickness measurements were performed to evaluate the cells-driven remodeling of the collagen matrix, and glucose consumption and lactate production rates were measured to monitor the cells metabolic activity. Finally, mechanical and viscoelastic properties were assessed for the resulting tubular constructs. To this end, specific protocols and a focused know-how (manipulation, gripping, working in hydrated environment, and so on) were developed to characterize the engineered tissues.

  19. Human urinary bladder regeneration through tissue engineering - an analysis of 131 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Adamowicz, Jan; Sharma, Arun K; Drewa, Tomasz

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of urinary bladder tissue with functional equivalents remains one of the most challenging problems of reconstructive urology over the last several decades. The gold standard treatment for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy is the ileal conduit or neobladder; however, this technique is associated with numerous complications including electrolyte imbalances, mucus production, and the potential for malignant transformation. Tissue engineering techniques provide the impetus to construct functional bladder substitutes de novo. Within this review, we have thoroughly perused the literature utilizing PubMed in order to identify clinical studies involving bladder reconstruction utilizing tissue engineering methodologies. The idea of urinary bladder regeneration through tissue engineering dates back to the 1950s. Many natural and synthetic biomaterials such as plastic mold, gelatin sponge, Japanese paper, preserved dog bladder, lyophilized human dura, bovine pericardium, small intestinal submucosa, bladder acellular matrix, or composite of collagen and polyglycolic acid were used for urinary bladder regeneration with a wide range of outcomes. Recent progress in the tissue engineering field suggest that in vitro engineered bladder wall substitutes may have expanded clinical applicability in near future but preclinical investigations on large animal models with defective bladders are necessary to optimize the methods of bladder reconstruction by tissue engineering in humans.

  20. Stem cells for cardiac regeneration by cell therapy and myocardial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Zeng, Faquan; Weisel, Richard D; Li, Ren-Ke

    2009-01-01

    Congestive heart failure, which often occurs progressively following a myocardial infarction, is characterized by impaired myocardial perfusion, ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction. Novel treatments are required to reverse these effects - especially in older patients whose endogenous regenerative responses to currently available therapies are limited by age. This review explores the current state of research for two related approaches to cardiac regeneration: cell therapy and tissue engineering. First, to evaluate cell therapy, we review the effectiveness of various cell types for their ability to limit ventricular dilatation and promote functional recovery following implantation into a damaged heart. Next, to assess tissue engineering, we discuss the characteristics of several biomaterials for their potential to physically support the infarcted myocardium and promote implanted cell survival following cardiac injury. Finally, looking ahead, we present recent findings suggesting that hybrid constructs combining a biomaterial with stem and supporting cells may be the most effective approaches to cardiac regeneration.

  1. Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration by Cell Therapy and Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Zeng, Faquan; Weisel, Richard D.; Li, Ren-Ke

    Congestive heart failure, which often occurs progressively following a myocardial infarction, is characterized by impaired myocardial perfusion, ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction. Novel treatments are required to reverse these effects - especially in older patients whose endogenous regenerative responses to currently available therapies are limited by age. This review explores the current state of research for two related approaches to cardiac regeneration: cell therapy and tissue engineering. First, to evaluate cell therapy, we review the effectiveness of various cell types for their ability to limit ventricular dilatation and promote functional recovery following implantation into a damaged heart. Next, to assess tissue engineering, we discuss the characteristics of several biomaterials for their potential to physically support the infarcted myocardium and promote implanted cell survival following cardiac injury. Finally, looking ahead, we present recent findings suggesting that hybrid constructs combining a biomaterial with stem and supporting cells may be the most effective approaches to cardiac regeneration.

  2. Performance analysis and parametric optimum criteria of a regeneration Bose-Otto engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Sanqiu; Du, Jianqiang

    2009-05-01

    A general regenerative model of the Otto engine cycle working with an ideal Bose gas is used to discuss the influence of quantum degeneracy, regeneration and finite rate heat transfer on the performance of the cycle. Based on the model, expressions for some important parameters, such as the power output and efficiency of the Bose-Otto engine cycle, are derived analytically. By means of numerical calculation and illustration, the influence of the compression ratio of the two isochoric processes and the regenerator effectiveness on the performance of the cycle are discussed and evaluated in detail. Moreover, the general optimal performance characteristics of the cycle are revealed. This analysis could provide a general theoretical tool for the optimal design and operation of real power plants.

  3. Potential of non-mulberry silk protein fibroin blended and grafted poly(Є-caprolactone) nanofibrous matrices for in vivo bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Promita; Naskar, Deboki; Maiti, Tapas K; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Das, Piyali; Nandi, Samit Kumar; Kundu, Subhas C

    2016-07-01

    An in vivo investigation is conducted to evaluate effectiveness of poly(Є-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibrous matrices, with non-mulberry silk fibroin (NSF) (from Antheraea mylitta) inclusion, for bone tissue engineering. Inclusion is achieved by either blending NSF with PCL prior to electrospinning substrates or by grafting NSF onto electrospun PCL substrates. Proceeding from our previous in vitro results, showing that NSF grafted matrices have an edge when it comes to aiding cellular adhesion and proliferation, animal trials using rabbits are planned. As this is first in vivo trial of nanofibrous scaffolds with silk fibroin from A. mylitta, aim is to both evaluate the grafted and blended scaffolds independently and compare the method of silk fibroin introduction into the nanofibrous structures. The scaffolds are implanted at bone defect site in distal metaphysis region of the rabbits' femur. Host tissue immuno-compatibility of implants is assessed from measurements of IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-α level through 4 weeks after implantation. Barring an initial inflammatory response, IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-α levels fall back at baseline values in 2 or 4 weeks, thus confirming long term compatibility. Substantial interfacial bonding strength between grafts and host bone is evidenced from mechanical push-out test. Formation of bone tissue for both implant varieties is confirmed using histological and radiological examinations along with fluorochrome labelling and scanning electron microscopy. Significantly better bone formation is observed for NSF grafted matrices. The cumulative results from in vivo tests indicate suitability of NSF grafted PCL nanofibrous matrix as an ECM for bone repair and regrowth.

  4. Modeling Planarian Regeneration: A Primer for Reverse-Engineering the Worm

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Daniel; Beane, Wendy S.; Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of robust self-assembly and repair capabilities of complex systems would have enormous implications for basic evolutionary developmental biology as well as for transformative applications in regenerative biomedicine and the engineering of highly fault-tolerant cybernetic systems. Molecular biologists are working to identify the pathways underlying the remarkable regenerative abilities of model species that perfectly regenerate limbs, brains, and other complex body parts. However, a profound disconnect remains between the deluge of high-resolution genetic and protein data on pathways required for regeneration, and the desired spatial, algorithmic models that show how self-monitoring and growth control arise from the synthesis of cellular activities. This barrier to progress in the understanding of morphogenetic controls may be breached by powerful techniques from the computational sciences—using non-traditional modeling approaches to reverse-engineer systems such as planaria: flatworms with a complex bodyplan and nervous system that are able to regenerate any body part after traumatic injury. Currently, the involvement of experts from outside of molecular genetics is hampered by the specialist literature of molecular developmental biology: impactful collaborations across such different fields require that review literature be available that presents the key functional capabilities of important biological model systems while abstracting away from the often irrelevant and confusing details of specific genes and proteins. To facilitate modeling efforts by computer scientists, physicists, engineers, and mathematicians, we present a different kind of review of planarian regeneration. Focusing on the main patterning properties of this system, we review what is known about the signal exchanges that occur during regenerative repair in planaria and the cellular mechanisms that are thought to underlie them. By establishing an engineering

  5. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alrefai, Mohammad T; Murali, Divya; Paul, Arghya; Ridwan, Khalid M; Connell, John M; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. PMID:25999743

  6. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves. PMID:19939265

  7. Improvement of eustachian tube function by tissue-engineered regeneration of mastoid air cells.

    PubMed

    Kanemaru, Shin-ichi; Umeda, Hiroo; Yamashita, Masaru; Hiraumi, Harukazu; Hirano, Shigeru; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Ito, Juichi

    2013-02-01

    Most cases of chronic otitis media (OMC) are associated with poor development of the mastoid air cells (MACs) and poor Eustachian tube (ET) function. We have previously reported that MAC regeneration can effectively eliminate intractable OMC. In this study, we assessed the ability of regenerated MACs to restore normal gas exchange function and contribute to improved ET function. Clinical trial with control. General hospitals. Seventy-six patients with OMC, including cholesteatoma and adhesive otitis media, received tympanoplasty and MAC regeneration therapy. At the first-stage of tympanoplasty, artificial pneumatic bones and/or autologous bone fragments were implanted into the opened mastoid cavity. At the 2nd-stage operation, a nitrous oxide (N2O) gas study was performed in 10 patients to measure middle ear pressure (MEP). For the control group, MEP was measured in five patients with good MAC development during cochlear implantation or facial nerve decompression. ET function was measured twice in each patient, once before the 1st operation and 6 months after the second operation. At the 2nd-stage operation, in all cases with regenerated MACs and in the normal control group, MEP changed after administration of N2O. In contrast, no change in MEP was observed in cases with unregenerated MACs. In 70% (n = 37/53) of the regenerated MAC group, ET function was improved, whereas improvement of ET function was observed in only 13% (n = 3/23) of the unregenerated MAC group. Tissue-engineered regeneration of MACs improves ET function and gas exchange in the middle ear. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Concise review: tissue-engineered skin and nerve regeneration in burn treatment.

    PubMed

    Blais, Mathieu; Parenteau-Bareil, Rémi; Cadau, Sébastien; Berthod, François

    2013-07-01

    Burns not only destroy the barrier function of the skin but also alter the perceptions of pain, temperature, and touch. Different strategies have been developed over the years to cover deep and extensive burns with the ultimate goal of regenerating the barrier function of the epidermis while recovering an acceptable aesthetic aspect. However, patients often complain about a loss of skin sensation and even cutaneous chronic pain. Cutaneous nerve regeneration can occur from the nerve endings of the wound bed, but it is often compromised by scar formation or anarchic wound healing. Restoration of pain, temperature, and touch perceptions should now be a major challenge to solve in order to improve patients' quality of life. In addition, the cutaneous nerve network has been recently highlighted to play an important role in epidermal homeostasis and may be essential at least in the early phase of wound healing through the induction of neurogenic inflammation. Although the nerve regeneration process was studied largely in the context of nerve transections, very few studies have been aimed at developing strategies to improve it in the context of cutaneous wound healing. In this concise review, we provide a description of the characteristics of and current treatments for extensive burns, including tissue-engineered skin approaches to improve cutaneous nerve regeneration, and describe prospective uses for autologous skin-derived adult stem cells to enhance recovery of the skin's sense of touch.

  9. Novel and simple alternative to create nanofibrillar matrices of interest for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sohier, Jérôme; Corre, Pierre; Perret, Christophe; Pilet, Paul; Weiss, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Synthetic analogs to natural extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer level are of great potential for regenerative medicine. This study introduces a novel and simple method to produce polymer nanofibers and evaluates the properties of the resulting structures, as well as their suitability to support cells and their potential interest for bone and vascular applications. The devised approach diffracts a polymer solution by means of a spraying apparatus and of an airstream as sole driving force. The resulting nanofibers were produced in an effective fashion and a factorial design allowed isolating the processing parameters that control nanofiber size and distribution. The nanofibrillar matrices revealed to be of very high porosity and were effectively colonized by human bone marrow mesenchymal cells, while allowing ECM production and osteoblastic differentiation. In vivo, the matrices provided support for new bone formation and provided a good patency as small diameter vessel grafts.

  10. Tissue engineering strategies applied in the regeneration of the human intervertebral disk.

    PubMed

    Silva-Correia, Joana; Correia, Sandra I; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Reis, Rui L

    2013-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common painful conditions that lead to work absenteeism, medical visits, and hospitalization. The majority of cases showing signs of LBP are due to age-related degenerative changes in the intervertebral disk (IVD), which are, in fact, associated with multiple spine pathologies. Traditional and more conservative procedures/clinical approaches only treat the symptoms of disease and not the underlying pathology, thus limiting their long-term efficiency. In the last few years, research and development of new approaches aiming to substitute the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus tissue and stimulate its regeneration has been conducted. Regeneration of the damaged IVD using tissue engineering strategies appears particularly promising in pre-clinical studies. Meanwhile, surgical techniques must be adapted to this new approach in order to be as minimally invasive as possible, reducing recovering time and side effects associated to traditional surgeries. In this review, the current knowledge on IVD, its associated pathologies and current surgical procedures are summarized. Furthermore, it also provides a succinct and up-to-date overview on regenerative medicine research, especially on the newest tissue engineering strategies for IVD regeneration.

  11. Intervertebral disc regeneration: from the degenerative cascade to molecular therapy and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Di Martino, Alberto; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    Low back pain is one of the major health problems in industrialized countries, as a leading source of disability in the working population. Intervertebral disc degeneration has been identified as its main cause, being a progressive process mainly characterized by alteration of extracellular matrix composition and water content. Many factors are involved in the degenerative cascade, such as anabolism/catabolism imbalance, reduction of nutrition supply and progressive cell loss. Currently available treatments are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consisting of disc removal are often necessary. Recent advances in our understanding of intervertebral disc biology led to an increased interest in the development of novel biological treatments aimed at disc regeneration. Growth factors, gene therapy, stem cell transplantation and biomaterials-based tissue engineering might support intervertebral disc regeneration by overcoming the limitation of the self-renewal mechanism. The aim of this paper is to overview the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge from the degenerative cascade of the intervertebral disc to the latest molecular, cell-based therapies and tissue-engineering strategies for disc regeneration.

  12. Should we use cells, biomaterials, or tissue engineering for cartilage regeneration?

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Jonathan C; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-04-18

    For a long time, cartilage has been a major focus of the whole field of tissue engineering, both because of the constantly growing need for more effective options for joint repair and the expectation that this apparently simple tissue will be easy to engineer. After several decades, cartilage regeneration has proven to be anything but easy. With gratifying progress in our understanding of the factors governing cartilage development and function, and cell therapy being successfully used for several decades, there is still a lot to do. We lack reliable methods to generate durable articular cartilage that would resemble the original tissue lost to injury or disease. The question posed here is whether the answer would come from the methods using cells, biomaterials, or tissue engineering. We present a concise review of some of the most meritorious efforts in each area, and propose that the solution will most likely emerge from the ongoing attempts to recapitulate certain aspects of native cartilage development. While an ideal recipe for cartilage regeneration is yet to be formulated, we believe that it will contain cell, biomaterial, and tissue engineering approaches, blended into an effective method for seamless repair of articular cartilage.

  13. Vascularization strategies of engineered tissues and their application in cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuetao; Altalhi, Wafa; Nunes, Sara S

    2016-01-15

    The primary function of vascular networks is to transport blood and deliver oxygen and nutrients to tissues, which occurs at the interface of the microvasculature. Therefore, the formation of the vessels at the microcirculatory level, or angiogenesis, is critical for tissue regeneration and repair. Current strategies for vascularization of engineered tissues have incorporated multi-disciplinary approaches including engineered biomaterials, cells and angiogenic factors. Pre-vascularization of scaffolds composed of native matrix, synthetic polymers, or other biological materials can be achieved through the use of single cells in mono or co-culture, in combination or not with angiogenic factors or by the use of isolated vessels. The advance of these methods, together with a growing understanding of the biology behind vascularization, has facilitated the development of vascularization strategies for engineered tissues with therapeutic potential for tissue regeneration and repair. Here, we review the different cell-based strategies utilized to pre-vascularize engineered tissues and in making more complex vascularized cardiac tissues for regenerative medicine applications.

  14. Finite element analysis of dynamic energy transfer in a Stirling engine regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S.; Larson, V. H.

    The application of the finite element method (FEM) to characterizing the Stirling engine is demonstrated. An assumption of laminar and one-dimensional flow is made, and the FEM model describes the regenerator and contiguous portions of the heater and cooler. The dead volume is accounted for and gas velocity is set equal to piston velocity. Constant temperatures are chosen for the heater and cooler in the mesh, and the regenerator mesh temperature is computed at nodal points as a cosine distribution between the boundary values at the heater and cooler. Energy, and mass conservation equations are defined, as are the equation of state for an ideal gas and auxiliary equations for viscosity and heat transfer coefficients. Details of the Eulerian FEM formulation in Galerkin form are provided, as are the solution method for the matrix equations.

  15. Engineering redox cofactor regeneration for improved pentose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Verho, Ritva; Londesborough, John; Penttilä, Merja; Richard, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Pentose fermentation to ethanol with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is slow and has a low yield. A likely reason for this is that the catabolism of the pentoses D-xylose and L-arabinose through the corresponding fungal pathways creates an imbalance of redox cofactors. The process, although redox neutral, requires NADPH and NAD+, which have to be regenerated in separate processes. NADPH is normally generated through the oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway by the action of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (ZWF1). To facilitate NADPH regeneration, we expressed the recently discovered gene GDP1, which codes for a fungal NADP+-dependent D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP-GAPDH) (EC 1.2.1.13), in an S. cerevisiae strain with the D-xylose pathway. NADPH regeneration through an NADP-GAPDH is not linked to CO2 production. The resulting strain fermented D-xylose to ethanol with a higher rate and yield than the corresponding strain without GDP1; i.e., the levels of the unwanted side products xylitol and CO2 were lowered. The oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway is the main natural path for NADPH regeneration. However, use of this pathway causes wasteful CO2 production and creates a redox imbalance on the path of anaerobic pentose fermentation to ethanol because it does not regenerate NAD+. The deletion of the gene ZWF1 (which codes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), in combination with overexpression of GDP1 further stimulated D-xylose fermentation with respect to rate and yield. Through genetic engineering of the redox reactions, the yeast strain was converted from a strain that produced mainly xylitol and CO2 from D-xylose to a strain that produced mainly ethanol under anaerobic conditions.

  16. The application of tissue engineering to regeneration of pulp and dentin in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Misako; Akamine, Akifumi

    2005-10-01

    Caries, pulpitis, and apical periodontitis increase health care costs and attendant loss of economic productivity. They ultimately result in premature tooth loss and therefore diminishing the quality of life. Advances in vital pulp therapy with pulp stem/progenitor cells might give impetus to regenerate dentin-pulp complex without the removal of the whole pulp. Tissue engineering is the science of design and manufacture of new tissues to replace lost parts because of diseases including cancer and trauma. The three key ingredients for tissue engineering are signals for morphogenesis, stem cells for responding to morphogens and the scaffold of extracellular matrix. In preclinical studies cell therapy and gene therapy have been developed for many tissues and organs such as bone, heart, liver, and kidney as a means of delivering growth factors, cytokines, or morphogens with stem/progenitor cells in a scaffold to the sites of tissue injury to accelerate and/or induce a natural biological regeneration. The pulp tissue contains stem/progenitor cells that potentially differentiate into odontoblasts in response to bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). There are two strategies to regenerate dentin. First, is in vivo therapy, where BMP proteins or BMP genes are directly applied to the exposed or amputated pulp. Second is ex vivo therapy and consists of isolation of stem/progenitor cells from pulp tissue, differentiation into odontoblasts with recombinant BMPs or BMP genes and finally transplanted autogenously to regenerate dentin. This review is focused on the recent progress in this area and discusses the barriers and challenges for clinical utility in endodontics.

  17. Comparative analysis of poly-glycolic acid-based hybrid polymer starter matrices for in vitro tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Generali, Melanie; Kehl, Debora; Capulli, Andrew K; Parker, Kevin K; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Weber, Benedikt

    2017-07-01

    Biodegradable scaffold matrixes form the basis of any in vitro tissue engineering approach by acting as a temporary matrix for cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition until the scaffold is replaced by neo-tissue. In this context several synthetic polymers have been investigated, however a concise systematic comparative analyses is missing. Therefore, the present study systematically compares three frequently used polymers for the in vitro engineering of extracellular matrix based on poly-glycolic acid (PGA) under static as well as dynamic conditions. Ultra-structural analysis was used to examine the polymers structure. For tissue engineering (TE) three human fibroblast cell lines were seeded on either PGA-poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (P4HB), PGA-poly-lactic acid (PLA) or PGA-poly-caprolactone (PCL) patches. These patches were analyzed after 21days of culture qualitative by histology and quantitative by determining the amount of DNA, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline. We found that PGA-P4HB and PGA-PLA scaffolds enhance tissue formation significantly higher than PGA-PCL scaffolds (p<0.05). Polymer remnants were visualized by polarization microscopy. In addition, biomechanical properties of the tissue engineered patches were determined in comparison to native tissue. This study may allow future studies to specifically select certain polymer starter matrices aiming at specific tissue properties of the bioengineered constructs in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. To engineer is to create: the link between engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Williams, David F

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a radically different approach to reconstruction of the body following degenerative diseases, trauma or chronic debilitating conditions. Although there have been some successes, tissue engineering is not yet delivering significant progress in terms of clinical outcomes and commercialization. Part of the problem is that we have failed to understand what tissue engineering really means and to appreciate that engineering is synonymous with creation. These processes involve many different phases and there has been minimal integration of these phases within tissue-engineering paradigms. The conventional concept, based upon a temporal sequence from sourcing cells through to the incorporation of generated tissue into a host, has to be transformed by a systems engineering approach in which all biological and technological phases, and the inter-relationships between them, are fully integrated. It might be that real success will not be achieved until systems biology is superimposed onto this systems engineering paradigm.

  19. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Itaba, Noriko; Matsumi, Yoshiaki; Okinaka, Kaori; Ashla, An Afida; Kono, Yohei; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Morimoto, Minoru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Shiota, Goshi

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hexachlorophene rapidly induced hepatic differentiation of human MSCs judging from expression of liver-specific genes and proteins, PAS staining, and urea production. The effect of orthotopic transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets against acute liver injury was examined in one-layered to three-layered cell sheets system. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets enhanced liver regeneration and suppressed liver injury. The survival rates of the mice were significantly improved. High expression of complement C3 and its downstream signals including C5a, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT-3 pathway was observed in hepatic cell sheets-grafted tissues. Expression of phosphorylated EGFR and thioredoxin is enhanced, resulting in reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that orthotopic transplantation of hepatic cell sheets manufactured from MSCs accelerates liver regeneration through complement C3, EGFR and thioredoxin. PMID:26553591

  20. A comparative study of zwitterionic ligands-mediated mineralization and the potential of mineralized zwitterionic matrices for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pingsheng; Emmons, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Cationic and anionic residues of the extracellular matrices (ECM) of bone play synergistic roles in recruiting precursor ions and templating the nucleation, growth and crystalline transformations of calcium apatite in natural biomineralization. We previously reported that zwitterionic sulfobetaine ligands can template extensive 3-dimensional (3-D) hydroxyapaptite (HA)-mineralization of photo-crosslinked polymethacrylatehydrogels. Here, we compared the potency of two other major zwitterionic ligands, phosphobetaine and carboxybetaine, with that of the sulfobetaine in mediating 3-D mineralization using the crosslinked polymethacrylate hydrogel platform. We confirmed that all three zwitterionic hydrogels were able to effectively template 3-D mineralization, supporting the general ability of zwitterions to mediate templated mineralization. Among them, however, sulfobetaine and phosphobetaine hydrogels templated denser 3-D mineralizationthan the carboxybetaine hydrogel, likely due to their higher free water fractions and better maintenance of zwitterionic nature throughout the pH-changes during the in vitro mineralization process. We further demonstrated that the extensively mineralized zwitterionic hydrogels could be exploited for efficient retention (e.g. 99% retention after 24-h incubation in PBS) of osteogenic growth factor recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and subsequent sustained local release with retained bioactivity. Combined with the excellent cytocompatibility of all three zwitterionic hydrogels and the significantly improved cell adhesive properties of their mineralized matrices, these materials could find promising applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25558374

  1. Hydrogels as extracellular matrices for skeletal tissue engineering: state-of-the-art and novel application in organ printing.

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Alblas, Jacqueline; de Wijn, Joost R; Hennink, Wim E; Verbout, Ab J; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2007-08-01

    Organ printing, a novel approach in tissue engineering, applies layered computer-driven deposition of cells and gels to create complex 3-dimensional cell-laden structures. It shows great promise in regenerative medicine, because it may help to solve the problem of limited donor grafts for tissue and organ repair. The technique enables anatomical cell arrangement using incorporation of cells and growth factors at predefined locations in the printed hydrogel scaffolds. This way, 3-dimensional biological structures, such as blood vessels, are already constructed. Organ printing is developing fast, and there are exciting new possibilities in this area. Hydrogels are highly hydrated polymer networks used as scaffolding materials in organ printing. These hydrogel matrices are natural or synthetic polymers that provide a supportive environment for cells to attach to and proliferate and differentiate in. Successful cell embedding requires hydrogels that are complemented with biomimetic and extracellular matrix components, to provide biological cues to elicit specific cellular responses and direct new tissue formation. This review surveys the use of hydrogels in organ printing and provides an evaluation of the recent advances in the development of hydrogels that are promising for use in skeletal regenerative medicine. Special emphasis is put on survival, proliferation and differentiation of skeletal connective tissue cells inside various hydrogel matrices.

  2. Endochondral ossification for enhancing bone regeneration: converging native extracellular matrix biomaterials and developmental engineering in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S Connor; Berkland, Cory J; Bonewald, Lynda F; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Autologous bone grafting (ABG) remains entrenched as the gold standard of treatment in bone regenerative surgery. Consequently, many marginally successful bone tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking portions of ABG's "ideal" osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic composition resembling the late reparative stage extracellular matrix (ECM) in bone fracture repair, also known as the "hard" or "bony" callus. An alternative, less common approach that has emerged in the last decade harnesses endochondral (EC) ossification through developmental engineering principles, which acknowledges that the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in developmental skeletogenesis, specifically EC ossification, are closely paralleled during native bone healing. EC ossification naturally occurs during the majority of bone fractures and, thus, can potentially be utilized to enhance bone regeneration for nearly any orthopedic indication, especially in avascular critical-sized defects where hypoxic conditions favor initial chondrogenesis instead of direct intramembranous ossification. The body's native EC ossification response, however, is not capable of regenerating critical-sized defects without intervention. We propose that an underexplored potential exists to regenerate bone through the native EC ossification response by utilizing strategies which mimic the initial inflammatory or fibrocartilaginous ECM (i.e., "pro-" or "soft" callus) observed in the early reparative stage of bone fracture repair. To date, the majority of strategies utilizing this approach rely on clinically burdensome in vitro cell expansion protocols. This review will focus on the confluence of two evolving areas, (1) native ECM biomaterials and (2) developmental engineering, which will attempt to overcome the technical, business, and regulatory challenges that persist in the area of bone regeneration. Significant attention will be given to native "raw" materials and ECM-based designs that

  3. Endochondral Ossification for Enhancing Bone Regeneration: Converging Native Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials and Developmental Engineering In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, S. Connor; Berkland, Cory J.; Bonewald, Lynda F.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous bone grafting (ABG) remains entrenched as the gold standard of treatment in bone regenerative surgery. Consequently, many marginally successful bone tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking portions of ABG's “ideal” osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic composition resembling the late reparative stage extracellular matrix (ECM) in bone fracture repair, also known as the “hard” or “bony” callus. An alternative, less common approach that has emerged in the last decade harnesses endochondral (EC) ossification through developmental engineering principles, which acknowledges that the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in developmental skeletogenesis, specifically EC ossification, are closely paralleled during native bone healing. EC ossification naturally occurs during the majority of bone fractures and, thus, can potentially be utilized to enhance bone regeneration for nearly any orthopedic indication, especially in avascular critical-sized defects where hypoxic conditions favor initial chondrogenesis instead of direct intramembranous ossification. The body's native EC ossification response, however, is not capable of regenerating critical-sized defects without intervention. We propose that an underexplored potential exists to regenerate bone through the native EC ossification response by utilizing strategies which mimic the initial inflammatory or fibrocartilaginous ECM (i.e., “pro-” or “soft” callus) observed in the early reparative stage of bone fracture repair. To date, the majority of strategies utilizing this approach rely on clinically burdensome in vitro cell expansion protocols. This review will focus on the confluence of two evolving areas, (1) native ECM biomaterials and (2) developmental engineering, which will attempt to overcome the technical, business, and regulatory challenges that persist in the area of bone regeneration. Significant attention will be given to native “raw” materials

  4. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Dilution During Active Regeneration of Aftertreatment Systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Williams, A.; Christensen, E.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) to compare lube oil dilution levels and lubricant properties for systems using late in-cylinder fuel injection for aftertreatment regeneration. Lube oil dilution was measured by gas chromatography (GC) following ASTM method D3524 to measure diesel content, by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry following a modified ASTM method D7371 to measure biodiesel content, and by a newly developed back-flush GC method that simultaneously measures both diesel and biodiesel. Heavy-duty (HD) engine testing was conducted on a 2008 6.7L Cummins ISB equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particle filter (DPF). Stage one of engine testing consisted of 10 consecutive repeats of a forced DPF regeneration event. This continuous operation with late in-cylinder fuel injection served as a method to accelerate lube-oil dilution. Stage two consisted of 16 hours of normal engine operation over a transient test cycle, which created an opportunity for any accumulated fuel in the oil sump to evaporate. Light duty (LD) vehicle testing was conducted on a 2010 VW Jetta equipped with DOC, DPF and a NOx storage catalyst (NSC). Vehicle testing comprised approximately 4,000 miles of operation on a mileage-accumulation dynamometer (MAD) using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Highway Fuel Economy Cycle because of the relatively low engine oil and exhaust temperatures, and high DPF regeneration frequency of this cycle relative to other cycles examined. Comparison of the lube oil dilution analysis methods suggests that D3524 does not measure dilution by biodiesel. The new back-flush GC method provided analysis for both diesel and biodiesel, in a shorter time and with lower detection limit. Thus all lube oil dilution results in this paper are based on this method. Analysis of the HD lube-oil samples showed only 1.5% to 1.6% fuel dilution for both fuels during continuous

  5. Translation Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurtleff, Richard

    2004-10-01

    Translation matrices together with rotation and boost matrices combine to represent spacetime symmetry transformations. A brief introduction to some of the properties of some not-so-well-known translation and momentum matrices is presented.

  6. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Bone Regeneration: Engineering the Delivery for Improved Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Isaac A.; Growney Kalaf, Emily A.; Bowlin, Gary L.; Sell, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Human bone is a tissue with a fairly remarkable inherent capacity for regeneration; however, this regenerative capacity has its limitations, and defects larger than a critical size lack the ability to spontaneously heal. As such, the development and clinical translation of effective bone regeneration modalities are paramount. One regenerative medicine approach that is beginning to gain momentum in the clinical setting is the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). PRP therapy is essentially a method for concentrating platelets and their intrinsic growth factors to stimulate and accelerate a healing response. While PRP has shown some efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo scenarios, to date its use and delivery have not been optimized for bone regeneration. Issues remain with the effective delivery of the platelet-derived growth factors to a localized site of injury, the activation and temporal release of the growth factors, and the rate of growth factor clearance. This review will briefly describe the physiological principles behind PRP use and then discuss how engineering its method of delivery may ultimately impact its ability to successfully translate to widespread clinical use. PMID:25050347

  7. Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide absorbents for lean-burn diesel engine emission control

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2010-01-23

    It is known that sulfur oxides contribute significantly and deleteriously to the overall performance of lean-burn diesel engine aftertreatment systems, especially in the case of NOx traps. A Ag-based, fast regenerable SO2 absorbent has been developed and will be described. Over a temperature range of 300oC to 550oC, it absorbs almost all of the SO2 in the simulated exhaust gases during the lean cycles and can be fully regenerated by the short rich cycles at the same temperature. Its composition has been optimized as 1 wt% Pt-5wt%Ag-SiO2, and the preferred silica source for the supporting material has been identified as inert Cabosil fumed silica. The thermal instability of Ag2O under fuel-lean conditions at 230oC and above makes it possible to fast regenerate the sulfur-loaded absorbent during the following fuel-rich cycles. Pt catalyst helps reducing Ag2SO4 during rich cycles at low temperatures. And the chemically inert fumed SiO2 support gives the absorbent long term stability. This absorbent shows great potential to work under the same lean-rich cycling conditions as those imposed on the NOx traps, and thus, can protect the downstream particulate filter and the NOx trap from sulfur poisoning.

  8. Fatigue failure of regenerator screens in a high frequency Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David R.; Alger, Donald L.; Moore, Thomas J.; Scheuermann, Coulson M.

    1987-01-01

    Failure of Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) regenerator screens was investigated. After several hours of operation the SPDE was shut down for inspection and on removing the regenerator screens, debris of unknown origin was discovered along with considerable cracking of the screens in localized areas. Metallurgical analysis of the debris determined it to be cracked-off-deformed pieces of the 41 micron thickness Type 304 stainless steel wire screen. Scanning electron microscopy of the cracked screens revealed failures occurring at wire crossovers and fatigue striations on the fracture surface of the wires. Thus, the screen failure can be characterized as a fatigue failure of the wires. The crossovers were determined to contain a 30 percent reduction in wire thickness and a highly worked microstructure occurring from the manufacturing process of the wire screens. Later it was found that reduction in wire thickness occurred because the screen fabricator had subjected it to a light cold-roll process after weaving. Installation of this screen left a clearance in the regenerator allowing the screens to move. The combined effects of the reduction in wire thickness, stress concentration (caused by screen movement), and highly worked microstructure at the wire crossovers led to the fatigue failure of the screens.

  9. Skeletal Muscle Regeneration on Protein-Grafted and Microchannel-Patterned Scaffold for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhisen; Guo, Shanshan; Ye, Dong; Chen, Jingjing; Kang, Cheng; Qiu, Shejie; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Xu, Kunjie; Lv, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU) scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF) or gelatin (PU-Gel) to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration. PMID:24175281

  10. Skeletal muscle regeneration on protein-grafted and microchannel-patterned scaffold for hypopharyngeal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhisen; Guo, Shanshan; Ye, Dong; Chen, Jingjing; Kang, Cheng; Qiu, Shejie; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Xu, Kunjie; Lv, Jingjing; Zhu, Yabin

    2013-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU) scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF) or gelatin (PU-Gel) to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration.

  11. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balañá, María Eugenia; Charreau, Hernán Eduardo; Leirós, Gustavo José

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functional hair follicle from dissociated cells propagated under defined tissue culture conditions is a challenge still pending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair follicles caused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia not only affects the patients’ psychological well-being, but also endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. It is then of great interest to find different strategies aiming to regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle under conditions proper of an adult individual. Based upon current knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells and their interactions during the embryonic hair generation and adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried to obtain mature hair follicles using different strategies and approaches depending on the causes of hair loss. This review summarizes current advances in the different experimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hair follicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesis of hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cells and tissue engineering. Most of these experiments were performed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonic or newborn origin. However, no successful strategy to generate human hair follicles from adult cells has yet been reported. This review identifies several issues that should be considered to achieve this objective. Perhaps the most important challenge is to provide three-dimensional culture conditions mimicking the structure of living tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow the expansion of specific cells while protecting their inductive properties, as well as methods for selecting populations of epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary tools to overcome the difficulties that constrain human hair follicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends shows that the number of patent applications aimed at hair follicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasing during the last decade. This

  12. Engineering bone regeneration with novel cell-laden hydrogel microfiber-injectable calcium phosphate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Ping; Wang, Lin; Bao, Chunyun; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Ren, Ke; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-06-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering is promising to create living functional tissues for bone regeneration. The implanted cells should be evenly distributed in the scaffold, be fast-released to the defect and maintain high viability in order to actively participate in the regenerative process. Herein, we report an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold containing cell-encapsulating hydrogel microfibers with desirable degradability that could deliver cells in a timely manner and maintain cell viability. Microfibers were synthesized using partially-oxidized alginate with various concentrations (0-0.8%) of fibrinogen to optimize the degradation rate of the alginate-fibrin microfibers (Alg-Fb MF). A fibrin concentration of 0.4% in Alg-Fb MF resulted in the greatest enhancement of cell migration, release and proliferation. Interestingly, a significant amount of cell-cell contact along the long-axis of the microfibers was established in Alg-0.4%Fb MF as early as day 2. The injectable tissue engineered construct for bone reconstruct was fabricated by mixing the fast-degradable Alg-0.4%Fb MF with CPC paste at 1:1 volume ratio. In vitro study showed that cells re-collected from the construct maintained good viability and osteogenic potentials. In vivo study demonstrated that the hBMSC-encapsulated CPC-MF tissue engineered construct displayed a robust capacity for bone regeneration. At 12weeks after implantation, osseous bridge in the rat mandibular defect was observed in CPC-MF-hBMSCs group with a new bone area fraction of (42.1±7.8) % in the defects, which was >3-fold that of the control group. The novel tissue-engineered construct presents an excellent prospect for a wide range of dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Through Hydrogel-Enriched Chitosan Conduits Containing Engineered Schwann Cells for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Cora; Wrobel, Sandra; Raimondo, Stefania; Rochkind, Shimon; Heimann, Claudia; Shahar, Abraham; Ziv-Polat, Ofra; Geuna, Stefano; Grothe, Claudia; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Critical length nerve defects in the rat sciatic nerve model were reconstructed with chitosan nerve guides filled with Schwann cells (SCs) containing hydrogel. The transplanted SCs were naive or had been genetically modified to overexpress neurotrophic factors, thus providing a cellular neurotrophic factor delivery system. Prior to the assessment in vivo, in vitro studies evaluating the properties of engineered SCs overexpressing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2(18kDa)) demonstrated their neurite outgrowth inductive bioactivity for sympathetic PC-12 cells as well as for dissociated dorsal root ganglion cell drop cultures. SCs within NVR-hydrogel, which is mainly composed of hyaluronic acid and laminin, were delivered into the lumen of chitosan hollow conduits with a 5% degree of acetylation. The viability and neurotrophic factor production by engineered SCs within NVR-Gel inside the chitosan nerve guides was further demonstrated in vitro. In vivo we studied the outcome of peripheral nerve regeneration after reconstruction of 15-mm nerve gaps with either chitosan/NVR-Gel/SCs composite nerve guides or autologous nerve grafts (ANGs). While ANGs did guarantee for functional sensory and motor regeneration in 100% of the animals, delivery of NVR-Gel into the chitosan nerve guides obviously impaired sufficient axonal outgrowth. This obstacle was overcome to a remarkable extent when the NVR-Gel was enriched with FGF-2(18kDa) overexpressing SCs.

  14. Enhancement of myocardial regeneration through genetic engineering of cardiac progenitor cells expressing Pim-1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kimberlee M; Cottage, Christopher T; Wu, Weitao; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie A; Avitabile, Daniele; Quijada, Pearl; Collins, Brett L; Fransioli, Jenna; Sussman, Mark A

    2009-11-24

    Despite numerous studies demonstrating the efficacy of cellular adoptive transfer for therapeutic myocardial regeneration, problems remain for donated cells with regard to survival, persistence, engraftment, and long-term benefits. This study redresses these concerns by enhancing the regenerative potential of adoptively transferred cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) via genetic engineering to overexpress Pim-1, a cardioprotective kinase that enhances cell survival and proliferation. Intramyocardial injections of CPCs overexpressing Pim-1 were given to infarcted female mice. Animals were monitored over 4, 12, and 32 weeks to assess cardiac function and engraftment of Pim-1 CPCs with echocardiography, in vivo hemodynamics, and confocal imagery. CPCs overexpressing Pim-1 showed increased proliferation and expression of markers consistent with cardiogenic lineage commitment after dexamethasone exposure in vitro. Animals that received CPCs overexpressing Pim-1 also produced greater levels of cellular engraftment, persistence, and functional improvement relative to control CPCs up to 32 weeks after delivery. Salutary effects include reduction of infarct size, greater number of c-kit(+) cells, and increased vasculature in the damaged region. Myocardial repair is significantly enhanced by genetic engineering of CPCs with Pim-1 kinase. Ex vivo gene delivery to enhance cellular survival, proliferation, and regeneration may overcome current limitations of stem cell-based therapeutic approaches.

  15. Fetal and adult fibroblasts display intrinsic differences in tendon tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiao-Mei; Chen, Jia Lin; Shen, Wei Liang; Yin, Zi; Liu, Huan Huan; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Chen, Xiao

    2014-07-03

    Injured adult tendons do not exhibit optimal healing through a regenerative process, whereas fetal tendons can heal in a regenerative fashion without scar formation. Hence, we compared FFs (mouse fetal fibroblasts) and AFs (mouse adult fibroblasts) as seed cells for the fabrication of scaffold-free engineered tendons. Our results demonstrated that FFs had more potential for tendon tissue engineering, as shown by higher levels of tendon-related gene expression. In the in situ AT injury model, the FFs group also demonstrated much better structural and functional properties after healing, with higher levels of collagen deposition and better microstructure repair. Moreover, fetal fibroblasts could increase the recruitment of fibroblast-like cells and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells to the injury site during the regeneration process. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanisms of better regeneration with FFs should be elucidated and be used to enhance adult tendon healing. This may assist in the development of future strategies to treat tendon injuries.

  16. Fetal and adult fibroblasts display intrinsic differences in tendon tissue engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiao-Mei; Chen, Jia Lin; Shen, Wei Liang; Yin, Zi; Liu, Huan Huan; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Chen, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Injured adult tendons do not exhibit optimal healing through a regenerative process, whereas fetal tendons can heal in a regenerative fashion without scar formation. Hence, we compared FFs (mouse fetal fibroblasts) and AFs (mouse adult fibroblasts) as seed cells for the fabrication of scaffold-free engineered tendons. Our results demonstrated that FFs had more potential for tendon tissue engineering, as shown by higher levels of tendon-related gene expression. In the in situ AT injury model, the FFs group also demonstrated much better structural and functional properties after healing, with higher levels of collagen deposition and better microstructure repair. Moreover, fetal fibroblasts could increase the recruitment of fibroblast-like cells and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells to the injury site during the regeneration process. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanisms of better regeneration with FFs should be elucidated and be used to enhance adult tendon healing. This may assist in the development of future strategies to treat tendon injuries. PMID:24992450

  17. Fractals in tissue engineering: toward biomimetic cell-culture matrices, microsystems and microstructured implants.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Pareja Sánchez, Beatriz; Gómez Murillo, Cristina; Urbieta Sotillo, Javier

    2013-09-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly evolving field in which the complexity of biomaterials and biostructures, with typically non-Euclidean or fractal-like geometries, has to be adequately taken into account for the promotion of enhanced and even personalized diagnostic and therapeutic solutions. This study covers the main applications of fractals in the field of tissue engineering, including their advantages for modeling biological processes and cell-culture procedures, but specially focusing on their benefits for describing the complex geometries and structures of biomaterials (both natural and synthetic), many of which have potential uses for the development of cell culture microsystems, scaffolds for tissue repair and implants for tissue repair in general. We also explore the main supporting design, simulation and manufacturing technologies, as well as the most remarkable difficulties and limitations linked to the generalized use of fractals in engineering design, and also detail some current solution proposals and future directions.

  18. Calculating linear A, B, C, and D matrices from a nonlinear dynamic engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    Digital program DYGABCD generates linear state-space models for simulating turbofan and turbojet engines over complete range of power settings and flight conditions. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is implemented on IBM 360-series computer.

  19. Approaches to evaluating weathering effects on release of engineered nanomaterials from solid matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) over the past decade has increased the potential for the transport and release of these materials into the environment. Here we present results of two separate studies designed to simulate the effects of weathering o...

  20. Enhancing nerve regeneration in the peripheral nervous system using polymeric scaffolds, stem cell engineering and nanoparticle delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anup Dutt

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complex biological process responsible for regrowth of neural tissue following a nerve injury. The main objective of this project was to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration using interdisciplinary approaches involving polymeric scaffolds, stem cell therapy, drug delivery and high content screening. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric materials such as poly (lactic acid) were used for engineering conduits with micropatterns capable of providing mechanical support and orientation to the regenerating axons and polyanhydrides for fabricating nano/microparticles for localized delivery of neurotrophic growth factors and cytokines at the site of injury. Transdifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were used as cellular replacements for lost native Schwann cells (SCs) at the injured nerve tissue. MSCs that have been transdifferentiated into an SC-like phenotype were tested as a substitute for the myelinating SCs. Also, genetically modified MSCs were engineered to hypersecrete brain- derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to secrete therapeutic factors which Schwann cell secrete. To further enhance the regeneration, nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin-4 (IL4) releasing polyanhydrides nano/microparticles were fabricated and characterized in vitro for their efficacy. Synergistic use of these proposed techniques was used for fabricating a multifunctional nerve regeneration conduit which can be used as an efficient tool for enhancing peripheral nerve regeneration.

  1. Electrospun polycaprolactone matrices with tensile properties suitable for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elamparithi, Anuradha; Punnoose, Alan M; Kuruvilla, Sarah; Ravi, Maddaly; Rao, Suresh; Paul, Solomon F D

    2016-05-01

    The extracellular environment is a complex network of functional and structural components that impart chemical and mechanical stimuli that affect cellular function and fate. Cell differentiation on three dimensional scaffolds is also determined by the modulus of the substrate. Electrospun PCL nanofibers, which mimic the extra cellular matrix, have been developed with a wide variety of solvents and their combinations. The various studies have revealed that the solvents used influence the physical and mechanical properties, resulting in scaffolds with Young's modulus in the range of 1.8-15.4 MPa, more suitable for engineering of hard tissue like bone. The current study describes the use of benign binary solvent-generated fibrous scaffolds with a Young's modulus of 36.05 ± 13.08 kPa, which is almost 50 times lower than that of scaffolds derived from the commonly used solvents, characterized with myoblast, which can be further explored for applications in muscle and soft tissue engineering.

  2. Macrophages Undergo M1-to-M2 Transition in Adipose Tissue Regeneration in a Rat Tissue Engineering Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijin; Xu, Fangfang; Wang, Zhifa; Dai, Taiqiang; Ma, Chao; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yanpu

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are involved in the full processes of tissue healing or regeneration and play an important role in the regeneration of a variety of tissues. Although recent evidence suggests the role of different macrophage phenotypes in adipose tissue expansion, metabolism, and remodeling, the spectrum of macrophage phenotype in the adipose tissue engineering field remains unknown. The present study established a rat model of adipose tissue regeneration using a tissue engineering chamber. Macrophage phenotypes were assessed during the regenerative process in the model. Neo-adipose tissue was generated 6 weeks after implantation. Macrophages were obvious in the chamber constructs 3 days after implantation, peaked at day 7, and significantly decreased thereafter. At day 3, macrophages were predominantly M1 macrophages (CCR7+), and there were few M2 macrophages (CD206+). At day 7, the percentage of M2 macrophages significantly increased and remained stable at day 14. M2 macrophages became the predominant macrophage population at 42 days. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated transition of cytokines from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory, which was consistent with the transition of macrophage phenotype from M1 to M2. These results showed distinct transition of macrophage phenotypes from a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype to an anti-inflammatory M2 in adipose tissue regeneration in our tissue engineering model. This study provides new insight into macrophage phenotype transition in the regeneration of adipose tissue.

  3. Biomimetic Engineering of Nanofibrous Gelatin Scaffolds with Noncollagenous Proteins for Enhanced Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao; Jiang, Yong; Liu, Qilin; Gao, Tian; Feng, Jian Q.; Dechow, Paul; D'Souza, Rena N.; Qin, Chunlin

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic approaches are widely used in scaffolding designs to enhance tissue regeneration. In this study, we integrated noncollagenous proteins (NCPs) from bone extracellular matrix (ECM) with three-dimensional nanofibrous gelatin (NF-Gelatin) scaffolds to form an artificial matrix (NF-Gelatin-NCPs) mimicking both the nano-structured architecture and chemical composition of natural bone ECM. Through a chemical coupling process, the NCPs were evenly distributed over all the surfaces (inner and outer) of the NF-gelatin-NCPs. The in vitro study showed that the number of osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) on the NF-Gelatin-NCPs was significantly higher than that on the NF-Gelatin after being cultured for 14 days. Both the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expression of osteogenic genes (OPN, BSP, DMP1, CON, and Runx2) were significantly higher in the NF-Gelatin-NCPs than in the NF-Gelatin at 3 weeks. Von Kossa staining, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, and microcomputed tomography all revealed a higher amount of mineral deposition in the NF-Gelatin-NCPs than in the NF-Gelatin after in vitro culturing for 3 weeks. The in vivo calvarial defect study indicated that the NF-Gelatin-NCPs recruited more host cells to the defect and regenerated a higher amount of bone than the controls after implantation for 6 weeks. Immunohistochemical staining also showed high-level mineralization of the bone matrix in the NF-Gelatin-NCPs. Taken together, both the in vitro and in vivo results confirmed that the incorporation of NCPs onto the surfaces of the NF-Gelatin scaffold significantly enhanced osteogenesis and mineralization. Biomimetic engineering of the surfaces of the NF-Gelatin scaffold with NCPs, therefore, is a promising strategy to enhance bone regeneration. PMID:23469769

  4. 3D-engineering of Cellularized Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu; Wu, Yao; Gou, Zhiyuan; Tao, Jie; Zhang, Jiumeng; Liu, Qianqi; Kang, Tianyi; Jiang, Shu; Huang, Siqing; He, Jiankang; Chen, Shaochen; Du, Yanan; Gou, Maling

    2016-08-01

    Tissue engineered conduits have great promise for bridging peripheral nerve defects by providing physical guiding and biological cues. A flexible method for integrating support cells into a conduit with desired architectures is wanted. Here, a 3D-printing technology is adopted to prepare a bio-conduit with designer structures for peripheral nerve regeneration. This bio-conduit is consisted of a cryopolymerized gelatin methacryloyl (cryoGelMA) gel cellularized with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). By modeling using 3D-printed “lock and key” moulds, the cryoGelMA gel is structured into conduits with different geometries, such as the designed multichannel or bifurcating and the personalized structures. The cryoGelMA conduit is degradable and could be completely degraded in 2-4 months in vivo. The cryoGelMA scaffold supports the attachment, proliferation and survival of the seeded ASCs, and up-regulates the expression of their neurotrophic factors mRNA in vitro. After implanted in a rat model, the bio-conduit is capable of supporting the re-innervation across a 10 mm sciatic nerve gap, with results close to that of the autografts in terms of functional and histological assessments. The study describes an indirect 3D-printing technology for fabricating cellularized designer conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration, and could lead to the development of future nerve bio-conduits for clinical use.

  5. Advances and Prospects in Tissue-Engineered Meniscal Scaffolds for Meniscus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weimin; Liu, Shuyun; Zhu, Yun; Yu, Changlong; Lu, Shibi; Yuan, Mei; Gao, Yue; Huang, Jingxiang; Yuan, Zhiguo; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Chen, Jifeng; Zhang, Li; Sui, Xiang; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus plays a crucial role in maintaining knee joint homoeostasis. Meniscal lesions are relatively common in the knee joint and are typically categorized into various types. However, it is difficult for inner avascular meniscal lesions to self-heal. Untreated meniscal lesions lead to meniscal extrusions in the long-term and gradually trigger the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA is complex. Partial meniscectomy, which is the primary method to treat a meniscal injury, only relieves short-term pain; however, it does not prevent the development of knee OA. Similarly, other current therapeutic strategies have intrinsic limitations in clinical practice. Tissue engineering technology will probably address this challenge by reconstructing a meniscus possessing an integrated configuration with competent biomechanical capacity. This review describes normal structure and biomechanical characteristics of the meniscus, discusses the relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA, and summarizes the classifications and corresponding treatment strategies for meniscal lesions to understand meniscal regeneration from physiological and pathological perspectives. Last, we present current advances in meniscal scaffolds and provide a number of prospects that will potentially benefit the development of meniscal regeneration methods. PMID:26199629

  6. 3D-engineering of Cellularized Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu; Wu, Yao; Gou, Zhiyuan; Tao, Jie; Zhang, Jiumeng; Liu, Qianqi; Kang, Tianyi; Jiang, Shu; Huang, Siqing; He, Jiankang; Chen, Shaochen; Du, Yanan; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineered conduits have great promise for bridging peripheral nerve defects by providing physical guiding and biological cues. A flexible method for integrating support cells into a conduit with desired architectures is wanted. Here, a 3D-printing technology is adopted to prepare a bio-conduit with designer structures for peripheral nerve regeneration. This bio-conduit is consisted of a cryopolymerized gelatin methacryloyl (cryoGelMA) gel cellularized with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). By modeling using 3D-printed “lock and key” moulds, the cryoGelMA gel is structured into conduits with different geometries, such as the designed multichannel or bifurcating and the personalized structures. The cryoGelMA conduit is degradable and could be completely degraded in 2-4 months in vivo. The cryoGelMA scaffold supports the attachment, proliferation and survival of the seeded ASCs, and up-regulates the expression of their neurotrophic factors mRNA in vitro. After implanted in a rat model, the bio-conduit is capable of supporting the re-innervation across a 10 mm sciatic nerve gap, with results close to that of the autografts in terms of functional and histological assessments. The study describes an indirect 3D-printing technology for fabricating cellularized designer conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration, and could lead to the development of future nerve bio-conduits for clinical use. PMID:27572698

  7. Fatigue failure of regenerator screens in a high frequency Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David R.; Alger, Donald L.; Moore, Thomas J.; Scheuermann, Coulson M.

    1988-01-01

    Failure of Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) regenerator screens was investigated. After several hours of operation the SPDE was shut down for inspection and on removing the regenator screens, debris of unknown origin was discovered along with considerable cracking of the screens in localized areas. Metallurgical analysis of the debris determined it to be cracked-off-deformed pieces of the 41 micron thickness Type 304 stainless steel wire screen. Scanning electron microscopy of the cracked screens revealed failures occurring at wire crossovers and fatigue striations on the fracture surface of the wires. Thus, the screen failure can be characterized as a fatigue failure of the wires. The crossovers were determined to contain 30 percent reduction in wire thickness and a highly worked microstructure occurring from the manufacturing process of the wire screens. Later it was found that reduction in wire thickness occurred because the screen fabricator had subjected it to a light cold-roll process after weaving. Installation of this screen left a clearance in the regenerator allowing the screens to move. The combined effects of the reduction in wire thickness, stress concentration (caused by screen movement), and highly worked microstructure at the wire crossovers led to the fatigue failure of the screens.

  8. Tissue engineering construct on the basis of multipotent stromal adipose tissue cells and Osteomatrix for regeneration of the bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Bukharova, T B; Arutyunyan, I V; Shustrov, S A; Alekseeva, I S; Fedyunina, I A; Logovskaya, L V; Volkov, A V; Rzhaninova, A A; Grigor'yan, A S; Kulakov, A A; Gol'dshtein, D V

    2011-11-01

    We developed a new method of creation of tissue engineering constructs for regeneration of the bone tissue based on the principle of free distribution of cells in a fibrin clot within a scaffold. The tissue engineering construct includes multipotent stromal adipose tissue cells committed in osteogenic lineage, platelet-rich plasma, and resorbed material on the basis of xenogeneic bone collagen. The culture of bone progenitor cells was characterized by the main markers of osteoblastic differon. The material meets all requirements for materials intended for tissue engineering. An innovative high-technological tissue engineering product for clinical application is prepared.

  9. Tissue Engineered Scaffolds for an Effective Healing and Regeneration: Reviewing Orthotopic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly stated that tissue engineering is the most promising approach to treat or replace failing tissues/organs. For this aim, a specific strategy should be planned including proper selection of biomaterials, fabrication techniques, cell lines, and signaling cues. A great effort has been pursued to develop suitable scaffolds for the restoration of a variety of tissues and a huge number of protocols ranging from in vitro to in vivo studies, the latter further differentiating into several procedures depending on the type of implantation (i.e., subcutaneous or orthotopic) and the model adopted (i.e., animal or human), have been developed. All together, the published reports demonstrate that the proposed tissue engineering approaches spread toward multiple directions. The critical review of this scenario might suggest, at the same time, that a limited number of studies gave a real improvement to the field, especially referring to in vivo investigations. In this regard, the present paper aims to review the results of in vivo tissue engineering experimentations, focusing on the role of the scaffold and its specificity with respect to the tissue to be regenerated, in order to verify whether an extracellular matrix-like device, as usually stated, could promote an expected positive outcome. PMID:25250319

  10. Tissue engineered scaffolds for an effective healing and regeneration: reviewing orthotopic studies.

    PubMed

    Baiguera, Silvia; Urbani, Luca; Del Gaudio, Costantino

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly stated that tissue engineering is the most promising approach to treat or replace failing tissues/organs. For this aim, a specific strategy should be planned including proper selection of biomaterials, fabrication techniques, cell lines, and signaling cues. A great effort has been pursued to develop suitable scaffolds for the restoration of a variety of tissues and a huge number of protocols ranging from in vitro to in vivo studies, the latter further differentiating into several procedures depending on the type of implantation (i.e., subcutaneous or orthotopic) and the model adopted (i.e., animal or human), have been developed. All together, the published reports demonstrate that the proposed tissue engineering approaches spread toward multiple directions. The critical review of this scenario might suggest, at the same time, that a limited number of studies gave a real improvement to the field, especially referring to in vivo investigations. In this regard, the present paper aims to review the results of in vivo tissue engineering experimentations, focusing on the role of the scaffold and its specificity with respect to the tissue to be regenerated, in order to verify whether an extracellular matrix-like device, as usually stated, could promote an expected positive outcome.

  11. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The traditional treatments of damaged tissue repair are unsatisfactory, especially for athletes, due to lack of donor and immune rejection. The strategy of tissue engineering may break through these limitations, and bring new hopes to tendon/ligament repair, even regeneration. Silk is a kind of natural biomaterials, which has good biocompatibility, wide range of mechanical properties and tunable physical structures; so it could be applied as tendon/ligament tissue engineering scaffolds. The silk-based scaffold has robust mechanical properties; combined with other biological ingredients, it could increase the surface area, promote more cell adhesion and improve the biocompatibility. The potential clinical application of silk-based scaffold has been confirmed by in vivo studies on tendon/ligament repairing, such as anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, achilles tendon and rotator cuff. To develop novel biomechanically stable and host integrated tissue engineered tendon/ligament needs more further micro and macro studies, combined with product development and clinical application, which will give new hope to patients with tendon/ligament injury.

  12. New Directions in Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Handorf, Andrew M.; Ionescu, Lara C.; Li, Wan-Ju; Mauck, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of nano-structure and nano-scale materials for tissue engineering applications. We detail a scaffold production method (electrospinning) for the production of nanofiber-based scaffolds that can approximate many critical features of the normal cellular microenvironment, and so foster and direct tissue formation. Further, we describe new and emerging methods to increase the applicability of these scaffolds for in vitro and in vivo application. This discussion includes a focus on methods to further functionalize scaffolds to promote cell infiltration, methods to tune scaffold mechanics to meet in vivo demands, and methods to control the release of pharmaceuticals and other biologic agents to modulate the wound environment and foster tissue regeneration. This review provides a perspective in the state-of-the-art of the production, application, and functionalization of these unique nanofibrous structures, and outlines future directions in this growing field. PMID:19751124

  13. Minimal analytical characterization of engineered nanomaterials needed for hazard assessment in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, Hans; Lynch, Iseult; Marvin, Hans J P; Dawson, Kenneth A; Berges, Markus; Braguer, Diane; Byrne, Hugh J; Casey, Alan; Chambers, Gordon; Clift, Martin J D; Elia, Giuliano; Fernandes, Teresa F; Fjellsbø, Lise B; Hatto, Peter; Juillerat, Lucienne; Klein, Christoph; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Nickel, Carmen; Riediker, Michael; Stone, Vicki

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the outcomes from a workshop of the European Network on the Health and Environmental Impact of Nanomaterials (NanoImpactNet). During the workshop, 45 experts in the field of safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials addressed the need to systematically study sets of engineered nanomaterials with specific metrics to generate a data set which would allow the establishment of dose-response relations. The group concluded that international cooperation and worldwide standardization of terminology, reference materials and protocols are needed to make progress in establishing lists of essential metrics. High quality data necessitates the development of harmonized study approaches and adequate reporting of data. Priority metrics can only be based on well-characterized dose-response relations derived from the systematic study of the bio-kinetics and bio-interactions of nanomaterials at both organism and (sub)-cellular levels. In addition, increased effort is needed to develop and validate analytical methods to determine these metrics in a complex matrix.

  14. Factors promoting increased rate of tissue regeneration: the zebrafish fin as a tool for examining tissue engineering design concepts.

    PubMed

    Boominathan, Vijay P; Ferreira, Tracie L

    2012-12-01

    Student interest in topics of tissue engineering is increasing exponentially as the number of universities offering programs in bioengineering are on the rise. Bioengineering encompasses all of the STEM categories: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Inquiry-based learning is one of the most effective techniques for promoting student learning and has been demonstrated to have a high impact on learning outcomes. We have designed program outcomes for our bioengineering program that require tiered activities to develop problem solving skills, peer evaluation techniques, and promote team work. While it is ideal to allow students to ask unique questions and design their own experiments, this can be difficult for instructors to have reagents and supplies available for a variety of activities. Zebrafish can be easily housed, and multiple variables can be tested on a large enough group to provide statistical value, lending them well to inquiry-based learning modules. We have designed a laboratory activity that takes observation of fin regeneration to the next level: analyzing conditions that may impact regeneration. Tissue engineers seek to define the optimum conditions to grow tissue for replacement parts. The field of tissue engineering is likely to benefit from understanding natural mechanisms of regeneration and the factors that influence the rate of regeneration. We have outlined the results of varying temperature on fin regeneration and propose other inquiry modules such as the role of pH in fin regeneration. Furthermore, we have provided useful tools for developing critical thinking and peer review of research ideas, assessment guidelines, and grading rubrics for the activities associated with this exercise.

  15. Factors Promoting Increased Rate of Tissue Regeneration: The Zebrafish Fin as a Tool for Examining Tissue Engineering Design Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Boominathan, Vijay P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Student interest in topics of tissue engineering is increasing exponentially as the number of universities offering programs in bioengineering are on the rise. Bioengineering encompasses all of the STEM categories: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Inquiry-based learning is one of the most effective techniques for promoting student learning and has been demonstrated to have a high impact on learning outcomes. We have designed program outcomes for our bioengineering program that require tiered activities to develop problem solving skills, peer evaluation techniques, and promote team work. While it is ideal to allow students to ask unique questions and design their own experiments, this can be difficult for instructors to have reagents and supplies available for a variety of activities. Zebrafish can be easily housed, and multiple variables can be tested on a large enough group to provide statistical value, lending them well to inquiry-based learning modules. We have designed a laboratory activity that takes observation of fin regeneration to the next level: analyzing conditions that may impact regeneration. Tissue engineers seek to define the optimum conditions to grow tissue for replacement parts. The field of tissue engineering is likely to benefit from understanding natural mechanisms of regeneration and the factors that influence the rate of regeneration. We have outlined the results of varying temperature on fin regeneration and propose other inquiry modules such as the role of pH in fin regeneration. Furthermore, we have provided useful tools for developing critical thinking and peer review of research ideas, assessment guidelines, and grading rubrics for the activities associated with this exercise. PMID:23244692

  16. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  17. CFD modeling and experimental verification of a single-stage coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler without either double-inlet or multi-bypass operating at 30-35 K using mixed stainless steel mesh regenerator matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Haizheng; Zhao, Yibo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the CFD modeling and experimental verifications of a single-stage inertance tube coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 30-35 K using mixed stainless steel mesh regenerator matrices without either double-inlet or multi-bypass. A two-dimensional axis-symmetric CFD model with the thermal non-equilibrium mode is developed to simulate the internal process, and the underlying mechanism of significantly reducing the regenerator losses with mixed matrices is discussed in detail based on the given six cases. The modeling also indicates that the combination of the given different mesh segments can be optimized to achieve the highest cooling efficiency or the largest exergy ratio, and then the verification experiments are conducted in which the satisfactory agreements between simulated and tested results are observed. The experiments achieve a no-load temperature of 27.2 K and the cooling power of 0.78 W at 35 K, or 0.29 W at 30 K, with an input electric power of 220 W and a reject temperature of 300 K.

  18. Genetically engineered stem cell-based strategies for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Santhagunam, Aruna; Madeira, Catarina; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage is frequently injured, often as a result of inflammatory rheumatic diseases or sports-related trauma. Given its nonvascular nature, articular cartilage has a limited capability for self-repair and currently the few therapeutic options still have uncertain long-term outcomes. Cell-based surgical therapies using autologous chondrocytes to repair cartilage injury have been used in the clinic for over a decade, but this approach has shown mixed results mainly due to the low number of harvested chondrocytes and the loss of cartilage-related phenotype and functionality after several passages of in vitro culture. A wide range of cell sources have been tested to circumvent chondrocyte limitations in cartilage repair, and stem cells have been presented as those that offer the greatest potential for clinical application. This review will focus on recent advances in stem cell-based strategies for articular cartilage repair, specifically focusing on the use of genetically engineered adult stem cells by conventional gene delivery methods and by gene-activated matrices. Perspectives in cartilage engineering are also addressed.

  19. Jet Penetration into a Scaled Microfabricated Stirling Cycle Regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Liyong; Simon, Terrence W.; Mantell, Susan; Ibrahim, Mournir; Gedeon, David; Tew, Roy

    2008-01-01

    The cooler and heater adjacent to the regenerator of a Stirling cycle engine have tubes or channels which form jets that pass into the regenerator while diffusing within the matrix. An inactive part of the matrix, beyond the cores of these jets, does not participate fully in the heat transfer between the flow of working fluid and the regenerator matrix material, weakening the regenerator s ability to exchange heat with the working fluid. The objective of the present program is to document this effect on the performance of the regenerator and to develop a model for generalizing the results. However, the small scales of actual Stirling regenerator matrices (on the order of tens of microns) make direct measurements of this effect very difficult. As a result, jet spreading within a regenerator matrix has not been characterized well and is poorly understood. Also, modeling is lacking experimental verification. To address this, a large-scale mockup of thirty times actual scale was constructed and operated under conditions that are dynamically similar to the engine operation. Jet penetration with round jets and slot jets into the microfabricated regenerator geometry are then measured by conventional means. The results are compared with those from a study of spreading of round jets within woven screen regenerator for further documentation of the comparative performance of the microfabricated regenerator geometry.

  20. Synthetic Bone Substitute Engineered with Amniotic Epithelial Cells Enhances Bone Regeneration after Maxillary Sinus Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Barboni, Barbara; Mangano, Carlo; Valbonetti, Luca; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Berardinelli, Paolo; Martelli, Alessandra; Muttini, Aurelio; Mauro, Annunziata; Bedini, Rossella; Turriani, Maura; Pecci, Raffaella; Nardinocchi, Delia; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Tetè, Stefano; Piattelli, Adriano; Mattioli, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence has been provided that a cell-based therapy combined with the use of bioactive materials may significantly improve bone regeneration prior to dental implant, although the identification of an ideal source of progenitor/stem cells remains to be determined. Aim In the present research, the bone regenerative property of an emerging source of progenitor cells, the amniotic epithelial cells (AEC), loaded on a calcium-phosphate synthetic bone substitute, made by direct rapid prototyping (rPT) technique, was evaluated in an animal study. Material And Methods Two blocks of synthetic bone substitute (∼0.14 cm3), alone or engineered with 1×106 ovine AEC (oAEC), were grafted bilaterally into maxillary sinuses of six adult sheep, an animal model chosen for its high translational value in dentistry. The sheep were then randomly divided into two groups and sacrificed at 45 and 90 days post implantation (p.i.). Tissue regeneration was evaluated in the sinus explants by micro-computer tomography (micro-CT), morphological, morphometric and biochemical analyses. Results And Conclusions The obtained data suggest that scaffold integration and bone deposition are positively influenced by allotransplantated oAEC. Sinus explants derived from sheep grafted with oAEC engineered scaffolds displayed a reduced fibrotic reaction, a limited inflammatory response and an accelerated process of angiogenesis. In addition, the presence of oAEC significantly stimulated osteogenesis either by enhancing bone deposition or making more extent the foci of bone nucleation. Besides the modulatory role played by oAEC in the crucial events successfully guiding tissue regeneration (angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inflammation), data provided herein show that oAEC were also able to directly participate in the process of bone deposition, as suggested by the presence of oAEC entrapped within the newly deposited osteoid matrix and by their ability to switch

  1. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  2. In situ guided tissue regeneration in musculoskeletal diseases and aging : Implementing pathology into tailored tissue engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Rudert, Maximilian; Nöth, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias; Meinel, Lorenz; Groll, Jürgen

    2012-03-01

    In situ guided tissue regeneration, also addressed as in situ tissue engineering or endogenous regeneration, has a great potential for population-wide "minimal invasive" applications. During the last two decades, tissue engineering has been developed with remarkable in vitro and preclinical success but still the number of applications in clinical routine is extremely small. Moreover, the vision of population-wide applications of ex vivo tissue engineered constructs based on cells, growth and differentiation factors and scaffolds, must probably be deemed unrealistic for economic and regulation-related issues. Hence, the progress made in this respect will be mostly applicable to a fraction of post-traumatic or post-surgery situations such as big tissue defects due to tumor manifestation. Minimally invasive procedures would probably qualify for a broader application and ideally would only require off the shelf standardized products without cells. Such products should mimic the microenvironment of regenerating tissues and make use of the endogenous tissue regeneration capacities. Functionally, the chemotaxis of regenerative cells, their amplification as a transient amplifying pool and their concerted differentiation and remodeling should be addressed. This is especially important because the main target populations for such applications are the elderly and diseased. The quality of regenerative cells is impaired in such organisms and high levels of inhibitors also interfere with regeneration and healing. In metabolic bone diseases like osteoporosis, it is already known that antagonists for inhibitors such as activin and sclerostin enhance bone formation. Implementing such strategies into applications for in situ guided tissue regeneration should greatly enhance the efficacy of tailored procedures in the future.

  3. Coupling of regenerator and end load in a standing wave thermoacoustic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin; Zhou, Gang; Li, Qing; Hu, Zhongjun

    2012-06-01

    In the thermoacoustic system, the performance of regenerator strongly depends on the acoustic field. To study the thermoacoustic characteristics of regenerator in different acoustic field, a model of loudspeaker-driven thermoacoustic system with a RC load is built and simulated based on linear thermoacoustic theory. The thermoacoustic conversion efficiency of regenerator is calculated by changing three parameters: the resistance R, the regenerator's position and the hydraulic radius. The results show that the acoustic fields in the system vary with the RC load in a wide range and the performance of the regenerator is also influenced by the RC load. The further analyses reveal that the efficiency of the regenerator can be improved by optimizing the hydraulic radius and the position of regenerator in the resonance tube. The research is useful for us to understand the thermoacoustic characteristic of the regenerator in different acoustic fields.

  4. Boron nitride nanotubes and nanoplatelets as reinforcing agents of polymeric matrices for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Farshid, Behzad; Lalwani, Gaurav; Shir Mohammadi, Meisam; Simonsen, John; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the mechanical properties and in vitro cytotoxicity of one- and two-dimensional boron nitride nanomaterials-reinforced biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites. Poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) nanocomposites were fabricated using crosslinking agent N-vinyl pyrrolidone and inorganic nanomaterials: boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and boron nitride nanoplatelets (BNNPs) dispersed at 0.2 wt % in the polymeric matrix. The incorporation of BNNPs and BNNTs resulted in a ∼38 and ∼15% increase in compressive (Young's) modulus, and ∼31 and ∼6% increase in compressive yield strength compared to PPF control, respectively. The nanocomposites showed a time-dependent increased protein adsorption for collagen I protein. The cytotoxicity evaluation of aqueous BNNT and BNNP dispersions (at 1-100 μg/mL concentrations) using murine MC3T3 preosteoblast cells showed ∼73-99% viability. The cytotoxicity evaluation of media extracts of nanocomposites before crosslinking, after crosslinking, and upon degradation (using 1×-100× dilutions) showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity responses. Crosslinked nanocomposites showed excellent (∼79-100%) cell viability, cellular attachment (∼57-67%), and spreading similar to cells grown on the surface of tissue culture polystyrene control. The media extracts of degradation products showed a dose-dependent cytotoxicity. The favorable cytocompatibility results in combination with improved mechanical properties of BNNT and BNNP nanocomposites opens new avenues for further in vitro and in vivo safety and efficacy studies towards bone tissue engineering applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 406-419, 2017.

  5. Experimental study on filtration and continuous regeneration of a particulate filter system for heavy-duty diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tao; Zhang, Jun; Cao, Dongxiao; Shuai, Shijin; Zhao, Yanguang

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the filtration and continuous regeneration of a particulate filter system on an engine test bench, consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF). Both the DOC and the CDPF led to a high conversion of NO to NO2 for continuous regeneration. The filtration efficiency on solid particle number (SPN) was close to 100%. The post-CDPF particles were mainly in accumulation mode. The downstream SPN was sensitively influenced by the variation of the soot loading. This phenomenon provides a method for determining the balance point temperature by measuring the trend of SPN concentration.

  6. Cell therapy, 3D culture systems and tissue engineering for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Maximilian Y; Hitchcock, Robert W; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2014-04-01

    Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) still represents the "Number One Killer" worldwide accounting for the death of numerous patients. However the capacity for self-regeneration of the adult heart is very limited and the loss of cardiomyocytes in the infarcted heart leads to continuous adverse cardiac-remodeling which often leads to heart-failure (HF). The concept of regenerative medicine comprising cell-based therapies, bio-engineering technologies and hybrid solutions has been proposed as a promising next-generation approach to address IHD and HF. Numerous strategies are under investigation evaluating the potential of regenerative medicine on the failing myocardium including classical cell-therapy concepts, three-dimensional culture techniques and tissue-engineering approaches. While most of these regenerative strategies have shown great potential in experimental studies, the translation into a clinical setting has either been limited or too rapid leaving many key questions unanswered. This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art, important challenges and future research directions as to regenerative approaches addressing IHD and resulting HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Directing the Differentiation of Parthenogenetic Stem Cells into Tenocytes for Tissue‐Engineered Tendon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Yin, Lu; Yan, Xingrong; Cui, Jihong; Liu, Wenguang; Rao, Yang; Sun, Mei; Wei, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Uniparental parthenogenesis yields pluripotent stem cells without the political and ethical concerns surrounding the use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for biomedical applications. In the current study, we hypothesized that parthenogenetic stem cells (pSCs) could be directed to differentiate into tenocytes and applied for tissue‐engineered tendon. We showed that pSCs displayed fundamental properties similar to those of ESCs, including pluripotency, clonogenicity, and self‐renewal capacity. pSCs spontaneously differentiated into parthenogenetic mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs), which were positive for mesenchymal stem cell surface markers and possessed osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic potential. Then, mechanical stretch was applied to improve the tenogenic differentiation of pMSCs, as indicated by the expression of tenogenic‐specific markers and an increasing COL1A1:3A1 ratio. The pSC‐derived tenocytes could proliferate and secrete extracellular matrix on the surface of poly(lactic‐co‐glycolic) acid scaffolds. Finally, engineered tendon‐like tissue was successfully generated after in vivo heterotopic implantation of a tenocyte‐scaffold composite. In conclusion, our experiment introduced an effective and practical strategy for applying pSCs for tendon regeneration. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:196–208 PMID:28170171

  8. Fabrication and characterization of regenerated silk scaffolds reinforced with natural silk fibers for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Sahba; Hoyer, Birgit; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Lode, Anja; Nosoudi, Nasim; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Gelinsky, Michael

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite material developed for bone tissue engineering. Three-dimensional scaffolds were fabricated by embedding of natural degummed silk fibers in a matrix of regenerated fibroin, followed by freeze-drying. Different ratios of fibers to fibroin were investigated with respect to their influence on mechanical and biological properties. For all scaffold types, an interconnected porous structure suitable for cell penetration was proven by scanning electron microscopy. Compressive tests, carried out in static and cyclic mode under dry as well as wet conditions, revealed a strong impact of fiber reinforcement on compressive modulus and compressive stress. Cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that the fiber/fibroin composite scaffolds support cell attachment, proliferation, as well as differentiation along the osteoblastic lineage. Considering the excellent mechanical and biological properties, novel fiber/fibroin scaffolds appear to be an interesting structure for prospect studies in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Process quality engineering for bioreactor-driven manufacturing of tissue-engineered constructs for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Papantoniou Ir, Ioannis; Chai, Yoke Chin; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten Ir, Jan

    2013-08-01

    The incorporation of Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles in tissue-engineering bioprocess development toward clinical use will ensure that manufactured constructs possess prerequisite quality characteristics addressing emerging regulatory requirements and ensuring the functional in vivo behavior. In this work, the QbD principles were applied on a manufacturing process step for the in vitro production of osteogenic three-dimensional (3D) hybrid scaffolds that involves cell matrix deposition on a 3D titanium (Ti) alloy scaffold. An osteogenic cell source (human periosteum-derived cells) cultured in a bioinstructive medium was used to functionalize regular Ti scaffolds in a perfusion bioreactor, resulting in an osteogenic hybrid carrier. A two-level three-factor fractional factorial design of experiments was employed to explore a range of production-relevant process conditions by simultaneously changing value levels of the following parameters: flow rate (0.5-2 mL/min), cell culture duration (7-21 days), and cell-seeding density (1.5×10(3)-3×10(3) cells/cm(2)). This approach allowed to evaluate the individual impact of the aforementioned process parameters upon key quality attributes of the produced hybrids, such as collagen production, mineralization level, and cell number. The use of a fractional factorial design approach helped create a design space in which hybrid scaffolds of predefined quality attributes may be robustly manufactured while minimizing the number of required experiments.

  10. TGF-β1 gene-engineered mesenchymal stem cells induce rat cartilage regeneration using nonviral gene vector.

    PubMed

    He, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Miao, Pei-Hong; Hu, Zhong-Jie; Han, Min; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Hu, Yu-Lan; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of utilizing transfected pTGFβ-1 gene-engineered rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using nonviral vector to promote cartilage regeneration. Pullulan-spermine was used as the nonviral gene vector and gelatin sponge was used as the scaffold. MSCs were engineered with TGF-β1 gene with either the three-dimensional (3D) reverse transfection system or the two-dimensional (2D) conventional transfection system. For the 3D reverse transfection system, pullulan-spermine/pTGF-β1 gene complexes were immobilized to the gelatin sponge, followed by the seeding of MSCs. Pullulan-spermine/pTGF-β1 gene complexes were delivered to MSCs cultured in the plate to perform the 2D conventional transfection system, and then MSCs were seeded to the gelatin sponge. Then, TGF-β1 gene-transfected MSC seeded gelatin sponge was implanted to the full-thickness cartilage defect. Compared with the control group, both groups of TGF-β1 gene-engineered MSCs improved cartilage regeneration through optical observation and histology staining. So, with pullulan-spermine as the nonviral vector, TGF-β1-gene engineered MSCs can induce cartilage regeneration in vivo.

  11. Engineered expression of polysialic acid enhances Purkinje cell axonal regeneration in L1/GAP-43 double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Xinyu; Yeh, John; Richardson, Peter; Bo, Xuenong

    2007-01-01

    Purkinje axons in adult mammals are generally unable to regenerate after axotomy. Our recent work has shown that over-expression of growth related genes, GAP-43 and L1, in Purkinje cells increased their axonal outgrowth into a predegenerated peripheral nerve graft, but not into a fresh graft [Zhang et al., (2005) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 102, 14883-14888]. In the current study we investigated whether engineered expression of growth permissive molecule polysialic acid (PSA) in the glial scar or on transplanted Schwann cells could overcome the inhibitory environment and promote Purkinje axonal regeneration. A stab wound was introduced in the cerebellum of the L1/GAP-43 transgenic mice and a lentiviral vector (LV) carrying the polysialyltransferase (PST) cDNA (LV/PST) was injected into the lesion site to transduce the cells in the glial scar. Regenerating Purkinje axons were examined by calbindin immunostaining. There was increased Purkinje axonal sprouting in the area expressing high-level PSA. However, Purkinje axons were unable to grow into the lesion cavity. In the second set of experiments when LV/PST transduced Schwann cells were transplanted into the lesion site, the number of Purkinje axons growing into the transplant was nine times more than that growing into Schwann cell transplant expressing GFP two months post operation. Our result suggests that transplanted Schwann cells engineered to express PSA support axonal regeneration better than naïve Schwann cells.

  12. Regeneration of sugarcane elite breeding lines and engineering of stem borer resistance.

    PubMed

    Weng, Li-Xing; Deng, Haihua; Xu, Jin-Ling; Li, Qi; Wang, Lian-Hui; Jiang, Zide; Zhang, Hai Bao; Li, Qiwei; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2006-02-01

    Five elite sugarcane breeding lines were tested for efficiency in embryogenesis and plant regeneration. All of them produced regenerative embryogenic calli but with varied efficiencies. To engineer strongly insect-resistant sugarcanes, the GC content of a truncated cry1Ac gene, which encodes the active region of Cry1Ac insecticidal delta-endotoxin, was increased from the original 37.4 to 47.5% following the sugarcane codon usage pattern. The synthetic cry1Ac gene (s-cry1Ac) was placed under the control of maize ubiquitin promoter and introduced by microprojectile bombardment into the embryogenic calli of sugarcane lines YT79-177 and ROC16. Southern blotting analysis showed that multicopies of s-cry1Ac were integrated into the genomes of transgenic sugarcane lines. Immunoblotting analysis identified 18 transgenic lines expressing detectable levels of s-Cry1Ac, which were estimated in the range of 1.8-10.0 ng mg(-1) total soluble proteins. Four transgenic and two parental lines were assayed for sugarcane stem borer resistance in leaf tissue feeding trials and greenhouse plant assays. The results showed that, while the untransformed control lines were severely damaged in both leaves and stems, the transgenic sugarcane lines expressing high levels of s-Cry1Ac proteins were highly resistant to sugarcane stem borer attack, resulting in complete mortality of the inoculated insects within 1 week after inoculation.

  13. Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Approaches for Cartilage Repair and/or Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Jofré, Claudio M.; Minguell, José J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage injuries caused by traumatic, mechanical and/or by progressive degeneration result in pain, swelling, subsequent loss of joint function and finally osteoarthritis. Due to the peculiar structure of the tissue (no blood supply), chondrocytes, the unique cellular phenotype in cartilage, receive their nutrition through diffusion from the synovial fluid and this limits their intrinsic capacity for healing. The first cellular avenue explored for cartilage repair involved the in situ transplantation of isolated chondrocytes. Latterly, an improved alternative for the above reparative strategy involved the infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which in addition to a self-renewal capacity exhibit a differentiation potential to chondrocytes, as well as a capability to produce a vast array of growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix compounds involved in cartilage development. In addition to the above and foremost reparative options up till now in use, other therapeutic options have been developed, comprising the design of biomaterial substrates (scaffolds) capable of sustaining MSC attachment, proliferation and differentiation. The implantation of these engineered platforms, closely to the site of cartilage damage, may well facilitate the initiation of an ‘in situ’ cartilage reparation process. In this mini-review, we examined the timely and conceptual development of several cell-based methods, designed to repair/regenerate a damaged cartilage. In addition to the above described cartilage reparative options, other therapeutic alternatives still in progress are portrayed. PMID:26019754

  14. Salidroside promotes peripheral nerve regeneration based on tissue engineering strategy using Schwann cells and PLGA: in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Lv, Peizhen; Zhu, Yongjia; Wu, Huayu; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Fuben; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Salidriside (SDS), a phenylpropanoid glycoside derived from Rhodiola rosea L, has been shown to be neuroprotective in many studies, which may be promising in nerve recovery. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of SDS on engineered nerve constructed by Schwann cells (SCs) and Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were studied in vitro. We further investigated the effect of combinational therapy of SDS and PLGA/SCs based tissue engineering on peripheral nerve regeneration based on the rat model of nerve injury by sciatic transection. The results showed that SDS dramatically enhanced the proliferation and function of SCs. The underlying mechanism may be that SDS affects SCs growth through the modulation of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, GDNF and CNTF). 12 weeks after implantation with a 12 mm gap of sciatic nerve injury, SDS-PLGA/SCs achieved satisfying outcomes of nerve regeneration, as evidenced by morphological and functional improvements upon therapy by SDS, PLGA/SCs or direct suture group assessed by sciatic function index, nerve conduction assay, HE staining and immunohistochemical analysis. Our results demonstrated the significant role of introducing SDS into neural tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration.

  15. Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Shan-Chang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Chih-Chiang; Lei, Mingxing; Wang, Ling Mei; Widelitz, Randall B.; Hughes, Michael W.; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are major new advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, developmental biology, regenerative hair cycling, and tissue engineering. The time is ripe to integrate, translate and apply these findings to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Readers will learn about new progress in cellular and molecular aspects of hair follicle development, regeneration and potential therapeutic opportunities these advances may offer. Areas covered Here we use hair follicle formation to illustrate this progress and to identify targets for potential strategies in therapeutics. Hair regeneration is discussed in four different categories. (1) Intra-follicle regeneration (or renewal) is the basic production of hair fibers from hair stem cells and dermal papillae in existing follicles. (2) Chimeric follicles via epithelial-mesenchymal recombination to identify stem cells and signaling centers. (3) Extra-follicular factors including local dermal and systemic factors can modulate the regenerative behavior of hair follicles, and may be relatively easy therapeutic targets. (4) Follicular neogenesis means the de novo formation of new follicles. In addition, scientists are working to engineer hair follicles, which require hair forming competent epidermal cells and hair inducing dermal cells. Expert opinion Ideally self-organizing processes similar to those occurring during embryonic development should be elicited with some help from biomaterials. PMID:23289545

  16. Salidroside promotes peripheral nerve regeneration based on tissue engineering strategy using Schwann cells and PLGA: in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Lv, Peizhen; Zhu, Yongjia; Wu, Huayu; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Fuben; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Salidriside (SDS), a phenylpropanoid glycoside derived from Rhodiola rosea L, has been shown to be neuroprotective in many studies, which may be promising in nerve recovery. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of SDS on engineered nerve constructed by Schwann cells (SCs) and Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were studied in vitro. We further investigated the effect of combinational therapy of SDS and PLGA/SCs based tissue engineering on peripheral nerve regeneration based on the rat model of nerve injury by sciatic transection. The results showed that SDS dramatically enhanced the proliferation and function of SCs. The underlying mechanism may be that SDS affects SCs growth through the modulation of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, GDNF and CNTF). 12 weeks after implantation with a 12 mm gap of sciatic nerve injury, SDS-PLGA/SCs achieved satisfying outcomes of nerve regeneration, as evidenced by morphological and functional improvements upon therapy by SDS, PLGA/SCs or direct suture group assessed by sciatic function index, nerve conduction assay, HE staining and immunohistochemical analysis. Our results demonstrated the significant role of introducing SDS into neural tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration. PMID:28054637

  17. Promising Therapeutic Strategies for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Cardiovascular Regeneration: From Cell Priming to Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Seung Taek; Yun, Jisoo

    2017-01-01

    The primary cause of death among chronic diseases worldwide is ischemic cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Recent evidence indicates that adult stem cell therapies involving cardiovascular regeneration represent promising strategies to treat cardiovascular diseases. Owing to their immunomodulatory properties and vascular repair capabilities, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are strong candidate therapeutic stem cells for use in cardiovascular regeneration. However, major limitations must be overcome, including their very low survival rate in ischemic lesion. Various attempts have been made to improve the poor survival and longevity of engrafted MSCs. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies, it is necessary to first identify stem cell modulators for intracellular signal triggering or niche activation. One promising therapeutic strategy is the priming of therapeutic MSCs with stem cell modulators before transplantation. Another is a tissue engineering-based therapeutic strategy involving a cell scaffold, a cell-protein-scaffold architecture made of biomaterials such as ECM or hydrogel, and cell patch- and 3D printing-based tissue engineering. This review focuses on the current clinical applications of MSCs for treating cardiovascular diseases and highlights several therapeutic strategies for promoting the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs in vitro or in vivo from cell priming to tissue engineering strategies, for use in cardiovascular regeneration. PMID:28303152

  18. Possible role of mechanical force in regulating regeneration of the vascularized fat flap inside a tissue engineering chamber.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yuan; Yuan, Yi; Lu, Feng; Gao, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    In plastic and reconstructive surgery, adipose tissue is widely used as effective filler for tissue defects. Strategies for treating soft tissue deficiency, which include free adipose tissue grafts, use of hyaluronic acid, collagen injections, and implantation of synthetic materials, have several clinical limitations. With the aim of overcoming these limitations, researchers have recently utilized tissue engineering chambers to produce large volumes of engineered vascularized fat tissue. However, the process of growing fat tissue in a chamber is still relatively limited, and can result in unpredictable or dissatisfactory final tissue volumes. Therefore, detailed understanding of the process is both necessary and urgent. Many studies have shown that mechanical force can change the function of cells via mechanotransduction. Here, we hypothesized that, besides the inflammatory response, one of the key factors to control the regeneration of vascularized fat flap inside a tissue engineering chamber might be the balance of mechanical forces. To test our hypothesis, we intend to change the balance of forces by means of measures in order to make the equilibrium point in favor of the direction of regeneration. If those measures proved to be feasible, they could be applied in clinical practice to engineer vascularized adipose tissue of predictable size and shape, which would in turn help in the advancement of tissue engineering.

  19. Stability of engineered nanomaterials in complex aqueous matrices: Settling behaviour of CeO2 nanoparticles in natural surface waters.

    PubMed

    Van Koetsem, Frederik; Verstraete, Simon; Van der Meeren, Paul; Du Laing, Gijs

    2015-10-01

    The stability of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in complex aqueous matrices is a key determinant of their fate and potential toxicity towards the aquatic environment and human health. Metal oxide nanoparticles, such as CeO2 ENPs, are increasingly being incorporated into a wide range of industrial and commercial applications, which will undoubtedly result in their (unintentional) release into the environment. Hereby, the behaviour and fate of CeO2 ENPs could potentially serve as model for other nanoparticles that possess similar characteristics. The present study examined the stability and settling of CeO2 ENPs (7.3±1.4 nm) as well as Ce(3+) ions in 10 distinct natural surface waters during 7d, under stagnant and isothermal experimental conditions. Natural water samples were collected throughout Flanders (Belgium) and were thoroughly characterized. For the majority of the surface waters, a substantial depletion (>95%) of the initially added CeO2 ENPs was observed just below the liquid surface of the water samples after 7d. In all cases, the reduction was considerably higher for CeO2 ENPs than for Ce(3+) ions (<68%). A first-order kinetics model was able to describe the observed time-dependant removal of both CeO2 ENPs (R(2)≥0.998) and Ce(3+) ions (R(2)≥0.812) from the water column, at least in case notable sedimentation occurred over time. Solution-pH appeared to be a prime parameter governing nanoparticle colloidal stability. Moreover, the suspended solids (TSS) content also seemed to be an important factor affecting the settling rate and residual fraction of CeO2 ENPs as well as Ce(3+) ions in natural surface waters. Correlation results also suggest potential association and co-precipitation of CeO2 ENPs with aluminium- and iron-containing natural colloidal material. The CeO2 ENPs remained stable in dispersion in surface water characterized by a low pH, ionic strength (IS), and TSS content, indicating the eventual stability and settling behaviour of the

  20. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  1. Genipin-Crosslinked Chitosan Gels and Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regeneration of Cartilage and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Muzzarelli, Riccardo A. A.; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Bottegoni, Carlo; Aquili, Alberto; Gigante, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The present review article intends to direct attention to the technological advances made since 2009 in the area of genipin-crosslinked chitosan (GEN-chitosan) hydrogels. After a concise introduction on the well recognized characteristics of medical grade chitosan and food grade genipin, the properties of GEN-chitosan obtained with a safe, spontaneous and irreversible chemical reaction, and the quality assessment of the gels are reviewed. The antibacterial activity of GEN-chitosan has been well assessed in the treatment of gastric infections supported by Helicobacter pylori. Therapies based on chitosan alginate crosslinked with genipin include stem cell transplantation, and development of contraction free biomaterials suitable for cartilage engineering. Collagen, gelatin and other proteins have been associated to said hydrogels in view of the regeneration of the cartilage. Viability and proliferation of fibroblasts were impressively enhanced upon addition of poly-l-lysine. The modulation of the osteocytes has been achieved in various ways by applying advanced technologies such as 3D-plotting and electrospinning of biomimetic scaffolds, with optional addition of nano hydroxyapatite to the formulations. A wealth of biotechnological advances and know-how has permitted reaching outstanding results in crucial areas such as cranio-facial surgery, orthopedics and dentistry. It is mandatory to use scaffolds fully characterized in terms of porosity, pore size, swelling, wettability, compressive strength, and degree of acetylation, if the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is sought: in fact, the novel characteristics imparted by GEN-chitosan must be simultaneously of physico-chemical and cytological nature. Owing to their high standard, the scientific publications dated 2010–2015 have met the expectations of an interdisciplinary audience. PMID:26690453

  2. Mathematical model for osteobstruction in bone regeneration mechanisms: a headway in skeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ogunsalu, C; Arunaye, F I; Ezeokoli, C; Gardner, M; Rohrer, M; Prasad, H

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we formulate a mathematical model for the evaluation of parameters responsible for the retardation and eventual acceleration of bone regeneration on the contralateral side of the mandible of experimental animals, following the discovery of a new mechanism of bone regeneration called the osteobstruction mechanism (a negative mechanism of bone regeneration as opposed to the well established and extensively documented positive mechanisms such as osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction). This osteobstructive mechanism was demonstrated by episodes of overtaking and reovertaking on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) following evaluation of osteoblastic activities in a sequential animal experiment to validate both the Ogunsalu sandwich technique (a double guided tissue technique; D-GTR) and the interceed membrane technique (a single guided tissue regeneration technique; S-GTR) utilizing SPECT, histological and histomorphometric evaluation. This work is now given special attention in terms of mathematical analysis because of limited experimental observations since experiments cannot be observed infinitely. Mathematical modelling is as such essential to generalize the results of this osteobstructive mechanism in bone regeneration. We utilize the Fisher's equation to describe bone cell mobilization during bone regeneration by two different techniques: the Ogunsalu sandwich bone regeneration technique (D-GTR) and the S-GTR.

  3. Middle ear mucosal regeneration with three-dimensionally tissue-engineered autologous middle ear cell sheets in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Daisuke; Yamato, Masayuki; Hama, Takanori; Yamamoto, Kazuhisa; Kojima, Hiromi; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Okano, Teruo

    2016-03-01

    The likelihood of recurrent retraction and adhesion of newly formed tympanic membrane is high when middle ear mucosa is extensively lost during cholesteatoma and adhesive otitis media surgery. If rapid postoperative regeneration of the mucosa on the exposed bone surface can be achieved, prevention of recurrent eardrum adhesion and cholesteatoma formation, for which there has been no definitive treatment, can be expected. Suture-less transplantation of tissue-engineered mucosal cell sheets was examined immediately after the operation of otitis media surgery in order to quickly regenerate middle ear mucosa lost during surgery in a rabbit model. Transplantable middle ear mucosal cell sheets with a three-dimensional tissue architecture very similar to native middle ear mucosa were fabricated from middle ear mucosal tissue fragments obtained in an autologous manner from middle ear bulla on temperature-responsive culture surfaces. Immediately after the mucosa was resected from middle ear bone bulla inner cavity, mucosal cell sheets were grafted at the resected site. Both bone hyperplasia and granulation tissue formation were inhibited and early mucosal regeneration was observed in the cell sheet-grafted group, compared with the control group in which only mucosal removal was carried out and the bone surface exposed. This result indicates that tissue engineered mucosal cell sheets would be useful to minimize complications after the surgical operation on otitis media and future clinical application is expected.

  4. Converging Matrices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Edward C.

    1985-01-01

    Explains an application of matrix algebra which involves probability matrices and weather predictions. Using probabilities of sunny or cloudy weather students can determine the effect weather on day one will have on subsequent days. (DH)

  5. Converging Matrices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Edward C.

    1985-01-01

    Explains an application of matrix algebra which involves probability matrices and weather predictions. Using probabilities of sunny or cloudy weather students can determine the effect weather on day one will have on subsequent days. (DH)

  6. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering: an advanced strategy for blood vessels regeneration and vascular disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yin, Pei; Bian, Guang-Liang; Huang, Hao-Yue; Shen, Han; Yang, Jun-Jie; Yang, Zi-Ying; Shen, Zhen-Ya

    2017-09-15

    Over the past years, vascular diseases have continued to threaten human health and increase financial burdens worldwide. Transplantation of allogeneic and autologous blood vessels is the most convenient treatment. However, it could not be applied generally due to the scarcity of donors and the patient's condition. Developments in tissue engineering are contributing greatly with regard to this urgent need for blood vessels. Tissue engineering-derived blood vessels are promising alternatives for patients with aortic dissection/aneurysm. The aim of this review is to show the importance of advances in biomaterials development for the treatment of vascular disease. We also provide a comprehensive overview of the current status of tissue reconstruction from stem cells and transplantable cellular scaffold constructs, focusing on the combination of stem cells and tissue engineering for blood vessel regeneration and vascular disease treatment.

  7. Regeneration of skull bones in adult rabbits after implantation of commercial osteoinductive materials and transplantation of a tissue-engineering construct.

    PubMed

    Volkov, A V; Alekseeva, I S; Kulakov, A A; Gol'dshtein, D V; Shustrov, S A; Shuraev, A I; Arutyunyan, I V; Bukharova, T B; Rzhaninova, A A; Bol'shakova, G B; Grigor'yan, A S

    2010-10-01

    We performed a comparative study of reparative osteogenesis in rabbits with experimental critical defects of the parietal bones after implantation of commercial osteoinductive materials "Biomatrix", "Osteomatrix", "BioOss" in combination with platelet-rich plasma and transplantation of a tissue-engineering construct on the basis of autogenic multipotent stromal cells from the adipose tissue predifferentiated in osteogenic direction. It was found that experimental reparative osteogenesis is insufficiently stimulated by implantation materials and full-thickness trepanation holes were not completely closed. After transplantation of the studied tissue-engineering construct, the defect was filled with full-length bone regenerate (in the center of the regenerate and from the maternal bone) in contrast to control and reference groups, where the bone tissue was formed only on the side of the maternal bone. On day 120 after transplantation of the tissue-engineering construct, the percent of newly-formed bone tissue in the regenerate was 24% (the total percent of bone tissue in the regenerate was 39%), which attested to active incomplete regenerative process in contrast to control and reference groups. Thus, the study demonstrated effective regeneration of the critical defects of the parietal bones in rabbits 120 days after transplantation of the tissue-engineering construct in contrast to commercial osteoplastic materials for directed bone regeneration.

  8. A program for calculating load coefficient matrices utilizing the force summation method, L218 (LOADS). Volume 1: Engineering and usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Anderson, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    The LOADS program L218, a digital computer program that calculates dynamic load coefficient matrices utilizing the force summation method, is described. The load equations are derived for a flight vehicle in straight and level flight and excited by gusts and/or control motions. In addition, sensor equations are calculated for use with an active control system. The load coefficient matrices are calculated for the following types of loads: translational and rotational accelerations, velocities, and displacements; panel aerodynamic forces; net panel forces; shears and moments. Program usage and a brief description of the analysis used are presented. A description of the design and structure of the program to aid those who will maintain and/or modify the program in the future is included.

  9. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  10. A tissue engineering approach to anterior cruciate ligament regeneration using novel shaped capillary channel polymer fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Kristofer D.

    2009-12-01

    Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are the most frequent of injuries to the knee due to its role in preventing anterior translation of the tibia. It is estimated that as many as 200,000 Americans per year will suffer from a ruptured ACL, resulting in management costs on the order of 5 billion dollars. Without treatment these patients are unable to return to normal activity, as a consequence of the joint instability found within the ACL deficient knee. Over the last thirty years, a variety of non-degradable, synthetic fibers have been evaluated for their use in ACL reconstruction; however, a widely accepted prosthesis has been unattainable due to differences in mechanical properties of the synthetic graft relative to the native tissue. Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field charged with the task of developing therapeutic solutions for tissue and organ failure by enhancing the natural wound healing process through the use of cellular transplants, biomaterials, and the delivery of bioactive molecules. The capillary channel polymer (CC-P) fibers used in this research were fabricated by melt extrusion from polyethylene terephthalate and polybutylene terephthalate. These fibers possess aligned micrometer scale surface channels that may serve as physical templates for tissue growth and regeneration. This inherent surface topography offers a unique and industrially viable approach for cellular contact guidance on three dimensional constructs. In this fundamental research the ability of these fiber channels to support the adhesion, alignment, and organization of fibroblasts was demonstrated and found to be superior to round fiber controls. The results demonstrated greater uniformity of seeding and accelerated formation of multi-layered three-dimensional biomass for the CC-P fibers relative to those with a circular cross-section. Furthermore, the CC-P geometry induced nuclear elongation consistent with that observed in native ACL tissue. Through the

  11. Analysis of regenerated single-shaft ceramic gas-turbine engines and resulting fuel economy in a compact car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.; Tew, R. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Ranges in design and off-design operating conditions of an advanced gas turbine and their effects on fuel economy were analyzed. The assumed engine incorporated a single stage radial flow turbine and compressor with fixed geometry. Fuel economies were calculated over the composite driving cycle with gasoline as the fuel. At a constant turbine-inlet temperature, with a regenerator sized for a full power effectiveness the best fuel economies ranged from 11.1 to 10.2 km/liter (26.2 to 22.5 mpg) for full power turbine tip speeds of 770 to 488m/sec (2530 to 1600ft/sec), respectively.

  12. Fibroblast reticular cells engineer a blastema extracellular network during digit tip regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Luis; Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi; Muneoka, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The regeneration blastema which forms following amputation of the mouse digit tip is composed of undifferentiated cells bound together by an organized network of fibers. A monoclonal antibody (ER-TR7) that identifies extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers produced by fibroblast reticular cells during lymphoid organogenesis was used to characterize the ECM of the digit, the blastema, and the regenerate. Digit fibroblast reticular cells produce an ER-TR7(+) ECM network associated with different tissues and represent a subset of loose connective tissue fibroblasts. During blastema formation there is an upregulation of matrix production that returns to its pre-existing level and anatomical pattern in the endpoint regenerate. Co-localization studies demonstrate a strong spatial correlation between the ER-TR7 antigen and collagen type III (COL3) in histological sections. ER-TR7 and COL3 are co-induced in cultured digit fibroblasts following treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and a lymphotoxin beta receptor agonist. These results provide an initial characterization of the ECM during digit regeneration and identify a subpopulation of fibroblasts involved in producing the blastema provisional matrix that is remodeled during the regeneration response.

  13. Matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in dental, oral and craniofacial tissue engineering☆

    PubMed Central

    Moioli, Eduardo K.; Clark, Paul A.; Xin, Xuejun; Lal, Shan; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2010-01-01

    Current treatments for diseases and trauma of dental, oral and craniofacial (DOC) structures rely on durable materials such as amalgam and synthetic materials, or autologous tissue grafts. A paradigm shift has taken place to utilize tissue engineering and drug delivery approaches towards the regeneration of these structures. Several prototypes of DOC structures have been regenerated such as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle, cranial sutures, tooth structures and periodontium components. However, many challenges remain when taking in consideration the high demand for esthetics of DOC structures, the complex environment and yet minimal scar formation in the oral cavity, and the need for accommodating multiple tissue phenotypes. This review highlights recent advances in the regeneration of DOC structures, including the tooth, periodontium, TMJ, cranial sutures and implant dentistry, with specific emphasis on controlled release of signaling cues for stem cells, biomaterial matrices and scaffolds, and integrated tissue engineering approaches. PMID:17499385

  14. In vitro characterization of electrochemically compacted collagen matrices for corneal applications.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Vipuil; Iyer, Ranjani; Frandsen, Athela; Nguyen, Thuy-Uyen

    2016-10-06

    Loss of vision due to corneal disease is a significant problem worldwide. Transplantation of donor corneas is a viable treatment option but limitations such as short supply and immune-related complications call for alternative options for the treatment of corneal disease. A tissue engineering-based approach using a collagen scaffold is a promising alternative to develop a bioengineered cornea that mimics the functionality of native cornea. In this study, an electrochemical compaction method was employed to synthesize highly dense and transparent collagen matrices. We hypothesized that chemical crosslinking of electrochemically compacted collagen (ECC) matrices will maintain transparency, improve stability, and enhance the mechanical properties of the matrices to the level of native cornea. Further, we hypothesized that keratocyte cell viability and proliferation will be maintained on crosslinked ECC matrices. The results indicated that uncrosslinked and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide-N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC-NHS) crosslinked ECC matrices were highly transparent with light transmission measurements comparable to native cornea. Stability tests showed that while the uncrosslinked ECC matrices degraded within 6 h when treated with collagenase, EDC-NHS or genipin crosslinking significantly improved the stability of ECC matrices (192 h for EDC-NHS and 256 h for genipin). Results from the mechanical tests showed that both EDC-NHS and genipin crosslinking significantly improved the strength and modulus of ECC matrices. Cell culture studies showed that keratocyte cell viability and proliferation are maintained on EDC-NHS crosslinked ECC matrices. Overall, results from this study suggest that ECC matrices have the potential to be developed as a functional biomaterial for corneal repair and regeneration.

  15. Tissue Engineering and Cellular Regeneration at NASA Report to Regenetech SAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A project overview describing three dimensional tissue models is shown. The topics include: 1) cellular regeneration; 2) haemopoietic replacement; 3) novel vaccine development; 4) pharmacology and toxicology interventions; 5) development of synthetic viruses; and 6) molecular genetics and proteomics of recapitulated models.

  16. Computational techniques for the two-dimensional gasdynamic equations in Stirling engine regenerators and associated manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedeon, D.

    1985-12-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for analysis of multi-dimensional gas flow in Stirling cycle machines. The two-dimensional gasdynamic equations which apply to flow through a porous matrix are derived and set up into an initial-value problem modeling a Stirling cycle regenerator and associated manifolds. A solution method based on finite-difference techniques is outlined.

  17. Stimulating effect of graphene oxide on myogenesis of C2C12 myoblasts on RGD peptide-decorated PLGA nanofiber matrices.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Min Jeong; Hong, Suck Won; Kim, Bongju; Hyun, Jung Keun; Choi, Yu Suk; Park, Jong-Chul; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    In the field of biomedical engineering, many studies have focused on the possible applications of graphene and related nanomaterials due to their potential for use as scaffolds, coating materials and delivery carriers. On the other hand, electrospun nanofiber matrices composed of diverse biocompatible polymers have attracted tremendous attention for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, their combination is intriguing and still challenging. In the present study, we fabricated nanofiber matrices composed of M13 bacteriophage with RGD peptide displayed on its surface (RGD-M13 phage) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and characterized their physicochemical properties. In addition, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the cellular behaviors of C2C12 myoblasts, which were cultured on PLGA decorated with RGD-M13 phage (RGD/PLGA) nanofiber matrices, was investigated. Our results revealed that the RGD/PLGA nanofiber matrices have suitable physicochemical properties as a tissue engineering scaffold and the growth of C2C12 myoblasts were significantly enhanced on the matrices. Moreover, the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was substantially stimulated when they were cultured on the RGD/PLGA matrices in the presence of GO. In conclusion, these findings propose that the combination of RGD/PLGA nanofiber matrices and GO can be used as a promising strategy for skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration.

  18. Inferring Regulatory Networks from Experimental Morphological Phenotypes: A Computational Method Reverse-Engineers Planarian Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transformative applications in biomedicine require the discovery of complex regulatory networks that explain the development and regeneration of anatomical structures, and reveal what external signals will trigger desired changes of large-scale pattern. Despite recent advances in bioinformatics, extracting mechanistic pathway models from experimental morphological data is a key open challenge that has resisted automation. The fundamental difficulty of manually predicting emergent behavior of even simple networks has limited the models invented by human scientists to pathway diagrams that show necessary subunit interactions but do not reveal the dynamics that are sufficient for complex, self-regulating pattern to emerge. To finally bridge the gap between high-resolution genetic data and the ability to understand and control patterning, it is critical to develop computational tools to efficiently extract regulatory pathways from the resultant experimental shape phenotypes. For example, planarian regeneration has been studied for over a century, but despite increasing insight into the pathways that control its stem cells, no constructive, mechanistic model has yet been found by human scientists that explains more than one or two key features of its remarkable ability to regenerate its correct anatomical pattern after drastic perturbations. We present a method to infer the molecular products, topology, and spatial and temporal non-linear dynamics of regulatory networks recapitulating in silico the rich dataset of morphological phenotypes resulting from genetic, surgical, and pharmacological experiments. We demonstrated our approach by inferring complete regulatory networks explaining the outcomes of the main functional regeneration experiments in the planarian literature; By analyzing all the datasets together, our system inferred the first systems-biology comprehensive dynamical model explaining patterning in planarian regeneration. This method provides an automated

  19. Inferring regulatory networks from experimental morphological phenotypes: a computational method reverse-engineers planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Transformative applications in biomedicine require the discovery of complex regulatory networks that explain the development and regeneration of anatomical structures, and reveal what external signals will trigger desired changes of large-scale pattern. Despite recent advances in bioinformatics, extracting mechanistic pathway models from experimental morphological data is a key open challenge that has resisted automation. The fundamental difficulty of manually predicting emergent behavior of even simple networks has limited the models invented by human scientists to pathway diagrams that show necessary subunit interactions but do not reveal the dynamics that are sufficient for complex, self-regulating pattern to emerge. To finally bridge the gap between high-resolution genetic data and the ability to understand and control patterning, it is critical to develop computational tools to efficiently extract regulatory pathways from the resultant experimental shape phenotypes. For example, planarian regeneration has been studied for over a century, but despite increasing insight into the pathways that control its stem cells, no constructive, mechanistic model has yet been found by human scientists that explains more than one or two key features of its remarkable ability to regenerate its correct anatomical pattern after drastic perturbations. We present a method to infer the molecular products, topology, and spatial and temporal non-linear dynamics of regulatory networks recapitulating in silico the rich dataset of morphological phenotypes resulting from genetic, surgical, and pharmacological experiments. We demonstrated our approach by inferring complete regulatory networks explaining the outcomes of the main functional regeneration experiments in the planarian literature; By analyzing all the datasets together, our system inferred the first systems-biology comprehensive dynamical model explaining patterning in planarian regeneration. This method provides an automated

  20. Matric potential

    Treesearch

    Melvin T. Tyree

    2003-01-01

    Matric potential, r, is a component of water potential, ?, but has different meanings in plant physiology vs. soil science. A rigorous definition of r requires a reference to principles of thermodynamics (both classical and irreversible thermodynamics). A rigorous treatment is beyond the scope of this brief overview. Readers...

  1. Macrophage-inducing FasL on chondrocytes forms immune privilege in cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing in vivo regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2014-05-01

    To obtain stable outcomes in regenerative medicine, controlling inflammatory reactions is a requirement. Previously, auricular chondrocytes in tissue-engineered cartilage have been shown to express factors related to immune privilege including Fas ligand (FasL) in mice. Since elucidation of mechanism on immune privilege formed in cartilage regeneration may contribute to suppression of excessive inflammation, in this study, we investigated the function of FasL and induction of immune privilege in tissue-engineered cartilage using a mouse subcutaneous model. When cocultured, auricular chondrocytes of FasL-dysfunctional mice, C57BL/6JSlc-gld/gld (gld), induced less cell death and apoptosis of macrophage-like cells, RAW264, compared with chondrocytes of C57BL/6 mice (wild), suggesting that FasL on chondrocytes could induce the apoptosis of macrophages. Meanwhile, the viability of chondrocytes was hardly affected by cocultured RAW264, although the expression of type II collagen was decreased, indicating that macrophages could hamper the maturation of chondrocytes. Tissue-engineered cartilage containing gld chondrocytes exhibited greater infiltration of macrophages, with less accumulation of proteoglycan than did wild constructs. Analysis of the coculture medium identified G-CSF as an inducer of FasL on chondrocytes, and G-CSF-treated tissue-engineered cartilage showed less infiltration of macrophages, with increased formation of cartilage after transplantation. The interactions between chondrocytes and macrophages may increase G-CSF secretion in macrophages and induce FasL on chondrocytes, which in turn induce the apoptosis of macrophages and suppress tissue reactions, promoting the maturation of tissue-engineered cartilage. These findings provide scientific insight into the mechanism of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, which could be applied as a novel strategy for cartilage tissue engineering.

  2. A new regenerator theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. D.

    The performance of a Stirling Engine regenerator having finite mass and operated under realistic conditions of pressure and flow cycling is analysed. It is shown that cyclic variations in the matrix temperature due to its finite mass cause an increase in the apparent regenerator effectiveness, but a decrease in engine power. Approximate closed-form expressions for both of these effects are deduced.

  3. Tissue engineering with peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells promotes the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Pan, Mengjie; Wang, Xianghai; Chen, Yijing; Cao, Shangtao; Wen, Jinkun; Wu, Guofeng; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Lixia; Qian, Changhui; Qin, Zhenqi; Li, Zhenlin; Tan, Dandan; Fan, Zhihao; Wu, Wutian; Guo, Jiasong

    2017-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury repair can be enhanced by Schwann cell (SC) transplantation, but clinical applications are limited by the lack of a cell source. Thus, alternative systems for generating SCs are desired. Herein, we found the peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PBMSCs) could be induced into SC like cells with expressing SC-specific markers (S100, P75NTR and CNPase) and functional factors (NGF, NT-3, c-Fos, and Krox20). When the induced PBMSCs (iPBMSCs) were transplanted into crushed rat sciatic nerves, they functioned as SCs by wrapping the injured axons and expressing myelin specific marker of MBP. Furthermore, iPBMSCs seeded in an artificial nerve conduit to bridge a 10-mm defect in a sciatic nerve achieved significant nerve regeneration outcomes, including axonal regeneration and remyelination, nerve conduction recovery, and restoration of motor function, and attenuated myoatrophy and neuromuscular junction degeneration in the target muscle. Overall, the data from this study indicated that PBMSCs can transdifferentiate towards SC-like cells and have potential as grafting cells for nerve tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Capacity of regeneration and clonal reproduction of ligneous species used in biotechnical engineering according to a gradient of drought stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaine, C.; Evette, A.; Piégay, H.

    2009-04-01

    Erosion in rivers is a natural process which can however be stressed by human activities. The presence of anthropological issues downstream to the eroded lands leads the managers to implant a dense and long-lasting vegetation cover by using soil bioengineering techniques. The phreatophyte species (eg salicaceae) are commonly used because of their excellent regeneration capacity and resistance to anoxia. However bioengineering works undergo the global climate change and it becomes necessary to test new species stemming from more Mediterranean environment, considered as more tolerant to drought stress. A first approach of this study consisted in reviewing literature for determining such species. The bibliographical work shows three species sub-used in biotechnical engineering and potentially drought-tolerant: Populus alba, Tamarix gallica, Myricaria germanica. Therefore the experiments mainly consist in measurements of plant traits in relation with drought stress on cuttings (eg diameter and height of the stalk, foliar phenology, osmotic potential, assimilation). The objectives are declined around three axes: 1) cutting regeneration, 2) characterization of the roots and aerial developments and 3) influence of the distance in the groundwater of cuttings during the first months following the cutting installation. The experiment is also transposed in situ to propose species able to support climate change in the context of bioengineering for riverbank protection.

  5. Current tissue engineering and novel therapeutic approaches to axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury using polymer scaffolds☆

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Nicolas N.; McMahon, Siobhan; O’Brien, Timothy; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights current tissue engineering and novel therapeutic approaches to axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury. The concept of developing 3-dimensional polymer scaffolds for placement into a spinal cord transection model has recently been more extensively explored as a solution for restoring neurologic function after injury. Given the patient morbidity associated with respiratory compromise, the discrete tracts in the spinal cord conveying innervation for breathing represent an important and achievable therapeutic target. The aim is to derive new neuronal tissue from the surrounding, healthy cord that will be guided by the polymer implant through the injured area to make functional reconnections. A variety of naturally derived and synthetic biomaterial polymers have been developed for placement in the injured spinal cord. Axonal growth is supported by inherent properties of the selected polymer, the architecture of the scaffold, permissive microstructures such as pores, grooves or polymer fibres, and surface modifications to provide improved adherence and growth directionality. Structural support of axonal regeneration is combined with integrated polymeric and cellular delivery systems for therapeutic drugs and for neurotrophic molecules to regionalize growth of specific nerve populations. PMID:19737633

  6. Application of avidin-biotin technology to improve cell adhesion on nanofibrous matrices.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jian-feng; Liu, Ning-hua; Shu, Lin-yuan; Sun, Hui

    2015-05-16

    Electrospinning is an easy and effective technique to produce submicron fibers possessing a range of attractive characteristics such as interconnected porous structures similar to natural ECM and good resilience to movement. Rapid and efficient cell attachment to nanofibrous matrices is a necessary prerequisite in tissue engineering. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate poly(ε-caprolactone-co-lactide)/Pluronic (PLCL/Pluronic) nanofibrous matrices with avidin-biotin technology for improving cell adhesion for the first time. PLCL/Pluronic nanofibers had relatively homogeneous fibers and interconnected porous structures. Pluronic significantly modified the hydrophilicity of nanofibrous matrices and PLCL/Pluronic nanofibrous matrices had better performance on maintaining cell proliferation. Avidin-biotin technology had no negative effect on the hydrophilic property, mechanical property and cell proliferation. Meanwhile, the attachment and spreading of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) onto PLCL/Pluronic nanofibrous matrices with avidin-biotin technology was promoted obviously. PLCL/Pluronic nanofibrous matrices inheriting the excellent characteristics of both PLCL and Pluronic have the better cell adhesion ability through avidin-biotin technology, implying a promising application in skin care, tissue regeneration and other related area.

  7. A Quiescent, Regeneration-Responsive Tissue Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Bone Marrow Niche Model via Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily Elizabeth Louise; Wheadon, Helen; Lewis, Natasha; Yang, Jingli; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Dalby, Matthew John; Berry, Catherine Cecilia

    2016-09-27

    The bone marrow niche represents a specialized environment that regulates mesenchymal stem cell quiescence and self-renewal, yet fosters stem cell migration and differentiation upon demand. An in vitro model that embodies these features would open up the ability to perform detailed study of stem cell behavior. In this paper we present a simple bone marrow-like niche model, which comprises of nanomagnetically levitated stem cells cultured as multicellular spheroids within a type I collagen gel. The stem cells maintained are nestin positive and remain quiescent until regenerative demand is placed upon them. In response to coculture wounding, they migrate and appropriately differentiate upon engraftment. This tissue engineered regeneration-responsive bone marrow-like niche model will allow for greater understanding of stem cell response to injury and also facilitate as a testing platform for drug candidates in a multiwell plate format.

  8. [Construction of guided bone regeneration membrane by tissue engineering in vitro].

    PubMed

    Huang, Lanfeng; Qi, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Xu, Xinxiang

    2004-08-01

    In this study, porous polymer (PLA/PCL) membrane was first treated with ethanol to become hydrophilic, and then immersed into DMEM with 50% fetal bovine serum to enhance the affinity to cells. MSCs cultured in osteogenic medium were loaded into the membrane at density of 5 x 10(6)/cm2 for 7 days, and scanning electrical microscope was used to observe the growth of the MSCs. The growth of MSCs inside the constructs was functionally well, and the cells proliferated with the time of culture. We concluded from current study that the membrane had satisfactory biocompatibility and the constructs could be used to guided bone regeneration.

  9. Regenerating cartilages by engineered ASCs: prolonged TGF-β3/BMP-6 expression improved articular cartilage formation and restored zonal structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Hsin; Yeh, Tsung-Szu; Yeh, Chia-Lin; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Sung, Li-Yu; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Yu-Han; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) hold promise for cartilage regeneration but their chondrogenesis potential is inferior. Here, we used a baculovirus (BV) system that exploited FLPo/Frt-mediated transgene recombination and episomal minicircle formation to genetically engineer rabbit ASCs (rASCs). The BV system conferred prolonged and robust TGF-β3/BMP-6 expression in rASCs cultured in porous scaffolds, which critically augmented rASCs chondrogenesis and suppressed osteogenesis/hypertrophy, leading to the formation of cartilaginous constructs with improved maturity and mechanical properties in 2-week culture. Twelve weeks after implantation into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits, these engineered constructs regenerated neocartilages that resembled native hyaline cartilages in cell morphology, matrix composition and mechanical properties. The neocartilages also displayed cartilage-specific zonal structures without signs of hypertrophy and degeneration, and eventually integrated with host cartilages. In contrast, rASCs that transiently expressed TGF-β3/BMP-6 underwent osteogenesis/hypertrophy and resulted in the formation of inferior cartilaginous constructs, which after implantation regenerated fibrocartilages. These data underscored the crucial role of TGF-β3/BMP-6 expression level and duration in rASCs in the cell differentiation, constructs properties and in vivo repair. The BV-engineered rASCs that persistently express TGF-β3/BMP-6 improved the chondrogenesis, in vitro cartilaginous constructs production and in vivo hyaline cartilage regeneration, thus representing a remarkable advance in cartilage engineering.

  10. Nanofiber-microsphere (nano-micro) matrices for bone regenerative engineering: a convergence approach toward matrix design.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Clarke; Khan, Yusuf; Laurencin, Cato T

    2014-11-01

    Bone is an essential organ for health and quality of life. Due to current shortfalls in therapy for bone tissue engineering, scientists have sought the application of synthetic materials as bone graft substitutes. As a composite organic/inorganic material with significant extra cellular matrix (ECM), one way to improve bone graft substitutes may be to engineer a synthetic matrix that is influenced by the physical appearance of natural ECM networks. In this work, the authors evaluate composite, hybrid scaffolds for bone tissue engineering based on composite ceramic/polymer microsphere scaffolds with synthetic ECM-mimetic networks in their pore spaces. Using thermally induced phase separation, nanoscale fibers were deposited in the pore spaces of structurally sound microsphere-based scaffold with a density proportionate to the initial polymer concentration. Porosimetry and mechanical testing indicated no significant changes in overall pore characteristics or mechanical integrity as a result of the fiber deposition process. These scaffolds displayed adequate mechanical integrity on the scale of human trabecular bone and supported the adhesion and proliferation of cultured mouse calvarial osteoblasts. Drawing from natural cues, these scaffolds may represent a new avenue forward for advanced bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  11. Bridging the lesion—engineering a permissive substrate for nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Liliana R.; Pêgo, Ana P.

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial-based strategies to restore connectivity after lesion at the spinal cord are focused on bridging the lesion and providing an favourable substrate and a path for axonal re-growth. Following spinal cord injury (SCI) a hostile environment for neuronal cell growth is established by the activation of multiple inhibitory mechanisms that hamper regeneration to occur. Implantable scaffolds can provide mechanical support and physical guidance for axon re-growth and, at the same time, contribute to alleviate the hostile environment by the in situ delivery of therapeutic molecules and/or relevant cells. Basic research on SCI has been contributing with the description of inhibitory mechanisms for regeneration as well as identifying drugs/molecules that can target inhibition. This knowledge is the background for the development of combined strategies with biomaterials. Additionally, scaffold design is significantly evolving. From the early simple hollow conduits, scaffolds with complex architectures that can modulate cell fate are currently being tested. A number of promising pre-clinical studies combining scaffolds, cells, drugs and/or nucleic acids are reported in the open literature. Overall, it is considered that to address the multi-factorial inhibitory environment of a SCI, a multifaceted therapeutic approach is imperative. The progress in the identification of molecules that target inhibition after SCI and its combination with scaffolds and/or cells are described and discussed in this review. PMID:26816642

  12. Balanced Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Kapoor M.R. Rao § Kristina Vu~kovic ¶ DTIC April 1994 ELECTE 1 SJjUN 01 1994uG - ,)ýK94-16267 "Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicata...introduce the connection with propositional logic and nonlinear 0, 1 optimization. In Section 3, we show how to sign a 0,1 matrix into a 0, ±1 balanced...polytope P(A) is irreducible. Then A is perfect if and only if all the monotone completions of A are perfect 0, 1 matrices. 2.4 Propositional Logic In

  13. Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Antonia F.; Klatt, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage damaged by trauma has a limited capacity to regenerate. Current methods for treating small chondral defects include palliative treatment with arthroscopic debridement and lavage, reparative treatment with marrow stimulation techniques (e.g. microfracture), and restorative treatment, including osteochondral grafting and autologous chondrocyte implantation. Larger defects are treated by osteochondral allografting or total joint replacements. However, the future of treating cartilage defects lies in providing biologic solutions through cartilage regeneration. Laboratory and clinical studies have examined the treatment of larger lesions using tissue engineered cartilage. Regenerated cartilage can be derived from various cell types, including chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells, and pluripotent stem cells. Common scaffolding materials include proteins, carbohydrates, synthetic materials, and composite polymers. Scaffolds may be woven, spun into nanofibers, or configured as hydrogels. Chondrogenesis may be enhanced with the application of chondroinductive growth factors. Finally, bioreactors are being developed to enhance nutrient delivery and provide mechanical stimulation to tissue-engineered cartilage ex vivo. The multi-disciplinary approaches currently being developed to produce cartilage promise to bring the dream of cartilage regeneration in clinical use to reality. PMID:23637149

  14. Novel strategies in tendon and ligament tissue engineering: Advanced biomaterials and regeneration motifs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Tendon and ligaments have poor healing capacity and when injured often require surgical intervention. Tissue replacement via autografts and allografts are non-ideal strategies that can lead to future problems. As an alternative, scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies are being pursued. In this review, we describe design considerations and major recent advancements of scaffolds for tendon/ligament engineering. Specifically, we outline native tendon/ligament characteristics critical for design parameters and outcome measures, and introduce synthetic and naturally-derived biomaterials used in tendon/ligament scaffolds. We will describe applications of these biomaterials in advanced tendon/ligament engineering strategies including the utility of scaffold functionalization, cyclic strain, growth factors, and interface considerations. The goal of this review is to compile and interpret the important findings of recent tendon/ligament engineering research in an effort towards the advancement of regenerative strategies. PMID:20727171

  15. Graphene oxide-stimulated myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells on PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y. C.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Hong, S. W.; Oh, J.-W.; Kim, C.-S.; Kim, B.; Hyun, J. K.; Kim, Y.-J.; Han, D.-W.

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade, much attention has been paid to graphene-based nanomaterials because they are considered as potential candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds for tissue engineering and substrates for the differentiation of stem cells. Until now, electrospun matrices composed of various biodegradable copolymers have been extensively developed for tissue engineering and regeneration; however, their use in combination with graphene oxide (GO) is novel and challenging. In this study, nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 phage with RGD peptide displayed on its surface (RGD peptide-M13 phage) were prepared as extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking substrates. RGD peptide is a tripeptide (Arg-Gly-Asp) found on ECM proteins that promotes various cellular behaviors. The physicochemical properties of PLGA and RGD peptide-M13 phage (PLGA/RGD peptide) nanofiber matrices were characterized by atomic force microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, the growth of C2C12 mouse myoblasts on the PLGA/RGD peptide matrices was examined by measuring the metabolic activity. Moreover, the differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts on the matrices when treated with GO was evaluated. The cellular behaviors, including growth and differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts, were substantially enhanced on the PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices when treated with GO. Overall, these findings suggest that the PLGA/RGD peptide nanofiber matrices can be used in combination with GO as a novel strategy for skeletal tissue regeneration.

  16. A multi-functional scaffold for tissue regeneration: the need to engineer a tissue analogue.

    PubMed

    Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2007-12-01

    In designing scaffolds for tissue regeneration, the principal objective is to recapitulate extracellular matrix (ECM) function in a temporally coordinated and spatially organised structure. A key issue is to encode required biological signals within the scaffold so that all aspects of cell response-adhesion and migration, proliferation and phenotype choice-can be controlled. In achieving this objective nanotechnology, bottom-up design approach and solid free-form fabrication (SFF) will play key roles, along with self-assembly processes. For scaffold materials, there must be the correct balance between architectural features notably, porosity and chemical, physical and biological properties. This paper reviews the main achievements in biomaterials design and the future challenges.

  17. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Oreffo, Richard OC

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p < 0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering. PMID:27577960

  18. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p < 0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.

  19. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A; Janeczek, Agnieszka A; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-08-31

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p < 0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.

  20. Platelet-Rich Blood Derivatives for Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Leijten, Jeroen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Platelet rich blood derivatives have been widely used in different fields of medicine and stem cell based tissue engineering. They represent natural cocktails of autologous growth factor, which could provide an alternative for recombinant protein based approaches. Platelet rich blood derivatives, such as platelet rich plasma, have consistently shown to potentiate stem cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Here, we review the spectrum of platelet rich blood derivatives, discuss their current applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, reflect on their effect on stem cells, and highlight current translational challenges. PMID:27047733

  1. Chondrogenic commitment of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in collagen matrices for cartilage engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Leduc, Tangni; Hervieu, Magalie; Legendre, Florence; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Gruchy, Nicolas; Poulain, Laurent; de Vienne, Claire; Herlicoviez, Michel; Demoor, Magali; Galéra, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a promising alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), because UCB-MSCs are abundant and harvesting them is a painless non-invasive procedure. Potential clinical applications of UCB-MSCs have been identified, but their ability for chondrogenic differentiation has not yet been fully evaluated. The aim of our work was to characterize and determine the chondrogenic differentiation potential of human UCB-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) for cartilage tissue engineering using an approach combining 3D culture in type I/III collagen sponges and chondrogenic factors. Our results showed that UCB-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity. These cells differentiated easily into an osteoblast lineage but not into an adipocyte lineage. Furthermore, BMP-2 and TGF-β1 potentiated chondrogenic differentiation, as revealed by a strong increase in mature chondrocyte-specific mRNA (COL2A1, COL2B, ACAN) and protein (type II collagen) markers. Although growth factors increased the transcription of hypertrophic chondrocyte markers such as COL10A1 and MMP13, the cells present in the neo-tissue maintained their phenotype and did not progress to terminal differentiation and mineralization of the extracellular matrix after subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our study demonstrates that our culture model has efficient chondrogenic differentiation, and that hUCB-MSCs can be a reliable source for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:27604951

  2. Tendon tissue engineering: adipose-derived stem cell and GDF-5 mediated regeneration using electrospun matrix systems.

    PubMed

    James, R; Kumbar, S G; Laurencin, C T; Balian, G; Chhabra, A B

    2011-04-01

    Tendon tissue engineering with a biomaterial scaffold that mimics the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) and is biomechanically suitable, and when combined with readily available autologous cells, may provide successful regeneration of defects in tendon. Current repair strategies using suitable autografts and freeze-dried allografts lead to a slow repair process that is sub-optimal and fails to restore function, particularly in difficult clinical situations such as zone II flexor tendon injuries of the hand. We have investigated the effect of GDF-5 on cell proliferation and gene expression by primary rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) that were cultured on a poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) PLAGA fiber scaffold and compared to a PLAGA 2D film scaffold. The electrospun scaffold mimics the collagen fiber bundles present in native tendon tissue, and supports the adhesion and proliferation of multipotent ADSCs. Gene expression of scleraxis, the neotendon marker, was upregulated seven- to eightfold at 1 week with GDF-5 treatment when cultured on a 3D electrospun scaffold, and was significantly higher at 2 weeks compared to 2D films with or without GDF-5 treatment. Expression of the genes that encode the major tendon ECM protein, collagen type I, was increased by fourfold starting at 1 week on treatment with 100 ng mL(-1) GDF-5, and at all time points the expression was significantly higher compared to 2D films irrespective of GDF-5 treatment. Thus stimulation with GDF-5 can modulate primary ADSCs on a PLAGA fiber scaffold to produce a soft, collagenous musculoskeletal tissue that fulfills the need for tendon regeneration.

  3. Improved non-invasive Optical Coherence Tomography detection of different engineered nanoparticles in food-mimicking matrices.

    PubMed

    Grombe, Ringo; Kirsten, Lars; Mehner, Mirko; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Koch, Edmund

    2016-12-01

    Food industry and regulators require fast and reliable analytical methods for quality control. This especially counts for the detection of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in food products. Respective EU regulation is in force, but the development of appropriate methods is still underway. This paper updates the scope of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for ENM/food matrix analysis. A range of nanomaterials and composites - Au@SiO2, Ag, Ag@SiO2 and SiO2 - in a simplified food matrix was investigated. The earlier finding of linear dependencies between concentration in the dispersion and light responses could be reproduced. Being able to analyse non-invasively for a relevant industrial compound such as SiO2, makes OCT an excellent candidate for screening purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Source Differentiation Toward Human Pediatric Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells within 3D Engineered Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Das, Shoshana; Xu, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Living tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHV) would be a major benefit for children who require a replacement with the capacity for growth and biological integration. A persistent challenge for TEHV is accessible human cell source(s) that can mimic native valve cell phenotypes and matrix remodeling characteristics that are essential for long-term function. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow (BMMSC) or adipose tissue (ADMSC) are intriguing cell sources for TEHV, but they have not been compared with pediatric human aortic valve interstitial cells (pHAVIC) in relevant 3D environments. In this study, we compared the spontaneous and induced multipotency of ADMSC and BMMSC with that of pHAVIC using different induction media within three-dimensional (3D) bioactive hybrid hydrogels with material modulus comparable to that of aortic heart valve leaflets. pHAVIC possessed some multi-lineage differentiation capacity in response to induction media, but limited to the earliest stages and much less potent than either ADMSC or BMMSC. ADMSC expressed cell phenotype markers more similar to pHAVIC when conditioned in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) containing HAVIC growth medium, while BMMSC generally expressed similar extracellular matrix remodeling characteristics to pHAVIC. Finally, we covalently attached bFGF to PEG monoacrylate linkers and further covalently immobilized in the 3D hybrid hydrogels. Immobilized bFGF upregulated vimentin expression and promoted the fibroblastic differentiation of pHAVIC, ADMSC, and BMMSC. These findings suggest that stem cells retain a heightened capacity for osteogenic differentiation in 3D culture, but can be shifted toward fibroblast differentiation through matrix tethering of bFGF. Such a strategy is likely important for utilizing stem cell sources in heart valve tissue engineering applications. PMID:25594437

  5. A novel approach to periodontal tissue regeneration with mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma using tissue engineering technology: A clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoichi; Ueda, Minoru; Hibi, Hideharu; Baba, Shunsuke

    2006-08-01

    Tissue engineering represents one of the most exciting advances in regenerative medicine. However, little has been reported on the application of tissue engineering for regeneration of periodontal tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to show how a technique based on tissue engineering principles can be applied to periodontology. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from a patient's iliac crest marrow aspirates. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was isolated from peripheral blood. Full-thickness periodontal flaps were elevated and the root surfaces were scaled and planed. A MSCs-PRP gel was prepared and applied to the root surface and adjacent defect space. The primary outcome measures were changes in pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and defect bone fill. Re-examination demonstrated that the treatment, including the application of MSCs-PRP gel at periodontal sites with angular defects, resulted in a 4-mm reduction in probing depths and a 4-mm clinical attachment gain, while bleeding and tooth mobility disappeared. Radiographic assessments showed that the bone defect had been reduced in depth. Interdental papillae supported by this tissue engineering technology regenerated. The use of MSCs in PRP gel might be helpful for periodontal tissue regeneration, treatment of esthetically sensitive sites, and reduction of patient morbidity.

  6. Ultra-rapid manufacturing of engineered epicardial substitute to regenerate cardiac tissue following acute ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Serpooshan, Vahid; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Considering the impaired regenerative capacity of adult mammalian heart tissue, cardiovascular tissue engineering aims to create functional substitutes that can restore the structure and function of the damaged cardiac tissue. The success of cardiac regenerative therapies has been limited mainly due to poor control on the structure and properties of the tissue substitute, lack of vascularization, and immunogenicity. In this study we introduce a new approach to rapidly engineer dense biomimetic scaffolds consisting of type I collagen, to protect the heart against severe ischemic injury. Scaffold biomechanical properties are adjusted to mimic embryonic epicardium which is shown to be optimal to support cardiomyocyte contractile work. Moreover, the designed patch can serve as a delivery device for targeted, controlled release of cells or therapeutic macromolecules into the lesion area.

  7. Hearts beating through decellularized scaffolds: whole-organ engineering for cardiac regeneration and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zia, Sonia; Mozafari, Masoud; Natasha, G; Tan, Aaron; Cui, Zhanfeng; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2016-08-01

    Whole-organ decellularization and tissue engineering approaches have made significant inroads during recent years. If proven to be successful and clinically viable, it is highly likely that this field would be poised to revolutionize organ transplantation surgery. In particular, whole-heart decellularization has captured the attention and imagination of the scientific community. This technique allows for the generation of a complex three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix scaffold, with the preservation of the intrinsic 3D basket-weave macroarchitecture of the heart itself. The decellularized scaffold can then be recellularized by seeding it with cells and incubating it in perfusion bioreactors in order to create functional organ constructs for transplantation. Indeed, research into this strategy of whole-heart tissue engineering has consequently emerged from the pages of science fiction into a proof-of-concept laboratory undertaking. This review presents current trends and advances, and critically appraises the concepts involved in various approaches to whole-heart decellularization and tissue engineering.

  8. Structure-induced nonlinear viscoelasticity of non-woven fibrous matrices.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Mohd Suhail; Pal, Anupam; Das, Sovan Lal

    2016-12-01

    Fibrous materials are widely utilized as tissue engineering scaffolds for tissue regeneration and other bioengineering applications. The structural as well as mechanical characteristics of the fibrous matrices under static and dynamic mechanical loading conditions influence the response of the cells. In this paper, we study the mechanical response of the non-woven fibrous matrices under oscillatory loading conditions and its dependence on the structural properties of fibrous matrix. We demonstrate that under oscillatory shear and elongation, the fibrous matrices demonstrate nonlinear viscoelasticity at all strain amplitudes. This is contrary to the behavior of other soft polymeric materials for which nonlinearity in the viscoelastic response vanishes for small strains. These observations suggest that despite their prevalence, the measures of linear viscoelasticity (e.g., storage and loss moduli) are inadequate for the general description of the viscoelastic nature of the fibrous materials. It was, however, found that linear viscoelastic nature of fibrous matrices for small amplitudes is restored when a pre-stretch is applied to the fibrous matrix along with oscillatory strains. Further, we also explored the influence of the structural properties of the fibrous matrices (fiber orientation, alignment and curvature) on their viscoelastic nature.

  9. Improvement of nerve regeneration in tissue-engineered skin enriched with schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Blais, Mathieu; Grenier, Myriam; Berthod, François

    2009-12-01

    The incorporation of Schwann cells in reconstructed skin (RS) could have a major role in achieving functional recovery of cutaneous sensory perception. We showed with a unique in vitro model of a tissue-engineered innervated reconstructed dermis that Schwann cells promoted a twofold increase in the number of sensory neurites migrating in the three-dimensional tissue as compared with the control. In addition, Schwann cells spontaneously colocalized along neurites and achieved the formation of myelin sheaths in vitro as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. We prepared RS samples enriched or not with Schwann cells and transplanted them on nude mice for 60-90 days. We demonstrated that Schwann cells induced a 1.8- and 1.7-fold increase in the number of nerve fibers migrating in the graft 60 and 90 days after transplantation, respectively. In addition, the RS sample enriched with Schwann cells had a current perception threshold similar to that of normal skin for the large and myelinated Abeta-sensory fibers, in contrast with the control. Thus, we showed that the addition of Schwann cells to tissue-engineered skin not only enhanced nerve migration but also promoted myelin sheath formation in vitro and nerve function recovery in vivo.

  10. Closed nutrient recycling via microbial catabolism in an eco-engineered self regenerating mixed anaerobic microbiome for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Savvas, Savvas; Donnelly, Joanne; Patterson, Tim P; Dinsdale, Richard; Esteves, Sandra R

    2017-03-01

    A novel eco-engineered mixed anaerobic culture was successfully demonstrated for the first time to be capable of continuous regeneration in nutrient limiting conditions. Microbial catabolism has been found to support a closed system of nutrients able to enrich a culture of lithotrophic methanogens and provide microbial cell recycling. After enrichment, the hydrogenotrophic species was the dominating methanogens while a bacterial substratum was responsible for the redistribution of nutrients. q-PCR results indicated that 7% of the total population was responsible for the direct conversion of the gases. The efficiency of H2/CO2 conversion to CH4 reached 100% at a gassing rate of above 60v/v/d. The pH of the culture media was effectively sustained at optimal levels (pH 7-8) through a buffering system created by the dissolved CO2. The novel approach can reduce the process nutrient/metal requirement and enhance the environmental and financial performance of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis for renewable energy storage.

  11. Immobilization of collagen peptide on dialdehyde bacterial cellulose nanofibers via covalent bonds for tissue engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Yudong; Wu, Jian; Wang, Lu-Ning; Yuan, Zhenya; Peng, Jiang; Meng, Haoye

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is an alternative nanostructured biomaterial to be utilized for a wide range of biomedical applications. Because of its low bioactivity, which restricted its practical application, collagen and collagen hydrolysate were usually composited into BC. It is necessary to develop a new method to generate covalent bonds between collagen and cellulose to improve the immobilization of collagen on BC. This study describes a facile dialdehyde BC/collagen peptide nanocomposite. BC was oxidized into dialdehyde bacterial cellulose (DBC) by regioselective oxidation, and then composited with collagen peptide (Col-p) via covalent bonds to form Schiff’s base type compounds, which was demonstrated by the results of microstructures, contact angle, Col-p content, and peptide-binding ratio. The peptide-binding ratio was further affected by the degree of oxidation, pH value, and zeta potential. In vitro desorption measurement of Col-p suggested a controlled release mechanism of the nanocomposite. Cell tests indicated that the prepared DBC/Col-p composite was bioactive and suitable for cell adhesion and attachment. This work demonstrates that the DBC/Col-p composite is a promising material for tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:26229466

  12. The Hidden Treasure in Apical Papilla: The Potential Role in Pulp/Dentin Regeneration and BioRoot Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George T.-J.; Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Liu, He; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2009-01-01

    Some clinical case reports have shown that immature permanent teeth with periradicular periodontitis or abscess can undergo apexogenesis after conservative endodontic treatment. A call for a paradigm shift and new protocol for the clinical management of these cases has been brought to attention. Concomitantly, a new population of mesenchymal stem cells residing in the apical papilla of permanent immature teeth recently has been discovered and was termed stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAP). These stem cells appear to be the source of odontoblasts that are responsible for the formation of root dentin. Conservation of these stem cells when treating immature teeth may allow continuous formation of the root to completion. This article reviews current findings on the isolation and characterization of these stem cells. The potential role of these stem cells in the following respects will be discussed: (1) their contribution in continued root maturation in endodontically treated immature teeth with periradicular periodontitis or abscess and (2) their potential utilization for pulp/dentin regeneration and bioroot engineering. PMID:18498881

  13. Evaluating Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes through a Novel 3-Dimensional In Vitro System for Cartilage Tissue Engineering and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanwei; Davison, Noel; Moroni, Lorenzo; Feng, Felicia; Crist, Joshua; Salter, Erin; Bingham, Clifton O; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    To characterize and evaluate osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes, in comparison to normal chondrocytes, through a novel 3-dimensional (3-D) culture system, poly(ethylene-glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was also used to simulate an in vitro OA model. Normal and OA chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer and analyzed for changes in cartilage-specific gene expressions due to passage number. Then, cells were encapsulated in PEGDA to evaluate phenotype and matrix production capabilities through the in vitro culture system. Characterization was conducted with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), biochemical analyses, and histological staining. 3-D encapsulated chondrocytes (human and bovine) were also treated with IL-1β to characterize how the cytokine affects gene transcription and extracellular matrix (ECM) content. In 2-dimensional monolayer, anabolic genes were down-regulated significantly in both normal and OA chondrocytes. In 3-D culture, OA chondrocytes demonstrated significantly higher expressions of catabolic genes when compared to normal cells. Differentiation medium resulted in significantly more matrix production than growth medium from OA chondrocytes, indicated through histological staining. In addition, normal chondrocytes responded more significantly to exogenous administration of IL-1β than OA chondrocytes. Temporary initial stimulation of IL-1β to OA chondrocytes resulted in comparable gene expressions to untreated cells after 3 weeks of in vitro culture. Our findings demonstrate the use of OA chondrocytes in tissue engineering and their significance for potential future cartilage regeneration research through their matrix production capabilities and the use of a hydrogel culture system.

  14. Immobilization of collagen peptide on dialdehyde bacterial cellulose nanofibers via covalent bonds for tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Yudong; Wu, Jian; Wang, Lu-Ning; Yuan, Zhenya; Peng, Jiang; Meng, Haoye

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is an alternative nanostructured biomaterial to be utilized for a wide range of biomedical applications. Because of its low bioactivity, which restricted its practical application, collagen and collagen hydrolysate were usually composited into BC. It is necessary to develop a new method to generate covalent bonds between collagen and cellulose to improve the immobilization of collagen on BC. This study describes a facile dialdehyde BC/collagen peptide nanocomposite. BC was oxidized into dialdehyde bacterial cellulose (DBC) by regioselective oxidation, and then composited with collagen peptide (Col-p) via covalent bonds to form Schiff's base type compounds, which was demonstrated by the results of microstructures, contact angle, Col-p content, and peptide-binding ratio. The peptide-binding ratio was further affected by the degree of oxidation, pH value, and zeta potential. In vitro desorption measurement of Col-p suggested a controlled release mechanism of the nanocomposite. Cell tests indicated that the prepared DBC/Col-p composite was bioactive and suitable for cell adhesion and attachment. This work demonstrates that the DBC/Col-p composite is a promising material for tissue engineering and regeneration.

  15. Design and Assembly of an Integrated Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) Subassembly Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Powers, Aaron; Iacomini, Christie S.; Bower, Chad E.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. The core of the MTSA technology is a sorbent bed that removes CO2 from the PLSS ventilation loop gas via a temperature swing. A Condensing Icing Heat eXchanger (CIHX) is used to warm the sorbent while also removing water from the ventilation loop gas. A Sublimation Heat eXchanger (SHX) is used to cool the sorbent. Research was performed to explore an MTSA designed for both lunar and Martian operations. Previously the sorbent bed, CIHX, and SHX had been built and tested individually on a scale relevant to PLSS operations, but they had not been done so as an integrated subassembly. Design and analysis of an integrated subassembly was performed based on this prior experience and an updated transient system model. Focus was on optimizing the design for Martian operations, but the design can also be used in lunar operations. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of an integrated MTSA subassembly was assembled based on the design. Its fabrication is discussed. Some details on the differences between the as-assembled EDU and the future flight unit are considered.

  16. Design and Assembly of an Integrated Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) Subassembly Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Powers, Aaron; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. The core of the MTSA technology is a sorbent bed that removes CO2 from the PLSS ventilation loop gas via a temperature swing. A Condensing Ice Heat eXchanger (CIHX) is used to warm the sorbent while also removing water from the ventilation loop gas. A Sublimation Heat eXchanger (SHX) is used to cool the sorbent. Research was performed to explore an MTSA designed for both lunar and Martian operations. Previously each the sorbent bed, CIHX, and SHX had been built and tested individually on a scale relevant to PLSS operations, but they had not been done so as an integrated subassembly. Design and analysis of an integrated subassembly was performed based on this prior experience and an updated transient system model. Focus was on optimizing the design for Martian operations, but the design can also be used in lunar operations. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of an integrated MTSA subassembly was assembled based on the design. Its fabrication is discussed. Some details on the differences between the as-assembled EDU to the future flight unit are considered.

  17. Pre-clinical characterization of tissue engineering constructs for bone and cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Vo, Tiffany N; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-03-01

    Pre-clinical animal models play a crucial role in the translation of biomedical technologies from the bench top to the bedside. However, there is a need for improved techniques to evaluate implanted biomaterials within the host, including consideration of the care and ethics associated with animal studies, as well as the evaluation of host tissue repair in a clinically relevant manner. This review discusses non-invasive, quantitative, and real-time techniques for evaluating host-materials interactions, quality and rate of neotissue formation, and functional outcomes of implanted biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Specifically, a comparison will be presented for pre-clinical animal models, histological scoring systems, and non-invasive imaging modalities. Additionally, novel technologies to track delivered cells and growth factors will be discussed, including methods to directly correlate their release with tissue growth.

  18. Pre-clinical characterization of tissue engineering constructs for bone and cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, Jordan E.; Vo, Tiffany N.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical animal models play a crucial role in the translation of biomedical technologies from the bench top to the bedside. However, there is a need for improved techniques to evaluate implanted biomaterials within the host, including consideration of the care and ethics associated with animal studies, as well as the evaluation of host tissue repair in a clinically relevant manner. This review discusses non-invasive, quantitative, and real-time techniques for evaluating host-materials interactions, quality and rate of neotissue formation, and functional outcomes of implanted biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Specifically, a comparison will be presented for pre-clinical animal models, histological scoring systems, and non-invasive imaging modalities. Additionally, novel technologies to track delivered cells and growth factors will be discussed, including methods to directly correlate their release with tissue growth. PMID:25319726

  19. Design and Use of a Novel Bioreactor for Regeneration of Biaxially Stretched Tissue-Engineered Vessels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Angela Hai; Lee, Yong-Ung; Calle, Elizabeth A; Boyle, Michael; Starcher, Barry C; Humphrey, Jay D; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-08-01

    Conventional bioreactors are used to enhance extracellular matrix (ECM) production and mechanical strength of tissue-engineered vessels (TEVs) by applying circumferential strain, which is uniaxial stretching. However, the resulting TEVs still suffer from inadequate mechanical properties, where rupture strengths and compliance values are still very different from native arteries. The biomechanical milieu of native arteries consists of both circumferential and axial loading. Therefore, to better simulate the physiological stresses acting on native arteries, we built a novel bioreactor system to enable biaxial stretching of engineered arteries during culture. This new bioreactor system allows for independent control of circumferential and axial stretching parameters, such as displacement and beat rate. The assembly and setup processes for this biaxial bioreactor system are reliable with a success rate greater than 75% for completion of long-term sterile culture. This bioreactor also supports side-by-side assessments of TEVs that are cultured under three types of mechanical conditions (static, uniaxial, and biaxial), all within the same biochemical environment. Using this bioreactor, we examined the impact of biaxial stretching on arterial wall remodeling of TEVs. Biaxial TEVs developed the greatest wall thickness compared with static and uniaxial TEVs. Unlike uniaxial loading, biaxial loading led to undulated collagen fibers that are commonly found in native arteries. More importantly, the biaxial TEVs developed the most mature elastin in the ECM, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The presence of mature extracellular elastin along with the undulated collagen fibers may contribute to the observed vascular compliance in the biaxial TEVs. The current work shows that biaxial stretching is a novel and promising means to improve TEV generation. Furthermore, this novel system allows us to optimize biomechanical conditioning by unraveling the interrelationships among the

  20. Design and Use of a Novel Bioreactor for Regeneration of Biaxially Stretched Tissue-Engineered Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Angela Hai; Lee, Yong-Ung; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Boyle, Michael; Starcher, Barry C.; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional bioreactors are used to enhance extracellular matrix (ECM) production and mechanical strength of tissue-engineered vessels (TEVs) by applying circumferential strain, which is uniaxial stretching. However, the resulting TEVs still suffer from inadequate mechanical properties, where rupture strengths and compliance values are still very different from native arteries. The biomechanical milieu of native arteries consists of both circumferential and axial loading. Therefore, to better simulate the physiological stresses acting on native arteries, we built a novel bioreactor system to enable biaxial stretching of engineered arteries during culture. This new bioreactor system allows for independent control of circumferential and axial stretching parameters, such as displacement and beat rate. The assembly and setup processes for this biaxial bioreactor system are reliable with a success rate greater than 75% for completion of long-term sterile culture. This bioreactor also supports side-by-side assessments of TEVs that are cultured under three types of mechanical conditions (static, uniaxial, and biaxial), all within the same biochemical environment. Using this bioreactor, we examined the impact of biaxial stretching on arterial wall remodeling of TEVs. Biaxial TEVs developed the greatest wall thickness compared with static and uniaxial TEVs. Unlike uniaxial loading, biaxial loading led to undulated collagen fibers that are commonly found in native arteries. More importantly, the biaxial TEVs developed the most mature elastin in the ECM, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The presence of mature extracellular elastin along with the undulated collagen fibers may contribute to the observed vascular compliance in the biaxial TEVs. The current work shows that biaxial stretching is a novel and promising means to improve TEV generation. Furthermore, this novel system allows us to optimize biomechanical conditioning by unraveling the interrelationships among the

  1. Beta-tricalcium phosphate granules improve osteogenesis in vitro and establish innovative osteo-regenerators for bone tissue engineering in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Yun; Fan, Bo; Li, Xiaokang; Xiao, Xin; Lan, Pingheng; Li, Minghui; Geng, Lei; Liu, Dong; Yuan, Yulin; Lian, Qin; Lu, Jianxi; Guo, Zheng; Wang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The drawbacks of traditional bone-defect treatments have prompted the exploration of bone tissue engineering. This study aimed to explore suitable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules for bone regeneration and identify an efficient method to establish β-TCP-based osteo-regenerators. β-TCP granules with diameters of 1 mm and 1–2.5 mm were evaluated in vitro. The β-TCP granules with superior osteogenic properties were used to establish in vivo bioreactors, referred to as osteo-regenerators, which were fabricated using two different methods. Improved proliferation of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), glucose consumption and ALP activity were observed for 1–2.5 mm β-TCP compared with 1-mm granules (P < 0.05). In addition, BMSCs incubated with 1–2.5 mm β-TCP expressed significantly higher levels of the genes for runt-related transcription factor-2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and collagen type-1 and the osteogenesis-related proteins alkaline phosphatase, collagen type-1 and runt-related transcription factor-2 compared with BMSCs incubated with 1 mm β-TCP (P < 0.05). Fluorochrome labelling, micro-computed tomography and histological staining analyses indicated that the osteo-regenerator with two holes perforating the femur promoted significantly greater bone regeneration compared with the osteo-regenerator with a periosteum incision (P < 0.05). This study provides an alternative to biofunctionalized bioreactors that exhibits improved osteogenesis. PMID:27000963

  2. Human airway organoid engineering as a step toward lung regeneration and disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qi; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Sicard, Delphine; Tschumperlin, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    Organoids represent both a potentially powerful tool for the study cell-cell interactions within tissue-like environments, and a platform for tissue regenerative approaches. The development of lung tissue-like organoids from human adult-derived cells has not previously been reported. Here we combined human adult primary bronchial epithelial cells, lung fibroblasts, and lung microvascular endothelial cells in supportive 3D culture conditions to generate airway organoids. We demonstrate that randomly-seeded mixed cell populations undergo rapid condensation and self-organization into discrete epithelial and endothelial structures that are mechanically robust and stable during long term culture. After condensation airway organoids generate invasive multicellular tubular structures that recapitulate limited aspects of branching morphogenesis, and require actomyosin-mediated force generation and YAP/TAZ activation. Despite the proximal source of primary epithelium used in the airway organoids, discrete areas of both proximal and distal epithelial markers were observed over time in culture, demonstrating remarkable epithelial plasticity within the context of organoid cultures. Airway organoids also exhibited complex multicellular responses to a prototypical fibrogenic stimulus (TGF-β1) in culture, and limited capacity to undergo continued maturation and engraftment after ectopic implantation under the murine kidney capsule. These results demonstrate that the airway organoid system developed here represents a novel tool for the study of disease-relevant cell-cell interactions, and establishes this platform as a first step toward cell-based therapy for chronic lung diseases based on de novo engineering of implantable airway tissues.

  3. Rapid repair and regeneration of damaged rabbit sciatic nerves by tissue-engineered scaffold made from nano-silver and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tan; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Zheng, Yan; Hu, Xue-Yu; Ye, Zheng-Xu

    2010-05-01

    A tissue-engineered scaffold with nano-silver and collagen type I was constructed and investigated for its ability to adsorb laminin and the usefulness in the repair and regeneration of damaged peripheral nerves in animals. The nano-silver scaffold displayed ideal microtubule structure under electronic microscope; even distribution of the nano-silver particles was also seen with energy spectrometry. After immersion in a laminin solution, the laminin-attached scaffolds were implanted into rabbits to repair a 10-mm injury of the sciatic nerve. At 30 days post-implantation, regeneration of the damaged nerve was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, electrophysiological examination and fluoro-gold (FG) retrograde labelling. Compared with the control collagen-scaffold without nano-silver, the nano-silver-containing scaffold showed a higher rate of laminin adsorption, regenerated a nerve with a thicker myelin sheath and improved the nerve conduction velocity and nerve potential amplitude. FG retrograde labelled the newly grown axons in the spinal cord cortex anterior horn and the dorsal root ganglion. These results demonstrate the superior functionality of the nano-silver-collagen scaffold in the adsorption to laminin and subsequent regeneration of damaged peripheral nerves.

  4. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  5. Transplantable living scaffolds comprised of micro-tissue engineered aligned astrocyte networks to facilitate central nervous system regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Carla C.; Katiyar, Kritika S.; Hernandez, Nicole S.; Song, Yeri J.; Struzyna, Laura A.; Harris, James P.; Cullen, D. Kacy

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease may result in widespread loss of neural cells as well as the complex interconnectivity necessary for proper central nervous system function, generally resulting in permanent functional deficits. Potential regenerative strategies involve the recruitment of endogenous neural stem cells and/or directed axonal regeneration through the use of tissue engineered “living scaffolds” built to mimic features of three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo migratory or guidance pathways. Accordingly, we devised a novel biomaterial encasement scheme using tubular hydrogel-collagen micro-columns that facilitated the self-assembly of seeded astrocytes into 3-D living scaffolds consisting of long, cable-like aligned astrocytic networks. Here, robust astrocyte alignment was achieved within a micro-column inner diameter (ID) of 180 μm or 300–350 μm but not 1.0 mm, suggesting that radius of curvature dictated the extent of alignment. Moreover, within small ID micro-columns, >70% of the astrocytes assumed a bi-polar morphology, versus ~10% in larger micro-columns or planar surfaces. Cell–cell interactions also influenced the aligned architecture, as extensive astrocyte-collagen contraction was achieved at high (9–12 × 105 cells/mL) but not lower (2–6 × 105 cells/mL) seeding densities. This high density micro-column seeding led to the formation of ultra-dense 3-D “bundles” of aligned bi-polar astrocytes within collagen measuring up to 150 μm in diameter yet extending to a remarkable length of over 2.5 cm. Importantly, co-seeded neurons extended neurites directly along the aligned astrocytic bundles, demonstrating permissive cues for neurite extension. These transplantable cable-like astrocytic networks structurally mimic the glial tube that guides neuronal progenitor migration in vivo along the rostral migratory stream, and therefore may be useful to guide progenitor cells to repopulate sites of widespread neurodegeneration

  6. Regenerating Articular Tissue by Converging Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Paoluzzi, Luca; Pieper, Jeroen; de Wijn, Joost R.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.

    2008-01-01

    Scaffolds for osteochondral tissue engineering should provide mechanical stability, while offering specific signals for chondral and bone regeneration with a completely interconnected porous network for cell migration, attachment, and proliferation. Composites of polymers and ceramics are often considered to satisfy these requirements. As such methods largely rely on interfacial bonding between the ceramic and polymer phase, they may often compromise the use of the interface as an instrument to direct cell fate. Alternatively, here, we have designed hybrid 3D scaffolds using a novel concept based on biomaterial assembly, thereby omitting the drawbacks of interfacial bonding. Rapid prototyped ceramic particles were integrated into the pores of polymeric 3D fiber-deposited (3DF) matrices and infused with demineralized bone matrix (DBM) to obtain constructs that display the mechanical robustness of ceramics and the flexibility of polymers, mimicking bone tissue properties. Ostechondral scaffolds were then fabricated by directly depositing a 3DF structure optimized for cartilage regeneration adjacent to the bone scaffold. Stem cell seeded scaffolds regenerated both cartilage and bone in vivo. PMID:18716660

  7. The effects of intercooling and regeneration on the thermo-ecological performance analysis of an irreversible-closed Brayton heat engine with variable-temperature thermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim Sogut, Oguz; Ust, Yasin; Sahin, Bahri

    2006-11-01

    A thermo-ecological performance analysis of an irreversible intercooled and regenerated closed Brayton heat engine exchanging heat with variable-temperature thermal reservoirs is presented. The effects of intercooling and regeneration are given special emphasis and investigated in detail. A comparative performance analysis considering the objective functions of an ecological coefficient of performance, an ecological function proposed by Angulo-Brown and power output is also carried out. The results indicate that the optimal total isentropic temperature ratio and intercooling isentropic temperature ratio at the maximum ecological coefficient of performance conditions (ECOPmax) are always less than those of at the maximum ecological function ( \\dot {E}_{\\max } ) and the maximum power output conditions ( \\dot {W}_{\\max } ) leading to a design that requires less investment cost. It is also concluded that a design at ECOPmax conditions has the advantage of higher thermal efficiency and a lesser entropy generation rate, but at the cost of a slight power loss.

  8. Bladder muscular wall regeneration with autologous adipose mesenchymal stem cells on three-dimensional collagen-based tissue-engineered prepuce and biocompatible nanofibrillar scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Tourchi, Ali; Mousavian, Amir-Abbas; Rouhi, Leila; Tavangar, Seyyed Mohammad; Sabetkish, Nastaran

    2014-12-01

    Tissue-engineered prepuce scaffold (TEPS) is a collagen-rich matrix with marvelous mechanical properties, promoting in vivo and in vitro tissue regeneration. In this study, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) were used to seed TEPS for bladder wall regeneration. Its potential in comparison with other materials such as polyglycolic acid (PGA) and nanofibrous scaffolds were evaluated. Rat ADMSCs were cultured and seeded into prepared TEPS. A synthetic matrix of electrospun nanofibrous polyamide was also prepared. Sprague Dawley rats (n=32) underwent bladder wall regeneration using (a) TEPS, (b) TEPS+PGA, (c) TEPS+nanofibrous scaffold, and (d) ADMSC-seeded TEPS, between bladder mucosa and seromuscular layer. Animals were followed for 30 and 90 days post implantation for evaluation of bladder wall regeneration by determining CD31/34 and SMC α-actin. Cystometric evaluation was also performed in all groups and in four separate rats as sham controls 3 months postoperatively. Histopathological analysis showed well-organized muscular wall generation in ADMSC-seeded TEPS and TEPS+three-dimensional (3D) nanofibrous scaffold without significant fibrosis after 90 days, while mild to severe fibrosis was detected in groups receiving TEPS and TEPS+PGA. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed the maintenance of CD34+, CD31+, and α-SMA in ADMSC-seeded TEPS and TEPS+3D nanofibrous scaffold with significantly higher density of CD34+ and CD31+ progenitor cells in ADMSC-seeded TEPS and TEPS+3D nanofibrous scaffold, respectively. This work has crucial functional and clinical implications, as it demonstrates the feasibility of ADMSC-seeded TEPS in enhancing the properties of TEPS in terms of bladder wall regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tissue Regeneration: A Silk Road

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Dave; Mou, Xiaoyang; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Silk proteins are natural biopolymers that have extensive structural possibilities for chemical and mechanical modifications to facilitate novel properties, functions, and applications in the biomedical field. The versatile processability of silk fibroins (SF) into different forms such as gels, films, foams, membranes, scaffolds, and nanofibers makes it appealing in a variety of applications that require mechanically superior, biocompatible, biodegradable, and functionalizable biomaterials. There is no doubt that nature is the world’s best biological engineer, with simple, exquisite but powerful designs that have inspired novel technologies. By understanding the surface interaction of silk materials with living cells, unique characteristics can be implemented through structural modifications, such as controllable wettability, high-strength adhesiveness, and reflectivity properties, suggesting its potential suitability for surgical, optical, and other biomedical applications. All of the interesting features of SF, such as tunable biodegradation, anti-bacterial properties, and mechanical properties combined with potential self-healing modifications, make it ideal for future tissue engineering applications. In this review, we first demonstrate the current understanding of the structures and mechanical properties of SF and the various functionalizations of SF matrices through chemical and physical manipulations. Then the diverse applications of SF architectures and scaffolds for different regenerative medicine will be discussed in detail, including their current applications in bone, eye, nerve, skin, tendon, ligament, and cartilage regeneration. PMID:27527229

  10. Tissue Regeneration: A Silk Road.

    PubMed

    Jao, Dave; Mou, Xiaoyang; Hu, Xiao

    2016-08-05

    Silk proteins are natural biopolymers that have extensive structural possibilities for chemical and mechanical modifications to facilitate novel properties, functions, and applications in the biomedical field. The versatile processability of silk fibroins (SF) into different forms such as gels, films, foams, membranes, scaffolds, and nanofibers makes it appealing in a variety of applications that require mechanically superior, biocompatible, biodegradable, and functionalizable biomaterials. There is no doubt that nature is the world's best biological engineer, with simple, exquisite but powerful designs that have inspired novel technologies. By understanding the surface interaction of silk materials with living cells, unique characteristics can be implemented through structural modifications, such as controllable wettability, high-strength adhesiveness, and reflectivity properties, suggesting its potential suitability for surgical, optical, and other biomedical applications. All of the interesting features of SF, such as tunable biodegradation, anti-bacterial properties, and mechanical properties combined with potential self-healing modifications, make it ideal for future tissue engineering applications. In this review, we first demonstrate the current understanding of the structures and mechanical properties of SF and the various functionalizations of SF matrices through chemical and physical manipulations. Then the diverse applications of SF architectures and scaffolds for different regenerative medicine will be discussed in detail, including their current applications in bone, eye, nerve, skin, tendon, ligament, and cartilage regeneration.

  11. A model regenerator for a Stirling cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolan, James

    2001-05-01

    An essential feature of the engine patented by Robert Stirling in 1817 was the careful description of the idea of regeneration. In the standard thermodynamic cycle representation of the engine, regeneration is the storing and the reusing of the thermal energy released in the constant volume cooling part of the cycle. Due to the difficulty in treating regeneration quantitatively, introductory physics texts generally either ignore the concept or assume the regeneration to be perfect. As a result students obtain little or no understanding of regeneration. In addition there seem to be differing views in various texts about the efficiency of Stirling engines. In this work a simple finite element model regenerator is presented with which one can do simple calculations. The model does not accurately represent actual regeneration in a practical engine. But the model might help students gain better insight into Stirling engine efficiency and the idea of regeneration.

  12. Cellular and nerve regeneration within a biosynthetic extracellular matrix for corneal transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengfu; Carlsson, David; Lohmann, Chris; Suuronen, Erik; Vascotto, Sandy; Kobuch, Karin; Sheardown, Heather; Munger, Rejean; Nakamura, Masatsugu; Griffith, May

    2003-12-01

    Our objective was to determine whether key properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecules can be replicated within tissue-engineered biosynthetic matrices to influence cellular properties and behavior. To achieve this, hydrated collagen and N-isopropylacrylamide copolymer-based ECMs were fabricated and tested on a corneal model. The structural and immunological simplicity of the cornea and importance of its extensive innervation for optimal functioning makes it an ideal test model. In addition, corneal failure is a clinically significant problem. Matrices were therefore designed to have the optical clarity and the proper dimensions, curvature, and biomechanical properties for use as corneal tissue replacements in transplantation. In vitro studies demonstrated that grafting of the laminin adhesion pentapeptide motif, YIGSR, to the hydrogels promoted epithelial stratification and neurite in-growth. Implants into pigs' corneas demonstrated successful in vivo regeneration of host corneal epithelium, stroma, and nerves. In particular, functional nerves were observed to rapidly regenerate in implants. By comparison, nerve regeneration in allograft controls was too slow to be observed during the experimental period, consistent with the behavior of human cornea transplants. Other corneal substitutes have been produced and tested, but here we report an implantable matrix that performs as a physiologically functional tissue substitute and not simply as a prosthetic device. These biosynthetic ECM replacements should have applicability to many areas of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, especially where nerve function is required. regenerative medicine | tissue engineering | cornea | implantation | innervation

  13. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  14. Axonal regeneration and remyelination evaluation of chitosan/gelatin-based nerve guide combined with transforming growth factor-β1 and Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Deng, Manjing; Yang, Maojin; Liu, Luchuan; Zhang, Yongjie; Wen, Xiujie

    2014-01-01

    Despite efforts in peripheral nerve injury and regeneration, it is difficult to achieve a functional recovery following extended peripheral nerve lesions. Even if artificial nerve conduit, cell components and growth factors can enhance nerve regeneration, integration in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration remains yet to be explored. For this study, we used chitosan/gelatin nerve graft constructed with collagenous matrices as a vehicle for Schwann cells and transforming growth factor-β1 to bridge a 10-mm gap of the sciatic nerve and explored the feasibility of improving regeneration and reinnervation in rats. The nerve regeneration was assessed with functional recovery, electrophysiological test, retrograde labeling, and immunohistochemistry analysis during the post-operative period of 16 weeks. The results showed that the internal sides of the conduits were compact enough to prevent the connective tissues from ingrowth. Nerve conduction velocity, average regenerated myelin area, and myelinated axon count were similar to those treated with autograft (p > 0.05) but significantly higher than those bridged with chitosan/gelatin nerve graft alone (p < 0.05). Evidences from retrograde labeling and immunohistochemistry analysis are further provided in support of improving axonal regeneration and remyelination. A designed graft incorporating all of the tissue-engineering strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration may provide great progress in tissue engineering for nerve repair.

  15. Characterization of particle- and vapor-phase organic fraction emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine equipped with a particle trap and regeneration controls.

    PubMed

    Bagley, S T; Gratz, L D; Leddy, D G; Johnson, J H

    1993-07-01

    The effects of a ceramic particle trap on the chemical and biological character of the exhaust from a heavy-duty diesel engine have been studied during steady-state operation and during periods of trap regeneration. Phase I of this project involved developing and refining the methods using a Caterpillar 3208 engine, and Phase II involved more detailed experiments with a Cummins LTA10-300 engine, which met Federal 1988 particulate matter standards, and a ceramic particle trap with built-in regeneration controls. During the Phase I experiments, samples wee collected at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)* steady-state mode 4 (50% load at intermediate speed). Varying the dilution ratio to obtain a constant filter-face temperature resulted in less variability in total particulate matter (TPM), particle-associated soluble organic fraction (SOF), solids (SOL), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels than sampling with a constant dilution ratio and allowing filter-face temperature to vary. A modified microsuspension Ames assay detected mutagenicity in the SOF samples, and in the semivolatile organic fraction extracted from XAD-2 resin (XAD-2 resin organic component, XOC) with at least 10 times less sample mass than the standard plate incorporation assay. Measurement techniques for PAH and nitro-PAH in the SOF and XOC also were developed during this portion of the project. For the Phase II work, two EPA steady-state rated speed modes were selected: mode 11 (25% load) and mode 9 (75% load). With or without the trap, filter-face temperatures were kept at 45 degrees +/- 2 degrees C, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels less than 5 parts per million (ppm), and sampling times less than 60 minutes. Particle sizes were determined using an electrical aerosol analyzer. Similar sampling methods were used when the trap was regenerated, except that a separate dilution tunnel and sampling system was designed and built to collect all of the regeneration emissions. The SOF and

  16. [Tribological assessment of articular cartilage. A system for the analysis of the friction coefficient of cartilage, regenerates and tissue engineering constructs; initial results].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M L R; Schneider-Wald, B; Krase, A; Richter, W; Reisig, G; Kreinest, M; Heute, S; Pott, P P; Brade, J; Schütte, A

    2012-10-01

    Values for the friction coefficient of articular cartilage are given in ranges of percentage and lower and are calculated as a quotient of the friction force and the perpendicular loading force acting on it. Thus, a sophisticated system has to be provided for analysing the friction coefficient under different conditions in particular when cartilage should be coupled as friction partner. It is possible to deep-freeze articular cartilage before measuring the friction coefficient as the procedure has no influence on the results. The presented tribological system was able to distinguish between altered and native cartilage. Furthermore, tissue engineered constructs for cartilage repair were differentiated from native cartilage probes by their friction coefficient. In conclusion a tribological equipment is presented to analyze the friction coefficient of articular cartilage, in vivo generated cartilage regenerates and in vitro tissue engineered constructs regarding their biomechanical properties for quality assessment.

  17. 40 CFR 1042.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to adjust emission results from engines using aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration... engineering judgment. All adjustment factors for regeneration are additive. Determine adjustment factors... your engines use aftertreatment technology with extremely infrequent regeneration and you are unable to...

  18. 40 CFR 1042.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to adjust emission results from engines using aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration... engineering judgment. All adjustment factors for regeneration are additive. Determine adjustment factors... your engines use aftertreatment technology with extremely infrequent regeneration and you are unable to...

  19. Novel opportunities and challenges offered by nanobiomaterials in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gelain, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decades, tissue engineering has demonstrated an unquestionable potential to regenerate damaged tissues and organs. Some tissue-engineered solutions recently entered the clinics (eg, artificial bladder, corneal epithelium, engineered skin), but most of the pathologies of interest are still far from being solved. The advent of stem cells opened the door to large-scale production of “raw living matter” for cell replacement and boosted the overall sector in the last decade. Still reliable synthetic scaffolds fairly resembling the nanostructure of extracellular matrices, showing mechanical properties comparable to those of the tissues to be regenerated and capable of being modularly functionalized with biological active motifs, became feasible only in the last years thanks to newly introduced nanotechnology techniques of material design, synthesis, and characterization. Nanostructured synthetic matrices look to be the next generation scaffolds, opening new powerful pathways for tissue regeneration and introducing new challenges at the same time. We here present a detailed overview of the advantages, applications, and limitations of nanostructured matrices with a focus on both electrospun and self-assembling scaffolds. PMID:19337410

  20. Effects of continuously regenerating diesel particulate filters on regulated emissions and number-size distribution of particles emitted from a diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Shah, Asad Naeem; Ge, Yunshan; Ding, Yan; Tan, Jianwei; Jiang, Lei; Yu, Linxiao; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chu; Zeng, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The effects of continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CRDPF) systems on regulated gaseous emissions, and number-size distribution and mass of particles emanated from a diesel engine have been investigated in this study. Two CRDPF units (CRDPF-1 and CRDPF-2) with different specifications were separately retrofitted to the engine running with European steady-state cycle (ESC). An electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) was used for particle number-size distribution measurement and mass estimation. The conversion/reduction rate (R(CR)) of hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) across CRDPF-1 was 83% and 96.3%, respectively. Similarly, the R(CR) of HC and CO and across CRDPF-2 was 91.8% and 99.1%, respectively. The number concentration of particles and their concentration peaks; nuclei mode, accumulation mode and total particles; and particle mass were highly reduced with the CRDPF units. The nuclei mode particles at downstream of CRDPF-1 and CRDPF-2 decreased by 99.9% to 100% and 97.8% to 99.8% respectively; and the particle mass reduced by 73% to 92.2% and 35.3% to 72.4%, respectively, depending on the engine conditions. In addition, nuclei mode particles increased with the increasing of engine speed due to the heterogeneous nucleation initiated by the higher exhaust temperature, while accumulation mode particles were higher at higher loads due to the decrease in the air-to-fuel ratio (A/F) at higher loads.

  1. Evaluation of advanced regenerator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    The major considerations are discussed which will affect the selection of a ceramic regenerative heat exchanger for an improved 100 HP automotive gas turbine engine. The regenerator considered for this application is about 36cm in diameter. Regenerator comparisons are made on the basis of material, method of fabrication, cost, and performance. A regenerator inlet temperature of 1000 C is assumed for performance comparisons, and laboratory test results are discussed for material comparisons at 1100 and 1200 C. Engine test results using the Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engine are also discussed.

  2. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability tests/in industrial gas turbine engines. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate shows minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 7804 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 4983 hours at 982 C. The results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  3. Spectral Theory of Matrices. I. General Matrices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    criterion for similarity of two matrices 93 1.23 The equation AX - XB = C 98 1.24 A case of two nilpotent matrices 101 1.25 Components of a matrix and...following result is needed later. Theorem 1.24.1. Let A C M n(F) be a nilpotent matrix . Put XX . {xlx C in, A kx = 0), k - 0,1 ...... Assume that o - x 0 x x...establishes the theorem in case that A(x) is a nilpotent matrix . Next consider the case where A(x) is an upper triangular matrix whose diagonal entries

  4. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  5. Efficient whole-cell biocatalyst for 2,3-butanediol/acetoin production with NADH/NAD(+) regeneration system in engineered Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Ben, Rao; Tu, Truong Ngoc; Ying, Fan Ji; An, Sun Jian; Shen, Yaling

    2017-05-24

    Serratia marcescens is reported to possess the potential for industrial 2,3-butanediol or acetoin production by fermentation. But 2,3-butanediol or acetoin are always co-produced and this may make purification process difficult. So biocatalytic technologies may be the appropriate production methods. In this study, we developed an auto-inducing expression system based on pET system and swr quorum sensing system by using S. marcescens. By using this system, S. marcescens could be engineered as whole-cell biocatalyst to obtain 2,3-butanediol or acetoin. In order to convert diacetyl to 2,3-butanediol, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase were co-expressed to construct a NADH regeneration system. This whole-cell biocatalyst could efficiently produced 53.6 g/L 2,3-butanediol with a productivity of 3.35 g/Lh. Next, in order to convert 2,3-butanediol to acetoin, NADH oxidase and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase were co-expressed to construct a NAD+ regeneration system. This whole-cell biocatalyst could efficiently produced 59 g/L acetoin with a productivity of 2.95 g/Lh. This work indicated this auto-inducing system was a powerful tool to construct whole-cell biocatalyst in S. marcescens in 2,3-butanediol and acetoin production.

  6. In situ tissue engineering with synthetic self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds, PuraMatrix, for mucosal regeneration in the rat middle-ear

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Naotaro; Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Takahashi, Haruo; Koji, Takehiko

    2013-01-01

    Middle-ear mucosa maintains middle-ear pressure. However, the majority of surgical cases exhibit inadequate middle-ear mucosal regeneration, and mucosal transplantation is necessary in such cases. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of transplantation of isolated mucosal cells encapsulated within synthetic self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds using PuraMatrix, which has been successfully used as scaffolding in tissue engineering, for the repair of damaged middle-ear. Middle-ear bullae with mucosa were removed from Sprague Dawley (SD) transgenic rats, transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene and excised into small pieces, then cultured up to the third passage. After surgical elimination of middle-ear mucosa in SD recipient rats, donor cells were encapsulated within PuraMatrix and transplanted into these immunosuppressed rats. Primary cultured cells were positive for pancytokeratin but not for vimentin, and retained the character of middle-ear epithelial cells. A high proportion of EGFP-expressing cells were found in the recipient middle-ear after transplantation with PuraMatrix, but not without PuraMatrix. These cells retained normal morphology and function, as confirmed by histological examination, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy, and multiplied to form new epithelial and subepithelial layers together with basement membrane. The present study demonstrated the feasibility of transplantation of cultured middle-ear mucosal epithelial cells encapsulated within PuraMatrix for regeneration of surgically eliminated mucosa of the middle-ear in SD rats. PMID:23926427

  7. In situ tissue engineering with synthetic self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds, PuraMatrix, for mucosal regeneration in the rat middle-ear.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Naotaro; Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Takahashi, Haruo; Koji, Takehiko

    2013-01-01

    Middle-ear mucosa maintains middle-ear pressure. However, the majority of surgical cases exhibit inadequate middle-ear mucosal regeneration, and mucosal transplantation is necessary in such cases. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of transplantation of isolated mucosal cells encapsulated within synthetic self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds using PuraMatrix, which has been successfully used as scaffolding in tissue engineering, for the repair of damaged middle-ear. Middle-ear bullae with mucosa were removed from Sprague Dawley (SD) transgenic rats, transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene and excised into small pieces, then cultured up to the third passage. After surgical elimination of middle-ear mucosa in SD recipient rats, donor cells were encapsulated within PuraMatrix and transplanted into these immunosuppressed rats. Primary cultured cells were positive for pancytokeratin but not for vimentin, and retained the character of middle-ear epithelial cells. A high proportion of EGFP-expressing cells were found in the recipient middle-ear after transplantation with PuraMatrix, but not without PuraMatrix. These cells retained normal morphology and function, as confirmed by histological examination, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy, and multiplied to form new epithelial and subepithelial layers together with basement membrane. The present study demonstrated the feasibility of transplantation of cultured middle-ear mucosal epithelial cells encapsulated within PuraMatrix for regeneration of surgically eliminated mucosa of the middle-ear in SD rats.

  8. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species.

  9. The composition of engineered cartilage at the time of implantation determines the likelihood of regenerating tissue with a normal collagen architecture.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Thomas; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    The biomechanical functionality of articular cartilage is derived from both its biochemical composition and the architecture of the collagen network. Failure to replicate this normal Benninghoff architecture in regenerating articular cartilage may in turn predispose the tissue to failure. In this article, the influence of the maturity (or functionality) of a tissue-engineered construct at the time of implantation into a tibial chondral defect on the likelihood of recapitulating a normal Benninghoff architecture was investigated using a computational model featuring a collagen remodeling algorithm. Such a normal tissue architecture was predicted to form in the intact tibial plateau due to the interplay between the depth-dependent extracellular matrix properties, foremost swelling pressures, and external mechanical loading. In the presence of even small empty defects in the articular surface, the collagen architecture in the surrounding cartilage was predicted to deviate significantly from the native state, indicating a possible predisposition for osteoarthritic changes. These negative alterations were alleviated by the implantation of tissue-engineered cartilage, where a mature implant was predicted to result in the formation of a more native-like collagen architecture than immature implants. The results of this study highlight the importance of cartilage graft functionality to maintain and/or re-establish joint function and suggest that engineering a tissue with a native depth-dependent composition may facilitate the establishment of a normal Benninghoff collagen architecture after implantation into load-bearing defects.

  10. A proposal for enhancing four-wave mixing in slow light engineered photonic crystal waveguides and its application to optical regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ebnali-Heidari, M; Monat, C; Grillet, C; Moravvej-Farshi, M K

    2009-09-28

    In this paper, we investigate both analytically and numerically four-wave mixing (FWM) in short (80 microm) dispersion engineered slow light photonic crystal waveguides. We demonstrate that both a larger FWM conversion efficiency and an increased FWM bandwidth (approximately 10 nm) can be achieved in these waveguides as compared to dispersive PhC waveguides. This improvement is achieved through the net slow light enhancement of the FWM efficiency (almost 30dB as compared to a fast nanowire of similar length), even in the presence of slow light increased linear and nonlinear losses, and the suitable dispersion profile of these waveguides. We show how such improved FWM operation can be advantageously exploited for designing a compact 2R and 3R regenerator with the appropriate nonlinear power transfer function.

  11. Invertible flexible matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justino, Júlia

    2017-06-01

    Matrices with coefficients having uncertainties of type o (.) or O (.), called flexible matrices, are studied from the point of view of nonstandard analysis. The uncertainties of the afore-mentioned kind will be given in the form of the so-called neutrices, for instance the set of all infinitesimals. Since flexible matrices have uncertainties in their coefficients, it is not possible to define the identity matrix in an unique way and so the notion of spectral identity matrix arises. Not all nonsingular flexible matrices can be turned into a spectral identity matrix using Gauss-Jordan elimination method, implying that that not all nonsingular flexible matrices have the inverse matrix. Under certain conditions upon the size of the uncertainties appearing in a nonsingular flexible matrix, a general theorem concerning the boundaries of its minors is presented which guarantees the existence of the inverse matrix of a nonsingular flexible matrix.

  12. Tissue-Engineered Regeneration of Hemisected Spinal Cord Using Human Endometrial Stem Cells, Poly ε-Caprolactone Scaffolds, and Crocin as a Neuroprotective Agent.

    PubMed

    Terraf, Panieh; Kouhsari, Shideh Montasser; Ai, Jafar; Babaloo, Hamideh

    2016-09-13

    Loss of motor and sensory function as a result of neuronal cell death and axonal degeneration are the hallmarks of spinal cord injury. To overcome the hurdles and achieve improved functional recovery multiple aspects, it must be taken into account. Tissue engineering approaches by coalescing biomaterials and stem cells offer a promising future for treating spinal cord injury. Here we investigated human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs) as our cell source. Electrospun poly ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were used for hEnSC adhesion and growth. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the attachment and survival of stem cells on the PCL scaffolds. The scaffold-stem cell construct was transplanted into the hemisected spinal cords of adult male rats. Crocin, an ethanol-extractable component of Crocus sativus L., was administered to rats for 15 consecutive days post injury. Neurite outgrowth and axonal regeneration were investigated using immunohistochemical staining for neurofilament marker NF-H and luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining, respectively. TNF-α staining was performed to determine the inflammatory response in each group. Functional recovery was assessed via the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) scale. Results showed that PCL scaffolds seeded with hEnSCs restored the continuity of the damaged spinal cord and decreased cavity formation. Additionally, hEnSC-seeded scaffolds contributed to the functional recovery of the spinal cord. Hence, hEnSC-seeded PCL scaffolds may serve as promising transplants for spinal cord tissue engineering purposes. Furthermore, crocin had an augmenting effect on spinal cord regeneration and proved to exert neuroprotective effects on damaged neurons and may be further studied as a promising drug for spinal cord injury.

  13. Comparative study on the role of gelatin, chitosan and their combination as tissue engineered scaffolds on healing and regeneration of critical sized bone defects: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Alidadi, Soodeh; Bigham-Sadegh, Amin; Moshiri, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Gelatin and chitosan are natural polymers that have extensively been used in tissue engineering applications. The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of chitosan and gelatin or combination of the two biopolymers (chitosan-gelatin) as bone scaffold on bone regeneration process in an experimentally induced critical sized radial bone defect model in rats. Fifty radial bone defects were bilaterally created in 25 Wistar rats. The defects were randomly filled with chitosan, gelatin and chitosan-gelatin and autograft or left empty without any treatment (n = 10 in each group). The animals were examined by radiology and clinical evaluation before euthanasia. After 8 weeks, the rats were euthanized and their harvested healing bone samples were evaluated by radiology, CT-scan, biomechanical testing, gross pathology, histopathology, histomorphometry and scanning electron microscopy. Gelatin was biocompatible and biodegradable in vivo and showed superior biodegradation and biocompatibility when compared with chitosan and chitosan-gelatin scaffolds. Implantation of both the gelatin and chitosan-gelatin scaffolds in bone defects significantly increased new bone formation and mechanical properties compared with the untreated defects (P < 0.05). Combination of the gelatin and chitosan considerably increased structural and functional properties of the healing bones when compared to chitosan scaffold (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the gelatin and gelatin-chitosan groups in these regards (P > 0.05). In conclusion, application of the gelatin alone or its combination with chitosan had beneficial effects on bone regeneration and could be considered as good options for bone tissue engineering strategies. However, chitosan alone was not able to promote considerable new bone formation in the experimentally induced critical-size radial bone defects.

  14. Injectable Chitin-Poly(ε-caprolactone)/Nanohydroxyapatite Composite Microgels Prepared by Simple Regeneration Technique for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Arun Kumar, R; Sivashanmugam, A; Deepthi, S; Iseki, Sachiko; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2015-05-13

    Injectable gel systems, for the purpose of bone defect reconstruction, have many advantages, such as controlled flowability, adaptability to the defect site, and increased handling properties when compared to the conventionally used autologous graft, scaffolds, hydroxyapatite blocks, etc. In this work, nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) incorporated chitin-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) based injectable composite microgels has been developed by a simple regeneration technique for bone defect repair. The prepared microgel systems were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The composite microgel, with the incorporation of nHAp, showed an increased elastic modulus and thermal stability and had shear-thinning behavior proving the injectability of the system. The protein adsorption, cytocompatibility, and migration of rabbit adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (rASCs) were also studied. Chitin-PCL-nHAp microgel elicited an early osteogenic differentiation compared to control gel. The immunofluorescence studies confirmed the elevated expression of osteogenic-specific markers such as alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin in chitin-PCL-nHAp microgels. Thus, chitin-PCL-nHAp microgel could be a promising injectable system for regeneration of bone defects which are, even in deeper planes, irregularly shaped and complex in nature.

  15. Efficient quantum circuits for Toeplitz and Hankel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahasinghe, A.; Wang, J. B.

    2016-07-01

    Toeplitz and Hankel matrices have been a subject of intense interest in a wide range of science and engineering related applications. In this paper, we show that quantum circuits can efficiently implement sparse or Fourier-sparse Toeplitz and Hankel matrices. This provides an essential ingredient for solving many physical problems with Toeplitz or Hankel symmetry in the quantum setting with deterministic queries.

  16. User-Friendly Tools for Random Matrices: An Introduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-03

    zeros of the Riemann zeta function [Mon73]). 1.2 The Modern Random Matrix By now, random matrices are ubiquitous. They arise throughout modern ... mathematics and statistics, as well as in many branches of science and engineering. Random matrices have sev- eral different purposes that we may wish to

  17. STRUMPACK -- STRUctured Matrices PACKage

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    STRUMPACK - STRUctured Matrices PACKage - is a package for computations with sparse and dense structured matrix, i.e., matrices that exhibit some kind of low-rank property, in particular Hierarchically Semi Separable structure (HSS). Such matrices appear in many applications, e.g., FEM, BEM, Integral equations. etc. Exploiting this structure using certain compression algorithms allow for fast solution of linear systems and/or fast computation of matrix-vector products, which are the two main building blocks of matrix computations. STRUMPACK has presently two main components: a distributed-memory dense matrix computations package and a shared-memory sparse direct solver.

  18. Generating correlation matrices based on the boundaries of their coefficients.

    PubMed

    Numpacharoen, Kawee; Atsawarungruangkit, Amporn

    2012-01-01

    Correlation coefficients among multiple variables are commonly described in the form of matrices. Applications of such correlation matrices can be found in many fields, such as finance, engineering, statistics, and medicine. This article proposes an efficient way to sequentially obtain the theoretical bounds of correlation coefficients together with an algorithm to generate n × n correlation matrices using any bounded random variables. Interestingly, the correlation matrices generated by this method using uniform random variables as an example produce more extreme relationships among the variables than other methods, which might be useful for modeling complex biological systems where rare cases are very important.

  19. Biomaterials in Tooth Tissue Engineering: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration. PMID:24596804

  20. Biomaterials in tooth tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration.

  1. Host cell and expression engineering for development of an E. coli ketoreductase catalyst: enhancement of formate dehydrogenase activity for regeneration of NADH.

    PubMed

    Mädje, Katharina; Schmölzer, Katharina; Nidetzky, Bernd; Kratzer, Regina

    2012-01-11

    Enzymatic NADH or NADPH-dependent reduction is a widely applied approach for the synthesis of optically active organic compounds. The overall biocatalytic conversion usually involves in situ regeneration of the expensive NAD(P)H. Oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide, catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.2; FDH), presents an almost ideal process solution for coenzyme regeneration that has been well established for NADH. Because isolated FDH is relatively unstable under a range of process conditions, whole cells often constitute the preferred form of the biocatalyst, combining the advantage of enzyme protection in the cellular environment with ease of enzyme production. However, the most prominent FDH used in biotransformations, the enzyme from the yeast Candida boidinii, is usually expressed in limiting amounts of activity in the prime host for whole cell biocatalysis, Escherichia coli. We therefore performed expression engineering with the aim of enhancing FDH activity in an E. coli ketoreductase catalyst. The benefit resulting from improved NADH regeneration capacity is demonstrated in two transformations of technological relevance: xylose conversion into xylitol, and synthesis of (S)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)ethanol from o-chloroacetophenone. As compared to individual expression of C. boidinii FDH in E. coli BL21 (DE3) that gave an intracellular enzyme activity of 400 units/g(CDW), co-expression of the FDH with the ketoreductase (Candida tenuis xylose reductase; XR) resulted in a substantial decline in FDH activity. The remaining FDH activity of only 85 U/g(CDW) was strongly limiting the overall catalytic activity of the whole cell system. Combined effects from increase in FDH gene copy number, supply of rare tRNAs in a Rosetta strain of E. coli, dampened expression of the ketoreductase, and induction at low temperature (18°C) brought up the FDH activity threefold to a level of 250 U/g(CDW) while reducing the XR activity by just 19% (1140 U/g(CDW)). The E

  2. Cell-engineered human elastic chondrocytes regenerate natural scaffold in vitro and neocartilage with neoperichondrium in the human body post-transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Yanaga, Katsu

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a unique method that allows us to culture large volumes of chondrocyte expansion from a small piece of human elastic cartilage. The characteristic features of our culturing method are that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), which promotes proliferation of elastic chondrocytes, is added to a culture medium, and that cell-engineering techniques are adopted in the multilayered culture system that we have developed. We have subsequently discovered that once multilayered chondrocytes are transplanted into a human body, differentiation induction that makes use of surrounding tissue occurs in situ, and a large cartilage block is obtained through cartinogenesis and matrix formation. We have named this method two-stage transplantation. We have clinically applied this transplantation method to the congenital ear defect, microtia, and reported successful ear reconstruction. In our present study, we demonstrated that when FGF2 was added to elastic chondrocytes, the cell count increased and the level of hyaluronic acid, which is a major extracellular matrix (ECM) component, increased. We also demonstrated that these biochemical changes are reflected in the morphology, with the elastic chondrocytes themselves producing a matrix and fibers in vitro to form a natural scaffold. We then demonstrated that inside the natural scaffold thus formed, the cells overlap, connect intercellularly to each other, and reconstruct a cartilage-like three-dimensional structure in vitro. We further demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and electron microscopic analysis that when the multilayered chondrocytes are subsequently transplanted into a living body (abdominal subcutaneous region) in the two-stage transplantation process, neocartilage and neoperichondrium of elastic cartilage origin are regenerated 6 months after transplantation. Further, evaluation by dynamic mechanical analysis showed the regenerated neocartilage to have the same viscoelasticity as normal auricular

  3. Effectiveness of tissue engineered chitosan-gelatin composite scaffold loaded with human platelet gel in regeneration of critical sized radial bone defect in rat.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Alidadi, Soodeh; Bigham-Sadegh, Amin; Moshiri, Ali; Kamali, Amir

    2017-05-28

    Although many strategies have been utilized to accelerate bone regeneration, an appropriate treatment strategy to regenerate a new bone with optimum morphology and mechanical properties has not been invented as yet. This study investigated the healing potential of a composite scaffold consisting of chitosan (CS), gelatin (Gel) and platelet gel (PG), named CS-Gel-PG, on a bilateral critical sized radial bone defect in rat. Eighty radial bone defects were bilaterally created in 40 Sprague-Dawley rats and were randomly divided into eight groups including untreated, autograft, CS, Gel, CS-PG, Gel-PG, CS-Gel, and CS-Gel-PG treated defects. The bone defects were evaluated clinically and radiologically during the study and their bone samples were assessed by gross and histopathology, histomorphometry, CT-scan, scanning electron microscopy, and biomechanical testing after 8weeks of bone injury. The autograft and CS-Gel-PG groups showed significantly higher new bone formation, density of osseous and cartilaginous tissues, bone volume, and mechanical performance than the defect, CS and Gel-PG groups (P˂0.05). In addition, bone volume, density of osseous and cartilaginous tissues, and numbers of osteons in the CS-Gel-PG group were significantly superior to the CS-PG, CS-Gel and Gel groups (P˂0.05). Increased mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor 2, osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor as osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation markers were found with the CS-Gel-PG scaffold by quantitative real-time PCR in vitro after 30days of culturing on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In conclusion, the healing potential of CS-Gel scaffold embedded with PG was comparable to autografting and therefore, it can be offered as an appropriate scaffold in bone tissue engineering and regenerative applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Engineering on the Straight and Narrow: The Mechanics of Nanofibrous Assemblies for Fiber-Reinforced Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation. PMID:19207040

  5. [The possibilities and perspectives of using scaffold technology for bone regeneration].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the one of the topical problem of tissue engineering--the design and implementation of biomaterials that could replace and repair bone defects. This review presents the recent studies of the potential of scaffold technology in bone tissue regeneration. This article contains information about the basic parameters and properties of modern scaffold systems. The results of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies on the use of matrices made of various materials are shown. Advantages and disadvantages of various materials used for the production of scaffolds are discussed. Attention is paid to the advantages combinations of different materials to achieve the desired structural and functional properties. Particular attention is paid to technologies and systems of targeted delivery and controlled release of factors that stimulate bone tissue regeneration. Different strategies for modulating tissue reactions and immune responses that take place during scaffold implantation are presented.

  6. Vegetative regeneration

    Treesearch

    George A. Schier; John R. Jones; Robert P. Winokur

    1985-01-01

    Aspen is noted for its ability to regenerate vegetatively by adventitious shoots or suckers that arise on its long lateral roots. It also produces sprouts from stumps and root collars; but they are not common. In a survey of regeneration after clearcutting mature aspen in Utah. Baker (1918b) found that 92% of the shoots originated from roots, 7% from root collars, and...

  7. Regeneration methods

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; James B. Baker

    1991-01-01

    Southern pines can be regenerated naturally, by clearcutting, seedtree, shelterwood, or selection reproduction culling methods, or artificially, by direct seeding or by planting either container or bareroot seedlings. All regeneration methods have inherent advantages: and disadvantages; thus, land managers must consider many factors before deciding on a specific method...

  8. Almost strictly totally positive matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasca, M.; Micchelli, Charles; Peña, J.

    1992-06-01

    A determinantal identity, frequently used in the study of totally positive matrices, is extended, and then used to re-prove the well-known univariate knot insertion formula for B-splines. Also we introduce a class of matrices, intermediate between totally positive and strictly totally positive matrices. The determinantal identity is used to show any minor of such matrices is positive if and only if its diagonal entries are positive. Among others, this class of matrices includes B-splines collocation matrices and Hurwitz matrices.

  9. Atlas Regeneration, Inc.

    PubMed

    Makarev, Eugene; Isayev, Olexandr; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Atlas Regeneration is dedicated to the development of novel data-driven solutions for regenerative medicine, adapting proven technologies, and analysis strategies to take a multiomics-wide view of stem cell quality and cell fate design. Our core offering is a global comprehensive map of stem cell differentiation, Universal Signalome Atlas for Regenerative Medicine, reflecting the pathway activation states across all characterized stem cells and their differentiated products. Key applications of Universal Signalome Atlas for Regenerative Medicine will include quality assurance for engineered cell products, and directed regeneration pharmacology, where we will screen and identify compounds that can efficiently convert pluripotent cells into desired subtypes. Another marketable piece of IP is development of specialized signaling pathway analysis systems Regeneration Intelligence which supposed to target the unmet needs of determination and prediction of stem cell signaling pathway activation to govern cell differentiation in specific directions.

  10. Protein-based biorefining: metabolic engineering for production of chemicals and fuel with regeneration of nitrogen fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Wernick, David G; Liao, James C

    2013-02-01

    Threats to stable oil supplies and concerns over environmental emissions have pushed for renewable biofuel developments to minimize dependence on fossil resources. Recent biofuel progress has moved towards fossil resource-independent carbon cycles, but environmental issues regarding use of nitrogen fertilizers have not been addressed on a global scale. The recently demonstrated conversion of waste protein biomass into advanced biofuels and renewable chemicals, while recycling nitrogen fertilizers, offers a glimpse of the efforts needed to balance the nitrogen cycle at scale. In general, the catabolism of protein into biofuels is challenging because of physiological regulation and thermodynamic limitations. This conversion became possible with metabolic engineering around ammonia assimilation, intracellular nitrogen flux, and quorum sensing. This review highlights the metabolic engineering solutions in transforming those cellular processes into driving forces for the high yield of chemical products from protein.

  11. Building Enterprise Transition Plans Through the Development of Collapsing Design Structure Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    BUILDING ENTERPRISE TRANSITION PLANS THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF COLLAPSING DESIGN STRUCTURE MATRICES ...COLLAPSING DESIGN STRUCTURE MATRICES DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Department of Operation Sciences Graduate School of Engineering and...DESIGN STRUCTURE MATRICES Michael P. Kretser, BS, MS Captain, USAF Committee Membership: Dr. Jeffrey. A. Ogden Chair Dr. John M

  12. Dynamic Mechanical and Nanofibrous Topological Combinatory Cues Designed for Periodontal Ligament Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Complete reconstruction of damaged periodontal pockets, particularly regeneration of periodontal ligament (PDL) has been a significant challenge in dentistry. Tissue engineering approach utilizing PDL stem cells and scaffolding matrices offers great opportunity to this, and applying physical and mechanical cues mimicking native tissue conditions are of special importance. Here we approach to regenerate periodontal tissues by engineering PDL cells supported on a nanofibrous scaffold under a mechanical-stressed condition. PDL stem cells isolated from rats were seeded on an electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin directionally-oriented nanofiber membrane and dynamic mechanical stress was applied to the cell/nanofiber construct, providing nanotopological and mechanical combined cues. Cells recognized the nanofiber orientation, aligning in parallel, and the mechanical stress increased the cell alignment. Importantly, the cells cultured on the oriented nanofiber combined with the mechanical stress produced significantly stimulated PDL specific markers, including periostin and tenascin with simultaneous down-regulation of osteogenesis, demonstrating the roles of topological and mechanical cues in altering phenotypic change in PDL cells. Tissue compatibility of the tissue-engineered constructs was confirmed in rat subcutaneous sites. Furthermore, in vivo regeneration of PDL and alveolar bone tissues was examined under the rat premaxillary periodontal defect models. The cell/nanofiber constructs engineered under mechanical stress showed sound integration into tissue defects and the regenerated bone volume and area were significantly improved. This study provides an effective tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration-culturing PDL stem cells with combinatory cues of oriented nanotopology and dynamic mechanical stretch.

  13. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  14. A preliminary study of the use of intercooling and reheat in conjunction with regeneration for aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect on fuel consumption of turbofans with intercooled, regenerative cycles and with intercooled, regenerative, reheat cycles was studied. The technology level for both engine and aircraft was that projected for 1985. The simulated mission was a 5556 km flight carrying 200 passengers at Mach 0.8 at 11582 min. Results indicate that these relatively complex cycles offer little, if any, fuel savings potential relative to a conventional turbofan cycle of comparable advanced technology. The intercooled, regenerative cycle yields about the same fuel economy as a conventional cycle at close to the same overall pressure ratio.

  15. Combined effects of engineered tendon matrix and GDF-6 on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-based tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dapeng; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yubo; Yang, Shulong

    2016-05-01

    To examine whether an engineered tendon matrix (ETM) environment and growth and differentiation factor-6 (GDF-6) have synergistic effects on the tenogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and the quality of tendon repair. ETM and GDF-6 promote tenogenic differentiation of BMSCs in vitro. Implantation of GDF-6-incorporated ETM containing BMSCs into a tendon injury model significantly improved the histological and mechanical properties of the repaired tendon. GDF-6-incorporated ETM containing BMSCs represents a promising strategy for tendon injury repair.

  16. Non-viral gene delivery to mesenchymal stem cells: methods, strategies and application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Santos, José L; Pandita, Deepti; Rodrigues, João; Pêgo, Ana P; Granja, Pedro L; Tomás, Helena

    2011-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from several tissues in the body, have the ability to self-renewal, show immune suppressive properties and are multipotent, being able to generate various cell types. At present, due to their intrinsic characteristics, MSCs are considered very promising in the area of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this context, genetic modification can be a powerful tool to control the behavior and fate of these cells and be used in the design of new cellular therapies. Viral systems are very effective in the introduction of exogenous genes inside MSCs. However, the risks associated with their use are leading to an increasing search for non-viral approaches to attain the same purpose, even if MSCs have been shown to be more difficult to transfect in this way. In the past few years, progress was made in the development of chemical and physical methods for non-viral gene delivery. Herein, an overview of the application of those methods specifically to MSCs is given and their use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapeutic strategies highlighted using the example of bone tissue. Key issues and future directions in non-viral gene delivery to MSCs are also critically addressed.

  17. Nano-Bio Engineered Carbon Dot-Peptide Functionalized Water Dispersible Hyperbranched Polyurethane for Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Maji, Somnath; Mishra, Debasish; Devi, K Sanjana P; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-03-01

    The present study delves into a combined bio-nano-macromolecular approach for bone tissue engineering. This approach relies on the properties of an ideal scaffold material imbued with all the chemical premises required for fostering cellular growth and differentiation. A tannic acid based water dispersible hyperbranched polyurethane is fabricated with bio-nanohybrids of carbon dot and four different peptides (viz. SVVYGLR, PRGDSGYRGDS, IPP, and CGGKVGKACCVPTKLSPISVLYK) to impart target specific in vivo bone healing ability. This polymeric bio-nanocomposite is blended with 10 wt% of gelatin and examined as a non-invasive delivery vehicle. In vitro assessment of the developed polymeric system reveals good osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Aided by this panel of peptides, the polymeric bio-nanocomposite exhibits in vivo ectopic bone formation ability. The study on in vivo mineralization and vascularization reveals the occurrence of calcification and blood vessel formation. Thus, the study demonstrates carbon dot/peptide functionalized hyperbranched polyurethane gel for bone tissue engineering application.

  18. Engineered neural tissue with aligned, differentiated adipose-derived stem cells promotes peripheral nerve regeneration across a critical sized defect in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Melanie; Golding, Jon P; Loughlin, Alison J; Kingham, Paul J; Phillips, James B

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells were isolated from rats and differentiated to a Schwann cell-like phenotype in vitro. The differentiated cells (dADSCs) underwent self-alignment in a tethered type-1 collagen gel, followed by stabilisation to generate engineered neural tissue (EngNT-dADSC). The pro-regenerative phenotype of dADSCs was enhanced by this process, and the columns of aligned dADSCs in the aligned collagen matrix supported and guided neurite extension in vitro. EngNT-dADSC sheets were rolled to form peripheral nerve repair constructs that were implanted within NeuraWrap conduits to bridge a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve. After 8 weeks regeneration was assessed using immunofluorescence imaging and transmission electron microscopy and compared to empty conduit and nerve graft controls. The proportion of axons detected in the distal stump was 3.5 fold greater in constructs containing EngNT-dADSC than empty tube controls. Our novel combination of technologies that can organise autologous therapeutic cells within an artificial tissue construct provides a promising new cellular biomaterial for peripheral nerve repair.

  19. A three-dimensional multiporous fibrous scaffold fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein/poly(l-lactic acid) for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiaozhen; Sun, Chengjun

    2015-02-01

    An axially aligned three-dimensional (3-D) fibrous scaffold was fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein (RSSP)/poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) through electrospinning and post treatment. The morphology, mechanical and degradation properties of the scaffold were controlled through the weight ratio of RSSP to PLLA, the thickness of the scaffold and the treatment time. The scaffold with a weight ratio of 2:3 (RSSP:PLLA) had a nanoleaves-on-nanofibers hierarchical nanostructure; the length and thickness of the nanoleaves were about 400 and 30 nm, respectively. The holes of the scaffolds ranged from hundreds of nanometers to several microns. The scaffold showed an ideal mechanical property that it was stiff when dry, but became soft once hydrated in the culture medium. Its degradation rate was very slow in the first 2 months, and then accelerated in the following 2 months. The pH values of the degradation mediums of all the samples remained in the range of 7.40-7.12 during degradation for 6 months. It had good biocompatibility with PC 12 cells. The aligned hierarchical nanostructure could guide the directions of the axon extension. This scaffold has a potential application in Tissue Engineering and controlled release. This study provides a method to produce synthetic or natural biodegradable polymer scaffold with tailored morphology, mechanical, and degradation properties.

  20. Depolarizing differential Mueller matrices.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-07-01

    The evolution of a polarized beam can be described by the differential formulation of Mueller calculus. The nondepolarizing differential Mueller matrices are well known. However, they only account for 7 out of the 16 independent parameters that are necessary to model a general anisotropic depolarizing medium. In this work we present the nine differential Mueller matrices for general depolarizing media, highlighting the physical implications of each of them. Group theory is applied to establish the relationship between the differential matrix and the set of transformation generators in the Minkowski space, of which Lorentz generators constitute a particular subgroup.

  1. Algebra of Neuron Matrices,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-13

    AD-Ri55 296 ALGEBRA OF NEURON MATRICES(U) FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV i/i WRIGHT-PATTERSON RF8 ON K~ G RGRBRBYRN 13 MAR 85 FTD-ID(RS)T-8@4i-85...ANCLASSIFIED F/G6/6 NL I. 1j.2 U .611111 ’’ K1*10 Vl( PIH OPY Pl (iLUTION TL T CHART I-" FTD-ID(RS )T-0041-85 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION In ALGEBRA OF NEURON ... NEURON MATRICES DTIC TAB Unannounced Q By: K.G. Agababyan JustLficatlon English pages: 10 By Distribution/ Source: Doklady Akademii Nauk SSSR, Vol. 199

  2. A numerical method of regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2004-02-01

    A numerical method for regenerators is introduced in this paper. It is not only suitable for the regenerators in cryocoolers and Stirling engines, but also suitable for the stacks in acoustic engines and the pulse tubes in pulse tube refrigerators. The numerical model is one dimensional periodic unsteady flow model. The numerical method is based on the control volume concept with the implicitly solve method. The iteration acceleration method, which considers the one-dimensional periodic unsteady problem as the steady two-dimensional problem, is used for decreasing the calculation time. By this method, the regenerator in an inertance tube pulse tube refrigerator was simulated. The result is useful for understanding how the inefficiency of the regenerator changes with the inertance effect.

  3. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  4. Utility of models of the gastrointestinal tract for assessment of the digestion and absorption of engineered nanomaterials released from food matrices.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, David E; Venema, Koen; Gombau, Lourdes; Valerio, Luis G; Raju, Jayadev; Bondy, Genevieve S; Bouwmeester, Hans; Singh, R Paul; Clippinger, Amy J; Collnot, Eva-Maria; Mehta, Rekha; Stone, Vicki

    2015-05-01

    Engineered metal/mineral, lipid and biochemical macromolecule nanomaterials (NMs) have potential applications in food. Methodologies for the assessment of NM digestion and bioavailability in the gastrointestinal tract are nascent and require refinement. A working group was tasked by the International Life Sciences Institute NanoRelease Food Additive project to review existing models of the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease, and the utility of these models for the assessment of the uptake of NMs intended for food. Gastrointestinal digestion and absorption could be addressed in a tiered approach using in silico computational models, in vitro non-cellular fluid systems and in vitro cell culture models, after which the necessity of ex vivo organ culture and in vivo animal studies can be considered. Examples of NM quantification in gastrointestinal tract fluids and tissues are emerging; however, few standardized analytical techniques are available. Coupling of these techniques to gastrointestinal models, along with further standardization, will further strengthen methodologies for risk assessment.

  5. Cell-Engineered Human Elastic Chondrocytes Regenerate Natural Scaffold In Vitro and Neocartilage with Neoperichondrium in the Human Body Post-Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Yanaga, Katsu

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a unique method that allows us to culture large volumes of chondrocyte expansion from a small piece of human elastic cartilage. The characteristic features of our culturing method are that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), which promotes proliferation of elastic chondrocytes, is added to a culture medium, and that cell-engineering techniques are adopted in the multilayered culture system that we have developed.1–4 We have subsequently discovered that once multilayered chondrocytes are transplanted into a human body, differentiation induction that makes use of surrounding tissue occurs in situ, and a large cartilage block is obtained through cartinogenesis and matrix formation. We have named this method two-stage transplantation. We have clinically applied this transplantation method to the congenital ear defect, microtia, and reported successful ear reconstruction.4 In our present study, we demonstrated that when FGF2 was added to elastic chondrocytes, the cell count increased and the level of hyaluronic acid, which is a major extracellular matrix (ECM) component, increased. We also demonstrated that these biochemical changes are reflected in the morphology, with the elastic chondrocytes themselves producing a matrix and fibers in vitro to form a natural scaffold. We then demonstrated that inside the natural scaffold thus formed, the cells overlap, connect intercellularly to each other, and reconstruct a cartilage-like three-dimensional structure in vitro. We further demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and electron microscopic analysis that when the multilayered chondrocytes are subsequently transplanted into a living body (abdominal subcutaneous region) in the two-stage transplantation process, neocartilage and neoperichondrium of elastic cartilage origin are regenerated 6 months after transplantation. Further, evaluation by dynamic mechanical analysis showed the regenerated neocartilage to have the same viscoelasticity as normal

  6. Experiments and Analysis of DPF Loading and Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Krishnan

    2000-08-20

    Particulate filter system consists of a filter and a regeneration strategy Commercial filters are very effective at removing PM, but regeneration is a challenge. In addition to removal of PM if is important to reduce other pollutants including NO, from diesel engine exhaust Particulate filter regeneration strategy can include catalysts, fuel additives, engine control, and fuel injection Regeneration 5M?-500 C without catalyst Near 350 C with fuel additive or catalyst coated DPF

  7. The use of nanoscaffolds and dendrimers in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gorain, Bapi; Tekade, Muktika; Kesharwani, Prashant; Iyer, Arun K; Kalia, Kiran; Tekade, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-02-20

    To avoid tissue rejection during organ transplantation, research has focused on the use of tissue engineering to regenerate required tissues or organs for patients. The biomedical applications of hyperbranched, multivalent, structurally uniform, biocompatible dendrimers in tissue engineering include the mimicking of natural extracellular matrices (ECMs) in the 3D microenvironment. Dendrimers are unimolecular architects that can incorporate a variety of biological and/or chemical substances in a 3D architecture to actively support the scaffold microenvironment during cell growth. Here, we review the use of dendritic delivery systems in tissue engineering. We discuss the available literature, highlighting the 3D architecture and preparation of these nanoscaffolds, and also review challenges to, and advances in, the use dendrimers in tissue engineering. Advances in the manufacturing of dendritic nanoparticles and scaffold architectures have resulted in the successful incorporation of dendritic scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  8. Engineering a multi-biofunctional composite using poly(ethylenimine) decorated graphene oxide for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Raj, Shammy; Sarkar, Kishor; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-03-28

    Toward preparing strong multi-biofunctional materials, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) conjugated graphene oxide (GO_PEI) was synthesized using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as a spacer and incorporated in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) at different fractions. GO_PEI significantly promoted the proliferation and formation of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on PCL. GO_PEI was highly potent in inducing stem cell osteogenesis leading to near doubling of alkaline phosphatase expression and mineralization over neat PCL with 5% filler content and was ≈50% better than GO. Remarkably, 5% GO_PEI was as potent as soluble osteoinductive factors. Increased adsorption of osteogenic factors due to the amine and oxygen containing functional groups on GO_PEI augment stem cell differentiation. GO_PEI was also highly efficient in imparting bactericidal activity with 85% reduction in counts of E. coli colonies compared to neat PCL at 5% filler content and was more than twice as efficient as GO. This may be attributed to the synergistic effect of the sharp edges of the particles along with the presence of the different chemical moieties. Thus, GO_PEI based polymer composites can be utilized to prepare bioactive resorbable biomaterials as an alternative to using labile biomolecules for fabricating orthopedic devices for fracture fixation and tissue engineering.

  9. Effect of different growth factors on human osteoblasts activities: a possible application in bone regeneration for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bosetti, Michela; Boccafoschi, Francesca; Leigheb, Massimiliano; Cannas, Mario F

    2007-12-01

    Cultured human primary osteoblasts reproduce the phenotypic differentiation and maturation of cells in vivo. We have investigated the influence of three isoforms of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3), three fibroblast growth factors (FGF-2, FGF-4 and FGF-6) and the active metabolite of Vitamin D [1,25-(OH)(2)D3] on proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of human osteoblasts during a period of 24 days of culture. TGF-beta isoforms and three FGFs examined have been proved to be inducers of osteoblasts proliferation (higher extent for TGF-beta and FGF-2) and inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblasts mineralization. Combination of these growth factors with the active form of Vitamin D induced osteodifferentiation. In fact Vitamin D showed an additive effect on alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content, induced by FGF-2 and TGF-beta in human osteoblast. These results highlight the potential of proliferating cytokines' combination with mineralizing agents for in vitro bone growth induction in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Engineering a multi-biofunctional composite using poly(ethylenimine) decorated graphene oxide for bone tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Raj, Shammy; Sarkar, Kishor; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    Toward preparing strong multi-biofunctional materials, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) conjugated graphene oxide (GO_PEI) was synthesized using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as a spacer and incorporated in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) at different fractions. GO_PEI significantly promoted the proliferation and formation of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on PCL. GO_PEI was highly potent in inducing stem cell osteogenesis leading to near doubling of alkaline phosphatase expression and mineralization over neat PCL with 5% filler content and was ~50% better than GO. Remarkably, 5% GO_PEI was as potent as soluble osteoinductive factors. Increased adsorption of osteogenic factors due to the amine and oxygen containing functional groups on GO_PEI augment stem cell differentiation. GO_PEI was also highly efficient in imparting bactericidal activity with 85% reduction in counts of E. coli colonies compared to neat PCL at 5% filler content and was more than twice as efficient as GO. This may be attributed to the synergistic effect of the sharp edges of the particles along with the presence of the different chemical moieties. Thus, GO_PEI based polymer composites can be utilized to prepare bioactive resorbable biomaterials as an alternative to using labile biomolecules for fabricating orthopedic devices for fracture fixation and tissue engineering.Toward preparing strong multi-biofunctional materials, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) conjugated graphene oxide (GO_PEI) was synthesized using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as a spacer and incorporated in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) at different fractions. GO_PEI significantly promoted the proliferation and formation of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on PCL. GO_PEI was highly potent in inducing stem cell osteogenesis leading to near doubling of alkaline phosphatase expression and mineralization over neat PCL with 5% filler content and was ~50% better than GO. Remarkably, 5% GO_PEI was as potent as soluble

  11. Woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds for regenerating load-bearing soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Han, F; Liu, S; Liu, X; Pei, Y; Bai, S; Zhao, H; Lu, Q; Ma, F; Kaplan, D L; Zhu, H

    2014-02-01

    Although three-dimensional (3-D) porous regenerated silk scaffolds with outstanding biocompatibility, biodegradability and low inflammatory reactions have promising application in different tissue regeneration, the mechanical properties of regenerated scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This study presents woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds aimed at dermal tissue engineering. To improve the mechanical properties, silk scaffolds prepared by lyophilization were reinforced with degummed woven silk fabrics. The ultimate tensile strength, elongation at break and suture retention strength of the scaffolds were significantly improved, providing suitable mechanical properties strong enough for clinical applications. The stiffness and degradation behaviors were then further regulated by different after-treatment processes, making the scaffolds more suitable for dermal tissue regeneration. The in vitro cell culture results indicated that these scaffolds maintained their excellent biocompatibility after being reinforced with woven silk fabrics. Without sacrifice of porous structure and biocompatibility, the fabric-reinforced scaffolds with better mechanical properties could facilitate future clinical applications of silk as matrices in skin repair.

  12. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D. N.; Vallance, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Ceramic Regenerator Design and Reliability Program aims to develop ceramic regenerator cores that can be used in passenger car and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. The major cause of failure of early gas turbine regenerators was found to be chemical attack of the ceramic material. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines late in 1974. Results of 53,065 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, show promise. Five aluminum silicate cores attained the durability objective of 10,000 hours at 800 C (1472 F). Another aluminum silicate core shows minimal evidence of chemical attack after 8071 hours at 982 C (1800 F). Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are included.

  13. Delivery of dexamethasone from bioactive nanofiber matrices stimulates odontogenesis of human dental pulp cells through integrin/BMP/mTOR signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Chang; Nam, Ok Hyung; Kim, Mi-Joo; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Lee, Yoo-Mi; Jin, Guang-Zhen; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutically relevant design of scaffolds is of special importance in the repair and regeneration of tissues including dentin and pulp. Here we exploit nanofiber matrices that incorporate bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGNs) and deliver the odontogenic drug dexamethasone (DEX) to stimulate the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). DEX molecules were first loaded onto the BGN, and then the DEX-BGN complex was incorporated within the biopolymer nanofiber matrix through electrospinning. The release of DEX continued over a month, showing a slow releasing profile. HDPCs cultured on the DEX-releasing BGN matrices were viable, proliferating well up to 14 days. The odontogenic differentiation, as assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expression of genes, and mineralization, was significantly stimulated on the matrices incorporating BGN and further on those releasing DEX. The DEX-releasing BGN matrices highly upregulated the expression of the integrin subsets α1, α5, and β3 as well as integrin downstream signaling molecules, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Paxillin, and RhoA, and activated bone morphogenetic protein mRNA and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. Furthermore, the DEX-releasing BGN-matrices stimulated Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which was proven by the inhibition study. Collectively, the designed therapeutic nanofiber matrices that incorporate BGN and deliver DEX were demonstrated to promote odontogenesis of HDPCs, and the integrins, bone morphogenetic protein, and mTOR signaling pathways are proposed to be the possible molecular mechanisms. While further in vivo studies are still needed, the DEX-releasing bioactive scaffolds are considered as a potential therapeutic nanomatrix for regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering.

  14. Delivery of dexamethasone from bioactive nanofiber matrices stimulates odontogenesis of human dental pulp cells through integrin/BMP/mTOR signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyun-Chang; Nam, Ok Hyung; Kim, Mi-joo; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Lee, Yoo-Mi; Jin, Guang-Zhen; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutically relevant design of scaffolds is of special importance in the repair and regeneration of tissues including dentin and pulp. Here we exploit nanofiber matrices that incorporate bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGNs) and deliver the odontogenic drug dexamethasone (DEX) to stimulate the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). DEX molecules were first loaded onto the BGN, and then the DEX-BGN complex was incorporated within the biopolymer nanofiber matrix through electrospinning. The release of DEX continued over a month, showing a slow releasing profile. HDPCs cultured on the DEX-releasing BGN matrices were viable, proliferating well up to 14 days. The odontogenic differentiation, as assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expression of genes, and mineralization, was significantly stimulated on the matrices incorporating BGN and further on those releasing DEX. The DEX-releasing BGN matrices highly upregulated the expression of the integrin subsets α1, α5, and β3 as well as integrin downstream signaling molecules, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Paxillin, and RhoA, and activated bone morphogenetic protein mRNA and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. Furthermore, the DEX-releasing BGN-matrices stimulated Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which was proven by the inhibition study. Collectively, the designed therapeutic nanofiber matrices that incorporate BGN and deliver DEX were demonstrated to promote odontogenesis of HDPCs, and the integrins, bone morphogenetic protein, and mTOR signaling pathways are proposed to be the possible molecular mechanisms. While further in vivo studies are still needed, the DEX-releasing bioactive scaffolds are considered as a potential therapeutic nanomatrix for regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering. PMID:27354790

  15. [Periodontitis and tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2005-08-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a destructive disease that affects the supporting structures of the teeth including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. If left untreated, patients may lose multiple teeth and extensive prosthetic treatment will be required. In order to re-engineer lost tooth-supporting tissues, various therapeutic modalities have been used clinically. Periodontal regeneration procedures including guided tissue regeneration have achieved substantial effects. However, there are several issues to be solved. They are highly technique-sensitive, applicable to limited cases which are susceptible to treatment, and supposed to have relatively low predictability. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new approaches to improve the predictability and effectiveness of regenerative therapies for periodontal tissues. Recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been introduced to restore lost tissues more effectively where the biological process of healing is mimicked. To achieve this, integration of three key elements is required: progenitor/stem cells, growth factors and the extracellular matrix scaffold. Although it has been shown that implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into periodontal osseous defects induced regeneration of cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone in dogs, further extensive preclinical studies are required. On the other hand, application of growth factors, particularly basic fibroblast growth factor in the treatment of human periodontitis, is promising and is now in clinical trial. Furthermore, the rate of release of growth factor from the scaffold also can profoundly affect the results of tissue engineering strategies and the development of new materials is expected. In addition, as tissue regenerative potential is negatively regulated by aging, the effects of aging have to be clarified to gain complete regeneration.

  16. Molecular engineering of simple phenothiazine-based dyes to modulate dye aggregation, charge recombination, and dye regeneration in highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yong; Chang, Shuai; He, Jian; Zhang, Caishun; Zhao, Jianzhang; Chen, Tao; Wong, Wai-Yeung; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Zhu, Xunjin

    2014-05-19

    A series of simple phenothiazine-based dyes, namely, TP, EP, TTP, ETP, and EEP have been developed, in which the thiophene (T), ethylenedioxythiophene (E), their dimers, and mixtures are present to modulate dye aggregation, charge recombination, and dye regeneration for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. Devices sensitized by the dyes TP and TTP display high power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 8.07 (Jsc = 15.2 mA cm(-2), Voc =0.783 V, fill factor (FF) = 0.679) and 7.87 % (Jsc = 16.1 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.717 V, FF = 0.681), respectively; these were measured under simulated AM 1.5 sunlight in conjunction with the I(-)/I3(-) redox couple. By replacing the T group with the E unit, EP-based DSSCs had a slightly lower PCE of 7.98 % with a higher short-circuit photocurrent (Jsc) of 16.7 mA cm(-2). The dye ETP, with a mixture of E and T, had an even lower PCE of 5.62 %. Specifically, the cell based on the dye EEP, with a dimer of E, had inferior Jsc and Voc values and corresponded to the lowest PCE of 2.24 %. The results indicate that the photovoltaic performance can be finely modulated through structural engineering of the dyes. The selection of T analogues as donors can not only modulate light absorption and energy levels, but also have an impact on dye aggregation and interfacial charge recombination of electrons at the interface of titania, electrolytes, and/or oxidized dye molecules; this was demonstrated through DFT calculations, electrochemical impedance analysis, and transient photovoltage studies.

  17. A tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration based on a biodegradable double-layer scaffold and adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Requicha, João F; Viegas, Carlos A; Muñoz, Fernando; Azevedo, Jorge M; Leonor, Isabel B; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2014-09-01

    Human and canine periodontium are often affected by an inflammatory pathology called periodontitis, which is associated with severe damages across tissues, namely, in the periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. However, the therapies used in the routine dental practice, often consisting in a combination of different techniques, do not allow to fully restore the functionality of the periodontium. Tissue Engineering (TE) appears as a valuable alternative approach to regenerate periodontal defects, but for this purpose, it is essential to develop supportive biomaterial and stem cell sourcing/culturing methodologies that address the complexity of the various tissues affected by this condition. The main aim of this work was to study the in vitro functionality of a newly developed double-layer scaffold for periodontal TE. The scaffold design was based on a combination of a three-dimensional (3D) fiber mesh functionalized with silanol groups and a membrane, both made of a blend of starch and poly-ɛ-(caprolactone). Adipose-derived stem cells (canine adipose stem cells [cASCs]) were seeded and cultured onto such scaffolds, and the obtained constructs were evaluated in terms of cellular morphology, metabolic activity, and proliferation. The osteogenic potential of the fiber mesh layer functionalized with silanol groups was further assessed concerning the osteogenic differentiation of the seeded and cultured ASCs. The obtained results showed that the proposed double-layer scaffold supports the proliferation and selectively promotes the osteogenic differentiation of cASCs seeded onto the functionalized mesh. These findings suggest that the 3D structure and asymmetric composition of the scaffold in combination with stem cells may provide the basis for developing alternative therapies to treat periodontal defects more efficiently.

  18. Capture Matrices Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    bottom image is an overlay of two images where one image was taken without filters and the other with the DAPI filter cube . This image shows that the...without any filters. The bottom images are an overlay of two images, one taken without filters and another taken using the DAPI filter cube . Figure...these capture matrices address integrating the device with “real-world” sampling. Depending on the chemical nature of the affinity ligands, capture

  19. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nuan; Tian, Lingling; He, Liumin; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-09-01

    Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanostructures with great flexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great potential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by five main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design, in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed.

  20. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nuan; Tian, Lingling; He, Liumin; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-01-01

    Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanostructures with great flexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great potential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by five main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design, in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed. PMID:27857724

  1. Dynamic Mechanical and Nanofibrous Topological Combinatory Cues Designed for Periodontal Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Complete reconstruction of damaged periodontal pockets, particularly regeneration of periodontal ligament (PDL) has been a significant challenge in dentistry. Tissue engineering approach utilizing PDL stem cells and scaffolding matrices offers great opportunity to this, and applying physical and mechanical cues mimicking native tissue conditions are of special importance. Here we approach to regenerate periodontal tissues by engineering PDL cells supported on a nanofibrous scaffold under a mechanical-stressed condition. PDL stem cells isolated from rats were seeded on an electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin directionally-oriented nanofiber membrane and dynamic mechanical stress was applied to the cell/nanofiber construct, providing nanotopological and mechanical combined cues. Cells recognized the nanofiber orientation, aligning in parallel, and the mechanical stress increased the cell alignment. Importantly, the cells cultured on the oriented nanofiber combined with the mechanical stress produced significantly stimulated PDL specific markers, including periostin and tenascin with simultaneous down-regulation of osteogenesis, demonstrating the roles of topological and mechanical cues in altering phenotypic change in PDL cells. Tissue compatibility of the tissue-engineered constructs was confirmed in rat subcutaneous sites. Furthermore, in vivo regeneration of PDL and alveolar bone tissues was examined under the rat premaxillary periodontal defect models. The cell/nanofiber constructs engineered under mechanical stress showed sound integration into tissue defects and the regenerated bone volume and area were significantly improved. This study provides an effective tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration—culturing PDL stem cells with combinatory cues of oriented nanotopology and dynamic mechanical stretch. PMID:26989897

  2. Pulp development, repair, and regeneration: challenges of the transition from traditional dentistry to biologically based therapies.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Smith, Anthony J

    2014-04-01

    The traditional concept of replacing diseased tooth/pulp tissues by inert materials (restoration) is being challenged by recent advances in pulp biology leading to regenerative strategies aiming at the generation of new vital tissue. New tissue formation in the pulp chamber can be observed after adequate infection control and the formation of a blood clot. However, differentiation of true odontoblasts is still more speculative, and the approach is largely limited to immature teeth with open apices. A more systematic approach may be provided by the adoption of the tissue engineering concepts of using matrices, suitable (stem) cells, and signaling molecules to direct tissue events. With these tools, pulplike constructs have already been generated in experimental animals. However, a number of challenges still remain for clinical translation of pulp regeneration (eg, the cell source [resident vs nonresident stem cells, the latter associated with cell-free approaches], mechanisms of odontoblast differentiation, the pulp environment, the role of infection and inflammation, dentin pretreatment to release fossilized signaling molecules from dentin, and the provision of suitable matrices). Transition as a process, defined by moving from one form of "normal" to another, is based not only on the progress of science but also on achieving change to established treatment concepts in daily practice. However, it is clear that the significant recent achievements in pulp biology are providing an exciting platform from which clinical translation of dental pulp regeneration can advance. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  4. The effect of decellularized matrices on human tendon stem/progenitor cell differentiation and tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Ting; Hu, Jia-jie; Song, Hai-xin; Shen, Wei-liang; Jiang, Liu-yun; Heng, Boon Chin; Ji, Jun-feng; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2013-12-01

    It is reported that decellularized collagen matrices derived from dermal skin and bone have been clinically used for tendon repair. However, the varying biological and physical properties of matrices originating from different tissues may influence the differentiation of tendon stem cells, which has not been systematically evaluated. In this study, the effects of collagenous matrices derived from different tissues (tendon, bone and dermis) on the cell differentiation of human tendon stem/progenitor cells (hTSPCs) were investigated, in the context of tendon repair. It was found that all three matrices supported the adhesion and proliferation of hTSPCs despite differences in topography. Interestingly, tendon-derived decellularized matrix promoted the tendinous phenotype in hTSPCs and inhibited their osteogenesis, even under osteogenic induction conditions, through modulation of the teno- and osteolineage-specific transcription factors Scleraxis and Runx2. Bone-derived decellularized matrix robustly induced osteogenic differentiation of hTSPCs, whereas dermal skin-derived collagen matrix had no apparent effect on hTSPC differentiation. Based on the specific biological function of the tendon-derived decellularized matrix, a tissue-engineered tendon comprising TSPCs and tendon-derived matrix was successfully fabricated for Achilles tendon reconstruction. Implantation of this cell-scaffold construct led to a more mature structure (histology score: 4.08 ± 0.61 vs. 8.51 ± 1.66), larger collagen fibrils (52.2 ± 1.6 nm vs. 47.5 ± 2.8 nm) and stronger mechanical properties (stiffness: 21.68 ± 7.1 Nm m(-1) vs.13.2 ± 5.9 Nm m(-1)) of repaired tendons compared to the control group. The results suggest that stem cells promote the rate of repair of Achilles tendon in the presence of a tendinous matrix. This study thus highlights the potential of decellularized matrix for future tissue engineering applications, as well as developing a practical strategy for functional tendon

  5. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Greenwell, Henry; Fiorellini, Joseph; Giannobile, William; Offenbacher, Steven; Salkin, Leslie; Townsend, Cheryl; Sheridan, Phillip; Genco, Robert J

    2005-09-01

    Untreated periodontal disease leads to tooth loss through destruction of the attachment apparatus and tooth-supporting structures. The goals of periodontal therapy include not only the arrest of periodontal disease progression,but also the regeneration of structures lost to disease where appropriate. Conventional surgical approaches (e.g., flap debridement) continue to offer time-tested and reliable methods to access root surfaces,reduce periodontal pockets, and attain improved periodontal form/architecture. However, these techniques offer only limited potential towards recovering tissues destroyed during earlier disease phases. Recently, surgical procedures aimed at greater and more predictable regeneration of periodontal tissues and functional attachment close to their original level have been developed, analyzed, and employed in clinical practice. This paper provides a review of the current understanding of the mechanisms, cells, and factors required for regeneration of the periodontium and of procedures used to restore periodontal tissues around natural teeth. Targeted audiences for this paper are periodontists and/or researchers with an interest in improving the predictability of regenerative procedures. This paper replaces the version published in 1993.

  6. The Molecular and Cellular Choreography of Appendage Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Elly M

    2016-06-16

    Recent advances in limb regeneration are revealing the molecular events that integrate growth control, cell fate programming, and positional information to yield the exquisite replacement of the amputated limb. Parallel progress in several invertebrate and vertebrate models has provided a broader context for understanding the mechanisms and the evolution of regeneration. Together, these discoveries provide a foundation for describing the principles underlying regeneration of complex, multi-tissue structures. As such these findings should provide a wealth of ideas for engineers seeking to reconstitute regeneration from constituent parts or to elicit full regeneration from partial regeneration events.

  7. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  8. Modeling 2-D jets impinging on Stirling regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, David

    1989-01-01

    The extent to which flow leaving Stirling coolers or heaters in the form of high-velocity jets penetrate the regenerator matrix is visually modeled using a computer program. Two-dimensional laminar jets are shown impinging on regenerator samples of variable permeability ranging from no matrix at all to matrices dense enough to stop the jet dead on. The results lend credibility to a simple tension for flow uniformity as a function of penetration depth.

  9. Bladder smooth muscle cells on electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone)/poly(l-lactic acid) scaffold promote bladder regeneration in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Shakhssalim, Nasser; Soleimani, Masoud; Dehghan, Mohammad M; Rasouli, Javad; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Torbati, Peyman M; Naji, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    Engineering of urinary bladder has been the focus of numerous studies in recent decade. Novel biomaterials, innovative fabrication methods and various modification processes of scaffolds are the critical issues to find supportive matrices. Supportive characteristics of electrospun PCL/PLLA nano-scaffold for bladder augmentation in canine model and the role of bladder cells in regeneration process were appraised. Electrospun PCL/PLLA was fabricated by co-electrospinning of PCL and PLLA. Bladder cells were isolated and transduced with lentiviral particles encoding eGFP and JRed proteins. Electrospun PCL/PLLA was seeded with different bladder cells individually or in co-culture condition. Cell-free and cell-seeded electrospun PCL/PLLA scaffolds (10cm(2)) were surgically implanted in bladders of eight female dogs for three months. To evaluate bladder regeneration, the dogs were sacrificed and their bladders were examined macroscopically and microscopically for presence of tracking proteins, expression of cell-specific markers and histological attributes of regenerated tissues. All animals survived the experiment with no complication. In smooth muscle transplanted group complete regeneration and covering of scaffold were observed. Other groups revealed partial regeneration. A well-developed layer of urothelium was formed in all groups in regenerated parts. Smooth muscle transplanted group showed the most developed muscle layer. Regenerated tissue demonstrated typical expression of cell-specific markers. No expression of eGFP and JRed was observed. Electrospun PCL/PLLA scaffold with proper handling, suture retention, nano-sized surface features, maintenance of normal phenotype of cells and minimal adverse effects in body can be a supportive substrate for bladder wall regeneration when seeded with bladder smooth muscle cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should redevelop the evidence of cell-based cardiovascular regeneration therapy, focusing on targets (disease, patient’s status, cardiac function), materials (cells, cytokines, genes), and methodology (transplantation route, implantation technology, tissue engineering). Meanwhile, establishment of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is an extremely innovative technology which should be proposed as embryonic stem (ES) cellularization of post natal somatic cells, and this application have also showed the milestones of the direct conversion to reconstruct cardiomyocyte from the various somatic cells, which does not need the acquisition of the re-pluripotency. This review discusses the new advance in cardiovascular regeneration therapy from cardiac regeneration to cardiac re-organization, which is involved in recent progress of on-going clinical trials, basic research in cardiovascular regeneration, and the possibility of tissue engineering technology. PMID:23825492

  11. Emerging rules for inducing organ regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yannas, Ioannis V

    2013-01-01

    We review the available evidence for regeneration of adult organs of very diverse nature and examine the applicability of simple rules that can be used to summarize these treatments. In the field of regenerative medicine no widely accepted paradigm is currently available that can guide formulation of new theories on the mechanism of regeneration in adults and open new directions for improved regeneration outcomes. The four rules have emerged from multiyear quantitative studies with skin and peripheral nerve regeneration using scaffold libraries based on a simple, well-defined collagen scaffold. These largely quantitative rules distinguish sharply between spontaneously regenerative and nonregenerative tissues, select the two reactants that are required for regeneration, recognize the essential modification of the wound healing process that must be realized prior to regeneration, and identify three structural features of scaffolds that are required for regenerative activity. The combined evidence points at certain requirements for the structure of a collagen scaffold with regenerative activity. An active scaffold emerges as a temporarily insoluble collagen surface, equipped with sufficient ligands for integrins of contractile cells, that inhibits wound contraction while also serving as a topographic template for new stroma synthesis. The four rules, based on studies with just two organs (skin and peripheral nerves), are now viewed in the context of ongoing studies using scaffolds based on decellularized matrices, which are mostly based on collagen. Decellularized matrices have been used during the past few years to regenerate, in whole or in part, the urethra, the abdominal wall, the Achilles tendon, the bladder, the trachea and other organs in several animal models and occasionally in humans. Although these acellular matrices are distinctly different from simple collagen scaffolds, and the methods used by the investigators are still evolving, the results obtained

  12. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  13. Future Prospects for Scaffolding Methods and Biomaterials in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Atul A.; Vig, Komal; Baganizi, Dieudonné Radé; Sahu, Rajnish; Dixit, Saurabh; Dennis, Vida; Singh, Shree Ram; Pillai, Shreekumar R.

    2016-01-01

    Over centuries, the field of regenerative skin tissue engineering has had several advancements to facilitate faster wound healing and thereby restoration of skin. Skin tissue regeneration is mainly based on the use of suitable scaffold matrices. There are several scaffold types, such as porous, fibrous, microsphere, hydrogel, composite and acellular, etc., with discrete advantages and disadvantages. These scaffolds are either made up of highly biocompatible natural biomaterials, such as collagen, chitosan, etc., or synthetic materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG), etc. Composite scaffolds, which are a combination of natural or synthetic biomaterials, are highly biocompatible with improved tensile strength for effective skin tissue regeneration. Appropriate knowledge of the properties, advantages and disadvantages of various biomaterials and scaffolds will accelerate the production of suitable scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration applications. At the same time, emphasis on some of the leading challenges in the field of skin tissue engineering, such as cell interaction with scaffolds, faster cellular proliferation/differentiation, and vascularization of engineered tissues, is inevitable. In this review, we discuss various types of scaffolding approaches and biomaterials used in the field of skin tissue engineering and more importantly their future prospects in skin tissue regeneration efforts. PMID:27898014

  14. Future Prospects for Scaffolding Methods and Biomaterials in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Review.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Atul A; Vig, Komal; Baganizi, Dieudonné Radé; Sahu, Rajnish; Dixit, Saurabh; Dennis, Vida; Singh, Shree Ram; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2016-11-25

    Over centuries, the field of regenerative skin tissue engineering has had several advancements to facilitate faster wound healing and thereby restoration of skin. Skin tissue regeneration is mainly based on the use of suitable scaffold matrices. There are several scaffold types, such as porous, fibrous, microsphere, hydrogel, composite and acellular, etc., with discrete advantages and disadvantages. These scaffolds are either made up of highly biocompatible natural biomaterials, such as collagen, chitosan, etc., or synthetic materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG), etc. Composite scaffolds, which are a combination of natural or synthetic biomaterials, are highly biocompatible with improved tensile strength for effective skin tissue regeneration. Appropriate knowledge of the properties, advantages and disadvantages of various biomaterials and scaffolds will accelerate the production of suitable scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration applications. At the same time, emphasis on some of the leading challenges in the field of skin tissue engineering, such as cell interaction with scaffolds, faster cellular proliferation/differentiation, and vascularization of engineered tissues, is inevitable. In this review, we discuss various types of scaffolding approaches and biomaterials used in the field of skin tissue engineering and more importantly their future prospects in skin tissue regeneration efforts.

  15. Cementum and Periodontal Ligament Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Menicanin, Danijela; Hynes, K; Han, J; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2015-01-01

    The unique anatomy and composition of the periodontium make periodontal tissue healing and regeneration a complex process. Periodontal regeneration aims to recapitulate the crucial stages of wound healing associated with periodontal development in order to restore lost tissues to their original form and function and for regeneration to occur, healing events must progress in an ordered and programmed sequence both temporally and spatially, replicating key developmental events. A number of procedures have been employed to promote true and predictable regeneration of the periodontium. Principally, the approaches are based on the use of graft materials to compensate for the bone loss incurred as a result of periodontal disease, use of barrier membranes for guided tissue regeneration and use of bioactive molecules. More recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been integrated into research and applications of regenerative dentistry, including periodontics, to aim to manage damaged and lost oral tissues, through reconstruction and regeneration of the periodontium and alleviate the shortcomings of more conventional therapeutic options. The essential components for generating effective cellular based therapeutic strategies include a population of multi-potential progenitor cells, presence of signalling molecules/inductive morphogenic signals and a conductive extracellular matrix scaffold or appropriate delivery system. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered suitable candidates for cell-based tissue engineering strategies owing to their extensive expansion rate and potential to differentiate into cells of multiple organs and systems. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from multiple tissue sources have been investigated in pre-clinical animal studies and clinical settings for the treatment and regeneration of the periodontium.

  16. Nanostructured mesoporous silica matrices in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, M

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years the biomedical research field has shown a growing interest towards nanostructured mesoporous silica materials, whose chemical composition is silica and present nanometric pores. These bioceramics exhibit two important features: they can regenerate osseous tissues--the bond bioactivity of these materials has been confirmed by the formation of biological-like nanoapatites on their surface when in contact with physiological fluids--and they are able to act as controlled release systems. Drugs in the nanometre scale can be loaded on those matrices and then locally released in a controlled fashion. It is possible to chemically modify the silica walls to favour the adsorption of certain biomolecules such as peptides, proteins or growth factors. It is even possible to design smart biomaterials where the drug is released under an external stimulus. Thus, looking at all those properties, a question arises: Have these bioceramics good expectations to be used in clinical medical practice? Their biocompatibility, bioactivity, capacity to regenerate bone and ability to act as controlled release systems of biologically active species have been confirmed. In fact, their preliminary in vitro and in vivo essays have been positive. Now it is the time to adequate all these properties to the actual clinical problems, and to evaluate their efficiency in comparison with materials already known and currently employed such as bioglasses.

  17. Enhancing Understanding of Transformation Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Jonathan; Childrey, Maria

    2012-01-01

    With the Common Core State Standards' emphasis on transformations, teachers need a variety of approaches to increase student understanding. Teaching matrix transformations by focusing on row vectors gives students tools to create matrices to perform transformations. This empowerment opens many doors: Students are able to create the matrices for…

  18. Enhancing Understanding of Transformation Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Jonathan; Childrey, Maria

    2012-01-01

    With the Common Core State Standards' emphasis on transformations, teachers need a variety of approaches to increase student understanding. Teaching matrix transformations by focusing on row vectors gives students tools to create matrices to perform transformations. This empowerment opens many doors: Students are able to create the matrices for…

  19. Intrinsic character of Stokes matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jean-François; Rousseau, Christiane

    2017-02-01

    Two germs of linear analytic differential systems x k + 1Y‧ = A (x) Y with a non-resonant irregular singularity are analytically equivalent if and only if they have the same eigenvalues and equivalent collections of Stokes matrices. The Stokes matrices are the transition matrices between sectors on which the system is analytically equivalent to its formal normal form. Each sector contains exactly one separating ray for each pair of eigenvalues. A rotation in S allows supposing that R+ lies in the intersection of two sectors. Reordering of the coordinates of Y allows ordering the real parts of the eigenvalues, thus yielding triangular Stokes matrices. However, the choice of the rotation in x is not canonical. In this paper we establish how the collection of Stokes matrices depends on this rotation, and hence on a chosen order of the projection of the eigenvalues on a line through the origin.

  20. Use of natural neural scaffolds consisting of engineered vascular endothelial growth factor immobilized on ordered collagen fibers filled in a collagen tube for peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fukai; Xiao, Zhifeng; Meng, Danqing; Hou, Xianglin; Zhu, Jianhong; Dai, Jianwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2014-10-15

    The search for effective strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration has attracted much attention in recent years. In this study, ordered collagen fibers were used as intraluminal fibers after nerve injury in rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in nerve regeneration, but its very fast initial burst of activity within a short time has largely limited its clinical use. For the stable binding of VEGF to ordered collagen fibers, we fused a collagen-binding domain (CBD) to VEGF through recombinant DNA technology. Then, we filled the ordered collagen fibers-CBD-VEGF targeting delivery system in a collagen tube to construct natural neural scaffolds, which were then used to bridge transected nerve stumps in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. After transplantation, the natural neural scaffolds showed minimal foreign body reactions and good integration into the host tissue. Oriented collagen fibers in the collagen tube could guide regenerating axons in an oriented manner to the distal, degenerating nerve segment, maximizing the chance of target reinnervation. Functional and histological analyses indicated that the recovery of nerve function in the natural neural scaffolds-treated group was superior to the other grafted groups. The guiding of oriented axonal regeneration and effective delivery systems surmounting the otherwise rapid and short-lived diffusion of growth factors in body fluids are two important strategies in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. The natural neural scaffolds described take advantage of these two aspects and may produce synergistic effects. These properties qualified the artificial nerve conduits as a putative candidate system for the fabrication of peripheral nerve reconstruction devices.

  1. Regenerator seal

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  2. Regenerator seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Leonard C. (Inventor); Pacala, Theodore (Inventor); Sippel, George R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  3. On Some Properties of Gamma Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumais, Jean-Francois

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the order, reducibility, and equivalence of systems of Dirac gamma matrices. Gives a simple systematic method for finding the matrices connecting different systems of 4 x 4 gamma matrices. (MLH)

  4. On Some Properties of Gamma Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumais, Jean-Francois

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the order, reducibility, and equivalence of systems of Dirac gamma matrices. Gives a simple systematic method for finding the matrices connecting different systems of 4 x 4 gamma matrices. (MLH)

  5. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering. PMID:28773924

  6. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-09-27

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  7. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  8. Esophageal tissue engineering: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, T; Catry, J; Luong-Nguyen, M; Bruneval, P; Domet, T; Arakelian, L; Sfeir, R; Michaud, L; Vanneaux, V; Gottrand, F; Larghero, J; Cattan, P

    2016-02-01

    Tissue engineering, which consists of the combination and in vivo implantation of elements required for tissue remodeling toward a specific organ phenotype, could be an alternative for classical techniques of esophageal replacement. The current hybrid approach entails creation of an esophageal substitute composed of an acellular matrix and autologous epithelial and muscle cells provides the most successful results. Current research is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells, whose potential for differentiation and proangioogenic, immune-modulator and anti-inflammatory properties are important assets. In the near future, esophageal substitutes could be constructed from acellular "intelligent matrices" that contain the molecules necessary for tissue regeneration; this should allow circumvention of the implantation step and still obtain standardized in vivo biological responses. At present, tissue engineering applications to esophageal replacement are limited to enlargement plasties with absorbable, non-cellular matrices. Nevertheless, the application of existing clinical techniques for replacement of other organs by tissue engineering in combination with a multiplication of translational research protocols for esophageal replacement in large animals should soon pave the way for health agencies to authorize clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  10. Numerical inversion of finite Toeplitz matrices and vector Toeplitz matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bareiss, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Numerical technique increases the efficiencies of the numerical methods involving Toeplitz matrices by reducing the number of multiplications required by an N-order Toeplitz matrix from N-cubed to N-squared multiplications. Some efficient algorithms are given.

  11. Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration methods and systems for hybrid vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.

    2010-10-12

    A control system for controlling regeneration of a particulate filter for a hybrid vehicle is provided. The system generally includes a regeneration module that controls current to the particulate filter to initiate regeneration. An engine control module controls operation of an engine of the hybrid vehicle based on the control of the current to the particulate filter.

  12. Two-stage transplantation of cell-engineered autologous auricular chondrocytes to regenerate chondrofat composite tissue: clinical application in regenerative surgery.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yoshio; Yanaga, Katsu

    2013-12-01

    The authors have developed a unique multilayered culture method that expands to large volumes elastic chondrocytes from a small piece of human auricular cartilage. In this study, the authors applied the two-stage transplantation method for cultured auricular chondrocytes to difficult cases of nasal/chin reconstruction where subcutaneous tissue is thin or scarred. Auricular chondrocytes were cultured and expanded to sufficiently large volumes, and then, in a two-stage transplantation process, injection-transplanted into a patient's lower abdomen, where they were regenerated into larger chondrofat composite tissue in 6 months and used as a material for nasal/chin reconstruction. The authors then performed histologic and electron microscopic analysis of serial cross-sections and magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the chondrofat composite tissue. The cultured auricular chondrocytes consistency regenerated intraabdominally to a larger, stable neocartilage, with adherent fat tissue within 6 months. Eighteen patients (nose, n = 14; chin, n = 4) underwent this procedure, and the chondrofat composite tissue was stable after 1 to 5 years' postoperative follow-up. The chondrofat composite tissue maintained good shape, with no major complications. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the chondrofat composite tissue was regenerated and vascularized in the abdomen in all 18 cases (100 percent). Infection and total absorption were not seen. Only partial absorption was noted (5.6 percent). The chondrofat composite tissue was found to be a new innovative graft material in which neocartilage is regenerated to be continuous with fat tissue by means of the neoperichondrium. It has thereby become possible to perform the previously impossible simultaneous reconstruction of cartilage and fat tissue.

  13. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  14. Regulation of migratory activity of human keratinocytes by topography of multiscale collagen-containing nanofibrous matrices.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoling; Xu, Meng; Liu, Jie; Qi, Yanmei; Li, Shaohua; Wang, Hongjun

    2014-02-01

    Nanofibrous matrices hold great promise in skin wound repair partially due to their capability of recapturing the essential attributes of native extracellular matrix (ECM). With regard to limited studies on the effect of nanofibrous matrices on keratinocytes, the present study was aimed to understand how the topographical feature of nanofibrous matrices regulates keratinocyte motility by culturing keratinocytes on polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen nanofibrous matrices (rough surface with fiber diameters of 331 ± 112 nm) or the matrices coated with a thin layer of collagen gel to form a secondary ultrafine fibrous network (smooth surface with ultrafine fiber diameters of 55 ± 26 nm). It was found that the PCL/collagen nanofibrous matrices alone did not stimulate cell migration, while collagen gel coating could significantly increase cell motility. Further studies demonstrated that the ultrafine fibrous network of collagen gel coating significantly activated integrin β1, Rac1 and Cdc42, facilitated the deposition of laminin-332 (formerly called laminin-5), and promoted the expression of active matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) (i.e., MMP-2 and 9). Neutralization of integrin β1 activity abrogated the gel coating-induced keratinocyte migration. These findings provide important evidence on the role of topographical features of nanofibrous matrices in regulating the phenotypic alteration of keratinocytes and suggest the possible utility of collagen-containing nanofibrous matrices for skin regeneration especially in re-epithelialization.

  15. Scaffolds and tissue regeneration: An overview of the functional properties of selected organic tissues.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Márcia A; Alves, Thais F R; de Lima, Renata; Oliveira, José M; Vila, Marta M D C; Balcão, Victor M; Severino, Patrícia; Chaud, Marco V

    2016-10-01

    Tissue engineering plays a significant role both in the re-establishment of functions and regeneration of organic tissues. Success in manufacturing projects for biological scaffolds, for the purpose of tissue regeneration, is conditioned by the selection of parameters such as the biomaterial, the device architecture, and the specificities of the cells making up the organic tissue to create, in vivo, a microenvironment that preserves and further enhances the proliferation of a specific cell phenotype. To support this approach, we have screened scientific publications that show biomedical applications of scaffolds, biomechanical, morphological, biochemical, and hemodynamic characteristics of the target organic tissues, and the possible interactions between different cell matrices and biological scaffolds. This review article provides an overview on the biomedical application of scaffolds and on the characteristics of the (bio)materials commonly used for manufacturing these biological devices used in tissue engineering, taking into consideration the cellular specificity of the target tissue. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1483-1494, 2016.

  16. Matrices of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buseck, Peter R.; Hua, Xin

    1993-01-01

    The morphology, classification, and chemistry of the matrices of carbonaceous chondrite (CC) meteorites is reviewed based on recent research results. The various kinds of CCs are examined in terms of their matrix mineralogy. Alteration processes in CCs are discussed.

  17. Computer-Access-Code Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Authorized users respond to changing challenges with changing passwords. Scheme for controlling access to computers defeats eavesdroppers and "hackers". Based on password system of challenge and password or sign, challenge, and countersign correlated with random alphanumeric codes in matrices of two or more dimensions. Codes stored on floppy disk or plug-in card and changed frequently. For even higher security, matrices of four or more dimensions used, just as cubes compounded into hypercubes in concurrent processing.

  18. Computer-Access-Code Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Authorized users respond to changing challenges with changing passwords. Scheme for controlling access to computers defeats eavesdroppers and "hackers". Based on password system of challenge and password or sign, challenge, and countersign correlated with random alphanumeric codes in matrices of two or more dimensions. Codes stored on floppy disk or plug-in card and changed frequently. For even higher security, matrices of four or more dimensions used, just as cubes compounded into hypercubes in concurrent processing.

  19. Assessing regeneration potential

    Treesearch

    Ivan L. Sander

    1989-01-01

    When a regeneration harvest cut is planned for even-aged stands or it is time to make another cut in uneven-aged stands, the first thing to do is assess the regeneration potential. Regeneration potential is the likelihood of being successful in reproducing desired species. You need an assessment to be reasonably sure that regeneration and management objectives can be...

  20. Somatic stem cell biology and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Yihan; Li, Dehua; Jin, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Somatic stem cells have been acknowledged for their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types and their capacity for self-renewal. Some mesenchymal stem cells play a dominant role in the repair and reconstruction of periodontal tissues. Both dental-derived and some non-dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells possess the capacity for periodontal regeneration under certain conditions with induced differentiation, proliferation, cellular secretion, and their interactions. Stem cell-based tissue engineering technology promises to bring improvements to periodontal regeneration, biologic tooth repair, and bioengineered implants. The present review discusses the roles and values of various somatic stem cells in periodontal regeneration.

  1. Efficient Whole-Cell Biocatalyst for Acetoin Production with NAD+ Regeneration System through Homologous Co-Expression of 2,3-Butanediol Dehydrogenase and NADH Oxidase in Engineered Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Zhiming; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Yang, Shangtian

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone), an extensively-used food spice and bio-based platform chemical, is usually produced by chemical synthesis methods. With increasingly requirement of food security and environmental protection, bio-fermentation of acetoin by microorganisms has a great promising market. However, through metabolic engineering strategies, the mixed acid-butanediol fermentation metabolizes a certain portion of substrate to the by-products of organic acids such as lactic acid and acetic acid, which causes energy cost and increases the difficulty of product purification in downstream processes. In this work, due to the high efficiency of enzymatic reaction and excellent selectivity, a strategy for efficiently converting 2,3-butandiol to acetoin using whole-cell biocatalyst by engineered Bacillus subtilis is proposed. In this process, NAD+ plays a significant role on 2,3-butanediol and acetoin distribution, so the NADH oxidase and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase both from B. subtilis are co-expressed in B. subtilis 168 to construct an NAD+ regeneration system, which forces dramatic decrease of the intracellular NADH concentration (1.6 fold) and NADH/NAD+ ratio (2.2 fold). By optimization of the enzymatic reaction and applying repeated batch conversion, the whole-cell biocatalyst efficiently produced 91.8 g/L acetoin with a productivity of 2.30 g/(L·h), which was the highest record ever reported by biocatalysis. This work indicated that manipulation of the intracellular cofactor levels was more effective than the strategy of enhancing enzyme activity, and the bioprocess for NAD+ regeneration may also be a useful way for improving the productivity of NAD+-dependent chemistry-based products. PMID:25036158

  2. Efficient whole-cell biocatalyst for acetoin production with NAD+ regeneration system through homologous co-expression of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase in engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Teng; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Yang, Shangtian

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone), an extensively-used food spice and bio-based platform chemical, is usually produced by chemical synthesis methods. With increasingly requirement of food security and environmental protection, bio-fermentation of acetoin by microorganisms has a great promising market. However, through metabolic engineering strategies, the mixed acid-butanediol fermentation metabolizes a certain portion of substrate to the by-products of organic acids such as lactic acid and acetic acid, which causes energy cost and increases the difficulty of product purification in downstream processes. In this work, due to the high efficiency of enzymatic reaction and excellent selectivity, a strategy for efficiently converting 2,3-butandiol to acetoin using whole-cell biocatalyst by engineered Bacillus subtilis is proposed. In this process, NAD+ plays a significant role on 2,3-butanediol and acetoin distribution, so the NADH oxidase and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase both from B. subtilis are co-expressed in B. subtilis 168 to construct an NAD+ regeneration system, which forces dramatic decrease of the intracellular NADH concentration (1.6 fold) and NADH/NAD+ ratio (2.2 fold). By optimization of the enzymatic reaction and applying repeated batch conversion, the whole-cell biocatalyst efficiently produced 91.8 g/L acetoin with a productivity of 2.30 g/(L·h), which was the highest record ever reported by biocatalysis. This work indicated that manipulation of the intracellular cofactor levels was more effective than the strategy of enhancing enzyme activity, and the bioprocess for NAD+ regeneration may also be a useful way for improving the productivity of NAD+-dependent chemistry-based products.

  3. Equine Model for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, J.E.; Lo, T.; Quinn, K.P.; Fourligas, N.; Georgakoudi, I.; Leisk, G.G.; Mazan, M.; Thane, K.E.; Taeymans, O.; Hoffman, A.M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kirker-Head, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue regeneration methods currently yield suboptimal clinical outcomes due to loss of tissue volume and a lack of functional tissue regeneration. Grafted tissues and natural biomaterials often degrade or resorb too quickly, while most synthetic materials do not degrade. In previous research we demonstrated that soft tissue regeneration can be supported using silk porous biomaterials for at least 18 months in vivo in a rodent model. In the present study, we scaled the system to a survival study using a large animal model and demonstrated the feasibility of these biomaterials for soft tissue regeneration in adult horses. Both slow and rapidly degrading silk matrices were evaluated in subcutaneous pocket and intramuscular defect depots. We showed that we can effectively employ an equine model over six months to simultaneously evaluate many different implants, reducing the number of animals needed. Furthermore, we were able to tailor matrix degradation by varying the initial format of the implanted silk. Finally, we demonstrate ultrasound imaging of implants to be an effective means for tracking tissue regeneration and implant degradation. PMID:25350377

  4. Equine model for soft-tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Evangelia; Rollins, Amanda; Moreau, Jodie E; Lo, Tim; Quinn, Kyle P; Fourligas, Nicholas; Georgakoudi, Irene; Leisk, Gary G; Mazan, Melissa; Thane, Kristen E; Taeymans, Olivier; Hoffman, A M; Kaplan, D L; Kirker-Head, C A

    2015-08-01

    Soft-tissue regeneration methods currently yield suboptimal clinical outcomes due to loss of tissue volume and a lack of functional tissue regeneration. Grafted tissues and natural biomaterials often degrade or resorb too quickly, while most synthetic materials do not degrade. In previous research we demonstrated that soft-tissue regeneration can be supported using silk porous biomaterials for at least 18 months in vivo in a rodent model. In the present study, we scaled the system to a survival study using a large animal model and demonstrated the feasibility of these biomaterials for soft-tissue regeneration in adult horses. Both slow and rapidly degrading silk matrices were evaluated in subcutaneous pocket and intramuscular defect depots. We showed that we can effectively employ an equine model over 6 months to simultaneously evaluate many different implants, reducing the number of animals needed. Furthermore, we were able to tailor matrix degradation by varying the initial format of the implanted silk. Finally, we demonstrate ultrasound imaging of implants to be an effective means for tracking tissue regeneration and implant degradation.

  5. Regenerator matrix physical property data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Among several cellular ceramic structures manufactured by various suppliers for regenerator application in a gas turbine engine, three have the best potential for achieving durability and performance objectives for use in gas turbines, Stirling engines, and waste heat recovery systems: (1) an aluminum-silicate sinusoidal flow passage made from a corrugated wate paper process; (2) an extruded isosceles triangle flow passage; and (3) a second generation matrix incorporating a square flow passage formed by an embossing process. Key physical and thermal property data for these configurations presented include: heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics, compressive strength, tensile strength and elasticity, thermal expansion characteristics, chanical attack, and thermal stability.

  6. Implantation of In Vitro Tissue Engineered Muscle Repair Constructs and Bladder Acellular Matrices Partially Restore In Vivo Skeletal Muscle Function in a Rat Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    repaired groups (Table 1). Further, when isometric torque was normalized to TA muscle wet weight (an estimate of specific torque ), BAM-treated... physical rehabilitation; however, neither are effective in pro- moting regeneration of skeletal muscle to replace the tissue that was lost. Toward...involves the use of free muscle transfer (i.e., muscle flaps) followed by exten- sive physical rehabilitation. However, free muscle flaps do not

  7. Delayed minimally invasive injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell sheets regenerates large bone defects in an ovine preclinical animal model.

    PubMed

    Berner, Arne; Henkel, Jan; Woodruff, Maria A; Steck, Roland; Nerlich, Michael; Schuetz, Michael A; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2015-05-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering approaches are promising strategies in the field of regenerative medicine. However, the mode of cell delivery is still a concern and needs to be significantly improved. Scaffolds and/or matrices loaded with cells are often transplanted into a bone defect immediately after the defect has been created. At this point, the nutrient and oxygen supply is low and the inflammatory cascade is incited, thus creating a highly unfavorable microenvironment for transplanted cells to survive and participate in the regeneration process. We therefore developed a unique treatment concept using the delayed injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) sheets to regenerate a critical-sized tibial defect in sheep to study the effect of the cells' regeneration potential when introduced at a postinflammatory stage. Minimally invasive percutaneous injection of allogenic BMSCs into biodegradable composite scaffolds 4 weeks after the defect surgery led to significantly improved bone regeneration compared with preseeded scaffold/cell constructs and scaffold-only groups. Biomechanical testing and microcomputed tomography showed comparable results to the clinical reference standard (i.e., an autologous bone graft). To our knowledge, we are the first to show in a validated preclinical large animal model that delayed allogenic cell transplantation can provide applicable clinical treatment alternatives for challenging bone defects in the future.

  8. Combinatorial Extracellular Matrices for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Cho, Seung-Woo; Son, Sun Mi; Hudson, Sarah P.; Bogatyrev, Said; Keung, Lily; Kohane, Daniel S.; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are promising cell sources for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Scaffolds for ESC-based tissue regeneration should provide not only structural support, but also signals capable of supporting appropriate cell differentiation and tissue development. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component of stem cell niche in vivo and can influence stem cell fate via mediating cell attachment and migration, presenting chemical and physical cues, as well as binding soluble factors. Here we investigated the effects of combinatorial extracellular matrix proteins on controlled human ESC (hESC) differentiation. Varying ECM compositions in 3D markedly affects cell behavior, and optimal compositions of ECM hydrogels are identified which facilitate specific-lineage differentiation of stem cells. To our knowledge, this is the first combinatorial analysis of ECM hydrogels for their effects on hESC differentiation in 3D. The 3D matrices described herein may provide a useful platform for studying the interactive ECM signaling in influencing stem cell differentiation. PMID:20614932

  9. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering.

  10. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering. PMID:26545748

  11. Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Nixdorf, Richard D.; Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M.

    2001-03-05

    Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 © 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  12. Thermal and Structural Analysis of Micro-Fabricated Involute Regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Songgang; Augenblick, Jack E.

    2005-02-01

    Long-life, high-efficiency power generators based on free-piston Stirling engines are an energy conversion solution for future space power generation and commercial applications. As part of the efforts to further improve Stirling engine efficiency and reliability, a micro-fabricated, involute regenerator structure is proposed by a Cleveland State University-led regenerator research team. This paper reports on thermal and structural analyses of the involute regenerator to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed regenerator. The results indicate that the involute regenerator has extremely high axial stiffness to sustain reasonable axial compression forces with negligible lateral deformation. The relatively low radial stiffness may impose some challenges to the appropriate installation of the in-volute regenerators.

  13. Dynamic Electromechanical Hydrogel Matrices for Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Han L.; Chuang, Jessica C.; Tran, Tuan; Aung, Aereas; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels have numerous biomedical applications including synthetic matrices for cell culture and tissue engineering. Here we report the development of hydrogel based multifunctional matrices that not only provide three-dimensional structural support to the embedded cells but also can simultaneously provide potentially beneficial dynamic mechanical and electrical cues to the cells. A unique aspect of these matrices is that they undergo reversible, anisotropic bending dynamics in an electric field. The direction and magnitude of this bending can be tuned through the hydrogel crosslink density while maintaining the same electric potential gradient, allowing control over the mechanical strain imparted to the cells in a three-dimensional environment. The conceptual design of these hydrogels was motivated through theoretical modeling of the osmotic pressure changes occurring at the gel-solution interfaces in an electric field. These electro-mechanical matrices support survival, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells. Thus, these new three-dimensional in vitro synthetic matrices, which mimic multiple aspects of the native cellular environment, take us one step closer to in vivo systems. PMID:24273479

  14. Dynamic Electromechanical Hydrogel Matrices for Stem Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Lim, Han L; Chuang, Jessica C; Tran, Tuan; Aung, Aereas; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2011-01-07

    Hydrogels have numerous biomedical applications including synthetic matrices for cell culture and tissue engineering. Here we report the development of hydrogel based multifunctional matrices that not only provide three-dimensional structural support to the embedded cells but also can simultaneously provide potentially beneficial dynamic mechanical and electrical cues to the cells. A unique aspect of these matrices is that they undergo reversible, anisotropic bending dynamics in an electric field. The direction and magnitude of this bending can be tuned through the hydrogel crosslink density while maintaining the same electric potential gradient, allowing control over the mechanical strain imparted to the cells in a three-dimensional environment. The conceptual design of these hydrogels was motivated through theoretical modeling of the osmotic pressure changes occurring at the gel-solution interfaces in an electric field. These electro-mechanical matrices support survival, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells. Thus, these new three-dimensional in vitro synthetic matrices, which mimic multiple aspects of the native cellular environment, take us one step closer to in vivo systems.

  15. Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Nonmulberry Silk Protein Fibroin Nanobiocomposite for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Naskar, Deboki; Bhattacharjee, Promita; Ghosh, Ananta K; Mandal, Mahitosh; Kundu, Subhas C

    2017-06-14

    Natural silk protein fibroin based biomaterial are exploited extensively in tissue engineering due to their aqueous preparation, slow biodegradability, mechanical stability, low immunogenicity, dielectric properties, tunable properties, sufficient and easy availability. Carbon nanofibers are reported for their conductivity, mechanical strength and as delivery vehicle of small molecules. Limited evidence about their cytocompatibility and their poor dispersibility are the key issues for them to be used as successful biomaterials. In this study, carbon nanofiber is functionalized and dispersed using the green aqueous-based method within the regenerated nonmulberry (tropical tasar: Antheraea mylitta) silk fibroin (AmF), which contains inherent - R-G-D- sequences. Carbon nanofiber (CNF) reinforced silk films are fabricated using solvent evaporation technique. Different biophysical characterizations and cytocompatibility of the composite matrices are assessed. The investigations show that the presence of the nanofiber greatly influence the property of the composite films in terms of excellent conductivity (up to 6.4 × 10(-6) Mho cm, which is 3 orders of magnitude of pure AmF matrix), and superior tensile modulus (up to 1423 MPa, which is 12.5 times more elastic than AmF matrix). The composite matrices (composed of up to 1 mg of CNF per mL of 2% AmF) also support better fibroblast cell growth and proliferation. The fibroin-carbon nanofiber matrices can lead to a novel multifunctional biomaterial platform, which will support conductive as well as load bearing tissue (such as, muscle, bone, and nerve tissue) regenerations.

  16. Universal power optimized work for reciprocating internally reversible Stirling-like heat engine cycles with regeneration and linear external heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, David A.

    1998-09-01

    When bounded by two infinite thermal reservoirs, the theory of irreversible thermodynamics for reciprocating externally irreversible cycles yields to an optimum efficiency at maximum power output of η=1-(TL/TH)0.5 for internally reversible Stirling-like cycles using regeneration and linear heat transfer modes is in contrast to the upper limit for Stirling cycles of η=1-(TL/TH) obtained from classical thermodynamics. This optimum behavior is, however, only based on cycle temperature bounds. For reciprocating cycles one must go a step further and minimize cycle time. While executing this new step for finite thermal reservoirs, it was discovered that, for the general family of reciprocating Stirling-like cycles, the finite-time optimum work output (Wopt) at maximum power is less than (and in the limit of ideal regeneration, infinite reservoirs and of no internal irreversibility, is equal to) exactly one-half of the work of the externally reversible cycle operating at maximum thermal efficiency (Carnot work, Wrev) between the same temperature limits (i.e., Wopt⩽1/2Wrev). To accomplish this the analysis goes beyond earlier works to use time symmetry to better optimize overall cycle power. Because this procedure results in the concurrent employment of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, it ensures optimal allocation of thermal conductances at the hot and cold ends while simultaneously achieving both minimization of internal entropy generation and maximization of specific cycle work for a given set of operating temperatures. Based on linear heat transfer laws, this expression for optimum work is shown to be independent of heat conductances. Finally, the analysis establishes that the maximum power attainable for a Stirling-like reciprocating cycle operating between two temperature bounds is always less than (and in the limit of power optimized Carnot conditions, equal to) one-half of that obtained for the continuous counterpart of the same cycle operating

  17. Iterative methods for Toeplitz-like matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Huckle, T.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the author will give a survey on iterative methods for solving linear equations with Toeplitz matrices, Block Toeplitz matrices, Toeplitz plus Hankel matrices, and matrices with low displacement rank. He will treat the following subjects: (1) optimal (w)-circulant preconditioners is a generalization of circulant preconditioners; (2) Optimal implementation of circulant-like preconditioners in the complex and real case; (3) preconditioning of near-singular matrices; what kind of preconditioners can be used in this case; (4) circulant preconditioning for more general classes of Toeplitz matrices; what can be said about matrices with coefficients that are not l{sub 1}-sequences; (5) preconditioners for Toeplitz least squares problems, for block Toeplitz matrices, and for Toeplitz plus Hankel matrices.

  18. Modulation of tissue repair by regeneration enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junsu; Hu, Jianxin; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L; Tornini, Valerie A; Nachtrab, Gregory; Gemberling, Matthew; Goldman, Joseph A; Black, Brian L; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-04-14

    How tissue regeneration programs are triggered by injury has received limited research attention. Here we investigate the existence of enhancer regulatory elements that are activated in regenerating tissue. Transcriptomic analyses reveal that leptin b (lepb) is highly induced in regenerating hearts and fins of zebrafish. Epigenetic profiling identified a short DNA sequence element upstream and distal to lepb that acquires open chromatin marks during regeneration and enables injury-dependent expression from minimal promoters. This element could activate expression in injured neonatal mouse tissues and was divisible into tissue-specific modules sufficient for expression in regenerating zebrafish fins or hearts. Simple enhancer-effector transgenes employing lepb-linked sequences upstream of pro- or anti-regenerative factors controlled the efficacy of regeneration in zebrafish. Our findings provide evidence for 'tissue regeneration enhancer elements' (TREEs) that trigger gene expression in injury sites and can be engineered to modulate the regenerative potential of vertebrate organs.

  19. Hyaluronic Acid/PLGA Core/Shell Fiber Matrices Loaded with EGCG Beneficial to Diabetic Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Ji Eun; Song, Sung Hwa; Hwang, Dae-Youn; Lee, Jun Jae; Kim, Bongju; Lim, Dohyung; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Lim, Young-Jun; Han, Dong-Wook

    2016-12-01

    During the last few decades, considerable research on diabetic wound healing strategies has been performed, but complete diabetic wound healing remains an unsolved problem, which constitutes an enormous biomedical burden. Herein, hyaluronic acid (HA)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) core/shell fiber matrices loaded with epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) (HA/PLGA-E) are fabricated by coaxial electrospinning. HA/PLGA-E core/shell fiber matrices are composed of randomly-oriented sub-micrometer fibers and have a 3D porous network structure. EGCG is uniformly dispersed in the shell and sustainedly released from the matrices in a stepwise manner by controlled diffusion and PLGA degradation over four weeks. EGCG does not adversely affect the thermomechanical properties of HA/PLGA-E matrices. The number of human dermal fibroblasts attached on HA/PLGA-E matrices is appreciably higher than that on HA/PLGA counterparts, while their proliferation is steadily retained on HA/PLGA-E matrices. The wound healing activity of HA/PLGA-E matrices is evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. After two weeks of surgical treatment, the wound areas are significantly reduced by the coverage with HA/PLGA-E matrices resulting from enhanced re-epithelialization/neovascularization and increased collagen deposition, compared with no treatment or HA/PLGA. In conclusion, the HA/PLGA-E matrices can be potentially exploited to craft strategies for the acceleration of diabetic wound healing and skin regeneration.

  20. Effects of regenerator geometry on pulse tube refrigerator performance.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M; Kuriyama, T; Xiao, J H; Radebaugh, R

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives results of the cooling performance of a double-inlet pulse tube refrigerator using various regenerators. The same pulse tube was used for all the experiments and measured 4.76 mm in diameter and 46.2 mm in length. A commercial linear compressor with a swept volume of 4 cm3 was used in these experiments. The operating conditions were held constant at a mean pressure of 2.0 MPa and a frequency of 54 Hz. Using finite difference software called REGEN3.1, developed at NIST, and recent experiment results, we optimized a series of regenerators based on dimensions, materials and screen packing. The values used for calculating the thermal conduction through stacked screens by REGEN3.1 were based on recent experimental results from NIST. The regenerator tubes were designed using 316 stainless steel and titanium materials. The regenerator matrices investigated were 400-mesh and 500-mesh stainless steel screen. The valve settings for both orifices were adjusted to minimize the no-load temperature for all regenerators. A cooling capacity curve from 0 to 3 W was also determined. The performance of the pulse tube refrigerator using the different regenerators is discussed. The experimental results from the various regenerators are evaluated and compared with their corresponding numerically calculated coefficient of performance (COP) and regenerator design as determined by REGEN3.1.

  1. Effects of regenerator geometry on pulse tube refrigerator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M.; Kuriyama, T.; Xiao, J. H.; Radebaugh, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives results of the cooling performance of a double-inlet pulse tube refrigerator using various regenerators. The same pulse tube was used for all the experiments and measured 4.76 mm in diameter and 46.2 mm in length. A commercial linear compressor with a swept volume of 4 cm3 was used in these experiments. The operating conditions were held constant at a mean pressure of 2.0 MPa and a frequency of 54 Hz. Using finite difference software called REGEN3.1, developed at NIST, and recent experiment results, we optimized a series of regenerators based on dimensions, materials and screen packing. The values used for calculating the thermal conduction through stacked screens by REGEN3.1 were based on recent experimental results from NIST. The regenerator tubes were designed using 316 stainless steel and titanium materials. The regenerator matrices investigated were 400-mesh and 500-mesh stainless steel screen. The valve settings for both orifices were adjusted to minimize the no-load temperature for all regenerators. A cooling capacity curve from 0 to 3 W was also determined. The performance of the pulse tube refrigerator using the different regenerators is discussed. The experimental results from the various regenerators are evaluated and compared with their corresponding numerically calculated coefficient of performance (COP) and regenerator design as determined by REGEN3.1.

  2. Sericin-carboxymethyl cellulose porous matrices as cellular wound dressing material.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sunita; Kundu, S C

    2014-06-01

    In this study, porous three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel matrices are fabricated composed of silk cocoon protein sericin of non-mulberry silkworm Antheraea mylitta and carboxymethyl cellulose. The matrices are prepared via freeze-drying technique followed by dual cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and aluminum chloride. The microstructure of the hydrogel matrices is assessed using scanning electron microscopy and biophysical characterization are carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The transforming growth factor β1 release from the cross-linked matrices as a growth factor is evaluated by immunosorbent assay. Live dead assay and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay show no cytotoxicity of blended matrices toward human keratinocytes. The matrices support the cell attachment and proliferation of human keratinocytes as observed through scanning electron microscope and confocal images. Gelatin zymography demonstrates the low levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and insignificant amount of MMP-9 in the culture media of cell seeded matrices. Low inflammatory response of the matrices is indicated through tumor necrosis factor alpha release assay. The results indicate that the fabricated matrices constitute 3D cell-interactive environment for tissue engineering applications and its potential use as a future cellular biological wound dressing material.

  3. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  4. Symmetric Toeplitz-Structured Compressed Sensing Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Fan, Yi-Zheng; Zhu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    How to construct a suitable measurement matrix is an important topic in compressed sensing. A significant part of the recent work is that the measurement matrices are not completely random on the entries but exhibit some considerable structures. In this paper, we proved that a symmetric Toeplitz matrix and its variant can be used as measurement matrices and recovery signal with high probability. Compared with random matrices (e.g. Gaussian and Bernoulli matrices) and some structured matrices (e.g. Toeplitz and circulant matrices), we need to generate fewer independent entries to obtain the measurement matrix while the effectiveness of the recovery keeps good.

  5. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect. PMID:23507891

  6. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

  7. Making almost commuting matrices commute

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2008-01-01

    Suppose two Hermitian matrices A, B almost commute ({parallel}[A,B]{parallel} {<=} {delta}). Are they close to a commuting pair of Hermitian matrices, A', B', with {parallel}A-A'{parallel},{parallel}B-B'{parallel} {<=} {epsilon}? A theorem of H. Lin shows that this is uniformly true, in that for every {epsilon} > 0 there exists a {delta} > 0, independent of the size N of the matrices, for which almost commuting implies being close to a commuting pair. However, this theorem does not specifiy how {delta} depends on {epsilon}. We give uniform bounds relating {delta} and {epsilon}. The proof is constructive, giving an explicit algorithm to construct A' and B'. We provide tighter bounds in the case of block tridiagonal and tridiagnonal matrices. Within the context of quantum measurement, this implies an algorithm to construct a basis in which we can make a projective measurement that approximately measures two approximately commuting operators simultaneously. Finally, we comment briefly on the case of approximately measuring three or more approximately commuting operators using POVMs (positive operator-valued measures) instead of projective measurements.

  8. Open string fields as matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Isao; Masuda, Toru; Takahashi, Tomohiko; Takemoto, Shoko

    2015-03-01

    We show that the action expanded around Erler-Maccaferri's N D-brane solution describes the N+1 D-brane system where one D-brane disappears due to tachyon condensation. String fields on multi-branes can be regarded as block matrices of a string field on a single D-brane in the same way as matrix theories.

  9. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

  10. Principles of natural regeneration

    Treesearch

    Paul S. Johnson

    1989-01-01

    To maximize chances of successful regeneration, carefully consider the following regeneration principles. Harvesting alone does not guarantee that the desired species will be established. The conditions required for the initial establishment and early growth of the desired species largely determine what regeneration method you should use and any supplemental treatments...

  11. Synergistic effect of defined artificial extracellular matrices and pulsed electric fields on osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs.

    PubMed

    Hess, Ricarda; Jaeschke, Anna; Neubert, Holger; Hintze, Vera; Moeller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Wiesmann, Hans-Peter; Hart, David A; Scharnweber, Dieter

    2012-12-01

    In vivo, bone formation is a complex, tightly regulated process, influenced by multiple biochemical and physical factors. To develop a vital bone tissue engineering construct, all of these individual components have to be considered and integrated to gain an in vivo-like stimulation of target cells. The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the synergistic role of defined biochemical and physical microenvironments with respect to osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Biochemical microenvironments have been designed using artificial extracellular matrices (aECMs), containing collagen I (coll) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) like chondroitin sulfate (CS), or a high-sulfated hyaluronan derivative (sHya), formulated as coatings on three-dimensional poly(caprolactone-co-lactide) (PCL) scaffolds. As part of the physical microenvironment, cells were exposed to pulsed electric fields via transformer-like coupling (TC). Results showed that aECM containing sHya enhanced osteogenic differentiation represented by increases in ALP activity and gene-expression (RT-qPCR) of several bone-related proteins (RUNX-2, ALP, OPN). Electric field stimulation alone did not influence cell proliferation, but osteogenic differentiation was enhanced if osteogenic supplements were provided, showing synergistic effects by the combination of sHya and electric fields. These results will improve the understanding of bone regeneration processes and support the development of effective tissue engineered bone constructs.

  12. Macromolecular crowding for tailoring tissue-derived fibrillated matrices.

    PubMed

    Magno, Valentina; Friedrichs, Jens; Weber, Heather M; Prewitz, Marina C; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Werner, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials characteristics only. In this work, we demonstrate how macromolecular crowding (MMC) - the supplementation of matrix reconstitution media with synthetic or natural macromolecules in ways to create excluded volume effects (EVE) - can be employed for tailoring important structural and biophysical characteristics of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices. Porcine kidneys were decellularized, ground and the obtained extracellular matrix (ECM) preparations were reconstituted under varied MMC conditions. We show that MMC strongly influences the fibrillogenesis kinetics and impacts the architecture and the elastic modulus of the reconstituted matrices, with diameters and relative alignment of fibrils increasing at elevated concentrations of the crowding agent Ficoll400, a nonionic synthetic polymer of sucrose. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MMC modulates the distribution of key ECM molecules within the reconstituted matrix scaffolds. As a proof of concept, we compared different variants of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices in cell culture experiments referring to specific requirements of kidney tissue engineering approaches. The results revealed that MMC-tailored matrices support the morphogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) into capillary networks and of murine kidney stem cells (KSCs) into highly branched aggregates. The established methodology is concluded to provide generally applicable new options for tailoring tissue-specific multiphasic matrices in vitro. Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials

  13. Transcript-activated collagen matrix as sustained mRNA delivery system for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Badieyan, Zohreh Sadat; Berezhanskyy, Taras; Utzinger, Maximilian; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Emrich, Daniela; Erben, Reinhold; Schüler, Christiane; Altpeter, Philipp; Ferizi, Mehrije; Hasenpusch, Günther; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2016-10-10

    Transcript therapies using chemically modified messenger RNAs (cmRNAs) are emerging as safe and promising alternatives for gene and recombinant protein therapies. However, their applications have been limited due to transient translation and relatively low stability of cmRNAs compared to DNA. Here we show that vacuum-dried cmRNA-loaded collagen sponges, termed transcript activated matrices (TAMs), can serve as depots for sustained delivery of cmRNA. TAMs provide steady state protein production for up to six days, and substantial residual expression until 11days post transfection. Another advantage of this technology was nearly 100% transfection efficiency as well as low toxicity in vitro. TAMs were stable for at least 6months at room temperature. Human BMP-2-encoding TAMs induced osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro and bone regeneration in a non-critical rat femoral bone defect model in vivo. In summary, TAMs are a promising tool for bone regeneration and potentially also for other applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  14. PROTEIN METABOLISM IN REGENERATING WOUND TISSUE: FUNCTION OF THE SULFUR AMINO ACIDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PROTEINS, *TISSUES(BIOLOGY), METABOLISM, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), REGENERATION(ENGINEERING), WOUNDS AND INJURIES, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TRACER STUDIES, METHIONINE, COLLAGEN, TYROSINE, BIOSYNTHESIS, AMINO ACIDS .

  15. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  16. 40 CFR 1039.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adjust emission results from engines using aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration events... an engine family, as described in § 1039.235(d), consistent with good engineering judgment. All... regard to regeneration. (2) If your engines use aftertreatment technology with extremely infrequent...

  17. Gene therapy for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jeffrey; Sun, Michael H; Kang, Quan; Peng, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Luu, Hue H; Luo, Qing; Park, Jae Yoon; Li, Yien; Haydon, Rex C; He, Tong-Chuan

    2005-04-01

    Efficacious bone regeneration could revolutionize the clinical management of many bone and musculoskeletal disorders. Bone has the unique ability to regenerate and continuously remodel itself throughout life. However, clinical situations arise when bone is unable to heal itself, as with segmental bone loss, fracture non-union, and failed spinal fusion. This leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Current attempts at improved bone healing have been met with limited success, fueling the development of improved techniques. Gene therapy in many ways represents an ideal approach for augmenting bone regeneration. Gene therapy allows specific gene products to be delivered to a precise anatomic location. In addition, the level of transgene expression as well as the duration of expression can be regulated with current techniques. For bone regeneration, the gene of interest should be delivered to the fracture site, expressed at appropriate levels, and then deactivated once the fracture has healed. Delivery of biological factors, mostly bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), has yielded promising results both in animal and clinical studies. There has also been tremendous work on discovering new growth factors and exploring previously defined ones. Finally, significant advances are being made in the delivery systems of the genes, ranging from viral and non-viral vectors to tissue engineering scaffolds. Despite some public hesitation to gene therapy, its use has great potential to expand our ability to treat a variety of human bone and musculoskeletal disorders. It is conceivable that in the near future gene therapy can be utilized to induce bone formation in virtually any region of the body in a minimally invasive manner. As bone biology and gene therapy research progresses, the goal of successful human gene transfer for augmentation of bone regeneration draws nearer.

  18. Impacts of continuously regenerating trap and particle oxidation catalyst on the NO2 and particulate matter emissions emitted from diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; He, Chao; Shah, Asad Naeem; Ding, Yan; Yu, Linxiao; Zhao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Two continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CRDPF) with different configurations and one particles oxidation catalyst (POC) were employed to perform experiments in a controlled laboratory setting to evaluate their effects on NO2, smoke and particle number emissions. The results showed that the application of the after-treatments increased the emission ratios of NO2/NOx significantly. The results of smoke emissions and particle number (PN) emissions indicated that both CRDPFs had sufficient capacity to remove more than 90% of total particulate matter (PM) and more than 97% of solid particles. However, the POC was able to remove the organic components of total PM, and only partially to remove the carbonaceous particles with size less than 30 nm. The negligible effects of POC on larger particles were observed due to its honeycomb structure leads to an inadequate residence time to oxidize the solid particles or trap them. The particles removal efficiencies of CRDPFs had high degree of correlations with the emission ratio of NO2/NOx. The PN emission results from two CRDPFs indicated that more NO2 generating in diesel oxidation catalyst section could obtain the higher removal efficiency of solid particles. However this also increased the risk of NO2 exposure in atmosphere.

  19. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lienemann, Philipp S; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-19

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (<1 mm). Herein, we employ modular designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  20. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (<1 mm). Herein, we employ modular designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  1. Higher order matrix differential equations with singular coefficient matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Fragkoulis, V. C.; Kougioumtzoglou, I. A.; Pantelous, A. A.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-03-10

    In this article, the class of higher order linear matrix differential equations with constant coefficient matrices and stochastic process terms is studied. The coefficient of the highest order is considered to be singular; thus, rendering the response determination of such systems in a straightforward manner a difficult task. In this regard, the notion of the generalized inverse of a singular matrix is used for determining response statistics. Further, an application relevant to engineering dynamics problems is included.

  2. Dissolution Rate of Propellant Energetics from Nitrocellulose Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Engineer Research and Development Center 72 Lyme Road Hanover, NH 03755 Katerina Dontsova Biosphere 2 Earthscience, University of Arizona 845 N...ER D C/ CR R EL T R -1 2 -9 ER-1691 Dissolution Rate of Propellant Energetics from Nitrocellulose Matrices C ol d R eg io n s R es ea...transformation rates measured. As a result, no 2 ,-4-DNT was detected in column outflow. NG experienced both adsorption and transformation in the soils

  3. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  4. Fluctuations of eigenvalues of patterned random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Kartick; Saha, Koushik

    2017-06-01

    In this article, we study the fluctuations of linear statistics of eigenvalues of circulant, symmetric circulant, reverse circulant, and Hankel matrices. We show that the linear spectral statistics of these matrices converge to the Gaussian distribution in total variation norm when the matrices are constructed using independent copies of a standard normal random variable. We also calculate the limiting variance of the linear spectral statistics for circulant, symmetric circulant, and reverse circulant matrices.

  5. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  6. Missing Concepts in De Novo Pulp Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, G T-J; Garcia-Godoy, F

    2014-08-01

    Regenerative endodontics has gained much attention in the past decade because it offers an alternative approach in treating endodontically involved teeth. Instead of filling the canal space with artificial materials, it attempts to fill the canal with vital tissues. The objective of regeneration is to regain the tissue and restore its function to the original state. In terms of pulp regeneration, a clinical protocol that intends to reestablish pulp/dentin tissues in the canal space has been developed--termed revitalization or revascularization. Histologic studies from animal and human teeth receiving revitalization have shown that pulp regeneration is difficult to achieve. In tissue engineering, there are 2 approaches to regeneration tissues: cell based and cell free. The former involves transplanting exogenous cells into the host, and the latter does not. Revitalization belongs to the latter approach. A number of crucial concepts have not been well discussed, noted, or understood in the field of regenerative endodontics in terms of pulp/dentin regeneration: (1) critical size defect of dentin and pulp, (2) cell lineage commitment to odontoblasts, (3) regeneration vs. repair, and (4) hurdles of cell-based pulp regeneration for clinical applications. This review article elaborates on these missing concepts and analyzes them at their cellular and molecular levels, which will in part explain why the non-cell-based revitalization procedure is difficult to establish pulp/dentin regeneration. Although the cell-based approach has been proven to regenerate pulp/dentin, such an approach will face barriers--with the key hurdle being the shortage of the current good manufacturing practice facilities, discussed herein. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  7. Missing Concepts in De Novo Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, G.T.-J.; Garcia-Godoy, F.

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has gained much attention in the past decade because it offers an alternative approach in treating endodontically involved teeth. Instead of filling the canal space with artificial materials, it attempts to fill the canal with vital tissues. The objective of regeneration is to regain the tissue and restore its function to the original state. In terms of pulp regeneration, a clinical protocol that intends to reestablish pulp/dentin tissues in the canal space has been developed—termed revitalization or revascularization. Histologic studies from animal and human teeth receiving revitalization have shown that pulp regeneration is difficult to achieve. In tissue engineering, there are 2 approaches to regeneration tissues: cell based and cell free. The former involves transplanting exogenous cells into the host, and the latter does not. Revitalization belongs to the latter approach. A number of crucial concepts have not been well discussed, noted, or understood in the field of regenerative endodontics in terms of pulp/dentin regeneration: (1) critical size defect of dentin and pulp, (2) cell lineage commitment to odontoblasts, (3) regeneration vs. repair, and (4) hurdles of cell-based pulp regeneration for clinical applications. This review article elaborates on these missing concepts and analyzes them at their cellular and molecular levels, which will in part explain why the non-cell-based revitalization procedure is difficult to establish pulp/dentin regeneration. Although the cell-based approach has been proven to regenerate pulp/dentin, such an approach will face barriers—with the key hurdle being the shortage of the current good manufacturing practice facilities, discussed herein. PMID:24879576

  8. Cranial bone regeneration via BMP-2 encoding mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vural, Altugan Cahit; Odabas, Sedat; Korkusuz, Petek; Yar Sağlam, Atiye Seda; Bilgiç, Elif; Çavuşoğlu, Tarık; Piskin, Erhan; Vargel, İbrahim

    2017-05-01

    Cranial bone repair and regeneration via tissue engineering principles has attracted a great deal of interest from researchers during last decade. Here, within this study, 6 mm critical-sized bone defect regeneration via genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were monitored up to 4 months. Cranial bone repair and new bone formations were evaluated by histological staining and real time PCR analysis in five different groups including autograft and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) transfected MSC groups. Results presented here indicate a proper cranial regeneration in autograft groups and a prospering regeneration for hBMP-2 encoding mesenchymal stem cells.

  9. Method and apparatus for PM filter regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Opris, Cornelius N.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-01-03

    A method and apparatus for initiating regeneration of a particulate matter (PM) filter in an exhaust system in an internal combustion engine. The method and apparatus includes determining a change in pressure of exhaust gases passing through the PM filter, and responsively varying an opening of an intake valve in fluid communication with a combustion chamber.

  10. S-matrices and integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardelli, Diego

    2016-08-01

    In these notes we review the S-matrix theory in (1+1)-dimensional integrable models, focusing mainly on the relativistic case. Once the main definitions and physical properties are introduced, we discuss the factorization of scattering processes due to integrability. We then focus on the analytic properties of the two-particle scattering amplitude and illustrate the derivation of the S-matrices for all the possible bound states using the so-called bootstrap principle. General algebraic structures underlying the S-matrix theory and its relation with the form factors axioms are briefly mentioned. Finally, we discuss the S-matrices of sine-Gordon and SU(2), SU(3) chiral Gross-Neveu models. In loving memory of Lilia Grandi.

  11. Threaded Operations on Sparse Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Sneed, Brett

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the use of sparse matrices and OpenMP multi-threading on linear algebra operations involving them. Several sparse matrix data structures are presented. Implementation of the multi- threading primarily occurs in the level one and two BLAS functions used within the four algorithms investigated{the Power Method, Conjugate Gradient, Biconjugate Gradient, and Jacobi's Method. The bene ts of launching threads once per high level algorithm are explored.

  12. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  13. Chitosan-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microsphere-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: in vitro degradation and in vivo bone regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Nukavarapu, Syam P; Deng, Meng; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Kofron, Michelle D; Doty, Stephen B; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Laurencin, Cato T

    2010-09-01

    Natural polymer chitosan and synthetic polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) have been investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications. We have previously reported the fabrication and in vitro evaluation of a novel chitosan/PLAGA sintered microsphere scaffold for load-bearing bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, the in vitro degradation characteristics of the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold and the in vivo bone formation capacity of the chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model were investigated. The chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed slower degradation than the PLAGA scaffold in vitro. Although chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed a gradual decrease in compressive properties during the 12-week degradation period, the compressive strength and compressive modulus remained in the range of human trabecular bone. Chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds were able to guide bone formation in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model. Microcomputed tomography analysis demonstrated that successful bridging of the critical-sized defect on the sides both adjacent to and away from the radius occurred using chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds. Immobilization of heparin and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold surface promoted early bone formation as evidenced by complete bridging of the defect along the radius and significantly enhanced mechanical properties when compared to the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold. Furthermore, histological analysis suggested that chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds supported normal bone formation via intramembranous formation.

  14. Genetic code, hamming distance and stochastic matrices.

    PubMed

    He, Matthew X; Petoukhov, Sergei V; Ricci, Paolo E

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we use the Gray code representation of the genetic code C=00, U=10, G=11 and A=01 (C pairs with G, A pairs with U) to generate a sequence of genetic code-based matrices. In connection with these code-based matrices, we use the Hamming distance to generate a sequence of numerical matrices. We then further investigate the properties of the numerical matrices and show that they are doubly stochastic and symmetric. We determine the frequency distributions of the Hamming distances, building blocks of the matrices, decomposition and iterations of matrices. We present an explicit decomposition formula for the genetic code-based matrix in terms of permutation matrices, which provides a hypercube representation of the genetic code. It is also observed that there is a Hamiltonian cycle in a genetic code-based hypercube.

  15. Rotationally invariant ensembles of integrable matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Scaramazza, Jasen A.

    2016-05-01

    We construct ensembles of random integrable matrices with any prescribed number of nontrivial integrals and formulate integrable matrix theory (IMT)—a counterpart of random matrix theory (RMT) for quantum integrable models. A type-M family of integrable matrices consists of exactly N -M independent commuting N ×N matrices linear in a real parameter. We first develop a rotationally invariant parametrization of such matrices, previously only constructed in a preferred basis. For example, an arbitrary choice of a vector and two commuting Hermitian matrices defines a type-1 family and vice versa. Higher types similarly involve a random vector and two matrices. The basis-independent formulation allows us to derive the joint probability density for integrable matrices, similar to the construction of Gaussian ensembles in the RMT.

  16. Rotationally invariant ensembles of integrable matrices.

    PubMed

    Yuzbashyan, Emil A; Shastry, B Sriram; Scaramazza, Jasen A

    2016-05-01

    We construct ensembles of random integrable matrices with any prescribed number of nontrivial integrals and formulate integrable matrix theory (IMT)-a counterpart of random matrix theory (RMT) for quantum integrable models. A type-M family of integrable matrices consists of exactly N-M independent commuting N×N matrices linear in a real parameter. We first develop a rotationally invariant parametrization of such matrices, previously only constructed in a preferred basis. For example, an arbitrary choice of a vector and two commuting Hermitian matrices defines a type-1 family and vice versa. Higher types similarly involve a random vector and two matrices. The basis-independent formulation allows us to derive the joint probability density for integrable matrices, similar to the construction of Gaussian ensembles in the RMT.

  17. Novel Factor-loaded Polyphosphazene Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Oredein-McCoy, Olugbemisola; Krogman, Nicholas R.; Weikel, Arlin L.; Hindenlang, Mark D.; Allcock, Harry R.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2009-01-01

    Currently employed bone tissue engineered scaffolds often lack the potential for vascularization, which may be enhanced through the incorporation of and regulated release of angiogenic factors. For this reason, our objective was to fabricate and characterize protein-loaded amino acid ester polyphosphazene (Pphos)-based scaffolds and evaluate the novel sintering method used for protein incorporation, a method which will ultimately allow for the incorporation of proangiogenic agents. To test the hypothesis, Pphos and their composite microspheres with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (Pphos-HAp) were fabricated via the emulsion solvent evaporation method. Next, bovine serum albumin (BSA)-containing microsphere matrices were created using a novel solvent-non solvent approach for protein loading. The resulting protein (BSA) loaded-circular porous microsphere based scaffolds were characterized for morphology, porosity, protein structure, protein distribution, and subsequent protein release pattern. Scanning electron microscopy revealed porous microsphere scaffolds with a smooth surface and sufficient level of sintering, illustrated by fusion of adjacent microspheres. The porosity measured for the PNPhGly and PNPhGly-HAp scaffolds were 23 +/- 0.11% and 18+/- 4.02%, respectively, and within the range of trabecular bone. Circular dichroism confirmed an intact secondary protein structure for BSA following the solvent sintering method used for loading, and confocal microscopy verified that FITC-BSA was successfully entrapped both between adjacent microspheres and within the surface of the microspheres while sintering. For both Pphos and their composite microsphere scaffolds, BSA was released at a steady rate over a 21day time period, following a zero order release profile. HAp particles in the composite scaffolds served to improve the release profile pattern, underscoring the potential of HAp for growth factor delivery. Moreover, the results of this work suggests that the

  18. Composite Hydrogels for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Gianluca; De Mori, Arianna; Oliveira, Antero; Roldo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, bone related disorders have constantly increased. Among all pathological conditions, osteoporosis is one of the most common and often leads to bone fractures. This is a massive burden and it affects an estimated 3 million people only in the UK. Furthermore, as the population ages, numbers are due to increase. In this context, novel biomaterials for bone fracture regeneration are constantly under development. Typically, these materials aim at favoring optimal bone integration in the scaffold, up to complete bone regeneration; this approach to regenerative medicine is also known as tissue engineering (TE). Hydrogels are among the most promising biomaterials in TE applications: they are very flexible materials that allow a number of different properties to be targeted for different applications, through appropriate chemical modifications. The present review will focus on the strategies that have been developed for formulating hydrogels with ideal properties for bone regeneration applications. In particular, aspects related to the improvement of hydrogels’ mechanical competence, controlled delivery of drugs and growth factors are treated in detail. It is hoped that this review can provide an exhaustive compendium of the main aspects in hydrogel related research and, therefore, stimulate future biomaterial development and applications. PMID:28773392

  19. Guided tissue regeneration in periapical surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Louis; Chen, Melody Y-H; Ricucci, Domenico; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2010-04-01

    Tissue regeneration by using membrane barriers and bone grafting materials in periapical surgery is an example of tissue engineering technology. Membrane barriers and/or bone grafts are often used to enhance periapical new bone formation. However, the periapical tissues also consist of the periodontal ligament (PDL) and cementum. For regeneration of the periapical tissues after periapical surgery, one of the important requirements is recruitment and differentiation of progenitor/stem cells into committed pre-osteoblasts, pre-PDL cells, and pre-cementoblasts. Homing of progenitor/stem cells into the wounded periapical tissues is regulated by factors such as stromal cell-derived factor 1, growth factors/cytokines, and by microenvironmental cues such as adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix and associated noncollagenous molecules. Tissue regeneration after injury appears to recapitulate the pathway of normal embryonic tissue development. Multiple tissue regeneration involves a complex interaction between different cells, extracellular matrix, growth/differentiation factors, and microenvironmental cues. Little is known concerning the biologic mechanisms that regulate temporal and spatial relationship between alveolar bone, PDL, and cementum regeneration during periapical wound healing. Simply applying a membrane barrier and/or bone graft during periapical surgery might not result in complete regeneration of the periapical tissues. It has not been clearly demonstrated that these biomaterials are capable of recruiting progenitor/stem cells and inducing these undifferentiated mesenchymal cells to differentiate into PDL cells and cementoblasts after periapical surgery.

  20. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  1. Soluble antioxidant compounds regenerate the antioxidants bound to insoluble parts of foods.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ecem Evrim; Gökmen, Vural; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2013-10-30

    This study aimed to investigate the regeneration potential of antioxidant capacity of an insoluble food matrix. Investigations were performed in vitro with several food matrices rich in dietary fiber (DF) and bound antioxidants. After removal of the soluble fraction, the antioxidant capacity (AC) of the insoluble fraction was measured by the QUENCHER procedure using ABTS(•+) or DPPH(•) radicals. After measurement, the insoluble residue was washed out to remove the excess of radicals and treated with pure antioxidant solution or antioxidant-rich beverage to regenerate depleted antioxidants on the fiber. Results revealed that the antioxidant capacity of compounds chemically bound to the insoluble moiety could be reconstituted in the presence of other hydrogen-donating substances in the liquid phase. Regeneration efficiency was found to range between 21.5 and 154.3% depending on the type of insoluble food matrix and regeneration agent. Among the food matrices studied, cereal products were found to have slightly higher regeneration efficiency, whereas antioxidant-rich beverages were more effective than pure antioxidants as regeneration agents. Taking wheat bran as reference insoluble material, the regeneration abilities of beverages were in the following order: green tea > espresso coffee > black tea > instant coffee > orange juice > red wine. These results highlighted the possible physiological relevance of antioxidants bound to the insoluble food material in the gastrointestinal tract. During the digestion process they could react with the free radicals and at the same time they can be regenerated by other soluble antioxidant compounds present in the meal.

  2. Tissue-Engineered Regeneration of Completely Transected Spinal Cord Using Induced Neural Stem Cells and Gelatin-Electrospun Poly (Lactide-Co-Glycolide)/Polyethylene Glycol Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Li, Shangfu; Liu, Linshan; Shu, Tao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Rong, Limin; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has brought new possibilities for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Two important components for tissue engineering of the spinal cord include a suitable cell source and scaffold. In our study, we investigated induced mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) directly reprogrammed into neural stem cells (iNSCs), as a cell source. Three-dimensional (3D) electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) nanofiber scaffolds were used for iNSCs adhesion and growth. Cell growth, survival and proliferation on the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microcopy (SEM) and nuclei staining were used to assess cell growth on the scaffolds. Scaffolds with iNSCs were then transplanted into transected rat spinal cords. Two or 8 weeks following transplantation, immunofluorescence was performed to determine iNSC survival and differentiation within the scaffolds. Functional recovery was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) Scale. Results indicated that iNSCs showed similar morphological features with wild-type neural stem cells (wt-NSCs), and expressed a variety of neural stem cell marker genes. Furthermore, iNSCs were shown to survive, with the ability to self-renew and undergo neural differentiation into neurons and glial cells within the 3D scaffolds in vivo. The iNSC-seeded scaffolds restored the continuity of the spinal cord and reduced cavity formation. Additionally, iNSC-seeded scaffolds contributed to functional recovery of the spinal cord. Therefore, PLGA-PEG scaffolds seeded with iNSCs may serve as promising supporting transplants for repairing spinal cord injury (SCI). PMID:25803031

  3. Tissue-engineered regeneration of completely transected spinal cord using induced neural stem cells and gelatin-electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Huang, Yong; Pang, Mao; Yang, Yang; Li, Shangfu; Liu, Linshan; Shu, Tao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Rong, Limin; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has brought new possibilities for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Two important components for tissue engineering of the spinal cord include a suitable cell source and scaffold. In our study, we investigated induced mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) directly reprogrammed into neural stem cells (iNSCs), as a cell source. Three-dimensional (3D) electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) nanofiber scaffolds were used for iNSCs adhesion and growth. Cell growth, survival and proliferation on the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclei staining were used to assess cell growth on the scaffolds. Scaffolds with iNSCs were then transplanted into transected rat spinal cords. Two or 8 weeks following transplantation, immunofluorescence was performed to determine iNSC survival and differentiation within the scaffolds. Functional recovery was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) Scale. Results indicated that iNSCs showed similar morphological features with wild-type neural stem cells (wt-NSCs), and expressed a variety of neural stem cell marker genes. Furthermore, iNSCs were shown to survive, with the ability to self-renew and undergo neural differentiation into neurons and glial cells within the 3D scaffolds in vivo. The iNSC-seeded scaffolds restored the continuity of the spinal cord and reduced cavity formation. Additionally, iNSC-seeded scaffolds contributed to functional recovery of the spinal cord. Therefore, PLGA-PEG scaffolds seeded with iNSCs may serve as promising supporting transplants for repairing spinal cord injury (SCI).

  4. Regeneration Heat Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    J. Lin

    2003-07-30

    The original project goals were to establish the viability of the proposed gas turbine regenerator concept by performing the following tasks: (1) Perform detailed design of a working model of the regenerator concept. (2) Construct a ''bench-top'' model of the regenerator concept based upon the detail design. (3) Test the bench-top model and gather data to support the concept's viability. The project funding was used to acquire the tools and material to perform the aforementioned tasks.

  5. Cell-adhesive RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofiber matrices for growth of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Oh, Jin-Woo; Kim, Tai Wan; Han, Dong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    M13 bacteriophages can be readily fabricated as nanofibers due to non-toxic bacterial virus with a nanofiber-like shape. In the present study, we prepared hybrid nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 bacteriophages which were genetically modified to display the RGD peptide on their surface (RGD-M13 phage). The surface morphology and chemical composition of hybrid nanofiber matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was conducted to investigate the existence of M13 bacteriophages in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofibers. In addition, the attachment and proliferation of three different types of fibroblasts on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices were evaluated to explore how fibroblasts interact with these matrices. SEM images showed that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid matrices had the non-woven porous structure, quite similar to that of natural extracellular matrices, having an average fiber diameter of about 190 nm. Immunofluorescence images and Raman spectra revealed that RGD-M13 phages were homogeneously distributed in entire matrices. Moreover, the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts cultured on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices were significantly enhanced due to enriched RGD moieties on hybrid matrices. These results suggest that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices can be efficiently used as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  6. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    ScienceCinema

    Cohen, Avis [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States

    2016-07-12

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  7. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Avis

    2009-02-04

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  8. Measurement of the matric potential of soil water in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Whalley, W R; Ober, E S; Jenkins, M

    2013-10-01

    The availability of soil water, and the ability of plants to extract it, are important variables in plant research. The matric potential has been a useful way to describe water status in a soil-plant system. In soil it is the potential that is derived from the surface tension of water menisci between soil particles. The magnitude of matric potential depends on the soil water content, the size of the soil pores, the surface properties of the soil particles, and the surface tension of the soil water. Of all the measures of soil water, matric potential is perhaps the most useful for plant scientists. In this review, the relationship between matric potential and soil water content is explored. It is shown that for any given soil type, this relationship is not unique and therefore both soil water content and matric potential need to be measured for the soil water status to be fully described. However, in comparison with water content, approaches for measuring matric potential have received less attention until recently. In this review, a critique of current methods to measure matric potential is presented, together with their limitations as well as underexploited opportunities. The relative merits of both direct and indirect methods to measure matric potential are discussed. The different approaches needed in wet and dry soil are outlined. In the final part of the paper, the emerging technologies are discussed in so far as our current imagination allows. The review draws upon current developments in the field of civil engineering where the measurement of matric potential is also important. The approaches made by civil engineers have been more imaginative than those of plant and soil scientists.

  9. Canonical form of Hamiltonian matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuker, A. P.; Waha Ndeuna, L.; Nowacki, F.; Caurier, E.

    2001-08-01

    On the basis of shell model simulations, it is conjectured that the Lanczos construction at fixed quantum numbers defines-within fluctuations and behavior very near the origin-smooth canonical matrices whose forms depend on the rank of the Hamiltonian, dimensionality of the vector space, and second and third moments. A framework emerges that amounts to a general Anderson model capable of dealing with ground state properties and strength functions. The smooth forms imply binomial level densities. A simplified approach to canonical thermodynamics is proposed.

  10. Development and characterization of a PHB-HV-based 3D scaffold for a tissue engineering and cell-therapy combinatorial approach for spinal cord injury regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Samy, Silvina; Silva, Nuno A; Correlo, Vitor M; Fraga, Joana S; Pinto, Luísa; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Leite-Almeida, Hugo; Almeida, Armando; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Sousa, Nuno; Salgado, António J; Reis, Rui L

    2013-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to devastating neurological deficits. Several tissue engineering (TE)-based approaches have been investigated for repairing this condition. Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHB-HV) is found to be particularly attractive for TE applications due to its properties, such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, thermoplasticity and piezoelectricity. Hence, this report addresses the development and characterization of PHB-HV-based 3D scaffolds, produced by freeze-drying, aimed to SCI treatment. The obtained scaffolds reveal an anisotropic morphology with a fully interconnected network of pores. In vitro studies demonstrate a lack of cytotoxic effect of PHB-HV scaffolds. Direct contact assays also reveal their ability to support the culture of CNS-derived cells and mesenchymal-like stem cells from different sources. Finally, histocompatibility studies show that PHB-HV scaffolds are well tolerated by the host tissue, and do not negatively impact the left hindlimb locomotor function recovery. Therefore results herein presented suggest that PHB-HV scaffolds may be suitable for SCI treatment.

  11. Enhanced production of 2,3-butanediol from xylose by combinatorial engineering of xylose metabolic pathway and cofactor regeneration in pyruvate decarboxylase-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Jung; Sim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Ye-Gi; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2017-06-09

    The aim of this study was to produce 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BDO) from xylose efficiently by modulation of the xylose metabolic pathway in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of the Scheffersomyces stipitis transaldolase and NADH-preferring xylose reductase in S. cerevisiae improved xylose consumption rate by a 2.1-fold and 2,3-BDO productivity by a 1.8-fold. Expression of the Lactococcus lactis noxE gene encoding NADH oxidase also increased 2,3-BDO yield by decreasing glycerol accumulation. Additionally, the disadvantage of C2-dependent growth of pyruvate decarboxylase-deficient (Pdc(-)) S. cerevisiae was overcome by expression of the Candida tropicalis PDC1 gene. A fed-batch fermentation of the BD5X-TXmNP strain resulted in 96.8g/L 2,3-BDO and 0.58g/L-h productivity from xylose, which were 15.6- and 2-fold increases compared with the corresponding values of the BD5X strain. It was concluded that facilitation of the xylose metabolic pathway, oxidation of NADH and relief of C2-dependency synergistically triggered 2,3-BDO production from xylose in Pdc(-)S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hear the beat: decellularized mouse heart regenerated with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Lu, Tung-Ying; Yang, Lei

    2014-02-01

    Heart tissue engineering holds a great potential for human heart disease therapy. Regeneration of whole biofunctional human heart is the ultimate goal of tissue engineering. Recent advances take the first step towards whole heart regeneration. However, a substantial amount of challenges have to be overcome.

  13. Molecular sieves control contamination and and insulate in thermal regenerators - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, M. G.

    1970-01-01

    Zeolitic molecular sieves prolong the lives of cryogenic engines by preventing contamination of the thermal regenerators on the cold ends of closed-cycle engines. Sieves also serve as thermal insulators by preventing conduction of heat along regenerators through contiguous disks of mesh.

  14. Harnessing biomechanics to develop cartilage regeneration strategies.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Responte, Donald J; Brown, Wendy E; Hu, Jerry C

    2015-02-01

    As this review was prepared specifically for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers H.R. Lissner Medal, it primarily discusses work toward cartilage regeneration performed in Dr. Kyriacos A. Athanasiou's laboratory over the past 25 years. The prevalence and severity of degeneration of articular cartilage, a tissue whose main function is largely biomechanical, have motivated the development of cartilage tissue engineering approaches informed by biomechanics. This article provides a review of important steps toward regeneration of articular cartilage with suitable biomechanical properties. As a first step, biomechanical and biochemical characterization studies at the tissue level were used to provide design criteria for engineering neotissues. Extending this work to the single cell and subcellular levels has helped to develop biochemical and mechanical stimuli for tissue engineering studies. This strong mechanobiological foundation guided studies on regenerating hyaline articular cartilage, the knee meniscus, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) fibrocartilage. Initial tissue engineering efforts centered on developing biodegradable scaffolds for cartilage regeneration. After many years of studying scaffold-based cartilage engineering, scaffoldless approaches were developed to address deficiencies of scaffold-based systems, resulting in the self-assembling process. This process was further improved by employing exogenous stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, growth factors, and matrix-modifying and catabolic agents, both singly and in synergistic combination to enhance neocartilage functional properties. Due to the high cell needs for tissue engineering and the limited supply of native articular chondrocytes, costochondral cells are emerging as a suitable cell source. Looking forward, additional cell sources are investigated to render these technologies more translatable. For example, dermis isolated adult stem (DIAS) cells show potential as a source of

  15. Nonlocal Parameters for Multiparticle Density Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, N.; Popescu, S.; Sudbery, A.

    1999-07-01

    As far as entanglement is concerned, two density matrices of n particles are completely equivalent if one can be transformed into the other by local unitary transformations. We present two methods to find whether or not two generic density matrices of arbitrary numbers of spin-1/2 particles are equivalent. Both methods describe density matrices in terms of a finite number of invariant parameters.

  16. A Transitional Extracellular Matrix Instructs Cell Behavior During Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Odelberg, Shannon J.; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-01

    Urodele amphibians regenerate appendages through the recruitment of progenitor cells into a blastema that rebuilds the lost tissue. Blastemal formation is accompanied by extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Although this remodeling process is important for appendage regeneration, it is not known whether the remodeled matrix directly influences the generation and behavior of blastemal progenitor cells. By integrating in vivo 3-dimensional spatiotemporal matrix maps with in vitro functional time-lapse imaging, we show that key components of this dynamic matrix, hyaluronic acid, tenascin-C and fibronectin, differentially direct cellular behaviors including DNA synthesis, migration, myotube fragmentation and myoblast fusion. These data indicate that both satellite cells and fragmenting myofibers contribute to the regeneration blastema and that the local extracellular environment provides instructive cues for the regenerative process. The fact that amphibian and mammalian myoblasts exhibit similar responses to various matrices suggests that the ability to sense and respond to regenerative signals is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:20478295

  17. Biofunctionalized carbon nanotubes in neural regeneration: a mini-review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ji-Young; Shin, Ueon Sang; Jang, Won-Cheoul; Hyun, Jung Keun; Wall, Ivan B.; Kim, Hae-Won

    2012-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become an intriguing and promising biomaterial platform for the regeneration and functional recovery of damaged nerve tissues. The unique electrical, structural and mechanical properties, diversity of available surface chemistry and cell-penetrating ability of CNTs have made them useful implantable matrices or carriers for the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Although there are still challenges being faced in the clinical applications of CNTs mainly due to their toxicity, many studies to overcome this issue have been published. Modification of CNTs with chemical groups to ensure their dissolution in aqueous media is one possible solution. Functionalization of CNTs with biologically relevant and effective molecules (biofunctionalization) is also a promising strategy to provide better biocompatibility and selectivity for neural regeneration. Here, we review recent advances in the use of CNTs to promote neural regeneration.

  18. [Resources of regeneration in planarians].

    PubMed

    Sheĭman, I M; Sedel'nikov, Z V; Kreshchenko, N D

    2006-01-01

    We studied the intensity of blastema growth in operated planarians at an early stage of regeneration as a function of the following factors: area of regenerate and its function and number of regeneration foci (volume of regeneration). There was no direct dependence between the intensity of regeneration and the size of regenerating fragment, as well as the volume of regeneration. Some specific features of the early stage of regeneration have been described, which suggest its determinate character. The behavior of neoblasts during formation of blastemas with different localization is discussed.

  19. Nanostructured polymeric scaffolds for orthopaedic regenerative engineering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Meng; James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T; Kumbar, Sangamesh G

    2012-03-01

    Successful regeneration necessitates the development of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-inducing scaffolds that mimic the hierarchical architecture of native tissue extracellular matrix (ECM). Cells in nature recognize and interact with the surface topography they are exposed to via ECM proteins. The interaction of cells with nanotopographical features such as pores, ridges, groves, fibers, nodes, and their combinations has proven to be an important signaling modality in controlling cellular processes. Integrating nanotopographical cues is especially important in engineering complex tissues that have multiple cell types and require precisely defined cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions on the nanoscale. Thus, in a regenerative engineering approach, nanoscale materials/scaffolds play a paramount role in controlling cell fate and the consequent regenerative capacity. Advances in nanotechnology have generated a new toolbox for the fabrication of tissue-specific nanostructured scaffolds. For example, biodegradable polymers such as polyesters, polyphosphazenes, polymer blends and composites can be electrospun into ECM-mimicking matrices composed of nanofibers, which provide high surface area for cell attachment, growth, and differentiation. This review provides the fundamental guidelines for the design and development of nanostructured scaffolds for the regeneration of various tissue types in human upper and lower extremities such as skin, ligament, tendon, and bone. Examples focusing on the collective work of our laboratory in those areas are discussed to demonstrate the regenerative efficacy of this approach. Furthermore, preliminary strategies and significant challenges to integrate these individual tissues into one complex organ through regenerative engineering-based integrated graft systems are also discussed.

  20. Specialized progenitors and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reddien, Peter W

    2013-03-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating all body parts. Planarian regeneration requires neoblasts, a population of dividing cells that has been studied for over a century. Neoblast progeny generate new cells of blastemas, which are the regenerative outgrowths at wounds. If the neoblasts comprise a uniform population of cells during regeneration (e.g. they are all uncommitted and pluripotent), then specialization of new cell types should occur in multipotent, non-dividing neoblast progeny cells. By contrast, recent data indicate that some neoblasts express lineage-specific transcription factors during regeneration and in uninjured animals. These observations raise the possibility that an important early step in planarian regeneration is the specialization of neoblasts to produce specified rather than naïve blastema cells.

  1. [Pharynx regeneration in planarians].

    PubMed

    Kreshchenko, N D

    2009-01-01

    The obtained and published data on pharynx regeneration in planarians have been reviewed. Planarians can regenerate from a small body fragment and restore all missing organs including the pharynx. The pharynx is a relatively autonomous organ with a differentiated structure and specialized function. Pharynx regeneration has specific features, and its studies are of considerable theoretical interest. Pharynx regeneration can also be a convenient model to study the molecular mechanisms of regeneration that remain undisclosed. In addition, this model can be used to test biologically active compounds in order to elucidate their effect on morphogenesis. This subject of investigation benefits by a simpler and more adequate analysis as well as a possibility to use large numbers of animals and small quantities of analyzed substances.

  2. The acellular matrix (ACM) for bladder tissue engineering: A quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret; Loai, Yasir; Beaumont, Marine; Farhat, Walid A

    2010-08-01

    Bladder acellular matrices (ACMs) derived from natural tissue are gaining increasing attention for their role in tissue engineering and regeneration. Unlike conventional scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers or gels, ACMs possess native biomechanical and many acquired biologic properties. Efforts to optimize ACM-based scaffolds are ongoing and would be greatly assisted by a noninvasive means to characterize scaffold properties and monitor interaction with cells. MRI is well suited to this role, but research with MRI for scaffold characterization has been limited. This study presents initial results from quantitative MRI measurements for bladder ACM characterization and investigates the effects of incorporating hyaluronic acid, a natural biomaterial useful in tissue-engineering and regeneration. Measured MR relaxation times (T(1), T(2)) and diffusion coefficient were consistent with increased water uptake and glycosaminoglycan content observed on biochemistry in hyaluronic acid ACMs. Multicomponent MRI provided greater specificity, with diffusion data showing an acellular environment and T(2) components distinguishing the separate effects of increased glycosaminoglycans and hydration. These results suggest that quantitative MRI may provide useful information on matrix composition and structure, which is valuable in guiding further development using bladder ACMs for organ regeneration and in strategies involving the use of hyaluronic acid.

  3. Biodegradable synthetic scaffolds for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reverchon, Ernesto; Baldino, Lucia; Cardea, Stefano; De Marco, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue regeneration is aimed at producing biological or synthetic scaffolds to be implanted in the body for regenerate functional tissues. Several techniques and materials have been used to obtain biodegradable synthetic scaffolds, on which adhesion, growth, migration and differentiation of human cells has been attempted. Scaffolds for tendon regeneration have been less frequently proposed, because they have a complex hierarchical structure and it is very difficult to mimic their peculiar mechanical properties. In this review, we critically analyzed the proposed materials and fabrication techniques for tendon tissue engineering and we indicated new preparation processes, based on the use of supercritical fluids, to produce scaffolds with characteristics very similar to the native tendon structure. PMID:23738295

  4. Cartilage tissue engineering using PHBV and PHBV/Bioglass scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingshu; Yu, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Scaffolds have an important role in cartilage tissue engineering. Poly(hydroxybutyrate‑co‑hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) has been demonstrated to have potential as a scaffold for the three dimensional construction of engineered cartilage tissue. However, the poor hydrophilicity and mechanical strength associated with PHBV affects its clinical applications as a scaffold in cartilage tissue engineering. The incorporation of Bioglass (BG) into PHBV has been shown to improve the hydrophilicity and mechanical strength of PHBV matrices. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the properties of PHBV scaffolds and PHBV scaffolds containing 10% BG (w/w) (PHBV/10% BG) and to investigate the effects of these scaffolds on the properties of engineered cartilage in vivo. Rabbit auricular chondrocytes were seeded onto PHBV and PHBV/10% BG scaffolds. Differences in cartilage regeneration were compared between the neocartilage grown on the PHBV and the PHBV/10% BG scaffolds after 10 weeks of in vivo transplantation. The incorporation of BG into PHBV was observed to improve the hydrophilicity and compressive strength of the scaffold. Furthermore, after 10 weeks incubation in vivo, the cartilage‑like tissue formed using the PHBV/10% BG scaffolds was observed to be thicker, exhibit enhanced biomechanical properties and have a higher cartilage matrix content than that generated using the pure PHBV scaffolds. The results of this study demonstrate that the incorporation of BG into PHBV may generate composite scaffolds with improved properties for cartilage engineering.

  5. Biomimetic matrices self-initiating the induction of bone formation.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Ugo; Roden, Laura C; Ferretti, Carlo; Klar, Roland M

    2011-09-01

    The new strategy of tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine at large, is to construct biomimetic matrices to mimic nature's hierarchical structural assemblages and mechanisms of simplicity and elegance that are conserved throughout genera and species. There is a direct spatial and temporal relationship of morphologic and molecular events that emphasize the biomimetism of the remodeling cycles of the osteonic corticocancellous bone versus the "geometric induction of bone formation," that is, the induction of bone by "smart" concavities assembled in biomimetic matrices of macroporous calc